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Sample records for acochlidian gastropod pseudunela

  1. Tiny but complex - interactive 3D visualization of the interstitial acochlidian gastropod Pseudunela cornuta (Challis, 1970

    Heß Martin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesopsammic acochlidians are small, and organ complexity may be strongly reduced (regressive evolution by progenesis, especially in microhedylacean species. The marine interstitial hedylopsacean Pseudunela cornuta (Challis, 1970, however, was suggested as having a complex reproductive system resembling that of much larger, limnic and benthic species. The present study aims to reconstruct the detailed anatomy and true complexity of P. cornuta from serial, semithin histological sections by using modern computer-based 3D visualization with Amira software, and to explain it in an evolutionary context. Results Our results demonstrate considerable discordance with the original species description, which was based solely on paraffin sections. Here, we show that the nervous system of P. cornuta has paired rhinophoral, optic and gastro-oesophageal ganglia, three distinct ganglia on the visceral nerve cord, and a putative osphradial ganglion, while anterior accessory ganglia are absent. The presence of an anal genital cloaca is clearly rejected and the anus, nephropore and gonopore open separately to the exterior; the circulatory and excretory systems are well-differentiated, including a two-chambered heart and a complex kidney with a long, looped nephroduct; the special androdiaulic reproductive system shows two allosperm receptacles, three nidamental glands, a cavity with unknown function, as well as highly complex anterior copulatory organs with two separate glandular and impregnatory systems including a penial stylet that measures approximately a third of the whole length of the preserved specimen. Conclusion In spite of its small body size, the interstitial hermaphroditic P. cornuta shows high complexity regarding all major organ systems; the excretory system is as differentiated as in species of the sister clade, the limnic and much larger Acochlidiidae, and the reproductive system is by far the most elaborated one ever observed

  2. Cryptic species in tropic sands--interactive 3D anatomy, molecular phylogeny and evolution of meiofaunal Pseudunelidae (Gastropoda, Acochlidia.

    Timea P Neusser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Towards realistic estimations of the diversity of marine animals, tiny meiofaunal species usually are underrepresented. Since the biological species concept is hardly applicable on exotic and elusive animals, it is even more important to apply a morphospecies concept on the best level of information possible, using accurate and efficient methodology such as 3D modelling from histological sections. Molecular approaches such as sequence analyses may reveal further, cryptic species. This is the first case study on meiofaunal gastropods to test diversity estimations from traditional taxonomy against results from modern microanatomical methodology and molecular systematics. RESULTS: The examined meiofaunal Pseudunela specimens from several Indo-Pacific islands cannot be distinguished by external features. Their 3D microanatomy shows differences in the organ systems and allows for taxonomic separation in some cases. Additional molecular analyses based on partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and 16S rRNA markers revealed considerable genetic structure that is largely congruent with anatomical or geographical patterns. Two new species (Pseudunela viatoris and P. marteli spp. nov. are formally described integrating morphological and genetic analyses. Phylogenetic analysis using partial 16S rRNA, COI and the nuclear 18S rRNA markers shows a clade of Pseudunelidae species as the sister group to limnic Acochlidiidae. Within Pseudunela, two subtypes of complex excretory systems occur. A complex kidney already evolved in the ancestor of Hedylopsacea. Several habitat shifts occurred during hedylopsacean evolution. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptic species occur in tropical meiofaunal Pseudunela gastropods, and likely in other meiofaunal groups with poor dispersal abilities, boosting current diversity estimations. Only a combined 3D microanatomical and molecular approach revealed actual species diversity within Pseudunela reliably. Such

  3. On the origin of Acochlidia and other enigmatic euthyneuran gastropods, with implications for the systematics of Heterobranchia

    Knebelsberger Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A robust phylogenetic hypothesis of euthyneuran gastropods, as a basis to reconstructing their evolutionary history, is still hindered by several groups of aberrant, more or less worm-like slugs with unclear phylogenetic relationships. As a traditional "order" in the Opisthobranchia, the Acochlidia have a long history of controversial placements, among others influenced by convergent adaptation to the mainly meiofaunal habitats. The present study includes six out of seven acochlidian families in a comprehensive euthyneuran taxon sampling with special focus on minute, aberrant slugs. Since there is no fossil record of tiny, shell-less gastropods, a molecular clock was used to estimate divergence times within Euthyneura. Results Our multi-locus molecular study confirms Acochlidia in a pulmonate relationship, as sister to Eupulmonata. Previous hypotheses of opisthobranch relations, or of a common origin with other meiofaunal Euthyneura, are clearly rejected. The enigmatic amphibious and insectivorous Aitengidae incerta sedis clusters within Acochlidia, as sister to meiofaunal and brackish Pseudunelidae and limnic Acochlidiidae. Euthyneura, Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata as traditionally defined are non-monophyletic. A relaxed molecular clock approach indicates a late Palaeozoic diversification of Euthyneura and a Mesozoic origin of the major euthyneuran diversity, including Acochlidia. Conclusions The present study shows that the inclusion of small, enigmatic groups is necessary to solve deep-level phylogenetic relationships, and underlines that "pulmonate" and "opisthobranch" phylogeny, respectively, cannot be solved independently from each other. Our phylogenetic hypothesis requires reinvestigation of the traditional classification of Euthyneura: morphological synapomorphies of the traditionally defined Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia are evaluated in light of the presented phylogeny, and a redefinition of major groups is

  4. A SURVEY OF GASTROPODS FROM TUTICORIN COAST

    S. Jesily; R. Rooslin

    2015-01-01

    Gastropod molluscs are represented by chank, top shells, turbo shell and a variety of ornamental species contribute to the marine fisheries . The present investigation is an attempt to assess the diversity of gastropods and their utilization in Tuticorin coast. In the present study 37 species of gastropods belong to 21 families, including 12 edible species were recorded. The gastropods species Xancus pyrum, Babylonia spirata, Babylonia zeylanica, Chicoreus ramosus, Chicoreus virgineus, Lambis...

  5. A SURVEY OF GASTROPODS FROM TUTICORIN COAST

    S. Jesily

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastropod molluscs are represented by chank, top shells, turbo shell and a variety of ornamental species contribute to the marine fisheries . The present investigation is an attempt to assess the diversity of gastropods and their utilization in Tuticorin coast. In the present study 37 species of gastropods belong to 21 families, including 12 edible species were recorded. The gastropods species Xancus pyrum, Babylonia spirata, Babylonia zeylanica, Chicoreus ramosus, Chicoreus virgineus, Lambis lambis, Lambis truncata and Cypraea tigris were recorded as the most abundant species. After extraction of the muscle for food the chank shells are cleaned and marketed and form the basis for the shell craft articles.

  6. Evolution of gastropod mitochondrial genome arrangements

    Zardoya Rafael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastropod mitochondrial genomes exhibit an unusually great variety of gene orders compared to other metazoan mitochondrial genome such as e.g those of vertebrates. Hence, gastropod mitochondrial genomes constitute a good model system to study patterns, rates, and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangement. However, this kind of evolutionary comparative analysis requires a robust phylogenetic framework of the group under study, which has been elusive so far for gastropods in spite of the efforts carried out during the last two decades. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of five mitochondrial genomes of gastropods (Pyramidella dolabrata, Ascobulla fragilis, Siphonaria pectinata, Onchidella celtica, and Myosotella myosotis, and we analyze them together with another ten complete mitochondrial genomes of gastropods currently available in molecular databases in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships among the main lineages of gastropods. Results Comparative analyses with other mollusk mitochondrial genomes allowed us to describe molecular features and general trends in the evolution of mitochondrial genome organization in gastropods. Phylogenetic reconstruction with commonly used methods of phylogenetic inference (ME, MP, ML, BI arrived at a single topology, which was used to reconstruct the evolution of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in the group. Conclusion Four main lineages were identified within gastropods: Caenogastropoda, Vetigastropoda, Patellogastropoda, and Heterobranchia. Caenogastropoda and Vetigastropoda are sister taxa, as well as, Patellogastropoda and Heterobranchia. This result rejects the validity of the derived clade Apogastropoda (Caenogastropoda + Heterobranchia. The position of Patellogastropoda remains unclear likely due to long-branch attraction biases. Within Heterobranchia, the most heterogeneous group of gastropods, neither Euthyneura (because of the inclusion of P

  7. Fracture Mitigation Strategies in Gastropod Shells

    Salinas, Christopher; Kisailus, David

    2013-04-01

    For hundreds of millions of years, gastropods have been evolving, modifying their external calcified shells for defense against shell-breaking and drilling predators. They have evolved primarily to use two different aragonitic microstructures: the evolutionary older Nacre (mother of pearl) structure and the more recently developed crossed-lamellar structure. By using both of these structures, gastropods are able to produce shells that are significantly tougher then geologic aragonite. However, the crossed-lamellar structure allows for a wider variety of shell morphologies, ensuring its increasing presence since the Mesozoic Marine Revolution more than 200 million years ago.

  8. Invasion of Impatiens glandulifera affects terrestrial gastropods by altering microclimate

    Ruckli, Regina; Rusterholz, Hans-Peter; Baur, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Invasive species can have far-reaching impacts on ecosystems. Invasive plants may be able to change habitat structure and quality. We conducted a field experiment to examine whether the invasive plant Impatiens glandulifera affects native terrestrial gastropods. We also evaluated whether the invasive plant alters forest soil characteristics and microclimate which in turn may influence gastropod abundance. We sampled gastropods in plots installed in patches of I. glandulifera, in plots in which I. glandulifera was regularly removed by hand, and in control plots which were not yet colonized by the invasive plant. The three types of plots were equally distributed over three mixed deciduous forest areas that were slightly, moderately or heavily affected by a wind throw 11 years ago. A total of 33 gastropod species were recorded. Gastropod species richness was not affected by delayed effects of the wind throw, but it was significantly higher in invaded plots than in uninvaded plots. Similarly, gastropod abundance was higher in invaded plots than in the two types of control plots. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed marginally significant shifts of gastropod communities between the three types of plots and indicated that soil moisture, presence of I. glandulifera and cover of woody debris affected gastropod species composition. Field measurements showed that soil moisture was higher and daily soil temperature was more damped in patches of I. glandulifera than in the native ground vegetation. The changed microclimatic conditions may favour certain gastropod species. In particular, ubiquitous species and species with a high inundation tolerance increased in abundance in plots invaded by I. glandulifera. Our field experiment demonstrated that an invasive plant can indirectly affect native organisms by changing soil characteristics and microclimate.

  9. Gastropod skeletal defences: land, freshwater, and sea compared

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2015-01-01

    Predation is a primary agency of natural selection affecting the evolution of skeletal form in gastropods. The nature of antipredatory defence depends on how predators attack their prey as well as on the types and quantities of resources that are available to the potential victims. Here I review the five main methods of predation on shell-bearing gastropods (swallowing prey whole, apertural entry, drilling, shell breakage, and partial consumption) and 31 categories of shell and opercular defe...

  10. GASTROPODS IN THE BASIN OF THE RIVER FOJNIČKA

    Asia Čičić-Močić

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed investigation of Gastropods in the basin of river Fojnička has been carried out in 2001–2002. The material has been sampled five times during four seasons (October 2001–September 2002 at 11 sites in the following waterways: the rivers Fojnička, Dragača, Željeznica, Kreševka and Lepenica. Measurement of certain physical and chemical parameters (BOD5, water temperature, pH value, amount of dissolved oxygen, saturation with oxygen and one time measurement of concentration of nitrates and phosphates has been carried out together with collecting of macroinvertebrates of zoobenthos. Since the knowledge of biodiversity of Gastropods in Bosnia and Herzegovina is at the very low level, the main objective of this paper is to give an overview of distribution of Gastropods communities in the Fojnička river basin. In these investigations, 11 taxa of Gastropods and 1468 individuals have been determined. The Gastropods made 16% of total settlement of macroinvertebrates of zoobenthos. Dominant species at investigated sites was Ancylus fluviatilis, while species Acicula sp., Saxurinator sp. and Valvata piscinalis were just sporadically recorded. The largest number of individuals (657 and largest number of species (eight was recorded at the mouth of the river Fojnička into the river Bosna.

  11. Review of intersex in gastropods and other molluscs

    Strand, Jakob

    Various studies have demonstrated that the presence of imposex, i.e. an imposition of a penis and/or a vas deferens in addition to the normal reproductive tracts in females of gonochoristics prosobranch gastropod species, is a common phenomenon in the marine environment today. However, also other...

  12. Density estimates for deep-sea gastropod assemblages

    Rex, Michael A.; Etter, Ron J.; Nimeskern, Phillip W.

    1990-04-01

    Extensive boxcore sampling in the Atlantic Continental Slope and Rise study permitted the first precise measurement of gastropod density in the bathyal region of the deep sea. Gastropod density decreases significantly and exponentially with depth (250-3494 m), and density-depth regression lines do not differ significantly in either slope or elevatiob over horizontal scales of approximately 1000 km. The subclasses Prosobranchia and Opisthobranchia both show significant decreases in density with depth. Predatory taxa (neogastropods and opisthobranchs) exhibit significantly steeper declines in density with depth than do taxa dominated by deposit feeders (archaeogastropods and mesogastropods). Members of upper trophic levels may be more sensitive to the reduction in nutrient input with increased depth because of the energy loss between trophic levels in the food chain. A comparison of density estimates of gastropods from boxcore, grab and anchor-dredge samples taken in the same region revealed no significant differences in density-depth relationships among the sampling methods. A synthesis of data from 777 boxcore samples collected from the Atlantic, Caribbean and Pacific over a depth range of 250-7298 m indicates that the decline in gastropod density with depth is a global trend with only moderate inter-regional variation.

  13. Redescription of the meiofaunal gastropod Parhedyle cryptophthalma, with focus on nervous system and sensory organs

    Jörger, Katharina M.; Kristof, Alen; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette;

    2010-01-01

    , integumental spicules, and aberrant radula morphology by light and scanning electron microscopy. Our focus was on the central nervous system and sensory organs, using 3D reconstruction based on serial semi-thin sections and immunocytochemistry (staining of FMRFamide and Tyrosine Hydroxylase) in conjunction...... tenctacular, rhinophoral, and pedal nerves and in single neurons in the anterior region of the foot sole. Central nervous and sensory features may greatly vary among acochlidians and other heterobranch taxa, and comprehensive comparative approaches are necessary to reveal their presence, function, homology...

  14. Pathology of Haplosporidium patagon affecting siphonariid gastropods in Patagonia.

    Di Giorgio, Gisele; Gilardoni, Carmen; Ituarte, Cristián

    2014-11-13

    Haplosporidium patagon was found parasitizing Siphonaria lessonii and S. lateralis, 2 siphonariid gastropods co-occurring on the littoral rocky shore at Puerto Deseado, Santa Cruz, Argentina. Gastropods from 2 habitats representing 2 different levels of environmental harshness were studied. In both cases, S. lessonii showed a higher prevalence of infection (3.78%) over the entire 14 mo study period than S. lateralis (0.13%). Very different values of prevalence of infection were observed at the different sampling sites: Site 1, the more restrictive habitat (exposed for long periods to desiccation during low tides, higher ultraviolet exposure, and high ranges of temperature variation) showed a higher prevalence value (5.99%) than Site 2 (1.46%). Statistical differences in prevalence were also found between values corresponding to the austral spring (3.35% at Site 1 and 0.74% at Site 2) and winter (13.79% at Site 1 and 2.13% at Site 2). The presence/absence of H. patagon did not vary significantly with gastropod shell length. Infection affected the digestive gland, whose normal histology was greatly modified. The hermaphroditic gonads were also affected; the female germinal cells disappeared or only a few primary or previtellogenic oocytes were present, and vitellogenesis was inhibited. The function of the male germinal epithelium, as well as spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis processes and associated organs (seminal vesicles and seminal receptacles), were not affected. However, the glandular pallial complex of the reproductive systemwas affected, and we observed a significant reduction in development in parasitized gastropods. H. patagon sporocysts also invaded the supporting connective tissues of both the kidney and pseudobranch. PMID:25392043

  15. Radular marks produced by grazing gastropods of the rocky intertidal

    Yván Reyes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We had used artificial surfaces to examine the radular marks of four common grazing gastropods from Ancon Bay. In this work we show radular marks on dental wax surface of the trochid Tegula atra (Lesson, 1830, the fissurellid Fissurella peruviana Lamarck, 1822, the lottid Lottia ceciliana (Orbigny, 1841 and the littorinid Nodilittorina peruviana (Lamarck, 1822. In addition, the radular type is described to each species to relate it to the produced mark.

  16. Phyletic patterns of early development in gastropod molluscs.

    Lindberg, David R; Guralnick, Robert P

    2003-01-01

    Cell lineage data for 30 exemplar gastropod taxa representing all major subclades and the outgroup Polyplacophora were examined for phylogenetic signal using cladistic analysis. Most cell lineages show phyletic trends of acceleration or retardation relative to the outgroup and more basal ingroup taxa, and when coded this variation is phylo-genetically informative. PAUP analyses of a cell lineage data set under three sets of character ordering assumptions produced similar tree topologies. The topologies of the strict consensus trees for both ordered and Dollo (near irreversibility of character transformations) character assumptions were similar, whereas the unordered character assumption recovers the least phyletic information. The cell lineage cladograms are also in agreement with the fossil record of the timing and sequence of gastropod subclade origination. A long branch lies between the Patellogastropoda+Vetigastropoda grade and the Neritopsina+Apogastropoda clade. The geological timing of this long branch is correlated with the first large-scale terrestrially derived eutrophication of the near-shore marine habitat, and one possible explanation for this branch may be a developmental shift associated with the evolution of feeding larvae in response to the more productive conditions in the near-shore water column. Although character transformations are highly ordered in this data set, developmental rate characters (like all other morphological and molecular characters) are also subject to homoplasy. Finally, this study further supports the hypothesis that early development of gastropod molluscs has conserved a strong phyletic signal for about half a billion years. PMID:12950628

  17. [Conotoxins: from the biodiversity of gastropods to new drugs].

    Fedosov, A É; Moshkovskiĭ, S A; Kuznetsova, K G; Olivera, B M

    2013-01-01

    A review describes general trends in research of conotoxins that are peptide toxins isolated from sea gastropods of the Conus genus, since the toxins were discovered in 1970th. There are disclosed a conotoxin classification, their structure diversity and different ways of action to their molecular targets, mainly, ion channels. In the applied aspect of conotoxin research, drug discovery and development is discussed, the drugs being based on conotoxin structure. A first exemplary drug is a ziconotide, which is an analgesic of new generation. PMID:23987066

  18. Spatially explicit analysis of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    T. Hauffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of scientific infrastructure. The European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes.

    In a total of 284 samples from 224 different locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, 68 gastropod species, with 50 of them (= 73.5% being endemic, could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics: (i within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the proportion of endemics increases, and (iv the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity. Moreover, gastropod communities of Lake Ohrid and its feeder springs are both distinct from each other and from the surrounding waters. The analysis also shows that community similarity of Lake Ohrid is mainly driven by niche processes (e.g. environmental factors, but also by neutral processes (e.g. dispersal

  19. Spatially explicit analysis of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; Trajanovski, S.; Wilke, T.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of scientific infrastructure. The European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes. In a total of 284 samples from 224 different locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, 68 gastropod species, with 50 of them (= 73.5%) being endemic, could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics: (i) within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii) widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond) are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii) while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the proportion of endemics increases, and (iv) the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity. Moreover, gastropod communities of Lake Ohrid and its feeder springs are both distinct from each other and from the surrounding waters. The analysis also shows that community similarity of Lake Ohrid is mainly driven by niche processes (e.g. environmental factors), but also by neutral processes (e.g. dispersal limitation and

  20. Space: A non-limiting resource in the niches of some abundant coral reef gastropods

    Reichelt, R. E.

    1982-06-01

    Given the importance attributed to the occupation of space in benthic coral reef communities, this study asks the question: are any particular microhabitat types limiting resources for an assemblage of worm-eating gastropods on Heron reef (Great Barrier Reef). Microhabitat resource use was measured on three occasions, separated by 12 and 20-month periods. The gastropod populations were typical of those of other Indo-Pacific sites with respect to mean shell size and density. Fluctuations in species' size and density are assumed to have not significantly influenced availability of microhabitat resources. Gastropods occurred mainly in the structurally complex “refuge” microhabitats during the day and showed an increased abundance in smooth, exposed, “foraging” microhabitat nocturnally. Nassarius gaudiosus is the most extreme microhabitat specialist diurnally and the most extreme microhabitat generalist nocturnally. A similar, although less pronounced trend was exhibited by other gastropod species. Microhabitat niche overlap was high for Conus coronatus, C. miliaris, C. flavidus, Vasum turbinellus and N. gaudiosus at night and was also high during the day for all these species except N. gaudiosus, which showed little overlap with other gastropod species diurnally. Using gastropod abundance data from all samples, and independently derived microhabitat abundance data, multiple regression analysis demonstrated: 1) A significant relationship between the abundances of N. gaudiosus, C. coronatus, and C. flavidus and the abundance of microhabitat 2 (sand under rocks=“refuge”). 2) No positive association between gastropod abundance and the abundance of microhabitat 7a (thin layer of algal-bound sand on reef limestone). Only N. gaudiosus is abundant in microhabitat 2. Therefore it is concluded that, with some exceptions, microhabitat abundance does not have a significant influence, directly or indirectly, on gastropod abundance. It is possible that density

  1. Evolution of corallivory in the gastropod genus Drupella

    Claremont, M.; Reid, D. G.; Williams, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    Although muricid gastropods in the genus Drupella are well-known consumers of Indo-Pacific corals, their evolutionary and ecological history is unclear, as is their relationship to the apparently facultative coral-feeder Ergalatax margariticola, which has been reported to feed upon corals in Hong Kong. We use a well resolved molecular phylogeny (reconstructed from one nuclear and two mitochondrial genes) to show that the monophyletic genus Drupella falls into the muricid subfamily Ergalataxinae and that the genus includes ` E. margariticola', which is composed of two cryptic species. We show that genetic structure within the here reassigned ` Drupella margariticola' species complex does not relate to feeding mode, but instead seems to correspond to broad patterns of habitat ecology found in other gastropod taxa. Our analyses suggest that Drupella originated in the late Miocene (approximately 9.6 Ma) and diversified approximately 5.0 Ma, much later than the appearance of modern coral reefs in the early Cenozoic. Thus, it is possible that corallivory in Drupella evolved in response to the major expansion and reorganization of reefs that took place in the early Miocene.

  2. Carbonate biomineralization in terrestrial gastropods: environmental vs. physiological constraints

    Mierzwa, D.; Stolarski, J.

    2009-04-01

    Preservational potential of shells of terrestrial gastropods allows to use them as valuable (paleo)climatic proxies. Despite of the fact, that the elements incorporated in their skeleton derive almost entirely from their diet, details of the ion uptake routes have not been studied in details. This work is a first step in the investigations of element uptake and biomineralization processes in pulmonate gastropod Cepaea vindobonensis (Férussac, 1821). Although phenotypic plasticity in the shell characters of the species appears to be mainly genetic in nature, some differences seem to correlate with availability of ions used in biomineralization. For example, shells of individuals living in marginal parts of flood plains (environment extreme for the species and generally depleted in calcium) have weakened structure and faded color pattern, whereas individuals from the lime substrata form typically developed, pigmented shells with several cross-lamellar layers. Micro- and nanostructural characteristics of shells from different environments are visualized by SEM and AFM imaging techniques and some biogeochemical properties are characterized by spectroscopic and fluorescence methods. Further experiments are required to elucidate the ion/trace elements transfer between the substratum, nutrients, organism, and the shell.

  3. Variation in the diets of hydrothermal vent gastropods

    Govenar, Breea; Fisher, Charles R.; Shank, Timothy M.

    2015-11-01

    A prevailing paradigm of hydrothermal vent ecology is that primary consumers feed on chemoautotrophic bacteria. However, for the purposes of reconstructing vent food webs and for tracking energy flow from the generation of rock and fluid chemistry through primary/ secondary productivity and consumption to the overlying water column, it remains unclear which consumers feed on which bacteria. In paired analyses of carbon and nitrogen tissue stable isotope values with unique 16S rRNA sequences from the stomach contents, we determined that two species of gastropod grazers appear to feed on epsilon-proteobacteria, while two other species have more diverse diets, including one species that consumes alpha-proteobacteria, planctomycetes, and non-green sulfur bacteria. Different carbon fixation pathways used by epsilon- and alpha-proteobacteria may account for the variation in the carbon stable isotope values among the consumers. Furthermore, our results indicate that trophic specialization and niche partitioning may contribute to the distribution and abundance of vent-endemic gastropods and support the hypothesis that consumers in the warmer habitats commonly feed on epsilon-proteobacteria that use the rTCA cycle, while in the cooler habitats they feed on additional bacteria that use the CBB cycle. These results suggest that the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of free-living bacteria may play an important and previously overlooked role in facilitating species coexistence among primary consumers at hydrothermal vents and other chemosynthesis-based ecosystems.

  4. A catalogue of Danian gastropods from the Baunekule facies, Faxe Formation, Denmark

    Lauridsen, B.W.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This catalogue of 194 gastropod taxa is based on the collection of Danian gastropods from the Baunekule facies, Faxe Formation in eastern Denmark. The gastropod fauna is extremely rich and well preserved. Most of the gastropods (106 species are referred to genus level only, 9 morphotypes to even higher taxonomical levels and 79 gastropods are referred to species level. The gastropods are classified following Bouchet & Rocroi (2005 as 4 different clades: Vetigastropoda (represented by 26 species and 10 superfamilies, Caenogastropoda (represented by 142 species and 17 superfamilies, Heterobranchia (represented by 23 species and 5 superfamilies and Opisthobranchia (represented by 1 species and 1 superfamily. The new species Zaclys? nuetzeli n. sp. is introduced. The Faxe Formation is recognised as a cold-water coral ecosystem with interfingering smaller bryozoan mounds. The Baunekule facies is found in the upper part of the coral mound complex of the Faxe Formation, where it forms isolated lensoidal bodies in the flanks of some of the coral mounds. It is characterised by a high diversity invertebrate fauna that occurs in weakly consolidated coraldominated floatstone to rudstone. The diagenesis of the Baunekule facies is of special significance because a high proportion of the originally aragonite-shelled fauna is preserved by recrystallization to calcite during early burial diagenesis. Most of the gastropods are not known from other parts of the Faxe Fm. The fauna is very important for comparative evolutionary studies of fossil and modern gastropods on cold-water coral mounds. Many of the genera have not previously been recorded from Danian strata. None of the gastropod species found in the Baunekule facies are known for certain to range below the Cretaceous–Palaeogene boundary. The fauna is comparable to gastropods found on modern cold-water coral mounds in the North Atlantic. The gastropod fauna from the Baunekule facies is characterised by a

  5. Europe's Neogene and Quaternary lake gastropod diversity - a statistical approach

    Neubauer, Thomas A.; Georgopoulou, Elisavet; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Kroh, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    During the Neogene Europe's geodynamic history gave rise to several long-lived lakes with conspicuous endemic radiations. However, such lacustrine systems are rare today as well as in the past compared to the enormous numbers of "normal" lakes. Most extant European lakes are mainly results of the Ice Ages and are due to their (geologically) temporary nature largely confined to the Pleistocene-Holocene. As glacial lakes are also geographically restricted to glacial regions (and their catchment areas) their preservation potential is fairly low. Also deposits of streams, springs, and groundwater, which today are inhabited by species-rich gastropod assemblages, are rarely preserved. Thus, the pre-Quaternary lacustrine record is biased towards long-lived systems, such as the Late Miocene Lake Pannon, the Early to Middle Miocene Dinaride Lake System, the Middle Miocene Lake Steinheim and several others. All these systems have been studied for more than 150 years concerning their mollusk inventories and the taxonomic literature is formidable. However, apart from few general overviews precise studies on the γ-diversities of the post-Oligocene European lake systems and the shifting biodiversity in European freshwater systems through space and time are entirely missing. Even for the modern faunas, literature on large-scale freshwater gastropod diversity in extant lakes is scarce and lacks a statistical approach. Our preliminary data suggest fundamental differences between modern and pre-Pleistocene freshwater biogeography in central Europe. A rather homogenous central European Pleistocene and Holocene lake fauna is contrasted by considerable provincialism during the early Middle Miocene. Aside from the ancient Dessaretes lakes of the Balkan Peninsula, Holocene lake faunas are dominated by planorbids and lymnaeids in species numbers. This composition differs considerably from many Miocene and Pliocene lake faunas, which comprise pyrgulid-, hydrobiid-, viviparid-, melanopsid

  6. Taphonomy and palaeoecology of the gastropod fauna from a Late Cretaceous rocky shore, Sweden

    Sørensen, Anne Mehlin; Surlyk, Finn

    2011-01-01

    A gastropod fauna comprising 17 species, each represented by a limited number of specimens, is described from a Late Cretaceous, late early Campanian rocky shore at Ivö Klack, southern Sweden. The gastropod fauna is associated with the most diverse ancient rocky shore fauna ever found. However, the...... low gastropod species diversity compared to the faunas of modern rocky shores is ascribed to taphonomic factors, notably dissolution of the aragonitic shells, but the predominance of epifaunal herbivores is indicative of a guild structure similar to that found on modern rocky shores. The presence of...... preservation of such drill holes difficult, since the majority of infaunal prey such as burrowing bivalves has aragonitic shells which are not preserved. The relatively high number of species in comparison to many other Late Cretaceous rocky shore faunas, offers an opportunity to compare gastropod guild...

