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Sample records for acochlidian gastropod pseudunela

  1. Tiny but complex - interactive 3D visualization of the interstitial acochlidian gastropod Pseudunela cornuta (Challis, 1970

    Heß Martin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesopsammic acochlidians are small, and organ complexity may be strongly reduced (regressive evolution by progenesis, especially in microhedylacean species. The marine interstitial hedylopsacean Pseudunela cornuta (Challis, 1970, however, was suggested as having a complex reproductive system resembling that of much larger, limnic and benthic species. The present study aims to reconstruct the detailed anatomy and true complexity of P. cornuta from serial, semithin histological sections by using modern computer-based 3D visualization with Amira software, and to explain it in an evolutionary context. Results Our results demonstrate considerable discordance with the original species description, which was based solely on paraffin sections. Here, we show that the nervous system of P. cornuta has paired rhinophoral, optic and gastro-oesophageal ganglia, three distinct ganglia on the visceral nerve cord, and a putative osphradial ganglion, while anterior accessory ganglia are absent. The presence of an anal genital cloaca is clearly rejected and the anus, nephropore and gonopore open separately to the exterior; the circulatory and excretory systems are well-differentiated, including a two-chambered heart and a complex kidney with a long, looped nephroduct; the special androdiaulic reproductive system shows two allosperm receptacles, three nidamental glands, a cavity with unknown function, as well as highly complex anterior copulatory organs with two separate glandular and impregnatory systems including a penial stylet that measures approximately a third of the whole length of the preserved specimen. Conclusion In spite of its small body size, the interstitial hermaphroditic P. cornuta shows high complexity regarding all major organ systems; the excretory system is as differentiated as in species of the sister clade, the limnic and much larger Acochlidiidae, and the reproductive system is by far the most elaborated one ever observed

  2. Cryptic species in tropic sands--interactive 3D anatomy, molecular phylogeny and evolution of meiofaunal Pseudunelidae (Gastropoda, Acochlidia.

    Timea P Neusser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Towards realistic estimations of the diversity of marine animals, tiny meiofaunal species usually are underrepresented. Since the biological species concept is hardly applicable on exotic and elusive animals, it is even more important to apply a morphospecies concept on the best level of information possible, using accurate and efficient methodology such as 3D modelling from histological sections. Molecular approaches such as sequence analyses may reveal further, cryptic species. This is the first case study on meiofaunal gastropods to test diversity estimations from traditional taxonomy against results from modern microanatomical methodology and molecular systematics. RESULTS: The examined meiofaunal Pseudunela specimens from several Indo-Pacific islands cannot be distinguished by external features. Their 3D microanatomy shows differences in the organ systems and allows for taxonomic separation in some cases. Additional molecular analyses based on partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and 16S rRNA markers revealed considerable genetic structure that is largely congruent with anatomical or geographical patterns. Two new species (Pseudunela viatoris and P. marteli spp. nov. are formally described integrating morphological and genetic analyses. Phylogenetic analysis using partial 16S rRNA, COI and the nuclear 18S rRNA markers shows a clade of Pseudunelidae species as the sister group to limnic Acochlidiidae. Within Pseudunela, two subtypes of complex excretory systems occur. A complex kidney already evolved in the ancestor of Hedylopsacea. Several habitat shifts occurred during hedylopsacean evolution. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptic species occur in tropical meiofaunal Pseudunela gastropods, and likely in other meiofaunal groups with poor dispersal abilities, boosting current diversity estimations. Only a combined 3D microanatomical and molecular approach revealed actual species diversity within Pseudunela reliably. Such

  3. On the origin of Acochlidia and other enigmatic euthyneuran gastropods, with implications for the systematics of Heterobranchia

    Knebelsberger Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A robust phylogenetic hypothesis of euthyneuran gastropods, as a basis to reconstructing their evolutionary history, is still hindered by several groups of aberrant, more or less worm-like slugs with unclear phylogenetic relationships. As a traditional "order" in the Opisthobranchia, the Acochlidia have a long history of controversial placements, among others influenced by convergent adaptation to the mainly meiofaunal habitats. The present study includes six out of seven acochlidian families in a comprehensive euthyneuran taxon sampling with special focus on minute, aberrant slugs. Since there is no fossil record of tiny, shell-less gastropods, a molecular clock was used to estimate divergence times within Euthyneura. Results Our multi-locus molecular study confirms Acochlidia in a pulmonate relationship, as sister to Eupulmonata. Previous hypotheses of opisthobranch relations, or of a common origin with other meiofaunal Euthyneura, are clearly rejected. The enigmatic amphibious and insectivorous Aitengidae incerta sedis clusters within Acochlidia, as sister to meiofaunal and brackish Pseudunelidae and limnic Acochlidiidae. Euthyneura, Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata as traditionally defined are non-monophyletic. A relaxed molecular clock approach indicates a late Palaeozoic diversification of Euthyneura and a Mesozoic origin of the major euthyneuran diversity, including Acochlidia. Conclusions The present study shows that the inclusion of small, enigmatic groups is necessary to solve deep-level phylogenetic relationships, and underlines that "pulmonate" and "opisthobranch" phylogeny, respectively, cannot be solved independently from each other. Our phylogenetic hypothesis requires reinvestigation of the traditional classification of Euthyneura: morphological synapomorphies of the traditionally defined Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia are evaluated in light of the presented phylogeny, and a redefinition of major groups is

  4. A SURVEY OF GASTROPODS FROM TUTICORIN COAST

    S. Jesily; R. Rooslin

    2015-01-01

    Gastropod molluscs are represented by chank, top shells, turbo shell and a variety of ornamental species contribute to the marine fisheries . The present investigation is an attempt to assess the diversity of gastropods and their utilization in Tuticorin coast. In the present study 37 species of gastropods belong to 21 families, including 12 edible species were recorded. The gastropods species Xancus pyrum, Babylonia spirata, Babylonia zeylanica, Chicoreus ramosus, Chicoreus virgineus, Lambis...

  5. A SURVEY OF GASTROPODS FROM TUTICORIN COAST

    S. Jesily

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastropod molluscs are represented by chank, top shells, turbo shell and a variety of ornamental species contribute to the marine fisheries . The present investigation is an attempt to assess the diversity of gastropods and their utilization in Tuticorin coast. In the present study 37 species of gastropods belong to 21 families, including 12 edible species were recorded. The gastropods species Xancus pyrum, Babylonia spirata, Babylonia zeylanica, Chicoreus ramosus, Chicoreus virgineus, Lambis lambis, Lambis truncata and Cypraea tigris were recorded as the most abundant species. After extraction of the muscle for food the chank shells are cleaned and marketed and form the basis for the shell craft articles.

  6. Evolution of gastropod mitochondrial genome arrangements

    Zardoya Rafael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastropod mitochondrial genomes exhibit an unusually great variety of gene orders compared to other metazoan mitochondrial genome such as e.g those of vertebrates. Hence, gastropod mitochondrial genomes constitute a good model system to study patterns, rates, and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangement. However, this kind of evolutionary comparative analysis requires a robust phylogenetic framework of the group under study, which has been elusive so far for gastropods in spite of the efforts carried out during the last two decades. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of five mitochondrial genomes of gastropods (Pyramidella dolabrata, Ascobulla fragilis, Siphonaria pectinata, Onchidella celtica, and Myosotella myosotis, and we analyze them together with another ten complete mitochondrial genomes of gastropods currently available in molecular databases in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships among the main lineages of gastropods. Results Comparative analyses with other mollusk mitochondrial genomes allowed us to describe molecular features and general trends in the evolution of mitochondrial genome organization in gastropods. Phylogenetic reconstruction with commonly used methods of phylogenetic inference (ME, MP, ML, BI arrived at a single topology, which was used to reconstruct the evolution of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in the group. Conclusion Four main lineages were identified within gastropods: Caenogastropoda, Vetigastropoda, Patellogastropoda, and Heterobranchia. Caenogastropoda and Vetigastropoda are sister taxa, as well as, Patellogastropoda and Heterobranchia. This result rejects the validity of the derived clade Apogastropoda (Caenogastropoda + Heterobranchia. The position of Patellogastropoda remains unclear likely due to long-branch attraction biases. Within Heterobranchia, the most heterogeneous group of gastropods, neither Euthyneura (because of the inclusion of P

  7. Fracture Mitigation Strategies in Gastropod Shells

    Salinas, Christopher; Kisailus, David

    2013-04-01

    For hundreds of millions of years, gastropods have been evolving, modifying their external calcified shells for defense against shell-breaking and drilling predators. They have evolved primarily to use two different aragonitic microstructures: the evolutionary older Nacre (mother of pearl) structure and the more recently developed crossed-lamellar structure. By using both of these structures, gastropods are able to produce shells that are significantly tougher then geologic aragonite. However, the crossed-lamellar structure allows for a wider variety of shell morphologies, ensuring its increasing presence since the Mesozoic Marine Revolution more than 200 million years ago.

  8. Invasion of Impatiens glandulifera affects terrestrial gastropods by altering microclimate

    Ruckli, Regina; Rusterholz, Hans-Peter; Baur, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Invasive species can have far-reaching impacts on ecosystems. Invasive plants may be able to change habitat structure and quality. We conducted a field experiment to examine whether the invasive plant Impatiens glandulifera affects native terrestrial gastropods. We also evaluated whether the invasive plant alters forest soil characteristics and microclimate which in turn may influence gastropod abundance. We sampled gastropods in plots installed in patches of I. glandulifera, in plots in which I. glandulifera was regularly removed by hand, and in control plots which were not yet colonized by the invasive plant. The three types of plots were equally distributed over three mixed deciduous forest areas that were slightly, moderately or heavily affected by a wind throw 11 years ago. A total of 33 gastropod species were recorded. Gastropod species richness was not affected by delayed effects of the wind throw, but it was significantly higher in invaded plots than in uninvaded plots. Similarly, gastropod abundance was higher in invaded plots than in the two types of control plots. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed marginally significant shifts of gastropod communities between the three types of plots and indicated that soil moisture, presence of I. glandulifera and cover of woody debris affected gastropod species composition. Field measurements showed that soil moisture was higher and daily soil temperature was more damped in patches of I. glandulifera than in the native ground vegetation. The changed microclimatic conditions may favour certain gastropod species. In particular, ubiquitous species and species with a high inundation tolerance increased in abundance in plots invaded by I. glandulifera. Our field experiment demonstrated that an invasive plant can indirectly affect native organisms by changing soil characteristics and microclimate.

  9. Gastropod skeletal defences: land, freshwater, and sea compared

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2015-01-01

    Predation is a primary agency of natural selection affecting the evolution of skeletal form in gastropods. The nature of antipredatory defence depends on how predators attack their prey as well as on the types and quantities of resources that are available to the potential victims. Here I review the five main methods of predation on shell-bearing gastropods (swallowing prey whole, apertural entry, drilling, shell breakage, and partial consumption) and 31 categories of shell and opercular defe...

  10. GASTROPODS IN THE BASIN OF THE RIVER FOJNIČKA

    Asia Čičić-Močić

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed investigation of Gastropods in the basin of river Fojnička has been carried out in 2001–2002. The material has been sampled five times during four seasons (October 2001–September 2002 at 11 sites in the following waterways: the rivers Fojnička, Dragača, Željeznica, Kreševka and Lepenica. Measurement of certain physical and chemical parameters (BOD5, water temperature, pH value, amount of dissolved oxygen, saturation with oxygen and one time measurement of concentration of nitrates and phosphates has been carried out together with collecting of macroinvertebrates of zoobenthos. Since the knowledge of biodiversity of Gastropods in Bosnia and Herzegovina is at the very low level, the main objective of this paper is to give an overview of distribution of Gastropods communities in the Fojnička river basin. In these investigations, 11 taxa of Gastropods and 1468 individuals have been determined. The Gastropods made 16% of total settlement of macroinvertebrates of zoobenthos. Dominant species at investigated sites was Ancylus fluviatilis, while species Acicula sp., Saxurinator sp. and Valvata piscinalis were just sporadically recorded. The largest number of individuals (657 and largest number of species (eight was recorded at the mouth of the river Fojnička into the river Bosna.

  11. Review of intersex in gastropods and other molluscs

    Strand, Jakob

    Various studies have demonstrated that the presence of imposex, i.e. an imposition of a penis and/or a vas deferens in addition to the normal reproductive tracts in females of gonochoristics prosobranch gastropod species, is a common phenomenon in the marine environment today. However, also other...

  12. Density estimates for deep-sea gastropod assemblages

    Rex, Michael A.; Etter, Ron J.; Nimeskern, Phillip W.

    1990-04-01

    Extensive boxcore sampling in the Atlantic Continental Slope and Rise study permitted the first precise measurement of gastropod density in the bathyal region of the deep sea. Gastropod density decreases significantly and exponentially with depth (250-3494 m), and density-depth regression lines do not differ significantly in either slope or elevatiob over horizontal scales of approximately 1000 km. The subclasses Prosobranchia and Opisthobranchia both show significant decreases in density with depth. Predatory taxa (neogastropods and opisthobranchs) exhibit significantly steeper declines in density with depth than do taxa dominated by deposit feeders (archaeogastropods and mesogastropods). Members of upper trophic levels may be more sensitive to the reduction in nutrient input with increased depth because of the energy loss between trophic levels in the food chain. A comparison of density estimates of gastropods from boxcore, grab and anchor-dredge samples taken in the same region revealed no significant differences in density-depth relationships among the sampling methods. A synthesis of data from 777 boxcore samples collected from the Atlantic, Caribbean and Pacific over a depth range of 250-7298 m indicates that the decline in gastropod density with depth is a global trend with only moderate inter-regional variation.

  13. Redescription of the meiofaunal gastropod Parhedyle cryptophthalma, with focus on nervous system and sensory organs

    Jörger, Katharina M.; Kristof, Alen; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette;

    2010-01-01

    , integumental spicules, and aberrant radula morphology by light and scanning electron microscopy. Our focus was on the central nervous system and sensory organs, using 3D reconstruction based on serial semi-thin sections and immunocytochemistry (staining of FMRFamide and Tyrosine Hydroxylase) in conjunction...... tenctacular, rhinophoral, and pedal nerves and in single neurons in the anterior region of the foot sole. Central nervous and sensory features may greatly vary among acochlidians and other heterobranch taxa, and comprehensive comparative approaches are necessary to reveal their presence, function, homology...

  14. Pathology of Haplosporidium patagon affecting siphonariid gastropods in Patagonia.

    Di Giorgio, Gisele; Gilardoni, Carmen; Ituarte, Cristián

    2014-11-13

    Haplosporidium patagon was found parasitizing Siphonaria lessonii and S. lateralis, 2 siphonariid gastropods co-occurring on the littoral rocky shore at Puerto Deseado, Santa Cruz, Argentina. Gastropods from 2 habitats representing 2 different levels of environmental harshness were studied. In both cases, S. lessonii showed a higher prevalence of infection (3.78%) over the entire 14 mo study period than S. lateralis (0.13%). Very different values of prevalence of infection were observed at the different sampling sites: Site 1, the more restrictive habitat (exposed for long periods to desiccation during low tides, higher ultraviolet exposure, and high ranges of temperature variation) showed a higher prevalence value (5.99%) than Site 2 (1.46%). Statistical differences in prevalence were also found between values corresponding to the austral spring (3.35% at Site 1 and 0.74% at Site 2) and winter (13.79% at Site 1 and 2.13% at Site 2). The presence/absence of H. patagon did not vary significantly with gastropod shell length. Infection affected the digestive gland, whose normal histology was greatly modified. The hermaphroditic gonads were also affected; the female germinal cells disappeared or only a few primary or previtellogenic oocytes were present, and vitellogenesis was inhibited. The function of the male germinal epithelium, as well as spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis processes and associated organs (seminal vesicles and seminal receptacles), were not affected. However, the glandular pallial complex of the reproductive systemwas affected, and we observed a significant reduction in development in parasitized gastropods. H. patagon sporocysts also invaded the supporting connective tissues of both the kidney and pseudobranch. PMID:25392043

  15. Radular marks produced by grazing gastropods of the rocky intertidal

    Yván Reyes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We had used artificial surfaces to examine the radular marks of four common grazing gastropods from Ancon Bay. In this work we show radular marks on dental wax surface of the trochid Tegula atra (Lesson, 1830, the fissurellid Fissurella peruviana Lamarck, 1822, the lottid Lottia ceciliana (Orbigny, 1841 and the littorinid Nodilittorina peruviana (Lamarck, 1822. In addition, the radular type is described to each species to relate it to the produced mark.

  16. Phyletic patterns of early development in gastropod molluscs.

    Lindberg, David R; Guralnick, Robert P

    2003-01-01

    Cell lineage data for 30 exemplar gastropod taxa representing all major subclades and the outgroup Polyplacophora were examined for phylogenetic signal using cladistic analysis. Most cell lineages show phyletic trends of acceleration or retardation relative to the outgroup and more basal ingroup taxa, and when coded this variation is phylo-genetically informative. PAUP analyses of a cell lineage data set under three sets of character ordering assumptions produced similar tree topologies. The topologies of the strict consensus trees for both ordered and Dollo (near irreversibility of character transformations) character assumptions were similar, whereas the unordered character assumption recovers the least phyletic information. The cell lineage cladograms are also in agreement with the fossil record of the timing and sequence of gastropod subclade origination. A long branch lies between the Patellogastropoda+Vetigastropoda grade and the Neritopsina+Apogastropoda clade. The geological timing of this long branch is correlated with the first large-scale terrestrially derived eutrophication of the near-shore marine habitat, and one possible explanation for this branch may be a developmental shift associated with the evolution of feeding larvae in response to the more productive conditions in the near-shore water column. Although character transformations are highly ordered in this data set, developmental rate characters (like all other morphological and molecular characters) are also subject to homoplasy. Finally, this study further supports the hypothesis that early development of gastropod molluscs has conserved a strong phyletic signal for about half a billion years. PMID:12950628

  17. Spatially explicit analysis of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    T. Hauffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of scientific infrastructure. The European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes.

    In a total of 284 samples from 224 different locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, 68 gastropod species, with 50 of them (= 73.5% being endemic, could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics: (i within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the proportion of endemics increases, and (iv the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity. Moreover, gastropod communities of Lake Ohrid and its feeder springs are both distinct from each other and from the surrounding waters. The analysis also shows that community similarity of Lake Ohrid is mainly driven by niche processes (e.g. environmental factors, but also by neutral processes (e.g. dispersal

  18. Spatially explicit analysis of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; Trajanovski, S.; Wilke, T.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of scientific infrastructure. The European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes. In a total of 284 samples from 224 different locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, 68 gastropod species, with 50 of them (= 73.5%) being endemic, could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics: (i) within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii) widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond) are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii) while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the proportion of endemics increases, and (iv) the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity. Moreover, gastropod communities of Lake Ohrid and its feeder springs are both distinct from each other and from the surrounding waters. The analysis also shows that community similarity of Lake Ohrid is mainly driven by niche processes (e.g. environmental factors), but also by neutral processes (e.g. dispersal limitation and

  19. [Conotoxins: from the biodiversity of gastropods to new drugs].

    Fedosov, A É; Moshkovskiĭ, S A; Kuznetsova, K G; Olivera, B M

    2013-01-01

    A review describes general trends in research of conotoxins that are peptide toxins isolated from sea gastropods of the Conus genus, since the toxins were discovered in 1970th. There are disclosed a conotoxin classification, their structure diversity and different ways of action to their molecular targets, mainly, ion channels. In the applied aspect of conotoxin research, drug discovery and development is discussed, the drugs being based on conotoxin structure. A first exemplary drug is a ziconotide, which is an analgesic of new generation. PMID:23987066

  20. Space: A non-limiting resource in the niches of some abundant coral reef gastropods

    Reichelt, R. E.

    1982-06-01

    Given the importance attributed to the occupation of space in benthic coral reef communities, this study asks the question: are any particular microhabitat types limiting resources for an assemblage of worm-eating gastropods on Heron reef (Great Barrier Reef). Microhabitat resource use was measured on three occasions, separated by 12 and 20-month periods. The gastropod populations were typical of those of other Indo-Pacific sites with respect to mean shell size and density. Fluctuations in species' size and density are assumed to have not significantly influenced availability of microhabitat resources. Gastropods occurred mainly in the structurally complex “refuge” microhabitats during the day and showed an increased abundance in smooth, exposed, “foraging” microhabitat nocturnally. Nassarius gaudiosus is the most extreme microhabitat specialist diurnally and the most extreme microhabitat generalist nocturnally. A similar, although less pronounced trend was exhibited by other gastropod species. Microhabitat niche overlap was high for Conus coronatus, C. miliaris, C. flavidus, Vasum turbinellus and N. gaudiosus at night and was also high during the day for all these species except N. gaudiosus, which showed little overlap with other gastropod species diurnally. Using gastropod abundance data from all samples, and independently derived microhabitat abundance data, multiple regression analysis demonstrated: 1) A significant relationship between the abundances of N. gaudiosus, C. coronatus, and C. flavidus and the abundance of microhabitat 2 (sand under rocks=“refuge”). 2) No positive association between gastropod abundance and the abundance of microhabitat 7a (thin layer of algal-bound sand on reef limestone). Only N. gaudiosus is abundant in microhabitat 2. Therefore it is concluded that, with some exceptions, microhabitat abundance does not have a significant influence, directly or indirectly, on gastropod abundance. It is possible that density

  1. Evolution of corallivory in the gastropod genus Drupella

    Claremont, M.; Reid, D. G.; Williams, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    Although muricid gastropods in the genus Drupella are well-known consumers of Indo-Pacific corals, their evolutionary and ecological history is unclear, as is their relationship to the apparently facultative coral-feeder Ergalatax margariticola, which has been reported to feed upon corals in Hong Kong. We use a well resolved molecular phylogeny (reconstructed from one nuclear and two mitochondrial genes) to show that the monophyletic genus Drupella falls into the muricid subfamily Ergalataxinae and that the genus includes ` E. margariticola', which is composed of two cryptic species. We show that genetic structure within the here reassigned ` Drupella margariticola' species complex does not relate to feeding mode, but instead seems to correspond to broad patterns of habitat ecology found in other gastropod taxa. Our analyses suggest that Drupella originated in the late Miocene (approximately 9.6 Ma) and diversified approximately 5.0 Ma, much later than the appearance of modern coral reefs in the early Cenozoic. Thus, it is possible that corallivory in Drupella evolved in response to the major expansion and reorganization of reefs that took place in the early Miocene.

  2. Carbonate biomineralization in terrestrial gastropods: environmental vs. physiological constraints

    Mierzwa, D.; Stolarski, J.

    2009-04-01

    Preservational potential of shells of terrestrial gastropods allows to use them as valuable (paleo)climatic proxies. Despite of the fact, that the elements incorporated in their skeleton derive almost entirely from their diet, details of the ion uptake routes have not been studied in details. This work is a first step in the investigations of element uptake and biomineralization processes in pulmonate gastropod Cepaea vindobonensis (Férussac, 1821). Although phenotypic plasticity in the shell characters of the species appears to be mainly genetic in nature, some differences seem to correlate with availability of ions used in biomineralization. For example, shells of individuals living in marginal parts of flood plains (environment extreme for the species and generally depleted in calcium) have weakened structure and faded color pattern, whereas individuals from the lime substrata form typically developed, pigmented shells with several cross-lamellar layers. Micro- and nanostructural characteristics of shells from different environments are visualized by SEM and AFM imaging techniques and some biogeochemical properties are characterized by spectroscopic and fluorescence methods. Further experiments are required to elucidate the ion/trace elements transfer between the substratum, nutrients, organism, and the shell.

  3. Variation in the diets of hydrothermal vent gastropods

    Govenar, Breea; Fisher, Charles R.; Shank, Timothy M.

    2015-11-01

    A prevailing paradigm of hydrothermal vent ecology is that primary consumers feed on chemoautotrophic bacteria. However, for the purposes of reconstructing vent food webs and for tracking energy flow from the generation of rock and fluid chemistry through primary/ secondary productivity and consumption to the overlying water column, it remains unclear which consumers feed on which bacteria. In paired analyses of carbon and nitrogen tissue stable isotope values with unique 16S rRNA sequences from the stomach contents, we determined that two species of gastropod grazers appear to feed on epsilon-proteobacteria, while two other species have more diverse diets, including one species that consumes alpha-proteobacteria, planctomycetes, and non-green sulfur bacteria. Different carbon fixation pathways used by epsilon- and alpha-proteobacteria may account for the variation in the carbon stable isotope values among the consumers. Furthermore, our results indicate that trophic specialization and niche partitioning may contribute to the distribution and abundance of vent-endemic gastropods and support the hypothesis that consumers in the warmer habitats commonly feed on epsilon-proteobacteria that use the rTCA cycle, while in the cooler habitats they feed on additional bacteria that use the CBB cycle. These results suggest that the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of free-living bacteria may play an important and previously overlooked role in facilitating species coexistence among primary consumers at hydrothermal vents and other chemosynthesis-based ecosystems.

  4. A catalogue of Danian gastropods from the Baunekule facies, Faxe Formation, Denmark

    Lauridsen, B.W.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This catalogue of 194 gastropod taxa is based on the collection of Danian gastropods from the Baunekule facies, Faxe Formation in eastern Denmark. The gastropod fauna is extremely rich and well preserved. Most of the gastropods (106 species are referred to genus level only, 9 morphotypes to even higher taxonomical levels and 79 gastropods are referred to species level. The gastropods are classified following Bouchet & Rocroi (2005 as 4 different clades: Vetigastropoda (represented by 26 species and 10 superfamilies, Caenogastropoda (represented by 142 species and 17 superfamilies, Heterobranchia (represented by 23 species and 5 superfamilies and Opisthobranchia (represented by 1 species and 1 superfamily. The new species Zaclys? nuetzeli n. sp. is introduced. The Faxe Formation is recognised as a cold-water coral ecosystem with interfingering smaller bryozoan mounds. The Baunekule facies is found in the upper part of the coral mound complex of the Faxe Formation, where it forms isolated lensoidal bodies in the flanks of some of the coral mounds. It is characterised by a high diversity invertebrate fauna that occurs in weakly consolidated coraldominated floatstone to rudstone. The diagenesis of the Baunekule facies is of special significance because a high proportion of the originally aragonite-shelled fauna is preserved by recrystallization to calcite during early burial diagenesis. Most of the gastropods are not known from other parts of the Faxe Fm. The fauna is very important for comparative evolutionary studies of fossil and modern gastropods on cold-water coral mounds. Many of the genera have not previously been recorded from Danian strata. None of the gastropod species found in the Baunekule facies are known for certain to range below the Cretaceous–Palaeogene boundary. The fauna is comparable to gastropods found on modern cold-water coral mounds in the North Atlantic. The gastropod fauna from the Baunekule facies is characterised by a

  5. Europe's Neogene and Quaternary lake gastropod diversity - a statistical approach

    Neubauer, Thomas A.; Georgopoulou, Elisavet; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Kroh, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    During the Neogene Europe's geodynamic history gave rise to several long-lived lakes with conspicuous endemic radiations. However, such lacustrine systems are rare today as well as in the past compared to the enormous numbers of "normal" lakes. Most extant European lakes are mainly results of the Ice Ages and are due to their (geologically) temporary nature largely confined to the Pleistocene-Holocene. As glacial lakes are also geographically restricted to glacial regions (and their catchment areas) their preservation potential is fairly low. Also deposits of streams, springs, and groundwater, which today are inhabited by species-rich gastropod assemblages, are rarely preserved. Thus, the pre-Quaternary lacustrine record is biased towards long-lived systems, such as the Late Miocene Lake Pannon, the Early to Middle Miocene Dinaride Lake System, the Middle Miocene Lake Steinheim and several others. All these systems have been studied for more than 150 years concerning their mollusk inventories and the taxonomic literature is formidable. However, apart from few general overviews precise studies on the γ-diversities of the post-Oligocene European lake systems and the shifting biodiversity in European freshwater systems through space and time are entirely missing. Even for the modern faunas, literature on large-scale freshwater gastropod diversity in extant lakes is scarce and lacks a statistical approach. Our preliminary data suggest fundamental differences between modern and pre-Pleistocene freshwater biogeography in central Europe. A rather homogenous central European Pleistocene and Holocene lake fauna is contrasted by considerable provincialism during the early Middle Miocene. Aside from the ancient Dessaretes lakes of the Balkan Peninsula, Holocene lake faunas are dominated by planorbids and lymnaeids in species numbers. This composition differs considerably from many Miocene and Pliocene lake faunas, which comprise pyrgulid-, hydrobiid-, viviparid-, melanopsid

  6. Taphonomy and palaeoecology of the gastropod fauna from a Late Cretaceous rocky shore, Sweden

    Sørensen, Anne Mehlin; Surlyk, Finn

    2011-01-01

    A gastropod fauna comprising 17 species, each represented by a limited number of specimens, is described from a Late Cretaceous, late early Campanian rocky shore at Ivö Klack, southern Sweden. The gastropod fauna is associated with the most diverse ancient rocky shore fauna ever found. However, the...... low gastropod species diversity compared to the faunas of modern rocky shores is ascribed to taphonomic factors, notably dissolution of the aragonitic shells, but the predominance of epifaunal herbivores is indicative of a guild structure similar to that found on modern rocky shores. The presence of...... preservation of such drill holes difficult, since the majority of infaunal prey such as burrowing bivalves has aragonitic shells which are not preserved. The relatively high number of species in comparison to many other Late Cretaceous rocky shore faunas, offers an opportunity to compare gastropod guild...

  7. Mitochondrial genome of the endangered marine gastropod Strombus gigas Linnaeus, 1758 (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    Márquez, Edna J; Castro, Erick R; Alzate, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    The queen conch Strombus gigas is an endangered marine gastropod of significant economic importance across the Greater Caribbean region. This work reports for the first time the complete mitochondrial genome of S. gigas, obtained by FLX 454 pyrosequencing. The mtDNA genome encodes for 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs. In addition, the coding sequences and gene synteny were similar to other previously reported mitogenomes of gastropods. PMID:25186797

  8. Gulf of Mannar Island coral reef associated gastropods assemblages:Distribution and diversity pattern

    Jayaraj Mohanraj; Gurusamy Chelladurai; Srinivasan Balakrishnan; IruthayamVijaya Kuamr

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the spatial and temporal variations of the distribution and diversity pattern of coral reef associated gastropods assemblages in Gulf of Mannar Island and to clarify the relationship between gastropods and surrounding coral reef ecosystem. Methods: Gastropods were collected from three islands–Hare (Picnic spot), Vaan (Church Island) and Koswari (Karsuvar Island). The samples were taxonomically identified according to external structure of typical shells and classified according to their feeding habits. Statistical tool Primer (Ver. 6.1.11) was employed to find the species diversity, richness and evenness. Results: A total of forty species of gastropods from 19 families were identified. The gastropods population density varied differently at stations, 479 species from Vaan islands, 390 species from Koswari islands and 254 species from Hare island were recorded. The gastropods species diversity, richness and evenness indices also varied differently at stations. The highest species diversity indice was recorded at Vaan Island (2.968), while both the highest richness and evenness indices were recorded at Hare Island with 0.937 and 0.942 respectively. Conclusions: The results of present study provides useful informtation for biodiversity conservation as well as the management of coral reef habitat in India.

  9. Spatially explicit analyses of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; Trajanovski, S.; Wilke, T.

    2010-07-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of biodiversity arises from evolutionary processes, constraints of environmental factors and the interaction of communities. The quality of such spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of infrastructure around them. The small European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes. In a total of 224 locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, representatives of 68 gastropod species with 50 of them being endemic (=73.5%) could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics: (i) within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii) widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond) are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii) while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the share of endemics increases, (iv) the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity and related environmental factors, (v) biotic interaction due to possible spillover effects may contribute to the establishment of hotspots, and (vi) eco-insularity within the Ohrid Basin occurs

  10. Spatially explicit analyses of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    T. Hauffe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity of biodiversity arises from evolutionary processes, constraints of environmental factors and the interaction of communities. The quality of such spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of infrastructure around them. The small European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes.

    In a total of 224 locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, representatives of 68 gastropod species with 50 of them being endemic (=73.5% could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics:

    (i within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the share of endemics increases, (iv the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity and related environmental factors, (v biotic interaction due to possible spillover effects may contribute to the establishment of hotspots, and (vi eco

  11. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    Rech, J.A.; Pigati, J.S.; Lehmann, S.B.; McGimpsey, C.N.; Grimley, D.A.; Nekola, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating. ?? 2011 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  12. Spatial vision in the prosobranch gastropod ampularia sp

    Seyer; Nilsson; Warrant

    1998-05-01

    The eyes of gastropods of the genus Ampularia superficially resemble the well-developed camera-type eyes of Littorina littorea and Strombus raninus. The eyes are of the closed-vesicle type, having a cornea and a lens that is separated from the retina by a narrow vitreous body. Light and electron microscopy were used to generate an accurate geometrical model of the Ampularia sp. eye, which was then used to predict its optical performance. The image quality of the lens was investigated using a modified microscope and revealed that images suffer from severe aberrations. The focal length was estimated to be approximately 430 microm, putting the plane of best focus in or just proximal to the rhabdoms. The aberrant optics result in a large retinal blur-circle with a diameter of approximately 120 microm and an angular half-width of approximately 17 degrees, allowing only comparatively poor resolution compared with the eyes of Littorina littorea and Strombus raninus. Behavioural experiments revealed no significant optomotor response. The results imply that Ampularia sp. has poor spatial vision, limited by the blur-circles on the retina. The eyes appear to be suitable only for relatively simple visual tasks, such as finding an open water surface for breathing, but the large size of the eye allows it to perform this task even at night. PMID:9556547

  13. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of strombid gastropod morphological diversity.