  7. Mitochondrial genome of the endangered marine gastropod Strombus gigas Linnaeus, 1758 (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    Márquez, Edna J; Castro, Erick R; Alzate, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    The queen conch Strombus gigas is an endangered marine gastropod of significant economic importance across the Greater Caribbean region. This work reports for the first time the complete mitochondrial genome of S. gigas, obtained by FLX 454 pyrosequencing. The mtDNA genome encodes for 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs. In addition, the coding sequences and gene synteny were similar to other previously reported mitogenomes of gastropods. PMID:25186797

  8. Gulf of Mannar Island coral reef associated gastropods assemblages:Distribution and diversity pattern

    Jayaraj Mohanraj; Gurusamy Chelladurai; Srinivasan Balakrishnan; IruthayamVijaya Kuamr

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the spatial and temporal variations of the distribution and diversity pattern of coral reef associated gastropods assemblages in Gulf of Mannar Island and to clarify the relationship between gastropods and surrounding coral reef ecosystem. Methods: Gastropods were collected from three islands–Hare (Picnic spot), Vaan (Church Island) and Koswari (Karsuvar Island). The samples were taxonomically identified according to external structure of typical shells and classified according to their feeding habits. Statistical tool Primer (Ver. 6.1.11) was employed to find the species diversity, richness and evenness. Results: A total of forty species of gastropods from 19 families were identified. The gastropods population density varied differently at stations, 479 species from Vaan islands, 390 species from Koswari islands and 254 species from Hare island were recorded. The gastropods species diversity, richness and evenness indices also varied differently at stations. The highest species diversity indice was recorded at Vaan Island (2.968), while both the highest richness and evenness indices were recorded at Hare Island with 0.937 and 0.942 respectively. Conclusions: The results of present study provides useful informtation for biodiversity conservation as well as the management of coral reef habitat in India.

  9. Spatially explicit analyses of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; Trajanovski, S.; Wilke, T.

    2010-07-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of biodiversity arises from evolutionary processes, constraints of environmental factors and the interaction of communities. The quality of such spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of infrastructure around them. The small European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes. In a total of 224 locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, representatives of 68 gastropod species with 50 of them being endemic (=73.5%) could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics: (i) within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii) widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond) are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii) while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the share of endemics increases, (iv) the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity and related environmental factors, (v) biotic interaction due to possible spillover effects may contribute to the establishment of hotspots, and (vi) eco-insularity within the Ohrid Basin occurs

  10. Spatially explicit analyses of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    T. Hauffe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity of biodiversity arises from evolutionary processes, constraints of environmental factors and the interaction of communities. The quality of such spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial variation of extant biodiversity have been hampered by the frequently vast size of ancient lakes, their limited accessibility, and the lack of infrastructure around them. The small European ancient Lake Ohrid provides a rare opportunity for such a reliable spatial study. The comprehensive horizontal and vertical sampling of a species-rich taxon, the Gastropoda, presented here, revealed interesting patterns of biodiversity, which, in part, have not been shown before for other ancient lakes.

    In a total of 224 locations throughout the Ohrid Basin, representatives of 68 gastropod species with 50 of them being endemic (=73.5% could be reported. The spatial distribution of these species shows the following characteristics:

    (i within Lake Ohrid, the most frequent species are endemic taxa with a wide depth range, (ii widespread species (i.e. those occurring throughout the Balkans or beyond are rare and mainly occur in the upper layer of the lake, (iii while the total number of species decreases with water depth, the share of endemics increases, (iv the deeper layers of Lake Ohrid appear to have a higher spatial homogeneity of biodiversity and related environmental factors, (v biotic interaction due to possible spillover effects may contribute to the establishment of hotspots, and (vi eco

  11. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    Rech, J.A.; Pigati, J.S.; Lehmann, S.B.; McGimpsey, C.N.; Grimley, D.A.; Nekola, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating. ?? 2011 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  12. Spatial vision in the prosobranch gastropod ampularia sp

    Seyer; Nilsson; Warrant

    1998-05-01

    The eyes of gastropods of the genus Ampularia superficially resemble the well-developed camera-type eyes of Littorina littorea and Strombus raninus. The eyes are of the closed-vesicle type, having a cornea and a lens that is separated from the retina by a narrow vitreous body. Light and electron microscopy were used to generate an accurate geometrical model of the Ampularia sp. eye, which was then used to predict its optical performance. The image quality of the lens was investigated using a modified microscope and revealed that images suffer from severe aberrations. The focal length was estimated to be approximately 430 microm, putting the plane of best focus in or just proximal to the rhabdoms. The aberrant optics result in a large retinal blur-circle with a diameter of approximately 120 microm and an angular half-width of approximately 17 degrees, allowing only comparatively poor resolution compared with the eyes of Littorina littorea and Strombus raninus. Behavioural experiments revealed no significant optomotor response. The results imply that Ampularia sp. has poor spatial vision, limited by the blur-circles on the retina. The eyes appear to be suitable only for relatively simple visual tasks, such as finding an open water surface for breathing, but the large size of the eye allows it to perform this task even at night. PMID:9556547

  13. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of strombid gastropod morphological diversity.

    Latiolais, Jared M; Taylor, Michael S; Roy, Kaustuv; Hellberg, Michael E

    2006-11-01

    The shells of strombid gastropods show a wide variety of forms, ranging from small and fusiform to large and elaborately ornamented with a strongly flared outer lip. Here, we present the first species-level molecular phylogeny for strombids and use the resulting phylogenetic framework to explore relationships between species richness and morphological diversity. We use portions of one nuclear (325 bp of histone H3) and one mitochondrial (640 bp of cytochrome oxidase I, COI) gene to infer relationships within the two most species-rich genera in the Strombidae: Strombus and Lambis. We include 32 species of Strombus, representing 10 of 11 extant subgenera, and 3 of the 9 species of Lambis, representing 2 of 3 extant subgenera. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of COI and of H3 and COI combined suggest Lambis is nested within a paraphyletic Strombus. Eastern Pacific and western Atlantic species of Strombus form a relatively recent monophyletic radiation within an older, paraphyletic Indo-West Pacific grade. Morphological diversity of subclades scales positively with species richness but does not show evidence of strong phylogenetic constraints. PMID:16839783

  14. Screening of Antibacterial Activities of Marine Gastropod Hemifusus Pugilinus

    S. Sugesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation was carried out to screen the antibacterial activities of marine gastropod Hemifusus pugilinus. The whole body of the animal was extracted in three different solvents such as, ethanol, methanol and water. The antibacterial properties were studied using 10 human pathogenic microorganisms such as, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. pnuemoniae, Lactobacillus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, S. paratyphi, Staphylococcus aureus, and Vibrio paraheamolyticus. The ethanolic extracts of H. pugilinus showed maximum antibacterial activities against E. coli (8 mm and minimum activities against Vibrio paraheamolyticus (2 mm, Methanolic extracts showed highest activity in E. coli (6 mm and lowest activity against S. paratyphi (1 mm and the extract of water showed antibacterial activities against E. coli K. oxytoca and S. paratyphi. The crude extracts were purified in silica gel column chromatography with 11 fractions. In that E:M, 16:4, 12:8, 10:10, which showed maximum zone of inhibition against E.coli (4 mm, K. oxytoca (4 mm, K. pneumoniae (3 mm, L. vulgaris (4 mm and V. parahemolyticus (5 mm. 18:2, 8:12, 6:14, 4:12 and 2:18 with these fractions showed minimum activities against the all pathogenic microbial forms.

  15. Comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes in gastropods

    In this work we presented a comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes in gastropods. Nucleotide and amino acids composition was calculated and a comparative visual analysis of the start and termination codons was performed. The organization of the genome was compared calculating the number of intergenic sequences, the location of the genes and the number of reorganized genes (breakpoints) in comparison with the sequence that is presumed to be ancestral for the group. In order to calculate variations in the rates of molecular evolution within the group, the relative rate test was performed. In spite of the differences in the size of the genomes, the amino acids number is conserved. The nucleotide and amino acid composition is similar between Vetigastropoda, Ceanogastropoda and Neritimorpha in comparison to Heterobranchia and Patellogastropoda. The mitochondrial genomes of the group are very compact with few intergenic sequences, the only exception is the genome of Patellogastropoda with 26,828 bp. Start codons of the Heterobranchia and Patellogastropoda are very variable and there is also an increase in genome rearrangements for these two groups. Generally, the hypothesis of constant rates of molecular evolution between the groups is rejected, except when the genomes of Caenogastropoda and Vetigastropoda are compared.

  16. Substrate attributes determine gait in a terrestrial gastropod.

    McKee, Amberle; Voltzow, Janice; Pernet, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Some terrestrial gastropods are able to move using two gaits: adhesive crawling, where the entire foot is separated from the substrate only by a thin layer of mucus and the snail leaves a continuous mucus trail; and loping, where regions of the foot arch above the substrate and the snail leaves a discontinuous mucus trail. Loping has been interpreted as a means of rapidly escaping predators. We found that the pulmonate Cornu aspersum moved using adhesive crawling on dry acrylic or glass substrates, but loped on dry concrete or wood. Loping snails did not move more rapidly than snails using adhesive crawling. Snails moving on concrete secreted a greater volume of pedal mucus per area of trail than those moving on acrylic; locomotion on concrete thus requires greater expenditure of mucus than does locomotion on acrylic. Because loping snails deposit a smaller area of mucus per distance traveled than do snails using adhesive crawling, loping may conserve mucus when moving on porous, absorbent substrates. Members of several other terrestrial pulmonate taxa can also lope on concrete, suggesting that this plasticity in gait is widespread among terrestrial snails. PMID:23493509

  17. A Method for Quantifying, Visualising, and Analysing Gastropod Shell Form

    Liew, Thor-Seng; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of organismal form is an important component for almost every branch of biology. Although generally considered an easily-measurable structure, the quantification of gastropod shell form is still a challenge because many shells lack homologous structures and have a spiral form that is difficult to capture with linear measurements. In view of this, we adopt the idea of theoretical modelling of shell form, in which the shell form is the product of aperture ontogeny profiles in terms of aperture growth trajectory that is quantified as curvature and torsion, and of aperture form that is represented by size and shape. We develop a workflow for the analysis of shell forms based on the aperture ontogeny profile, starting from the procedure of data preparation (retopologising the shell model), via data acquisition (calculation of aperture growth trajectory, aperture form and ontogeny axis), and data presentation (qualitative comparison between shell forms) and ending with data analysis (quantitative comparison between shell forms). We evaluate our methods on representative shells of the genera Opisthostoma and Plectostoma, which exhibit great variability in shell form. The outcome suggests that our method is a robust, reproducible, and versatile approach for the analysis of shell form. Finally, we propose several potential applications of our methods in functional morphology, theoretical modelling, taxonomy, and evolutionary biology. PMID:27280463

  18. A STUDY ON VARIATIONS IN POPULATION DENSITY OF GASTROPODS IN A VILLAGE POND NEAR BIKANER, RAJASTHAN

    Ankush Sharma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of Thar Desert of India spread over Rajasthan and because of this it is known as state of desert. Because of harsh and inhospitable environmental conditions Rajasthan is well known in all over the world. Bikaner, district which is located in northern western part of Rajasthan are also well known for its violent climatic conditions and scarcity of water resources. Present study was focused on monthly as well as seasonal variations in gastropods population density in a village pond namely Nal village. The study was carried out from September, 2010 to November, 2011. This finding of study suggested the presence of three gastropods species viz. Digoniostoma pulchella, Gabbia orcula and Indoplanorbis exustus belongs to two subclasses namely pulmonata and pro sobranch during whole study period. Highest population density of gastropods was recorded in the month of March, while minimum in July. Among all studied season highest population of gastropods density of all three reported species were recorded in summer season. Minimum population density of Digoniostoma pulchella, Gabbia orcula was recorded in monsoon season, while minimum population density of Indoplanorbis exustus was recorded in winter season. Many gastropods act as intermediate host of platyhelimenthic parasites and play significant role in public and veterinary health and also used in many biomonitoring programs to assess the water quality level.

  19. Prior exposure influences the behavioural avoidance by an intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, of acidified waters

    Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Bishop, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity may be critical to the maintenance of viable populations under future environmental change. Here we examined the role of behavioural avoidance of sub-optimal conditions in enabling the intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, to persist in mangrove forests affected by the low pH runoff from acid sulphate soils (ASS). Behaviourally, the gastropod may be able to avoid periods of particularly high acidity by using pneumatophores and/or mangrove trunks to vertically migrate above the water line or by retreating into its shell. We hypothesised that (1) B. auratum would display greater and more rapid vertical migration out of acidified than reference estuarine waters, and (2) responses would be more pronounced in gastropods collected from acidified than reference sites. Gastropods from acidified sites showed significantly higher activity in and more rapid migration out of acidified waters of pH 6.2-7.0, than reference waters or waters of pH impact of this stressor on their populations. The stronger response to acidification of gastropods from populations previously exposed to this stressor suggests that the response may be learned, inherited or induced over multiple exposures. Our study adds to growing evidence that estuarine organisms may exhibit considerable physiological and behaviour adaptive capacity to acidification. The potential for such adaptive capacity should be incorporated into studies seeking to forecast impacts to marine organisms of environmental change.

  20. Labelling and marketing of bivalve and gastropod molluscs retailed in Sardinia, Italy between 2009 and 2013

    Domenico Meloni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present survey was to investigate the correct enforcement of the Community rules on the labelling and marketing of bivalve and gastropod molluscs retailed in Sardinia, Italy between 2009 and 2013. A total of 1500 packages and labels for live bivalve and gastropod molluscs were considered. A total of 375 labels (25% presented non-compliance concerning the wrong trade name and additional wrong or missing information. The highest percentage of anomalous labels has been detected in small-scale retail shops (35% and open-air markets (25% compared with the big retailing chains (20%. The 5% of packages were not in compliance with the European Community rules on packaging of bivalve and gastropod molluscs. The high percentage of non-compliance with the European regulations on labelling results is a strong limitation for the consumers and highlights the need to improve the control system about labelling of seafood products.

  1. Assessing the status of endangered invertebrates from the ancient Lake Ohrid: The gastropod Chilopyrgula sturanyi

    Budzakoska-Gjoreska Biljana; Trajanovski S.; Trajanovska Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Lake Ohrid is the oldest and deepest lake on the Balkan Peninsula and one of the five oldest lakes in the world. Two of the most striking attributes of the species of the Lake’s fauna, especially the fauna of gastropods, are the high level of biological diversity as well as a high percentage of endemism. The main subject of interest in our research was to follow the distribution and density of the endemic gastropod species Chilopyrgula sturanyi. For this purpose different depth points o...

  2. Terrestrial gastropods of Srebarna Nature Reserve, North-Eastern Bulgaria (Gastropoda

    Ivailo Dedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We give the results from the first investigation focused on the land snail fauna in Srebarna Nature Reserve in Bulgaria. A total of 23 localities were studied and 27 species of terrestrial gastropods were found, 23 of which were new observations for the Reserve.

  3. Toxin-screening and identification of bacteria isolated from highly toxic marine gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus.

    Wang, Xiao-Jie; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Luo, Xuan; Zhou, Ming-Jiang; Lin, Xiang-Tian

    2008-07-01

    Bacteria isolated from a highly toxic sample of gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus in Lianyungang, Jiangsu Province in July 2007, were studied to probe into the relationship between bacteria and toxicity of nassariid gastropod. The toxicity of the gastropod sample was 2 x 10(2)mouse unit (MU) per gram of tissue (wet weight). High concentration of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and its analogues (TTXs) were found in the digestive gland and muscle of the gastropod, using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass chromatography (LC-MS). Bacterial strains isolated from the digestive gland were cultured and screened for TTX with a competitive ELISA method. Tetrodotoxin was detected in a proportion of bacterial strains, but the toxin content was low. Partial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the TTX-producing strains was then sequenced and compared with those published in the GenBank to tentatively identify the toxic strains. It was found that most of the toxic strains were closely affiliated with genus Vibrio, and the others were related to genus Shewanella, Marinomonas, Tenacibaculum and Aeromonas. These findings suggest that tetrodotoxin-producing bacteria might play an important role in tetrodotoxin accumulation/production in N. semiplicatus. PMID:18573274

  4. The role of MAPK signaling in patterning and establishing axial symmetry in the gastropod Haliotis asinina

    Koop, Demian; Richards, Gemma S; Wanninger, Andreas;

    2007-01-01

    Gastropods are members of the Spiralia, a diverse group of invertebrates that share a common early developmental program, which includes spiral cleavage and a larval trochophore stage. The spiral cleavage program results in the division of the embryo into four quadrants. Specification of the dorsal...

  5. Patterns of diatom treatment in two coexisting species of filter-feeding freshwater gastropods

    Sitnikova T.Ya.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess trophic partitioning among sympatric gastropod species in ancient lakes, we quantified diatoms in the guts of two coexistent Baikal gastropod species and tested for differences in species, size, and fracturing of large and small diatoms by taenioglossan radulae. In May 2010, the diatom Synedra acus dominated the littoral phytoplankton and gut contents of Baicalia turriformis and Teratobaikalia ciliata (Baicaliidae, both inhabiting the rocky Baikal littoral. In laboratory experiments, both ctenidial filter-feeding gastropods were fed with two diets of cultivated Synedra acus of different cell sizes: >150 μm and <100 μm. Field and laboratory studies revealed intact diatom cells (often with green chromatophores and fragmented frustules of diatoms <60 μm in the guts of both species. The two baicaliids varied in the number of ingested microalgae. In addition, they exhibited significantly different efficiencies for breaking large diatoms; B. turriformis broke large diatoms into more fragments than T. ciliata. The differences in the utilization of large and small diatoms by gastropods are discussed in terms of the relationships among coexisting species. Small diatom survival is considered from the view of interactions between producers and their consumers in the freshwater food web.

  6. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1 describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2 identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3 identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org. A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2% appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs. In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska. No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05. Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages.

  7. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Klein, Eduardo; Iken, Katrin; Weinberger, Vanessa; Konar, Brenda; Trott, Tom; Pohle, Gerhard; Bigatti, Gregorio; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Mead, Angela; Palomo, Gabriela; Ortiz, Manuel; Gobin, Judith; Sardi, Adriana; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Knowlton, Ann; Wong, Melisa; Peralta, Ana C

    2013-01-01

    Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1) describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2) identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3) identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME) following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas) standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org). A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2%) appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs) followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs). In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska). No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05). Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages. PMID

  8. Temporal dynamics of gastropod fauna on subtidal sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    Moreira, J.; Aldea, C. (Cristian); Troncoso, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The temporal variation of the gastropod fauna inhabiting sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (Galicia, Spain) was studied at three subtidal sites from February 1996 to February 1997 by means of quantitative sampling. A total of 5,463 individuals representing 51 gastropod species and 22 families were found. The family Pyramidellidae was the most diverse in number of species (11 species), followed by Rissoidae and Trochidae (4 species each). The dogwhelk, Nassarius ret...

  9. Screening of antibacterial drugs from marine gastropod Chicoreus ramosus (Linnaeus, 1758

    Pasiyappazham Ramasamy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen the antibacterial drugs from different solvent extracts of tissue and egg of marine gastropods Chicoreus ramosus against clinically isolated human pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Different solvent extracts of Chicoreus ramosus was screened for their activity against Vibrio parehaemolyticus (J13300, Aeromonus hydrophilla (IDH1585, Salmonella typhi (C6953, Salmonella paratyphi A (C6915, Vibrio cholerae (IDH5439 and Escherichia coli (H10407 using standard well diffusion method and its minimum inhibitory concentration. Results: The study revealed that the acetone and chloroform extract of both the tissues and egg inhibited the growth of the tested pathogenic bacterial strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration of both the extract ranged from 4 to 12 mg/mL. Conclusions: These results suggest that marine gastropods tissue and egg extract contains comparatively good antibacterial activity.

  10. Symmetry breaking in gastropod locomotion through acceleration or deceleration of the pedal waves

    Del Alamo, Juan C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Lai, Janice; Shepherd, Robert D.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2008-03-01

    Marine and terrestrial gastropods move by gliding over a ventral foot that is lubricated by secreted mucus (terrestrial) or simply by water (marine). The rim of the ventral foot generates suction forces that keep the animal adhered to the substrate. The central part of the foot produces a forward traction force by generating trains of pedal waves through periodic muscle contractions. Recent experiments show that, in some gastropods, these pedal waves become faster and longer as they move forward, suggesting a mechanism for breaking the symmetry in the flow between the pedal waves and the substrate. To investigate this mechanism, we have analyzed theoretically a two-dimensional lubrication layer between a train of waves of slowly varying length and speed, and a flat, rigid, impermeable surface. The inhomogeneity of the pedal waves has been modeled through multiple-scale asymptotics. We have considered a Newtonian fluid to separate the effect of this inhomogeneity from the viscoelastic symmetry breaking reported in previous works.

  11. Gastropod diversity, distribution and abundance in habitats with and without anthropogenic disturbances in Lake Victoria, Kenya

    Lange, C. N.; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Madsen, Henry

    2013-01-01

    We investigated freshwater gastropod diversity, abundance and distribution in habitats with and without anthropogenic disturbance in two localities, Ndere in the Winam Gulf and Mbita Point, Lake Victoria, Kenya, from May 2002 to January 2004. A total of 133 984 gastropod specimens belonging to 15...... species were recorded, 14 from Mbita and 12 from Ndere. Two species, Ferrissia kavirondica and Cleopatra cridlandi, which were recorded only from undisturbed habitats, could be indicators of least disturbed habitats. Water chemistry did differ between fish landing sites and undisturbed habitats at some...... sampling times, indicating that differences due to human impact do exist, but these are dependent on periods of calm weather. The study shows that anthropogenic disturbances cause ecological changes that can be exploited by some snail species, especially Biomphalaria choanomphala and Melanoides tuberculata...

  12. Ancient lakes as evolutionary reservoirs: evidence from the thalassoid gastropods of Lake Tanganyika.

    Wilson, Anthony Bruce; Glaubrecht, Matthias; Meyer, Axel

    2004-01-01

    Ancient lakes are often collectively viewed as evolutionary hot spots of diversification. East Africa s Lake Tanganyika has long been the subject of scientific interest owing to dramatic levels of endemism in species as diverse as cichlid fishes, paludomid gastropods, decapod and ostracod crustaceans and poriferans. It is the largest and deepest of the African rift lakes, and its endemic fauna has been presented with a stable inland environment for over 10 Myr, offering unique opportunities f...

  13. Trematode prevalence-occupancy relationships on regional and continental spatial scales in marine gastropod hosts

    Thieltges, D.W.; Marcogliese, D.J.; Blanar, C.A.; Poulin, R.

    2013-01-01

    The positive inter-specific relationship between local abundance and large-scale spatial occupancy is one of the most universal patterns in the distribution of species. However, evidence for the validity of this relationship in the marine realm is still scarce, especially for parasites. Using data from published studies, we investigated this relationship in trematode parasites infecting several marine gastropod species. On a regional spatial scale ( 1000 km between the most distant sites) in ...

  14. Antimicrobial secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsules and egg masses

    Kaviarasan, T; Siva, Sankar R; Yogamoorthi, A

    2012-01-01

    Marine organisms have attracted special attention in the last three decades for their ability to produce interesting pharmacological active compounds. Even though all marine organisms have the potential to produce antimicrobial secondary metabolites, the gastropod has the vital sources of secondary metabolites particularly their egg capsule which has the promising antimicrobial secondary metabolites. In the present review, we intend to focus on marine secondary metabolites from marine gastrop...

  15. DNA damage and oxidative stress in marine gastropod Morula granulata exposed to phenanthrene

    Bhagat, J.; Sarkar, A.; Ingole, B.S.

    , around 300 gastropods were equally divided in five experimental groups: control group and four treatment groups with different concentrations of phenanthrene (10, 25, 50 and 100 μg/L). Phenanthrene was first diluted in DMSO and then mixed with seawater... to make the stock solution (2500 µg/ml). The final phenanthrene concentration for treatment groups were achieved by diluting stock solution in seawater. The final concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in all treatment groups was less than 0...

  16. Weeds and endangered herbs have unforeseen dispersal helpers in the agri-environment: gastropods and earthworms

    Türke, Manfred; Blattmann, Tamara; Knop, Eva; Kindermann, Anne; Prestele, Julia; Marquez, Leonardo; Eisenhauer, Nico; Fischer, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Agri-environmental schemes involving organic farming or set-aside management aim at promoting biodiversity and restoring ecosystem functioning in agrarian landscapes. Application of pesticides in these crop fields is strongly regulated facilitating the spread of weeds but also allowing for the establishment of endangered herbs and a variety of animals.Recent studies found gastropods and earthworms to be legitimate dispersers of seeds of wild plants. We assumed that both groups also playa sign...

  17. Dominant species of the gastropod fauna from the littoral region in Lake Ohrid of R. Macedonia.

    Smiljkov, S; Budzakoska-Gjoreska, B; Sapkarev, J; Trajanovski, S

    2007-07-01

    The class of Gastropoda is one of the Lake Ohrid' macrozoobenthic groups, which characterize highest level of endemism. Since the first published references until now, studying the Lake Ohrid's snail fauna represents huge scientific challenge for many malacologists from the world. The high percent of endemic as well as relic forms among the lake's gastropods could be explained by the processes of intralacustric speciation during the history and evolution of this aquatic ecosystem. These processes no doubt have been enabled by the complexity and stability of the Lake's basin. This work represents the results of the dominant species, from both qualitative and quantitative sense of the gastropod fauna from 19 investigated littoral localities of Lake Ohrid. The results from the investigations on gastropod fauna has shown that following species: Chilopyrgula sturanyi, Radix relicta and Valvata stenotrema quailtatively predominates in the samples from the littoral region of the Macedonian part of Lake Ohrid. The quantitative analyses (according to their presence on m2), has shown that the following species predominate: Chilopyrgula sturanyi (6879 No x m2), Theodoxus fluviatilis dalmaticus (6412 No x m2), Pyrgohydrobia grochmalickii (5504 No x m2) and Valvata stenotrema (5009 No x m2). PMID:17921924

  18. COUPLING AMPULLINID GASTROPODS: SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR FROZEN IN PALAEOGENE DEPOSITS OF NORTHERN ITALY

    IGINIO DIENI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Couples of the ampullinid gastropods Globularia (Eocernina vulcani (Brogniart, 1823, Amaurellina (Crommium angustata (Grateloup, 1827 and Amaurellina (Pachycrommium cf. suessoniensis (d'Orbigny, 1850, composed of dimorphed shells tightly conjoined at the apertures, from the Palaeogene (Eocene and Oligocene marine successions of northern Italy, are interpreted as buried while mating, specimens being "frozen" while suddenly covered by a mass of sediment. Violent depositional events were responsible for their rapid burial, primarily by volcanoclastics, the formation of which had also involved acidification. The consequent poisoning of sea water and/or overwarming beyond the range in which the gastropods could survive, induced mass mortality. A similar set of conditional circumstances is also discussed for differently sized coupled specimens of Ampullinopsis crassatina (Lamarck, 1804, preserved with their shells slightly apart but with their apertures almost in contact. With reference to the catastrophic eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, when Pompei was buried under tephra, it is thought that volcanic activity caused the death and burial of all these pairing gastropods in a "Pompeian" way. 

  19. Evaluation of impairment of DNA in marine gastropod, Morula granulata as a biomarker of marine pollution.

    Sarkar, A; Bhagat, Jacky; Sarker, Subhodeep

    2014-08-01

    The impairment of DNA in marine gastropod Morula granulata was evaluated in terms of the loss of DNA integrity in the species as a measure of the impact of genotoxic contaminants prevalent in the marine environment along the coast of Goa, India. The extent of DNA damage occurred in the marine gastropods collected from different sampling sites such as Arambol, Anjuna, Sinquerim, Dona Paula, Bogmalo, Hollant, Velsao, Betul and Palolem along the coast of Goa was measured following the technique of partial alkaline unwinding as well as comet assays. The highest DNA integrity was observed at Arambol (F, 0.75), identified as the reference site, whereas the lowest DNA integrity at Hollant (F, 0.33) situated between the two most contaminated sites at Bogmalo and Velsao. The impact of genotoxic contaminants on marine gastropods was pronounced by their low DNA integrity at Sinquerim (F, 0.40) followed by Betul (F, 0.47), Velsao (F, 0.51), Anjuna (F, 0.54), Bogmalo (F, 0.55), Dona Paula (F, 0.67) and Palolem (F, 0.70). The extent of DNA damage occurred in M. granulata due to ecotoxicological impact of the prevailing marine pollutants along the coast of Goa was further substantiated by comet assay and expressed in terms of %head-DNA, %tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment. The single cell gel electrophoresis of M. granulata clearly showed relatively higher olive tail moment in the marine gastropod from the contaminated sites, Anjuna, Hollant, Velsao and Betul. The variation in the mean %head DNA at different sampling sites clearly indicated that the extent of DNA damage in marine gastropod increases with the increase in the levels of contamination at different sampling sites along the coast. The stepwise multiple regression analysis of the water quality parameters showed significant correlation between the variation in DNA integrity and PAH in combination with NO3, salinity and PO4 (R¯(2), 0.90). The measurement of DNA integrity in M. granulata thus provides an early

  20. Snails under stress. Gastropods as models in ecophysiology and ecotoxicology; Schnecken unter Stress. Gastropoden als Modelle in Oekophysiologie und Oekotoxikologie

    Triebskorn, Rita [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Oekotoxikologie und Oekophysiologie, Rottenburg (Germany); Physiologische Oekologie der Tiere, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Background: In ecophysiology and ecotoxicology, gastropods are important both as target organisms for molluscicides and non-target organisms for environmental pollutants or other environmental stressors. With respect to both aspects, biomarkers are investigated at different levels of biological organization in order to understand mechanisms which enable gastropods to cope with or even to benefit from unfavourable environmental conditions. Main topics: The paper focuses on the ecotoxicological and ecophysiological work of the author on gastropods which will be reviewed in the context of the state of knowledge in this field of research. In addition to cellular aspects in biomarker research, also biochemical responses of snails to environmental stress (stress proteins, metallothioneins, and metabolic enzymes) will be addressed. Conclusions: The paper highlights the suitability of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods as sensitive indicators of environmental stress induced by chemicals or other non-chemical factors. Biomarker studies have been shown not only to be applicable in environmental risk assessment but also to provide fundamental and background knowledge necessary to understand correlations of responses at different levels of biological organization. Recommendations and perspectives: A standardized toxicity test with the grapevine snail (ISO 15952) has been established for toxicity assessment in terrestrial habitats. However, freshwater gastropods display a high sensitivity as well, e.g. to endocrine disrupters, and should be incorporated into future standardized assays for aquatic toxicity testing on the basis of existing knowledge. (orig.)

  1. Freshwater gastropods of Neogene and Quaternary lake systems of Europe - state of the art and outlook

    Neubauer, Thomas A.; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Kroh, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Globally, about 4000 extant species of freshwater gastropod species have been described. In contrast, only 225 species are listed by MollBase2012 for North- and Central Europe. Many of these are rare species, limited to certain springs and in fact the typical diversity of gastropods in lakes of North and Central Europe is much lower. The high number is boosted by several highly speciose endemic radiations in long-lived ancient lakes, which are hotspots for biodiversity. These long-lived ancient lakes provide key examples for understanding evolutionary processes and therefore are intensively studied. During the Neogene, Europe's geodynamic history gave rise to several such long-lived lakes with conspicuous endemic radiations. However, these lacustrine systems are rare today as well as in the past compared to the enormous numbers of "normal" lakes. Most extant European lakes are mainly results of the Ice Ages and are due to their geologically temporary nature largely confined to the Pleistocene-Holocene. Also deposits of streams, springs, and groundwater, which today are inhabited by species-rich gastropod assemblages, are rarely preserved. Thus, the pre-Quaternary lacustrine record is biased towards long-lived systems. Apart from few general overviews precise studies on the γ-diversities of the post-Oligocene European lake systems and the shifting biodiversity in European freshwater systems through space and time are entirely missing. Even for the modern faunas, literature on large-scale freshwater gastropod diversity in extant lakes is scarce and lacks a statistical approach. Building upon a great amount of existing literature, a new project will provide the first detailed assessment of the composition of European freshwater gastropods during the Neogene and Quaternary at species, genus and family levels, with emphasis on lake faunas. The γ-diversity of several hundred modern and fossil European lakes will be evaluated. Data will be made available permanently for

  2. Increasing sea surface temperature and range shifts of intertidal gastropods along the Iberian Peninsula

    Rubal, Marcos; Veiga, Puri; Cacabelos, Eva; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    There are well-documented changes in abundance and geographical range of intertidal invertebrates related to climate change at north Europe. However, the effect of sea surface warming on intertidal invertebrates has been poorly studied at lower latitudes. Here we analyze potential changes in the abundance patterns and distribution range of rocky intertidal gastropods related to climate change along the Iberian Peninsula. To achieve this aim, the spatial distribution and range of sub-tropical, warm- and cold-water species of intertidal gastropods was explored by a fully hierarchical sampling design considering four different spatial scales, i.e. from region (100 s of km apart) to quadrats (ms apart). Variability on their patterns of abundance was explored by analysis of variance, changes on their distribution ranges were detected by comparing with previous records and their relationship with sea water temperature was explored by rank correlation analyses. Mean values of sea surface temperature along the Iberian coast, between 1949 and 2010, were obtained from in situ data compiled for three different grid squares: south Portugal, north Portugal, and Galicia. Lusitanian species did not show significant correlation with sea water temperature or changes on their distributional range or abundance, along the temperature gradient considered. The sub-tropical species Siphonaria pectinata has, however, increased its distribution range while boreal cold-water species showed the opposite pattern. The latter was more evident for Littorina littorea that was almost absent from the studied rocky shores of the Iberian Peninsula. Sub-tropical and boreal species showed significant but opposite correlation with sea water temperature. We hypothesized that the energetic cost of frequent exposures to sub-lethal temperatures might be responsible for these shifts. Therefore, intertidal gastropods at the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula coast are responding to the effect of global warming as it

  3. New porcellioidean gastropods from early Devonian of Royal Creek area, Yukon Territory, Canada, with notes on their early phylogeny

    Fryda, J.; Blodgett, R.B.; Lenz, A.C.; Manda, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a description of new gastropods belonging to the superfamily Porcellioidea (Vetigastropoda) from the richly diverse Lower Devonian gastropod fauna of the Road River Formation in the Royal Creek area, Yukon Territory. This fauna belongs to Western Canada Province of the Old World Realm. The Pragian species Porcellia (Porcellia) yukonensis n. sp. and Porcellia (Paraporcellia) sp. represent the oldest presently known members of subgenera Porcellia (Porcellia) and Porcellia (Paraporcellia). Their simple shell ornamentation fits well with an earlier described evolutionary trend in shell morphology of the Porcellinae. Late Pragian to early Emsian Perryconcha pulchra n. gen. and n. sp. is the first member of the Porcellioidea bearing a row of tremata on adult teleoconch whorls. The occurrence of this shell feature in the Porcellioidea is additional evidence that the evolution of the apertural slit was much more complicated than has been proposed in classical models of Paleozoic gastropod evolution. Copyright ?? 2008, The Paleontological Society.

  4. Radiocarbon ages of terrestrial gastropods extend duration of ice-free conditions at the Two Creeks forest bed, Wisconsin, USA

    Rech, Jason A.; Nekola, Jeffrey C.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of terrestrial gastropods that underlie the late Pleistocene Two Creeks forest bed (~ 13,800–13,500 cal yr BP) in eastern Wisconsin, USA provides evidence for a mixed tundra-taiga environment prior to formation of the taiga forest bed. Ten new AMS 14C analyses on terrestrial gastropod shells indicate the mixed tundra-taiga environment persisted from ~ 14,500 to 13,900 cal yr BP. The Twocreekan climatic substage, representing ice-free conditions on the shore of Lake Michigan, therefore began near the onset of peak warming conditions during the Bølling–Allerød interstadial and lasted ~ 1000 yr, nearly 600 yr longer than previously thought. These results provide important data for understanding the response of continental ice sheets to global climate forcing and demonstrate the potential of using terrestrial gastropod fossils for both environmental reconstruction and age control in late Quaternary sediments.

  5. Snails and their trails: the multiple functions of trail-following in gastropods.

    Ng, Terence P T; Saltin, Sara H; Davies, Mark S; Johannesson, Kerstin; Stafford, Richard; Williams, Gray A

    2013-08-01

    Snails are highly unusual among multicellular animals in that they move on a layer of costly mucus, leaving behind a trail that can be followed and utilized for various purposes by themselves or by other animals. Here we review more than 40 years of experimental and theoretical research to try to understand the ecological and evolutionary rationales for trail-following in gastropods. Data from over 30 genera are currently available, representing a broad taxonomic range living in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. The emerging picture is that the production of mucus trails, which initially was an adaptation to facilitate locomotion and/or habitat extension, has evolved to facilitate a multitude of additional functions. Trail-following supports homing behaviours, and provides simple mechanisms for self-organisation in groups of snails, promoting aggregation and thus relieving desiccation and predation pressures. In gastropods that copulate, trail-following is an important component in mate-searching, either as an alternative, or in addition to the release of water- or air-borne pheromones. In some species, this includes a capacity of males not only to identify trails of conspecifics but also to discriminate between trails laid by females and males. Notably, trail discrimination seems important as a pre-zygotic barrier to mating in some snail species. As production of a mucus trail is the most costly component of snail locomotion, it is also tempting to speculate that evolution has given rise to various ways to compensate for energy losses. Some snails, for example, increase energy intake by eating particles attached to the mucus of trails that they follow, whereas others save energy through reducing the production of their own mucus by moving over previously laid mucus trails. Trail-following to locate a prey item or a mate is also a way to save energy. While the rationale for trail-following in many cases appears clear, the basic mechanisms of trail

  6. Cap-shaped gastropods from Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous deposits of northern East Siberia

    Guzhov, A. V.; Zakharov, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    Cap-shaped gastropods are first identified in Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sections of northern East Siberia. They belong to three new genera of the subclass Pectinibranchia ( Boreioconus gen. nov., Nixepileolus gen. nov., and Taimyroconus gen. nov.), which are identified at the species level ( B. bojarkensis sp. nov., N. depressus sp. nov., T. zakharovi sp. nov.), and several species with the open nomenclature. The genus Taimyroconus attributed to the family Calyptraeidae is considered as an ancestral form of the genus Crepidula. The stratigraphic position of each taxon is determined for several sections. The facies confinement, habitat conditions, and ethology of defined genera are considered with the analysis of their geographic distribution.

  7. Diversity and abundance of epibiota on invasive and native estuarine gastropods depend on substratum and salinity

    Thyrring, Jakob; Thomsen, Mads Solgaard; Brunbjerg, Ane Kirstine;

    2015-01-01

    ,226 shells representing the common gastropod species in the estuary; Nassarius pauperatus, Bedeva paiva and Batillaria australs from various sites and habitats. Generalized linear models were used to model variability of richness and abundances of common functional groups and species for the above listed......Epibiosis is a common life form in estuarine ecosystems, where shell structures in particular, provide important attachment substrate for sessile species. Many studies have quantified variation in epibiota communities against a few environmental factors, but rarely studies have accounted...

  8. Relation between aquatic plants and gastropods (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in the region of Gentilly I (Quebec) nuclear generating station

    This study is based on a sampling of the gastropods present in the vegetation of the St. Lawrence riverside zone at Gentilly. A total of 536 plant specimens belonging to 20 species as well as 37 239 specimens grouping 10 different species of gastropods were sampled. A comparison of the plant species - mollusc data was carried out. The analysis of the results indicates that prosobranchs have no affinity whatsoever for any plant species in particular. The pulmonates, however, are found mainly on emergent plants. (author)

  9. Body Size Extinction and Origination Selectivity: A Case Study of Marine Gastropods

    Kuo, E.; Seixas, G.; Faerber, M.; Payne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Body size has received exceptional interest in evolutionary biology because of its correlation with many ecological and physiological traits. Because large size is typically associated with long generation time and small population size, it has been widely assumed that extinction risk is positively correlated with body size. Data from Pleistocene and Holocene terrestrial mammals and birds support this inference. However, there have been few studies on size bias of marine invertebrate animals, so the true extent of this pattern remains unknown. For this study, we compiled genus-level body size data for marine gastropods spanning the entire Phanerozoic. We use this dataset to examine the statistical evidence for size bias in both origination and extinction of marine gastropods. We perform logistic regression analyses on the data from each Phanerozoic stage to determine the association of body size with origination and extinction. Contrary to previous studies on terrestrial vertebrates, we observe no strong or persistent association between body size and the probability that a genus either originated or went extinct during that stage. Hence, our findings indicate that size bias in extinction risk may reflect particular aspects of mammalian biology or anthropogenic environmental change rather than a general pattern of animal evolution.

  10. The role of the ventral pedal waves in the locomotion of terrestrial gastropods

    Lai, Janice; Shepherd, Robert D.; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2008-03-01

    The locomotion of terrestrial gastropods exhibits unique characteristics which allow these animals to crawl on steep surfaces. Gastropods move by gliding over a ventral foot lubricated by mucus. They generate trains of pedal waves through periodic muscle contractions in the central portion of the ventral foot, producing a forward traction, while the rim of the foot adheres to the substrate and generates suction forces. We analyzed the kinematics and dynamics of locomotion by conducting two sets of experiments. In the first set, we used digital image processing to correlate the frequency and wavelength of the pedal waves to the migration velocity. In the second set, we computed the traction and adhesion forces produced by these animals from measurements of the deformation of an elastic substrate of known properties. We found that the strain energy exerted by the animal on the substrate is quasi-periodic, and explored a possible correlation between the mean speed of migration and the period of this energy fluctuation. In addition, we found that the pedal waves accelerate as they move forward along the ventral foot producing the symmetry break necessary for the generation of a net traction force.

  11. Assessing the status of endangered invertebrates from the ancient Lake Ohrid: The gastropod Chilopyrgula sturanyi

    Budzakoska-Gjoreska Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Ohrid is the oldest and deepest lake on the Balkan Peninsula and one of the five oldest lakes in the world. Two of the most striking attributes of the species of the Lake’s fauna, especially the fauna of gastropods, are the high level of biological diversity as well as a high percentage of endemism. The main subject of interest in our research was to follow the distribution and density of the endemic gastropod species Chilopyrgula sturanyi. For this purpose different depth points of the transect Hydrobiological Institute-Radozda as well as other littoral points on the northwestern part of Lake Ohrid, were investigated. The results showed maximum density in the population of Chilopyrgula sturanyi in the muddy lakebed covered by Chara tomentosa. The minimum density in population was recorded on the lakebed with gravel. Specimens of Chilopyrgula sturanyi were not recorded at the depth of 50 m, where the lakebed is covered by a sandy-muddy substrate.

  12. Traces (ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides of predatory gastropods on bivalve shells from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea

    Dal-Yong Kong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Circular to subcircular drill holes were identified on the bivalve shells collected from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea. A great majority of the drill holes (>70% were found on the surfaces of a bivalve species Glycymeris rotunda. They are characterized by a beveled sharp edge and paraboloid in cross section with larger outer borehole diameter (OBD; mean 4.21 mm and smaller inner borehole diameter (mean 2.94 mm. Walls of the drill holes are generally smooth, and walls ornamented with etched relief-like structures were also recognized. A slightly raised central boss observed in an incomplete specimen may indicate a failure of predator’s attack. All drill holes collected are classified as a single ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides Bromley, 1981. They are interpreted as boring traces produced by predatory gastropods, particularly naticid gastropods. Most O. paraboloides boreholes are observed in the central area of shell surfaces; a few boreholes lie marginally, which may reflect a borehole-site selectivity. No correlation between size of prey (shell height and size of predator (OBD is recognized. It is likely, however, that drilled shells of about 30 mm in height represent optimal prey size for naticid predators that lived in a benthic Seogwipo community.

  13. Parasitic infection alters the physiological response of a marine gastropod to ocean acidification.

    Macleod, C D; Poulin, R

    2016-09-01

    Increased hydrogen ion concentration and decreased carbonate ion concentration in seawater are the most physiologically relevant consequences of ocean acidification (OA). Changes to either chemical species may increase the metabolic cost of physiological processes in marine organisms, and reduce the energy available for growth, reproduction and survival. Parasitic infection also increases the energetic demands experienced by marine organisms, and may reduce host tolerance to stressors associated with OA. This study assessed the combined metabolic effects of parasitic infection and OA on an intertidal gastropod, Zeacumantus subcarinatus. Oxygen consumption rates and tissue glucose content were recorded in snails infected with one of three trematode parasites, and an uninfected control group, maintained in acidified (7·6 and 7·4 pH) or unmodified (8·1 pH) seawater. Exposure to acidified seawater significantly altered the oxygen consumption rates and tissue glucose content of infected and uninfected snails, and there were clear differences in the magnitude of these changes between snails infected with different species of trematode. These results indicate that the combined effects of OA and parasitic infection significantly alter the energy requirements of Z. subcarinatus, and that the species of the infecting parasite may play an important role in determining the tolerance of marine gastropods to OA. PMID:27222227

  14. Studies on bioprospecting potential of a gastropod mollusc Cantharus tranquebaricus(Gmelin,1791)

    G; Sarumathi; M; Arumugam; S; Kumaresan; T; Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To study the biological activities of the tissue extract of Cantharus tranquebaricus(C.tranquebaricus).Methods:Crude extract of gastropod was tested for inhibition of bacterial growth.Antibacterial assay was carried out by disc diffusion method and the activity was measured accordingly based on the inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with gastropod extract.Molecular weight of the extract was determined by using SDS-PAGE.Plasma coagulation,Fibrin plate assay and substrate SDS-PAGE were used to determine the effect of sample on plasma coagulation,fibrin(ogen)olytic and proteolytic;activity.Results:The maximum inhibition zone(10 mm)was observed against Vibrio cholera(V.cholera)and minimum inhibition zone(2 mm)was noticed against Proteus mirablis(P.mirablis).The molecular weight was determined as 47-106kDa.The tissue extract shows proteolytic activity above 48 kDa.SDS-PAGE analysis of fibrinogen after incubation with the tissue extract showed fibrinogenolytic activity.In plasma coagulation assay C.tranquebaricus tissue extract showed procoagulant property and it coagulated chicken plasma within 150 s,while control took 5 min to clot.The 9 HU hemolytic units were found against chicken blood and also exhibit high level of brine shrimp lethality.Conclusions:This study suggests that C.tranquebaricus could be used as potential source for isolating bioactive compounds,since it is explored first time and found with promising results.

  15. Studies on bioprospecting potential of a gastropod mollusc Cantharus tranquebaricus (Gmelin, 1791)

    G Sarumathi; M Arumugam; S Kumaresan; T Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    To study the biological activities of the tissue extract of Cantharus tranquebaricus (C. tranquebaricus). Methods: Crude extract of gastropod was tested for inhibition of bacterial growth. Antibacterial assay was carried out by disc diffusion method and the activity was measured accordingly based on the inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with gastropod extract. Molecular weight of the extract was determined by using SDS-PAGE. Plasma coagulation, Fibrin plate assay and substrate SDS-PAGE were used to determine the effect of sample on plasma coagulation, fibrin (ogen) olytic and proteolytic activity. Results: The maximum inhibition zone (10 mm) was observed against Vibrio cholera (V. cholera) and minimum inhibition zone (2 mm) was noticed against Proteus mirablis (P. mirablis). The molecular weight was determined as 47-106 kDa. The tissue extract shows proteolytic activity above 48 kDa. SDS-PAGE analysis of fibrinogen after incubation with the tissue extract showed fibrinogenolytic activity. In plasma coagulation assay C. tranquebaricus tissue extract showed procoagulant property and it coagulated chicken plasma within 150 s, while control took 5 min to clot. The 9 HU hemolytic units were found against chicken blood and also exhibit high level of brine shrimp lethality. Conclusions: This study suggests that C. tranquebaricus could be used as potential source for isolating bioactive compounds, since it is explored first time and found with promising results.

  16. Hydrothermal vent gastropods from the same family (Provannidae) harbour epsilon- and gamma-proteobacterial endosymbionts.

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Dubilier, Nicole; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Cunningham, Dale E; Kojima, Shigeaki; Stahl, David A

    2005-05-01

    The discovery of new hydrothermal vent systems in the back-arc basins of the Western Pacific revealed chemosynthesis-based faunal communities distinct from those of other vents. These vents are dominated by two related gastropods (Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei) that harbour symbiotic bacteria in their gills. We used comparative 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing and in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted probes to characterize the bacterial symbionts of Alviniconcha sp. and I. nautilei from the Manus Basin in the Western Pacific. The analyses revealed that these two gastropod species, although affiliated with the same family, harbour phylogenetically distant chemosymbionts, suggesting independent origins of these endosymbioses. The I. nautilei endosymbiont clusters with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within the gamma-Proteobacteria, as is the case for all previously characterized endosymbionts from a wide diversity of host taxa harbouring thioautotrophic prokaryotes. In contrast, the Alviniconcha endosymbiont is affiliated with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within the epsilon-Proteobacteria. These results show that bacteria from the epsilon-Proteobacteria are also capable of forming endosymbiotic associations with marine invertebrates from chemosynthetic environments. More generally, the endosymbiotic lifestyle is now shown to be distributed throughout all recognized classes of the Proteobacteria. PMID:15819856

  17. Microstructures in shells of the freshwater gastropod Viviparus viviparus: a potential sensor for temperature change?

    Füllenbach, Christoph S; Schöne, Bernd R; Branscheid, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Mollusk shells contain a plethora of information on past climate variability. However, only a limited toolkit is currently available to reconstruct such data from the shells. The environmental data of some proxies (e.g. Sr/Ca ratios) is obscured by physiological effects, whereas other proxies, such as δ(18)O, simultaneously provide information on two or more different environmental variables. The present study investigates whether microstructures of the freshwater gastropod Viviparus viviparus provide an alternative means to reconstruct past water temperature. Cold and highly variable temperature regimes resulted in the precipitation of highly unordered first-order lamellae of simple crossed-lamellar (XLM) structures if new shell formed from scratch. However, during stable and warm conditions, well-ordered first-order lamellae were laid down irrespective of pre-existing shell material. Homogeneous first-order lamellae also formed during times of cold and highly variable temperatures if the new shell was deposited onto existing shell material with well-ordered first-order lamellae. The growth front seems to contain instructions for building specific microstructure variants, irrespective of environmental conditions. However, if this template is missing, the animal forms a deviating microstructure. Under extremely stressful situations (e.g. removal from habitat, calcein staining, extreme temperature shifts), the gastropod precipitates an evolutionarily older microstructure (irregular simple prisms) rather than XLM structures. These shell portions were macroscopically described as disturbance lines. In addition, repetitive, presumably periodic growth patterns were observed, which consisted of gradually changing third-order lamellae between consecutive faint, organic-rich growth lines. These growth patterns were probably controlled by intrinsic biological clocks and exhibited a two-daily periodicity. The results of this study may provide the basis for using changes in

  18. Evolution and development of gastropod larval shell morphology: experimental evidence for mechanical defense and repair.

    Hickman, C S

    2001-01-01

    The structural diversity of gastropod veliger larvae offers an instructive counterpoint to the view of larval forms as conservative archetypes. Larval structure, function, and development are fine-tuned for survival in the plankton. Accordingly, the study of larval adaptation provides an important perspective for evolutionary-developmental biology as an integrated science. Patterns of breakage and repair in the field, as well as patterns of breakage in arranged encounters with zooplankton under laboratory conditions, are two powerful sources of data on the adaptive significance of morphological and microsculptural features of the gastropod larval shell. Shells of the planktonic veliger larvae of the caenogastropod Nassarius paupertus [GOULD] preserve multiple repaired breaks, attributed to unsuccessful zooplankton predators. In culture, larvae isolated from concentrated zooplankton samples rapidly repaired broken apertural margins and restored the "ideal" apertural form, in which an elaborate projection or "beak" covers the head of the swimming veliger. When individuals with repaired apertures were reintroduced to a concentrated mixture of potential zooplankton predators, the repaired margins were rapidly chipped and broken back. The projecting beak of the larval shell is the first line of mechanical defense, covering the larval head and mouth and potentially the most vulnerable part of the shell to breakage. Patterns of mechanical failure show that spiral ridges do reinforce the beak and retard breakage. The capacity for rapid shell repair and regeneration, and the evolution of features that resist or retard mechanical damage, may play a more prominent role than previously thought in enhancing the ability of larvae to survive in the plankton. PMID:11256430

  19. [Composition, abundance and distribution of populations of commercially important gastropods in La Guajira, Colombian Caribbean].

    Nieto-Bernal, Ramón; Luis, Chasqui; Rodriguez, Angélica María; Castro, Erick; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L

    2013-06-01

    In the continental Colombian Caribbean the conch resource exploitation and the status of snails populations has been poorly studied, which are reflected in the lack of fisheries management. This study assesses composition, population density and distribution of the gastropods species that make conch resource in La Guajira region. Underwater visual censuses for snails were performed between September-November 2009 in 145100x4m (400m2) transects, spanning a total area of 56920m2 between Riohacha and Cabo de la Vela. The study was complemented with the evaluation of composition, abundance and size of gastropods conch found in the discarded-by-fishermen shell mounds in 13 beaches. In October 2010 another 40 transects were evaluated (16 000 m2) from the Southern of Riohacha to the Camarones village (La Guajira). We found a total of 9911 snails belonging to 12 species, the most abundant being Strombus pugilis with 8 912 individuals and an average density of 1 538.4 +/- 3 662.6 ind./ha, followed by Vasum muricatum with 374 individuals and an average density of 51.8 +/- 91.2 ind./ha. Calculating the importance value index (IVI) for both living organisms as the empty shells on beaches, shows that Turbinella angulata is the most used species by artisanal fishermen in the region. Cassis madagascariensis and Cassis tuberosa are also important snail resources in the region (as suggested by the number of empty shells found in beaches), but its densities were low. Strombus gigas, with only three living organisms found in the area, presented the lowest abundance ever found in the Colombian Caribbean (0.52 +/- 3.6 ind./ha), showing that queen conch population in La Guajira cannot support commercial exploitation. The abundance of discarded S. gigas shells on beaches suggests resource exploitation in the recent past. Results remarks the urgency of implementing management plans for snail fisheries in the region. PMID:23885583

  20. Consumption rates and prey preference of the invasive gastropod Rapana venosa in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    Savini, Dario; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, Anna

    2006-05-01

    The alien Asian gastropod Rapana venosa (Valenciennes 1846) was first recorded in 1973 along the Italian coast of the Northern Adriatic Sea. Recently, this predator of bivalves has been spreading all around the world oceans, probably helped by ship traffic and aquaculture trade. A caging experiment in natural environment was performed during the summer of 2002 in Cesenatico (Emilia-Romagna, Italy) in order to estimate consumption rates and prey preference of R. venosa. The prey items chosen were the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck 1819), the introduced carpet clam Tapes philippinarum (Adams and Reeve 1850), both supporting the local fisheries, and the Indo-Pacific invasive clam Anadara (Scapharca) inaequivalvis (Bruguière 1789). Results showed an average consumption of about 1 bivalve prey per day (or 1.2 g wet weight per day). Predation was species and size selective towards small specimens of A. inaequivalvis; consumption of the two commercial species was lower. These results might reduce the concern about the economical impact on the local bivalve fishery due to the presence of the predatory gastropod. On the other hand, selective predation might probably alter local community structure, influencing competition amongst filter feeder/suspension feeder bivalve species and causing long-term ecological impact. The large availability of food resource and the habitat characteristics of the Emilia-Romagna littoral makes this area an important breeding ground for R. venosa in the Mediterranean Sea, thus worthy of consideration in order to understand the bioinvasion ecology of this species and to control its likely further dispersal.

  1. The ultrastructure of spermatozoa and spermiogenesis in pyramidellid gastropods, and its systematic importance

    Healy, John M.

    1988-06-01

    Ultrastructural observations on spermiogenesis and spermatozoa of selected pyramidellid gastropods (species of Turbonilla, Pyrgulina, Cingulina and Hinemoa) are presented. During spermatid developement, the condensing nucleus becomes initially anterio-posteriorly compressed or sometimes cup-shaped. Concurrently, the acrosomal complex attaches to an electrondense layer at the presumptive anterior pole of the nucleus, while at the opposite (posterior) pole of the nucleus a shallow invagination is formed to accommodate the centriolar derivative. Midpiece formation begins soon after these events have taken place, and involves the following processes: (1) the wrapping of individual mitochondria around the axoneme/coarse fibre complex; (2) later internal metamorphosis resulting in replacement of cristae by paracrystalline layers which envelope the matrix material; and (3) formation of a glycogen-filled helix within the mitochondrial derivative (via a secondary wrapping of mitochondria). Advanced stages of nuclear condensation (elongation, transformation of fibres into lamellae, subsequent compaction) and midpiece formation proceed within a microtubular sheath (‘manchette’). Pyramidellid spermatozoa consist of an acrosomal complex (round to ovoid apical vesicle; column-shaped acrosomal pedestal), helically-keeled nucleus (short, 7 10 μm long, shallow basal invagination for axoneme/coarse fibre attachment), elongate helical midpiece (composed of axoneme, coarse fibres, paracrystalline and matrix materials, glycogen-filled helix), glycogen piece (length variable, preceeded by a dense ring structure at junction with midpiece). The features of developing and mature spermatozoa observed in the Pyramidellidae are as observed in opisthobranch and pulmonate gastropods indicating that the Pyramidelloidea should be placed within the Euthyneura/Heterobranchia, most appropriately as a member group of the Opisthobranchia.

  2. Sclerite formation in the hydrothermal-vent “scaly-foot” gastropod — possible control of iron sulfide biomineralization by the animal

    Suzuki, Yohey; Kopp, Robert E.; Kogure, Toshihiro; Suga, Akinobu; Takai, Ken; Tsuchida, Shinji; Ozaki, Noriaki; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Jun; Kato, Yasuhiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Hirata, Takafumi; CHIBA, Hitoshi; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    A gastropod from a deep-sea hydrothermal field at the Rodriguez triple junction, Indian Ocean, has scale-shaped structures, called sclerites, mineralized with iron sulfides on its foot. No other organisms are known to produce a skeleton consisting of iron sulfides. To investigate whether iron sulfide mineralization is mediated by the gastropod for the function of the sclerites, we performed a detailed physical and chemical characterization. Nanostructural characterization of the iron sulfide ...

  3. Ecosystem engineering potential of the gastropod Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767) in mangrove wastewater wetlands--a controlled mesocosm experiment.