    Latiolais, Jared M; Taylor, Michael S; Roy, Kaustuv; Hellberg, Michael E

    2006-11-01

    The shells of strombid gastropods show a wide variety of forms, ranging from small and fusiform to large and elaborately ornamented with a strongly flared outer lip. Here, we present the first species-level molecular phylogeny for strombids and use the resulting phylogenetic framework to explore relationships between species richness and morphological diversity. We use portions of one nuclear (325 bp of histone H3) and one mitochondrial (640 bp of cytochrome oxidase I, COI) gene to infer relationships within the two most species-rich genera in the Strombidae: Strombus and Lambis. We include 32 species of Strombus, representing 10 of 11 extant subgenera, and 3 of the 9 species of Lambis, representing 2 of 3 extant subgenera. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of COI and of H3 and COI combined suggest Lambis is nested within a paraphyletic Strombus. Eastern Pacific and western Atlantic species of Strombus form a relatively recent monophyletic radiation within an older, paraphyletic Indo-West Pacific grade. Morphological diversity of subclades scales positively with species richness but does not show evidence of strong phylogenetic constraints. PMID:16839783

  14. Screening of Antibacterial Activities of Marine Gastropod Hemifusus Pugilinus

    S. Sugesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation was carried out to screen the antibacterial activities of marine gastropod Hemifusus pugilinus. The whole body of the animal was extracted in three different solvents such as, ethanol, methanol and water. The antibacterial properties were studied using 10 human pathogenic microorganisms such as, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. pnuemoniae, Lactobacillus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, S. paratyphi, Staphylococcus aureus, and Vibrio paraheamolyticus. The ethanolic extracts of H. pugilinus showed maximum antibacterial activities against E. coli (8 mm and minimum activities against Vibrio paraheamolyticus (2 mm, Methanolic extracts showed highest activity in E. coli (6 mm and lowest activity against S. paratyphi (1 mm and the extract of water showed antibacterial activities against E. coli K. oxytoca and S. paratyphi. The crude extracts were purified in silica gel column chromatography with 11 fractions. In that E:M, 16:4, 12:8, 10:10, which showed maximum zone of inhibition against E.coli (4 mm, K. oxytoca (4 mm, K. pneumoniae (3 mm, L. vulgaris (4 mm and V. parahemolyticus (5 mm. 18:2, 8:12, 6:14, 4:12 and 2:18 with these fractions showed minimum activities against the all pathogenic microbial forms.

  15. Substrate attributes determine gait in a terrestrial gastropod.

    McKee, Amberle; Voltzow, Janice; Pernet, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Some terrestrial gastropods are able to move using two gaits: adhesive crawling, where the entire foot is separated from the substrate only by a thin layer of mucus and the snail leaves a continuous mucus trail; and loping, where regions of the foot arch above the substrate and the snail leaves a discontinuous mucus trail. Loping has been interpreted as a means of rapidly escaping predators. We found that the pulmonate Cornu aspersum moved using adhesive crawling on dry acrylic or glass substrates, but loped on dry concrete or wood. Loping snails did not move more rapidly than snails using adhesive crawling. Snails moving on concrete secreted a greater volume of pedal mucus per area of trail than those moving on acrylic; locomotion on concrete thus requires greater expenditure of mucus than does locomotion on acrylic. Because loping snails deposit a smaller area of mucus per distance traveled than do snails using adhesive crawling, loping may conserve mucus when moving on porous, absorbent substrates. Members of several other terrestrial pulmonate taxa can also lope on concrete, suggesting that this plasticity in gait is widespread among terrestrial snails. PMID:23493509

  16. Comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes in gastropods

    In this work we presented a comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes in gastropods. Nucleotide and amino acids composition was calculated and a comparative visual analysis of the start and termination codons was performed. The organization of the genome was compared calculating the number of intergenic sequences, the location of the genes and the number of reorganized genes (breakpoints) in comparison with the sequence that is presumed to be ancestral for the group. In order to calculate variations in the rates of molecular evolution within the group, the relative rate test was performed. In spite of the differences in the size of the genomes, the amino acids number is conserved. The nucleotide and amino acid composition is similar between Vetigastropoda, Ceanogastropoda and Neritimorpha in comparison to Heterobranchia and Patellogastropoda. The mitochondrial genomes of the group are very compact with few intergenic sequences, the only exception is the genome of Patellogastropoda with 26,828 bp. Start codons of the Heterobranchia and Patellogastropoda are very variable and there is also an increase in genome rearrangements for these two groups. Generally, the hypothesis of constant rates of molecular evolution between the groups is rejected, except when the genomes of Caenogastropoda and Vetigastropoda are compared.

  17. A Method for Quantifying, Visualising, and Analysing Gastropod Shell Form

    Liew, Thor-Seng; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of organismal form is an important component for almost every branch of biology. Although generally considered an easily-measurable structure, the quantification of gastropod shell form is still a challenge because many shells lack homologous structures and have a spiral form that is difficult to capture with linear measurements. In view of this, we adopt the idea of theoretical modelling of shell form, in which the shell form is the product of aperture ontogeny profiles in terms of aperture growth trajectory that is quantified as curvature and torsion, and of aperture form that is represented by size and shape. We develop a workflow for the analysis of shell forms based on the aperture ontogeny profile, starting from the procedure of data preparation (retopologising the shell model), via data acquisition (calculation of aperture growth trajectory, aperture form and ontogeny axis), and data presentation (qualitative comparison between shell forms) and ending with data analysis (quantitative comparison between shell forms). We evaluate our methods on representative shells of the genera Opisthostoma and Plectostoma, which exhibit great variability in shell form. The outcome suggests that our method is a robust, reproducible, and versatile approach for the analysis of shell form. Finally, we propose several potential applications of our methods in functional morphology, theoretical modelling, taxonomy, and evolutionary biology. PMID:27280463

  18. A STUDY ON VARIATIONS IN POPULATION DENSITY OF GASTROPODS IN A VILLAGE POND NEAR BIKANER, RAJASTHAN

    Ankush Sharma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of Thar Desert of India spread over Rajasthan and because of this it is known as state of desert. Because of harsh and inhospitable environmental conditions Rajasthan is well known in all over the world. Bikaner, district which is located in northern western part of Rajasthan are also well known for its violent climatic conditions and scarcity of water resources. Present study was focused on monthly as well as seasonal variations in gastropods population density in a village pond namely Nal village. The study was carried out from September, 2010 to November, 2011. This finding of study suggested the presence of three gastropods species viz. Digoniostoma pulchella, Gabbia orcula and Indoplanorbis exustus belongs to two subclasses namely pulmonata and pro sobranch during whole study period. Highest population density of gastropods was recorded in the month of March, while minimum in July. Among all studied season highest population of gastropods density of all three reported species were recorded in summer season. Minimum population density of Digoniostoma pulchella, Gabbia orcula was recorded in monsoon season, while minimum population density of Indoplanorbis exustus was recorded in winter season. Many gastropods act as intermediate host of platyhelimenthic parasites and play significant role in public and veterinary health and also used in many biomonitoring programs to assess the water quality level.

  19. Prior exposure influences the behavioural avoidance by an intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, of acidified waters

    Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Bishop, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity may be critical to the maintenance of viable populations under future environmental change. Here we examined the role of behavioural avoidance of sub-optimal conditions in enabling the intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, to persist in mangrove forests affected by the low pH runoff from acid sulphate soils (ASS). Behaviourally, the gastropod may be able to avoid periods of particularly high acidity by using pneumatophores and/or mangrove trunks to vertically migrate above the water line or by retreating into its shell. We hypothesised that (1) B. auratum would display greater and more rapid vertical migration out of acidified than reference estuarine waters, and (2) responses would be more pronounced in gastropods collected from acidified than reference sites. Gastropods from acidified sites showed significantly higher activity in and more rapid migration out of acidified waters of pH 6.2-7.0, than reference waters or waters of pH impact of this stressor on their populations. The stronger response to acidification of gastropods from populations previously exposed to this stressor suggests that the response may be learned, inherited or induced over multiple exposures. Our study adds to growing evidence that estuarine organisms may exhibit considerable physiological and behaviour adaptive capacity to acidification. The potential for such adaptive capacity should be incorporated into studies seeking to forecast impacts to marine organisms of environmental change.

  20. Labelling and marketing of bivalve and gastropod molluscs retailed in Sardinia, Italy between 2009 and 2013

    Domenico Meloni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present survey was to investigate the correct enforcement of the Community rules on the labelling and marketing of bivalve and gastropod molluscs retailed in Sardinia, Italy between 2009 and 2013. A total of 1500 packages and labels for live bivalve and gastropod molluscs were considered. A total of 375 labels (25% presented non-compliance concerning the wrong trade name and additional wrong or missing information. The highest percentage of anomalous labels has been detected in small-scale retail shops (35% and open-air markets (25% compared with the big retailing chains (20%. The 5% of packages were not in compliance with the European Community rules on packaging of bivalve and gastropod molluscs. The high percentage of non-compliance with the European regulations on labelling results is a strong limitation for the consumers and highlights the need to improve the control system about labelling of seafood products.

  1. Assessing the status of endangered invertebrates from the ancient Lake Ohrid: The gastropod Chilopyrgula sturanyi

    Budzakoska-Gjoreska Biljana; Trajanovski S.; Trajanovska Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Lake Ohrid is the oldest and deepest lake on the Balkan Peninsula and one of the five oldest lakes in the world. Two of the most striking attributes of the species of the Lake’s fauna, especially the fauna of gastropods, are the high level of biological diversity as well as a high percentage of endemism. The main subject of interest in our research was to follow the distribution and density of the endemic gastropod species Chilopyrgula sturanyi. For this purpose different depth points o...

  2. The role of MAPK signaling in patterning and establishing axial symmetry in the gastropod Haliotis asinina

    Koop, Demian; Richards, Gemma S; Wanninger, Andreas;

    2007-01-01

    Gastropods are members of the Spiralia, a diverse group of invertebrates that share a common early developmental program, which includes spiral cleavage and a larval trochophore stage. The spiral cleavage program results in the division of the embryo into four quadrants. Specification of the dorsal...

  3. Terrestrial gastropods of Srebarna Nature Reserve, North-Eastern Bulgaria (Gastropoda

    Ivailo Dedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We give the results from the first investigation focused on the land snail fauna in Srebarna Nature Reserve in Bulgaria. A total of 23 localities were studied and 27 species of terrestrial gastropods were found, 23 of which were new observations for the Reserve.

  4. Toxin-screening and identification of bacteria isolated from highly toxic marine gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus.

    Wang, Xiao-Jie; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Luo, Xuan; Zhou, Ming-Jiang; Lin, Xiang-Tian

    2008-07-01

    Bacteria isolated from a highly toxic sample of gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus in Lianyungang, Jiangsu Province in July 2007, were studied to probe into the relationship between bacteria and toxicity of nassariid gastropod. The toxicity of the gastropod sample was 2 x 10(2)mouse unit (MU) per gram of tissue (wet weight). High concentration of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and its analogues (TTXs) were found in the digestive gland and muscle of the gastropod, using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass chromatography (LC-MS). Bacterial strains isolated from the digestive gland were cultured and screened for TTX with a competitive ELISA method. Tetrodotoxin was detected in a proportion of bacterial strains, but the toxin content was low. Partial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the TTX-producing strains was then sequenced and compared with those published in the GenBank to tentatively identify the toxic strains. It was found that most of the toxic strains were closely affiliated with genus Vibrio, and the others were related to genus Shewanella, Marinomonas, Tenacibaculum and Aeromonas. These findings suggest that tetrodotoxin-producing bacteria might play an important role in tetrodotoxin accumulation/production in N. semiplicatus. PMID:18573274

  5. Patterns of diatom treatment in two coexisting species of filter-feeding freshwater gastropods

    Sitnikova T.Ya.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess trophic partitioning among sympatric gastropod species in ancient lakes, we quantified diatoms in the guts of two coexistent Baikal gastropod species and tested for differences in species, size, and fracturing of large and small diatoms by taenioglossan radulae. In May 2010, the diatom Synedra acus dominated the littoral phytoplankton and gut contents of Baicalia turriformis and Teratobaikalia ciliata (Baicaliidae, both inhabiting the rocky Baikal littoral. In laboratory experiments, both ctenidial filter-feeding gastropods were fed with two diets of cultivated Synedra acus of different cell sizes: >150 μm and <100 μm. Field and laboratory studies revealed intact diatom cells (often with green chromatophores and fragmented frustules of diatoms <60 μm in the guts of both species. The two baicaliids varied in the number of ingested microalgae. In addition, they exhibited significantly different efficiencies for breaking large diatoms; B. turriformis broke large diatoms into more fragments than T. ciliata. The differences in the utilization of large and small diatoms by gastropods are discussed in terms of the relationships among coexisting species. Small diatom survival is considered from the view of interactions between producers and their consumers in the freshwater food web.

  6. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Klein, Eduardo; Iken, Katrin; Weinberger, Vanessa; Konar, Brenda; Trott, Tom; Pohle, Gerhard; Bigatti, Gregorio; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Mead, Angela; Palomo, Gabriela; Ortiz, Manuel; Gobin, Judith; Sardi, Adriana; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Knowlton, Ann; Wong, Melisa; Peralta, Ana C

    2013-01-01

    Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1) describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2) identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3) identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME) following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas) standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org). A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2%) appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs) followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs). In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska). No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05). Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages. PMID

  7. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1 describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2 identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3 identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org. A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2% appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs. In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska. No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05. Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages.

  8. Temporal dynamics of gastropod fauna on subtidal sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    Moreira, J.; Aldea, C. (Cristian); Troncoso, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The temporal variation of the gastropod fauna inhabiting sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (Galicia, Spain) was studied at three subtidal sites from February 1996 to February 1997 by means of quantitative sampling. A total of 5,463 individuals representing 51 gastropod species and 22 families were found. The family Pyramidellidae was the most diverse in number of species (11 species), followed by Rissoidae and Trochidae (4 species each). The dogwhelk, Nassarius ret...

  9. Screening of antibacterial drugs from marine gastropod Chicoreus ramosus (Linnaeus, 1758

    Pasiyappazham Ramasamy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen the antibacterial drugs from different solvent extracts of tissue and egg of marine gastropods Chicoreus ramosus against clinically isolated human pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Different solvent extracts of Chicoreus ramosus was screened for their activity against Vibrio parehaemolyticus (J13300, Aeromonus hydrophilla (IDH1585, Salmonella typhi (C6953, Salmonella paratyphi A (C6915, Vibrio cholerae (IDH5439 and Escherichia coli (H10407 using standard well diffusion method and its minimum inhibitory concentration. Results: The study revealed that the acetone and chloroform extract of both the tissues and egg inhibited the growth of the tested pathogenic bacterial strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration of both the extract ranged from 4 to 12 mg/mL. Conclusions: These results suggest that marine gastropods tissue and egg extract contains comparatively good antibacterial activity.

  10. Gastropod diversity, distribution and abundance in habitats with and without anthropogenic disturbances in Lake Victoria, Kenya

    Lange, C. N.; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Madsen, Henry

    2013-01-01

    We investigated freshwater gastropod diversity, abundance and distribution in habitats with and without anthropogenic disturbance in two localities, Ndere in the Winam Gulf and Mbita Point, Lake Victoria, Kenya, from May 2002 to January 2004. A total of 133 984 gastropod specimens belonging to 15...... species were recorded, 14 from Mbita and 12 from Ndere. Two species, Ferrissia kavirondica and Cleopatra cridlandi, which were recorded only from undisturbed habitats, could be indicators of least disturbed habitats. Water chemistry did differ between fish landing sites and undisturbed habitats at some...... sampling times, indicating that differences due to human impact do exist, but these are dependent on periods of calm weather. The study shows that anthropogenic disturbances cause ecological changes that can be exploited by some snail species, especially Biomphalaria choanomphala and Melanoides tuberculata...

  11. Symmetry breaking in gastropod locomotion through acceleration or deceleration of the pedal waves

    Del Alamo, Juan C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Lai, Janice; Shepherd, Robert D.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2008-03-01

    Marine and terrestrial gastropods move by gliding over a ventral foot that is lubricated by secreted mucus (terrestrial) or simply by water (marine). The rim of the ventral foot generates suction forces that keep the animal adhered to the substrate. The central part of the foot produces a forward traction force by generating trains of pedal waves through periodic muscle contractions. Recent experiments show that, in some gastropods, these pedal waves become faster and longer as they move forward, suggesting a mechanism for breaking the symmetry in the flow between the pedal waves and the substrate. To investigate this mechanism, we have analyzed theoretically a two-dimensional lubrication layer between a train of waves of slowly varying length and speed, and a flat, rigid, impermeable surface. The inhomogeneity of the pedal waves has been modeled through multiple-scale asymptotics. We have considered a Newtonian fluid to separate the effect of this inhomogeneity from the viscoelastic symmetry breaking reported in previous works.

  12. Antimicrobial secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsules and egg masses

    Kaviarasan, T; Siva, Sankar R; Yogamoorthi, A

    2012-01-01

    Marine organisms have attracted special attention in the last three decades for their ability to produce interesting pharmacological active compounds. Even though all marine organisms have the potential to produce antimicrobial secondary metabolites, the gastropod has the vital sources of secondary metabolites particularly their egg capsule which has the promising antimicrobial secondary metabolites. In the present review, we intend to focus on marine secondary metabolites from marine gastrop...

  13. DNA damage and oxidative stress in marine gastropod Morula granulata exposed to phenanthrene

    Bhagat, J.; Sarkar, A.; Ingole, B.S.

    , around 300 gastropods were equally divided in five experimental groups: control group and four treatment groups with different concentrations of phenanthrene (10, 25, 50 and 100 μg/L). Phenanthrene was first diluted in DMSO and then mixed with seawater... to make the stock solution (2500 µg/ml). The final phenanthrene concentration for treatment groups were achieved by diluting stock solution in seawater. The final concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in all treatment groups was less than 0...

  14. Ancient lakes as evolutionary reservoirs: evidence from the thalassoid gastropods of Lake Tanganyika.

    Wilson, Anthony Bruce; Glaubrecht, Matthias; Meyer, Axel

    2004-01-01

    Ancient lakes are often collectively viewed as evolutionary hot spots of diversification. East Africa s Lake Tanganyika has long been the subject of scientific interest owing to dramatic levels of endemism in species as diverse as cichlid fishes, paludomid gastropods, decapod and ostracod crustaceans and poriferans. It is the largest and deepest of the African rift lakes, and its endemic fauna has been presented with a stable inland environment for over 10 Myr, offering unique opportunities f...

  15. Trematode prevalence-occupancy relationships on regional and continental spatial scales in marine gastropod hosts

    Thieltges, D.W.; Marcogliese, D.J.; Blanar, C.A.; Poulin, R.

    2013-01-01

    The positive inter-specific relationship between local abundance and large-scale spatial occupancy is one of the most universal patterns in the distribution of species. However, evidence for the validity of this relationship in the marine realm is still scarce, especially for parasites. Using data from published studies, we investigated this relationship in trematode parasites infecting several marine gastropod species. On a regional spatial scale ( 1000 km between the most distant sites) in ...

  16. Weeds and endangered herbs have unforeseen dispersal helpers in the agri-environment: gastropods and earthworms

    Türke, Manfred; Blattmann, Tamara; Knop, Eva; Kindermann, Anne; Prestele, Julia; Marquez, Leonardo; Eisenhauer, Nico; Fischer, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Agri-environmental schemes involving organic farming or set-aside management aim at promoting biodiversity and restoring ecosystem functioning in agrarian landscapes. Application of pesticides in these crop fields is strongly regulated facilitating the spread of weeds but also allowing for the establishment of endangered herbs and a variety of animals.Recent studies found gastropods and earthworms to be legitimate dispersers of seeds of wild plants. We assumed that both groups also playa sign...

  17. Dominant species of the gastropod fauna from the littoral region in Lake Ohrid of R. Macedonia.

    Smiljkov, S; Budzakoska-Gjoreska, B; Sapkarev, J; Trajanovski, S

    2007-07-01

    The class of Gastropoda is one of the Lake Ohrid' macrozoobenthic groups, which characterize highest level of endemism. Since the first published references until now, studying the Lake Ohrid's snail fauna represents huge scientific challenge for many malacologists from the world. The high percent of endemic as well as relic forms among the lake's gastropods could be explained by the processes of intralacustric speciation during the history and evolution of this aquatic ecosystem. These processes no doubt have been enabled by the complexity and stability of the Lake's basin. This work represents the results of the dominant species, from both qualitative and quantitative sense of the gastropod fauna from 19 investigated littoral localities of Lake Ohrid. The results from the investigations on gastropod fauna has shown that following species: Chilopyrgula sturanyi, Radix relicta and Valvata stenotrema quailtatively predominates in the samples from the littoral region of the Macedonian part of Lake Ohrid. The quantitative analyses (according to their presence on m2), has shown that the following species predominate: Chilopyrgula sturanyi (6879 No x m2), Theodoxus fluviatilis dalmaticus (6412 No x m2), Pyrgohydrobia grochmalickii (5504 No x m2) and Valvata stenotrema (5009 No x m2). PMID:17921924

  18. COUPLING AMPULLINID GASTROPODS: SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR FROZEN IN PALAEOGENE DEPOSITS OF NORTHERN ITALY

    IGINIO DIENI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Couples of the ampullinid gastropods Globularia (Eocernina vulcani (Brogniart, 1823, Amaurellina (Crommium angustata (Grateloup, 1827 and Amaurellina (Pachycrommium cf. suessoniensis (d'Orbigny, 1850, composed of dimorphed shells tightly conjoined at the apertures, from the Palaeogene (Eocene and Oligocene marine successions of northern Italy, are interpreted as buried while mating, specimens being "frozen" while suddenly covered by a mass of sediment. Violent depositional events were responsible for their rapid burial, primarily by volcanoclastics, the formation of which had also involved acidification. The consequent poisoning of sea water and/or overwarming beyond the range in which the gastropods could survive, induced mass mortality. A similar set of conditional circumstances is also discussed for differently sized coupled specimens of Ampullinopsis crassatina (Lamarck, 1804, preserved with their shells slightly apart but with their apertures almost in contact. With reference to the catastrophic eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, when Pompei was buried under tephra, it is thought that volcanic activity caused the death and burial of all these pairing gastropods in a "Pompeian" way. 

  19. Evaluation of impairment of DNA in marine gastropod, Morula granulata as a biomarker of marine pollution.

    Sarkar, A; Bhagat, Jacky; Sarker, Subhodeep

    2014-08-01

    The impairment of DNA in marine gastropod Morula granulata was evaluated in terms of the loss of DNA integrity in the species as a measure of the impact of genotoxic contaminants prevalent in the marine environment along the coast of Goa, India. The extent of DNA damage occurred in the marine gastropods collected from different sampling sites such as Arambol, Anjuna, Sinquerim, Dona Paula, Bogmalo, Hollant, Velsao, Betul and Palolem along the coast of Goa was measured following the technique of partial alkaline unwinding as well as comet assays. The highest DNA integrity was observed at Arambol (F, 0.75), identified as the reference site, whereas the lowest DNA integrity at Hollant (F, 0.33) situated between the two most contaminated sites at Bogmalo and Velsao. The impact of genotoxic contaminants on marine gastropods was pronounced by their low DNA integrity at Sinquerim (F, 0.40) followed by Betul (F, 0.47), Velsao (F, 0.51), Anjuna (F, 0.54), Bogmalo (F, 0.55), Dona Paula (F, 0.67) and Palolem (F, 0.70). The extent of DNA damage occurred in M. granulata due to ecotoxicological impact of the prevailing marine pollutants along the coast of Goa was further substantiated by comet assay and expressed in terms of %head-DNA, %tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment. The single cell gel electrophoresis of M. granulata clearly showed relatively higher olive tail moment in the marine gastropod from the contaminated sites, Anjuna, Hollant, Velsao and Betul. The variation in the mean %head DNA at different sampling sites clearly indicated that the extent of DNA damage in marine gastropod increases with the increase in the levels of contamination at different sampling sites along the coast. The stepwise multiple regression analysis of the water quality parameters showed significant correlation between the variation in DNA integrity and PAH in combination with NO3, salinity and PO4 (R¯(2), 0.90). The measurement of DNA integrity in M. granulata thus provides an early

  20. Snails under stress. Gastropods as models in ecophysiology and ecotoxicology; Schnecken unter Stress. Gastropoden als Modelle in Oekophysiologie und Oekotoxikologie

    Triebskorn, Rita [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Oekotoxikologie und Oekophysiologie, Rottenburg (Germany); Physiologische Oekologie der Tiere, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Background: In ecophysiology and ecotoxicology, gastropods are important both as target organisms for molluscicides and non-target organisms for environmental pollutants or other environmental stressors. With respect to both aspects, biomarkers are investigated at different levels of biological organization in order to understand mechanisms which enable gastropods to cope with or even to benefit from unfavourable environmental conditions. Main topics: The paper focuses on the ecotoxicological and ecophysiological work of the author on gastropods which will be reviewed in the context of the state of knowledge in this field of research. In addition to cellular aspects in biomarker research, also biochemical responses of snails to environmental stress (stress proteins, metallothioneins, and metabolic enzymes) will be addressed. Conclusions: The paper highlights the suitability of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods as sensitive indicators of environmental stress induced by chemicals or other non-chemical factors. Biomarker studies have been shown not only to be applicable in environmental risk assessment but also to provide fundamental and background knowledge necessary to understand correlations of responses at different levels of biological organization. Recommendations and perspectives: A standardized toxicity test with the grapevine snail (ISO 15952) has been established for toxicity assessment in terrestrial habitats. However, freshwater gastropods display a high sensitivity as well, e.g. to endocrine disrupters, and should be incorporated into future standardized assays for aquatic toxicity testing on the basis of existing knowledge. (orig.)

  1. Freshwater gastropods of Neogene and Quaternary lake systems of Europe - state of the art and outlook

    Neubauer, Thomas A.; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Kroh, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Globally, about 4000 extant species of freshwater gastropod species have been described. In contrast, only 225 species are listed by MollBase2012 for North- and Central Europe. Many of these are rare species, limited to certain springs and in fact the typical diversity of gastropods in lakes of North and Central Europe is much lower. The high number is boosted by several highly speciose endemic radiations in long-lived ancient lakes, which are hotspots for biodiversity. These long-lived ancient lakes provide key examples for understanding evolutionary processes and therefore are intensively studied. During the Neogene, Europe's geodynamic history gave rise to several such long-lived lakes with conspicuous endemic radiations. However, these lacustrine systems are rare today as well as in the past compared to the enormous numbers of "normal" lakes. Most extant European lakes are mainly results of the Ice Ages and are due to their geologically temporary nature largely confined to the Pleistocene-Holocene. Also deposits of streams, springs, and groundwater, which today are inhabited by species-rich gastropod assemblages, are rarely preserved. Thus, the pre-Quaternary lacustrine record is biased towards long-lived systems. Apart from few general overviews precise studies on the γ-diversities of the post-Oligocene European lake systems and the shifting biodiversity in European freshwater systems through space and time are entirely missing. Even for the modern faunas, literature on large-scale freshwater gastropod diversity in extant lakes is scarce and lacks a statistical approach. Building upon a great amount of existing literature, a new project will provide the first detailed assessment of the composition of European freshwater gastropods during the Neogene and Quaternary at species, genus and family levels, with emphasis on lake faunas. The γ-diversity of several hundred modern and fossil European lakes will be evaluated. Data will be made available permanently for

  2. Increasing sea surface temperature and range shifts of intertidal gastropods along the Iberian Peninsula

    Rubal, Marcos; Veiga, Puri; Cacabelos, Eva; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    There are well-documented changes in abundance and geographical range of intertidal invertebrates related to climate change at north Europe. However, the effect of sea surface warming on intertidal invertebrates has been poorly studied at lower latitudes. Here we analyze potential changes in the abundance patterns and distribution range of rocky intertidal gastropods related to climate change along the Iberian Peninsula. To achieve this aim, the spatial distribution and range of sub-tropical, warm- and cold-water species of intertidal gastropods was explored by a fully hierarchical sampling design considering four different spatial scales, i.e. from region (100 s of km apart) to quadrats (ms apart). Variability on their patterns of abundance was explored by analysis of variance, changes on their distribution ranges were detected by comparing with previous records and their relationship with sea water temperature was explored by rank correlation analyses. Mean values of sea surface temperature along the Iberian coast, between 1949 and 2010, were obtained from in situ data compiled for three different grid squares: south Portugal, north Portugal, and Galicia. Lusitanian species did not show significant correlation with sea water temperature or changes on their distributional range or abundance, along the temperature gradient considered. The sub-tropical species Siphonaria pectinata has, however, increased its distribution range while boreal cold-water species showed the opposite pattern. The latter was more evident for Littorina littorea that was almost absent from the studied rocky shores of the Iberian Peninsula. Sub-tropical and boreal species showed significant but opposite correlation with sea water temperature. We hypothesized that the energetic cost of frequent exposures to sub-lethal temperatures might be responsible for these shifts. Therefore, intertidal gastropods at the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula coast are responding to the effect of global warming as it

  3. New porcellioidean gastropods from early Devonian of Royal Creek area, Yukon Territory, Canada, with notes on their early phylogeny

    Fryda, J.; Blodgett, R.B.; Lenz, A.C.; Manda, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a description of new gastropods belonging to the superfamily Porcellioidea (Vetigastropoda) from the richly diverse Lower Devonian gastropod fauna of the Road River Formation in the Royal Creek area, Yukon Territory. This fauna belongs to Western Canada Province of the Old World Realm. The Pragian species Porcellia (Porcellia) yukonensis n. sp. and Porcellia (Paraporcellia) sp. represent the oldest presently known members of subgenera Porcellia (Porcellia) and Porcellia (Paraporcellia). Their simple shell ornamentation fits well with an earlier described evolutionary trend in shell morphology of the Porcellinae. Late Pragian to early Emsian Perryconcha pulchra n. gen. and n. sp. is the first member of the Porcellioidea bearing a row of tremata on adult teleoconch whorls. The occurrence of this shell feature in the Porcellioidea is additional evidence that the evolution of the apertural slit was much more complicated than has been proposed in classical models of Paleozoic gastropod evolution. Copyright ?? 2008, The Paleontological Society.

  4. Radiocarbon ages of terrestrial gastropods extend duration of ice-free conditions at the Two Creeks forest bed, Wisconsin, USA

    Rech, Jason A.; Nekola, Jeffrey C.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of terrestrial gastropods that underlie the late Pleistocene Two Creeks forest bed (~ 13,800–13,500 cal yr BP) in eastern Wisconsin, USA provides evidence for a mixed tundra-taiga environment prior to formation of the taiga forest bed. Ten new AMS 14C analyses on terrestrial gastropod shells indicate the mixed tundra-taiga environment persisted from ~ 14,500 to 13,900 cal yr BP. The Twocreekan climatic substage, representing ice-free conditions on the shore of Lake Michigan, therefore began near the onset of peak warming conditions during the Bølling–Allerød interstadial and lasted ~ 1000 yr, nearly 600 yr longer than previously thought. These results provide important data for understanding the response of continental ice sheets to global climate forcing and demonstrate the potential of using terrestrial gastropod fossils for both environmental reconstruction and age control in late Quaternary sediments.

  5. Diversity and abundance of epibiota on invasive and native estuarine gastropods depend on substratum and salinity

    Thyrring, Jakob; Thomsen, Mads Solgaard; Brunbjerg, Ane Kirstine;

    2015-01-01

    ,226 shells representing the common gastropod species in the estuary; Nassarius pauperatus, Bedeva paiva and Batillaria australs from various sites and habitats. Generalized linear models were used to model variability of richness and abundances of common functional groups and species for the above listed......Epibiosis is a common life form in estuarine ecosystems, where shell structures in particular, provide important attachment substrate for sessile species. Many studies have quantified variation in epibiota communities against a few environmental factors, but rarely studies have accounted...

  6. Snails and their trails: the multiple functions of trail-following in gastropods.

    Ng, Terence P T; Saltin, Sara H; Davies, Mark S; Johannesson, Kerstin; Stafford, Richard; Williams, Gray A

    2013-08-01

    Snails are highly unusual among multicellular animals in that they move on a layer of costly mucus, leaving behind a trail that can be followed and utilized for various purposes by themselves or by other animals. Here we review more than 40 years of experimental and theoretical research to try to understand the ecological and evolutionary rationales for trail-following in gastropods. Data from over 30 genera are currently available, representing a broad taxonomic range living in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. The emerging picture is that the production of mucus trails, which initially was an adaptation to facilitate locomotion and/or habitat extension, has evolved to facilitate a multitude of additional functions. Trail-following supports homing behaviours, and provides simple mechanisms for self-organisation in groups of snails, promoting aggregation and thus relieving desiccation and predation pressures. In gastropods that copulate, trail-following is an important component in mate-searching, either as an alternative, or in addition to the release of water- or air-borne pheromones. In some species, this includes a capacity of males not only to identify trails of conspecifics but also to discriminate between trails laid by females and males. Notably, trail discrimination seems important as a pre-zygotic barrier to mating in some snail species. As production of a mucus trail is the most costly component of snail locomotion, it is also tempting to speculate that evolution has given rise to various ways to compensate for energy losses. Some snails, for example, increase energy intake by eating particles attached to the mucus of trails that they follow, whereas others save energy through reducing the production of their own mucus by moving over previously laid mucus trails. Trail-following to locate a prey item or a mate is also a way to save energy. While the rationale for trail-following in many cases appears clear, the basic mechanisms of trail

  7. Cap-shaped gastropods from Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous deposits of northern East Siberia

    Guzhov, A. V.; Zakharov, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    Cap-shaped gastropods are first identified in Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sections of northern East Siberia. They belong to three new genera of the subclass Pectinibranchia ( Boreioconus gen. nov., Nixepileolus gen. nov., and Taimyroconus gen. nov.), which are identified at the species level ( B. bojarkensis sp. nov., N. depressus sp. nov., T. zakharovi sp. nov.), and several species with the open nomenclature. The genus Taimyroconus attributed to the family Calyptraeidae is considered as an ancestral form of the genus Crepidula. The stratigraphic position of each taxon is determined for several sections. The facies confinement, habitat conditions, and ethology of defined genera are considered with the analysis of their geographic distribution.