    Penha-Lopes, Gil; Bartolini, Fabrizio; Limbu, Samwel; Cannicci, Stefano; Mgaya, Yunus; Kristensen, Erik; Paula, José

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different sewage concentrations (0, 20, 60 and 100%), vegetation (Bare, Avicennia marina or Rhizophora mucronata) and immersion periods (immersion/emersion period of 12/12 h or 3/3 days just for 100%) conditions were studied for 6 months on survival and growth rates of Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767). Gastropods' activity and ecosystem engineering preformed at bare and A. marina planted cells and 3 sewage conditions (0, 20 and 60%) were determined. Survival rates were higher than 70% in all treatments. Growth rate decreased significantly with increasing sewage concentrations (mainly at unplanted conditions) and longer immersion periods. A complete shift (from immersion to emersion periods) and a significant decrease in mobility and consequently its engineer potential, due to sewage contamination, lead to a 3-4 fold decrease in the amount of sediment disturbed. Sewage contamination, primary producers' abundance and environmental conditions may have influenced the gastropods survival, growth and its ecosystem engineering potential. PMID:19640623

  4. Gastropods Associated with Fossil Traces from Yacoraite Formation (Maastrichtian-Danian), and its Paleoenvironmental Significance, Jujuy,Northwestern Argentina

    Carlos A. C(O)NSOLE GONELLA; Miguel GRIFFIN; Florencio G. ACE(N)OLAZA

    2009-01-01

    We present results tending to characterize the new records of invertebrates from the Yacoraite Formation (Maastrichtian-Danian). The fossils reported come from two stratigraphic sections exposed in the surroundings of Maimara and Jueya, province of Jujuy, northwestern Argentina. The selection was based on geological and paleontological evidence. The recovered fossils include gastropods and invertebrate fossil traces, including Planolites, Skolithos and Gastrochanoelites ichnogenns. As result of our review, we discussed the possibility of assigning the analyzed gastropods to the family Zygopleuridae (gene. et. sp. indet.), as an approximation to the taxonomic resolution of this fossil fauna. The trace fossils were assigned to the archetypical Glossifungites ichnofacies. The study of the fossil assemblage allowed us to defme a shallow depositional environment, characteristic of a marine context with high-energy conditions.

  5. On the origin of Acochlidia and other enigmatic euthyneuran gastropods, with implications for the systematics of Heterobranchia

    Knebelsberger Thomas; Fukuda Hiroshi; Kano Yasunori; Stöger Isabella; Jörger Katharina M; Schrödl Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A robust phylogenetic hypothesis of euthyneuran gastropods, as a basis to reconstructing their evolutionary history, is still hindered by several groups of aberrant, more or less worm-like slugs with unclear phylogenetic relationships. As a traditional "order" in the Opisthobranchia, the Acochlidia have a long history of controversial placements, among others influenced by convergent adaptation to the mainly meiofaunal habitats. The present study includes six out of seven ...

  6. Influences of population density on polyandry and patterns of sperm usage in the marine gastropod Rapana venosa

    Dong-Xiu Xue; Tao Zhang; Jin-Xian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, with potential for sexual selection to continue post-copulation through sperm competition and/or cryptic female choice. Few studies have investigated the influences of population density on polyandry and sperm usage, and paternity distribution in successive broods of marine invertebrates. The marine gastropod Rapana venosa is ideal for investigating how population density influences the frequency of polyandry and elucidating patterns of sperm ...

  7. Ecophenotypic plasticity leads to extraordinary gastropod shells found on the “Roof of the World”

    Clewing, Catharina; Riedel, Frank; Wilke, Thomas; Albrecht, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The often extraordinary shell forms and shapes of gastropods found in palaeolakes, such as the highly diverse Gyraulus fauna of the famous Steinheim Basin, have been puzzling evolutionary biologists for centuries, and there is an ongoing debate whether these aberrant shell forms are indicative of true species (or subspecies) or ecophenotypic morphs. Interestingly, one of the Steinheim Gyraulus morphs – a corkscrew-like open-coiled shell – has a recent analogue in the Lake Bangong drainage sys...

  8. Population structure of an invasive parthenogenetic gastropod in coastal lakes and estuaries of northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Nelson A F Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Estuaries and coastal lakes receive little attention despite being heavily invaded by non-indigenous invasive species (NIS. In these situations, studies of population dynamics in invaded habitats can provide valuable insights into how NIS interact with new environments. Tarebia granifera is a prosobranch gastropod from south-east Asia which has invaded other sub-tropical parts of the world. This study addresses whether a small number of key environmental factors influences gastropod communities, and specifically how the population density and size structure of T. granifera were influenced by environmental change in estuaries and coastal lakes in southern Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T. granifera's density, number of brooded juveniles and size structure were measured at the St. Lucia Estuary, Mgobozeleni Estuary, Lake Sibaya and Lake Nhlange. Size structure was classified according to shell height (SH. All dissected individuals were found to be female and free from trematode infection. Salinity, water depth, temperature, and pH were the main factors correlated with population density of gastropod communities. T. granifera often reached densities well over 1000 ind. m(-2, displacing indigenous gastropods and becoming a dominant component of the benthic community. T. granifera successfully invaded estuaries despite frequent exposure to high salinity and desiccation, which could together eliminate >97% of the population. The persistence of T. granifera was ensured due to its high fecundity and the environmental tolerance of large adults (20-30 mm SH which carried an average of 158±12.8 SD brooded juveniles. Repeat introductions were not essential for the success of this parthenogenetic NIS. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: There is a need for a broader study on the reproductive biology of T. granifera (including the previously overlooked "brood pouch ecology", which affects population dynamics and may be relevant to other

  9. A neurotropic herpesvirus infecting the gastropod, abalone, shares ancestry with oyster herpesvirus and a herpesvirus associated with the amphioxus genome

    Sawbridge Tim; Wong Frank; Cocks Benjamin G; Savin Keith W; Cogan Noel; Savage David; Warner Simone

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background With the exception of the oyster herpesvirus OsHV-1, all herpesviruses characterized thus far infect only vertebrates. Some cause neurological disease in their hosts, while others replicate or become latent in neurological tissues. Recently a new herpesvirus causing ganglioneuritis in abalone, a gastropod, was discovered. Molecular analysis of new herpesviruses, such as this one and others, still to be discovered in invertebrates, will provide insight into the evolution of...

  10. Morphological and behavioral differences in the gastropod Trophon geversianus associated to distinct environmental conditions, as revealed by a multidisciplinary approach

    Márquez, Federico; Nieto Vilela, Rocío Aimé; Lozada, Mariana; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    The gastropod Trophon geversianus exhibits shell polymorphisms along its distribution in subtidal and intertidal habitats. Our hypothesis is that morphological and behavioral patterns of T. geversianus represent habitat-specific constrains; subsequently we expect an association between shell morphology, attachment behavior, and habitat. In order to test this hypothesis we compared individuals from intertidal and subtidal habitats, at three sites in Golfo Nuevo (Argentina). We analyzed shell morphology using classic morphometric variables, 3D geometric morphometrics and computing tomography scan. The results were complemented with field observations of attachment to substrate and turning time behavior, as well as of the number of shell scars produced by crab predation. Our results showed differences in shell size and shape between intertidal and subtidal-collected individuals. Centroid size, total weight and shell weight, as well as shell density and thickness were significantly lower in intertidal individuals than in subtidal ones. Gastropods from intertidal habitats presented a low-spired shell and an expanded aperture which might allow better attachment to the bottom substrate, while subtidal individuals presented a slender and narrower shell shape. The number of crab scars was significantly higher in shells from subtidal individuals. Observations of the behavior of gastropods placed at the intertidal splash zone showed 100% of attachment to the bottom in the intertidal individuals, while subtidal specimens only attached in average in 32% of the cases. These latter took 12 times longer to re-attach to the bottom when faced up. Phylogenetic analysis of COI gene fragments showed no consistent differences among individuals sampled in both habitats. All these results suggest that T. geversianus has developed two ecomorphs with distinct morphological and behavioral responses to physically stressful conditions registered in north Patagonian intertidals, as opposed to

  11. The Mitochondrial Genomes of the Nudibranch Mollusks, Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea, and Their Impact on Gastropod Phylogeny.

    Sevigny, Joseph L; Kirouac, Lauren E; Thomas, William Kelley; Ramsdell, Jordan S; Lawlor, Kayla E; Sharifi, Osman; Grewal, Simarvir; Baysdorfer, Christopher; Curr, Kenneth; Naimie, Amanda A; Okamoto, Kazufusa; Murray, James A; Newcomb, James M

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among certain groups of gastropods have remained unresolved in recent studies, especially in the diverse subclass Opisthobranchia, where nudibranchs have been poorly represented. Here we present the complete mitochondrial genomes of Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea (more recently named T. tetraquetra), two nudibranchs from the unrepresented Cladobranchia group, and report on the resulting phylogenetic analyses. Both genomes coded for the typical thirteen protein-coding genes, twenty-two transfer RNAs, and two ribosomal RNAs seen in other species. The twelve-nucleotide deletion previously reported for the cytochrome oxidase 1 gene in several other Melibe species was further clarified as three separate deletion events. These deletions were not present in any opisthobranchs examined in our study, including the newly sequenced M. leonina or T. diomedea, suggesting that these previously reported deletions may represent more recently divergent taxa. Analysis of the secondary structures for all twenty-two tRNAs of both M. leonina and T. diomedea indicated truncated d arms for the two serine tRNAs, as seen in some other heterobranchs. In addition, the serine 1 tRNA in T. diomedea contained an anticodon not yet reported in any other gastropod. For phylogenetic analysis, we used the thirteen protein-coding genes from the mitochondrial genomes of M. leonina, T. diomedea, and seventy-one other gastropods. Phylogenetic analyses were performed for both the class Gastropoda and the subclass Opisthobranchia. Both Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses resulted in similar tree topologies. In the Opisthobranchia, the five orders represented in our study were monophyletic (Anaspidea, Cephalaspidea, Notaspidea, Nudibranchia, Sacoglossa). In Gastropoda, two of the three traditional subclasses, Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata, were not monophyletic. In contrast, four of the more recently named gastropod clades (Vetigastropoda, Neritimorpha

  12. The Mitochondrial Genomes of the Nudibranch Mollusks, Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea, and Their Impact on Gastropod Phylogeny.

    Joseph L Sevigny

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic relationships among certain groups of gastropods have remained unresolved in recent studies, especially in the diverse subclass Opisthobranchia, where nudibranchs have been poorly represented. Here we present the complete mitochondrial genomes of Melibe leonina and Tritonia diomedea (more recently named T. tetraquetra, two nudibranchs from the unrepresented Cladobranchia group, and report on the resulting phylogenetic analyses. Both genomes coded for the typical thirteen protein-coding genes, twenty-two transfer RNAs, and two ribosomal RNAs seen in other species. The twelve-nucleotide deletion previously reported for the cytochrome oxidase 1 gene in several other Melibe species was further clarified as three separate deletion events. These deletions were not present in any opisthobranchs examined in our study, including the newly sequenced M. leonina or T. diomedea, suggesting that these previously reported deletions may represent more recently divergent taxa. Analysis of the secondary structures for all twenty-two tRNAs of both M. leonina and T. diomedea indicated truncated d arms for the two serine tRNAs, as seen in some other heterobranchs. In addition, the serine 1 tRNA in T. diomedea contained an anticodon not yet reported in any other gastropod. For phylogenetic analysis, we used the thirteen protein-coding genes from the mitochondrial genomes of M. leonina, T. diomedea, and seventy-one other gastropods. Phylogenetic analyses were performed for both the class Gastropoda and the subclass Opisthobranchia. Both Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses resulted in similar tree topologies. In the Opisthobranchia, the five orders represented in our study were monophyletic (Anaspidea, Cephalaspidea, Notaspidea, Nudibranchia, Sacoglossa. In Gastropoda, two of the three traditional subclasses, Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata, were not monophyletic. In contrast, four of the more recently named gastropod clades (Vetigastropoda

  13. Novel excitatory neuropeptides isolated from a prosobranch gastropod, Thais clavigera : The molluscan counterpart of the annelidan GGNG peptides

    Morishita, Fumihiro; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Takeshige, K.; Furukawa, Yasuo; Takata, T.; Matsushima, Osamu; Mukai, S.T.; Saleuddin, A.S.M.; Horiguchi, Toshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The GGNG peptides are excitatory neuropeptides identified from earthworms, leeches and polychaeta. Two structurally related peptides were purified and characterized from a mollusk, Thais clavigera (prosobranch gastropod). The peptides designated as TEP-1 (Thais excitatory peptide-1) (KCSGKWAIHACWGGN-NH2) and TEP-2 (KCYGKWAMHACWGGN-NH2) are pentadecapeptides having one disulfide bond and C-terminal GGN-NH2 structures, which are shared by most GGNG peptides. TEP augmented the motilities of Thai...

  14. Temporal dynamics of gastropod fauna on subtidal sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    Moreira, J.; Aldea, C.; Troncoso, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    The temporal variation of the gastropod fauna inhabiting sandy sediments of the Ensenada de Baiona (Galicia, Spain) was studied at three subtidal sites from February 1996 to February 1997 by means of quantitative sampling. A total of 5,463 individuals representing 51 gastropod species and 22 families were found. The family Pyramidellidae was the most diverse in number of species (11 species), followed by Rissoidae and Trochidae (4 species each). The dogwhelk, Nassarius reticulatus, and the rissoid snail, Rissoa parva, were the numerically dominant species at the three studied sites; those and other abundant species showed their greatest densities by the end of summer and the beginning of autumn. In general, univariate measures of the assemblage (number of species, abundance, diversity and evenness) showed variations through time; greater values were recorded between summer and autumn depending on the site. Multivariate analyses done on abundance data showed certain seasonality in the evolution of the assemblage as expected for shallow subtidal sandy sediments at temperate latitudes; those seasonal changes were mostly related to variations in abundance of numerically dominant species. Although the measured sedimentary variables did not show significant correlations with faunal univariate parameters, sediment heterogeneity due to the presence of mats of Zostera marina L. and shells of dead bivalves might explain the differences in composition of the gastropod assemblage among sampling sites.

  15. Species diversity of planktonic gastropods (Pteropoda and Heteropoda) from six ocean regions based on DNA barcode analysis

    Jennings, Robert M.; Bucklin, Ann; Ossenbrügger, Holger; Hopcroft, Russell R.

    2010-12-01

    Pteropods and heteropods are two distinct groups of holoplanktonic gastropods whose species and genetic diversity remain poorly understood, despite their ubiquity in the world's oceans. Some species apparently attain near cosmopolitan distributions, implying long-distance dispersal or cryptic species assemblages. We present the first multi-regional and species-rich molecular dataset of holoplanktonic gastropods, comprising DNA barcodes from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I subunit gene (COI) from 115 individuals of 41 species sampled from six ocean regions across the globe. Molecular analysis and assessment of barcoding utility supported the validity of several morphological subspecies and forms (e.g. of Creseis virgula and Limacina helicina), while others were not supported (e.g. Cavolinia uncinata). Significant genetic variation was observed among conspecific specimens collected in different geographic regions for some species, particularly in euthecosomatous pteropods. Several species of euthecosomes showed no evidence of genetic separation among distant ocean regions. Overall, we suggest some taxonomic revision of the holoplanktonic gastropods will be required, pending a more complete molecular inventory of these groups.

  16. Bioactive potential of some economically important marine gastropods along the Gulf of Mannar region, southeast coast of India

    JayanthiGovindarajalu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse the economically important gastropods for prospective antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities from the Gulf of Mannar region, southeast coast of India. Methods: The bioactive potential of some gastropods i.e. Babylonia spirata (B. spirata, Phalium glaucum, Tonna dolium, Hemifusus pugilinus, Xancus pyrum, Chicoreus ramosus (C. ramosus, Harpa articularis, Ficus ficus and Babylonia zeylanica were analysed. Antimicrobial activity was carried out against 8 human pathogenic bacteria and 3 fungal strains by well diffusion method. Antioxidant and cytotoxic activities were analyzed by standard methods. Results: In antibacterial and antifungal activities, methanolic extract of B. spirata significantly showed the highest inhibition zone against Aeromonas hydrophila and Fusarium spp. (P > 0.05. In the total antioxidant activity, the maximum activity was observed in B. spirata (510 µg/mg and in the 1.1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity, B. spirata showed the highest percentage of inhibition (76.7%. In the case of cytotoxicity i.e. brine shrimp lethality tests the methanolic extract of C. ramosus showed the lowest percentage of mortality and the LC50 values were found to be 523.9 µg/mL. Conclusions: The results revealed that all the gastropods in the present study possessed antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic effects. However, species like B. spirata and C. ramosus exhibited potent activity and can be used for further clinical studies.

  17. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    K. Föller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four modes are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial phase of diversification, or there may be a pronounced lag phase between colonization and subsequent diversification. As understanding the tempo of diversification in ancient lake environments may help unrevealing the underlying processes that drive speciation and extinction, we here use the Balkan Lake Ohrid as a model system and the largest species flock in the lake, the non-pyrgulinid Hydrobiidae, as a model taxon to study changes in diversification rates over time together with the respective drivers. Based on phylogenetic, molecular-clock, lineage-through-time plot and diversification-rate analyses we found that this monophyletic group is comparatively old and that it most likely evolved with a constant diversification rate. Preliminary data of the SCOPSCO deep-drilling program do indicate signatures of severe environmental/climatic perturbations in Lake Ohrid. However, so far there is no evidence for the occurrence of catastrophic environmental events. We therefore propose that the rate homogeneity observed in endemic gastropods has been caused by two factors: (i a potential lack of catastrophic environmental events in Lake Ohrid and/or (ii a high ecosystem resilience, buffering environmental changes. Parameters potentially contributing to the lake's high ecosystem resilience are its distinct bathymetry, ongoing tectonic activities, and karst hydrology. The current study not only contributes to one of the overall goals of the SCOPSCO deep-drilling program – inferring

  18. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    Föller, K.; Stelbrink, B.; Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four types are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial phase of diversification, or there may be a pronounced lag phase between colonization and subsequent diversification. As understanding the tempo of diversification in ancient lake environments may help reveal the underlying processes that drive speciation and extinction, we here use the Balkan Lake Ohrid as a model system and the largest species flock in the lake, the non-pyrgulinid Hydrobiidae, as a model taxon to study changes in diversification rates over time together with the respective drivers. Based on phylogenetic, molecular-clock, lineage-through-time plot, and diversification-rate analyses we found that this potentially monophyletic group is comparatively old and that it most likely evolved with a constant diversification rate. Preliminary data of the SCOPSCO (Scientific Collaboration On Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid) deep-drilling program do indicate signatures of severe environmental/climatic perturbations in Lake Ohrid. However, so far there is no evidence for the occurrence of catastrophic environmental events. We therefore propose that the constant diversification rate observed in endemic gastropods has been caused by two factors: (i) a potential lack of catastrophic environmental events in Lake Ohrid and/or (ii) a probably high ecosystem resilience, buffering environmental changes. Parameters potentially contributing to the lake's high ecosystem resilience are its distinct bathymetry, ongoing tectonic activities, and karst hydrology. The current study not only

  19. Freshwater gastropods diversity hotspots: three new species from the Uruguay River (South America)

    de Lucía, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Atlantic Forest is globally one of the priority ecoregions for biodiversity conservation. In Argentina, it is represented by the Paranense Forest, which covers a vast area of Misiones Province between the Paraná and Uruguay rivers. The Uruguay River is a global hotspot of freshwater gastropod diversity, here mainly represented by Tateidae (genus Potamolithus) and to a lesser extent Chilinidae. The family Chilinidae (Gastropoda, Hygrophila) includes 21 species currently recorded in Argentina, and three species in the Uruguay River. The species of Chilinidae occur in quite different types of habitats, but generally in clean oxygenated water recording variable temperature ranges. Highly oxygenated freshwater environments (waterfalls and rapids) are the most vulnerable continental environments. We provide here novel information on three new species of Chilinidae from environments containing waterfalls and rapids in the Uruguay River malacological province of Argentina. Materials and Methods: The specimens were collected in 2010. We analyzed shell, radula, and nervous and reproductive systems, and determined the molecular genetics. The genetic distance was calculated for two mitochondrial markers (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I–COI- and cytochrome b -Cyt b-) for these three new species and the species recorded from the Misionerean, Uruguay River and Lower Paraná-Río de la Plata malacological provinces. In addition, the COI data were analyzed phylogenetically by the neighbor-joining and Bayesian inference techniques. Results: The species described here are different in terms of shell, radula and nervous and reproductive systems, mostly based on the sculpture of the penis sheath. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the three new species with those present in the Lower Paraná-Río de la Plata and Uruguay River malacological provinces. Discussion: Phylogenetic analyses confirm the separation between the Uruguay River and the Misionerean malacological

  20. Impact of toxic cyanobacteria on gastropods and microcystin accumulation in a eutrophic lake (Grand-Lieu, France) with special reference to Physa (= Physella) acuta

    Lance, Emilie, E-mail: emilie.lance@live.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Brient, Luc, E-mail: luc.brient@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Carpentier, Alexandre, E-mail: alexandre.carpentier@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR 7208 BOREA, CRESCO, Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, 38 rue du Port Blanc, 35800 Dinard (France); Acou, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.acou@mnhn.fr [UMR 7208 BOREA, CRESCO, Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, 38 rue du Port Blanc, 35800 Dinard (France); Marion, Loic, E-mail: loic.marion@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Bormans, Myriam, E-mail: myriam.bormans@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France); Gerard, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.gerard@univ-rennes1.fr [ECOBIO, CNRS, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc 35042 Rennes (France)

    2010-08-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria are known to accumulate in gastropods following grazing of toxic cyanobacteria and/or absorption of MCs dissolved in water, with adverse effects on life history traits demonstrated in the laboratory. In the field, such effects may vary depending on species, according to their relative sensitivity and ecology. The aims of this study were to i) establish how various intensities of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations alter the structure of gastropod community and ii) compare MC tissue concentration in gastropods in the field with those obtained in our previous laboratory experiments on the prosobranch Potamopyrgus antipodarum and the pulmonate Lymnaea stagnalis. We explored these questions through a one-year field study at three stations at Grand-Lieu Lake (France) affected by different intensities of cyanobacteria proliferations. A survey of the community structure and MC content of both cyanobacteria and gastropods was associated with a caging experiment involving P. antipodarum and L. stagnalis. In total, 2592 gastropods belonging to 7 prosobranch and 16 pulmonate species were collected. However, distribution among the stations was unequal with 62% vs 2% of gastropods sampled respectively at the stations with the lowest vs highest concentrations of MC. Irrespective of the station, pulmonates were always more diverse, more abundant and occurred at higher frequencies than prosobranchs. Only the pulmonate Physa acuta occurred at all stations, with abundance and MC tissue concentration ({<=} 4.32 {mu}g g DW{sup -1}) depending on the degrees of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations in the stations; therefore, P. acuta is proposed as a potential sentinel species. The caging experiment demonstrated a higher MC accumulation in L. stagnalis ({<=} 0.36 {mu}g g DW{sup -1} for 71% of individuals) than in P. antipodarum ({<=} 0.02 {mu}g g DW{sup -1} for 12%), corroborating previous laboratory observations

  1. Impact of toxic cyanobacteria on gastropods and microcystin accumulation in a eutrophic lake (Grand-Lieu, France) with special reference to Physa (= Physella) acuta

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria are known to accumulate in gastropods following grazing of toxic cyanobacteria and/or absorption of MCs dissolved in water, with adverse effects on life history traits demonstrated in the laboratory. In the field, such effects may vary depending on species, according to their relative sensitivity and ecology. The aims of this study were to i) establish how various intensities of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations alter the structure of gastropod community and ii) compare MC tissue concentration in gastropods in the field with those obtained in our previous laboratory experiments on the prosobranch Potamopyrgus antipodarum and the pulmonate Lymnaea stagnalis. We explored these questions through a one-year field study at three stations at Grand-Lieu Lake (France) affected by different intensities of cyanobacteria proliferations. A survey of the community structure and MC content of both cyanobacteria and gastropods was associated with a caging experiment involving P. antipodarum and L. stagnalis. In total, 2592 gastropods belonging to 7 prosobranch and 16 pulmonate species were collected. However, distribution among the stations was unequal with 62% vs 2% of gastropods sampled respectively at the stations with the lowest vs highest concentrations of MC. Irrespective of the station, pulmonates were always more diverse, more abundant and occurred at higher frequencies than prosobranchs. Only the pulmonate Physa acuta occurred at all stations, with abundance and MC tissue concentration (≤ 4.32 μg g DW-1) depending on the degrees of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations in the stations; therefore, P. acuta is proposed as a potential sentinel species. The caging experiment demonstrated a higher MC accumulation in L. stagnalis (≤ 0.36 μg g DW-1 for 71% of individuals) than in P. antipodarum (≤ 0.02 μg g DW-1 for 12%), corroborating previous laboratory observations. Results are discussed in terms

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of hepatopancreatic phospholipase in gastropods mollusc, Littorina littorea and Buccinum undatum digestive cells

    Zarai Zied

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the digestive enzymes, phospholipase A2 (PLA2 hydrolyzes the essential dietary phospholipids in marine fish and shellfish. However, we know little about the organs that produce PLA2, and the ontogeny of the PLA2-cells. Accordingly, accurate localization of PLA2 in marine snails might afford a better understanding permitting the control of the quality and composition of diets and the mode of digestion of lipid food. Results We have previously producted an antiserum reacting specifically with mSDPLA2. It labeled zymogen granules of the hepatopancreatic acinar cells and the secretory materials of certain epithelial cells in the depths of epithelial crypts in the hepatopancreas of snail. To confirm this localization a laser capture microdissection was performed targeting stained cells of hepatopancreas tissue sections. A Western blot analysis revealed a strong signal at the expected size (30 kDa, probably corresponding to the PLA2. Conclusions The present results support the presence of two hepatopancreatic intracellular and extracellular PLA2 in the prosobranchs gastropods molluscs, Littorina littorea and Buccinum undatum and bring insights on their localizations.

  3. Heavy-tailed distributions in the intermittent motion behaviour of the intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea

    Seuront, Laurent; Duponchel, Anne-Charlotte; Chapperon, Coraline

    2007-11-01

    The two-dimensional motion behaviour of the common intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea is investigated as a function of the immersion time from three sampling sites on an exposed rocky shore. A total of 90 individuals have been individually marked and tracked over 14 consecutive daylight low tide. Successive displacements show very intermittent behaviour, with a few localised large displacements over a wide range of small displacements. We show that successive displacements are described by flight length l d heavy-tailed distributions with P(ld)∼ld-μ. The very low values of the exponent μ ( μ≈2.22, 2.43 and 2.67) indicate that L. littorea flights fall into the category of super-diffusive processes. These exponents were significantly higher than the special value μ≈2 analytically and theoretically predicted to be the most advantageous in optimising long-term encounter statistics, especially for low-prey-density scenario. As natural selection should favour flexible behaviour, leading to different optimum searching statistics, under different conditions, our results support the idea that the differences in food concentration and distribution encountered at the different sites by L. littorea led to different heavy-tailed distributions observed for the most extreme displacements.

  4. The relationship between sex change and reproductive success in a protandric marine gastropod.

    Brante, Antonio; Quiñones, Adriana; Silva, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Protandric species switch sex during their lifetime. According to theory, the time (body size) at which sex change occurs is determined by the reproductive success of individuals affected by social interactions as well as by post-copulatory factors. Experimental evidence is biased to few social systems making the exploration of general patterns difficult. We used the protandric marine gastropod Crepidula coquimbensis that partakes in intrabrood sibling cannibalism to test the following hypotheses: 1. Male-male competition for access to females and sibling cannibalism determine male reproductive success; 2. Males with greater access to females and with higher reproductive success will have reduced growth rates and will delay sex change. Artificial aggregations with different social structures were constructed and male reproductive success was estimated by paternity analysis. The results supported our expectations showing that male competitive ability for access to the female, time spent by males in the copulatory position, and sibling cannibalism affect reproductive success and influence time to sex change, with less successful males hastening sex change. Also, males that spent more time in the copulatory position had reduced growth rates. Comparing these results with those reported for other sequential hermaphrodites provides evidence supporting general patterns of sex change in nature. PMID:27385040

  5. Molluscan fauna from the Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat, India – Part 3. Gastropods

    Kantimati G Kulkarni; Satarupa Bhattacharjee Kapoor; Vidyadhar D Borkar

    2010-06-01

    Systematic description of 25 gastropod species from the Khari Nadi Formation (Aquitanian) and Chhasra Formation (Burdigalian) from the Kachchh District, Gujarat, India is given. A checklist of 116 forms including those reported by earlier researchers, emending taxonomic identifications wherever necessary, is also provided. Vredenburg had referred these two formations together as ‘the Gaj Beds of Kachchh’. He noticed the affinity of molluscs among the Miocene deposits of Kachchh and Kathiawar regions of Gujarat, and Sind province of Pakistan. He also observed that molluscs from his ‘Lower Gaj’ and ‘Upper Gaj’ Formations showed relationship respectively with the Rembang (Aquitanian) and Njalindung (Burdigalian) series of the East Indies. Aquitanian and Burdigalian ages assigned by him were later substantiated by Raju on the basis of foraminifera. Present studies corroborated that the molluscan assemblage from the Miocene rocks of Kachchh is closely related to that from the Gaj Beds of Sind and the Ashapura Clay Member of Kathiawar; besides revealing that the fauna from these three formations taken together is essentially endemic. Discovery of certain species from the Quilon Beds in the Miocene of Kachchh evinces a close affinity between these two formations. The present fauna includes five extant forms, while 29 forms have related species in the Recent fauna.

  6. Bacterial diversity and tetrodotoxin analysis in the viscera of the gastropods from Portuguese coast.

    Pratheepa, Vijayakumari; Alex, Anoop; Silva, Marisa; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2016-09-01

    To trace the pathway of tetrodotoxin (TTX) producing microorganism in the Atlantic coast of Portugal, culture-dependent evaluation of the bacterial isolates from the viscera of the gastropods Monodonta lineata, Gibbula umbilicalis, Nucella lapillus and Patella intermedia, and from the environmental samples (biofilm and surrounding sea water) was carried out. Samples were collected from eight different coastal locations of Northern Portugal. A total of 311 isolates were identified. The observed bacterial diversity was distributed over five different classes (Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria) with the greatest number of 16S rRNA gene sequence derived from the Gammaproteobacteria (75%). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that bacterial isolates were highly diverse and most of which were found in other marine environment. Among the different species isolated, Vibrio was found abundant. Eventhough TTX was not detected (UPLC-MS/MS) in the isolates from this study, PCR screening identified some natural product biosynthesis genes (PKS and NRPS) involved in its assembly. Further PCR screening of the TTX producing two ATCC Vibrio sp. reveals that NRPS might be involved in the biosynthesis of TTX through the incorporation of arginine. PMID:27312988

  7. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Forbes, Valery E.; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity to the sediment-dwelling gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum. The influence of Cu added as CuCl2 (i.e., aqueous Cu treatment) was also examined. Exposure to sediment mixed with aqueous Cu or with different-shaped CuO NPs at an average measured exposure concentration of 207 μg Cu per g dry weight sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu was efficiently retained (i.e., elimination rate constants were generally not significantly different from zero). Consequently, snails are likely to concentrate Cu over time, from both aqueous and NP sources, resulting in a high potential for toxicity.

  8. Baseline trace metals in gastropod mollusks from the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego (Patagonia, Argentina).

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Stripeikis, Jorge; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz

    2012-05-01

    With the aim to evaluate the mollusk Nacella (P)magellanica as biomonitor of elemental pollution in seawater of the Beagle Channel, more than one hundred individuals of the gastropod were sampled, separated in viscera and muscle, and then examined with respect to the accumulation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. Collection was performed in seven strategic locations along 170 km of the coastal area of the Beagle Channel (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) in two campaigns during 2005 and 2007. Samples of surrounding seawater in the different sites were obtained and tested for the same metals as well. The accumulation capacity of Nacella (P)magellanica and thus its aptitude as biomonitor, was evaluated through the calculus of the preconcentration factors of the metals assayed. A discussion involving the comparison with other mollusks previously tested will be given. Several statistical approaches able to analyze data with environmental purposes were applied. Non parametric univariate tests such as Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney were carried out to assess the changes of the metal concentrations with time (2005 and 2007) in each location. Multivariate methods (linear discriminant analysis on PCA factors) were also applied to obtain a more reliable site classification. Johnson's probabilistic method was carried out for comparison between different geographical areas. The possibility of employing these results as heavy metals' background levels of seawater from the Beagle Channel will be debated. PMID:22350107

  9. Uptake and metabolism of dissolved amino acids by larvae and embryos of three gastropod species

    Dissolved organic matter is a potential nutritional resource for soft-bodied marine invertebrates. Experiments were done with developmental stages of three gastropod species to examine uptake kinetics and metabolism of dissolved amino acids. Free-swimming larvae of Crepidula fornicata and Thais-haemastoma were fed before experiments or starved for 48 hours before experiments to see whether nutritional state affected uptake of 14C-glycine of 14C-alanine. Time course of amino acid uptake was linear from 0-100 minutes for fed and starved larvae of both species. Uptake rates of starved T. haemastoma larvae were similar to or greater than rates for fed larvae, while uptake rates of starved C. fornicata larvae are similar to or less than rates for fed larvae. Starvation may enhance uptake by T. haemastoma larvae. 14CO2 was detected 10 minutes after larval exposure to labeled amino acids began, indicating rapid catabolism of amino acids. Label was found in protein extracted from larvae, indicating that absorbed glycine and alanine can be used for protein synthesis. A greater percent of glycine and alanine was converted to CO2 by starved larvae of both species. Encapsulated embryos of Nucella lapillus were used to study uptake and metabolism of amino acids because encapsulated embryos are in a bacteria-free environment. Uptake by embryos was linear from 10-90 minutes. Because capsules were bacteria-free embryos were the agents responsible for uptake and metabolism of labeled amino acids

  10. Autonomous changes in the swimming direction of sperm in the gastropod Strombus luhuanus.

    Shiba, Kogiku; Shibata, Daisuke; Inaba, Kazuo

    2014-03-15

    The sperm of the gastropod Strombus luhuanus show dimorphism. The eusperm have a nucleus and fertilize the egg, whereas the other type of sperm, parasperm, are anucleate and are thought to assist fertilization. Here we report the autonomous changes in the swimming pattern of S. luhuanus eusperm. In artificial seawater, the eusperm collected from S. luhuanus sperm ducts formed sperm bundles and initially swam backward with asymmetric flagellar waveforms to detach from the bundles. One hour later, the sperm began to swim forward and in a circle. After an additional 1 h incubation, the sperm swam straight, with a change in the flagellar waveforms from asymmetric to symmetric. Spontaneous backward swimming with symmetric waveforms was also observed. The eusperm stored in the female seminal receptacle were motile and showed forward symmetric swimming with spontaneous backward swimming, which appeared necessary for detachment from the wall of receptacle. All of these motility changes were observed in the absence of parasperm, suggesting that these changes autonomously occur in eusperm. Our waveform analysis of these swimming patterns revealed that only the swimming with symmetric waveform showed reverse propagation of the flagellar waveforms. Both types of backward swimming were diminished in Ca(2+)-free seawater and in seawater containing Ni(2+), indicating the regulation of swimming direction by Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction. PMID:24311809

  11. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A.

    2016-02-03

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  12. Intracapsular development and dispersal polymorphism in the predatory gastropod Ocenebra erinaceus (Linnaeus 1758)

    Smith, Kathryn E.; Reed, Adam J.; Thatje, Sven

    2015-09-01

    Intraspecific polymorphism during development, such as poecilogony or dispersal polymorphism, has rarely been observed in the marine environment. The ecological advantages of this bet-hedging strategy, whereby the offspring from one species exhibit multiple developmental modes, include the potential for rapid colonization of new habitats while simultaneously achieving a degree of gene flow between populations. The muricid gastropod, Ocenebra erinaceus, is a common, shallow-water marine predator found across England and France. Historically, O. erinaceus caused significant damage to shellfisheries, but more recently it has been impacted by TBT-induced imposex. Despite the previous attention given to this species, little is known about its encapsulated development. Studying O. erinaceus egg capsules from the Solent, UK, we describe intracapsular development at 15 °C, the in situ temperature at time of oviposition. Within each capsule, all embryos developed; no nurse eggs were present. Development was categorized into eight ontogenetic stages, although not all individuals displayed every stage; embryos hatched as either swimming late-pediveliger larvae or crawling juveniles after 59-69 days, indicating dispersal polymorphism to occur in this species. Swimming late-pediveliger larvae completed metamorphosis within 72 h of hatching. As O. erinaceus continues to recover from TBT pollution, dispersal polymorphism may facilitate a rapid expansion in both population size and range. If this occurs, O. erinaceus has the potential to, once again, become a serious problem for shellfisheries around Europe.

  13. Phylogenomics supports Panpulmonata: opisthobranch paraphyly and key evolutionary steps in a major radiation of gastropod molluscs.

    Kocot, Kevin M; Halanych, Kenneth M; Krug, Patrick J

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonates, with over 30,000 described species, represent the largest radiation of non-marine animals outside of Arthropoda. The pulmonate lung was a key evolutionary innovation enabling diversification of terrestrial and freshwater snails and slugs. However, recent studies drew conflicting conclusions about pulmonate monophyly, and support for a sister group is lacking, hindering our understanding of this major animal radiation. Analyses of mitochondrial protein-coding genes recovered a paraphyletic Pulmonata grading into a monophyletic Opisthobranchia, a traditional group of sea slugs long considered sister to pulmonates. Conversely, analyses of datsets dominated by nuclear rDNA indicated Opisthobranchia is paraphyletic with respect to Pulmonata. No study resolved the placement of two key taxa: Sacoglossa, an opisthobranch group including photosynthetic sea slugs, and Siphonarioidea, intertidal limpet-like snails traditionally in Pulmonata. To examine evolutionary relationships at the base of the pulmonate radiation, we performed a phylogenomic analysis of 102 nuclear protein-coding gene regions for 19 gastropods. Opisthobranchia was recovered as paraphyletic with respect to Panpulmonata, a clade in which Sacoglossa was sister to Pulmonata, with Siphonarioidea as the basal pulmonate lineage. Siphonarioideans share a similar gill structure with shelled sacoglossans but lack the contractile pneumostome of pulmonates, suggesting descent from an evolutionary intermediate that facilitated the pulmonate radiation into non-marine habitats. PMID:23850501

  14. Details of gastropod phylogeny inferred from 18S rRNA sequences.

    Winnepenninckx, B; Steiner, G; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1998-02-01

    Some generally accepted viewpoints on the phylogenetic relationships within the molluscan class Gastropoda are reassessed by comparing complete 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. The previously suggested basal position of Archaeogastropoda, including Neritimorpha and Vetigastropoda, in the gastropod clade is confirmed. The present study also provides new molecular evidence for the monophyly of both Caenogastropoda and Euthyneura (Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia), making Prosobranchia paraphyletic. The relationships within Caenogastropoda and Euthyneura data turn out to be very unstable on the basis of the present 18S rRNA sequences. The present 18S rRNA data question, but are insufficient to decide on, muricacean (Neogastropoda), neotaenioglossan, pulmonate, or stylommatophoran monophyly. The analyses also focus on two systellommatophoran families, namely, Veronicellidae and Onchidiidae. It is suggested that Systellommatophora are not a monophyletic unit but, due to the lack of stability in the euthyneuran clade, their affinity to either Opisthobranchia or Pulmonata could not be determined. PMID:9479694

  15. The adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity in two ecotypes of a marine gastropod

    Butlin Roger K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few surveys have concentrated on studying the adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity within genetically-distinct conspecific ecotypes. Here, we conduct a test to assess the adaptive value that partial phenotypic plasticity may have for survival in the marine gastropod Littorina saxatilis. This species has evolved canalized ecotypes but, nevertheless, the ecotypes show some phenotypic plasticity for the traits under divergent selection between wave-exposed and high-predation habitats. Results We exposed juveniles of each ecotype to several environmental treatments under laboratory conditions in order to produce shape variation associated with plasticity. The two ecotypes from different treatments were then transplanted to the wave-exposed habitat and the survival rate was monitored. Ecotype explained the largest distinction in survival rate while treatment caused variation in survival rate within the ecotype released into its parental habitat which was correlated with plastic changes in shell shape. Snails that had experienced a treatment mimicking the environment of the transplantation location survived with the highest rate, while individuals from the contrary experimental treatment had lower survivorship. Conclusions We conclude that the partial plastic response shown in Littorina saxatilis has a significant impact on fitness, although this remains small compared to the overall adaptive difference between ecotypes.

  16. Reconstruction of Regional Environments in the Caribbean During the Neogene Using Gastropod Stable Isotope Profiles

    Robbins, J. A.; Grossman, E. L.; O'Dea, A.; Tao, K.

    2011-12-01

    The closure of the Central American Isthmus (CAI) ca. 3.8-3.6 Ma triggered changes in nearshore environments in the Caribbean, causing changes in marine annual range of temperature (MART), carbonate deposition, and the benthic ecosystem. The associated extinction event began ca. 3-2 Ma, peaking between 2-1 Ma. More than two dozen "faunules", discreet packages of fauna which lived under similar environmental conditions, represent time just prior to, during, and after the uplift of the CAI. Multiple parameters including the amount and types of fauna present in each faunule have been used to estimate factors such as paleodepth, MART, extinction rates, and changes in ecological structure over time. Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses (δ18O and δ13C) of gastropod shells serially-sampled about the spire provide records of seasonal environmental conditions. In the tropics, gastropods that live under conditions of strong seasonal upwelling and freshwater input have a greater range of δ18O values in their profiles compared to those animals that live in non-upwelling waters with little freshwater input. Low δ13C values often represent the isotopically low terrestrial carbon found in river runoff, and may be coupled with low δ18O values during seasonal freshening of marine waters. Preliminary data from Strombus shells representing four faunules ranging in age from before the rise of the isthmus through its completion demonstrate the effectiveness of using these mollusks to study ancient tropical environments. Rio Limoncito (~3 Ma), which is believed to represent water depths of 20-40m based on foraminiferal assemblage, yielded the lowest δ18O values (-0.6±0.4%, representing the warmest temperatures/lowest salinities). The samples from Pueblo Nuevo (~1.6 Ma), with an estimated paleodepth between 50 and 100m, had an average value of 0.4±0.3% and therefore represent cooler waters/higher salinity. A shell from NE Escudo de Veraguas (~3.55 Ma) shows a shift from essentially

  17. De novo transcriptome assembly of the marine gastropod Reishia clavigera for supporting toxic mechanism studies.

    Ip, Jack C H; Leung, Priscilla T Y; Ho, Kevin K Y; Qiu, J W; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2016-09-01

    The intertidal whelk Reishia clavigera is commonly used as a biomonitor of chemical contamination in the marine environment along Western Pacific region, and as a model for mechanistic studies of organotin-mediated imposex development. However, limited genomic resources of R. clavigera have restricted its role for the investigation of molecular mechanisms of such endocrine disruptions. This study, therefore, aimed to establish tissue-specific transcriptomes of the digestive gland, gonad, head ganglia, penis and the remaining body part of the male and female R. clavigera. By combining the results, a global transcriptome was obtained. A total of 578,134,720 high-quality filtered reads were obtained using Illumina sequencing. The R. clavigera transcriptome comprised of 38,466 transcripts and 32,798 unigenes with predicted open reading frames. The average length of transcripts was 1,709bp with N50 of 2,236bp. Based on sequence similarity searches against public databases, 28,657 transcripts and 24,403 unigenes had at least one BLAST hit. There were 17,530 transcripts and 14,897 unigenes annotated with at least one Gene Ontology (GO) term. Moreover, 5,776 transcripts and 5,137 unigenes were associated with 333 Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The numbers of unigenes were similar among the five target tissues and between sexes, but tissue-specific expression profiles were revealed by multivariate analyses. Based on the functional annotation, putative steroid hormone-associated unigenes were identified. In particular, we highlighted the presence of steroid hormone receptor homologues that could be the targets for mechanistic studies of the organotin-mediated imposex development in marine gastropods. This newly generated transcriptome assembly of R. clavigera provides a valuable molecular resource for ecotoxicological and environmental genomic studies. PMID:27450239

  18. Ecophenotypic plasticity leads to extraordinary gastropod shells found on the "Roof of the World".

    Clewing, Catharina; Riedel, Frank; Wilke, Thomas; Albrecht, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The often extraordinary shell forms and shapes of gastropods found in palaeolakes, such as the highly diverse Gyraulus fauna of the famous Steinheim Basin, have been puzzling evolutionary biologists for centuries, and there is an ongoing debate whether these aberrant shell forms are indicative of true species (or subspecies) or ecophenotypic morphs. Interestingly, one of the Steinheim Gyraulus morphs - a corkscrew-like open-coiled shell - has a recent analogue in the Lake Bangong drainage system on the western Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, a combination of morphological, molecular, palaeolimnological, and ecological analyses was used in this study to assess whether the extraordinary shell shape in Gyraulus sp. from this drainage system represents a (young) ecophenotypic phenomenon or if it has been genetically fixed over an extended period of time. Our morphological, ecological, and palaeolimnological data suggest that the corkscrew-like specimens remain restricted to a small pond near Lake Bangong with an elevated pH value and that the colonization may have occurred recently. The phylogenetic reconstruction based on two gene fragments shows that these nonplanispiral specimens cluster within the previous described Tibetan Plateau Gyraulus clade N2. A network analysis indicates that some haplotypes are even shared by planispiral and nonplanispiral specimens. Given the ephemerality of the phenomenon, the compact network patterns inferred, the likely young phylogenetic age of the aberrant Gyraulus shells studied, and the ecological peculiarities of the study site, we suggest that the evolution of the aberrant shell forms on the Tibetan Plateau could likely be considered as a rapid ecophenotypic response, possibly induced by ecological stress. This finding may thus have implications for the ongoing debate about the processes that have caused the extraordinary shell diversity in palaeolakes such as the Steinheim Basin. PMID:26306180

  19. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade.

    Ng, Ting Hui; Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C J

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity-59 species-of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future monitoring

  20. Surveys of arthropod and gastropod diversity in the geothermal resource subzones, Puna, Hawaii

    Miller, S.E.; Burgett, J.; Bruegmann, M.

    1995-04-01

    The invertebrate surveys reported here were carried out as part of ecological studies funded by the Department of Energy in support of their environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Hawaii Geothermal Project. Currently, preparation of the EIS has been suspended, and all supporting information is being archived and made available to the public. The invertebrate surveys reported here assessed diversity and abundance of the arthropod and gastropod fauna in forested habitat and lava tubes in or near the three geothermal resource subzones. Recommendations for conservation of these organisms are given in this report. Surveys were conducted along three 100-m transect lines at each of the six forested locations. Malaise traps, baited pitfall traps, yellow pan traps, baited sponge lures, and visual examination of vegetation were used to assess invertebrate diversity along each transect line. Three of these locations were adjacent to roads, and three were adjacent to lava flows. Two of these lava-forest locations (Keauohana Forest Reserve and Pu`u O`o) were relatively remote from direct human impacts. The third location (Southeast Kula) was near a low-density residential area. Two lava tubes were surveyed. The forest over one of these tubes (Keokea tube) had recently been burned away. This tube was used to assess the effects of loss of forest habitat on the subterranean fauna. An undisturbed tube (Pahoa tube) was used as a control. Recommendations offered in this report direct geothermal development away from areas of high endemic diversity and abundance, and toward areas where natural Hawaiian biotic communities have already been greatly disturbed. These disturbed areas are mainly found in the lower half of the Kamaili (middle) geothermal subzone and throughout most of the Kapoho (lower) geothermal subzone. These recommendation may also generally apply to other development projects in the Puna District.

  1. Conus: first comprehensive conservation red list assessment of a marine gastropod mollusc genus.

    Howard Peters

    Full Text Available Marine molluscs represent an estimated 23% of all extant marine taxa, but research into their conservation status has so far failed to reflect this importance, with minimal inclusion on the authoritative Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN. We assessed the status of all 632 valid species of the tropical marine gastropod mollusc, Conus (cone snails, using Red List standards and procedures to lay the groundwork for future decadal monitoring, one of the first fully comprehensive global assessments of a marine taxon. Three-quarters (75.6% of species were not currently considered at risk of extinction owing to their wide distribution and perceived abundance. However, 6.5% were considered threatened with extinction with a further 4.1% near threatened. Data deficiency prevented 13.8% of species from being categorised although they also possess characteristics that signal concern. Where hotspots of endemism occur, most notably in the Eastern Atlantic, 42.9% of the 98 species from that biogeographical region were classified as threatened or near threatened with extinction. All 14 species included in the highest categories of Critically Endangered and Endangered are endemic to either Cape Verde or Senegal, with each of the three Critically Endangered species restricted to single islands in Cape Verde. Threats to all these species are driven by habitat loss and anthropogenic disturbance, in particular from urban pollution, tourism and coastal development. Our findings show that levels of extinction risk to which cone snails are exposed are of a similar magnitude to those seen in many fully assessed terrestrial taxa. The widely held view that marine species are less at risk is not upheld.

  2. The neuronal basis of feeding in the snail, Helisoma, with comparisons to selected gastropods.

    Murphy, A D

    2001-03-01

    Research on identified neurons during the last quarter century was forecast at a conference in 1973 that discussed "neuronal mechanisms of coordination in simple systems." The focus of the conference was on the neuronal control of simple stereotyped behavioral acts. Participants discussing the future of such research called for a comparative approach; emphasis on structure-function interactions; attention to environmental and behavioral context; and the development of new techniques. Significantly, in some cases amazing progress has been made in these areas. Major conclusions of the last quarter century are that so-called simple behaviors and the neural circuitry underlying them tend to be less simple, more flexible, and more highly modulated than originally imagined. However, the comparative approach has, as yet, failed to reach its potential. Molluscan preparations, along with arthropods and annelids, have always been at the forefront of neuroethological studies. Circuitry underlying feeding has been studied in a handful of species of gastropod molluscs. These studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of sensorimotor organization, the hierarchical control of behavior and coordination of multiple behaviors, and the organization and modulation of central pattern generators. However, direct interspecific comparisons of feeding circuitry and potentially homologous neurons have been lacking. This is unfortunate because much of the vast radiation of the class Gastropoda is associated with variations in feeding behaviors and feeding apparatuses, providing ample substrates for comparative studies including the evolution of defined circuitry. Here, the neural organization of feeding in the snail, Helisoma, is examined critically. Possible direct interspecific comparisons of neural circuitry and potentially homologous neurons are made. A universal model for central pattern generators underlying rasping feeding is proposed. Future comparative studies can

  3. Gastropod diversification and community structuring processes in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-09-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most speciose freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether the diversification of its endemic taxa is mainly driven by neutral processes, environmental factors, or species interactions. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics. Such a unifying framework - the metacommunity speciation model - considers how community assembly affects diversification and vice versa by assessing the relative contribution of the three main community assembly processes, dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, and species interaction. The current study therefore used the species-rich model taxon Gastropoda to assess how extant communities in Lake Ohrid are structured by performing process based metacommunity analyses. Specifically, the study aimed at (i) identifying the relative importance of the three community assembly processes and (ii) to test whether the importance of these individual processes changes gradually with lake depth or whether they are distinctively related to eco-zones. Based on specific simulation steps for each of the three processes, it could be demonstrated that dispersal limitation had the strongest influence on gastropod community structures in Lake Ohrid. However, it was not the exclusive assembly process but acted together with the other two processes - environmental filtering, and species interaction. In fact, the relative importance of the three community assembly processes varied both with lake depth and eco-zones, though the processes were better predicted by the latter. The study thus corroborated the high importance of dispersal limitation for both maintaining species richness in Lake Ohrid (through its impact on community structure) and generating endemic biodiversity (via its influence on diversification processes). However, according to the metacommunity speciation model, the inferred importance of environmental

  4. Symbiotic association between symbiodinium and the gastropod Strombus gigas: larval acquisition of symbionts.

    García Ramos, Maribel; Banaszak, Anastazia T

    2014-04-01

    The importance of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. was studied in the early life stages of the gastropod Strombus gigas. This dinoflagellate was not found in the eggs or the gelatinous mass surrounding the eggs of the mollusk; therefore, Symbiodinium is not inherited directly. To determine whether the planktonic veligers can acquire these algae from the environment, they were exposed to freshly isolated Symbiodinium from adult S. gigas (homologous). The optimal stage for Symbiodinium inoculation was found at 48 h post-hatching. Survival and growth rates of veligers and juveniles were higher when inoculated with freshly isolated Symbiodinium in conjunction with daily feeding of Isochrysis spp. Veligers inoculated with Symbiodinium freshly isolated from three host species elicited distinct responses: (1) veligers did not take up Symbiodinium isolated from the hydrozoan Millepora alcicornis suggesting that there is discrimination on contact prior to ingestion, (2) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from the anemone Bartholomea annulata, but the algae did not persist in the host tissue suggesting that selection against this type took place after ingestion or that the algae did not divide in the host, and (3) veligers did take up Symbiodinium isolated from Pterogorgia anceps where it persisted and was associated with metamorphosis of the larvae. In contrast, the Symbiodinium freshly isolated from S. gigas were not associated with metamorphosis and required an inducer such as the red alga Laurencia poitei. These data present a significant advancement for the establishment of a new approach in the aquaculture of this important but declining Caribbean species. PMID:24037186

  5. Haematopoiesis in molluscs: A review of haemocyte development and function in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves.

    Pila, E A; Sullivan, J T; Wu, X Z; Fang, J; Rudko, S P; Gordy, M A; Hanington, P C

    2016-05-01

    Haematopoiesis is a process that is responsible for generating sufficient numbers of blood cells in the circulation and in tissues. It is central to maintenance of homeostasis within an animal, and is critical for defense against infection. While haematopoiesis is common to all animals possessing a circulatory system, the specific mechanisms and ultimate products of haematopoietic events vary greatly. Our understanding of this process in non-vertebrate organisms is primarily derived from those species that serve as developmental and immunological models, with sparse investigations having been carried out in other organisms spanning the metazoa. As research into the regulation of immune and blood cell development advances, we have begun to gain insight into haematopoietic events in a wider array of animals, including the molluscs. What began in the early 1900's as observational studies on the morphological characteristics of circulating immune cells has now advanced to mechanistic investigations of the cytokines, growth factors, receptors, signalling pathways, and patterns of gene expression that regulate molluscan haemocyte development. Emerging is a picture of an incredible diversity of developmental processes and outcomes that parallels the biological diversity observed within the different classes of the phylum Mollusca. However, our understanding of haematopoiesis in molluscs stems primarily from the three most-studied classes, the Gastropoda, Cephalopoda and Bivalvia. While these represent perhaps the molluscs of greatest economic and medical importance, the fact that our information is limited to only 3 of the 9 extant classes in the phylum highlights the need for further investigation in this area. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that defines haematopoiesis and its products in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves. PMID:26592965

  6. Size-dependent concentrations of trace metals in four Mediterranean gastropods.

    Cubadda, F; Conti, M E; Campanella, L

    2001-11-01

    In order to gain more information on the possible use of four gastropod species as metal biomonitors for the Mediterranean area, the influence of body weight upon Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations was studied in specimens collected at locations with different degrees of environmental pollution. The selected species were the marine snails Monodonta turbinata Born and Monodonta mutabilis Philippi, and the limpets Patella caerulea L. and Patella lusitanica Gmelin. Significant differences between metal concentrations in individuals from different stations were tested by ANCOVA on log-transformed data with log body weight as covariate. For all species a positive correlation between metal concentrations and body weight was observed, which means that the largest individuals contained the highest levels of metals. The inclusion of body weight as covariate in the statistical analysis explained from 81% to 99% of the metal variability within the organisms and enabled the achievement of improvements in the detection of differences among sites. The four selected species provided a rather univocal picture of bioavailable metal loads at the different stations of the experimental area. Except for Cd, the metal concentrations recorded at the clean stations were found to lie in the range of the lowest values reported in the literature and can be employed as useful background levels which can be referred to for intraspecific comparison within the Mediterranean area. It is concluded that in view of its distribution, unambiguous identification, resistance to pollution and accumulation patterns M. turbinata has considerable potential as a biomonitor of trace metals over the Mediterranean. PMID:11680752

  7. Phenotypic differentiation of the Red Sea gastropods in response to the environmental deterioration: Geometric morphometric approach

    Abdelhady, Ahmed Awad

    2016-03-01

    The negative impacts of degradation in the coastal zone of the Red Sea are becoming well known in upper portions of the trophic web (e.g., humans and fish), but are less well known among the benthic primary consumers. In addition, the degree to which heavy metals are entering the trophic web can be better-quantified using macrobenthos. Two-gastropod genera encompassing Echinolittorina subnodosa and Planaxis sulcatus from three different localities on the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea were examined in order to deduce the impact of environmental deterioration on the morphology of shells. The examined sites include clean pristine, slightly polluted, and markedly polluted rocky shores. Phosphate/lead industry is the main source of pollution in this zone. Because landmarks on the rugose Echinolittorina are difficult to define and to ensure finer resolution of the analyses, a newly 'grid-based' landmarks was implemented. Both Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) were particularly capable to capture and terrace the minor morphological variations accurately. Two phenotypes portioned among the environmentally different populations were recognized and interpreted as ecotypes with many intermediate forms. The first ecotype has a higher spire and smaller aperture and dominating the pristine site North of Marsa Alam, whereas the second ecotype has a globular shell shape with big aperture and dominating the markedly polluted site. The intermediate forms dominating the slightly polluted site. The shape differences are interpreted as an adaptive differentiation to different metal concentrations. As the morphological variation between the two-ecotypes of both taxa is still minors, and both ecotypes occur together with many intermediate forms, the phenotypic divergence stage has not yet accomplished. The gradational shape change among the investigated populations was positively correlated with index of Pollution (IP). As the human activities were the main

  8. Bioaccumulation of microcystins in two freshwater gastropods from a cyanobacteria-bloom plateau lake, Lake Dianchi

    To investigate the bioaccumulation patterns of microcystins (MCs) in organs of two gastropods, samples were collected in Lake Dianchi monthly from May to October, 2008, when cyanobacteria typically bloom. The average MCs concentrations for Radix swinhoei (pulmonate) and Margarya melanioides (prosobranch) tended to be similar for the different organs: the highest values in the hepatopancreas (9.33 by 3.74 μg/g DW), followed by digestive tracts (1.66 by 3.03 μg/g DW), gonads (0.45 by 1.34 μg/g DW) and muscles (0.22 by 0.40 μg/g DW). Pulmonate had higher value than prosobranch because of the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. The levels in organs of R. swinhoei were correlated with environmentally dissolved MCs, but influenced by intracellular MCs for M. melanioides. The estimated MCs concentrations in edible parts of M. melanioides were beyond the WHO’s provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg/kg), suggesting the risk of consumption of M. melanioides from the lake. Highlights: ► We probe bioaccumulated patterns of microcystins in organs of pulmonate and prosobranch. ► The highest microcystins in hepatopancreas for both snails. ► The higher microcystins for pulmonate results from the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. ► Environmentally dissolved microcystins are the main sources for pulmonate, but intracellular for prosobranch. ► Suggesting the risk of consumption snails in the studying regions. - Higher bioaccumulation MCs level for pulmonate mainly contributed to the stronger bioaccumulation ability in its hepatopancreas.

  9. Cenozoic climate change and diversification on the continental shelf and slope: evolution of gastropod diversity in the family Solariellidae (Trochoidea).