  8. Relation between aquatic plants and gastropods (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in the region of Gentilly I (Quebec) nuclear generating station

    This study is based on a sampling of the gastropods present in the vegetation of the St. Lawrence riverside zone at Gentilly. A total of 536 plant specimens belonging to 20 species as well as 37 239 specimens grouping 10 different species of gastropods were sampled. A comparison of the plant species - mollusc data was carried out. The analysis of the results indicates that prosobranchs have no affinity whatsoever for any plant species in particular. The pulmonates, however, are found mainly on emergent plants. (author)

  9. Studies on bioprospecting potential of a gastropod mollusc Cantharus tranquebaricus(Gmelin,1791)

    G; Sarumathi; M; Arumugam; S; Kumaresan; T; Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To study the biological activities of the tissue extract of Cantharus tranquebaricus(C.tranquebaricus).Methods:Crude extract of gastropod was tested for inhibition of bacterial growth.Antibacterial assay was carried out by disc diffusion method and the activity was measured accordingly based on the inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with gastropod extract.Molecular weight of the extract was determined by using SDS-PAGE.Plasma coagulation,Fibrin plate assay and substrate SDS-PAGE were used to determine the effect of sample on plasma coagulation,fibrin(ogen)olytic and proteolytic;activity.Results:The maximum inhibition zone(10 mm)was observed against Vibrio cholera(V.cholera)and minimum inhibition zone(2 mm)was noticed against Proteus mirablis(P.mirablis).The molecular weight was determined as 47-106kDa.The tissue extract shows proteolytic activity above 48 kDa.SDS-PAGE analysis of fibrinogen after incubation with the tissue extract showed fibrinogenolytic activity.In plasma coagulation assay C.tranquebaricus tissue extract showed procoagulant property and it coagulated chicken plasma within 150 s,while control took 5 min to clot.The 9 HU hemolytic units were found against chicken blood and also exhibit high level of brine shrimp lethality.Conclusions:This study suggests that C.tranquebaricus could be used as potential source for isolating bioactive compounds,since it is explored first time and found with promising results.

  10. Studies on bioprospecting potential of a gastropod mollusc Cantharus tranquebaricus (Gmelin, 1791)

    G Sarumathi; M Arumugam; S Kumaresan; T Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    To study the biological activities of the tissue extract of Cantharus tranquebaricus (C. tranquebaricus). Methods: Crude extract of gastropod was tested for inhibition of bacterial growth. Antibacterial assay was carried out by disc diffusion method and the activity was measured accordingly based on the inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with gastropod extract. Molecular weight of the extract was determined by using SDS-PAGE. Plasma coagulation, Fibrin plate assay and substrate SDS-PAGE were used to determine the effect of sample on plasma coagulation, fibrin (ogen) olytic and proteolytic activity. Results: The maximum inhibition zone (10 mm) was observed against Vibrio cholera (V. cholera) and minimum inhibition zone (2 mm) was noticed against Proteus mirablis (P. mirablis). The molecular weight was determined as 47-106 kDa. The tissue extract shows proteolytic activity above 48 kDa. SDS-PAGE analysis of fibrinogen after incubation with the tissue extract showed fibrinogenolytic activity. In plasma coagulation assay C. tranquebaricus tissue extract showed procoagulant property and it coagulated chicken plasma within 150 s, while control took 5 min to clot. The 9 HU hemolytic units were found against chicken blood and also exhibit high level of brine shrimp lethality. Conclusions: This study suggests that C. tranquebaricus could be used as potential source for isolating bioactive compounds, since it is explored first time and found with promising results.

  11. Assessing the status of endangered invertebrates from the ancient Lake Ohrid: The gastropod Chilopyrgula sturanyi

    Budzakoska-Gjoreska Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Ohrid is the oldest and deepest lake on the Balkan Peninsula and one of the five oldest lakes in the world. Two of the most striking attributes of the species of the Lake’s fauna, especially the fauna of gastropods, are the high level of biological diversity as well as a high percentage of endemism. The main subject of interest in our research was to follow the distribution and density of the endemic gastropod species Chilopyrgula sturanyi. For this purpose different depth points of the transect Hydrobiological Institute-Radozda as well as other littoral points on the northwestern part of Lake Ohrid, were investigated. The results showed maximum density in the population of Chilopyrgula sturanyi in the muddy lakebed covered by Chara tomentosa. The minimum density in population was recorded on the lakebed with gravel. Specimens of Chilopyrgula sturanyi were not recorded at the depth of 50 m, where the lakebed is covered by a sandy-muddy substrate.

  12. Traces (ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides of predatory gastropods on bivalve shells from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea

    Dal-Yong Kong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Circular to subcircular drill holes were identified on the bivalve shells collected from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea. A great majority of the drill holes (>70% were found on the surfaces of a bivalve species Glycymeris rotunda. They are characterized by a beveled sharp edge and paraboloid in cross section with larger outer borehole diameter (OBD; mean 4.21 mm and smaller inner borehole diameter (mean 2.94 mm. Walls of the drill holes are generally smooth, and walls ornamented with etched relief-like structures were also recognized. A slightly raised central boss observed in an incomplete specimen may indicate a failure of predator’s attack. All drill holes collected are classified as a single ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides Bromley, 1981. They are interpreted as boring traces produced by predatory gastropods, particularly naticid gastropods. Most O. paraboloides boreholes are observed in the central area of shell surfaces; a few boreholes lie marginally, which may reflect a borehole-site selectivity. No correlation between size of prey (shell height and size of predator (OBD is recognized. It is likely, however, that drilled shells of about 30 mm in height represent optimal prey size for naticid predators that lived in a benthic Seogwipo community.

  13. Body Size Extinction and Origination Selectivity: A Case Study of Marine Gastropods

    Kuo, E.; Seixas, G.; Faerber, M.; Payne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Body size has received exceptional interest in evolutionary biology because of its correlation with many ecological and physiological traits. Because large size is typically associated with long generation time and small population size, it has been widely assumed that extinction risk is positively correlated with body size. Data from Pleistocene and Holocene terrestrial mammals and birds support this inference. However, there have been few studies on size bias of marine invertebrate animals, so the true extent of this pattern remains unknown. For this study, we compiled genus-level body size data for marine gastropods spanning the entire Phanerozoic. We use this dataset to examine the statistical evidence for size bias in both origination and extinction of marine gastropods. We perform logistic regression analyses on the data from each Phanerozoic stage to determine the association of body size with origination and extinction. Contrary to previous studies on terrestrial vertebrates, we observe no strong or persistent association between body size and the probability that a genus either originated or went extinct during that stage. Hence, our findings indicate that size bias in extinction risk may reflect particular aspects of mammalian biology or anthropogenic environmental change rather than a general pattern of animal evolution.

  14. The role of the ventral pedal waves in the locomotion of terrestrial gastropods

    Lai, Janice; Shepherd, Robert D.; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2008-03-01

    The locomotion of terrestrial gastropods exhibits unique characteristics which allow these animals to crawl on steep surfaces. Gastropods move by gliding over a ventral foot lubricated by mucus. They generate trains of pedal waves through periodic muscle contractions in the central portion of the ventral foot, producing a forward traction, while the rim of the foot adheres to the substrate and generates suction forces. We analyzed the kinematics and dynamics of locomotion by conducting two sets of experiments. In the first set, we used digital image processing to correlate the frequency and wavelength of the pedal waves to the migration velocity. In the second set, we computed the traction and adhesion forces produced by these animals from measurements of the deformation of an elastic substrate of known properties. We found that the strain energy exerted by the animal on the substrate is quasi-periodic, and explored a possible correlation between the mean speed of migration and the period of this energy fluctuation. In addition, we found that the pedal waves accelerate as they move forward along the ventral foot producing the symmetry break necessary for the generation of a net traction force.

  15. Hydrothermal vent gastropods from the same family (Provannidae) harbour epsilon- and gamma-proteobacterial endosymbionts.

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Dubilier, Nicole; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Cunningham, Dale E; Kojima, Shigeaki; Stahl, David A

    2005-05-01

    The discovery of new hydrothermal vent systems in the back-arc basins of the Western Pacific revealed chemosynthesis-based faunal communities distinct from those of other vents. These vents are dominated by two related gastropods (Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei) that harbour symbiotic bacteria in their gills. We used comparative 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing and in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted probes to characterize the bacterial symbionts of Alviniconcha sp. and I. nautilei from the Manus Basin in the Western Pacific. The analyses revealed that these two gastropod species, although affiliated with the same family, harbour phylogenetically distant chemosymbionts, suggesting independent origins of these endosymbioses. The I. nautilei endosymbiont clusters with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within the gamma-Proteobacteria, as is the case for all previously characterized endosymbionts from a wide diversity of host taxa harbouring thioautotrophic prokaryotes. In contrast, the Alviniconcha endosymbiont is affiliated with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within the epsilon-Proteobacteria. These results show that bacteria from the epsilon-Proteobacteria are also capable of forming endosymbiotic associations with marine invertebrates from chemosynthetic environments. More generally, the endosymbiotic lifestyle is now shown to be distributed throughout all recognized classes of the Proteobacteria. PMID:15819856

  16. Parasitic infection alters the physiological response of a marine gastropod to ocean acidification.

    Macleod, C D; Poulin, R

    2016-09-01

    Increased hydrogen ion concentration and decreased carbonate ion concentration in seawater are the most physiologically relevant consequences of ocean acidification (OA). Changes to either chemical species may increase the metabolic cost of physiological processes in marine organisms, and reduce the energy available for growth, reproduction and survival. Parasitic infection also increases the energetic demands experienced by marine organisms, and may reduce host tolerance to stressors associated with OA. This study assessed the combined metabolic effects of parasitic infection and OA on an intertidal gastropod, Zeacumantus subcarinatus. Oxygen consumption rates and tissue glucose content were recorded in snails infected with one of three trematode parasites, and an uninfected control group, maintained in acidified (7·6 and 7·4 pH) or unmodified (8·1 pH) seawater. Exposure to acidified seawater significantly altered the oxygen consumption rates and tissue glucose content of infected and uninfected snails, and there were clear differences in the magnitude of these changes between snails infected with different species of trematode. These results indicate that the combined effects of OA and parasitic infection significantly alter the energy requirements of Z. subcarinatus, and that the species of the infecting parasite may play an important role in determining the tolerance of marine gastropods to OA. PMID:27222227

  17. Evolution and development of gastropod larval shell morphology: experimental evidence for mechanical defense and repair.

    Hickman, C S

    2001-01-01

    The structural diversity of gastropod veliger larvae offers an instructive counterpoint to the view of larval forms as conservative archetypes. Larval structure, function, and development are fine-tuned for survival in the plankton. Accordingly, the study of larval adaptation provides an important perspective for evolutionary-developmental biology as an integrated science. Patterns of breakage and repair in the field, as well as patterns of breakage in arranged encounters with zooplankton under laboratory conditions, are two powerful sources of data on the adaptive significance of morphological and microsculptural features of the gastropod larval shell. Shells of the planktonic veliger larvae of the caenogastropod Nassarius paupertus [GOULD] preserve multiple repaired breaks, attributed to unsuccessful zooplankton predators. In culture, larvae isolated from concentrated zooplankton samples rapidly repaired broken apertural margins and restored the "ideal" apertural form, in which an elaborate projection or "beak" covers the head of the swimming veliger. When individuals with repaired apertures were reintroduced to a concentrated mixture of potential zooplankton predators, the repaired margins were rapidly chipped and broken back. The projecting beak of the larval shell is the first line of mechanical defense, covering the larval head and mouth and potentially the most vulnerable part of the shell to breakage. Patterns of mechanical failure show that spiral ridges do reinforce the beak and retard breakage. The capacity for rapid shell repair and regeneration, and the evolution of features that resist or retard mechanical damage, may play a more prominent role than previously thought in enhancing the ability of larvae to survive in the plankton. PMID:11256430

  18. [Composition, abundance and distribution of populations of commercially important gastropods in La Guajira, Colombian Caribbean].

    Nieto-Bernal, Ramón; Luis, Chasqui; Rodriguez, Angélica María; Castro, Erick; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L

    2013-06-01

    In the continental Colombian Caribbean the conch resource exploitation and the status of snails populations has been poorly studied, which are reflected in the lack of fisheries management. This study assesses composition, population density and distribution of the gastropods species that make conch resource in La Guajira region. Underwater visual censuses for snails were performed between September-November 2009 in 145100x4m (400m2) transects, spanning a total area of 56920m2 between Riohacha and Cabo de la Vela. The study was complemented with the evaluation of composition, abundance and size of gastropods conch found in the discarded-by-fishermen shell mounds in 13 beaches. In October 2010 another 40 transects were evaluated (16 000 m2) from the Southern of Riohacha to the Camarones village (La Guajira). We found a total of 9911 snails belonging to 12 species, the most abundant being Strombus pugilis with 8 912 individuals and an average density of 1 538.4 +/- 3 662.6 ind./ha, followed by Vasum muricatum with 374 individuals and an average density of 51.8 +/- 91.2 ind./ha. Calculating the importance value index (IVI) for both living organisms as the empty shells on beaches, shows that Turbinella angulata is the most used species by artisanal fishermen in the region. Cassis madagascariensis and Cassis tuberosa are also important snail resources in the region (as suggested by the number of empty shells found in beaches), but its densities were low. Strombus gigas, with only three living organisms found in the area, presented the lowest abundance ever found in the Colombian Caribbean (0.52 +/- 3.6 ind./ha), showing that queen conch population in La Guajira cannot support commercial exploitation. The abundance of discarded S. gigas shells on beaches suggests resource exploitation in the recent past. Results remarks the urgency of implementing management plans for snail fisheries in the region. PMID:23885583

  19. Microstructures in shells of the freshwater gastropod Viviparus viviparus: a potential sensor for temperature change?

    Füllenbach, Christoph S; Schöne, Bernd R; Branscheid, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Mollusk shells contain a plethora of information on past climate variability. However, only a limited toolkit is currently available to reconstruct such data from the shells. The environmental data of some proxies (e.g. Sr/Ca ratios) is obscured by physiological effects, whereas other proxies, such as δ(18)O, simultaneously provide information on two or more different environmental variables. The present study investigates whether microstructures of the freshwater gastropod Viviparus viviparus provide an alternative means to reconstruct past water temperature. Cold and highly variable temperature regimes resulted in the precipitation of highly unordered first-order lamellae of simple crossed-lamellar (XLM) structures if new shell formed from scratch. However, during stable and warm conditions, well-ordered first-order lamellae were laid down irrespective of pre-existing shell material. Homogeneous first-order lamellae also formed during times of cold and highly variable temperatures if the new shell was deposited onto existing shell material with well-ordered first-order lamellae. The growth front seems to contain instructions for building specific microstructure variants, irrespective of environmental conditions. However, if this template is missing, the animal forms a deviating microstructure. Under extremely stressful situations (e.g. removal from habitat, calcein staining, extreme temperature shifts), the gastropod precipitates an evolutionarily older microstructure (irregular simple prisms) rather than XLM structures. These shell portions were macroscopically described as disturbance lines. In addition, repetitive, presumably periodic growth patterns were observed, which consisted of gradually changing third-order lamellae between consecutive faint, organic-rich growth lines. These growth patterns were probably controlled by intrinsic biological clocks and exhibited a two-daily periodicity. The results of this study may provide the basis for using changes in

  20. Consumption rates and prey preference of the invasive gastropod Rapana venosa in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    Savini, Dario; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, Anna

    2006-05-01

    The alien Asian gastropod Rapana venosa (Valenciennes 1846) was first recorded in 1973 along the Italian coast of the Northern Adriatic Sea. Recently, this predator of bivalves has been spreading all around the world oceans, probably helped by ship traffic and aquaculture trade. A caging experiment in natural environment was performed during the summer of 2002 in Cesenatico (Emilia-Romagna, Italy) in order to estimate consumption rates and prey preference of R. venosa. The prey items chosen were the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck 1819), the introduced carpet clam Tapes philippinarum (Adams and Reeve 1850), both supporting the local fisheries, and the Indo-Pacific invasive clam Anadara (Scapharca) inaequivalvis (Bruguière 1789). Results showed an average consumption of about 1 bivalve prey per day (or 1.2 g wet weight per day). Predation was species and size selective towards small specimens of A. inaequivalvis; consumption of the two commercial species was lower. These results might reduce the concern about the economical impact on the local bivalve fishery due to the presence of the predatory gastropod. On the other hand, selective predation might probably alter local community structure, influencing competition amongst filter feeder/suspension feeder bivalve species and causing long-term ecological impact. The large availability of food resource and the habitat characteristics of the Emilia-Romagna littoral makes this area an important breeding ground for R. venosa in the Mediterranean Sea, thus worthy of consideration in order to understand the bioinvasion ecology of this species and to control its likely further dispersal.

  1. The ultrastructure of spermatozoa and spermiogenesis in pyramidellid gastropods, and its systematic importance

    Healy, John M.

    1988-06-01

    Ultrastructural observations on spermiogenesis and spermatozoa of selected pyramidellid gastropods (species of Turbonilla, Pyrgulina, Cingulina and Hinemoa) are presented. During spermatid developement, the condensing nucleus becomes initially anterio-posteriorly compressed or sometimes cup-shaped. Concurrently, the acrosomal complex attaches to an electrondense layer at the presumptive anterior pole of the nucleus, while at the opposite (posterior) pole of the nucleus a shallow invagination is formed to accommodate the centriolar derivative. Midpiece formation begins soon after these events have taken place, and involves the following processes: (1) the wrapping of individual mitochondria around the axoneme/coarse fibre complex; (2) later internal metamorphosis resulting in replacement of cristae by paracrystalline layers which envelope the matrix material; and (3) formation of a glycogen-filled helix within the mitochondrial derivative (via a secondary wrapping of mitochondria). Advanced stages of nuclear condensation (elongation, transformation of fibres into lamellae, subsequent compaction) and midpiece formation proceed within a microtubular sheath (‘manchette’). Pyramidellid spermatozoa consist of an acrosomal complex (round to ovoid apical vesicle; column-shaped acrosomal pedestal), helically-keeled nucleus (short, 7 10 μm long, shallow basal invagination for axoneme/coarse fibre attachment), elongate helical midpiece (composed of axoneme, coarse fibres, paracrystalline and matrix materials, glycogen-filled helix), glycogen piece (length variable, preceeded by a dense ring structure at junction with midpiece). The features of developing and mature spermatozoa observed in the Pyramidellidae are as observed in opisthobranch and pulmonate gastropods indicating that the Pyramidelloidea should be placed within the Euthyneura/Heterobranchia, most appropriately as a member group of the Opisthobranchia.

  2. Sclerite formation in the hydrothermal-vent “scaly-foot” gastropod — possible control of iron sulfide biomineralization by the animal

    Suzuki, Yohey; Kopp, Robert E.; Kogure, Toshihiro; Suga, Akinobu; Takai, Ken; Tsuchida, Shinji; Ozaki, Noriaki; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Jun; Kato, Yasuhiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Hirata, Takafumi; CHIBA, Hitoshi; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    A gastropod from a deep-sea hydrothermal field at the Rodriguez triple junction, Indian Ocean, has scale-shaped structures, called sclerites, mineralized with iron sulfides on its foot. No other organisms are known to produce a skeleton consisting of iron sulfides. To investigate whether iron sulfide mineralization is mediated by the gastropod for the function of the sclerites, we performed a detailed physical and chemical characterization. Nanostructural characterization of the iron sulfide ...

  3. Gastropods Associated with Fossil Traces from Yacoraite Formation (Maastrichtian-Danian), and its Paleoenvironmental Significance, Jujuy,Northwestern Argentina

    Carlos A. C(O)NSOLE GONELLA; Miguel GRIFFIN; Florencio G. ACE(N)OLAZA

    2009-01-01

    We present results tending to characterize the new records of invertebrates from the Yacoraite Formation (Maastrichtian-Danian). The fossils reported come from two stratigraphic sections exposed in the surroundings of Maimara and Jueya, province of Jujuy, northwestern Argentina. The selection was based on geological and paleontological evidence. The recovered fossils include gastropods and invertebrate fossil traces, including Planolites, Skolithos and Gastrochanoelites ichnogenns. As result of our review, we discussed the possibility of assigning the analyzed gastropods to the family Zygopleuridae (gene. et. sp. indet.), as an approximation to the taxonomic resolution of this fossil fauna. The trace fossils were assigned to the archetypical Glossifungites ichnofacies. The study of the fossil assemblage allowed us to defme a shallow depositional environment, characteristic of a marine context with high-energy conditions.

  4. Ecosystem engineering potential of the gastropod Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767) in mangrove wastewater wetlands--a controlled mesocosm experiment.

    Penha-Lopes, Gil; Bartolini, Fabrizio; Limbu, Samwel; Cannicci, Stefano; Mgaya, Yunus; Kristensen, Erik; Paula, José

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different sewage concentrations (0, 20, 60 and 100%), vegetation (Bare, Avicennia marina or Rhizophora mucronata) and immersion periods (immersion/emersion period of 12/12 h or 3/3 days just for 100%) conditions were studied for 6 months on survival and growth rates of Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767). Gastropods' activity and ecosystem engineering preformed at bare and A. marina planted cells and 3 sewage conditions (0, 20 and 60%) were determined. Survival rates were higher than 70% in all treatments. Growth rate decreased significantly with increasing sewage concentrations (mainly at unplanted conditions) and longer immersion periods. A complete shift (from immersion to emersion periods) and a significant decrease in mobility and consequently its engineer potential, due to sewage contamination, lead to a 3-4 fold decrease in the amount of sediment disturbed. Sewage contamination, primary producers' abundance and environmental conditions may have influenced the gastropods survival, growth and its ecosystem engineering potential. PMID:19640623

  5. Morphological and behavioral differences in the gastropod Trophon geversianus associated to distinct environmental conditions, as revealed by a multidisciplinary approach

    Márquez, Federico; Nieto Vilela, Rocío Aimé; Lozada, Mariana; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    The gastropod Trophon geversianus exhibits shell polymorphisms along its distribution in subtidal and intertidal habitats. Our hypothesis is that morphological and behavioral patterns of T. geversianus represent habitat-specific constrains; subsequently we expect an association between shell morphology, attachment behavior, and habitat. In order to test this hypothesis we compared individuals from intertidal and subtidal habitats, at three sites in Golfo Nuevo (Argentina). We analyzed shell morphology using classic morphometric variables, 3D geometric morphometrics and computing tomography scan. The results were complemented with field observations of attachment to substrate and turning time behavior, as well as of the number of shell scars produced by crab predation. Our results showed differences in shell size and shape between intertidal and subtidal-collected individuals. Centroid size, total weight and shell weight, as well as shell density and thickness were significantly lower in intertidal individuals than in subtidal ones. Gastropods from intertidal habitats presented a low-spired shell and an expanded aperture which might allow better attachment to the bottom substrate, while subtidal individuals presented a slender and narrower shell shape. The number of crab scars was significantly higher in shells from subtidal individuals. Observations of the behavior of gastropods placed at the intertidal splash zone showed 100% of attachment to the bottom in the intertidal individuals, while subtidal specimens only attached in average in 32% of the cases. These latter took 12 times longer to re-attach to the bottom when faced up. Phylogenetic analysis of COI gene fragments showed no consistent differences among individuals sampled in both habitats. All these results suggest that T. geversianus has developed two ecomorphs with distinct morphological and behavioral responses to physically stressful conditions registered in north Patagonian intertidals, as opposed to

  6. Population structure of an invasive parthenogenetic gastropod in coastal lakes and estuaries of northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Nelson A F Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Estuaries and coastal lakes receive little attention despite being heavily invaded by non-indigenous invasive species (NIS. In these situations, studies of population dynamics in invaded habitats can provide valuable insights into how NIS interact with new environments. Tarebia granifera is a prosobranch gastropod from south-east Asia which has invaded other sub-tropical parts of the world. This study addresses whether a small number of key environmental factors influences gastropod communities, and specifically how the population density and size structure of T. granifera were influenced by environmental change in estuaries and coastal lakes in southern Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T. granifera's density, number of brooded juveniles and size structure were measured at the St. Lucia Estuary, Mgobozeleni Estuary, Lake Sibaya and Lake Nhlange. Size structure was classified according to shell height (SH. All dissected individuals were found to be female and free from trematode infection. Salinity, water depth, temperature, and pH were the main factors correlated with population density of gastropod communities. T. granifera often reached densities well over 1000 ind. m(-2, displacing indigenous gastropods and becoming a dominant component of the benthic community. T. granifera successfully invaded estuaries despite frequent exposure to high salinity and desiccation, which could together eliminate >97% of the population. The persistence of T. granifera was ensured due to its high fecundity and the environmental tolerance of large adults (20-30 mm SH which carried an average of 158±12.8 SD brooded juveniles. Repeat introductions were not essential for the success of this parthenogenetic NIS. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: There is a need for a broader study on the reproductive biology of T. granifera (including the previously overlooked "brood pouch ecology", which affects population dynamics and may be relevant to other

  7. On the origin of Acochlidia and other enigmatic euthyneuran gastropods, with implications for the systematics of Heterobranchia

    Knebelsberger Thomas; Fukuda Hiroshi; Kano Yasunori; Stöger Isabella; Jörger Katharina M; Schrödl Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A robust phylogenetic hypothesis of euthyneuran gastropods, as a basis to reconstructing their evolutionary history, is still hindered by several groups of aberrant, more or less worm-like slugs with unclear phylogenetic relationships. As a traditional "order" in the Opisthobranchia, the Acochlidia have a long history of controversial placements, among others influenced by convergent adaptation to the mainly meiofaunal habitats. The present study includes six out of seven ...

  8. Influences of population density on polyandry and patterns of sperm usage in the marine gastropod Rapana venosa

    Dong-Xiu Xue; Tao Zhang; Jin-Xian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, with potential for sexual selection to continue post-copulation through sperm competition and/or cryptic female choice. Few studies have investigated the influences of population density on polyandry and sperm usage, and paternity distribution in successive broods of marine invertebrates. The marine gastropod Rapana venosa is ideal for investigating how population density influences the frequency of polyandry and elucidating patterns of sperm ...

  9. Ecophenotypic plasticity leads to extraordinary gastropod shells found on the “Roof of the World”

    Clewing, Catharina; Riedel, Frank; Wilke, Thomas; Albrecht, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The often extraordinary shell forms and shapes of gastropods found in palaeolakes, such as the highly diverse Gyraulus fauna of the famous Steinheim Basin, have been puzzling evolutionary biologists for centuries, and there is an ongoing debate whether these aberrant shell forms are indicative of true species (or subspecies) or ecophenotypic morphs. Interestingly, one of the Steinheim Gyraulus morphs – a corkscrew-like open-coiled shell – has a recent analogue in the Lake Bangong drainage sys...

  10. A neurotropic herpesvirus infecting the gastropod, abalone, shares ancestry with oyster herpesvirus and a herpesvirus associated with the amphioxus genome

    Sawbridge Tim; Wong Frank; Cocks Benjamin G; Savin Keith W; Cogan Noel; Savage David; Warner Simone

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background With the exception of the oyster herpesvirus OsHV-1, all herpesviruses characterized thus far infect only vertebrates. Some cause neurological disease in their hosts, while others replicate or become latent in neurological tissues. Recently a new herpesvirus causing ganglioneuritis in abalone, a gastropod, was discovered. Molecular analysis of new herpesviruses, such as this one and others, still to be discovered in invertebrates, will provide insight into the evolution of...

  11. Novel excitatory neuropeptides isolated from a prosobranch gastropod, Thais clavigera : The molluscan counterpart of the annelidan GGNG peptides

    Morishita, Fumihiro; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Takeshige, K.; Furukawa, Yasuo; Takata, T.; Matsushima, Osamu; Mukai, S.T.; Saleuddin, A.S.M.; Horiguchi, Toshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The GGNG peptides are excitatory neuropeptides identified from earthworms, leeches and polychaeta. Two structurally related peptides were purified and characterized from a mollusk, Thais clavigera (prosobranch gastropod). The peptides designated as TEP-1 (Thais excitatory peptide-1) (KCSGKWAIHACWGGN-NH2) and TEP-2 (KCYGKWAMHACWGGN-NH2) are pentadecapeptides having one disulfide bond and C-terminal GGN-NH2 structures, which are shared by most GGNG peptides. TEP augmented the motilities of Thai...

  12. The Mitochondrial Genomes of the Nudibranch Mollusks, Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea, and Their Impact on Gastropod Phylogeny.

    Sevigny, Joseph L; Kirouac, Lauren E; Thomas, William Kelley; Ramsdell, Jordan S; Lawlor, Kayla E; Sharifi, Osman; Grewal, Simarvir; Baysdorfer, Christopher; Curr, Kenneth; Naimie, Amanda A; Okamoto, Kazufusa; Murray, James A; Newcomb, James M

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among certain groups of gastropods have remained unresolved in recent studies, especially in the diverse subclass Opisthobranchia, where nudibranchs have been poorly represented. Here we present the complete mitochondrial genomes of Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea (more recently named T. tetraquetra), two nudibranchs from the unrepresented Cladobranchia group, and report on the resulting phylogenetic analyses. Both genomes coded for the typical thirteen protein-coding genes, twenty-two transfer RNAs, and two ribosomal RNAs seen in other species. The twelve-nucleotide deletion previously reported for the cytochrome oxidase 1 gene in several other Melibe species was further clarified as three separate deletion events. These deletions were not present in any opisthobranchs examined in our study, including the newly sequenced M. leonina or T. diomedea, suggesting that these previously reported deletions may represent more recently divergent taxa. Analysis of the secondary structures for all twenty-two tRNAs of both M. leonina and T. diomedea indicated truncated d arms for the two serine tRNAs, as seen in some other heterobranchs. In addition, the serine 1 tRNA in T. diomedea contained an anticodon not yet reported in any other gastropod. For phylogenetic analysis, we used the thirteen protein-coding genes from the mitochondrial genomes of M. leonina, T. diomedea, and seventy-one other gastropods. Phylogenetic analyses were performed for both the class Gastropoda and the subclass Opisthobranchia. Both Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses resulted in similar tree topologies. In the Opisthobranchia, the five orders represented in our study were monophyletic (Anaspidea, Cephalaspidea, Notaspidea, Nudibranchia, Sacoglossa). In Gastropoda, two of the three traditional subclasses, Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata, were not monophyletic. In contrast, four of the more recently named gastropod clades (Vetigastropoda, Neritimorpha

  13. The Mitochondrial Genomes of the Nudibranch Mollusks, Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea, and Their Impact on Gastropod Phylogeny.

    Joseph L Sevigny

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic relationships among certain groups of gastropods have remained unresolved in recent studies, especially in the diverse subclass Opisthobranchia, where nudibranchs have been poorly represented. Here we present the complete mitochondrial genomes of Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea (more recently named T. tetraquetra, two nudibranchs from the unrepresented Cladobranchia group, and report on the resulting phylogenetic analyses. Both genomes coded for the typical thirteen protein-coding genes, twenty-two transfer RNAs, and two ribosomal RNAs seen in other species. The twelve-nucleotide deletion previously reported for the cytochrome oxidase 1 gene in several other Melibe species was further clarified as three separate deletion events. These deletions were not present in any opisthobranchs examined in our study, including the newly sequenced M. leonina or T. diomedea, suggesting that these previously reported deletions may represent more recently divergent taxa. Analysis of the secondary structures for all twenty-two tRNAs of both M. leonina and T. diomedea indicated truncated d arms for the two serine tRNAs, as seen in some other heterobranchs. In addition, the serine 1 tRNA in T. diomedea contained an anticodon not yet reported in any other gastropod. For phylogenetic analysis, we used the thirteen protein-coding genes from the mitochondrial genomes of M. leonina, T. diomedea, and seventy-one other gastropods. Phylogenetic analyses were performed for both the class Gastropoda and the subclass Opisthobranchia. Both Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses resulted in similar tree topologies. In the Opisthobranchia, the five orders represented in our study were monophyletic (Anaspidea, Cephalaspidea, Notaspidea, Nudibranchia, Sacoglossa. In Gastropoda, two of the three traditional subclasses, Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata, were not monophyletic. In contrast, four of the more recently named gastropod clades (Vetigastropoda

  14. Bioactive potential of some economically important marine gastropods along the Gulf of Mannar region, southeast coast of India

    JayanthiGovindarajalu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse the economically important gastropods for prospective antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities from the Gulf of Mannar region, southeast coast of India. Methods: The bioactive potential of some gastropods i.e. Babylonia spirata (B. spirata, Phalium glaucum, Tonna dolium, Hemifusus pugilinus, Xancus pyrum, Chicoreus ramosus (C. ramosus, Harpa articularis, Ficus ficus and Babylonia zeylanica were analysed. Antimicrobial activity was carried out against 8 human pathogenic bacteria and 3 fungal strains by well diffusion method. Antioxidant and cytotoxic activities were analyzed by standard methods. Results: In antibacterial and antifungal activities, methanolic extract of B. spirata significantly showed the highest inhibition zone against Aeromonas hydrophila and Fusarium spp. (P > 0.05. In the total antioxidant activity, the maximum activity was observed in B. spirata (510 µg/mg and in the 1.1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity, B. spirata showed the highest percentage of inhibition (76.7%. In the case of cytotoxicity i.e. brine shrimp lethality tests the methanolic extract of C. ramosus showed the lowest percentage of mortality and the LC50 values were found to be 523.9 µg/mL. Conclusions: The results revealed that all the gastropods in the present study possessed antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic effects. However, species like B. spirata and C. ramosus exhibited potent activity and can be used for further clinical studies.

  15. Temporal dynamics of gastropod fauna on subtidal sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    Moreira, J.; Aldea, C.; Troncoso, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    The temporal variation of the gastropod fauna inhabiting sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (Galicia, Spain) was studied at three subtidal sites from February 1996 to February 1997 by means of quantitative sampling. A total of 5,463 individuals representing 51 gastropod species and 22 families were found. The family Pyramidellidae was the most diverse in number of species (11 species), followed by Rissoidae and Trochidae (4 species each). The dogwhelk, Nassarius reticulatus, and the rissoid snail, Rissoa parva, were the numerically dominant species at the three studied sites; those and other abundant species showed their greatest densities by the end of summer and the beginning of autumn. In general, univariate measures of the assemblage (number of species, abundance, diversity and evenness) showed variations through time; greater values were recorded between summer and autumn depending on the site. Multivariate analyses done on abundance data showed certain seasonality in the evolution of the assemblage as expected for shallow subtidal sandy sediments at temperate latitudes; those seasonal changes were mostly related to variations in abundance of numerically dominant species. Although the measured sedimentary variables did not show significant correlations with faunal univariate parameters, sediment heterogeneity due to the presence of mats of Zostera marina L. and shells of dead bivalves might explain the differences in composition of the gastropod assemblage among sampling sites.