    Williams, S T; Smith, L M; Herbert, D G; Marshall, B A; Warén, A; Kiel, S; Dyal, P; Linse, K; Vilvens, C; Kano, Y

    2013-04-01

    Recent expeditions have revealed high levels of biodiversity in the tropical deep-sea, yet little is known about the age or origin of this biodiversity, and large-scale molecular studies are still few in number. In this study, we had access to the largest number of solariellid gastropods ever collected for molecular studies, including many rare and unusual taxa. We used a Bayesian chronogram of these deep-sea gastropods (1) to test the hypothesis that deep-water communities arose onshore, (2) to determine whether Antarctica acted as a source of diversity for deep-water communities elsewhere and (3) to determine how factors like global climate change have affected evolution on the continental slope. We show that although fossil data suggest that solariellid gastropods likely arose in a shallow, tropical environment, interpretation of the molecular data is equivocal with respect to the origin of the group. On the other hand, the molecular data clearly show that Antarctic species sampled represent a recent invasion, rather than a relictual ancestral lineage. We also show that an abrupt period of global warming during the Palaeocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) leaves no molecular record of change in diversification rate in solariellids and that the group radiated before the PETM. Conversely, there is a substantial, although not significant increase in the rate of diversification of a major clade approximately 33.7 Mya, coinciding with a period of global cooling at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Increased nutrients made available by contemporaneous changes to erosion, ocean circulation, tectonic events and upwelling may explain increased diversification, suggesting that food availability may have been a factor limiting exploitation of deep-sea habitats. Tectonic events that shaped diversification in reef-associated taxa and deep-water squat lobsters in central Indo-West Pacific were also probably important in the evolution of solariellids during the Oligo

  10. Chromosome aberration and hematological rates of gastropod snail (Lymnaea stagnalis L.) in water bodies of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone

    The radiation dose, as well as the chromosome aberration rate and a change of the hemolymph structure of the gastropod snail (Lymnaea stagnalis L.) in water bodies within the Chernobyl NPP exclusion Zone during 1998-2007, is evaluated. The absorbed dose is registered in range 0.3-85.0 μGy/h. In closed water bodies, the high rate of chromosome aberration in embryo tissues (up to 27%) and essential changes of hematological rates of adult molluscs in comparison with those in control water bodies are determined.

  11. Convergence Caused Confusion: On the Systematics Of the Freshwater Gastropod Sulcospira pisum (Brot, 1868) (Cerithioidea, Pachychilidae)

    Koehler, Frank; Brinkmann, Nora; Glaubrecht, Matthias

    the family. It is tentatively placed within the genus Sulcospira, which is endemic to Java. We assume that a similar shell shape has evolved in both species of not closely related gastropods through convergence, which once more reveals that purely shell-based classifications are particularly...... present evidence that "Melania" pisum is not a thiarid species closely related to Balanocochlis glans (Busch, 1842), as has been supposed with respect to the very similar shells of both species. The species is transferred to the family Pachychilidae, because it shows various typical character states for...

  12. Ecosystem engineering potential of the gastropod Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767) in mangrove wastewater wetlands - A controlled mesocosm experiment

    The effect of different sewage concentrations (0, 20, 60 and 100%), vegetation (Bare, Avicennia marina or Rhizophora mucronata) and immersion periods (immersion/emersion period of 12/12 h or 3/3 days just for 100%) conditions were studied for 6 months on survival and growth rates of Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767). Gastropods' activity and ecosystem engineering preformed at bare and A. marina planted cells and 3 sewage conditions (0, 20 and 60%) were determined. Survival rates were higher than 70% in all treatments. Growth rate decreased significantly with increasing sewage concentrations (mainly at unplanted conditions) and longer immersion periods. A complete shift (from immersion to emersion periods) and a significant decrease in mobility and consequently its engineer potential, due to sewage contamination, lead to a 3-4 fold decrease in the amount of sediment disturbed. Sewage contamination, primary producers' abundance and environmental conditions may have influenced the gastropods survival, growth and its ecosystem engineering potential. - Terebralia palustris high ecosystem engineering potential in constructed mangrove wetlands.

  13. Ecosystem engineering potential of the gastropod Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767) in mangrove wastewater wetlands - A controlled mesocosm experiment

    Penha-Lopes, Gil, E-mail: gil.penha-lopes@biology-research.co [Centro de Oceanografia - Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Na, Senhora do Cabo 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal); Department of Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Bartolini, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via Romana 17, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Limbu, Samwel [University of Dar es Salaam, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries, P.O. Box 35064, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Cannicci, Stefano [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via Romana 17, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Mgaya, Yunus [University of Dar es Salaam, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries, P.O. Box 35064, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Kristensen, Erik [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Paula, Jose [Centro de Oceanografia - Laboratorio Maritimo da Guia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Na, Senhora do Cabo 939, 2750-374 Cascais (Portugal)

    2010-01-15

    The effect of different sewage concentrations (0, 20, 60 and 100%), vegetation (Bare, Avicennia marina or Rhizophora mucronata) and immersion periods (immersion/emersion period of 12/12 h or 3/3 days just for 100%) conditions were studied for 6 months on survival and growth rates of Terebralia palustris (Linnaeus, 1767). Gastropods' activity and ecosystem engineering preformed at bare and A. marina planted cells and 3 sewage conditions (0, 20 and 60%) were determined. Survival rates were higher than 70% in all treatments. Growth rate decreased significantly with increasing sewage concentrations (mainly at unplanted conditions) and longer immersion periods. A complete shift (from immersion to emersion periods) and a significant decrease in mobility and consequently its engineer potential, due to sewage contamination, lead to a 3-4 fold decrease in the amount of sediment disturbed. Sewage contamination, primary producers' abundance and environmental conditions may have influenced the gastropods survival, growth and its ecosystem engineering potential. - Terebralia palustris high ecosystem engineering potential in constructed mangrove wetlands.

  14. Environmental and developmental controls of morphological diversity in a thermal spring gastropod from Coahuila, Mexico

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Tang, C. M.

    2001-12-01

    Isolated thermal springs and associated aquatic environments near Cuatro Ciénegas, in north-central Mexico provide an opportunity to study patterns of evolutionary diversification under extreme conditions. Significant differences in temperature, seasonality, pH, and salinities among other variables may allow for high levels of differentiation and endemism. Biological studies of the unique faunas in this type of environment may serve as analogues for extreme and/or evaporitic environments as targeted by astrobiological research. The endemic hydrobiid gastropod \\textit{Mexipyrgus} is widely distributed in a variety of aquatic environments within the Cuatro Cienégas basin. Original description of this genus by Taylor listed six distinct species reflecting shell and anatomical features. Later revision by Hershler suggests that this diversity be reduced to one single, highly-variable species, based mainly on the morphology of reproductive structures. The systematic conflict emphasizes the need to understand the bases of morphological variation at small scales and in environmentally unusual settings. Shells of \\textit{Mexipyrgus} were collected from six localities and the following species were identified based on Taylor's classification: \\textit{M. carranzae}, \\textit{M. escobedae}, \\textit{M. multilineatus}, and specimens intermediate in character between \\textit{M. carranzae}, \\textit{M. lugoi} and \\textit{M. mojarralis}. All specimens consisted of 4-6 whorls. Shell shape was archived by the digitization of geometrically homologous landmarks on the spire (apex, whorl sutures in apertural view) and aperture. Shell size was calculated as Centroid Size. Data were analyzed using uniform and principal warp analysis of raw landmark coordinates, followed by relative warp analysis of uniform and partial warp scores. Three separate analyses were performed for 4, 5 and 6 whorled specimens. Results indicate two different levels of variation based on individual age

  15. Gastropod diversification and community structuring processes in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    T. Hauffe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most speciose freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether the diversification of its endemic taxa is mainly driven by neutral processes, environmental factors, or species interactions. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics. Such a unifying framework – the metacommunity speciation model – considers how community assembly affects diversification and vice versa by assessing the relative contribution of the three main community assembly processes, dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, and species interaction. The current study therefore used the species-rich model taxon Gastropoda to assess how extant communities in Lake Ohrid are structured by performing process based metacommunity analyses. Specifically, the study aimed at (i identifying the relative importance of the three community assembly processes and (ii to test whether the importance of these individual processes changes gradually with lake depth or whether they are distinctively related to eco-zones. Based on specific simulation steps for each of the three processes, it could be demonstrated that dispersal limitation had the strongest influence on gastropod community structures in Lake Ohrid. However, it was not the exclusive assembly process but acted together with the other two processes – environmental filtering, and species interaction. In fact, the relative importance of the three community assembly processes varied both with lake depth and eco-zones, though the processes were better predicted by the latter. The study thus corroborated the high importance of dispersal limitation for both maintaining species richness in Lake Ohrid (through its impact on community structure and generating endemic biodiversity (via its influence on diversification processes. However, according to the metacommunity speciation model, the inferred importance of

  16. Flying high: on the airborne dispersal of aquatic organisms as illustrated by the distribution histories of the gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius

    Wesselingh, F.P.; Cadée, G.C.; Renema, W.

    1999-01-01

    The actual and fossil distribution patterns of the aquatic gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius indicate that avian dispersal was an important dispersal mechanism in the geological past. Combining the distribution histories of these genera with ecological data on modern relatives provides insig

  17. A study on the diversity of gastropods in Hormuz Island with first record of two species from the Iranian coast of the Persian Gulf

    Nabiallah Kheirabadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the diversity of gastropod species in the intertidal zone of Hormuz Island in the Persian Gulf. Seasonal sampling was conducted in 7 selected sites by throwing nine random quadrates (0.5×0.5 m in each site. Samples of each site were separately transferred to the laboratory and identified by the standard keys and verified by the Conchology Museum of Tokyo University of Science. Forty -nine gastropod species were identified, from which 2 species, Turicula nelliae and Linatella caudata were recorded for the first time from the Iranian coast of the Persian Gulf. The highest number of gastropods in one site was 28 species in site 1 (East of Marine Research Center, Also highest number of gastropods in one season was 35 species in winter and lowest number was in 28 species in summer. Simpson dominance index, Shannon-Wiener species diversity index, Margalef richness index and evenness index were calculated in the different sites and results showed that site 1 contained the most amount of the Shannon-Wiener and Margalef indices and site 6 (West of Island contained the most amount of the Simpson index. Also, site 3 (Mangrove forest showed the lowest amount of the Simpson, Shannon-Wiener and Margalef indices, while maximum amount of evenness index occurred in this site.

  18. A baseline measure of tree and gastropod biodiversity in replanted and natural mangrove stands in malaysia: langkawi island and sungai merbok.

    Hookham, Brenda; Shau-Hwai, Aileen Tan; Dayrat, Benoit; Hintz, William

    2014-08-01

    THE DIVERSITIES OF MANGROVE TREES AND OF THEIR ASSOCIATED GASTROPODS WERE ASSESSED FOR TWO MANGROVE REGIONS ON THE WEST COAST OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA: Langkawi Island and Sungai Merbok. The mangrove area sampled on Langkawi Island was recently logged and replanted, whereas the area sampled in Sungai Merbok was part of a protected nature reserve. Mangrove and gastropod diversity were assessed in four 50 m(2) (10 × 5 m) sites per region. The species richness (S), Shannon Index (H') and Evenness Index (J') were calculated for each site, and the mean S, H' and J' values were calculated for each region. We report low tree and gastropod S, H' and J' values in all sites from both regions. For Langkawi Island, the mean S, H' and J' values for mangrove trees were S = 2.00±0, H' = 0.44±0.17 and J' = 0.44±0.17; the mean S, H' and J' values for gastropods were S = 4.00±1.63, H' = 0.96±0.41 and J' = 0.49±0.06. In Sungai Merbok, the mean S, H' and J' values for mangrove trees were S = 1.33±0.58, H' = 0.22±0.39 and J' = 0.22 ±0.39; the mean S, H' and J' values for gastropods were S = 4.75±2.22, H' = 1.23±0.63 and J' = 0.55±0.12. This study emphasises the need for baseline biodiversity measures to be established in mangrove ecosystems to track the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances and to inform management and restoration efforts. PMID:25210584

  19. Assembly processes of gastropod community change with horizontal and vertical zonation in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    Hauffe, Torsten; Albrecht, Christian; Wilke, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most diverse freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether species community composition, as well as the diversification of its endemic taxa, is mainly driven by dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, or species interaction. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics, as provided by the unifying framework of the "metacommunity speciation model".The current study used the species-rich model taxon Gastropoda to assess how extant communities in Lake Ohrid are structured by performing process-based metacommunity analyses. Specifically, the study aimed (1) to identifying the relative importance of the three community assembly processes and (2) to test whether the importance of these individual processes changes gradually with lake depth or discontinuously with eco-zone shifts.Based on automated eco-zone detection and process-specific simulation steps, we demonstrated that dispersal limitation had the strongest influence on gastropod community composition. However, it was not the exclusive assembly process, but acted together with the other two processes - environmental filtering and species interaction. The relative importance of the community assembly processes varied both with lake depth and eco-zones, though the processes were better predicted by the latter.This suggests that environmental characteristics have a pronounced effect on shaping gastropod communities via assembly processes. Moreover, the study corroborated the high importance of dispersal limitation for both maintaining species richness in Lake Ohrid (through its impact on community composition) and generating endemic biodiversity (via its influence on diversification processes). However, according to the metacommunity speciation model, the inferred importance of environmental filtering and biotic interaction also suggests a small but significant influence of ecological

  20. The role of vermetid gastropods in the development of the Florida Middle Ground, northeast Gulf of Mexico

    Reich, Christopher D.; Poore, Richard Z.; Hickey, Todd D.

    2013-01-01

    The Florida Middle Ground is a complex of north to northwest trending ridges that lie approximately 180 km northwest of Tampa Bay, Florida. The irregular ridges appear on the otherwise gently sloping West Florida shelf and exhibit between 10-15 m of relief. Modern studies interpret the ridges as remnants of a Holocene coral-reef buildup that today provide a hard substrate for growth of a variety of benthic organisms including hydrocorals, scleractinians, alcyonarians, and algae. Recent rotary coring reveals that the core of the eastern ridge of the Florida Middle Ground complex consists of unconsolidated marine calcareous muddy sand that is capped by a boundstone composed primarily of the sessile vermetid gastropod Petaloconchus sp., and overlays a weathered, fossiliferous limestone. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon ages (uncalibrated) on the 3.6-m thick vermetid worm rock indicate that it developed during a sea-level stillstand in the early Holocene (8,225 ±30-8,910 ± 25 yr B.P.). Our observations suggest that the Florida Middle Ground is a remnant of a series of shore parallel bars that formed in the early Holocene and were capped by a 3.6-m thick unit of vermetid gastropods. During a rapid sea-level rise that began ~8,000 yr B.P. the vermetids growth ceased and the worm rock preserved the ridges structure. Diver observations document that the edges of the ridges are currently being eroded and undermined by biological activity and current action, leading to calving of large capstone blocks.

  1. The use of the marine gastropod, Cellana tramoserica, as a biomonitor of metal contamination in near shore environments.

    Maher, W; Maher, N; Taylor, A; Krikowa, F; Ubrihien, R; Mikac, K M

    2016-07-01

    The use of the marine gastropod, Cellana tramoserica, as a biomonitor of metal exposure was investigated. The factors influencing metal concentrations, such as mass, gender, substrate, shoreline position and temporal variation were examined. Tissue metal concentrations were mostly found to be independent of mass and gender. When metal concentrations were significantly correlated with mass, correlations were low and explained little variability. The underlying substrate and position in the littoral zone had only a small influence on metal concentrations. Variation between individuals, inherent variability due to genetic variability, was the most significant contribution to the overall variation in metal concentrations, resulting in positive skewing of population distributions. The mean metal concentrations varied temporally; metal masses were relatively constant with fluctuations in metal concentrations related to fluctuations in metal body burdens. The populations from a metal-contaminated site had significantly higher tissue Cu, Zn, As and Pb concentrations than the populations from relatively uncontaminated locations. C. tramoserica therefore can be considered to be a net accumulator of metals. A sample number of >10 is required to detect changes of 25 % from the mean concentrations at uncontaminated locations. This species meets the requirements of a suitable biomonitor for metal contaminants in the environment i.e. hardy, sessile, widespread, sufficient tissue mass and a metal accumulator. As the measurement of metal concentrations in C. tramesoria were influenced by substrate and shore position and, sometimes, mass, sites with similar substrates and organisms of similar mass and shoreline position should be chosen for comparison. When comparing metal concentrations in gastropods from different locations, they should be collected over the same period to minimise variability due to mass differences, spawning and other seasonal/temporal effects. PMID:27262969

  2. Ecosystem Alterations and Species Range Shifts: An Atlantic-Mediterranean Cephalaspidean Gastropod in an Inland Egyptian Lake.

    Cruz-Rivera, Edwin; Malaquias, Manuel António E

    2016-01-01

    The eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean marine Cephalaspidea gastropod Haminoea orbignyana was collected from Lake Qarun (Fayoum, Egypt), a landlocked lake that has undergone a shift from freshwater to estuarine conditions in the past 100 years. Species identity was confirmed by both morphological (anatomical dissection and scanning electron microscopy) and molecular methods (COI gene phylogeny). Observations suggested a robust population of H. orbignyana in the lake with a density of ca. 64 individuals/m2 and ca. 105 egg masses/m2 during surveys conducted in the summer of 2013. The vast majority of snails and egg masses were found under rocks. Observations of egg masses in the lab showed a gradual change from whitish to yellow-green as the eggs matured and the release of veliger larvae alone after about a week. Although adult cephalaspideans readily consumed filamentous red and green algae, and cyanobacteria, laboratory trials showed that they consumed significantly more of the red alga Ceramium sp., than of the green alga Cladophora glomerata, with consumption of Oscillatoria margaritifera being similar to those on the two algae. When grown on these resources for 16 days, H. orbignyana maintained their mass on the rhodophyte and cyanobacterium, but not in starvation controls. No cephalaspideans grew over the course of this experiment. Lake Qarun has been periodically restocked with Mediterranean fishes and prawns since the 1920s to maintain local fisheries, which represents a possible route of colonization for H. orbignyana. Yet, based on literature records, it seems more likely that invasion of the lake by this gastropod species has occurred only within the last 20 years. As human activities redistribute species through direct and indirect means, the structure of the community of this inland lake has become unpredictable and the long-term effects of these recent introductions are unknown. PMID:27248835

  3. Ecosystem Alterations and Species Range Shifts: An Atlantic-Mediterranean Cephalaspidean Gastropod in an Inland Egyptian Lake

    Malaquias, Manuel António E.

    2016-01-01

    The eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean marine Cephalaspidea gastropod Haminoea orbignyana was collected from Lake Qarun (Fayoum, Egypt), a landlocked lake that has undergone a shift from freshwater to estuarine conditions in the past 100 years. Species identity was confirmed by both morphological (anatomical dissection and scanning electron microscopy) and molecular methods (COI gene phylogeny). Observations suggested a robust population of H. orbignyana in the lake with a density of ca. 64 individuals/m2 and ca. 105 egg masses/m2 during surveys conducted in the summer of 2013. The vast majority of snails and egg masses were found under rocks. Observations of egg masses in the lab showed a gradual change from whitish to yellow-green as the eggs matured and the release of veliger larvae alone after about a week. Although adult cephalaspideans readily consumed filamentous red and green algae, and cyanobacteria, laboratory trials showed that they consumed significantly more of the red alga Ceramium sp., than of the green alga Cladophora glomerata, with consumption of Oscillatoria margaritifera being similar to those on the two algae. When grown on these resources for 16 days, H. orbignyana maintained their mass on the rhodophyte and cyanobacterium, but not in starvation controls. No cephalaspideans grew over the course of this experiment. Lake Qarun has been periodically restocked with Mediterranean fishes and prawns since the 1920s to maintain local fisheries, which represents a possible route of colonization for H. orbignyana. Yet, based on literature records, it seems more likely that invasion of the lake by this gastropod species has occurred only within the last 20 years. As human activities redistribute species through direct and indirect means, the structure of the community of this inland lake has become unpredictable and the long-term effects of these recent introductions are unknown. PMID:27248835

  4. Heavy metal concentrations in edible bivalves and gastropods available in major markets of the Pearl River Delta

    2001-01-01

    Molluscs are able to accumulate heavy metals and impose healthhazard to consumers. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the heavy metal concentrations in edible bivalves and gastropods available in major markets of the Pearl River Delta. Fourteen species of edible molluscs were purchased from six markets in Hong Kong and Guangdong Province. The fresh of these biota were tested for their cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn)concentrations (based on wet weight). The results indicated that amongst the 14 edible molluscs, only Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, Sb and Sn concentrations in three species(Ruditapes philippinarum, Perna viridis and Hemifusus tuba) were within the local regulatory limits. Over 60% of bivalve species exceeded maximum permitted levels of Cd (2 μg/g) and Cr (1 μg/g), while over 40% of gastropod species exceeded the maximum levels of Sb (1 μg/g) and Cr(1 μg/g). Most of the samples collected from Hong Kong had significantly higher contents of Pb and Sb, but similar levels of Cd, Cu and Zn when compared with samples collected across the border (p<0.5; p<0.01; p<0.001 respectively). In general, the molluscs purchased in Guangdong markets had higher metal contents than those purchased from the Hong Kong markets. When compared with the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake or Maximum Acceptable Daily Load recommended by FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, Cd levels of five species (Anadara ferruginea, Pinna pectinata, Chlamys nobilis, Babylonia lutosa and Hemifusus terntanus) and Cr levels of seven species (Anadara ferruginea, Paphia undulata, Pinna pectinata, Babylonia lutosa, Hemifusus terntanus, Cymbium melo and Cipangopaludina chinensis) were higher than both the human daily acceptable limits (for Cd and Cr respectively) and the local regulatory levels (for Cd and Cr respectively).

  5. Flying high: on the airborne dispersal of aquatic organisms as illustrated by the distribution histories of the gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius

    Wesselingh, F.P.; Cadée, G.C.; Renema, W.

    1999-01-01

    The actual and fossil distribution patterns of the aquatic gastropod genera Tryonia and Planorbarius indicate that avian dispersal was an important dispersal mechanism in the geological past. Combining the distribution histories of these genera with ecological data on modern relatives provides insights into the process of dispersal of aquatic taxa in general. Avian dispersal of aquatic taxa is facilitated by a variety of factors, including mass occurrence in resting/foraging places of migrati...

  6. The Mollusk Gastropod Lanistes carinatus (Olivier, 1804) as Abiomonitor for Some Trace Metals in the Nile River

    S.S.I. Abd El Gawad

    2009-01-01

    The fresh water gastropod Lanistes carinatus was tested to be used as potential biomonitor for the trace metals, Copper, Cadmium and Lead. Some chemical and biological measurements were sampled and measured in two consecutive years 2005 and 2006 in different stations from Damietta Branch of Nile River. Cu level in water not detected in all investigated sites, while concentrations of Cd and Pb in water and the concentrations of Cu, Cd and Pb in sediment varied in different stations. It was fou...

  7. The systematics of Cephalaspidea (Mollusca: gastropods) revisited, with a study on the diversity of deep sea Philinidae sensu lato from the West Pacific

    Oskars, Trond Roger

    2013-01-01

    The Cephalaspidea are the second most diverse marine clade of the Euthyneura gastropods, after the Nudipleura with many groups still known largely from shells or little anatomical data. These marine snails occur worldwide across all latitudes and depths. The definition of the group and the relationships between members has been hampered by the difficulty of establishing sound synapomorphies, but the advent of molecular phylogenetics in recent times has helped changed significantly...

  8. Tetrodotoxin and paralytic shellfish poisons in gastropod species from Vietnam analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Hsiao-Chin Jen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Among marine toxins, tetrodotoxin (TTX and paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs are known as notorious neurotoxins that induce serious food poisoning incidents in the Southeast Asia region. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TTX and PSP toxins are important issues of seafood safety. Paralytic toxicity was observed in mice exposed to 34 specimens from five species of gastropods using a PSP bioassay. Five species of gastropods, Natica vitellus, Natica tumidus, Oliva hirasei, Oliva lignaria, and Oliva annulata, were collected from the coastal seawaters in Nha Trang City, Vietnam, between August 2007 and October 2007. The average lethal potency of gastropod specimens was 90 ± 40 (mean ± standard deviation mouse units (MU for N. vitellus, 64 ± 19 MU for N. tumidus, 42 ± 28 MU for O. hirasei, 51 ± 17 MU for O. lignaria, and 39 ± 18 MU for O. annulata. All toxic extracts from the sample species were clarified using a C18 Sep-Pak solid-phase extraction column and a microcentrifuge filter prior to analysis. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection indicated that the toxins of the olive shell (O. hirasei, O. lignaria, and O. annulata were mainly composed of saxitoxin (STX (73–82%, gonyautoxin (GTX 2, 3 (12–22%, and minor levels of TTX (5–6%. The toxins of N. vitellus and N. tumidus were mainly composed of STX (76–81% and GTX 1, 4 (19–24%. Furthermore, liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis was used to verify the identity of the PSPs and TTX. Our evidence shows that these gastropods have novel toxin profiles.

  9. Trace elements in shells of common gastropods in the near vicinity of a natural CO2 vent: no evidence of pH-dependent contamination

    J. B. McClintock

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is concern that the use of natural volcanic CO2 vents as analogs for studies of the impacts of ocean acidification on marine organisms are biased due to physiochemical influences other than seawater pH alone. One issue that has been raised is whether potentially harmful trace elements in sediments that are rendered more soluble and labile in low pH environments are made more bioavailable, and sequestered in the local flora and fauna at harmful levels. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, we analyzed the concentrations of trace elements in shells (an established proxy for tissues of four species of gastropods (two limpets, a topshell and a whelk collected from three sites in Levante Bay, Vulcano Island. Each sampling site increased in distance from the primary CO2 vent and thus represented low, moderate, and ambient seawater pH conditions. Concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, and V measured in shells using ICP-OES were below detection thresholds for all four gastropod species at all three sites. However, there were measurable concentrations of Sr, Mn, and U in the shells of the limpets Patella caerulea, P. rustica, and the snail Osilinus turbinatus, and similarly, Sr, Mn, U, and also Zn in the shells of the whelk Hexaplex trunculus. Levels of these elements were within the ranges measured in gastropod shells in non-polluted environments, and with the exception of U in the shells of P. caerulea, where the concentration was significantly lower at the collecting site closest to the vent (low pH site, there were no site-specific spatial differences in concentrations for any of the trace elements in shells. Thus trace element enhancement in sediments in low-pH environments was not reflected in greater bioaccumulations of potentially harmful elements in the shells of common gastropods.

  10. Evaluation of impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods (Cronia contracta) as a biomarker of genotoxic contaminants in coastal water around Goa, West coast of India.

    Sarkar, A; Gaitonde, Dipak C S; Sarkar, Amit; Vashistha, D; D'Silva, Classy; Dalal, S G

    2008-10-01

    The measurement of the impairment of DNA in marine gastropod (Cronia contracta) provides an insight into the genotoxic effects of contaminants on marine organisms along the Goa coast. The impact of genotoxic contaminants on Goan coastal environment was evaluated in terms of the loss of DNA integrity (expressed as the value of 'I') in marine snails with respect to those from the reference site (Palolem) over a period from April 2004 to May 2005 using the technique of alkaline unwinding assay. The DNA integrity in marine snails was found to be significantly damaged at Dona Paula (58%), Vasco (73.5%), and Velsao (48.5%) during the monsoon period (July-August 2004). Similar trend in the loss of DNA integrity in marine gastropods was also detected during the post-monsoon (November-December 2004) and the pre-monsoon (April-May 2005) periods. The low integrities of DNA in marine gastropods at these sites can be attributed to exposure to genotoxic contaminants especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and toxic heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Mn) prevalent in the marine environment as evident by their accumulation in the tissues of the marine snails inhabiting different sites along the Goa coast. The contaminant-induced DNA strand breaks in marine snails increased significantly at Dona Paula, Vasco, and Velsao clearly indicating the levels of contamination of the sites by genotoxic compounds in those regions. The genotoxic effects of contaminants were further substantiated by detection of the impairment (39%) of DNA integrity in marine snails in a field experiment in which the same species of marine snails (C. contracta) collected from the reference site, Palolem, were deployed at Dona Paula and caged for 25 days for exposure to ambient marine pollutants. The impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods along the Goa coast can thus act as a biomarker for marine pollution monitoring of genotoxic contaminants. PMID:18358533

  11. Reticulate phylogeny of gastropod-shell-breeding cichlids from Lake Tanganyika – the result of repeated introgressive hybridization

    Blanc Michel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tribe Lamprologini is the major substrate breeding lineage of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species flock. Among several different life history strategies found in lamprologines, the adaptation to live and breed in empty gastropod shells is probably the most peculiar. Although shell-breeding arose several times in the evolutionary history of the lamprologines, all obligatory and most facultative shell-breeders belong to the so called "ossified group", a monophyletic lineage within the lamprologine cichlids. Since their distinctive life style enables these species to live and breed in closest vicinity, we hypothesized that these cichlids might be particularly prone to accidental hybridization, and that introgression might have affected the evolutionary history of this cichlid lineage. Results Our analyses revealed discrepancies between phylogenetic hypotheses based on mitochondrial and nuclear (AFLP data. While the nuclear phylogeny was congruent with morphological, behavioral and ecological characteristics, several species – usually highly specialized shell-breeders – were placed at contradicting positions in the mitochondrial phylogeny. The discordant phylogenies strongly suggest repeated incidents of introgressive hybridization between several distantly related shell-breeding species, which reticulated the phylogeny of this group of cichlids. Long interior branches and high bootstrap support for many interior nodes in the mitochondrial phylogeny argue against a major effect of ancient incomplete lineage sorting on the phylogenetic reconstruction. Moreover, we provide morphological and genetic (mtDNA and microsatellites evidence for ongoing hybridization among distantly related shell-breeders. In these cases, the territorial males of the inferred paternal species are too large to enter the shells of their mate, such that they have to release their sperm over the entrance of the shell to fertilize the eggs. With sperm

  12. Effect of parasitism by the pyramidellid gastropod Boonea impressa on the net productivity of oysters ( Crassostrea virginica)

    White, M. E.; Powell, E. N.; Ray, S. M.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of an ectoparasitic gastropod, Boonea (= Odostomia) impressa, on the energy bidget of its host, the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was examined. A model was developed from laboratory and field data, as well as from equations developed by Powell and Stanton (1985). The model predicted that net productivity by large (7 cm length) oysters parasitized by 10 and 30 large (6 mm length) snails would be reduced by 21% and 63%, respectively. In contrast, net productivity in small (3 cm length) oysters would be reduced 25% by only 3 snails. Small oysters would have a negative energy balance when parasitized by 10 snails. The predicted reduction in growth was compared with measured growth in small and large oysters parasitized at abundances typical of Texas oyster reefs. Control oysters (no parasites) gained more shell weight than parasitized oysters. In four-week experiments conducted during the spring and fall, small control oysters gained 86% and 75% more weight than highly parasitized oysters. Large control oysters had 29% and 88% more shell deposition. Snail parasitism produced 75% mortality in small, highly parasitized oysters in the summer. In typical field populations in Texas bays, a minimal estimate of 4-12% of the energy otherwise available to the oyster for growth and reproduction is consumed by Boonea impressa.

  13. Influences of population density on polyandry and patterns of sperm usage in the marine gastropod Rapana venosa.

    Xue, Dong-Xiu; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Jin-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, with potential for sexual selection to continue post-copulation through sperm competition and/or cryptic female choice. Few studies have investigated the influences of population density on polyandry and sperm usage, and paternity distribution in successive broods of marine invertebrates. The marine gastropod Rapana venosa is ideal for investigating how population density influences the frequency of polyandry and elucidating patterns of sperm usage. Two different population density (12 ind/m(3) and 36 ind/m(3)) treatments with two replications were set to observe reproductive behaviors. Five microsatellite markers were used to identify the frequency of multiple paternity and determine paternal contributions to progeny arrays in 120 egg masses. All of the mean mating frequency, mean number of sires and mean egg-laying frequency were higher at high population density treatment relative to low population density treatment, indicating population density is an important factor affecting polyandry. The last sperm donors achieved high proportions of paternity in 74.77% of egg masses, which supported the "last male sperm precedence" hypothesis. In addition, high variance in reproductive success among R. venosa males were detected, which might have an important influence on effective population size. PMID:26996441

  14. Isolation and identification of crude oil degrading bacteria from gastropod Haustrum scobina collected from Persian Gulf (Bandar Abbas Shoreline provenance

    Zinab Bayat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biodegradation is a good alternative rather than chemical and physical methods for cleaning oil contaminated areas. Several factors like crude oil concentration, biosurfactant production, salinity and incubation time affect the biodegradation. Materials and methods: In this study, seawater sample and gastropod were collected from Persian Gulf. To isolate oil degrading bacteria from collected samples, ONR7a medium was used. The strains that had more growth and higher oil removal were selected and identified. The factors such as the effect of different concentrations of oil, incubation time, mixed cultures and salinity on the biodegradation were investigated. Results: Six crude oil degrading bacteria were isolated. Between these bacteria 2 strains were selected based on higher oil removal. These strains belonged to the genus Vibrio and Halomonas. Strains with higher Emulsification activity produce more biosurfactant and have higher oil biodegradation. Growth and oil degradation have increment pattern by prolonging the incubation time. Mixed culture of Vibrio and Halomonas strains have higher rates of degradation rather than culturing with one of them. Increase in crudeoil concentration to 2.5% caused reduction in growth of bacteria and degradation of oil. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study show that crude oil degrading bacteria have high diversity in Persian Gulf. These bacteria have higher capability for oil degradation thus they can be used for remediation of oil contaminated areas.

  15. Effects of low salinity on adult behavior and larval performance in the intertidal gastropod Crepipatella peruviana (Calyptraeidae.

    Jaime A Montory

    Full Text Available Shallow-water coastal areas suffer frequent reductions in salinity due to heavy rains, potentially stressing the organisms found there, particularly the early stages of development (including pelagic larvae. Individual adults and newly hatched larvae of the gastropod Crepipatella peruviana were exposed to different levels of salinity stress (32(control, 25, 20 or 15, to quantify the immediate effects of exposure to low salinities on adult and larval behavior and on the physiological performance of the larvae. For adults we recorded the threshold salinity that initiates brood chamber isolation. For larvae, we measured the impact of reduced salinity on velar surface area, velum activity, swimming velocity, clearance rate (CR, oxygen consumption (OCR, and mortality (LC50; we also documented the impact of salinity discontinuities on the vertical distribution of veliger larvae in the water column. The results indicate that adults will completely isolate themselves from the external environment by clamping firmly against the substrate at salinities ≤24. Moreover, the newly hatched larvae showed increased mortality at lower salinities, while survivors showed decreased velum activity, decreased exposed velum surface area, and decreased mean swimming velocity. The clearance rates and oxygen consumption rates of stressed larvae were significantly lower than those of control individuals. Finally, salinity discontinuities affected the vertical distribution of larvae in the water column. Although adults can protect their embryos from low salinity stress until hatching, salinities <24 clearly affect survival, physiology and behavior in early larval life, which will substantially affect the fitness of the species under declining ambient salinities.

  16. Genetic divergence of peripherally disjunct populations of the gastropod Batillariella estuarina in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia.

    Pudovskis, M S; Johnson, M S; Black, R

    2001-11-01

    Geographically disjunct populations are unusual in marine species, but the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, provide opportunities to study highly disjunct peripheral isolates of several species. The intertidal snail Batillariella estuarina occurs in isolated tidal ponds in the Abrolhos Islands, where it is at its northern limit, disjunct from mainland populations by 600-900 km. The species is thus disjunct both geographically and among the peripherally isolated populations in the Abrolhos Islands. Comparisons of allozymes at 11 polymorphic loci were made among populations from 10 ponds in the Abrolhos Islands and six sites from relatively continuous tidal flats at Albany, 900 km away, the nearest major set of populations. Among all 16 populations, subdivision was high (FST = 0.455). Although there were subtle differences between the geographical regions, the large majority of divergence occurred among the isolated ponds in the Abrolhos (FST = 0.441), and divergence on the tidal flats at Albany was only moderate (FST = 0.085). Characteristic of peripheral isolates, the pond populations have less polymorphism and fewer alleles than the more connected populations at Albany. Combined with evidence of genetic divergence in the gastropods Bembicium vittatum and Austrocochlea constricta, which have very similar geographical distributions to that of B. estuarina, these results indicate the potential evolutionary significance of peripherally isolated marine populations in the unusual habitats of the Abrolhos Islands. PMID:11883876

  17. [Evolutionary regularities of somatic polyploidy expansion in salivary glands of gastropod mollusks. V. Subclasses Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata].

    Anisimov, A P; Ziumchenko, N E

    2012-01-01

    Salivary glands of 25 species of euthyneural gastropod mollusks (Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata) have been investigated by means of histochemical methods and DNA cytophotometry in nuclei of cells. The cells of three basic types are distinguished in glandular epithelim: granular cells (with glicoproteid granular inclusions), mucocytes-I (with sulfatic acid mucopolysaccharides) and mucocytes-II (with neutral and acid nonsulfatic polysaccharides and proteins) and so the epithelial ciliated cells and cells of the ducts. It was shown that glandular cells of salivary glands of all discovered mollusks' species are polyploid in different degree. The highest ploidy level estimated by means of DNA content in most of species is 64-128c. The giant polyploidy, attained to 4096c, is discovered in cells of salivary glands of Tritonia diomedea. The functional conditionality connected with features of feeding of different mollusk species and phylogenetic tendencies of expansion of somatic polyploidy in class Gastropoda are discussed. In comparison with allogenic, facultative and small polyploidy manifestation in Prosobranchia the obligatory polyploidization of high degree revealed in cells of salivary glands of Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata is consider to be the original cytological arogenesis. The probable causes of such differences are conneted with euthyneural type of organization of central nervous system and giant polyploidy of neurons in Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata mollusks. The causes, mechanisms and significance of such correlations are unclear for the present. PMID:22590930

  18. The spatial scale of genetic subdivision in populations of Ifremeria nautilei, a hydrothermal-vent gastropod from the southwest Pacific

    Thaler Andrew D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep-sea hydrothermal vents provide patchy, ephemeral habitats for specialized communities of animals that depend on chemoautotrophic primary production. Unlike eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents, where population structure has been studied at large (thousands of kilometres and small (hundreds of meters spatial scales, population structure of western Pacific vents has received limited attention. This study addresses the scale at which genetic differentiation occurs among populations of a western Pacific vent-restricted gastropod, Ifremeria nautilei. Results We used mitochondrial and DNA microsatellite markers to infer patterns of gene flow and population subdivision. A nested sampling strategy was employed to compare genetic diversity in discrete patches of Ifremeria nautilei separated by a few meters within a single vent field to distances as great as several thousand kilometres between back-arc basins that encompass the known range of the species. No genetic subdivisions were detected among patches, mounds, or sites within Manus Basin. Although I. nautilei from Lau and North Fiji Basins (~1000 km apart also exhibited no evidence for genetic subdivision, these populations were genetically distinct from the Manus Basin population. Conclusions An unknown process that restricts contemporary gene flow isolates the Manus Basin population of Ifremeria nautilei from widespread populations that occupy the North Fiji and Lau Basins. A robust understanding of the genetic structure of hydrothermal vent populations at multiple spatial scales defines natural conservation units and can help minimize loss of genetic diversity in situations where human activities are proposed and managed.

  19. A neurotropic herpesvirus infecting the gastropod, abalone, shares ancestry with oyster herpesvirus and a herpesvirus associated with the amphioxus genome

    Sawbridge Tim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the exception of the oyster herpesvirus OsHV-1, all herpesviruses characterized thus far infect only vertebrates. Some cause neurological disease in their hosts, while others replicate or become latent in neurological tissues. Recently a new herpesvirus causing ganglioneuritis in abalone, a gastropod, was discovered. Molecular analysis of new herpesviruses, such as this one and others, still to be discovered in invertebrates, will provide insight into the evolution of herpesviruses. Results We sequenced the genome of a neurotropic virus linked to a fatal ganglioneuritis devastating parts of a valuable wild abalone fishery in Australia. We show that the newly identified virus forms part of an ancient clade with its nearest relatives being a herpesvirus infecting bivalves (oyster and, unexpectedly, one we identified, from published data, apparently integrated within the genome of amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate. Predicted protein sequences from the abalone virus genome have significant similarity to several herpesvirus proteins including the DNA packaging ATPase subunit of (putative terminase and DNA polymerase. Conservation of amino acid sequences in the terminase across all herpesviruses and phylogenetic analysis using the DNA polymerase and terminase proteins demonstrate that the herpesviruses infecting the molluscs, oyster and abalone, are distantly related. The terminase and polymerase protein sequences from the putative amphioxus herpesvirus share more sequence similarity with those of the mollusc viruses than with sequences from any of the vertebrate herpesviruses analysed. Conclusions A family of mollusc herpesviruses, Malacoherpesviridae, that was based on a single virus infecting oyster can now be further established by including a distantly related herpesvirus infecting abalone, which, like many vertebrate viruses is neurotropic. The genome of Branchiostoma floridae (amphioxus provides evidence for the

  20. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered. PMID:11281267

  1. Developmental analysis reveals labial and subradular ganglia and the primary framework of the nervous system in nudibranch gastropods.

    Page, L R

    1993-11-01

    Previous ultrastructural observations on late stage larvae of dorid nudibranchs (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) revealed two pairs of ganglia within the base of the foot that do not have obvious counterparts in existing descriptions of other gastropod larvae [Chia and Koss (1989). Cell Tiss. Res. 256:17-26.] One of these ganglionic pairs has been implicated in the initiation of settlement preceding metamorphosis [Arkett et al. (1989). Biol. Bull. 176:155-160.] By examining neurogenesis in sequential larval stages, I have found that the pattern of connectives and commissures associated with these enigmatic ganglia is comparable to patterns found in less consolidated adult nervous systems of chitons, monoplacophorans, and archaeogastropods. These comparative data suggest that the two pairs of ganglia in dorid nudibranch larvae are homologues of labial and subradular ganglia. The labial ganglia become incorporated into the cerebral ganglia at metamorphosis. In an attempt to integrate anatomical and developmental observations with behavioral and neurophysiological results, I suggest that receptor cells of the larval labial ganglia may become postmetamorphic primary mechanoreceptors of the oral tube, which have central cell bodies within the "cerebral" ganglia and which help coordinate feeding. Results of this study also address a larger evolutionary issue by questioning the traditional model of an ancestral molluscan nervous system that consists of four longitudinal nerve cords that arise from separate sites along a circumesophageal nerve ring. This pattern results from secondary connections in nudibranchs and possibly other molluscs. The primary condition of a single axon bundle emerging from each cerebral ganglion is more similar to the developing nervous system in polychaete annelids than what has been recognized previously. PMID:8283184

  2. [Effects mangrove conversion to pasture on density and shell size of two gastropods in the Turbo River Delta (Urabá Gulf, Caribbean coast of Colombia)].

    Blanco, Juan F; Castaño, María C

    2012-12-01

    Mangrove deforestation is widespread in the Greater Caribbean but its impact on macrobenthos has not been evaluated to date. In order to assess the impact of mangrove conversion to pasture, densities and shell sizes of two dominant gastropods (Neritina virginea and Melampus coffeus) were compared among four mangrove types: 1) Rhizophora mangle-dominated fringing mangroves, 2) Avicennia germinans-dominated basin mangroves, 3) Mixed-species basin mangroves, and 4) A. germinans- basin mangroves converted to pastures, in the Turbo River Delta (Urabá Gulf, Colombia). Mangrove types were polygon-delimited with satellite images and color aerial photographs were taken in 2009. Various (n<5) polygons per mangrove type were sampled in January, July and December 2009, and a total (n<20) 0.025m2-quadrats were randomly placed along each polygon. Forest structure variables, pore-water physicochemical variables and sediment-grain metrics were measured in the four mangrove types. Mean density and size of both gastropod species were measured. The results showed that the mean density and size of both species were significantly greater in R. mangle-fringing mangroves. N. virginea density decreased gradually towards the A. germinans-basin mangroves seemly related to the diadromous life-history. This species nearly disappeared in the neighboring pastures because individuals were constrained to a few remaining flooded areas. In the pastures, M. coffeus individuals were clumped in the remaining A. germinans trees due to its climbing behavior as a pulmonate. We hypothesize that the decline of these two gastropods was related to physical microhabitat (e.g. trees, prop roots, and seedlings) degradation, and alteration of soil properties (e.g. temperature, pH, organic matter content). Finally, we also hypothesize that the local extinction of N. virginea due to clear-cutting may exert strong negative effects on the ecosystem function because it is a dominant omnivore. PMID:23342523

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of euthyneuran gastropods from sea to land mainly based on comparative mitogenomic of four species of Onchidiidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Pulmonata).

    Sun, Bian Na; Wei, Luan Luan; Shen, He Ding; Wu, Hong Xi; Wang, Dong Feng

    2016-09-01

    We generated complete mitochondrial genome sequences data for 4 genera (Onchidium, Platevindex, Paraoncidium and Peronia) in Onchidiidae to construct a phylogenetic tree in conjunction with other 9 existing data among gastropods. The topology showed that the taxa clustered into two main groups of four species, one of which included Onchidium struma and the Platevindex mortoni, the other Paraoncidium reevesii and Peronia verruculata. The process in Pulmonata from sea to land in accordance with the evolution of respiratory organs from branchial gills to pulmonary cavity has been shown. This will also constitute a framework for phylogeny evolution analysis, systematic classfication of Onchidiidae and other euthyneurans (pulmonates and opisthobranchs). PMID:25648917

  4. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern, and Immunocytochemical Localization of a Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-like Molecule in the Gastropod Mollusk, Aplysia californica

    Zhang, Lihong; Tello, Javier A; Zhang, Weimin; Tsai, Pei-San

    2007-01-01

    Successful reproduction in vertebrates depends upon the actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Despite the wide presence of GnRH in Phylum Chordata, GnRH has not been isolated in protostomes other than the common octopus. To provide information on the evolution of this critical hormone, we isolated the full-length cDNA of a GnRH-like molecule from the central nervous system of a gastropod mollusk, the sea hare Aplysia californica. The open reading frame of this cDNA encodes a prote...

  5. The locomotion of marine and terrestrial gastropods: can the acceleration of the ventral pedal waves contribute to the generation of net propulsive forces?

    Del Alamo, Juan C.; Rodroguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Lai, Janice; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2008-11-01

    Marine and terrestrial gastropods move by gliding over a ventral foot that is lubricated by secreted mucus (terrestrial) or simply by water (marine). The rim of the ventral foot generates suction forces that keep the animal adhered to the substrate. The central part of the foot produces a net propulsive force by generating trains of pedal waves through periodic muscle contractions. Recent experiments show that, in some gastropods, these pedal waves become faster and longer as they move forward, suggesting a mechanism for the generation of net propulsive forces by building a pressure difference across consecutive waves. We have investigated the efficiency of this mechanism through a theoretical analysis of a two-dimensional lubrication layer between a train of waves of slowly varying length and speed, and a flat, rigid, impermeable surface. The inhomogeneity of the speed and length of the pedal waves has been modeled through multiple-scale asymptotics. We have considered a Newtonian fluid to separate the effect of this inhomogeneity from the viscoelastic propulsion reported in previous works.

  6. A Novel Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) Influences Compatibility between the Gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata, and the Digenean Trematode Schistosoma mansoni.

    Pila, Emmanuel A; Tarrabain, Mahmoud; Kabore, Alethe L; Hanington, Patrick C

    2016-03-01

    shed S. mansoni cercariae 1-week before the susceptible controls. Our results represent the first functional characterization of a gastropod TLR, and demonstrate that BgTLR is an important snail immune receptor that is capable of influencing infection outcome following S. mansoni challenge. PMID:27015424

  7. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    Lyons Deirdre C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition towards constructing the bilaterian body plan. These cells give rise to the visceral mesoderm in virtually all spiralians examined and in many species they also contribute to the endodermal intestine. Hence, the 4d lineage is an ideal one for studying the evolution and diversification of the bipotential endomesodermal germ layer in protostomes at the level of individual cells. Little is known of how division patterns are controlled or how mesodermal and endodermal sublineages diverge in spiralians. Detailed modern fate maps for 4d exist in only a few species of clitellate annelids, specifically in glossiphoniid leeches and the sludge worm Tubifex. We investigated the 4d lineage in the gastropod Crepidula fornicata, an established model system for spiralian biology, and in a closely related direct-developing species, C. convexa. Results High-resolution cell lineage tracing techniques were used to study the 4d lineage of C. fornicata and C. convexa. We present a new nomenclature to name the progeny of 4d, and report the fate map for the sublineages up through the birth of the first five pairs of teloblast daughter cells (when 28 cells are present in the 4d sublineage, and describe each clone’s behavior during gastrulation and later stages as these undergo differentiation. We identify the precise origin of the intestine, two cells of the larval kidney complex, the larval retractor muscles and the presumptive germ cells, among others. Other tissues that arise

  8. Mieniplotia scabra (Müller, 1774, another gastropod invasive species in Europe and the status of freshwater allochthonous molluscs in Greece and Europe

    S. CIANFANELLI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mieniplotia scabra (Müller, 1774, a freshwater gastropod originating from the Indo-Pacific area, has proved to be a successful invader spreading to other parts of East Asia, Middle East, the Pacific Islands, North America and West Indies. This paper reports the first record of M. scabra from Europe, where it has become naturalized in Kos Island in Greece. This new trans-continental introduction brings to nine the number of alien freshwater molluscs species in Greece and to 30 in Europe. It is therefore given an updated snapshot on the presence of the numerous non-native fresh water species in Europe, divided by nation, an account that is currently lacking in literature and in the specific databases.

  9. Comparison of sample preparation methods, validation of an UPLC-MS/MS procedure for the quantification of tetrodotoxin present in marine gastropods and analysis of pufferfish.

    Nzoughet, Judith Kouassi; Campbell, Katrina; Barnes, Paul; Cooper, Kevin M; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T

    2013-02-15

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is one of the most potent marine neurotoxins reported. The global distribution of this toxin is spreading with the European Atlantic coastline now being affected. Climate change and increasing pollution have been suggested as underlying causes for this. In the present study, two different sample preparation techniques were used to extract TTX from Trumpet shells and pufferfish samples. Both extraction procedures (accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and a simple solvent extraction) were shown to provide good recoveries (80-92%). A UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the analysis of TTX and validated following the guidelines contained in the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC for chemical contaminant analysis. The performance of this procedure was demonstrated to be fit for purpose. This study is the first report on the use of ASE as a mean for TTX extraction, the use of UPLC-MS/MS for TTX analysis, and the validation of this method for TTX in gastropods. PMID:23194566

  10. Determination of the variability of both hydrophilic and lipophilic toxins in endemic wild bivalves and carnivorous gastropods from the southern part of Chile.

    Zamorano, Ruben; Marín, Michelle; Cabrera, Fabiola; Figueroa, Diego; Contreras, Cristóbal; Barriga, Andrés; Lagos, Néstor; García, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse and determine the composition of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins and lipophilic toxins in the Region of Aysén, Chile, in wild endemic mussels (Mytilus chilensis, Venus antiqua, Aulacomya ater, Choromytilus chorus, Tagelus dombeii and Gari solida) and in two endemic carnivorous molluscs species (Concholepas concholepas and Argobuccinum ranelliforme). PSP-toxin contents were determined by using HPLC with fluorescence detection, while lipophilic toxins were determined by using LC-MS/MS. Mean concentrations for the total of PSP toxins were in the range 55-2505 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g. The two most contaminated samples for PSP toxicity were bivalve Gari solida and carnivorous Argobuccinum ranelliforme with 2505 ± 101 and 1850 ± 137 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g, respectively (p < 0.05). The lipophilic toxins identified were okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and yessotoxins (YTX). All analysed molluscs contained lipophilic toxins at levels ranging from 56 ± 4.8 to 156.1 ± 8.2 μg of okadaic acid-equivalent/kg shellfish together with YTX at levels ranging from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 18 ± 0.9 μg of YTX-equivalent/kg shellfish and AZA at levels ranging from 3.6 ± 0.2 to 31 ± 2.1 μg of AZA-equivalent/kg shellfish. Furthermore, different bivalves and gastropods differ in their capacity of retention of lipophilic toxins, as shown by the determination of their respective lipophilic toxins levels. In all the evaluated species, the presence of lipophilic toxins associated with biotransformation in molluscs and carnivorous gastropods was not identified, in contrast to the identification of PSP toxins, where the profiles identified in the different species are directly related to biotransformation processes. Thus, this study provides evidence that the concentration of toxins in the food intake of the evaluated species (Bivalvia and Gastropoda class) determines the degree of

  11. Hydrologic and climatic implications of stable isotope and minor element analyses of authigenic calcite silts and gastropod shells from a mid-Pleistocene pluvial lake, Western Desert, Egypt

    Kieniewicz, Johanna M.; Smith, Jennifer R.

    2007-11-01

    Authigenic calcite silts at Wadi Midauwara in Kharga Oasis, Egypt, indicate the prolonged presence of surface water during the Marine Isotope Stage 5e pluvial phase recognized across North Africa. Exposed over an area of ˜ 4.25 km 2, these silts record the ponding of water derived from springs along the Libyan Plateau escarpment and from surface drainage. The δ 18O values of these lacustrine carbonates (- 11.3‰ to - 8.0‰ PDB), are too high to reflect equilibrium precipitation with Nubian aquifer water or water of an exclusively Atlantic origin. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca of the silts have a modest negative covariance with silt δ 18O values, suggesting that the water may have experienced the shortest residence time in local aquifers when the water δ 18O values were highest. Furthermore, intra-shell δ 18O, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca analyses of the freshwater gastropod Melanoides tuberculata are consistent with a perennially fresh water source, suggesting that strong evaporative effects expected in a monsoonal climate did not occur, or that dry season spring flow was of sufficient magnitude to mute the effects of evaporation. The input of a second, isotopically heavier water source to aquifers, possibly Indian Ocean monsoonal rain, could explain the observed trends in δ 18O and minor element ratios.

  12. Avian Schistosomes from the South American Endemic Gastropod Genus Chilina (Pulmonata: Chilinidae), with a Brief Review of South American Schistosome Species.

    Flores, Verónica; Brant, Sara V; Loker, Eric S

    2015-10-01

    Our current knowledge of avian schistosomes from South America is scarce in all respects, including species and generic diversity, their life cycles, patterns of host use, potential to cause dermatitis outbreaks, and evolutionary affinities. As a step towards addressing this shortcoming, the goal of this study was to provide discrete reference points relating to snail hosts, locality records, morphological attributes, sequence for nuclear 28S and ITS, and partial mitochondrial cox1 genes, and phylogenetic relationships for schistosome cercariae recovered from different species of Chilina, which are gastropods endemic to South America. In total, 1,308 snails belonging to 6 species of Chilina were collected from 12 localities across Argentina. Thirty-eight snails (2.9%) had schistosome infections. Our data indicate the presence of 3 lineages of Chilina-transmitted schistosomes, all of which group within the major avian schistosome clade. However, none of the lineages grouped within or as sister to other known avian schistosome genera in the tree, indicating they probably represent undescribed genera. The relationships of these schistosomes from Chilina spp. are discussed in relation to their position in the global schistosome phylogenetic tree. PMID:26186680

  13. Cloning of the non-neuronal intermediate filament protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica; identification of an amino acid residue essential for the IFA epitope.

    Riemer, D; Dodemont, H; Weber, K

    1991-12-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a full-length cDNA corresponding to the larger non-neuronal (nn) intermediate filament (IF) protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica. Comparison of the sequences of the nn-IF proteins from Aplysia californica and Helix aspersa shows a strong evolutionary drift. At a 72% sequence identity level, the IF proteins of Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata show a larger distance than vimentins from Xenopus and mammals. The sequence comparison of the two snail proteins provides an important step in understanding the epitope of the monoclonal antibody IFA mapped by previous studies to the consensus sequence at the carboxy-terminal end of the rod domain of IF proteins. We identify for the first time in a naturally occurring IF protein a single amino acid exchange which leads to the loss of the epitope. The consensus sequence YRKLLEGEE present in IFA-positive proteins such as the Helix IF protein is changed in the IFA-negative Aplysia protein only by the conservative substitution of the arginine (R) by a lysine (K). Thus, the IFA epitope is not a necessity of IF structure, and its presence or absence on different IF proteins reflects only small changes in an otherwise conserved consensus sequence. Consequently, lack of IFA reactivity does not exclude the presence of IF. This result predicts that IF are much more universally expressed in lower eukaryotes than currently expected from immunological results with the monoclonal antibody IFA. PMID:1724961

  14. Analysis of naticid gastropod predation across the trans-Arctic invasion in the Tjörnes beds, Iceland, and the Red Crag Formation, East Anglia, England

    Neely, Samuel H.; Kelley, Patricia H.

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species are wreaking havoc on modern ecosystems; however, species invasions are not new threats to ecosystems. The fossil record allows conservationists to acquire deep-time perspectives on long-term effects of natural invasions before anthropogenic impacts. Drill holes from invasive naticid gastropod predators on bivalve prey can be quantified to provide evidence of the impact of these invasive predators on ecosystems. An asymmetrical faunal interchange, known as the trans-Arctic invasion (TAI), occurred between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans during the Pliocene (˜3.5 Ma) because of the opening of the Bering Strait. This interchange could have changed naticid gastropod drilling predation on bivalves due to the migration of Pacific fauna into the Atlantic Ocean. The Tjörnes locality of northeast Iceland well characterizes the TAI because this site has preserved genera in three distinct levels that divide the invasion into the pre-invasion (Tapes and Mactra zones) and the post-invasion (Serripes zone). Temporal comparisons can be made between these pre- and post-invasion zones to analyze drilling predation across the TAI. Spatial comparisons of drilling predation in the post-invasion deposits can be made by correlating the Serripes zone (3.6-2.6 Ma) to the Red Crag Formation (2.54 Ma) of East Anglia, England, because these localities are of similar age and contain similar taxa. Specimens from the Tjörnes Beds, Iceland, were analyzed in collections housed at the Icelandic Institute of Natural History. Red Crag Formation specimens were analyzed at the Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. Height and length of bivalve specimens were measured. The occurrence of complete and incomplete (unsuccessful) drill holes and drill hole diameter were recorded for all whole bivalves. Drilling frequency (DF = % mortality) and prey effectiveness (PE = % of attempted drill holes that were incomplete) were calculated. Icelandic samples

  15. The distribution of the invasive non-native gastropod Crepidula fornicata in the Milford Haven Waterway, its northernmost population along the west coast of Britain

    Bohn, Katrin; Richardson, Christopher A.; Jenkins, Stuart R.