  16. Species diversity of planktonic gastropods (Pteropoda and Heteropoda) from six ocean regions based on DNA barcode analysis

    Jennings, Robert M.; Bucklin, Ann; Ossenbrügger, Holger; Hopcroft, Russell R.

    2010-12-01

    Pteropods and heteropods are two distinct groups of holoplanktonic gastropods whose species and genetic diversity remain poorly understood, despite their ubiquity in the world's oceans. Some species apparently attain near cosmopolitan distributions, implying long-distance dispersal or cryptic species assemblages. We present the first multi-regional and species-rich molecular dataset of holoplanktonic gastropods, comprising DNA barcodes from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I subunit gene (COI) from 115 individuals of 41 species sampled from six ocean regions across the globe. Molecular analysis and assessment of barcoding utility supported the validity of several morphological subspecies and forms (e.g. of Creseis virgula and Limacina helicina), while others were not supported (e.g. Cavolinia uncinata). Significant genetic variation was observed among conspecific specimens collected in different geographic regions for some species, particularly in euthecosomatous pteropods. Several species of euthecosomes showed no evidence of genetic separation among distant ocean regions. Overall, we suggest some taxonomic revision of the holoplanktonic gastropods will be required, pending a more complete molecular inventory of these groups.

  17. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    Föller, K.; Stelbrink, B.; Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four types are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial phase of diversification, or there may be a pronounced lag phase between colonization and subsequent diversification. As understanding the tempo of diversification in ancient lake environments may help reveal the underlying processes that drive speciation and extinction, we here use the Balkan Lake Ohrid as a model system and the largest species flock in the lake, the non-pyrgulinid Hydrobiidae, as a model taxon to study changes in diversification rates over time together with the respective drivers. Based on phylogenetic, molecular-clock, lineage-through-time plot, and diversification-rate analyses we found that this potentially monophyletic group is comparatively old and that it most likely evolved with a constant diversification rate. Preliminary data of the SCOPSCO (Scientific Collaboration On Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid) deep-drilling program do indicate signatures of severe environmental/climatic perturbations in Lake Ohrid. However, so far there is no evidence for the occurrence of catastrophic environmental events. We therefore propose that the constant diversification rate observed in endemic gastropods has been caused by two factors: (i) a potential lack of catastrophic environmental events in Lake Ohrid and/or (ii) a probably high ecosystem resilience, buffering environmental changes. Parameters potentially contributing to the lake's high ecosystem resilience are its distinct bathymetry, ongoing tectonic activities, and karst hydrology. The current study not only

  18. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    K. Föller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four modes are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial phase of diversification, or there may be a pronounced lag phase between colonization and subsequent diversification. As understanding the tempo of diversification in ancient lake environments may help unrevealing the underlying processes that drive speciation and extinction, we here use the Balkan Lake Ohrid as a model system and the largest species flock in the lake, the non-pyrgulinid Hydrobiidae, as a model taxon to study changes in diversification rates over time together with the respective drivers. Based on phylogenetic, molecular-clock, lineage-through-time plot and diversification-rate analyses we found that this monophyletic group is comparatively old and that it most likely evolved with a constant diversification rate. Preliminary data of the SCOPSCO deep-drilling program do indicate signatures of severe environmental/climatic perturbations in Lake Ohrid. However, so far there is no evidence for the occurrence of catastrophic environmental events. We therefore propose that the rate homogeneity observed in endemic gastropods has been caused by two factors: (i a potential lack of catastrophic environmental events in Lake Ohrid and/or (ii a high ecosystem resilience, buffering environmental changes. Parameters potentially contributing to the lake's high ecosystem resilience are its distinct bathymetry, ongoing tectonic activities, and karst hydrology. The current study not only contributes to one of the overall goals of the SCOPSCO deep-drilling program – inferring

  19. Freshwater gastropods diversity hotspots: three new species from the Uruguay River (South America)

    de Lucía, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Atlantic Forest is globally one of the priority ecoregions for biodiversity conservation. In Argentina, it is represented by the Paranense Forest, which covers a vast area of Misiones Province between the Paraná and Uruguay rivers. The Uruguay River is a global hotspot of freshwater gastropod diversity, here mainly represented by Tateidae (genus Potamolithus) and to a lesser extent Chilinidae. The family Chilinidae (Gastropoda, Hygrophila) includes 21 species currently recorded in Argentina, and three species in the Uruguay River. The species of Chilinidae occur in quite different types of habitats, but generally in clean oxygenated water recording variable temperature ranges. Highly oxygenated freshwater environments (waterfalls and rapids) are the most vulnerable continental environments. We provide here novel information on three new species of Chilinidae from environments containing waterfalls and rapids in the Uruguay River malacological province of Argentina. Materials and Methods: The specimens were collected in 2010. We analyzed shell, radula, and nervous and reproductive systems, and determined the molecular genetics. The genetic distance was calculated for two mitochondrial markers (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I–COI- and cytochrome b -Cyt b-) for these three new species and the species recorded from the Misionerean, Uruguay River and Lower Paraná-Río de la Plata malacological provinces. In addition, the COI data were analyzed phylogenetically by the neighbor-joining and Bayesian inference techniques. Results: The species described here are different in terms of shell, radula and nervous and reproductive systems, mostly based on the sculpture of the penis sheath. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the three new species with those present in the Lower Paraná-Río de la Plata and Uruguay River malacological provinces. Discussion: Phylogenetic analyses confirm the separation between the Uruguay River and the Misionerean malacological

  20. Impact of toxic cyanobacteria on gastropods and microcystin accumulation in a eutrophic lake (Grand-Lieu, France) with special reference to Physa (= Physella) acuta

    Lance, Emilie, E-mail: emilie.lance@live.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Brient, Luc, E-mail: luc.brient@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Carpentier, Alexandre, E-mail: alexandre.carpentier@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR 7208 BOREA, CRESCO, Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, 38 rue du Port Blanc, 35800 Dinard (France); Acou, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.acou@mnhn.fr [UMR 7208 BOREA, CRESCO, Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, 38 rue du Port Blanc, 35800 Dinard (France); Marion, Loic, E-mail: loic.marion@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Bormans, Myriam, E-mail: myriam.bormans@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Gerard, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.gerard@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France)

    2010-08-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria are known to accumulate in gastropods following grazing of toxic cyanobacteria and/or absorption of MCs dissolved in water, with adverse effects on life history traits demonstrated in the laboratory. In the field, such effects may vary depending on species, according to their relative sensitivity and ecology. The aims of this study were to i) establish how various intensities of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations alter the structure of gastropod community and ii) compare MC tissue concentration in gastropods in the field with those obtained in our previous laboratory experiments on the prosobranch Potamopyrgus antipodarum and the pulmonate Lymnaea stagnalis. We explored these questions through a one-year field study at three stations at Grand-Lieu Lake (France) affected by different intensities of cyanobacteria proliferations. A survey of the community structure and MC content of both cyanobacteria and gastropods was associated with a caging experiment involving P. antipodarum and L. stagnalis. In total, 2592 gastropods belonging to 7 prosobranch and 16 pulmonate species were collected. However, distribution among the stations was unequal with 62% vs 2% of gastropods sampled respectively at the stations with the lowest vs highest concentrations of MC. Irrespective of the station, pulmonates were always more diverse, more abundant and occurred at higher frequencies than prosobranchs. Only the pulmonate Physa acuta occurred at all stations, with abundance and MC tissue concentration ({<=} 4.32 {mu}g g DW{sup -1}) depending on the degrees of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations in the stations; therefore, P. acuta is proposed as a potential sentinel species. The caging experiment demonstrated a higher MC accumulation in L. stagnalis ({<=} 0.36 {mu}g g DW{sup -1} for 71% of individuals) than in P. antipodarum ({<=} 0.02 {mu}g g DW{sup -1} for 12%), corroborating previous laboratory observations

  1. Impact of toxic cyanobacteria on gastropods and microcystin accumulation in a eutrophic lake (Grand-Lieu, France) with special reference to Physa (= Physella) acuta

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria are known to accumulate in gastropods following grazing of toxic cyanobacteria and/or absorption of MCs dissolved in water, with adverse effects on life history traits demonstrated in the laboratory. In the field, such effects may vary depending on species, according to their relative sensitivity and ecology. The aims of this study were to i) establish how various intensities of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations alter the structure of gastropod community and ii) compare MC tissue concentration in gastropods in the field with those obtained in our previous laboratory experiments on the prosobranch Potamopyrgus antipodarum and the pulmonate Lymnaea stagnalis. We explored these questions through a one-year field study at three stations at Grand-Lieu Lake (France) affected by different intensities of cyanobacteria proliferations. A survey of the community structure and MC content of both cyanobacteria and gastropods was associated with a caging experiment involving P. antipodarum and L. stagnalis. In total, 2592 gastropods belonging to 7 prosobranch and 16 pulmonate species were collected. However, distribution among the stations was unequal with 62% vs 2% of gastropods sampled respectively at the stations with the lowest vs highest concentrations of MC. Irrespective of the station, pulmonates were always more diverse, more abundant and occurred at higher frequencies than prosobranchs. Only the pulmonate Physa acuta occurred at all stations, with abundance and MC tissue concentration (≤ 4.32 μg g DW-1) depending on the degrees of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations in the stations; therefore, P. acuta is proposed as a potential sentinel species. The caging experiment demonstrated a higher MC accumulation in L. stagnalis (≤ 0.36 μg g DW-1 for 71% of individuals) than in P. antipodarum (≤ 0.02 μg g DW-1 for 12%), corroborating previous laboratory observations. Results are discussed in terms

  2. Bacterial diversity and tetrodotoxin analysis in the viscera of the gastropods from Portuguese coast.

    Pratheepa, Vijayakumari; Alex, Anoop; Silva, Marisa; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2016-09-01

    To trace the pathway of tetrodotoxin (TTX) producing microorganism in the Atlantic coast of Portugal, culture-dependent evaluation of the bacterial isolates from the viscera of the gastropods Monodonta lineata, Gibbula umbilicalis, Nucella lapillus and Patella intermedia, and from the environmental samples (biofilm and surrounding sea water) was carried out. Samples were collected from eight different coastal locations of Northern Portugal. A total of 311 isolates were identified. The observed bacterial diversity was distributed over five different classes (Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria) with the greatest number of 16S rRNA gene sequence derived from the Gammaproteobacteria (75%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that bacterial isolates were highly diverse and most of which were found in other marine environment. Among the different species isolated, Vibrio was found abundant. Eventhough TTX was not detected (UPLC-MS/MS) in the isolates from this study, PCR screening identified some natural product biosynthesis genes (PKS and NRPS) involved in its assembly. Further PCR screening of the TTX producing two ATCC Vibrio sp. reveals that NRPS might be involved in the biosynthesis of TTX through the incorporation of arginine. PMID:27312988

  3. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Forbes, Valery E.; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity to the sediment-dwelling gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum. The influence of Cu added as CuCl2 (i.e., aqueous Cu treatment) was also examined. Exposure to sediment mixed with aqueous Cu or with different-shaped CuO NPs at an average measured exposure concentration of 207 μg Cu per g dry weight sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu was efficiently retained (i.e., elimination rate constants were generally not significantly different from zero). Consequently, snails are likely to concentrate Cu over time, from both aqueous and NP sources, resulting in a high potential for toxicity.

  4. Baseline trace metals in gastropod mollusks from the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego (Patagonia, Argentina).

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Stripeikis, Jorge; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz

    2012-05-01

    With the aim to evaluate the mollusk Nacella (P)magellanica as biomonitor of elemental pollution in seawater of the Beagle Channel, more than one hundred individuals of the gastropod were sampled, separated in viscera and muscle, and then examined with respect to the accumulation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. Collection was performed in seven strategic locations along 170 km of the coastal area of the Beagle Channel (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) in two campaigns during 2005 and 2007. Samples of surrounding seawater in the different sites were obtained and tested for the same metals as well. The accumulation capacity of Nacella (P)magellanica and thus its aptitude as biomonitor, was evaluated through the calculus of the preconcentration factors of the metals assayed. A discussion involving the comparison with other mollusks previously tested will be given. Several statistical approaches able to analyze data with environmental purposes were applied. Non parametric univariate tests such as Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney were carried out to assess the changes of the metal concentrations with time (2005 and 2007) in each location. Multivariate methods (linear discriminant analysis on PCA factors) were also applied to obtain a more reliable site classification. Johnson's probabilistic method was carried out for comparison between different geographical areas. The possibility of employing these results as heavy metals' background levels of seawater from the Beagle Channel will be debated. PMID:22350107

  5. Uptake and metabolism of dissolved amino acids by larvae and embryos of three gastropod species

    Dissolved organic matter is a potential nutritional resource for soft-bodied marine invertebrates. Experiments were done with developmental stages of three gastropod species to examine uptake kinetics and metabolism of dissolved amino acids. Free-swimming larvae of Crepidula fornicata and Thais-haemastoma were fed before experiments or starved for 48 hours before experiments to see whether nutritional state affected uptake of 14C-glycine of 14C-alanine. Time course of amino acid uptake was linear from 0-100 minutes for fed and starved larvae of both species. Uptake rates of starved T. haemastoma larvae were similar to or greater than rates for fed larvae, while uptake rates of starved C. fornicata larvae are similar to or less than rates for fed larvae. Starvation may enhance uptake by T. haemastoma larvae. 14CO2 was detected 10 minutes after larval exposure to labeled amino acids began, indicating rapid catabolism of amino acids. Label was found in protein extracted from larvae, indicating that absorbed glycine and alanine can be used for protein synthesis. A greater percent of glycine and alanine was converted to CO2 by starved larvae of both species. Encapsulated embryos of Nucella lapillus were used to study uptake and metabolism of amino acids because encapsulated embryos are in a bacteria-free environment. Uptake by embryos was linear from 10-90 minutes. Because capsules were bacteria-free embryos were the agents responsible for uptake and metabolism of labeled amino acids

  6. Autonomous changes in the swimming direction of sperm in the gastropod Strombus luhuanus.

    Shiba, Kogiku; Shibata, Daisuke; Inaba, Kazuo

    2014-03-15

    The sperm of the gastropod Strombus luhuanus show dimorphism. The eusperm have a nucleus and fertilize the egg, whereas the other type of sperm, parasperm, are anucleate and are thought to assist fertilization. Here we report the autonomous changes in the swimming pattern of S. luhuanus eusperm. In artificial seawater, the eusperm collected from S. luhuanus sperm ducts formed sperm bundles and initially swam backward with asymmetric flagellar waveforms to detach from the bundles. One hour later, the sperm began to swim forward and in a circle. After an additional 1 h incubation, the sperm swam straight, with a change in the flagellar waveforms from asymmetric to symmetric. Spontaneous backward swimming with symmetric waveforms was also observed. The eusperm stored in the female seminal receptacle were motile and showed forward symmetric swimming with spontaneous backward swimming, which appeared necessary for detachment from the wall of receptacle. All of these motility changes were observed in the absence of parasperm, suggesting that these changes autonomously occur in eusperm. Our waveform analysis of these swimming patterns revealed that only the swimming with symmetric waveform showed reverse propagation of the flagellar waveforms. Both types of backward swimming were diminished in Ca(2+)-free seawater and in seawater containing Ni(2+), indicating the regulation of swimming direction by Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction. PMID:24311809

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of hepatopancreatic phospholipase in gastropods mollusc, Littorina littorea and Buccinum undatum digestive cells

    Zarai Zied

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the digestive enzymes, phospholipase A2 (PLA2 hydrolyzes the essential dietary phospholipids in marine fish and shellfish. However, we know little about the organs that produce PLA2, and the ontogeny of the PLA2-cells. Accordingly, accurate localization of PLA2 in marine snails might afford a better understanding permitting the control of the quality and composition of diets and the mode of digestion of lipid food. Results We have previously producted an antiserum reacting specifically with mSDPLA2. It labeled zymogen granules of the hepatopancreatic acinar cells and the secretory materials of certain epithelial cells in the depths of epithelial crypts in the hepatopancreas of snail. To confirm this localization a laser capture microdissection was performed targeting stained cells of hepatopancreas tissue sections. A Western blot analysis revealed a strong signal at the expected size (30 kDa, probably corresponding to the PLA2. Conclusions The present results support the presence of two hepatopancreatic intracellular and extracellular PLA2 in the prosobranchs gastropods molluscs, Littorina littorea and Buccinum undatum and bring insights on their localizations.

  8. Heavy-tailed distributions in the intermittent motion behaviour of the intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea

    Seuront, Laurent; Duponchel, Anne-Charlotte; Chapperon, Coraline

    2007-11-01

    The two-dimensional motion behaviour of the common intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea is investigated as a function of the immersion time from three sampling sites on an exposed rocky shore. A total of 90 individuals have been individually marked and tracked over 14 consecutive daylight low tide. Successive displacements show very intermittent behaviour, with a few localised large displacements over a wide range of small displacements. We show that successive displacements are described by flight length l d heavy-tailed distributions with P(ld)∼ld-μ. The very low values of the exponent μ ( μ≈2.22, 2.43 and 2.67) indicate that L. littorea flights fall into the category of super-diffusive processes. These exponents were significantly higher than the special value μ≈2 analytically and theoretically predicted to be the most advantageous in optimising long-term encounter statistics, especially for low-prey-density scenario. As natural selection should favour flexible behaviour, leading to different optimum searching statistics, under different conditions, our results support the idea that the differences in food concentration and distribution encountered at the different sites by L. littorea led to different heavy-tailed distributions observed for the most extreme displacements.

  9. The relationship between sex change and reproductive success in a protandric marine gastropod.

    Brante, Antonio; Quiñones, Adriana; Silva, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Protandric species switch sex during their lifetime. According to theory, the time (body size) at which sex change occurs is determined by the reproductive success of individuals affected by social interactions as well as by post-copulatory factors. Experimental evidence is biased to few social systems making the exploration of general patterns difficult. We used the protandric marine gastropod Crepidula coquimbensis that partakes in intrabrood sibling cannibalism to test the following hypotheses: 1. Male-male competition for access to females and sibling cannibalism determine male reproductive success; 2. Males with greater access to females and with higher reproductive success will have reduced growth rates and will delay sex change. Artificial aggregations with different social structures were constructed and male reproductive success was estimated by paternity analysis. The results supported our expectations showing that male competitive ability for access to the female, time spent by males in the copulatory position, and sibling cannibalism affect reproductive success and influence time to sex change, with less successful males hastening sex change. Also, males that spent more time in the copulatory position had reduced growth rates. Comparing these results with those reported for other sequential hermaphrodites provides evidence supporting general patterns of sex change in nature. PMID:27385040

  10. Molluscan fauna from the Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat, India – Part 3. Gastropods

    Kantimati G Kulkarni; Satarupa Bhattacharjee Kapoor; Vidyadhar D Borkar

    2010-06-01

    Systematic description of 25 gastropod species from the Khari Nadi Formation (Aquitanian) and Chhasra Formation (Burdigalian) from the Kachchh District, Gujarat, India is given. A checklist of 116 forms including those reported by earlier researchers, emending taxonomic identifications wherever necessary, is also provided. Vredenburg had referred these two formations together as ‘the Gaj Beds of Kachchh’. He noticed the affinity of molluscs among the Miocene deposits of Kachchh and Kathiawar regions of Gujarat, and Sind province of Pakistan. He also observed that molluscs from his ‘Lower Gaj’ and ‘Upper Gaj’ Formations showed relationship respectively with the Rembang (Aquitanian) and Njalindung (Burdigalian) series of the East Indies. Aquitanian and Burdigalian ages assigned by him were later substantiated by Raju on the basis of foraminifera. Present studies corroborated that the molluscan assemblage from the Miocene rocks of Kachchh is closely related to that from the Gaj Beds of Sind and the Ashapura Clay Member of Kathiawar; besides revealing that the fauna from these three formations taken together is essentially endemic. Discovery of certain species from the Quilon Beds in the Miocene of Kachchh evinces a close affinity between these two formations. The present fauna includes five extant forms, while 29 forms have related species in the Recent fauna.

  11. Intracapsular development and dispersal polymorphism in the predatory gastropod Ocenebra erinaceus (Linnaeus 1758)

    Smith, Kathryn E.; Reed, Adam J.; Thatje, Sven

    2015-09-01

    Intraspecific polymorphism during development, such as poecilogony or dispersal polymorphism, has rarely been observed in the marine environment. The ecological advantages of this bet-hedging strategy, whereby the offspring from one species exhibit multiple developmental modes, include the potential for rapid colonization of new habitats while simultaneously achieving a degree of gene flow between populations. The muricid gastropod, Ocenebra erinaceus, is a common, shallow-water marine predator found across England and France. Historically, O. erinaceus caused significant damage to shellfisheries, but more recently it has been impacted by TBT-induced imposex. Despite the previous attention given to this species, little is known about its encapsulated development. Studying O. erinaceus egg capsules from the Solent, UK, we describe intracapsular development at 15 °C, the in situ temperature at time of oviposition. Within each capsule, all embryos developed; no nurse eggs were present. Development was categorized into eight ontogenetic stages, although not all individuals displayed every stage; embryos hatched as either swimming late-pediveliger larvae or crawling juveniles after 59-69 days, indicating dispersal polymorphism to occur in this species. Swimming late-pediveliger larvae completed metamorphosis within 72 h of hatching. As O. erinaceus continues to recover from TBT pollution, dispersal polymorphism may facilitate a rapid expansion in both population size and range. If this occurs, O. erinaceus has the potential to, once again, become a serious problem for shellfisheries around Europe.

  12. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A.

    2016-02-03

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  13. Phylogenomics supports Panpulmonata: opisthobranch paraphyly and key evolutionary steps in a major radiation of gastropod molluscs.

    Kocot, Kevin M; Halanych, Kenneth M; Krug, Patrick J

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonates, with over 30,000 described species, represent the largest radiation of non-marine animals outside of Arthropoda. The pulmonate lung was a key evolutionary innovation enabling diversification of terrestrial and freshwater snails and slugs. However, recent studies drew conflicting conclusions about pulmonate monophyly, and support for a sister group is lacking, hindering our understanding of this major animal radiation. Analyses of mitochondrial protein-coding genes recovered a paraphyletic Pulmonata grading into a monophyletic Opisthobranchia, a traditional group of sea slugs long considered sister to pulmonates. Conversely, analyses of datsets dominated by nuclear rDNA indicated Opisthobranchia is paraphyletic with respect to Pulmonata. No study resolved the placement of two key taxa: Sacoglossa, an opisthobranch group including photosynthetic sea slugs, and Siphonarioidea, intertidal limpet-like snails traditionally in Pulmonata. To examine evolutionary relationships at the base of the pulmonate radiation, we performed a phylogenomic analysis of 102 nuclear protein-coding gene regions for 19 gastropods. Opisthobranchia was recovered as paraphyletic with respect to Panpulmonata, a clade in which Sacoglossa was sister to Pulmonata, with Siphonarioidea as the basal pulmonate lineage. Siphonarioideans share a similar gill structure with shelled sacoglossans but lack the contractile pneumostome of pulmonates, suggesting descent from an evolutionary intermediate that facilitated the pulmonate radiation into non-marine habitats. PMID:23850501

  14. Details of gastropod phylogeny inferred from 18S rRNA sequences.

    Winnepenninckx, B; Steiner, G; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1998-02-01

    Some generally accepted viewpoints on the phylogenetic relationships within the molluscan class Gastropoda are reassessed by comparing complete 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. The previously suggested basal position of Archaeogastropoda, including Neritimorpha and Vetigastropoda, in the gastropod clade is confirmed. The present study also provides new molecular evidence for the monophyly of both Caenogastropoda and Euthyneura (Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia), making Prosobranchia paraphyletic. The relationships within Caenogastropoda and Euthyneura data turn out to be very unstable on the basis of the present 18S rRNA sequences. The present 18S rRNA data question, but are insufficient to decide on, muricacean (Neogastropoda), neotaenioglossan, pulmonate, or stylommatophoran monophyly. The analyses also focus on two systellommatophoran families, namely, Veronicellidae and Onchidiidae. It is suggested that Systellommatophora are not a monophyletic unit but, due to the lack of stability in the euthyneuran clade, their affinity to either Opisthobranchia or Pulmonata could not be determined. PMID:9479694

  15. The adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity in two ecotypes of a marine gastropod

    Butlin Roger K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few surveys have concentrated on studying the adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity within genetically-distinct conspecific ecotypes. Here, we conduct a test to assess the adaptive value that partial phenotypic plasticity may have for survival in the marine gastropod Littorina saxatilis. This species has evolved canalized ecotypes but, nevertheless, the ecotypes show some phenotypic plasticity for the traits under divergent selection between wave-exposed and high-predation habitats. Results We exposed juveniles of each ecotype to several environmental treatments under laboratory conditions in order to produce shape variation associated with plasticity. The two ecotypes from different treatments were then transplanted to the wave-exposed habitat and the survival rate was monitored. Ecotype explained the largest distinction in survival rate while treatment caused variation in survival rate within the ecotype released into its parental habitat which was correlated with plastic changes in shell shape. Snails that had experienced a treatment mimicking the environment of the transplantation location survived with the highest rate, while individuals from the contrary experimental treatment had lower survivorship. Conclusions We conclude that the partial plastic response shown in Littorina saxatilis has a significant impact on fitness, although this remains small compared to the overall adaptive difference between ecotypes.

  16. Reconstruction of Regional Environments in the Caribbean During the Neogene Using Gastropod Stable Isotope Profiles

    Robbins, J. A.; Grossman, E. L.; O'Dea, A.; Tao, K.

    2011-12-01

    The closure of the Central American Isthmus (CAI) ca. 3.8-3.6 Ma triggered changes in nearshore environments in the Caribbean, causing changes in marine annual range of temperature (MART), carbonate deposition, and the benthic ecosystem. The associated extinction event began ca. 3-2 Ma, peaking between 2-1 Ma. More than two dozen "faunules", discreet packages of fauna which lived under similar environmental conditions, represent time just prior to, during, and after the uplift of the CAI. Multiple parameters including the amount and types of fauna present in each faunule have been used to estimate factors such as paleodepth, MART, extinction rates, and changes in ecological structure over time. Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses (δ18O and δ13C) of gastropod shells serially-sampled about the spire provide records of seasonal environmental conditions. In the tropics, gastropods that live under conditions of strong seasonal upwelling and freshwater input have a greater range of δ18O values in their profiles compared to those animals that live in non-upwelling waters with little freshwater input. Low δ13C values often represent the isotopically low terrestrial carbon found in river runoff, and may be coupled with low δ18O values during seasonal freshening of marine waters. Preliminary data from Strombus shells representing four faunules ranging in age from before the rise of the isthmus through its completion demonstrate the effectiveness of using these mollusks to study ancient tropical environments. Rio Limoncito (~3 Ma), which is believed to represent water depths of 20-40m based on foraminiferal assemblage, yielded the lowest δ18O values (-0.6±0.4%, representing the warmest temperatures/lowest salinities). The samples from Pueblo Nuevo (~1.6 Ma), with an estimated paleodepth between 50 and 100m, had an average value of 0.4±0.3% and therefore represent cooler waters/higher salinity. A shell from NE Escudo de Veraguas (~3.55 Ma) shows a shift from essentially

  17. Size-dependent concentrations of trace metals in four Mediterranean gastropods.

    Cubadda, F; Conti, M E; Campanella, L

    2001-11-01

    In order to gain more information on the possible use of four gastropod species as metal biomonitors for the Mediterranean area, the influence of body weight upon Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations was studied in specimens collected at locations with different degrees of environmental pollution. The selected species were the marine snails Monodonta turbinata Born and Monodonta mutabilis Philippi, and the limpets Patella caerulea L. and Patella lusitanica Gmelin. Significant differences between metal concentrations in individuals from different stations were tested by ANCOVA on log-transformed data with log body weight as covariate. For all species a positive correlation between metal concentrations and body weight was observed, which means that the largest individuals contained the highest levels of metals. The inclusion of body weight as covariate in the statistical analysis explained from 81% to 99% of the metal variability within the organisms and enabled the achievement of improvements in the detection of differences among sites. The four selected species provided a rather univocal picture of bioavailable metal loads at the different stations of the experimental area. Except for Cd, the metal concentrations recorded at the clean stations were found to lie in the range of the lowest values reported in the literature and can be employed as useful background levels which can be referred to for intraspecific comparison within the Mediterranean area. It is concluded that in view of its distribution, unambiguous identification, resistance to pollution and accumulation patterns M. turbinata has considerable potential as a biomonitor of trace metals over the Mediterranean. PMID:11680752

  18. Phenotypic differentiation of the Red Sea gastropods in response to the environmental deterioration: Geometric morphometric approach

    Abdelhady, Ahmed Awad

    2016-03-01

    The negative impacts of degradation in the coastal zone of the Red Sea are becoming well known in upper portions of the trophic web (e.g., humans and fish), but are less well known among the benthic primary consumers. In addition, the degree to which heavy metals are entering the trophic web can be better-quantified using macrobenthos. Two-gastropod genera encompassing Echinolittorina subnodosa and Planaxis sulcatus from three different localities on the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea were examined in order to deduce the impact of environmental deterioration on the morphology of shells. The examined sites include clean pristine, slightly polluted, and markedly polluted rocky shores. Phosphate/lead industry is the main source of pollution in this zone. Because landmarks on the rugose Echinolittorina are difficult to define and to ensure finer resolution of the analyses, a newly 'grid-based' landmarks was implemented. Both Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) were particularly capable to capture and terrace the minor morphological variations accurately. Two phenotypes portioned among the environmentally different populations were recognized and interpreted as ecotypes with many intermediate forms. The first ecotype has a higher spire and smaller aperture and dominating the pristine site North of Marsa Alam, whereas the second ecotype has a globular shell shape with big aperture and dominating the markedly polluted site. The intermediate forms dominating the slightly polluted site. The shape differences are interpreted as an adaptive differentiation to different metal concentrations. As the morphological variation between the two-ecotypes of both taxa is still minors, and both ecotypes occur together with many intermediate forms, the phenotypic divergence stage has not yet accomplished. The gradational shape change among the investigated populations was positively correlated with index of Pollution (IP). As the human activities were the main

  19. Conus: first comprehensive conservation red list assessment of a marine gastropod mollusc genus.

    Howard Peters

    Full Text Available Marine molluscs represent an estimated 23% of all extant marine taxa, but research into their conservation status has so far failed to reflect this importance, with minimal inclusion on the authoritative Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN. We assessed the status of all 632 valid species of the tropical marine gastropod mollusc, Conus (cone snails, using Red List standards and procedures to lay the groundwork for future decadal monitoring, one of the first fully comprehensive global assessments of a marine taxon. Three-quarters (75.6% of species were not currently considered at risk of extinction owing to their wide distribution and perceived abundance. However, 6.5% were considered threatened with extinction with a further 4.1% near threatened. Data deficiency prevented 13.8% of species from being categorised although they also possess characteristics that signal concern. Where hotspots of endemism occur, most notably in the Eastern Atlantic, 42.9% of the 98 species from that biogeographical region were classified as threatened or near threatened with extinction. All 14 species included in the highest categories of Critically Endangered and Endangered are endemic to either Cape Verde or Senegal, with each of the three Critically Endangered species restricted to single islands in Cape Verde. Threats to all these species are driven by habitat loss and anthropogenic disturbance, in particular from urban pollution, tourism and coastal development. Our findings show that levels of extinction risk to which cone snails are exposed are of a similar magnitude to those seen in many fully assessed terrestrial taxa. The widely held view that marine species are less at risk is not upheld.

  20. The neuronal basis of feeding in the snail, Helisoma, with comparisons to selected gastropods.

    Murphy, A D

    2001-03-01

    Research on identified neurons during the last quarter century was forecast at a conference in 1973 that discussed "neuronal mechanisms of coordination in simple systems." The focus of the conference was on the neuronal control of simple stereotyped behavioral acts. Participants discussing the future of such research called for a comparative approach; emphasis on structure-function interactions; attention to environmental and behavioral context; and the development of new techniques. Significantly, in some cases amazing progress has been made in these areas. Major conclusions of the last quarter century are that so-called simple behaviors and the neural circuitry underlying them tend to be less simple, more flexible, and more highly modulated than originally imagined. However, the comparative approach has, as yet, failed to reach its potential. Molluscan preparations, along with arthropods and annelids, have always been at the forefront of neuroethological studies. Circuitry underlying feeding has been studied in a handful of species of gastropod molluscs. These studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of sensorimotor organization, the hierarchical control of behavior and coordination of multiple behaviors, and the organization and modulation of central pattern generators. However, direct interspecific comparisons of feeding circuitry and potentially homologous neurons have been lacking. This is unfortunate because much of the vast radiation of the class Gastropoda is associated with variations in feeding behaviors and feeding apparatuses, providing ample substrates for comparative studies including the evolution of defined circuitry. Here, the neural organization of feeding in the snail, Helisoma, is examined critically. Possible direct interspecific comparisons of neural circuitry and potentially homologous neurons are made. A universal model for central pattern generators underlying rasping feeding is proposed. Future comparative studies can

  1. Gastropod diversification and community structuring processes in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-09-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most speciose freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether the diversification of its endemic taxa is mainly driven by neutral processes, environmental factors, or species interactions. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics. Such a unifying framework - the metacommunity speciation model - considers how community assembly affects diversification and vice versa by assessing the relative contribution of the three main community assembly processes, dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, and species interaction. The current study therefore used the species-rich model taxon Gastropoda to assess how extant communities in Lake Ohrid are structured by performing process based metacommunity analyses. Specifically, the study aimed at (i) identifying the relative importance of the three community assembly processes and (ii) to test whether the importance of these individual processes changes gradually with lake depth or whether they are distinctively related to eco-zones. Based on specific simulation steps for each of the three processes, it could be demonstrated that dispersal limitation had the strongest influence on gastropod community structures in Lake Ohrid. However, it was not the exclusive assembly process but acted together with the other two processes - environmental filtering, and species interaction. In fact, the relative importance of the three community assembly processes varied both with lake depth and eco-zones, though the processes were better predicted by the latter. The study thus corroborated the high importance of dispersal limitation for both maintaining species richness in Lake Ohrid (through its impact on community structure) and generating endemic biodiversity (via its influence on diversification processes). However, according to the metacommunity speciation model, the inferred importance of environmental

  2. Symbiotic association between symbiodinium and the gastropod Strombus gigas: larval acquisition of symbionts.

    García Ramos, Maribel; Banaszak, Anastazia T

    2014-04-01

    The importance of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. was studied in the early life stages of the gastropod Strombus gigas. This dinoflagellate was not found in the eggs or the gelatinous mass surrounding the eggs of the mollusk; therefore, Symbiodinium is not inherited directly. To determine whether the planktonic veligers can acquire these algae from the environment, they were exposed to freshly isolated Symbiodinium from adult S. gigas (homologous). The optimal stage for Symbiodinium inoculation was found at 48 h post-hatching. Survival and growth rates of veligers and juveniles were higher when inoculated with freshly isolated Symbiodinium in conjunction with daily feeding of Isochrysis spp. Veligers inoculated with Symbiodinium freshly isolated from three host species elicited distinct responses: (1) veligers did not take up Symbiodinium isolated from the hydrozoan Millepora alcicornis suggesting that there is discrimination on contact prior to ingestion, (2) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from the anemone Bartholomea annulata, but the algae did not persist in the host tissue suggesting that selection against this type took place after ingestion or that the algae did not divide in the host, and (3) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from Pterogorgia anceps where it persisted and was associated with metamorphosis of the larvae. In contrast, the Symbiodinium freshly isolated from S. gigas were not associated with metamorphosis and required an inducer such as the red alga Laurencia poitei. These data present a significant advancement for the establishment of a new approach in the aquaculture of this important but declining Caribbean species. PMID:24037186

  3. De novo transcriptome assembly of the marine gastropod Reishia clavigera for supporting toxic mechanism studies.

    Ip, Jack C H; Leung, Priscilla T Y; Ho, Kevin K Y; Qiu, J W; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2016-09-01

    The intertidal whelk Reishia clavigera is commonly used as a biomonitor of chemical contamination in the marine environment along Western Pacific region, and as a model for mechanistic studies of organotin-mediated imposex development. However, limited genomic resources of R. clavigera have restricted its role for the investigation of molecular mechanisms of such endocrine disruptions. This study, therefore, aimed to establish tissue-specific transcriptomes of the digestive gland, gonad, head ganglia, penis and the remaining body part of the male and female R. clavigera. By combining the results, a global transcriptome was obtained. A total of 578,134,720 high-quality filtered reads were obtained using Illumina sequencing. The R. clavigera transcriptome comprised of 38,466 transcripts and 32,798 unigenes with predicted open reading frames. The average length of transcripts was 1,709bp with N50 of 2,236bp. Based on sequence similarity searches against public databases, 28,657 transcripts and 24,403 unigenes had at least one BLAST hit. There were 17,530 transcripts and 14,897 unigenes annotated with at least one Gene Ontology (GO) term. Moreover, 5,776 transcripts and 5,137 unigenes were associated with 333 Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The numbers of unigenes were similar among the five target tissues and between sexes, but tissue-specific expression profiles were revealed by multivariate analyses. Based on the functional annotation, putative steroid hormone-associated unigenes were identified. In particular, we highlighted the presence of steroid hormone receptor homologues that could be the targets for mechanistic studies of the organotin-mediated imposex development in marine gastropods. This newly generated transcriptome assembly of R. clavigera provides a valuable molecular resource for ecotoxicological and environmental genomic studies. PMID:27450239

  4. Ecophenotypic plasticity leads to extraordinary gastropod shells found on the "Roof of the World".

    Clewing, Catharina; Riedel, Frank; Wilke, Thomas; Albrecht, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The often extraordinary shell forms and shapes of gastropods found in palaeolakes, such as the highly diverse Gyraulus fauna of the famous Steinheim Basin, have been puzzling evolutionary biologists for centuries, and there is an ongoing debate whether these aberrant shell forms are indicative of true species (or subspecies) or ecophenotypic morphs. Interestingly, one of the Steinheim Gyraulus morphs - a corkscrew-like open-coiled shell - has a recent analogue in the Lake Bangong drainage system on the western Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, a combination of morphological, molecular, palaeolimnological, and ecological analyses was used in this study to assess whether the extraordinary shell shape in Gyraulus sp. from this drainage system represents a (young) ecophenotypic phenomenon or if it has been genetically fixed over an extended period of time. Our morphological, ecological, and palaeolimnological data suggest that the corkscrew-like specimens remain restricted to a small pond near Lake Bangong with an elevated pH value and that the colonization may have occurred recently. The phylogenetic reconstruction based on two gene fragments shows that these nonplanispiral specimens cluster within the previous described Tibetan Plateau Gyraulus clade N2. A network analysis indicates that some haplotypes are even shared by planispiral and nonplanispiral specimens. Given the ephemerality of the phenomenon, the compact network patterns inferred, the likely young phylogenetic age of the aberrant Gyraulus shells studied, and the ecological peculiarities of the study site, we suggest that the evolution of the aberrant shell forms on the Tibetan Plateau could likely be considered as a rapid ecophenotypic response, possibly induced by ecological stress. This finding may thus have implications for the ongoing debate about the processes that have caused the extraordinary shell diversity in palaeolakes such as the Steinheim Basin. PMID:26306180

  5. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade.

    Ng, Ting Hui; Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C J

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity-59 species-of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future monitoring

  6. Surveys of arthropod and gastropod diversity in the geothermal resource subzones, Puna, Hawaii

    Miller, S.E.; Burgett, J.; Bruegmann, M.

    1995-04-01

    The invertebrate surveys reported here were carried out as part of ecological studies funded by the Department of Energy in support of their environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Hawaii Geothermal Project. Currently, preparation of the EIS has been suspended, and all supporting information is being archived and made available to the public. The invertebrate surveys reported here assessed diversity and abundance of the arthropod and gastropod fauna in forested habitat and lava tubes in or near the three geothermal resource subzones. Recommendations for conservation of these organisms are given in this report. Surveys were conducted along three 100-m transect lines at each of the six forested locations. Malaise traps, baited pitfall traps, yellow pan traps, baited sponge lures, and visual examination of vegetation were used to assess invertebrate diversity along each transect line. Three of these locations were adjacent to roads, and three were adjacent to lava flows. Two of these lava-forest locations (Keauohana Forest Reserve and Pu`u O`o) were relatively remote from direct human impacts. The third location (Southeast Kula) was near a low-density residential area. Two lava tubes were surveyed. The forest over one of these tubes (Keokea tube) had recently been burned away. This tube was used to assess the effects of loss of forest habitat on the subterranean fauna. An undisturbed tube (Pahoa tube) was used as a control. Recommendations offered in this report direct geothermal development away from areas of high endemic diversity and abundance, and toward areas where natural Hawaiian biotic communities have already been greatly disturbed. These disturbed areas are mainly found in the lower half of the Kamaili (middle) geothermal subzone and throughout most of the Kapoho (lower) geothermal subzone. These recommendation may also generally apply to other development projects in the Puna District.

  7. Bioaccumulation of microcystins in two freshwater gastropods from a cyanobacteria-bloom plateau lake, Lake Dianchi

    To investigate the bioaccumulation patterns of microcystins (MCs) in organs of two gastropods, samples were collected in Lake Dianchi monthly from May to October, 2008, when cyanobacteria typically bloom. The average MCs concentrations for Radix swinhoei (pulmonate) and Margarya melanioides (prosobranch) tended to be similar for the different organs: the highest values in the hepatopancreas (9.33 by 3.74 μg/g DW), followed by digestive tracts (1.66 by 3.03 μg/g DW), gonads (0.45 by 1.34 μg/g DW) and muscles (0.22 by 0.40 μg/g DW). Pulmonate had higher value than prosobranch because of the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. The levels in organs of R. swinhoei were correlated with environmentally dissolved MCs, but influenced by intracellular MCs for M. melanioides. The estimated MCs concentrations in edible parts of M. melanioides were beyond the WHO’s provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg/kg), suggesting the risk of consumption of M. melanioides from the lake. Highlights: ► We probe bioaccumulated patterns of microcystins in organs of pulmonate and prosobranch. ► The highest microcystins in hepatopancreas for both snails. ► The higher microcystins for pulmonate results from the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. ► Environmentally dissolved microcystins are the main sources for pulmonate, but intracellular for prosobranch. ► Suggesting the risk of consumption snails in the studying regions. - Higher bioaccumulation MCs level for pulmonate mainly contributed to the stronger bioaccumulation ability in its hepatopancreas.

  8. Haematopoiesis in molluscs: A review of haemocyte development and function in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves.

    Pila, E A; Sullivan, J T; Wu, X Z; Fang, J; Rudko, S P; Gordy, M A; Hanington, P C

    2016-05-01

    Haematopoiesis is a process that is responsible for generating sufficient numbers of blood cells in the circulation and in tissues. It is central to maintenance of homeostasis within an animal, and is critical for defense against infection. While haematopoiesis is common to all animals possessing a circulatory system, the specific mechanisms and ultimate products of haematopoietic events vary greatly. Our understanding of this process in non-vertebrate organisms is primarily derived from those species that serve as developmental and immunological models, with sparse investigations having been carried out in other organisms spanning the metazoa. As research into the regulation of immune and blood cell development advances, we have begun to gain insight into haematopoietic events in a wider array of animals, including the molluscs. What began in the early 1900's as observational studies on the morphological characteristics of circulating immune cells has now advanced to mechanistic investigations of the cytokines, growth factors, receptors, signalling pathways, and patterns of gene expression that regulate molluscan haemocyte development. Emerging is a picture of an incredible diversity of developmental processes and outcomes that parallels the biological diversity observed within the different classes of the phylum Mollusca. However, our understanding of haematopoiesis in molluscs stems primarily from the three most-studied classes, the Gastropoda, Cephalopoda and Bivalvia. While these represent perhaps the molluscs of greatest economic and medical importance, the fact that our information is limited to only 3 of the 9 extant classes in the phylum highlights the need for further investigation in this area. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that defines haematopoiesis and its products in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves. PMID:26592965

  9. Cenozoic climate change and diversification on the continental shelf and slope: evolution of gastropod diversity in the family Solariellidae (Trochoidea).

    Williams, S T; Smith, L M; Herbert, D G; Marshall, B A; Warén, A; Kiel, S; Dyal, P; Linse, K; Vilvens, C; Kano, Y

    2013-04-01

    Recent expeditions have revealed high levels of biodiversity in the tropical deep-sea, yet little is known about the age or origin of this biodiversity, and large-scale molecular studies are still few in number. In this study, we had access to the largest number of solariellid gastropods ever collected for molecular studies, including many rare and unusual taxa. We used a Bayesian chronogram of these deep-sea gastropods (1) to test the hypothesis that deep-water communities arose onshore, (2) to determine whether Antarctica acted as a source of diversity for deep-water communities elsewhere and (3) to determine how factors like global climate change have affected evolution on the continental slope. We show that although fossil data suggest that solariellid gastropods likely arose in a shallow, tropical environment, interpretation of the molecular data is equivocal with respect to the origin of the group. On the other hand, the molecular data clearly show that Antarctic species sampled represent a recent invasion, rather than a relictual ancestral lineage. We also show that an abrupt period of global warming during the Palaeocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) leaves no molecular record of change in diversification rate in solariellids and that the group radiated before the PETM. Conversely, there is a substantial, although not significant increase in the rate of diversification of a major clade approximately 33.7 Mya, coinciding with a period of global cooling at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Increased nutrients made available by contemporaneous changes to erosion, ocean circulation, tectonic events and upwelling may explain increased diversification, suggesting that food availability may have been a factor limiting exploitation of deep-sea habitats. Tectonic events that shaped diversification in reef-associated taxa and deep-water squat lobsters in central Indo-West Pacific were also probably important in the evolution of solariellids during the Oligo

  10. Chromosome aberration and hematological rates of gastropod snail (Lymnaea stagnalis L.) in water bodies of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone

    The radiation dose, as well as the chromosome aberration rate and a change of the hemolymph structure of the gastropod snail (Lymnaea stagnalis L.) in water bodies within the Chernobyl NPP exclusion Zone during 1998-2007, is evaluated. The absorbed dose is registered in range 0.3-85.0 μGy/h. In closed water bodies, the high rate of chromosome aberration in embryo tissues (up to 27%) and essential changes of hematological rates of adult molluscs in comparison with those in control water bodies are determined.

  11. Convergence Caused Confusion: On the Systematics Of the Freshwater Gastropod Sulcospira pisum (Brot, 1868) (Cerithioidea, Pachychilidae)

    Koehler, Frank; Brinkmann, Nora; Glaubrecht, Matthias

    the family. It is tentatively placed within the genus Sulcospira, which is endemic to Java. We assume that a similar shell shape has evolved in both species of not closely related gastropods through convergence, which once more reveals that purely shell-based classifications are particularly...... present evidence that "Melania" pisum is not a thiarid species closely related to Balanocochlis glans (Busch, 1842), as has been supposed with respect to the very similar shells of both species. The species is transferred to the family Pachychilidae, because it shows various typical character states for...

  12. Ecosystem engineering potential of the gastropod Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767) in mangrove wastewater wetlands - A controlled mesocosm experiment

    Penha-Lopes, Gil, E-mail: gil.penha-lopes@biology-research.co [Centro de Oceanografia - Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Na, Senhora do Cabo 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal); Department of Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Bartolini, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via Romana 17, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Limbu, Samwel [University of Dar es Salaam, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries, P.O. Box 35064, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Cannicci, Stefano [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via Romana 17, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Mgaya, Yunus [University of Dar es Salaam, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries, P.O. Box 35064, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Kristensen, Erik [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Paula, Jose [Centro de Oceanografia - Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Na, Senhora do Cabo 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal)

    2010-01-15

    The effect of different sewage concentrations (0, 20, 60 and 100%), vegetation (Bare, Avicennia marina or Rhizophora mucronata) and immersion periods (immersion/emersion period of 12/12 h or 3/3 days just for 100%) conditions were studied for 6 months on survival and growth rates of Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767). Gastropods' activity and ecosystem engineering preformed at bare and A. marina planted cells and 3 sewage conditions (0, 20 and 60%) were determined. Survival rates were higher than 70% in all treatments. Growth rate decreased significantly with increasing sewage concentrations (mainly at unplanted conditions) and longer immersion periods. A complete shift (from immersion to emersion periods) and a significant decrease in mobility and consequently its engineer potential, due to sewage contamination, lead to a 3-4 fold decrease in the amount of sediment disturbed. Sewage contamination, primary producers' abundance and environmental conditions may have influenced the gastropods survival, growth and its ecosystem engineering potential. - Terebralia palustris high ecosystem engineering potential in constructed mangrove wetlands.

  13. Ecosystem engineering potential of the gastropod Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767) in mangrove wastewater wetlands - A controlled mesocosm experiment

    The effect of different sewage concentrations (0, 20, 60 and 100%), vegetation (Bare, Avicennia marina or Rhizophora mucronata) and immersion periods (immersion/emersion period of 12/12 h or 3/3 days just for 100%) conditions were studied for 6 months on survival and growth rates of Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767). Gastropods' activity and ecosystem engineering preformed at bare and A. marina planted cells and 3 sewage conditions (0, 20 and 60%) were determined. Survival rates were higher than 70% in all treatments. Growth rate decreased significantly with increasing sewage concentrations (mainly at unplanted conditions) and longer immersion periods. A complete shift (from immersion to emersion periods) and a significant decrease in mobility and consequently its engineer potential, due to sewage contamination, lead to a 3-4 fold decrease in the amount of sediment disturbed. Sewage contamination, primary producers' abundance and environmental conditions may have influenced the gastropods survival, growth and its ecosystem engineering potential. - Terebralia palustris high ecosystem engineering potential in constructed mangrove wetlands.

  14. Gastropod diversification and community structuring processes in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    T. Hauffe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most speciose freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether the diversification of its endemic taxa is mainly driven by neutral processes, environmental factors, or species interactions. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics. Such a unifying framework – the metacommunity speciation model – considers how community assembly affects diversification and vice versa by assessing the relative contribution of the three main community assembly processes, dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, and species interaction. The current study therefore used the species-rich model taxon Gastropoda to assess how extant communities in Lake Ohrid are structured by performing process based metacommunity analyses. Specifically, the study aimed at (i identifying the relative importance of the three community assembly processes and (ii to test whether the importance of these individual processes changes gradually with lake depth or whether they are distinctively related to eco-zones. Based on specific simulation steps for each of the three processes, it could be demonstrated that dispersal limitation had the strongest influence on gastropod community structures in Lake Ohrid. However, it was not the exclusive assembly process but acted together with the other two processes – environmental filtering, and species interaction. In fact, the relative importance of the three community assembly processes varied both with lake depth and eco-zones, though the processes were better predicted by the latter. The study thus corroborated the high importance of dispersal limitation for both maintaining species richness in Lake Ohrid (through its impact on community structure and generating endemic biodiversity (via its influence on diversification processes. However, according to the metacommunity speciation model, the inferred importance of

  15. Environmental and developmental controls of morphological diversity in a thermal spring gastropod from Coahuila, Mexico

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Tang, C. M.

    2001-12-01

    Isolated thermal springs and associated aquatic environments near Cuatro Ciénegas, in north-central Mexico provide an opportunity to study patterns of evolutionary diversification under extreme conditions. Significant differences in temperature, seasonality, pH, and salinities among other variables may allow for high levels of differentiation and endemism. Biological studies of the unique faunas in this type of environment may serve as analogues for extreme and/or evaporitic environments as targeted by astrobiological research. The endemic hydrobiid gastropod \\textit{Mexipyrgus} is widely distributed in a variety of aquatic environments within the Cuatro Cienégas basin. Original description of this genus by Taylor listed six distinct species reflecting shell and anatomical features. Later revision by Hershler suggests that this diversity be reduced to one single, highly-variable species, based mainly on the morphology of reproductive structures. The systematic conflict emphasizes the need to understand the bases of morphological variation at small scales and in environmentally unusual settings. Shells of \\textit{Mexipyrgus} were collected from six localities and the following species were identified based on Taylor's classification: \\textit{M. carranzae}, \\textit{M. escobedae}, \\textit{M. multilineatus}, and specimens intermediate in character between \\textit{M. carranzae}, \\textit{M. lugoi} and \\textit{M. mojarralis}. All specimens consisted of 4-6 whorls. Shell shape was archived by the digitization of geometrically homologous landmarks on the spire (apex, whorl sutures in apertural view) and aperture. Shell size was calculated as Centroid Size. Data were analyzed using uniform and principal warp analysis of raw landmark coordinates, followed by relative warp analysis of uniform and partial warp scores. Three separate analyses were performed for 4, 5 and 6 whorled specimens. Results indicate two different levels of variation based on individual age

  16. Flying high: on the airborne dispersal of aquatic organisms as illustrated by the distribution histories of the gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius

    Wesselingh, F.P.; Cadée, G.C.; Renema, W.

    1999-01-01

    The actual and fossil distribution patterns of the aquatic gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius indicate that avian dispersal was an important dispersal mechanism in the geological past. Combining the distribution histories of these genera with ecological data on modern relatives provides insig

  17. A study on the diversity of gastropods in Hormuz Island with first record of two species from the Iranian coast of the Persian Gulf

    Nabiallah Kheirabadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the diversity of gastropod species in the intertidal zone of Hormuz Island in the Persian Gulf. Seasonal sampling was conducted in 7 selected sites by throwing nine random quadrates (0.5×0.5 m in each site. Samples of each site were separately transferred to the laboratory and identified by the standard keys and verified by the Conchology Museum of Tokyo University of Science. Forty -nine gastropod species were identified, from which 2 species, Turicula nelliae and Linatella caudata were recorded for the first time from the Iranian coast of the Persian Gulf. The highest number of gastropods in one site was 28 species in site 1 (East of Marine Research Center, Also highest number of gastropods in one season was 35 species in winter and lowest number was in 28 species in summer. Simpson dominance index, Shannon-Wiener species diversity index, Margalef richness index and evenness index were calculated in the different sites and results showed that site 1 contained the most amount of the Shannon-Wiener and Margalef indices and site 6 (West of Island contained the most amount of the Simpson index. Also, site 3 (Mangrove forest showed the lowest amount of the Simpson, Shannon-Wiener and Margalef indices, while maximum amount of evenness index occurred in this site.

  18. A baseline measure of tree and gastropod biodiversity in replanted and natural mangrove stands in malaysia: langkawi island and sungai merbok.

    Hookham, Brenda; Shau-Hwai, Aileen Tan; Dayrat, Benoit; Hintz, William

    2014-08-01

    THE DIVERSITIES OF MANGROVE TREES AND OF THEIR ASSOCIATED GASTROPODS WERE ASSESSED FOR TWO MANGROVE REGIONS ON THE WEST COAST OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA: Langkawi Island and Sungai Merbok. The mangrove area sampled on Langkawi Island was recently logged and replanted, whereas the area sampled in Sungai Merbok was part of a protected nature reserve. Mangrove and gastropod diversity were assessed in four 50 m(2) (10 × 5 m) sites per region. The species richness (S), Shannon Index (H') and Evenness Index (J') were calculated for each site, and the mean S, H' and J' values were calculated for each region. We report low tree and gastropod S, H' and J' values in all sites from both regions. For Langkawi Island, the mean S, H' and J' values for mangrove trees were S = 2.00±0, H' = 0.44±0.17 and J' = 0.44±0.17; the mean S, H' and J' values for gastropods were S = 4.00±1.63, H' = 0.96±0.41 and J' = 0.49±0.06. In Sungai Merbok, the mean S, H' and J' values for mangrove trees were S = 1.33±0.58, H' = 0.22±0.39 and J' = 0.22 ±0.39; the mean S, H' and J' values for gastropods were S = 4.75±2.22, H' = 1.23±0.63 and J' = 0.55±0.12. This study emphasises the need for baseline biodiversity measures to be established in mangrove ecosystems to track the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances and to inform management and restoration efforts. PMID:25210584

  19. Assembly processes of gastropod community change with horizontal and vertical zonation in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    Hauffe, Torsten; Albrecht, Christian; Wilke, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most diverse freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether species community composition, as well as the diversification of its endemic taxa, is mainly driven by dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, or species interaction. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics, as provided by the unifying framework of the "metacommunity speciation model".The current study used the species-rich model taxon Gastropoda to assess how extant communities in Lake Ohrid are structured by performing process-based metacommunity analyses. Specifically, the study aimed (1) to identifying the relative importance of the three community assembly processes and (2) to test whether the importance of these individual processes changes gradually with lake depth or discontinuously with eco-zone shifts.Based on automated eco-zone detection and process-specific simulation steps, we demonstrated that dispersal limitation had the strongest influence on gastropod community composition. However, it was not the exclusive assembly process, but acted together with the other two processes - environmental filtering and species interaction. The relative importance of the community assembly processes varied both with lake depth and eco-zones, though the processes were better predicted by the latter.This suggests that environmental characteristics have a pronounced effect on shaping gastropod communities via assembly processes. Moreover, the study corroborated the high importance of dispersal limitation for both maintaining species richness in Lake Ohrid (through its impact on community composition) and generating endemic biodiversity (via its influence on diversification processes). However, according to the metacommunity speciation model, the inferred importance of environmental filtering and biotic interaction also suggests a small but significant influence of ecological

  20. The role of vermetid gastropods in the development of the Florida Middle Ground, northeast Gulf of Mexico

    Reich, Christopher D.; Poore, Richard Z.; Hickey, Todd D.

    2013-01-01

    The Florida Middle Ground is a complex of north to northwest trending ridges that lie approximately 180 km northwest of Tampa Bay, Florida. The irregular ridges appear on the otherwise gently sloping West Florida shelf and exhibit between 10-15 m of relief. Modern studies interpret the ridges as remnants of a Holocene coral-reef buildup that today provide a hard substrate for growth of a variety of benthic organisms including hydrocorals, scleractinians, alcyonarians, and algae. Recent rotary coring reveals that the core of the eastern ridge of the Florida Middle Ground complex consists of unconsolidated marine calcareous muddy sand that is capped by a boundstone composed primarily of the sessile vermetid gastropod Petaloconchus sp., and overlays a weathered, fossiliferous limestone. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon ages (uncalibrated) on the 3.6-m thick vermetid worm rock indicate that it developed during a sea-level stillstand in the early Holocene (8,225 ±30-8,910 ± 25 yr B.P.). Our observations suggest that the Florida Middle Ground is a remnant of a series of shore parallel bars that formed in the early Holocene and were capped by a 3.6-m thick unit of vermetid gastropods. During a rapid sea-level rise that began ~8,000 yr B.P. the vermetids growth ceased and the worm rock preserved the ridges structure. Diver observations document that the edges of the ridges are currently being eroded and undermined by biological activity and current action, leading to calving of large capstone blocks.

  1. The use of the marine gastropod, Cellana tramoserica, as a biomonitor of metal contamination in near shore environments.

    Maher, W; Maher, N; Taylor, A; Krikowa, F; Ubrihien, R; Mikac, K M

    2016-07-01

    The use of the marine gastropod, Cellana tramoserica, as a biomonitor of metal exposure was investigated. The factors influencing metal concentrations, such as mass, gender, substrate, shoreline position and temporal variation were examined. Tissue metal concentrations were mostly found to be independent of mass and gender. When metal concentrations were significantly correlated with mass, correlations were low and explained little variability. The underlying substrate and position in the littoral zone had only a small influence on metal concentrations. Variation between individuals, inherent variability due to genetic variability, was the most significant contribution to the overall variation in metal concentrations, resulting in positive skewing of population distributions. The mean metal concentrations varied temporally; metal masses were relatively constant with fluctuations in metal concentrations related to fluctuations in metal body burdens. The populations from a metal-contaminated site had significantly higher tissue Cu, Zn, As and Pb concentrations than the populations from relatively uncontaminated locations. C. tramoserica therefore can be considered to be a net accumulator of metals. A sample number of >10 is required to detect changes of 25 % from the mean concentrations at uncontaminated locations. This species meets the requirements of a suitable biomonitor for metal contaminants in the environment i.e. hardy, sessile, widespread, sufficient tissue mass and a metal accumulator. As the measurement of metal concentrations in C. tramesoria were influenced by substrate and shore position and, sometimes, mass, sites with similar substrates and organisms of similar mass and shoreline position should be chosen for comparison. When comparing metal concentrations in gastropods from different locations, they should be collected over the same period to minimise variability due to mass differences, spawning and other seasonal/temporal effects. PMID:27262969

  2. Ecosystem Alterations and Species Range Shifts: An Atlantic-Mediterranean Cephalaspidean Gastropod in an Inland Egyptian Lake

    Malaquias, Manuel António E.

    2016-01-01

    The eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean marine Cephalaspidea gastropod Haminoea orbignyana was collected from Lake Qarun (Fayoum, Egypt), a landlocked lake that has undergone a shift from freshwater to estuarine conditions in the past 100 years. Species identity was confirmed by both morphological (anatomical dissection and scanning electron microscopy) and molecular methods (COI gene phylogeny). Observations suggested a robust population of H. orbignyana in the lake with a density of ca. 64 individuals/m2 and ca. 105 egg masses/m2 during surveys conducted in the summer of 2013. The vast majority of snails and egg masses were found under rocks. Observations of egg masses in the lab showed a gradual change from whitish to yellow-green as the eggs matured and the release of veliger larvae alone after about a week. Although adult cephalaspideans readily consumed filamentous red and green algae, and cyanobacteria, laboratory trials showed that they consumed significantly more of the red alga Ceramium sp., than of the green alga Cladophora glomerata, with consumption of Oscillatoria margaritifera being similar to those on the two algae. When grown on these resources for 16 days, H. orbignyana maintained their mass on the rhodophyte and cyanobacterium, but not in starvation controls. No cephalaspideans grew over the course of this experiment. Lake Qarun has been periodically restocked with Mediterranean fishes and prawns since the 1920s to maintain local fisheries, which represents a possible route of colonization for H. orbignyana. Yet, based on literature records, it seems more likely that invasion of the lake by this gastropod species has occurred only within the last 20 years. As human activities redistribute species through direct and indirect means, the structure of the community of this inland lake has become unpredictable and the long-term effects of these recent introductions are unknown. PMID:27248835

  3. Heavy metal concentrations in edible bivalves and gastropods available in major markets of the Pearl River Delta

    2001-01-01

    Molluscs are able to accumulate heavy metals and impose healthhazard to consumers. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the heavy metal concentrations in edible bivalves and gastropods available in major markets of the Pearl River Delta. Fourteen species of edible molluscs were purchased from six markets in Hong Kong and Guangdong Province. The fresh of these biota were tested for their cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn)concentrations (based on wet weight). The results indicated that amongst the 14 edible molluscs, only Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, Sb and Sn concentrations in three species(Ruditapes philippinarum, Perna viridis and Hemifusus tuba) were within the local regulatory limits. Over 60% of bivalve species exceeded maximum permitted levels of Cd (2 μg/g) and Cr (1 μg/g), while over 40% of gastropod species exceeded the maximum levels of Sb (1 μg/g) and Cr(1 μg/g). Most of the samples collected from Hong Kong had significantly higher contents of Pb and Sb, but similar levels of Cd, Cu and Zn when compared with samples collected across the border (p<0.5; p<0.01; p<0.001 respectively). In general, the molluscs purchased in Guangdong markets had higher metal contents than those purchased from the Hong Kong markets. When compared with the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake or Maximum Acceptable Daily Load recommended by FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, Cd levels of five species (Anadara ferruginea, Pinna pectinata, Chlamys nobilis, Babylonia lutosa and Hemifusus terntanus) and Cr levels of seven species (Anadara ferruginea, Paphia undulata, Pinna pectinata, Babylonia lutosa, Hemifusus terntanus, Cymbium melo and Cipangopaludina chinensis) were higher than both the human daily acceptable limits (for Cd and Cr respectively) and the local regulatory levels (for Cd and Cr respectively).

  4. Ecosystem Alterations and Species Range Shifts: An Atlantic-Mediterranean Cephalaspidean Gastropod in an Inland Egyptian Lake.

    Cruz-Rivera, Edwin; Malaquias, Manuel António E

    2016-01-01

    The eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean marine Cephalaspidea gastropod Haminoea orbignyana was collected from Lake Qarun (Fayoum, Egypt), a landlocked lake that has undergone a shift from freshwater to estuarine conditions in the past 100 years. Species identity was confirmed by both morphological (anatomical dissection and scanning electron microscopy) and molecular methods (COI gene phylogeny). Observations suggested a robust population of H. orbignyana in the lake with a density of ca. 64 individuals/m2 and ca. 105 egg masses/m2 during surveys conducted in the summer of 2013. The vast majority of snails and egg masses were found under rocks. Observations of egg masses in the lab showed a gradual change from whitish to yellow-green as the eggs matured and the release of veliger larvae alone after about a week. Although adult cephalaspideans readily consumed filamentous red and green algae, and cyanobacteria, laboratory trials showed that they consumed significantly more of the red alga Ceramium sp., than of the green alga Cladophora glomerata, with consumption of Oscillatoria margaritifera being similar to those on the two algae. When grown on these resources for 16 days, H. orbignyana maintained their mass on the rhodophyte and cyanobacterium, but not in starvation controls. No cephalaspideans grew over the course of this experiment. Lake Qarun has been periodically restocked with Mediterranean fishes and prawns since the 1920s to maintain local fisheries, which represents a possible route of colonization for H. orbignyana. Yet, based on literature records, it seems more likely that invasion of the lake by this gastropod species has occurred only within the last 20 years. As human activities redistribute species through direct and indirect means, the structure of the community of this inland lake has become unpredictable and the long-term effects of these recent introductions are unknown. PMID:27248835

  5. The systematics of Cephalaspidea (Mollusca: gastropods) revisited, with a study on the diversity of deep sea Philinidae sensu lato from the West Pacific

    Oskars, Trond Roger

    2013-01-01

    The Cephalaspidea are the second most diverse marine clade of the Euthyneura gastropods, after the Nudipleura with many groups still known largely from shells or little anatomical data. These marine snails occur worldwide across all latitudes and depths. The definition of the group and the relationships between members has been hampered by the difficulty of establishing sound synapomorphies, but the advent of molecular phylogenetics in recent times has helped changed significantly...

  6. Flying high: on the airborne dispersal of aquatic organisms as illustrated by the distribution histories of the gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius

    Wesselingh, F.P.; Cadée, G.C.; Renema, W.

    1999-01-01

    The actual and fossil distribution patterns of the aquatic gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius indicate that avian dispersal was an important dispersal mechanism in the geological past. Combining the distribution histories of these genera with ecological data on modern relatives provides insights into the process of dispersal of aquatic taxa in general. Avian dispersal of aquatic taxa is facilitated by a variety of factors, including mass occurrence in resting/foraging places of migrati...

  7. The Mollusk Gastropod Lanistes carinatus (Olivier, 1804) as Abiomonitor for Some Trace Metals in the Nile River

    S.S.I. Abd El Gawad

    2009-01-01

    The fresh water gastropod Lanistes carinatus was tested to be used as potential biomonitor for the trace metals, Copper, Cadmium and Lead. Some chemical and biological measurements were sampled and measured in two consecutive years 2005 and 2006 in different stations from Damietta Branch of Nile River. Cu level in water not detected in all investigated sites, while concentrations of Cd and Pb in water and the concentrations of Cu, Cd and Pb in sediment varied in different stations. It was fou...

  8. Evaluation of impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods (Cronia contracta) as a biomarker of genotoxic contaminants in coastal water around Goa, West coast of India.

    Sarkar, A; Gaitonde, Dipak C S; Sarkar, Amit; Vashistha, D; D'Silva, Classy; Dalal, S G

    2008-10-01

    The measurement of the impairment of DNA in marine gastropod (Cronia contracta) provides an insight into the genotoxic effects of contaminants on marine organisms along the Goa coast. The impact of genotoxic contaminants on Goan coastal environment was evaluated in terms of the loss of DNA integrity (expressed as the value of 'I') in marine snails with respect to those from the reference site (Palolem) over a period from April 2004 to May 2005 using the technique of alkaline unwinding assay. The DNA integrity in marine snails was found to be significantly damaged at Dona Paula (58%), Vasco (73.5%), and Velsao (48.5%) during the monsoon period (July-August 2004). Similar trend in the loss of DNA integrity in marine gastropods was also detected during the post-monsoon (November-December 2004) and the pre-monsoon (April-May 2005) periods. The low integrities of DNA in marine gastropods at these sites can be attributed to exposure to genotoxic contaminants especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and toxic heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Mn) prevalent in the marine environment as evident by their accumulation in the tissues of the marine snails inhabiting different sites along the Goa coast. The contaminant-induced DNA strand breaks in marine snails increased significantly at Dona Paula, Vasco, and Velsao clearly indicating the levels of contamination of the sites by genotoxic compounds in those regions. The genotoxic effects of contaminants were further substantiated by detection of the impairment (39%) of DNA integrity in marine snails in a field experiment in which the same species of marine snails (C. contracta) collected from the reference site, Palolem, were deployed at Dona Paula and caged for 25 days for exposure to ambient marine pollutants. The impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods along the Goa coast can thus act as a biomarker for marine pollution monitoring of genotoxic contaminants. PMID:18358533

  9. Tetrodotoxin and paralytic shellfish poisons in gastropod species from Vietnam analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Hsiao-Chin Jen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Among marine toxins, tetrodotoxin (TTX and paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs are known as notorious neurotoxins that induce serious food poisoning incidents in the Southeast Asia region. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TTX and PSP toxins are important issues of seafood safety. Paralytic toxicity was observed in mice exposed to 34 specimens from five species of gastropods using a PSP bioassay. Five species of gastropods, Natica vitellus, Natica tumidus, Oliva hirasei, Oliva lignaria, and Oliva annulata, were collected from the coastal seawaters in Nha Trang City, Vietnam, between August 2007 and October 2007. The average lethal potency of gastropod specimens was 90 ± 40 (mean ± standard deviation mouse units (MU for N. vitellus, 64 ± 19 MU for N. tumidus, 42 ± 28 MU for O. hirasei, 51 ± 17 MU for O. lignaria, and 39 ± 18 MU for O. annulata. All toxic extracts from the sample species were clarified using a C18 Sep-Pak solid-phase extraction column and a microcentrifuge filter prior to analysis. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection indicated that the toxins of the olive shell (O. hirasei, O. lignaria, and O. annulata were mainly composed of saxitoxin (STX (73–82%, gonyautoxin (GTX 2, 3 (12–22%, and minor levels of TTX (5–6%. The toxins of N. vitellus and N. tumidus were mainly composed of STX (76–81% and GTX 1, 4 (19–24%. Furthermore, liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis was used to verify the identity of the PSPs and TTX. Our evidence shows that these gastropods have novel toxin profiles.

  10. Trace elements in shells of common gastropods in the near vicinity of a natural CO2 vent: no evidence of pH-dependent contamination

    J. B. McClintock

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is concern that the use of natural volcanic CO2 vents as analogs for studies of the impacts of ocean acidification on marine organisms are biased due to physiochemical influences other than seawater pH alone. One issue that has been raised is whether potentially harmful trace elements in sediments that are rendered more soluble and labile in low pH environments are made more bioavailable, and sequestered in the local flora and fauna at harmful levels. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, we analyzed the concentrations of trace elements in shells (an established proxy for tissues of four species of gastropods (two limpets, a topshell and a whelk collected from three sites in Levante Bay, Vulcano Island. Each sampling site increased in distance from the primary CO2 vent and thus represented low, moderate, and ambient seawater pH conditions. Concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, and V measured in shells using ICP-OES were below detection thresholds for all four gastropod species at all three sites. However, there were measurable concentrations of Sr, Mn, and U in the shells of the limpets Patella caerulea, P. rustica, and the snail Osilinus turbinatus, and similarly, Sr, Mn, U, and also Zn in the shells of the whelk Hexaplex trunculus. Levels of these elements were within the ranges measured in gastropod shells in non-polluted environments, and with the exception of U in the shells of P. caerulea, where the concentration was significantly lower at the collecting site closest to the vent (low pH site, there were no site-specific spatial differences in concentrations for any of the trace elements in shells. Thus trace element enhancement in sediments in low-pH environments was not reflected in greater bioaccumulations of potentially harmful elements in the shells of common gastropods.

  11. Reticulate phylogeny of gastropod-shell-breeding cichlids from Lake Tanganyika – the result of repeated introgressive hybridization

    Blanc Michel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tribe Lamprologini is the major substrate breeding lineage of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species flock. Among several different life history strategies found in lamprologines, the adaptation to live and breed in empty gastropod shells is probably the most peculiar. Although shell-breeding arose several times in the evolutionary history of the lamprologines, all obligatory and most facultative shell-breeders belong to the so called "ossified group", a monophyletic lineage within the lamprologine cichlids. Since their distinctive life style enables these species to live and breed in closest vicinity, we hypothesized that these cichlids might be particularly prone to accidental hybridization, and that introgression might have affected the evolutionary history of this cichlid lineage. Results Our analyses revealed discrepancies between phylogenetic hypotheses based on mitochondrial and nuclear (AFLP data. While the nuclear phylogeny was congruent with morphological, behavioral and ecological characteristics, several species – usually highly specialized shell-breeders – were placed at contradicting positions in the mitochondrial phylogeny. The discordant phylogenies strongly suggest repeated incidents of introgressive hybridization between several distantly related shell-breeding species, which reticulated the phylogeny of this group of cichlids. Long interior branches and high bootstrap support for many interior nodes in the mitochondrial phylogeny argue against a major effect of ancient incomplete lineage sorting on the phylogenetic reconstruction. Moreover, we provide morphological and genetic (mtDNA and microsatellites evidence for ongoing hybridization among distantly related shell-breeders. In these cases, the territorial males of the inferred paternal species are too large to enter the shells of their mate, such that they have to release their sperm over the entrance of the shell to fertilize the eggs. With sperm

  12. The spatial scale of genetic subdivision in populations of Ifremeria nautilei, a hydrothermal-vent gastropod from the southwest Pacific

    Thaler Andrew D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep-sea hydrothermal vents provide patchy, ephemeral habitats for specialized communities of animals that depend on chemoautotrophic primary production. Unlike eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents, where population structure has been studied at large (thousands of kilometres and small (hundreds of meters spatial scales, population structure of western Pacific vents has received limited attention. This study addresses the scale at which genetic differentiation occurs among populations of a western Pacific vent-restricted gastropod, Ifremeria nautilei. Results We used mitochondrial and DNA microsatellite markers to infer patterns of gene flow and population subdivision. A nested sampling strategy was employed to compare genetic diversity in discrete patches of Ifremeria nautilei separated by a few meters within a single vent field to distances as great as several thousand kilometres between back-arc basins that encompass the known range of the species. No genetic subdivisions were detected among patches, mounds, or sites within Manus Basin. Although I. nautilei from Lau and North Fiji Basins (~1000 km apart also exhibited no evidence for genetic subdivision, these populations were genetically distinct from the Manus Basin population. Conclusions An unknown process that restricts contemporary gene flow isolates the Manus Basin population of Ifremeria nautilei from widespread populations that occupy the North Fiji and Lau Basins. A robust understanding of the genetic structure of hydrothermal vent populations at multiple spatial scales defines natural conservation units and can help minimize loss of genetic diversity in situations where human activities are proposed and managed.

  13. Genetic divergence of peripherally disjunct populations of the gastropod Batillariella estuarina in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia.

    Pudovskis, M S; Johnson, M S; Black, R

    2001-11-01

    Geographically disjunct populations are unusual in marine species, but the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, provide opportunities to study highly disjunct peripheral isolates of several species. The intertidal snail Batillariella estuarina occurs in isolated tidal ponds in the Abrolhos Islands, where it is at its northern limit, disjunct from mainland populations by 600-900 km. The species is thus disjunct both geographically and among the peripherally isolated populations in the Abrolhos Islands. Comparisons of allozymes at 11 polymorphic loci were made among populations from 10 ponds in the Abrolhos Islands and six sites from relatively continuous tidal flats at Albany, 900 km away, the nearest major set of populations. Among all 16 populations, subdivision was high (FST = 0.455). Although there were subtle differences between the geographical regions, the large majority of divergence occurred among the isolated ponds in the Abrolhos (FST = 0.441), and divergence on the tidal flats at Albany was only moderate (FST = 0.085). Characteristic of peripheral isolates, the pond populations have less polymorphism and fewer alleles than the more connected populations at Albany. Combined with evidence of genetic divergence in the gastropods Bembicium vittatum and Austrocochlea constricta, which have very similar geographical distributions to that of B. estuarina, these results indicate the potential evolutionary significance of peripherally isolated marine populations in the unusual habitats of the Abrolhos Islands. PMID:11883876

  14. Isolation and identification of crude oil degrading bacteria from gastropod Haustrum scobina collected from Persian Gulf (Bandar Abbas Shoreline provenance

    Zinab Bayat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biodegradation is a good alternative rather than chemical and physical methods for cleaning oil contaminated areas. Several factors like crude oil concentration, biosurfactant production, salinity and incubation time affect the biodegradation. Materials and methods: In this study, seawater sample and gastropod were collected from Persian Gulf. To isolate oil degrading bacteria from collected samples, ONR7a medium was used. The strains that had more growth and higher oil removal were selected and identified. The factors such as the effect of different concentrations of oil, incubation time, mixed cultures and salinity on the biodegradation were investigated. Results: Six crude oil degrading bacteria were isolated. Between these bacteria 2 strains were selected based on higher oil removal. These strains belonged to the genus Vibrio and Halomonas. Strains with higher Emulsification activity produce more biosurfactant and have higher oil biodegradation. Growth and oil degradation have increment pattern by prolonging the incubation time. Mixed culture of Vibrio and Halomonas strains have higher rates of degradation rather than culturing with one of them. Increase in crudeoil concentration to 2.5% caused reduction in growth of bacteria and degradation of oil. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study show that crude oil degrading bacteria have high diversity in Persian Gulf. These bacteria have higher capability for oil degradation thus they can be used for remediation of oil contaminated areas.

  15. Effect of parasitism by the pyramidellid gastropod Boonea impressa on the net productivity of oysters ( Crassostrea virginica)

    White, M. E.; Powell, E. N.; Ray, S. M.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of an ectoparasitic gastropod, Boonea (= Odostomia) impressa, on the energy bidget of its host, the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was examined. A model was developed from laboratory and field data, as well as from equations developed by Powell and Stanton (1985). The model predicted that net productivity by large (7 cm length) oysters parasitized by 10 and 30 large (6 mm length) snails would be reduced by 21% and 63%, respectively. In contrast, net productivity in small (3 cm length) oysters would be reduced 25% by only 3 snails. Small oysters would have a negative energy balance when parasitized by 10 snails. The predicted reduction in growth was compared with measured growth in small and large oysters parasitized at abundances typical of Texas oyster reefs. Control oysters (no parasites) gained more shell weight than parasitized oysters. In four-week experiments conducted during the spring and fall, small control oysters gained 86% and 75% more weight than highly parasitized oysters. Large control oysters had 29% and 88% more shell deposition. Snail parasitism produced 75% mortality in small, highly parasitized oysters in the summer. In typical field populations in Texas bays, a minimal estimate of 4-12% of the energy otherwise available to the oyster for growth and reproduction is consumed by Boonea impressa.

  16. Influences of population density on polyandry and patterns of sperm usage in the marine gastropod Rapana venosa.

    Xue, Dong-Xiu; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Jin-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, with potential for sexual selection to continue post-copulation through sperm competition and/or cryptic female choice. Few studies have investigated the influences of population density on polyandry and sperm usage, and paternity distribution in successive broods of marine invertebrates. The marine gastropod Rapana venosa is ideal for investigating how population density influences the frequency of polyandry and elucidating patterns of sperm usage. Two different population density (12 ind/m(3) and 36 ind/m(3)) treatments with two replications were set to observe reproductive behaviors. Five microsatellite markers were used to identify the frequency of multiple paternity and determine paternal contributions to progeny arrays in 120 egg masses. All of the mean mating frequency, mean number of sires and mean egg-laying frequency were higher at high population density treatment relative to low population density treatment, indicating population density is an important factor affecting polyandry. The last sperm donors achieved high proportions of paternity in 74.77% of egg masses, which supported the "last male sperm precedence" hypothesis. In addition, high variance in reproductive success among R. venosa males were detected, which might have an important influence on effective population size. PMID:26996441

  17. [Evolutionary regularities of somatic polyploidy expansion in salivary glands of gastropod mollusks. V. Subclasses Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata].

    Anisimov, A P; Ziumchenko, N E

    2012-01-01

    Salivary glands of 25 species of euthyneural gastropod mollusks (Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata) have been investigated by means of histochemical methods and DNA cytophotometry in nuclei of cells. The cells of three basic types are distinguished in glandular epithelim: granular cells (with glicoproteid granular inclusions), mucocytes-I (with sulfatic acid mucopolysaccharides) and mucocytes-II (with neutral and acid nonsulfatic polysaccharides and proteins) and so the epithelial ciliated cells and cells of the ducts. It was shown that glandular cells of salivary glands of all discovered mollusks' species are polyploid in different degree. The highest ploidy level estimated by means of DNA content in most of species is 64-128c. The giant polyploidy, attained to 4096c, is discovered in cells of salivary glands of Tritonia diomedea. The functional conditionality connected with features of feeding of different mollusk species and phylogenetic tendencies of expansion of somatic polyploidy in class Gastropoda are discussed. In comparison with allogenic, facultative and small polyploidy manifestation in Prosobranchia the obligatory polyploidization of high degree revealed in cells of salivary glands of Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata is consider to be the original cytological arogenesis. The probable causes of such differences are conneted with euthyneural type of organization of central nervous system and giant polyploidy of neurons in Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata mollusks. The causes, mechanisms and significance of such correlations are unclear for the present. PMID:22590930

  18. Effects of low salinity on adult behavior and larval performance in the intertidal gastropod Crepipatella peruviana (Calyptraeidae.

    Jaime A Montory

    Full Text Available Shallow-water coastal areas suffer frequent reductions in salinity due to heavy rains, potentially stressing the organisms found there, particularly the early stages of development (including pelagic larvae. Individual adults and newly hatched larvae of the gastropod Crepipatella peruviana were exposed to different levels of salinity stress (32(control, 25, 20 or 15, to quantify the immediate effects of exposure to low salinities on adult and larval behavior and on the physiological performance of the larvae. For adults we recorded the threshold salinity that initiates brood chamber isolation. For larvae, we measured the impact of reduced salinity on velar surface area, velum activity, swimming velocity, clearance rate (CR, oxygen consumption (OCR, and mortality (LC50; we also documented the impact of salinity discontinuities on the vertical distribution of veliger larvae in the water column. The results indicate that adults will completely isolate themselves from the external environment by clamping firmly against the substrate at salinities ≤24. Moreover, the newly hatched larvae showed increased mortality at lower salinities, while survivors showed decreased velum activity, decreased exposed velum surface area, and decreased mean swimming velocity. The clearance rates and oxygen consumption rates of stressed larvae were significantly lower than those of control individuals. Finally, salinity discontinuities affected the vertical distribution of larvae in the water column. Although adults can protect their embryos from low salinity stress until hatching, salinities <24 clearly affect survival, physiology and behavior in early larval life, which will substantially affect the fitness of the species under declining ambient salinities.

  19. A neurotropic herpesvirus infecting the gastropod, abalone, shares ancestry with oyster herpesvirus and a herpesvirus associated with the amphioxus genome

    Sawbridge Tim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the exception of the oyster herpesvirus OsHV-1, all herpesviruses characterized thus far infect only vertebrates. Some cause neurological disease in their hosts, while others replicate or become latent in neurological tissues. Recently a new herpesvirus causing ganglioneuritis in abalone, a gastropod, was discovered. Molecular analysis of new herpesviruses, such as this one and others, still to be discovered in invertebrates, will provide insight into the evolution of herpesviruses. Results We sequenced the genome of a neurotropic virus linked to a fatal ganglioneuritis devastating parts of a valuable wild abalone fishery in Australia. We show that the newly identified virus forms part of an ancient clade with its nearest relatives being a herpesvirus infecting bivalves (oyster and, unexpectedly, one we identified, from published data, apparently integrated within the genome of amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate. Predicted protein sequences from the abalone virus genome have significant similarity to several herpesvirus proteins including the DNA packaging ATPase subunit of (putative terminase and DNA polymerase. Conservation of amino acid sequences in the terminase across all herpesviruses and phylogenetic analysis using the DNA polymerase and terminase proteins demonstrate that the herpesviruses infecting the molluscs, oyster and abalone, are distantly related. The terminase and polymerase protein sequences from the putative amphioxus herpesvirus share more sequence similarity with those of the mollusc viruses than with sequences from any of the vertebrate herpesviruses analysed. Conclusions A family of mollusc herpesviruses, Malacoherpesviridae, that was based on a single virus infecting oyster can now be further established by including a distantly related herpesvirus infecting abalone, which, like many vertebrate viruses is neurotropic. The genome of Branchiostoma floridae (amphioxus provides evidence for the

  20. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered. PMID:11281267

  1. Developmental analysis reveals labial and subradular ganglia and the primary framework of the nervous system in nudibranch gastropods.

    Page, L R

    1993-11-01

    Previous ultrastructural observations on late stage larvae of dorid nudibranchs (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) revealed two pairs of ganglia within the base of the foot that do not have obvious counterparts in existing descriptions of other gastropod larvae [Chia and Koss (1989). Cell Tiss. Res. 256:17-26.] One of these ganglionic pairs has been implicated in the initiation of settlement preceding metamorphosis [Arkett et al. (1989). Biol. Bull. 176:155-160.] By examining neurogenesis in sequential larval stages, I have found that the pattern of connectives and commissures associated with these enigmatic ganglia is comparable to patterns found in less consolidated adult nervous systems of chitons, monoplacophorans, and archaeogastropods. These comparative data suggest that the two pairs of ganglia in dorid nudibranch larvae are homologues of labial and subradular ganglia. The labial ganglia become incorporated into the cerebral ganglia at metamorphosis. In an attempt to integrate anatomical and developmental observations with behavioral and neurophysiological results, I suggest that receptor cells of the larval labial ganglia may become postmetamorphic primary mechanoreceptors of the oral tube, which have central cell bodies within the "cerebral" ganglia and which help coordinate feeding. Results of this study also address a larger evolutionary issue by questioning the traditional model of an ancestral molluscan nervous system that consists of four longitudinal nerve cords that arise from separate sites along a circumesophageal nerve ring. This pattern results from secondary connections in nudibranchs and possibly other molluscs. The primary condition of a single axon bundle emerging from each cerebral ganglion is more similar to the developing nervous system in polychaete annelids than what has been recognized previously. PMID:8283184

  2. [Effects mangrove conversion to pasture on density and shell size of two gastropods in the Turbo River Delta (Urabá Gulf, Caribbean coast of Colombia)].

    Blanco, Juan F; Castaño, María C

    2012-12-01

    Mangrove deforestation is widespread in the Greater Caribbean but its impact on macrobenthos has not been evaluated to date. In order to assess the impact of mangrove conversion to pasture, densities and shell sizes of two dominant gastropods (Neritina virginea and Melampus coffeus) were compared among four mangrove types: 1) Rhizophora mangle-dominated fringing mangroves, 2) Avicennia germinans-dominated basin mangroves, 3) Mixed-species basin mangroves, and 4) A. germinans- basin mangroves converted to pastures, in the Turbo River Delta (Urabá Gulf, Colombia). Mangrove types were polygon-delimited with satellite images and color aerial photographs were taken in 2009. Various (n<5) polygons per mangrove type were sampled in January, July and December 2009, and a total (n<20) 0.025m2-quadrats were randomly placed along each polygon. Forest structure variables, pore-water physicochemical variables and sediment-grain metrics were measured in the four mangrove types. Mean density and size of both gastropod species were measured. The results showed that the mean density and size of both species were significantly greater in R. mangle-fringing mangroves. N. virginea density decreased gradually towards the A. germinans-basin mangroves seemly related to the diadromous life-history. This species nearly disappeared in the neighboring pastures because individuals were constrained to a few remaining flooded areas. In the pastures, M. coffeus individuals were clumped in the remaining A. germinans trees due to its climbing behavior as a pulmonate. We hypothesize that the decline of these two gastropods was related to physical microhabitat (e.g. trees, prop roots, and seedlings) degradation, and alteration of soil properties (e.g. temperature, pH, organic matter content). Finally, we also hypothesize that the local extinction of N. virginea due to clear-cutting may exert strong negative effects on the ecosystem function because it is a dominant omnivore. PMID:23342523

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of euthyneuran gastropods from sea to land mainly based on comparative mitogenomic of four species of Onchidiidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Pulmonata).

    Sun, Bian Na; Wei, Luan Luan; Shen, He Ding; Wu, Hong Xi; Wang, Dong Feng

    2016-09-01

    We generated complete mitochondrial genome sequences data for 4 genera (Onchidium, Platevindex, Paraoncidium and Peronia) in Onchidiidae to construct a phylogenetic tree in conjunction with other 9 existing data among gastropods. The topology showed that the taxa clustered into two main groups of four species, one of which included Onchidium struma and the Platevindex mortoni, the other Paraoncidium reevesii and Peronia verruculata. The process in Pulmonata from sea to land in accordance with the evolution of respiratory organs from branchial gills to pulmonary cavity has been shown. This will also constitute a framework for phylogeny evolution analysis, systematic classfication of Onchidiidae and other euthyneurans (pulmonates and opisthobranchs). PMID:25648917

  4. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern, and Immunocytochemical Localization of a Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-like Molecule in the Gastropod Mollusk, Aplysia californica

    Zhang, Lihong; Tello, Javier A; Zhang, Weimin; Tsai, Pei-San

    2007-01-01

    Successful reproduction in vertebrates depends upon the actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Despite the wide presence of GnRH in Phylum Chordata, GnRH has not been isolated in protostomes other than the common octopus. To provide information on the evolution of this critical hormone, we isolated the full-length cDNA of a GnRH-like molecule from the central nervous system of a gastropod mollusk, the sea hare Aplysia californica. The open reading frame of this cDNA encodes a prote...

  5. The locomotion of marine and terrestrial gastropods: can the acceleration of the ventral pedal waves contribute to the generation of net propulsive forces?

    Del Alamo, Juan C.; Rodroguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Lai, Janice; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2008-11-01

    Marine and terrestrial gastropods move by gliding over a ventral foot that is lubricated by secreted mucus (terrestrial) or simply by water (marine). The rim of the ventral foot generates suction forces that keep the animal adhered to the substrate. The central part of the foot produces a net propulsive force by generating trains of pedal waves through periodic muscle contractions. Recent experiments show that, in some gastropods, these pedal waves become faster and longer as they move forward, suggesting a mechanism for the generation of net propulsive forces by building a pressure difference across consecutive waves. We have investigated the efficiency of this mechanism through a theoretical analysis of a two-dimensional lubrication layer between a train of waves of slowly varying length and speed, and a flat, rigid, impermeable surface. The inhomogeneity of the speed and length of the pedal waves has been modeled through multiple-scale asymptotics. We have considered a Newtonian fluid to separate the effect of this inhomogeneity from the viscoelastic propulsion reported in previous works.

  6. A Novel Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) Influences Compatibility between the Gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata, and the Digenean Trematode Schistosoma mansoni.

    Pila, Emmanuel A; Tarrabain, Mahmoud; Kabore, Alethe L; Hanington, Patrick C

    2016-03-01

    shed S. mansoni cercariae 1-week before the susceptible controls. Our results represent the first functional characterization of a gastropod TLR, and demonstrate that BgTLR is an important snail immune receptor that is capable of influencing infection outcome following S. mansoni challenge. PMID:27015424

  7. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    Lyons Deirdre C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition towards constructing the bilaterian body plan. These cells give rise to the visceral mesoderm in virtually all spiralians examined and in many species they also contribute to the endodermal intestine. Hence, the 4d lineage is an ideal one for studying the evolution and diversification of the bipotential endomesodermal germ layer in protostomes at the level of individual cells. Little is known of how division patterns are controlled or how mesodermal and endodermal sublineages diverge in spiralians. Detailed modern fate maps for 4d exist in only a few species of clitellate annelids, specifically in glossiphoniid leeches and the sludge worm Tubifex. We investigated the 4d lineage in the gastropod Crepidula fornicata, an established model system for spiralian biology, and in a closely related direct-developing species, C. convexa. Results High-resolution cell lineage tracing techniques were used to study the 4d lineage of C. fornicata and C. convexa. We present a new nomenclature to name the progeny of 4d, and report the fate map for the sublineages up through the birth of the first five pairs of teloblast daughter cells (when 28 cells are present in the 4d sublineage, and describe each clone’s behavior during gastrulation and later stages as these undergo differentiation. We identify the precise origin of the intestine, two cells of the larval kidney complex, the larval retractor muscles and the presumptive germ cells, among others. Other tissues that arise

  8. Comparison of sample preparation methods, validation of an UPLC-MS/MS procedure for the quantification of tetrodotoxin present in marine gastropods and analysis of pufferfish.

    Nzoughet, Judith Kouassi; Campbell, Katrina; Barnes, Paul; Cooper, Kevin M; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T

    2013-02-15

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is one of the most potent marine neurotoxins reported. The global distribution of this toxin is spreading with the European Atlantic coastline now being affected. Climate change and increasing pollution have been suggested as underlying causes for this. In the present study, two different sample preparation techniques were used to extract TTX from Trumpet shells and pufferfish samples. Both extraction procedures (accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and a simple solvent extraction) were shown to provide good recoveries (80-92%). A UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the analysis of TTX and validated following the guidelines contained in the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC for chemical contaminant analysis. The performance of this procedure was demonstrated to be fit for purpose. This study is the first report on the use of ASE as a mean for TTX extraction, the use of UPLC-MS/MS for TTX analysis, and the validation of this method for TTX in gastropods. PMID:23194566

  9. Mieniplotia scabra (Müller, 1774, another gastropod invasive species in Europe and the status of freshwater allochthonous molluscs in Greece and Europe

    S. CIANFANELLI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mieniplotia scabra (Müller, 1774, a freshwater gastropod originating from the Indo-Pacific area, has proved to be a successful invader spreading to other parts of East Asia, Middle East, the Pacific Islands, North America and West Indies. This paper reports the first record of M. scabra from Europe, where it has become naturalized in Kos Island in Greece. This new trans-continental introduction brings to nine the number of alien freshwater molluscs species in Greece and to 30 in Europe. It is therefore given an updated snapshot on the presence of the numerous non-native fresh water species in Europe, divided by nation, an account that is currently lacking in literature and in the specific databases.

  10. Determination of the variability of both hydrophilic and lipophilic toxins in endemic wild bivalves and carnivorous gastropods from the southern part of Chile.

    Zamorano, Ruben; Marín, Michelle; Cabrera, Fabiola; Figueroa, Diego; Contreras, Cristóbal; Barriga, Andrés; Lagos, Néstor; García, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse and determine the composition of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins and lipophilic toxins in the Region of Aysén, Chile, in wild endemic mussels (Mytilus chilensis, Venus antiqua, Aulacomya ater, Choromytilus chorus, Tagelus dombeii and Gari solida) and in two endemic carnivorous molluscs species (Concholepas concholepas and Argobuccinum ranelliforme). PSP-toxin contents were determined by using HPLC with fluorescence detection, while lipophilic toxins were determined by using LC-MS/MS. Mean concentrations for the total of PSP toxins were in the range 55-2505 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g. The two most contaminated samples for PSP toxicity were bivalve Gari solida and carnivorous Argobuccinum ranelliforme with 2505 ± 101 and 1850 ± 137 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g, respectively (p < 0.05). The lipophilic toxins identified were okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and yessotoxins (YTX). All analysed molluscs contained lipophilic toxins at levels ranging from 56 ± 4.8 to 156.1 ± 8.2 μg of okadaic acid-equivalent/kg shellfish together with YTX at levels ranging from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 18 ± 0.9 μg of YTX-equivalent/kg shellfish and AZA at levels ranging from 3.6 ± 0.2 to 31 ± 2.1 μg of AZA-equivalent/kg shellfish. Furthermore, different bivalves and gastropods differ in their capacity of retention of lipophilic toxins, as shown by the determination of their respective lipophilic toxins levels. In all the evaluated species, the presence of lipophilic toxins associated with biotransformation in molluscs and carnivorous gastropods was not identified, in contrast to the identification of PSP toxins, where the profiles identified in the different species are directly related to biotransformation processes. Thus, this study provides evidence that the concentration of toxins in the food intake of the evaluated species (Bivalvia and Gastropoda class) determines the degree of

  11. Avian Schistosomes from the South American Endemic Gastropod Genus Chilina (Pulmonata: Chilinidae), with a Brief Review of South American Schistosome Species.

    Flores, Verónica; Brant, Sara V; Loker, Eric S

    2015-10-01

    Our current knowledge of avian schistosomes from South America is scarce in all respects, including species and generic diversity, their life cycles, patterns of host use, potential to cause dermatitis outbreaks, and evolutionary affinities. As a step towards addressing this shortcoming, the goal of this study was to provide discrete reference points relating to snail hosts, locality records, morphological attributes, sequence for nuclear 28S and ITS, and partial mitochondrial cox1 genes, and phylogenetic relationships for schistosome cercariae recovered from different species of Chilina, which are gastropods endemic to South America. In total, 1,308 snails belonging to 6 species of Chilina were collected from 12 localities across Argentina. Thirty-eight snails (2.9%) had schistosome infections. Our data indicate the presence of 3 lineages of Chilina-transmitted schistosomes, all of which group within the major avian schistosome clade. However, none of the lineages grouped within or as sister to other known avian schistosome genera in the tree, indicating they probably represent undescribed genera. The relationships of these schistosomes from Chilina spp. are discussed in relation to their position in the global schistosome phylogenetic tree. PMID:26186680

  12. Hydrologic and climatic implications of stable isotope and minor element analyses of authigenic calcite silts and gastropod shells from a mid-Pleistocene pluvial lake, Western Desert, Egypt

    Kieniewicz, Johanna M.; Smith, Jennifer R.

    2007-11-01

    Authigenic calcite silts at Wadi Midauwara in Kharga Oasis, Egypt, indicate the prolonged presence of surface water during the Marine Isotope Stage 5e pluvial phase recognized across North Africa. Exposed over an area of ˜ 4.25 km 2, these silts record the ponding of water derived from springs along the Libyan Plateau escarpment and from surface drainage. The δ 18O values of these lacustrine carbonates (- 11.3‰ to - 8.0‰ PDB), are too high to reflect equilibrium precipitation with Nubian aquifer water or water of an exclusively Atlantic origin. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca of the silts have a modest negative covariance with silt δ 18O values, suggesting that the water may have experienced the shortest residence time in local aquifers when the water δ 18O values were highest. Furthermore, intra-shell δ 18O, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca analyses of the freshwater gastropod Melanoides tuberculata are consistent with a perennially fresh water source, suggesting that strong evaporative effects expected in a monsoonal climate did not occur, or that dry season spring flow was of sufficient magnitude to mute the effects of evaporation. The input of a second, isotopically heavier water source to aquifers, possibly Indian Ocean monsoonal rain, could explain the observed trends in δ 18O and minor element ratios.

  13. Cloning of the non-neuronal intermediate filament protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica; identification of an amino acid residue essential for the IFA epitope.

    Riemer, D; Dodemont, H; Weber, K

    1991-12-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a full-length cDNA corresponding to the larger non-neuronal (nn) intermediate filament (IF) protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica. Comparison of the sequences of the nn-IF proteins from Aplysia californica and Helix aspersa shows a strong evolutionary drift. At a 72% sequence identity level, the IF proteins of Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata show a larger distance than vimentins from Xenopus and mammals. The sequence comparison of the two snail proteins provides an important step in understanding the epitope of the monoclonal antibody IFA mapped by previous studies to the consensus sequence at the carboxy-terminal end of the rod domain of IF proteins. We identify for the first time in a naturally occurring IF protein a single amino acid exchange which leads to the loss of the epitope. The consensus sequence YRKLLEGEE present in IFA-positive proteins such as the Helix IF protein is changed in the IFA-negative Aplysia protein only by the conservative substitution of the arginine (R) by a lysine (K). Thus, the IFA epitope is not a necessity of IF structure, and its presence or absence on different IF proteins reflects only small changes in an otherwise conserved consensus sequence. Consequently, lack of IFA reactivity does not exclude the presence of IF. This result predicts that IF are much more universally expressed in lower eukaryotes than currently expected from immunological results with the monoclonal antibody IFA. PMID:1724961

  14. Analysis of naticid gastropod predation across the trans-Arctic invasion in the Tjörnes beds, Iceland, and the Red Crag Formation, East Anglia, England

    Neely, Samuel H.; Kelley, Patricia H.

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species are wreaking havoc on modern ecosystems; however, species invasions are not new threats to ecosystems. The fossil record allows conservationists to acquire deep-time perspectives on long-term effects of natural invasions before anthropogenic impacts. Drill holes from invasive naticid gastropod predators on bivalve prey can be quantified to provide evidence of the impact of these invasive predators on ecosystems. An asymmetrical faunal interchange, known as the trans-Arctic invasion (TAI), occurred between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans during the Pliocene (˜3.5 Ma) because of the opening of the Bering Strait. This interchange could have changed naticid gastropod drilling predation on bivalves due to the migration of Pacific fauna into the Atlantic Ocean. The Tjörnes locality of northeast Iceland well characterizes the TAI because this site has preserved genera in three distinct levels that divide the invasion into the pre-invasion (Tapes and Mactra zones) and the post-invasion (Serripes zone). Temporal comparisons can be made between these pre- and post-invasion zones to analyze drilling predation across the TAI. Spatial comparisons of drilling predation in the post-invasion deposits can be made by correlating the Serripes zone (3.6-2.6 Ma) to the Red Crag Formation (2.54 Ma) of East Anglia, England, because these localities are of similar age and contain similar taxa. Specimens from the Tjörnes Beds, Iceland, were analyzed in collections housed at the Icelandic Institute of Natural History. Red Crag Formation specimens were analyzed at the Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. Height and length of bivalve specimens were measured. The occurrence of complete and incomplete (unsuccessful) drill holes and drill hole diameter were recorded for all whole bivalves. Drilling frequency (DF = % mortality) and prey effectiveness (PE = % of attempted drill holes that were incomplete) were calculated. Icelandic samples

  15. Accumulation and detoxication responses of the gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis to single and combined exposures to natural (cyanobacteria) and anthropogenic (the herbicide RoundUp(®) Flash) stressors.

    Lance, Emilie; Desprat, Julia; Holbech, Bente Frost; Gérard, Claudia; Bormans, Myriam; Lawton, Linda A; Edwards, Christine; Wiegand, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Freshwater gastropods are increasingly exposed to multiple stressors in the field such as the herbicide glyphosate in Roundup formulations and cyanobacterial blooms either producing or not producing microcystins (MCs), potentially leading to interacting effects. Here, the responses of Lymnaea stagnalis to a 21-day exposure to non-MC or MC-producing (33μgL(-1)) Planktothrix agardhii alone or in combination with the commercial formulation RoundUp(®) Flash at a concentration of 1μgL(-1) glyphosate, followed by 14days of depuration, were studied via i) accumulation of free and bound MCs in tissues, and ii) activities of anti-oxidant (catalase CAT) and biotransformation (glutathione-S-transferase GST) enzymes. During the intoxication, the cyanobacterial exposure induced an early increase of CAT activity, independently of the MC content, probably related to the production of secondary cyanobacterial metabolites. The GST activity was induced by RoundUp(®) Flash alone or in combination with non MC-producing cyanobacteria, but was inhibited by MC-producing cyanobacteria with or without RoundUp(®) Flash. Moreover, MC accumulation in L. stagnalis was 3.2 times increased when snails were concomitantly exposed to MC-producing cyanobacteria with RoundUp(®), suggesting interacting effects of MCs on biotransformation processes. The potent inhibition of detoxication systems by MCs and RoundUp(®) Flash was reversible during the depuration, during which CAT and GST activities were significantly higher in snails previously exposed to MC-producing cyanobacteria with or without RoundUp(®) Flash than in other conditions, probably related to the oxidative stress caused by accumulated MCs remaining in tissues. PMID:27267390

  16. Freshwater biogeography and limnological evolution of the Tibetan Plateau--insights from a plateau-wide distributed gastropod taxon (Radix spp..

    Parm Viktor von Oheimb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Tibetan Plateau is not only the highest and largest plateau on earth; it is also home to numerous freshwater lakes potentially harbouring endemic faunal elements. As it remains largely unknown whether these lakes have continuously existed during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, questions arise as to whether taxa have been able to exist on the plateau since before the latest Pleistocene, from where and how often the plateau was colonized, and by which mechanisms organisms conquered remote high altitude lentic freshwater systems. In this study, species of the plateau-wide distributed freshwater gastropod genus Radix are used to answer these biogeographical questions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on a broad spatial sampling of Radix spp. on the Tibetan Plateau, and phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequence data, three probably endemic and one widespread major Radix clade could be identified on the plateau. Two of the endemic clades show a remarkably high genetic diversity, indicating a relatively great phylogenetic age. Phylogeographical analyses of individuals belonging to the most widely distributed clade indicate that intra-plateau distribution cannot be explained by drainage-related dispersal alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals that Radix spp. persisted throughout the LGM on the Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, we assume the continuous existence of suitable water bodies during that time. The extant Radix diversity on the plateau might have been caused by multiple colonization events combined with a relatively long intra-plateau evolution. At least one colonization event has a Palaearctic origin. In contrast to freshwater fishes, passive dispersal, probably by water birds, might be an important mechanism for conquering remote areas on the plateau. Patterns found in Radix spp. are shared with some terrestrial plateau taxa, indicating that Radix may be a suitable model taxon for inferring general patterns of biotic

  17. The distribution of the invasive non-native gastropod Crepidula fornicata in the Milford Haven Waterway, its northernmost population along the west coast of Britain

    Bohn, Katrin; Richardson, Christopher A.; Jenkins, Stuart R.

    2015-12-01

    The invasive non-native gastropod Crepidula fornicata is well established in the Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) in south-west Wales, UK, since its first introduction to this ria in 1953. Whilst it reaches high densities within the MHW and has extended its range to the south of this ria, there has been very little northward expansion. Here, we report findings of a series of intertidal and subtidal surveys in 2009 and 2010 where we monitored the population density and the vertical distribution of C. fornicata at its northern range limit in Wales (the MHW). We also characterised the composition of the surface substrata of the seabed in the MHW to provide some insight into how the availability of certain settlement substrata may limit its distribution along the west coast of Britain. We found locally very dense aggregations (maximum 2748 ± 3859 individuals m-2, mean ± SD) in the shallow subtidal and low intertidal of the MHW. Subtidally, highest densities were found in areas of high gravel content (grain sizes ~16-256 mm), suggesting that the availability of this substrata type is beneficial for its establishment at a site. In the intertidal, on the other hand, high gravel content was indicative of low C. fornicata abundance, possibly because gravelly shores are an indicator of very exposed conditions that, at least in the intertidal, may result in high levels of early post-settlement mortality and low recruitment. C. fornicata was absent from the entrance of the MHW, possibly due to the lack of suitable settlement substrata. The presence of substantial populations in the MHW suggests that C. fornicata's population growth and potential expansion in Welsh coastal waters is not fully limited by prevailing environmental conditions in the region, but that other processes may affect its local distribution.

  18. Bioaccumulation of native polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from sediment by a polychaete and a gastropod: freely dissolved concentrations and activated carbon amendment.

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Breedveld, Gijs D; Naes, Kristoffer; Oen, Amy M P; Ruus, Anders

    2006-09-01

    The present paper describes a study on the bioaccumulation of native polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from three harbors in Norway using the polychaete Nereis diversicolor and the gastropod Hinia reticulata. First, biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were measured in laboratory bioassays using the original sediments. Median BSAFs were 0.004 to 0.01 kg organic carbon/kg lipid (10 PAHs and 6 organism-sediment combinations), which was a factor of 89 to 240 below the theoretical BSAF based on total sediment contents (which is approximately one). However, if BSAFs were calculated on the basis of measured freely dissolved PAH concentrations in the pore water (measured with polyoxymethylene passive samplers), it appeared that these BSAFfree values agreed well with the measured BSAFs, within a factor of 1.7 to 4.3 (median values for 10 PAHs and six organism-sediment combinations). This means that for bioaccumulation, freely dissolved pore-water concentrations appear to be a much better measure than total sediment contents. Second, we tested the effect of 2% (of sediment dry wt) activated carbon (AC) amendments on BSAE The BSAFs were significantly reduced by a factor of six to seven for N. diversicolor in two sediments (i.e., two of six organism-sediment combinations), whereas no significant reduction was observed for H. reticulata. This implies that either site-specific evaluations of AC amendment are necessary, using several site-relevant benthic organisms, or that the physiology of H. reticulata caused artifactually high BSAF values in the presence of AC. PMID:16986789

  19. Biogeography and biodiversity of gastropod molluscs from the eastern Brazilian continental shelf and slope Biogeografía y biodiversidad de moluscos gastrópodos de la plataforma y talud continental brasileño

    Gabriela Benkendorfer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogeographic distributional patterns of gastropods are proposed based on the species' geo-graphic and bathymetric distribution. Samples were collected along the Brazilian continental margin between 18° S and 23° S, at 37 stations with depths from 20 m to 1,330 m. The analysis of the biogeographic distribution patterns confirmed the existence of a transitional zone from tropical to subtropical waters in the area of both the continental shelf and slope, suggesting a relationship with water mass circulation. We observed a high species turnover rate between the shelf and slope. The analysis of gastropod species distribution revealed a similar pattern on the shelf and slope and a large difference between shallow and deep-water faunas.Los patrones de distribución biogeográfica de gastrópodos fueron propuestos basados en la distribución geográfica y batimétrica de las especies. Los muestreos fueron realizados en el margen continental brasileño entre 18°S y 23°S, en 37 estaciones de 20 m a 1.330 m de profundidad. El análisis de los patrones de distribución biogeográfica confirmó la existencia de una zona de transición de aguas tropicales a aguas subtropicales, que se encuentra en la zona de la plataforma continental y también en la zona del talud continental, esto puede sugerir una relación con la circulación de las masas de agua. Se observó una elevada tasa de turnover de las especies entre la plataforma y el talud continental. El análisis de las especies de gastrópodos reveló un patrón similar tanto en la plataforma como en el talud y una gran diferencia entre las faunas de las aguas someras y profundas.

  20. Conducta de forrajeo del gastrópodo Acanthina monodon Pallas, 1774 (Gastropoda: Muricidae en el intermareal rocoso de Chile central Foraging behavior of the gastropod Acanthina monodon Pallas, 1774 (Gastropoda: Muricidae in the intertidal rocky shores of central Chile

    RUBÉN E. SOTO

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo investigamos aspectos de la ecología y conducta de forrajeo de Acanthina monodon, un gastrópodo murícido que habita en el intermareal rocoso de Chile central. En terreno, estudiamos las variaciones temporales en su distribución, densidad y dieta. En el laboratorio, cuantificamos la tasa de consumo, las preferencias alimentarias, el tiempo de ingestión y la rentabilidad energética obtenida con distintos tipos de presas mediante experimentos y registros en video. Las mayores densidades de individuos de A. monodon fueron observadas en la franja intermareal cercana al nivel cero de marea. En terreno, A. monodon realiza sus actividades de forrajeo principalmente durante la noche y su dieta consistió principalmente de mitílidos (95 % y cirripedios (5 %. La composición de la dieta de A. monodon en terreno presentó variaciones temporales las cuales dependerían principalmente de cambios en la oferta de los distintos tipos de mitílidos presentes en terreno durante los dos años de muestreo. En el laboratorio, los individuos de Acanthina presentaron preferencias alimentarias significativas por el mitílido Semimytilus algosus. En general, A. monodon bajo condiciones de laboratorio presentó una conducta de forrajeo en la cual maximizó la ganancia neta de energía, mediante la selección de las especies y tamaños de presas que le retribuyen la mayor rentabilidad energéticaWe investigated the ecology and foraging behavior of Acanthina monodon, a muricid gastropod that inhabits in the intertidal rocky shores of central Chile. In the field, we studied temporal variation of their spatial distribution, density, and diet composition. While in the laboratory, we quantified the consumption rate, alimentary preferences, ingestion times and energy profitability obtained with different types of prey using experiments and video recording. High densities of A. monodon individuals were observed in the intertidal fringe near at the

  1. The Gastropods of Lake Eğirdir

    YILDIRIM, Mehmet Zeki

    2004-01-01

    The Gastropoda species and its distribution was investigated in Lake Eğirdir. It was determined that 5 species belonging to Gastropoda, order Prosobranchia (Theodoxus heldreichi, Valvata naticina, Graecoanatolica lacustristurca, Falsipyrgula pfeiferi and Bithynia pseudemmericia) and 7 species belonging to the order Pulmonata (Radix peregra, Stagnicola palustris, Physa fontinalis, Physa acuta, Planorbis planorbis, Planorbis carinatus and Gyraulus albus) were present. Gastropoda species from 9 ...

  2. Riesgo de establecimiento del gasterópodo dulceacuícola invasor Melanoides tuberculatus (Thiaridae en el Río de la Plata (Argentina-Uruguay Colonization risks of the invading freshwater gastropod Melanoides tuberculatus (Thiaridae in Río de la Plata (Argentina-Uruguay

    Diego E. Gutiérrez-Gregoric

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Melanoides tuberculatus es un gasterópodo cosmopolita que ha invadido y se ha establecido en casi todos los países del continente americano, desconociéndose en la mayoría de los casos el origen de su introducción. En este trabajo se menciona el riesgo de establecimiento de esta especie en áreas de influencia del Río de la Plata como consecuencia de su registro en acuarios de la ciudad de La Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina dedicados a la venta de flora y fauna limnética. A principios de 2009, la especie fue identificada a partir de 26 ejemplares procedentes de un comercio, siendo éste el registro más austral de la especie para una localidad de la cuenca del Plata. Revisiones posteriores en 3 locales comerciales de la ciudad confirmaron la presencia de la especie en 2 de ellos. Dicha presencia se relacionó con la adquisición de plantas ornamentales por parte de los establecimientos. La identificación del gasterópodo en la ciudad de La Plata debe considerarse cuidadosamente, debido a las posibles consecuencias que tendría la liberación accidental de este molusco en el Río de la Plata en lo relacionado con el desplazamiento de fauna local y salud pública.Melanoides tuberculatus is a cosmopolitan gastropod that has invaded and has now spread into most countries of the American continent. Introduction pathways remain unknown in most cases. This work draws attention on the colonization risks of this species in the Río de la Plata area as a consequence of its record in flower and pet shops - in the city of La Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina - in which limnic species are sold. The species was identified at the beginning of 2009 within a lot of 29 specimens from a shop, and this is the southernmost record of this species in the Plata Basin. Subsequent surveys in 3 commercial shops in the same city revealed its presence in 2 of them. This was related to the purchase of ornamental plants by the shops. Identification of this species in the

  3. Variabilidad geográfica en la tolerancia térmica y economía hídrica del gastrópodo intermareal Nodilittorina peruviana (Gastropoda: Littorinidae, Lamarck, 1822 Geographic variability in thermal tolerance and water economy of the intertidal gastropod Nodilittorina peruviana. (Gastropoda: Littorinidae, Lamarck, 1822

    JOSE MIGUEL ROJAS

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available El gastrópodo Nodilittorina peruviana es un habitante común de la zona intermareal rocosa de la costa norte y centro de Chile. Las poblaciones de esta especie se caracterizan por presentar distribuciones agregadas. Por medio de mediciones de terreno y ensayos de laboratorio se evaluó la influencia de la agregación sobre las habilidades de termorregulación y conservación de agua, en individuos pertenecientes a dos localidades de la costa de Chile que presentan distintos regímenes termales (Taltal 25º 25' S; 70º 29' W y Las Cruces 33º 35' S; 71º 38' W. Los resultados indican que la influencia de la agregación sobre las habilidades termorregulatorias es dependiente de las condiciones locales. A pesar de que los individuos de ambas localidades presentaron puntos de tolerancia térmica similares, los caracoles de Taltal mostraron tasas de pérdidas de agua menores. El tamaño de las agregaciones se relacionó en forma negativa con la tasa de pérdida de agua de los individuos de ambas localidades. En el caso de Taltal se observó un límite de tolerancia menor que en Las Cruces y una relación positiva entre tamaño de la agregación y temperatura grupal. Los resultados demuestran que las condiciones ambientales locales puede ser determinante para la efectividad de los mecanismos de termorregulación.The gastropod Nodilittorina peruviana inhabit rocky intertidal of the north and center Chile. Populations of this species exhibits aggregated distributions. Through field and lab records we studied the effect of spatial distribution of snails on their thermoregulatory and water conservation efficiencies. We studied individuals from two localities of the Chilean coast with different climatic conditions (Taltal 25° 25 ` S; 70° 29 ` W and Las Cruces 33° 35 ` S; 71° 38 ` W. Results indicate that the influence of spatial distribution thermoregulatory efficiency is dependent of the local conditions. Although individuals from both localities

  4. Rodriguesic acids, modified diketopiperazines from the gastropod mollusc Pleurobranchus areolatus

    Pereira, Fabio R.; Santos, Mario F.C.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S., E-mail: rgsberlinck@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Williams, David E.; Andersen, Raymond J. [Departments of Chemistry and Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Padula, Vinicius [SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München, München, Germany and Department Biology II and GeoBio-Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, (Germany); Ferreira, Antonio G. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-04-15

    In the present investigation, two specimens of the nudipleuran mollusc Pleurobranchus areolatus have shown to accumulate oxidized rodriguesin A derivatives. Rodriguesic acid presents a carboxylic acid replacing the terminal methyl group of the alkyl chain of rodriguesin A. A hydroxamate group was also present on the diketopiperazine moiety of a rodriguesic acid derivative. The structures of both rodriguesic acid and of rodriguesic acid hydroxamate have been established by analysis of spectroscopic data, including their absolute configuration. Two methyl esters of the rodriguesic acids have been isolated as major compounds, but were considered to be isolation artifacts. (author)

  5. Spatially explicit analysis of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; S. Trajanovski; Wilke, T.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial ...

  6. Spatially explicit analyses of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; S. Trajanovski; Wilke, T.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of biodiversity arises from evolutionary processes, constraints of environmental factors and the interaction of communities. The quality of such spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and the...

  7. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  8. Acetylcholinesterase activity in marine gastropods as biomarker of neurotoxic contaminants

    Sarkar, A.; Gaitonde, D.C.S.; Vashistha, D.

    activity was expressed as the micro moles of acetic acid liberated per mg of proteins per minute and shown in term of arbitrary units. The AChE activity was compared with respect to that from a relatively uncontaminated region (Anjuna) along the Goa coast...

  9. Effects of different concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene on antioxidant enzymes in gastropod abalone,Haliotis diversicolor%不同浓度苯并(a)芘对杂色鲍抗氧化酶活性的影响

    刘洁; 林智勇; 王克坚

    2014-01-01

    为阐释不同浓度苯并(a)芘[B(a)P]对杂色鲍(Haliotis diversicolor)的毒性效应,以0.02、0.04和0.08 mg/dm33个质量浓度的B(a)P对杂色鲍进行水体暴露胁迫,7d后检测肌肉、外套膜、鳃、性腺、肾和肝胰腺的超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化氢酶(CAT)、谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(GST)和谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶(GPx)活性及还原型谷胱甘肽(GSH)含量.结果显示:0.02 mg/dm3的B(a)P暴露对杂色鲍抗氧化系统的影响不明显,而0.04、0.08 mg/dm3的B(a)P则显著抑制了SOD、CAT和GPx酶活性以及GSH含量,同时对GST酶活性具有显著的诱导作用;实验还发现,不同组织抗氧化酶活性对B(a)P胁迫的敏感性响应存在较大差异,其中鳃、肾脏和肝胰腺的敏感性响应明显高于肌肉和外套膜.上述结果表明,苯并(a)芘暴露对杂色鲍抗氧化酶活性的影响具有明显的剂量-效应关系及组织差异性,杂色鲍的鳃、肾脏或者肝胰腺的抗氧化酶响应多环芳香烃胁迫的更敏感,可作为B(a)P污染的生物标志物.%To reveal the ecotoxicological effects of benzo(a)pyrene[B(a)P]on gastropod abalone,Haliotis diversi-color,the effects of different concentrations of B(a)P (0.02,0.04 and 0.08 mg/dm3 )were studied on antioxidant defense system of H.diversicolor.The results showed that the antioxidant enzymes activities showed little difference for the animals exposed to 0.02 mg/dm3 B(a)P compared with the control.In 0.04 mg/dm3 and 0.08 mg/dm3 groups,the activities of SOD,CAT,GPx and the contents of GSH were significant inhibited by B(a)P exposure, while the GST activities were significantly induced.The activities of antioxidant enzymes were also significantly dif-ferent among the tissues,suggesting the exist of remarkable different physiological functions and responses to B(a)P content.In summary,the antioxidant enzymes activities of exposure to

  10. Antidiabetic potential and secondary metabolites screening of mangrove gastropod Cerithidea obtusa

    Reni Tri Cahyani; Sri Purwaningsih; Azrifitria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible effects of Cerithidea obtusa extract as antidiabetic and to screen the secondary metabolites presence. Methods: Antidiabetic activity of Cerithidea obtusa extract was measured in vitro using α-glucosidase inhibition method. Whereas, secondary metabolites screening was measured qualitatively. Results: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 36.40 mg/mL). However, the control drug acarbose had significantly higher antidiabetic ac...

  11. Some ecological aspects and potential threats to an intertidal gastropod, Umbonium vestiarium

    Sivadas, S.; Ingole, B.S.; Sen, A.

    Kalbadevi Bay in Ratgnairi has been identified as potential site for placer mining along the west coast of India. Since, Umbonium vestiarium is a keystone species of the region; study on some ecological aspect was carried out. The paper also...

  12. First proteome of the egg perivitelline fluid of a freshwater gastropod with aerial oviposition

    Sun, Jin

    2012-08-03

    Pomacea canaliculata is a freshwater snail that deposits eggs on solid substrates above the water surface. Previous studies have emphasized the nutritional and protective functions of the three most abundant perivitelline fluid (PVF) protein complexes (ovorubin, PV2, and PV3) during its embryonic development, but little is known about the structure and function of other less abundant proteins. Using 2-DE, SDS-PAGE, MALDI TOF/TOF, and LC-MS/MS, we identified 59 proteins from the PVF of P. canaliculata, among which 19 are novel. KEGG analysis showed that the functions of the majority of these proteins are "unknown" (n = 34), "environmental information processing" (10), 9 of which are related to innate immunity, and "metabolism" (7). Suppressive subtractive hybridization revealed 21 PVF genes to be specific to the albumen gland, indicating this organ is the origin of many of the PVF proteins. Further, the 3 ovorubin subunits were identified with 30.2-35.0% identity among them, indicating their common origin but ancient duplications. Characterization of the PVF proteome has opened the gate for further studies aiming to understand the evolution of the novel proteins and their contribution to the switch to aerial oviposition. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    K. Föller; B. Stelbrink; Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four modes are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher ...

  14. Gastropod diversification and community structuring processes in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    2015-01-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most speciose freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether the diversification of its endemic taxa is mainly driven by neutral processes, environmental factors, or species interactions. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics. Such a unifying framework – the metacommunity speciation model – considers how community assembly affect...

  15. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    K. Föller; B. Stelbrink; Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four types are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial ph...

  16. Ocean Warming and CO2-Induced Acidification Impact the Lipid Content of a Marine Predatory Gastropod

    Roselyn Valles-Regino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean warming and acidification are current global environmental challenges impacting aquatic organisms. A shift in conditions outside the optimal environmental range for marine species is likely to generate stress that could impact metabolic activity, with consequences for the biosynthesis of marine lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the lipid content of Dicathais orbita exposed to current and predicted future climate change scenarios. The whelks were exposed to a combination of temperature and CO2-induced acidification treatments in controlled flowthrough seawater mesocosms for 35 days. Under current conditions, D. orbita foot tissue has an average of 6 mg lipid/g tissue, but at predicted future ocean temperatures, the total lipid content dropped significantly, to almost half. The fatty acid composition is dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 52% with an n-3:6 fatty acid ratio of almost 2, which remains unchanged under future ocean conditions. However, we detected an interactive effect of temperature and pCO2 on the % PUFAs and n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were significantly reduced by elevated water temperature, while both the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly reduced under increased pCO2 acidifying conditions. The present study indicates the potential for relatively small predicted changes in ocean conditions to reduce lipid reserves and alter the fatty acid composition of a predatory marine mollusc. This has potential implications for the growth and survivorship of whelks under future conditions, but only minimal implications for human consumption of D. orbita as nutritional seafood are predicted.

  17. Predator-induced behavioral and morphological plasticity in the tropical marine Gastropod Strombus gigas.

    Delgado, Gabriel A; Glazer, Robert A; Stewart, Nicola J

    2002-08-01

    Florida queen conch stocks once supported a significant fishery, but overfishing prompted the state of Florida to institute a harvest moratorium in 1985. Despite the closure of the fishery, the queen conch population has been slow to recover. One method used in the efforts to restore the Florida conch population has been to release hatchery-reared juvenile conch into the wild; however, suboptimal predator avoidance responses and lighter shell weights relative to their wild counterparts have been implicated in the high mortality rates of released hatchery juveniles. We conducted a series of experiments in which hatchery-reared juvenile conch were exposed to a predator, the spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), to determine whether they could develop behavioral and morphological characteristics that would improve survival. Experiments were conducted in tanks with a calcareous sand substrate to simulate a natural environment. Conditioned conch were exposed to caged lobsters while conch in the control tanks were exposed to empty cages. Conditioned conch moved significantly less and buried themselves more frequently than the naive control conch. Morphometric data indicated that the conditioned conch grew at a significantly slower rate than the naive conch, but the shell weights of the two groups were not significantly different. This implies that the conditioned conch had thicker or denser shells than the control group. As a result, the conditioned conch had significantly higher survival than naive conch in a subsequent predation experiment in which a lobster was allowed to roam free in each tank for 24 hours. In the future, the conditioning protocols documented in this study will be used to increase the survival of hatchery-reared conch in the wild. PMID:12200261

  18. Biological and physical contributions to the accumulation of strombid gastropods in a Pliocene shell bed

    Geary, D.H. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)); Allmon, W.D. (Univ. of South Florida, Tampa (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Before the evolutionary and ecological information contained in shell beds can be interpreted, the conditions of shell bed formation must be understood. Here the authors investigate the mode and time scale of accumulation of a dense layer of Strombus floridanus in the Pliocene Pinecrest Beds of Florida. They utilize a variety of comparative taphonomic data, including the extent of encrustation and boring on strombid shells of different ontogenetic ages, and on accompanying pelecypods of different ecological types. The taphonomic comparisons enable them to reconstruct more accurately the events of shell bed formation. The formation of the strombid shell layer involved both biological and physical components. The characteristically gregarious behavior of Strombus is reflected in the large number of individuals preserved in this layer. Based on average densities of individuals in strombid colonies today, the authors estimate that a time period of tens to hundreds of years was required to accumulate these fossils. Repeated sediment winnowing by storms, followed by rapid reburial in a regime of at least episodically high sedimentation rates, is the most likely mechanism of accumulation, and accounts for the observed patterns of encrustation and boring on the shells of Strombus and various associated pelecypods. The origin of Florida's Plio-Pleistocene shelly sands is poorly understood; analysis of this bed may provide a working model for future taphonomic studies.

  19. Endozoic algae in shelled gastropods — a new symbiotic association in coral reefs?

    Berner, T.; Wishkovsky, A.; Dubinsky, Z.

    1986-10-01

    Live algae were found in the hepatopancreas and gonads of the Red Sea snail Strombus tricornis. These organs are constantly concealed within the upper whorls of the snail's shell. Light penetration was 5 15% of the incident light reaching the shell. Pigment analysis indicated the presence of chlorophyll a, c and peridinin, a composition resembling the Dinoflagellata. Chlorophyll a concentration in the algae was 1.18±0.36 pg chl/cell. 14C assimilation of isolated algae incubated in the light exceeded that of dark controls, demonstrating the photosynthetic activity of the endozoic algae.

  20. Evaluation of impairment of DNA in marine gastropod, Morula granulata as a biomarker of marine pollution.

    Sarkar, A.; Bhagat, J.; Sarker, S.

    , Goa 403004, India b Global Enviro-Care, Kevnem, Caranzalem, Goa 403002, India c Clinical Division of Fish Medicine, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinarplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November... to cause severe damage to the genetic material directly or indirectly. Among the direct genotoxicants, alkylating agents, like hydrogen peroxides and pesticides, etc., are significant whereas indirect toxicity depends on the mechanisms of metabolic...

  1. Measurement of DNA integrity in marine gastropods as biomarker of genotoxicity

    Sarkar, A.; Vashistha, D.; Gupta, N.; Malik, K.; Gaitonde, D.C.S.

    ., 2006; IARC. 1980; IARC 1990; IARC. 1991; IARC. 1993). Thus, it has become a global concern to assess the state of marine pollution by genotoxic compounds and to prevent any catastrophe to occur. In view of the increasing trend of environmental... integrity from Arambol to Velsao Nerita chameleon (26.92% – 43.63%), Morula granulata (34.75% - 82.22%) and Cerethedia cingulata (34.34%). The number of strand breaks per alkaline unwinding unit was determined with respect to the reference site (Tirakol...

  2. Toxicity of oil dispersant, crude oil and dispersed crude oil to a marine amphipod and gastropod

    Gulec, I.; Holdway, D.A. [RMIT, Melbourne (Australia). Oil Spill Research Group

    1995-12-31

    The importance of appropriate oil spill remedial action was emphasized during the recent Iron Barron oil spill off of the Tamar river in North Tasmania. One important potential oil spill response is dispersion, but little information exists on the toxicity of dispersants and dispersed oil to Australian marine species. This research was undertaken to assess the acute toxicity of Corexit 9527 (a widely used dispersant), water accommodated fractions of Bass Strait crude oil and dispersed Bass Strait crude oil, to the saltwater amphipod, Allorchestes compressa under semi-static conditions. Acute 96 h LC50`s were determined for each toxicant as well as for the reference toxicants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and zinc sulfate. Sublethal bioassays were undertaken for the same 3 toxicants utilizing the marines and snail Polinices conicus as the test species. No-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC) and lowest-observed-effect-concentrations (LOEC) were determined using ANOVA while EC50`s and EC0`s were calculated using regression analysis. Mean acute 96 h LC50 (S.E.) values for A. compressa exposed to SDS and zinc sulfate were 3.6 mg/l (0.28) and 41.6 mg/l (9.01) respectively. EC50 (S.E.) concentrations for P. conicus exposed to SDS and zinc sulfate for 30 minutes were 44.7 mg/l and 246 mg/l respectively using burying behavior as an endpoint. These sublethal EC50`s were reduced to 20.7 mg/l for SDS and 23.5 mg/l for zinc sulfate following 24 hours of exposure.

  3. Antidiabetic potential and secondary metabolites screening of mangrove gastropod Cerithidea obtusa

    Reni Tri Cahyani; Sri Purwaningsih; Azrifitria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible effects of Cerithidea obtusa extract as antidiabetic and to screen the secondary metabolites presence. Methods: Antidiabetic activity of Cerithidea obtusa extract was measured in vitro usingα-glucosidase inhibition method. Whereas, secondary metabolites screening was measured qualitatively. Results: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 36.40 mg/mL). However, the control drug acarbose had significantly higher antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 0.32 mg/mL). Secondary metabolites screening showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenoids and saponins. Conclusions: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity and the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids and triterpenoids might contribute to the activity.

  4. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noelle; Forbes, Valery E; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing...... particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity...... sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu...

  5. Evolution of shell loss in Opisthobranch gastropods: sea hares (Opisthobranchia, Anaspidea) as a model system

    Vue, Zer

    2009-01-01

    Due to the advantages of the hard, calcifying shell, the Mollusca are one of the most successful animal phyla. The shell forms during embryonic and larval development; however, many molluscan groups have a highly reduced shell or have lost it completely as development and maturation proceeds. These major developmental transitions in shell morphology frequently correlate with ecological transitions (e.g. diet change/change from planktonic to bethic existence pre- and post-met...

  6. Shells of Nerita gastropod bio-monitors of heavy metals pollution around the Indian Ocean

    Minor and heavy metals Mg, Sr, Mn, Fe and Zn were measured in individual shells of four different Nerita species collected from Phuket Island, Thailand. Shell weight and crystallography were also recorded. Heavy metal concentrations were poorly correlated with both shell weight and crystallography. Out of the four species, N. albicilla acquired the highest heavy metal concentrations. Subsequently shells of N. albicilla collected from different sites around the Indian Ocean were compared for their metal concentrations. Shells of industrial sites in Kenya and India had significantly higher heavy metal concentrations than shells from pristine sites in Mauritius and Aldabra. Discussing the factors that may affect the shell metal concentration, the variations encountered herein are best attributed to the ambient bio-available metal concentration. (author)

  7. Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) Concentrations in Marine Gastropod Strombus Canarium in Johor Coastal Areas

    Strombus canarium is a popular food source with high commercial value in southern part of Peninsular Malaysia. As a deposit feeder, Strombus canarium can accumulate pollutants especially heavy metals in their system. Study on this species was conducted at Teluk Sengat and Mersing, Johor where samples of seawater and Strombus canarium were collected during spring low tides around 0 to 0.2 meters. Lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were investigated to determine pollution status in the area. Samples from Teluk Sengat showed that Zn has higher concentration in both water and S. canarium with 0.055 mg/ L and 20.257 mg/ kg wet weight respectively. However the concentrations were within permissible limit of Malaysia Marine Water Quality Criteria and Standard (MMWQS). In contrast, Pb concentration at Teluk Sengat exceeded the MMWQS and its concentration in soft tissues of S. canarium also exceeded the permissible limit recommended by Food and Agriculture Organisation (0.5 mg/ kg wet weight) and World Health Organisation (0.2 mg/ kg wet weight). (author)

  8. Evolution of poecilogony from planktotrophy: cryptic speciation, phylogeography, and larval development in the gastropod genus Alderia.

    Ellingson, Ryan A; Krug, Patrick J

    2006-11-01

    Poecilogony, a rare phenomenon in marine invertebrates, occurs when alternative larval morphs differing in dispersal potential or trophic mode are produced from a single genome. Because both poecilogony and cryptic species are prevalent among sea slugs in the suborder Sacoglossa (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia), molecular data are needed to confirm cases of variable development and to place them in a phylogenetic context. The nominal species Alderia modesta produces long-lived, feeding larvae throughout the North Atlantic and Pacific, but in California can also produce short-lived larvae that metamorphose without feeding. We collected morphological, developmental, and molecular data for Alderia from 17 sites spanning the eastern and western Pacific and North Atlantic. Estuaries south of Bodega Harbor, California, contained a cryptic species (hereafter Alderia sp.) with variable development, sister to the strictly planktotrophic A. modesta. The smaller Alderia sp. seasonally toggled between planktotrophy and lecithotrophy, with some individuals differing in development but sharing mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. The sibling species overlapped in Tomales Bay, California, but showed no evidence of hybridization; laboratory mating trials suggest postzygotic isolation has arisen. Intra- and interspecific divergence times were estimated using a molecular clock calibrated with geminate sacoglossans. Speciation occurred about 4.1 million years ago during a major marine radiation in the eastern Pacific, when large inland embayments in California may have isolated ancestral populations. Atlantic and Pacific A. modesta diverged about 1.7 million years ago, suggesting trans-Arctic gene flow was interrupted by Pleistocene glaciation. Both Alderia species showed evidence of late Pleistocene population expansion, but the southern Alderia sp. likely experienced a more pronounced bottleneck. Reduced body size may have incurred selection against obligate planktotrophy in Alderia sp. by limiting fecundity in the face of high larval mortality rates in warm months. Alternatively, poecilogony may be an adaptive response to seasonal opening of estuaries, facilitating dispersal by long-lived larvae. An improved understanding of the forces controlling seasonal shifts in development in Alderia sp. may yield insight into the evolutionary forces promoting transitions to nonfeeding larvae. PMID:17236422

  9. Discrete potential waves in the photoreceptors of a gastropod mollusc, Hermissenda crassicornis.

    Takeda, T

    1982-01-01

    Intracellular recording of dark adapted photoreceptors of Hermissenda crassicornis (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda, Mollusca) revealed the occurrence of depolarizing waves even after blockade of synaptic transmission and postsynaptic potentials by application of low Ca2+ and high Mg2+ solution. Dim illumination increased the frequency of depolarizing waves. These observations show that Hermissenda photoreceptors have discrete waves which have been demonstrated mainly in arthropod photoreceptors. An histogram of intervals between successive discrete waves under continuous dim illumination was exponential, which is characteristic of a Poisson process. Frequency of discrete waves increased linearly depending on numbers of incident photons to the eye. Comparison of probabilities of eliciting a response to brief dim flashes of various intensities to theoretical Poisson sum curves, together with statistical analysis, indicate that the absorption of single photon is sufficient to evoke a discrete wave. PMID:7101766

  10. Escalation and trophic specialization drive adaptive radiation of freshwater gastropods in ancient lakes on Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Rintelen, Thomas von; Wilson, Anthony Bruce; Meyer, Axel; Glaubrecht, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Species flocks in ancient lakes have long been appreciated as ideal model systems for the study of speciation and adaptive processes. We here present data from a new invertebrate model system with intrinsic parameters distinct from those of other documented radiations. The ancient lakes on Sulawesi harbour an endemic species flock of at least 33 species of viviparous snails. Molecular data reveal multiple independent colonizations of the lakes by riverine ancestors. In each colonizing clade, ...

  11. A gastropod scavenger serving as paratenic host for larval helminth communities in shore crabs

    Latham, A D M; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; McFarland, L H; Poulin, R

    2003-01-01

    The whelk Cominella glandiformis is an important predator-scavenger of New Zealand intertidal ecosystems; a few whelks can quickly eat all the soft tissues of recently dead crabs. In this study, we demonstrate that whelks can also ingest and act as paratenic hosts for at least 4 helminth species ...

  12. Pleistocene gastropods from Toca da Esperança, municipality of Central, State of Bahia, Brazil

    Lais Clark Lima

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Fossil shells collected during excavations in Toca da Esperança, BA, were identified on morphological grounds as: Artemon intermedius intermedius (Albers, 1857; Gastrocopta (Privatula corticaria (Say; Bulimulus (Rhinus heterotrichus (Moricand, 1836 and Polygyratia polygyrata polygyrata (Born, 1780. Bone samples found associated with these shells were dated by the Uranium - Thorium method as being between 204,000 and 295,000 years old (Middle - Upper Pleistocene. Species of the mastofauna also found associated, on the other hand, were identified as being of the Upper Pleistocene or even of the beginning of the Holocene. The material studied here was not dated.

  13. Attachment to gastropod veliger shells - a possible mechanism of dispersal in benthic foraminiferans

    Cedhagen, Tomas; Middelfart, Peter

    1998-01-01

    that the swimming veliger larva is able to carry this load. Most other dispersal mechanisms described in foraminiferans occur in shallow water or are of local importance. In contrast to them, this mechanism may be important for long- distance dispersal also over the sublittoral or in the deep-sea and...

  14. Genotoxic potency of mercuric chloride in gill cells of marine gastropod Planaxis sulcatus using comet assay

    Bhagat, J.; Ingole, B.S.

    Introduction The increase in the discharge of genotoxic chemical from either industrial or municipal waste waters into the aquatic ecosystem has become a great concern to environmentalists around the world. Heavy metals are of great ecological concern due... in sediments and coastal waters of India are presented in table 1. Karunasagar et al., 2006 has reported mercury pollution in Kodaikanal lake due to a thermometer factory. Aquatic mercury pollution of the Ulhas estuary, India have been reported by Ram et al...

  15. Genetic diversification in the Tropical Western Atlantic Ocean: Phylogeography of the gastropod Bulla occidentalis

    Aarø, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    The region under study is the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA) which includes the Caribbean Sea with adjacent coastlines, the Gulf of Mexico, Bermuda and the coast of South America down to the tropical/temperate transitional zone near Uruguay. There are several examples of genetic breaks within the Caribbean that have been attributed to oceanographic factors, transient allopatry, as well as ecological factors, but no common biogeographical pattern has been found and mechanisms behind div...

  16. Relationships and origin of endemic Lake Baikal gastropods (Caenogastropoda: Rissooidea) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Hausdorf, Bernhard; Röpstorf, Peter; Riedel, Frank

    2003-03-01

    The phylogenetic relationships and the origin of two groups of rissooid freshwater snails endemic to Lake Baikal were investigated using partial mitochondrial COI, 12S rDNA, and 16S rDNA sequences. The Baikalian Benedictiinae proved to be closely related to the Lithoglyphinae. According to a molecular clock estimate the two groups diverged in the Paleogene. The Benedictiinae might have evolved autochthonously in precursors of Lake Baikal. The Baikalian Baicaliidae are probably most closely related to the Amnicolidae and the Bithyniidae. These groups diverged at the latest during the Cretaceous. Thus the origin of the Baicaliidae predates the origin of the Baikal rift zone. The Baicaliidae evolved probably in other Central Asian freshwater reservoirs. However, the radiation of the extant Baicaliidae only started in the Neogene and might have occurred autochthonously in Lake Baikal. The conchological similarity of the Baicaliidae and the Pyrgulidae is due to convergence. The Pyrgulidae diverged from the common stem lineage of the other hydrobiid families at the latest in the Jurassic. The Bithyniidae is derived from hydrobiids and is related to the Amnicolidae. PMID:12644402

  17. Foraminiferan Prey in the Annual Life-cycle of the Predatory Opisthobranch Gastropod Retusa obtusa (Montagu)

    Berry, A. J.

    1994-06-01

    From February to June species of Foraminifera were the only food found in gizzards of young Retusa obtusa (Montagu) in the Forth Estuary, Scotland. Then, in July, newly settled Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant) also began to be eaten although foraminiferans continued to be consumed in increasing frequency until September. Foraminiferans became scarce in R. obtusa from October to January during which time H. ulvae increasingly dominated the diet. Foraminiferans and H. ulvae both reached their highest frequencies in the gizzards of adults during February-April. Finally, foraminiferans became predominant again as H. ulvae became rare in older, post-reproductive R. obtusa in April and May prior to the death of predators in May and June. The highest count was 31 foraminiferans in one gizzard, the overall mean was 5·6 per gizzard and monthly means ranged from 1·6 in January to 9·7 in February 1993. Throughout most of the period of predation on H. ulvae (August-January), counts of foraminiferans were markedly higher in those gizzards which lacked H. ulvae than where H. ulvae was also present. Only earlier (July) and later (February and March), did counts with H. ulvae present approach and even exceed (in March) those where H. ulvae was absent. Foraminiferans in the gizzards reflected the mudflat population in species composition [almost all Haynesina germanica (Ehrenburg)]. Yet the snails, even the biggest ones, largely restricted their diet to the smaller foraminiferans (mostly 100-150 μm diameter), rarely taking the abundant individuals measuring 200-350 μm. Foraminiferans were cleared from the gizzard in ˜12 h, implying maximum consumption in the field of ˜4800 Foraminifera m -2 day -1 in September, and a total of ˜2747 by a single R. obtusa in the course of a year's growth from February to February, after which the biggest specimens of R. obtusa soon die. It is estimated that foraminiferans supply ˜60% more food than do H. ulvae during a lifetimes's growth but that H. ulvae become most important during late growth and reproduction.

  18. Novel Forms of Structural Integration between Microbes and a Hydrothermal Vent Gastropod from the Indian Ocean

    Goffredi, Shana K.; Warén, Anders; Orphan, Victoria J; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    Here we describe novel forms of structural integration between endo- and episymbiotic microbes and an unusual new species of snail from hydrothermal vents in the Indian Ocean. The snail houses a dense population of {gamma}-proteobacteria within the cells of its greatly enlarged esophageal gland. This tissue setting differs from that of all other vent mollusks, which harbor sulfur-oxidizing endosymbionts in their gills. The significantly reduced digestive tract, the isotopic signatures of the ...

  19. Novel forms of structural integration between microbes and a hydrothermal vent gastropod from the Indian Ocean.

    Goffredi, Shana K; Warén, Anders; Orphan, Victoria J; Van Dover, Cindy L; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2004-05-01

    Here we describe novel forms of structural integration between endo- and episymbiotic microbes and an unusual new species of snail from hydrothermal vents in the Indian Ocean. The snail houses a dense population of gamma-proteobacteria within the cells of its greatly enlarged esophageal gland. This tissue setting differs from that of all other vent mollusks, which harbor sulfur-oxidizing endosymbionts in their gills. The significantly reduced digestive tract, the isotopic signatures of the snail tissues, and the presence of internal bacteria suggest a dependence on chemoautotrophy for nutrition. Most notably, this snail is unique in having a dense coat of mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, a feature seen in no other living metazoan. The scales are coated with iron sulfides (pyrite and greigite) and heavily colonized by epsilon- and delta-proteobacteria, likely participating in mineralization of the sclerites. This novel metazoan-microbial collaboration illustrates the great potential of organismal adaptation in chemically and physically challenging deep-sea environments. PMID:15128570

  20. Detection of Bioactive Compounds in the Mucus Nets of Dendropoma maxima, Sowerby 1825 (Prosobranch Gastropod Vermetidae, Mollusca

    Anne Klöppel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The sessile suspension-feeding wormsnail Dendropoma maxima, Sowerby 1825 (Vermetidae secretes a mucus net to capture planktonic prey. The nets are spread out over the corals and often have remarkable deleterious effects on them like changes in growth form and pigmentation shifts not uncommonly resulting in tissue necrosis. Until now, there is no explanation for this phenomenon although the indication as well as theories about its genesis is mentioned in several publications. Vermetids are well studied concerning the intraspecific competition with neighboring individuals but not in their interaction with other taxa like corals or fish. We did extensive in situ video recording and observed that fish avoided the plankton-load nets although several specialized taxa are known to be molluscivores, mucivores, and/or feed on plankton. As many molluscs use chemical weapons to combat feeding pressure and to defend themselves against predators, we screened empty and plankton-load mucus nets for potential bioactive metabolites. Bioactivity testing was performed with a recently developed system based on a chromatographic separation (high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC and a bioassay with luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. Thus, we found at least two active compounds exclusively accumulated by the wormsnails themselves. This is the first record of bioactive properties in the whole family of Vermetidae.

  1. Genotoxicity of cadmium chloride in the marine gastropod Nerita chamaeleon using comet assay and alkaline unwinding assay

    Sarkar, A.; Bhagat, J.; Ingole, B.S.; Rao, P.V.S.S.D.P.; Markad, V.L.

    of DNA damage in gill cells of N. chamaeleon was measured after in vivo exposure to four different concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 75 mu g/L) of CdCl2. In vitro exposure of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 1, 10, 25, and 50 mu M...

  2. Conservation of ParaHox genes' function in patterning of the digestive tract of the marine gastropod Gibbula varia

    Steiner Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of all three ParaHox genes has been described in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans, but to date one of these three genes, Xlox has not been reported from any ecdysozoan taxa and both Xlox and Gsx are absent in nematodes. There is evidence that the ParaHox genes were ancestrally a single chromosomal cluster. Colinear expression of the ParaHox genes in anterior, middle, and posterior tissues of several species studied so far suggest that these genes may be responsible for axial patterning of the digestive tract. So far, there are no data on expression of these genes in molluscs. Results We isolated the complete coding sequences of the three Gibbula varia ParaHox genes, and then tested their expression in larval and postlarval development. In Gibbula varia, the ParaHox genes participate in patterning of the digestive tract and are expressed in some cells of the neuroectoderm. The expression of these genes coincides with the gradual formation of the gut in the larva. Gva-Gsx patterns potential neural precursors of cerebral ganglia as well as of the apical sensory organ. During larval development this gene is involved in the formation of the mouth and during postlarval development it is expressed in the precursor cells involved in secretion of the radula, the odontoblasts. Gva-Xolx and Gva-Cdx are involved in gut patterning in the middle and posterior parts of digestive tract, respectively. Both genes are expressed in some ventral neuroectodermal cells; however the expression of Gva-Cdx fades in later larval stages while the expression of Gva-Xolx in these cells persists. Conclusions In Gibbula varia the ParaHox genes are expressed during anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive system. This colinearity is not easy to spot during early larval stages because the differentiated endothelial cells within the yolk permanently migrate to their destinations in the gut. After torsion, Gsx patterns the mouth and foregut, Xlox the midgut gland or digestive gland, and Cdx the hindgut. ParaHox genes of Gibbula are also expressed during specification of cerebral and ventral neuroectodermal cells. Our results provide additional support for the ancestral complexity of Gsx expression and its ancestral role in mouth patterning in protostomes, which was secondarily lost or simplified in some species.

  3. Assembly processes of gastropod community change with horizontal and vertical zonation in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    Hauffe, Torsten; Albrecht, Christian; Wilke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most diverse freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether species community composition, as well as the diversification of its endemic taxa, is mainly driven by dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, or species interaction. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics, as provided by the unifying framework of the “metacommunity speciation mode...

  4. Determination of Acetylcholinesterase activities in marine gastropod (Morula granulata) as a biomarker of neurotoxic contaminants along the Goan coast.

    Sarkar, A.; Tegur, P.M.; Jana, S.; Rao, P.V.S.S.D.P.

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that degrades the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, producing choline and acetate. group. It is mainly found at neuromuscular junctions and cholinergic synapses in the central nervous system, where its activity...

  5. Assembly and annotation of a non-model gastropod (Nerita melanotragus) transcriptome: a comparison of De novo assemblers

    Amin, Shorash; Prentis, Peter J.; Gilding, Edward K.; Pavasovic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background The sequencing, de novo assembly and annotation of transcriptome datasets generated with next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled biologists to answer genomic questions in non-model species with unprecedented ease. Reliable and accurate de novo assembly and annotation of transcriptomes, however, is a critically important step for transcriptome assemblies generated from short read sequences. Typical benchmarks for assembly and annotation reliability have been performed with mode...

  6. X-irradiation effects on growth and metamorphosis of gastropod larvae (Crepidula fornicata): A model for environmental radiation teratogenesis

    Little information is available on the effects of x-irradiation on multicellular marine organisms. C. fornicata larvae were irradiated at 200 rad/min, 250 kVp x-rays to doses between 50 and 20,000 rad in a single fraction. Shell length, biomass, metamorphosis to the next stage of development, and mortality were measured. The results demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in 20 day shell length at doses above 2000 rad (control 850 +- 110 μm length, 820 +- 100μm for 50 rad, 750 +- 30 μm for 2000 rad, 710 +- 30 μm for 5000 rad, 620 +- 30 μm for 10,000 rad, 580 +- 15 μm for 20,000 rad). There was a dose dependent decrease in shell length growth between days 1 and 20. Biomass was significantly decreased per 100μm shell length for doses above 10,000 rad. A significant increase in larvae mortality was detected with doses above 2000 rad. Most significantly, the cumulative percent of larval metamorphosis was significantly decreased by doses as low as 500 rad and was detectable as early as 18 days after irradiation. C. fornicata may provide a very sensitive system in which to study teratogenic effects of x-irradiation on multicellular organisms

  7. The Gastropod Menace: Slugs on Brassica Plants Affect Caterpillar Survival through Consumption and Interference with Parasitoid Attraction.

    Desurmont, Gaylord A; Zemanova, Miriam A; Turlings, Ted C J

    2016-03-01

    Terrestrial molluscs and insect herbivores play a major role as plant consumers in a number of ecosystems, but their direct and indirect interactions have hardly been explored. The omnivorous nature of slugs makes them potential disrupters of predator-prey relationships, as a direct threat to small insects and through indirect, plant-mediated effects. Here, we examined the effects of the presence of two species of slugs, Arion rufus (native) and A. vulgaris (invasive) on the survivorship of young Pieris brassicae caterpillars when feeding on Brassica rapa plants, and on plant attractiveness to the main natural enemy of P. brassicae, the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata. In two separate predation experiments, caterpillar mortality was significantly higher on plants co-infested with A. rufus or A. vulgaris. Moreover, caterpillar mortality correlated positively with slug mass and leaf consumption by A. vulgaris. At the third trophic level, plants infested with slugs and plants co-infested with slugs and caterpillars were far less attractive to parasitoids than plants damaged by caterpillars only, independently of slug species. Chemical analyses confirmed that volatile emissions, which provide foraging cues for parasitoids, were strongly reduced in co-infested plants. Our study shows that the presence of slugs has the potential to affect insect populations, directly via consumptive effects, and indirectly via changes in plant volatiles that result in a reduced attraction of natural enemies. The fitness cost for P. brassicae imposed by increased mortality in presence of slugs may be counterbalanced by the benefit of escaping its parasitoids. PMID:27002323

  8. THE EFFECTS OF OCEAN ACIDIFICATION AND SEA SURFACE WARMING ON THE EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE OPISTHOBRANCH GASTROPOD STYLOCHEILUS STRIATUS

    Allen, Trevor Riley

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO2 compound the rates of long-term changes in the abiotic conditions of the Earth’s oceans. Because many physiological processes, including calcification rate, depend on these physical factors, there is mounting concern over how changes in temperature (T) and the CaCO3 saturation of seawater will affect marine organisms.  These effects may be particularly relevant during development— many organisms produce protective calcified structures critical for pe...

  9. Effects of test design and temperature in a partial life-cycle study with the freshwater gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    Macken, Ailbhe; Le Page, Gareth; Hayfield, Amanda; Williams, Timothy D; Brown, Rebecca J

    2012-09-01

    Potamopyrgus antipodarum is a candidate for a standardized mollusk partial life-cycle study. This is a comparative study of two test designs (microplate and beaker), with additional endpoints to the proposed guideline methods, for example, tracking of continuous reproductive output over 28 d and attributing it to individual female snails. In addition, an investigation of the effects of temperature (16, 20, and 25°C) on reproduction was also conducted employing the microplate design. PMID:22573501

  10. Mechanisms driving diversity-productivity relationships differ between exotic and native communities and are affected by gastropod herbivory.

    Korell, Lotte; Schmidt, Robin; Bruelheide, Helge; Hensen, Isabell; Auge, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Biodiversity experiments have shown that productivity usually increases with plant species richness. However, most of those studies disregarded the importance of trophic interactions to the diversity-productivity relationship, and focused on the loss of native species while ignoring invasions by exotic species. Yet, as functional complementarity and the impact of plant antagonists are likely to differ between native and exotic communities, the diversity-productivity relationship may change when native communities are invaded by exotic species. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to test how diversity effects, evenness, and productivity differed between exotic and native assemblages of grassland plants, and how these communities were influenced by slug herbivory. In line with other experiments, we found higher productivity in exotic than in native communities. However, different mechanisms (complementarity vs. selection effect) contributed to the positive diversity-productivity relationships in exotic vs. native communities. Against expectations, native communities showed much lower evenness and a greater selection effect, suggesting that competitive dominance among native species may be even stronger than among exotic species. Slug herbivory decreased productivity independently of species origin and species diversity. However, exotic communities showed a threefold higher complementarity effect than native communities in the absence of slugs, which was mainly driven by differences in the responses of native and exotic legumes and nonleguminous herbs. Our results imply that underlying mechanisms for the positive diversity-productivity relationship differ between native and exotic communities in the early stages of community development, and that differential responses of plant functional groups to generalist herbivory can contribute to this pattern. PMID:26235964

  11. Responses of primary cultured haemocytes from the marine gastropod Haliotis tuberculata under 10-day exposure to cadmium chloride

    Latire, Thomas; Le Pabic, Charles; Mottin, Elmina; Mottier, Antoine; Costil, Katherine; Koueta, Noussithe; Lebel, Jean-Marc [UMR 100 IFREMER ' Physiologie et Ecophysiologie des Mollusques Marins' - IFR 146 ICORE - IBFA - Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Campus 1, Science C, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex (France); Serpentini, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.serpentini@unicaen.fr [UMR 100 IFREMER ' Physiologie et Ecophysiologie des Mollusques Marins' - IFR 146 ICORE - IBFA - Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Campus 1, Science C, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex (France)

    2012-03-15

    Among metals, cadmium, a non-essential element, is an important pollutant that is released into aquatic environments. Due to its persistence and bioaccumulation, this metal has been shown to exert immunological effects on organisms. The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro effects of cadmium chloride using a haemocyte primary culture from the European abalone, Haliotis tuberculata. Most studies have maintained viable haemocytes in vitro for periods ranging from several hours to several days during acute exposures. Few investigations have reported the effects of metals using longer in vitro exposures, which are more realistic with regard to mimicking environmental conditions. In this study, we exposed abalone haemocytes to concentrations from 0.5 to 50,000 {mu}g L{sup -1} of CdCl{sub 2} for 10 days. The effects of cadmium chloride were reflected in a significant decrease in the number of viable cells and morphological modifications in a concentration-dependent manner beginning at a concentration of 500 {mu}g L{sup -1} as well as in some physiological processes, such as phagocytotic activity and the number of lysosome-positive cells. In contrast, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were increased beginning at a concentration of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}, which is consistent with environmental concentrations in polluted sites. For PO activity and ROS production, maximally 9-fold and 130% inductions, respectively, were recorded under the highest dose. These results thus indicate that cadmium chloride alters immune parameters of abalone haemocytes and that the long-term (10 days) primary culture system used here represents a suitable, sensitive in vitro model for assessing cytotoxic responses.

  12. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    Lyons Deirdre C; Perry Kimberly J; Lesoway Maryna P; Henry Jonathan Q

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition...

  13. Gastropod shell as a substrate for cocoon deposition by the deep-sea fish leech Notostomum cyclostomum (Hirudinida: Piscicolidae)

    Nagasawa,Kazuya; Ueda, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Cocoons of the piscicolid leech Notostomum cyclostomum Johansson, 1898 were found on the shell of the whelk Buccinum striatissimum collected at 200 m in depth in the southern Sea of Japan off Hyogo Prefecture, central Japan. The leech appears to utilize whelks as well as snow crabs Chionoecetes opilio as a substrate for cocoon deposition.

  14. Gastropod (Otala lactea) shell nanomechanical and structural characterization as a biomonitoring tool for dermal and dietary exposure to a model metal

    Allison, Paul G. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Seiter, Jennifer M. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Diaz, Alfredo [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico); Lindsay, James H. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Moser, Robert D. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Tappero, Ryan V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kennedy, Alan J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Metallic tungsten (W) was initially assumed to be environmentally benign and a green alternative to lead. However, subsequent investigations showed that fishing weights and munitions containing elemental W can fragment and oxidize into complex monomeric and polymeric tungstate (WO4) species in the environment; this led to increased solubility and mobility in soils and increased bioaccumulation potential in plant and animal tissues. Here we expand on the results of our previous research, which examined tungsten toxicity, bioaccumulation, and compartmentalization into organisms, and present in this research that the bioaccumulation of W was related to greater than 50% reduction in the mechanical properties of the snail (Otala lactea), based on depth-sensing nanoindentation. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence maps and X-ray diffraction measurements confirm the integration of W in newly formed layers of the shell matrix with the observed changes in shell biomechanical properties, mineralogical composition, and crystal orientation. With further development, this technology could be employed as a biomonitoring tool for historic metals contamination since unlike the more heavily studied bioaccumulation into soft tissue, shell tissue does not actively eliminate contaminants.

  15. Running crabs, walking crinoids, grazing gastropods: behavioral diversity and evolutionary implications in the Cabeço da Ladeira lagerstätte (Middle Jurassic, Portugal)

    Carvalho, Carlos Neto de; Pereira, Bruno Claro; Klompmaker, Adiel; Baucon, Andrea; Moita, José António; Pereira, Pedro; Machado, Susana; Belo, João; Carvalho, Jorge; Mergulhão, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Ichnology is a powerful tool for understanding the evolutionary paths of animal clades, through the paleobiology of behavior preserved in Lagerstätten such as the Cabeço da Ladeira (Portugal) site. Here, the peritidal carbonates of the Chão das Pias Formation (Middle Jurassic, upper Bajocian) record the development of microbial mats in a tidal flat. Episodically, the flat was expanded during periods of equinoctial spring tides that may have been responsible for the in situ killing of several ...

  16. Evaluation of impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods (Cronia contracta) as a biomarker of genotoxic contaminants in coastal water around Goa, west coast of India

    Sarkar, A.; Gaitonde, D.C.S.; Sarkar, Amit; Vashistha, D.; DeSilva, C.; Dalal, S.G.

    , Palolem, were deployed at indicate that the risk of cancer increased alarmingly due to occurrence of carcinogenic compounds in the environment (Ruddon, 1995; Vogelstein and Kinzler, 1998). In order to ARTICLE IN PRESS accordance with national... and institutional guidelines for the protection of human subjects and animal welfare. C3 Corresponding author. E-mail addresses: asarkar@nio.org (A. Sarkar), understand the mechanisms and to characterise high-risk toxicants, the application of biomarkers...

  17. Preliminary observations on the effects of vector-averaged gravity on the embryonic and larval development of the gastropod mollusk, Ilyanassa obsoleta Stimpson

    Conrad, G. W.; Stephens, A. P.; Conrad, A. H.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of Ilyanassa obsoleta Stimpson were collected immediately after their deposition in egg capsules. Unopened egg capsules then were affixed to glass slides, and incubated either statically (controls) or on a clinostat (experimentals). After incubation for 9-14 days, hatching occurred sooner and in a higher percentage of clinostated capsules than in controls. Embryos that hatched while undergoing clinostat incubation were abnormal in morphology, whereas other embryos present in non-hatched capsules in the same tubes appeared normal, as did embryos in the control tubes. Although the results are compatible with a conclusion that vector-averaged gravity in the experimental tubes caused the altered development, some other aspects of how the incubations were done may have contributed to the differences between the control and experimental results.

  18. Retraction notice to "Antimicrobial secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsules and egg masses" [APJTB Volume 2 Issue 11(2012) 916-922

    Kaviarasan; T; Siva; Sankar; R; Yogamoorthi; A

    2015-01-01

    <正>This article has been retracted:please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal(http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy).This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and the First Author.Both the first author and the journal’s editor confirmed that Dr.A Yogamoorthi is not responsible for the plagiarism since his/her name was added without consent.

  19. Freshwater gastropods of the Baixada Maranhense Microregion, an endemic area for schistosomiasis in the State of Maranhão, Brazil: I - qualitative study

    Selma Patricia Diniz Cantanhede

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Baixada Maranhense Microregion currently has the highest prevalence of schistosomiasis in the State of Maranhão, likely because this parasitosis is characterized as an occupational disease, and increased contact with water increases the risk of infection by Schistosoma mansoni. This paper reports the results of the first comprehensive freshwater malacological survey performed in the Baixada Maranhense Microregion. Methods: Freshwater mollusks were collected from the twenty-one municipalities of the Baixada Maranhense Microregion and from Bacurituba and Cajapió and were evaluated for infection by trematodes. Results: A total of 9,129 mollusks were collected (sixteen species, which included the first records of six species in the State of Maranhão: Gundlachia radiata, G. ticaga, Hebetancylus moricandi, Plesiophysa guadeloupensis, Pomacea bridgesii diffusa and Omalonyx sp. Biomphalaria glabrata was found in five municipalities, whereas B. straminea was found in nine. Biomphalaria glabrata and B. straminea were observed in syntopy in Pinheiro and São Bento. Of the 990 specimens of B. glabrata and the 2,109 specimens of B. straminea that were exposed to and/or analyzed for the presence of larval trematodes, only a single specimen of B. glabrata (0.1% from São Bento shed S. mansoni. Other larval trematodes were first observed in mollusks from the State of Maranhão. Conclusions: These results indicate that the study area is epidemiologically important due to the presence of two natural vectors of schistosomiasis and the active transmission of schistosomiasis, which was confirmed in the infected specimen that was collected in this study.

  20. A new species of Miocene terrestrial gastropod Gastrocopta from Poland and the validity of 'Pupa (Vertigo) suevica'

    Stworzewicz, E.; Prisyazhnyuk, V.A. [Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland)

    2006-03-15

    We describe Gastrocopta sandbergeri sp. nov. from the Miocene brown coal deposits of the open-cast mine Belchatow (central Poland) and identify it as conspecific with Pupa (Vertigo) suevica Sandberger, 1875 (nomen nudum) from the Miocene of Steinheim. The new species is most similar to Gastrocopta nouletiana (Dupuy, 1850) but differs in having smaller and always slender shell, less convex whorls, much weaker crest on the body whorl (or even absent) and generally rather weakly developed teeth (6-7) in the aperture.

  1. Recieps for the Mesogastropod - Strombus canarium

    S. Arularasan

    2010-01-01

    Shellfish and other aquatic organisms suitable for food and feed are of worldwide importance. Thelipid components of the gastropods are attaining unpredicted popularity as important nutritional contributionto man’s diet. The gastropod meat is not only tasty but also a nourishing food. As the gastropod meat is freeof cholesterol, it is considered good for cardiac disorders. In the present study, the gastropod Strombuscanarium meat is used for the preparation of good recipes such as dog conch s...

  2. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-01-01

    postmetamorphic stages exhibit only few congruencies with other gastropod taxa investigated to date, which is probably due to common larval but different adult life styles within gastropods. Accordingly, this study provides further evidence for morphological plasticity in gastropod myogenesis and stresses the...

  3. Control biológico del fouling en tanques de cultivo de macroalgas mediante el gasterópodo Osilinus atratus (Wood, 1828)

    Portillo, E.

    2002-01-01

    We tested the use of the gastropod Osilinus atratus (Wood, 1828) to control and eliminate fouling on the walls of macroalgae culture tanks. These gastropods use such fouling as a food source, and their continuous grazing excursions prevent the attachment and development of propagules. This system of biological fouling control via the co-culture of gastropods and macroalgae, besides being an environmentally friendly, is effective in reducing production costs and in limiting the negative effect...

  4. Efecto de la conversión del manglar a potrero sobre la densidad y tallas de dos gasterópodos en el delta del río Turbo (golfo de Urabá, Caribe colombiano) Effects mangrove conversion to pasture on density and shell size of two gastropods in the Turbo River Delta (Urabá Gulf, Caribbean coast of Colombia)

    Blanco, Juan F.; María C. Castaño

    2012-01-01

    El delta del río Turbo es una de las áreas del golfo de Urabá, Colombia donde la tala de manglar es más extensa y activa, por lo tanto, se evaluó el impacto de la conversión de manglar a potrero, comparando la densidad y talla promedio de dos gasterópodos (Neritina virginea y Melampus coffeus), variables dasonómicas, físico-químicas intersticiales y granulométricas del suelo entre varios parches de: 1) manglar de franja, 2) manglar de cuenca, 3) manglar de cuenca mixto y 4) manglar de cuenca ...

  5. Role of marine pollutants in impairment of DNA integrity.

    Sarker, S.; Sarkar, A.

    In this article, we present an overview on the role of marine pollutants in impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods exposed to xenobiotics released from various sources into the coastal ecosystem. We provide an insight into the impact...

  6. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Southern California: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for sensitive bivalves, gastropods, insects, crustaceans, and other invertebrate species in Southern...

  7. Evaluation and selection of test methods for assessment of contaminated sediments in the Baltic Sea

    Lehtonen, Kari; Ahvo, Aino; Berezina, Nadya; Breitholtz, Martin; Eklund, Brita; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Strand, Jakob; Sundelin, Brita

    toxicity), sediment avoidance (C. volutator), bacterial luminescence (Vibrio fischeri), algae growth inhibition (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Ceramium tenuicorne), SOS/umu genotoxicity (Salmonella) and imposex in female gastropods (Nassarius reticulata). The results of this first round of experiments...

  8. Functional-ecological and age-specific regularities of radionuclide concentration by freshwater molluscs of Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone

    The results of the studies on 90Sr and 137Cs content in the tissues of bivalve and gastropod mollusks of water basins in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP have been analyzed. The dependence of radionuclide accumulation factors on the peculiarities of morphological structure, functional ecology and nutrition type was found. The age dynamics of 137Cs content in some species of Gastropod was studied

  9. カゴシマケン クロシマ ニオケル キバアマガイ Nerita plicata ノ カラモヨウ タヨウセイ

    河合, 渓; カワイ, ケイ; KAWAI, Kei

    2011-01-01

    The gastropod Nerita plicata is widely distributed over the upper parts of the intertidal zone in the Indo-Pacif ic Ocean and is reported to exhibit a shell colour polymorphism. This study examined the shell colour polymorphism related to size class. The study was performed on two islands in the Kuroshima Islands on 22 May 2010. Three different shell colour morphs (completely black-banded, partially black-banded, and completely white) were observed for this gastropod. There is ...

  10. Utilization of shells of the snail Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda) by the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802) (Decapoda, Anomura) in the São Vicente Estuary, São Paulo, Brazil Utilización de conchas de caracoles terrestres Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda) por el cangrejo ermitaño Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802) (Decapoda, Anomura) en el estuario de São Vicente, São Paulo, Brasil

    Bruno S. Sant'Anna; Cilene M. Zangrande; Alvaro L. D. Reigada

    2005-01-01

    Hermit crabs depend on mollusc shells for housing. In this study, an unusual resource is reported for a hermit crab that usually inhabits marine gastropod shells. During a field study conducted from May 2001 to April 2003 in an estuarine area in São Vicente, state of São Paulo, Brazil, 21 individuals of Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802) were found inhabiting the shells of the terrestrial gastropod Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822. A. fulica occurs in nearshore grass patches, where occasional con...