    2015-12-01

    The invasive non-native gastropod Crepidula fornicata is well established in the Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) in south-west Wales, UK, since its first introduction to this ria in 1953. Whilst it reaches high densities within the MHW and has extended its range to the south of this ria, there has been very little northward expansion. Here, we report findings of a series of intertidal and subtidal surveys in 2009 and 2010 where we monitored the population density and the vertical distribution of C. fornicata at its northern range limit in Wales (the MHW). We also characterised the composition of the surface substrata of the seabed in the MHW to provide some insight into how the availability of certain settlement substrata may limit its distribution along the west coast of Britain. We found locally very dense aggregations (maximum 2748 ± 3859 individuals m-2, mean ± SD) in the shallow subtidal and low intertidal of the MHW. Subtidally, highest densities were found in areas of high gravel content (grain sizes ~16-256 mm), suggesting that the availability of this substrata type is beneficial for its establishment at a site. In the intertidal, on the other hand, high gravel content was indicative of low C. fornicata abundance, possibly because gravelly shores are an indicator of very exposed conditions that, at least in the intertidal, may result in high levels of early post-settlement mortality and low recruitment. C. fornicata was absent from the entrance of the MHW, possibly due to the lack of suitable settlement substrata. The presence of substantial populations in the MHW suggests that C. fornicata's population growth and potential expansion in Welsh coastal waters is not fully limited by prevailing environmental conditions in the region, but that other processes may affect its local distribution.

  16. Accumulation and detoxication responses of the gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis to single and combined exposures to natural (cyanobacteria) and anthropogenic (the herbicide RoundUp(®) Flash) stressors.

    Lance, Emilie; Desprat, Julia; Holbech, Bente Frost; Gérard, Claudia; Bormans, Myriam; Lawton, Linda A; Edwards, Christine; Wiegand, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Freshwater gastropods are increasingly exposed to multiple stressors in the field such as the herbicide glyphosate in Roundup formulations and cyanobacterial blooms either producing or not producing microcystins (MCs), potentially leading to interacting effects. Here, the responses of Lymnaea stagnalis to a 21-day exposure to non-MC or MC-producing (33μgL(-1)) Planktothrix agardhii alone or in combination with the commercial formulation RoundUp(®) Flash at a concentration of 1μgL(-1) glyphosate, followed by 14days of depuration, were studied via i) accumulation of free and bound MCs in tissues, and ii) activities of anti-oxidant (catalase CAT) and biotransformation (glutathione-S-transferase GST) enzymes. During the intoxication, the cyanobacterial exposure induced an early increase of CAT activity, independently of the MC content, probably related to the production of secondary cyanobacterial metabolites. The GST activity was induced by RoundUp(®) Flash alone or in combination with non MC-producing cyanobacteria, but was inhibited by MC-producing cyanobacteria with or without RoundUp(®) Flash. Moreover, MC accumulation in L. stagnalis was 3.2 times increased when snails were concomitantly exposed to MC-producing cyanobacteria with RoundUp(®), suggesting interacting effects of MCs on biotransformation processes. The potent inhibition of detoxication systems by MCs and RoundUp(®) Flash was reversible during the depuration, during which CAT and GST activities were significantly higher in snails previously exposed to MC-producing cyanobacteria with or without RoundUp(®) Flash than in other conditions, probably related to the oxidative stress caused by accumulated MCs remaining in tissues. PMID:27267390

  17. Freshwater biogeography and limnological evolution of the Tibetan Plateau--insights from a plateau-wide distributed gastropod taxon (Radix spp..

    Parm Viktor von Oheimb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Tibetan Plateau is not only the highest and largest plateau on earth; it is also home to numerous freshwater lakes potentially harbouring endemic faunal elements. As it remains largely unknown whether these lakes have continuously existed during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, questions arise as to whether taxa have been able to exist on the plateau since before the latest Pleistocene, from where and how often the plateau was colonized, and by which mechanisms organisms conquered remote high altitude lentic freshwater systems. In this study, species of the plateau-wide distributed freshwater gastropod genus Radix are used to answer these biogeographical questions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on a broad spatial sampling of Radix spp. on the Tibetan Plateau, and phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequence data, three probably endemic and one widespread major Radix clade could be identified on the plateau. Two of the endemic clades show a remarkably high genetic diversity, indicating a relatively great phylogenetic age. Phylogeographical analyses of individuals belonging to the most widely distributed clade indicate that intra-plateau distribution cannot be explained by drainage-related dispersal alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals that Radix spp. persisted throughout the LGM on the Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, we assume the continuous existence of suitable water bodies during that time. The extant Radix diversity on the plateau might have been caused by multiple colonization events combined with a relatively long intra-plateau evolution. At least one colonization event has a Palaearctic origin. In contrast to freshwater fishes, passive dispersal, probably by water birds, might be an important mechanism for conquering remote areas on the plateau. Patterns found in Radix spp. are shared with some terrestrial plateau taxa, indicating that Radix may be a suitable model taxon for inferring general patterns of biotic

  18. Bioaccumulation of native polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from sediment by a polychaete and a gastropod: freely dissolved concentrations and activated carbon amendment.

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Breedveld, Gijs D; Naes, Kristoffer; Oen, Amy M P; Ruus, Anders

    2006-09-01

    The present paper describes a study on the bioaccumulation of native polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from three harbors in Norway using the polychaete Nereis diversicolor and the gastropod Hinia reticulata. First, biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were measured in laboratory bioassays using the original sediments. Median BSAFs were 0.004 to 0.01 kg organic carbon/kg lipid (10 PAHs and 6 organism-sediment combinations), which was a factor of 89 to 240 below the theoretical BSAF based on total sediment contents (which is approximately one). However, if BSAFs were calculated on the basis of measured freely dissolved PAH concentrations in the pore water (measured with polyoxymethylene passive samplers), it appeared that these BSAFfree values agreed well with the measured BSAFs, within a factor of 1.7 to 4.3 (median values for 10 PAHs and six organism-sediment combinations). This means that for bioaccumulation, freely dissolved pore-water concentrations appear to be a much better measure than total sediment contents. Second, we tested the effect of 2% (of sediment dry wt) activated carbon (AC) amendments on BSAE The BSAFs were significantly reduced by a factor of six to seven for N. diversicolor in two sediments (i.e., two of six organism-sediment combinations), whereas no significant reduction was observed for H. reticulata. This implies that either site-specific evaluations of AC amendment are necessary, using several site-relevant benthic organisms, or that the physiology of H. reticulata caused artifactually high BSAF values in the presence of AC. PMID:16986789

  19. Biogeography and biodiversity of gastropod molluscs from the eastern Brazilian continental shelf and slope Biogeografía y biodiversidad de moluscos gastrópodos de la plataforma y talud continental brasileño

    Gabriela Benkendorfer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogeographic distributional patterns of gastropods are proposed based on the species' geo-graphic and bathymetric distribution. Samples were collected along the Brazilian continental margin between 18° S and 23° S, at 37 stations with depths from 20 m to 1,330 m. The analysis of the biogeographic distribution patterns confirmed the existence of a transitional zone from tropical to subtropical waters in the area of both the continental shelf and slope, suggesting a relationship with water mass circulation. We observed a high species turnover rate between the shelf and slope. The analysis of gastropod species distribution revealed a similar pattern on the shelf and slope and a large difference between shallow and deep-water faunas.Los patrones de distribución biogeográfica de gastrópodos fueron propuestos basados en la distribución geográfica y batimétrica de las especies. Los muestreos fueron realizados en el margen continental brasileño entre 18°S y 23°S, en 37 estaciones de 20 m a 1.330 m de profundidad. El análisis de los patrones de distribución biogeográfica confirmó la existencia de una zona de transición de aguas tropicales a aguas subtropicales, que se encuentra en la zona de la plataforma continental y también en la zona del talud continental, esto puede sugerir una relación con la circulación de las masas de agua. Se observó una elevada tasa de turnover de las especies entre la plataforma y el talud continental. El análisis de las especies de gastrópodos reveló un patrón similar tanto en la plataforma como en el talud y una gran diferencia entre las faunas de las aguas someras y profundas.

  20. Conducta de forrajeo del gastrópodo Acanthina monodon Pallas, 1774 (Gastropoda: Muricidae en el intermareal rocoso de Chile central Foraging behavior of the gastropod Acanthina monodon Pallas, 1774 (Gastropoda: Muricidae in the intertidal rocky shores of central Chile

    RUBÉN E. SOTO

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo investigamos aspectos de la ecología y conducta de forrajeo de Acanthina monodon, un gastrópodo murícido que habita en el intermareal rocoso de Chile central. En terreno, estudiamos las variaciones temporales en su distribución, densidad y dieta. En el laboratorio, cuantificamos la tasa de consumo, las preferencias alimentarias, el tiempo de ingestión y la rentabilidad energética obtenida con distintos tipos de presas mediante experimentos y registros en video. Las mayores densidades de individuos de A. monodon fueron observadas en la franja intermareal cercana al nivel cero de marea. En terreno, A. monodon realiza sus actividades de forrajeo principalmente durante la noche y su dieta consistió principalmente de mitílidos (95 % y cirripedios (5 %. La composición de la dieta de A. monodon en terreno presentó variaciones temporales las cuales dependerían principalmente de cambios en la oferta de los distintos tipos de mitílidos presentes en terreno durante los dos años de muestreo. En el laboratorio, los individuos de Acanthina presentaron preferencias alimentarias significativas por el mitílido Semimytilus algosus. En general, A. monodon bajo condiciones de laboratorio presentó una conducta de forrajeo en la cual maximizó la ganancia neta de energía, mediante la selección de las especies y tamaños de presas que le retribuyen la mayor rentabilidad energéticaWe investigated the ecology and foraging behavior of Acanthina monodon, a muricid gastropod that inhabits in the intertidal rocky shores of central Chile. In the field, we studied temporal variation of their spatial distribution, density, and diet composition. While in the laboratory, we quantified the consumption rate, alimentary preferences, ingestion times and energy profitability obtained with different types of prey using experiments and video recording. High densities of A. monodon individuals were observed in the intertidal fringe near at the

  1. The Gastropods of Lake Eğirdir

    YILDIRIM, Mehmet Zeki

    2004-01-01

    The Gastropoda species and its distribution was investigated in Lake Eğirdir. It was determined that 5 species belonging to Gastropoda, order Prosobranchia (Theodoxus heldreichi, Valvata naticina, Graecoanatolica lacustristurca, Falsipyrgula pfeiferi and Bithynia pseudemmericia) and 7 species belonging to the order Pulmonata (Radix peregra, Stagnicola palustris, Physa fontinalis, Physa acuta, Planorbis planorbis, Planorbis carinatus and Gyraulus albus) were present. Gastropoda species from 9 ...

  2. Riesgo de establecimiento del gasterópodo dulceacuícola invasor Melanoides tuberculatus (Thiaridae en el Río de la Plata (Argentina-Uruguay Colonization risks of the invading freshwater gastropod Melanoides tuberculatus (Thiaridae in Río de la Plata (Argentina-Uruguay

    Diego E. Gutiérrez-Gregoric

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Melanoides tuberculatus es un gasterópodo cosmopolita que ha invadido y se ha establecido en casi todos los países del continente americano, desconociéndose en la mayoría de los casos el origen de su introducción. En este trabajo se menciona el riesgo de establecimiento de esta especie en áreas de influencia del Río de la Plata como consecuencia de su registro en acuarios de la ciudad de La Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina dedicados a la venta de flora y fauna limnética. A principios de 2009, la especie fue identificada a partir de 26 ejemplares procedentes de un comercio, siendo éste el registro más austral de la especie para una localidad de la cuenca del Plata. Revisiones posteriores en 3 locales comerciales de la ciudad confirmaron la presencia de la especie en 2 de ellos. Dicha presencia se relacionó con la adquisición de plantas ornamentales por parte de los establecimientos. La identificación del gasterópodo en la ciudad de La Plata debe considerarse cuidadosamente, debido a las posibles consecuencias que tendría la liberación accidental de este molusco en el Río de la Plata en lo relacionado con el desplazamiento de fauna local y salud pública.Melanoides tuberculatus is a cosmopolitan gastropod that has invaded and has now spread into most countries of the American continent. Introduction pathways remain unknown in most cases. This work draws attention on the colonization risks of this species in the Río de la Plata area as a consequence of its record in flower and pet shops - in the city of La Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina - in which limnic species are sold. The species was identified at the beginning of 2009 within a lot of 29 specimens from a shop, and this is the southernmost record of this species in the Plata Basin. Subsequent surveys in 3 commercial shops in the same city revealed its presence in 2 of them. This was related to the purchase of ornamental plants by the shops. Identification of this species in the

  3. Variabilidad geográfica en la tolerancia térmica y economía hídrica del gastrópodo intermareal Nodilittorina peruviana (Gastropoda: Littorinidae, Lamarck, 1822 Geographic variability in thermal tolerance and water economy of the intertidal gastropod Nodilittorina peruviana. (Gastropoda: Littorinidae, Lamarck, 1822

    JOSE MIGUEL ROJAS

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available El gastrópodo Nodilittorina peruviana es un habitante común de la zona intermareal rocosa de la costa norte y centro de Chile. Las poblaciones de esta especie se caracterizan por presentar distribuciones agregadas. Por medio de mediciones de terreno y ensayos de laboratorio se evaluó la influencia de la agregación sobre las habilidades de termorregulación y conservación de agua, en individuos pertenecientes a dos localidades de la costa de Chile que presentan distintos regímenes termales (Taltal 25º 25' S; 70º 29' W y Las Cruces 33º 35' S; 71º 38' W. Los resultados indican que la influencia de la agregación sobre las habilidades termorregulatorias es dependiente de las condiciones locales. A pesar de que los individuos de ambas localidades presentaron puntos de tolerancia térmica similares, los caracoles de Taltal mostraron tasas de pérdidas de agua menores. El tamaño de las agregaciones se relacionó en forma negativa con la tasa de pérdida de agua de los individuos de ambas localidades. En el caso de Taltal se observó un límite de tolerancia menor que en Las Cruces y una relación positiva entre tamaño de la agregación y temperatura grupal. Los resultados demuestran que las condiciones ambientales locales puede ser determinante para la efectividad de los mecanismos de termorregulación.The gastropod Nodilittorina peruviana inhabit rocky intertidal of the north and center Chile. Populations of this species exhibits aggregated distributions. Through field and lab records we studied the effect of spatial distribution of snails on their thermoregulatory and water conservation efficiencies. We studied individuals from two localities of the Chilean coast with different climatic conditions (Taltal 25° 25 ` S; 70° 29 ` W and Las Cruces 33° 35 ` S; 71° 38 ` W. Results indicate that the influence of spatial distribution thermoregulatory efficiency is dependent of the local conditions. Although individuals from both localities

  4. Acetylcholinesterase activity in marine gastropods as biomarker of neurotoxic contaminants

    Sarkar, A.; Gaitonde, D.C.S.; Vashistha, D.

    activity was expressed as the micro moles of acetic acid liberated per mg of proteins per minute and shown in term of arbitrary units. The AChE activity was compared with respect to that from a relatively uncontaminated region (Anjuna) along the Goa coast...

  5. Spatially explicit analysis of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; S. Trajanovski; Wilke, T.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and their biota. While research on ancient lakes has contributed significantly to our understanding of evolutionary processes, statistically sound studies of spatial ...

  6. Spatially explicit analyses of gastropod biodiversity in ancient Lake Ohrid

    Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Schreiber, K.; Birkhofer, K.; S. Trajanovski; Wilke, T.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of biodiversity arises from evolutionary processes, constraints of environmental factors and the interaction of communities. The quality of such spatial analyses of biodiversity is improved by (i) utilizing study areas with well defined physiogeographical boundaries, (ii) limiting the impact of widespread species, and (iii) using taxa with heterogeneous distributions. These conditions are typically met by ecosystems such as oceanic islands or ancient lakes and the...

  7. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  8. Rodriguesic acids, modified diketopiperazines from the gastropod mollusc Pleurobranchus areolatus

    Pereira, Fabio R.; Santos, Mario F.C.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S., E-mail: rgsberlinck@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Williams, David E.; Andersen, Raymond J. [Departments of Chemistry and Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Padula, Vinicius [SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München, München, Germany and Department Biology II and GeoBio-Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, (Germany); Ferreira, Antonio G. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-04-15

    In the present investigation, two specimens of the nudipleuran mollusc Pleurobranchus areolatus have shown to accumulate oxidized rodriguesin A derivatives. Rodriguesic acid presents a carboxylic acid replacing the terminal methyl group of the alkyl chain of rodriguesin A. A hydroxamate group was also present on the diketopiperazine moiety of a rodriguesic acid derivative. The structures of both rodriguesic acid and of rodriguesic acid hydroxamate have been established by analysis of spectroscopic data, including their absolute configuration. Two methyl esters of the rodriguesic acids have been isolated as major compounds, but were considered to be isolation artifacts. (author)

  9. Effects of different concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene on antioxidant enzymes in gastropod abalone,Haliotis diversicolor%不同浓度苯并(a)芘对杂色鲍抗氧化酶活性的影响

    刘洁; 林智勇; 王克坚

    2014-01-01

    为阐释不同浓度苯并(a)芘[B(a)P]对杂色鲍(Haliotis diversicolor)的毒性效应,以0.02、0.04和0.08 mg/dm33个质量浓度的B(a)P对杂色鲍进行水体暴露胁迫,7d后检测肌肉、外套膜、鳃、性腺、肾和肝胰腺的超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化氢酶(CAT)、谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(GST)和谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶(GPx)活性及还原型谷胱甘肽(GSH)含量.结果显示:0.02 mg/dm3的B(a)P暴露对杂色鲍抗氧化系统的影响不明显,而0.04、0.08 mg/dm3的B(a)P则显著抑制了SOD、CAT和GPx酶活性以及GSH含量,同时对GST酶活性具有显著的诱导作用;实验还发现,不同组织抗氧化酶活性对B(a)P胁迫的敏感性响应存在较大差异,其中鳃、肾脏和肝胰腺的敏感性响应明显高于肌肉和外套膜.上述结果表明,苯并(a)芘暴露对杂色鲍抗氧化酶活性的影响具有明显的剂量-效应关系及组织差异性,杂色鲍的鳃、肾脏或者肝胰腺的抗氧化酶响应多环芳香烃胁迫的更敏感,可作为B(a)P污染的生物标志物.%To reveal the ecotoxicological effects of benzo(a)pyrene[B(a)P]on gastropod abalone,Haliotis diversi-color,the effects of different concentrations of B(a)P (0.02,0.04 and 0.08 mg/dm3 )were studied on antioxidant defense system of H.diversicolor.The results showed that the antioxidant enzymes activities showed little difference for the animals exposed to 0.02 mg/dm3 B(a)P compared with the control.In 0.04 mg/dm3 and 0.08 mg/dm3 groups,the activities of SOD,CAT,GPx and the contents of GSH were significant inhibited by B(a)P exposure, while the GST activities were significantly induced.The activities of antioxidant enzymes were also significantly dif-ferent among the tissues,suggesting the exist of remarkable different physiological functions and responses to B(a)P content.In summary,the antioxidant enzymes activities of exposure to

  10. Evaluation of impairment of DNA in marine gastropod, Morula granulata as a biomarker of marine pollution.

    Sarkar, A.; Bhagat, J.; Sarker, S.

    , Goa 403004, India b Global Enviro-Care, Kevnem, Caranzalem, Goa 403002, India c Clinical Division of Fish Medicine, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinarplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November... to cause severe damage to the genetic material directly or indirectly. Among the direct genotoxicants, alkylating agents, like hydrogen peroxides and pesticides, etc., are significant whereas indirect toxicity depends on the mechanisms of metabolic...

  11. Measurement of DNA integrity in marine gastropods as biomarker of genotoxicity

    Sarkar, A.; Vashistha, D.; Gupta, N.; Malik, K.; Gaitonde, D.C.S.

    ., 2006; IARC. 1980; IARC 1990; IARC. 1991; IARC. 1993). Thus, it has become a global concern to assess the state of marine pollution by genotoxic compounds and to prevent any catastrophe to occur. In view of the increasing trend of environmental... integrity from Arambol to Velsao Nerita chameleon (26.92% – 43.63%), Morula granulata (34.75% - 82.22%) and Cerethedia cingulata (34.34%). The number of strand breaks per alkaline unwinding unit was determined with respect to the reference site (Tirakol...

  12. Toxicity of oil dispersant, crude oil and dispersed crude oil to a marine amphipod and gastropod

    Gulec, I.; Holdway, D.A. [RMIT, Melbourne (Australia). Oil Spill Research Group

    1995-12-31

    The importance of appropriate oil spill remedial action was emphasized during the recent Iron Barron oil spill off of the Tamar river in North Tasmania. One important potential oil spill response is dispersion, but little information exists on the toxicity of dispersants and dispersed oil to Australian marine species. This research was undertaken to assess the acute toxicity of Corexit 9527 (a widely used dispersant), water accommodated fractions of Bass Strait crude oil and dispersed Bass Strait crude oil, to the saltwater amphipod, Allorchestes compressa under semi-static conditions. Acute 96 h LC50`s were determined for each toxicant as well as for the reference toxicants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and zinc sulfate. Sublethal bioassays were undertaken for the same 3 toxicants utilizing the marines and snail Polinices conicus as the test species. No-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC) and lowest-observed-effect-concentrations (LOEC) were determined using ANOVA while EC50`s and EC0`s were calculated using regression analysis. Mean acute 96 h LC50 (S.E.) values for A. compressa exposed to SDS and zinc sulfate were 3.6 mg/l (0.28) and 41.6 mg/l (9.01) respectively. EC50 (S.E.) concentrations for P. conicus exposed to SDS and zinc sulfate for 30 minutes were 44.7 mg/l and 246 mg/l respectively using burying behavior as an endpoint. These sublethal EC50`s were reduced to 20.7 mg/l for SDS and 23.5 mg/l for zinc sulfate following 24 hours of exposure.

  13. Antidiabetic potential and secondary metabolites screening of mangrove gastropod Cerithidea obtusa

    Reni Tri Cahyani; Sri Purwaningsih; Azrifitria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible effects of Cerithidea obtusa extract as antidiabetic and to screen the secondary metabolites presence. Methods: Antidiabetic activity of Cerithidea obtusa extract was measured in vitro usingα-glucosidase inhibition method. Whereas, secondary metabolites screening was measured qualitatively. Results: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 36.40 mg/mL). However, the control drug acarbose had significantly higher antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 0.32 mg/mL). Secondary metabolites screening showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenoids and saponins. Conclusions: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity and the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids and triterpenoids might contribute to the activity.

  14. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noelle; Forbes, Valery E; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing...... particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity...... sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu...

  15. Evolution of shell loss in Opisthobranch gastropods: sea hares (Opisthobranchia, Anaspidea) as a model system

    Vue, Zer

    2009-01-01

    Due to the advantages of the hard, calcifying shell, the Mollusca are one of the most successful animal phyla. The shell forms during embryonic and larval development; however, many molluscan groups have a highly reduced shell or have lost it completely as development and maturation proceeds. These major developmental transitions in shell morphology frequently correlate with ecological transitions (e.g. diet change/change from planktonic to bethic existence pre- and post-met...

  16. Antidiabetic potential and secondary metabolites screening of mangrove gastropod Cerithidea obtusa

    Reni Tri Cahyani; Sri Purwaningsih; Azrifitria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible effects of Cerithidea obtusa extract as antidiabetic and to screen the secondary metabolites presence. Methods: Antidiabetic activity of Cerithidea obtusa extract was measured in vitro using α-glucosidase inhibition method. Whereas, secondary metabolites screening was measured qualitatively. Results: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 36.40 mg/mL). However, the control drug acarbose had significantly higher antidiabetic ac...

  17. Some ecological aspects and potential threats to an intertidal gastropod, Umbonium vestiarium

    Sivadas, S.; Ingole, B.S.; Sen, A.

    Kalbadevi Bay in Ratgnairi has been identified as potential site for placer mining along the west coast of India. Since, Umbonium vestiarium is a keystone species of the region; study on some ecological aspect was carried out. The paper also...

  18. First proteome of the egg perivitelline fluid of a freshwater gastropod with aerial oviposition

    Sun, Jin

    2012-08-03

    Pomacea canaliculata is a freshwater snail that deposits eggs on solid substrates above the water surface. Previous studies have emphasized the nutritional and protective functions of the three most abundant perivitelline fluid (PVF) protein complexes (ovorubin, PV2, and PV3) during its embryonic development, but little is known about the structure and function of other less abundant proteins. Using 2-DE, SDS-PAGE, MALDI TOF/TOF, and LC-MS/MS, we identified 59 proteins from the PVF of P. canaliculata, among which 19 are novel. KEGG analysis showed that the functions of the majority of these proteins are "unknown" (n = 34), "environmental information processing" (10), 9 of which are related to innate immunity, and "metabolism" (7). Suppressive subtractive hybridization revealed 21 PVF genes to be specific to the albumen gland, indicating this organ is the origin of many of the PVF proteins. Further, the 3 ovorubin subunits were identified with 30.2-35.0% identity among them, indicating their common origin but ancient duplications. Characterization of the PVF proteome has opened the gate for further studies aiming to understand the evolution of the novel proteins and their contribution to the switch to aerial oviposition. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    K. Föller; B. Stelbrink; Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four modes are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher ...

  20. Gastropod diversification and community structuring processes in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    2015-01-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most speciose freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether the diversification of its endemic taxa is mainly driven by neutral processes, environmental factors, or species interactions. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics. Such a unifying framework – the metacommunity speciation model – considers how community assembly affect...

  1. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    K. Föller; B. Stelbrink; Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four types are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial ph...

  2. Ocean Warming and CO2-Induced Acidification Impact the Lipid Content of a Marine Predatory Gastropod

    Roselyn Valles-Regino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean warming and acidification are current global environmental challenges impacting aquatic organisms. A shift in conditions outside the optimal environmental range for marine species is likely to generate stress that could impact metabolic activity, with consequences for the biosynthesis of marine lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the lipid content of Dicathais orbita exposed to current and predicted future climate change scenarios. The whelks were exposed to a combination of temperature and CO2-induced acidification treatments in controlled flowthrough seawater mesocosms for 35 days. Under current conditions, D. orbita foot tissue has an average of 6 mg lipid/g tissue, but at predicted future ocean temperatures, the total lipid content dropped significantly, to almost half. The fatty acid composition is dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 52% with an n-3:6 fatty acid ratio of almost 2, which remains unchanged under future ocean conditions. However, we detected an interactive effect of temperature and pCO2 on the % PUFAs and n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were significantly reduced by elevated water temperature, while both the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly reduced under increased pCO2 acidifying conditions. The present study indicates the potential for relatively small predicted changes in ocean conditions to reduce lipid reserves and alter the fatty acid composition of a predatory marine mollusc. This has potential implications for the growth and survivorship of whelks under future conditions, but only minimal implications for human consumption of D. orbita as nutritional seafood are predicted.

  3. Predator-induced behavioral and morphological plasticity in the tropical marine Gastropod Strombus gigas.

    Delgado, Gabriel A; Glazer, Robert A; Stewart, Nicola J

    2002-08-01

    Florida queen conch stocks once supported a significant fishery, but overfishing prompted the state of Florida to institute a harvest moratorium in 1985. Despite the closure of the fishery, the queen conch population has been slow to recover. One method used in the efforts to restore the Florida conch population has been to release hatchery-reared juvenile conch into the wild; however, suboptimal predator avoidance responses and lighter shell weights relative to their wild counterparts have been implicated in the high mortality rates of released hatchery juveniles. We conducted a series of experiments in which hatchery-reared juvenile conch were exposed to a predator, the spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), to determine whether they could develop behavioral and morphological characteristics that would improve survival. Experiments were conducted in tanks with a calcareous sand substrate to simulate a natural environment. Conditioned conch were exposed to caged lobsters while conch in the control tanks were exposed to empty cages. Conditioned conch moved significantly less and buried themselves more frequently than the naive control conch. Morphometric data indicated that the conditioned conch grew at a significantly slower rate than the naive conch, but the shell weights of the two groups were not significantly different. This implies that the conditioned conch had thicker or denser shells than the control group. As a result, the conditioned conch had significantly higher survival than naive conch in a subsequent predation experiment in which a lobster was allowed to roam free in each tank for 24 hours. In the future, the conditioning protocols documented in this study will be used to increase the survival of hatchery-reared conch in the wild. PMID:12200261

  4. Biological and physical contributions to the accumulation of strombid gastropods in a Pliocene shell bed

    Geary, D.H. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)); Allmon, W.D. (Univ. of South Florida, Tampa (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Before the evolutionary and ecological information contained in shell beds can be interpreted, the conditions of shell bed formation must be understood. Here the authors investigate the mode and time scale of accumulation of a dense layer of Strombus floridanus in the Pliocene Pinecrest Beds of Florida. They utilize a variety of comparative taphonomic data, including the extent of encrustation and boring on strombid shells of different ontogenetic ages, and on accompanying pelecypods of different ecological types. The taphonomic comparisons enable them to reconstruct more accurately the events of shell bed formation. The formation of the strombid shell layer involved both biological and physical components. The characteristically gregarious behavior of Strombus is reflected in the large number of individuals preserved in this layer. Based on average densities of individuals in strombid colonies today, the authors estimate that a time period of tens to hundreds of years was required to accumulate these fossils. Repeated sediment winnowing by storms, followed by rapid reburial in a regime of at least episodically high sedimentation rates, is the most likely mechanism of accumulation, and accounts for the observed patterns of encrustation and boring on the shells of Strombus and various associated pelecypods. The origin of Florida's Plio-Pleistocene shelly sands is poorly understood; analysis of this bed may provide a working model for future taphonomic studies.

  5. Endozoic algae in shelled gastropods — a new symbiotic association in coral reefs?

    Berner, T.; Wishkovsky, A.; Dubinsky, Z.

    1986-10-01

    Live algae were found in the hepatopancreas and gonads of the Red Sea snail Strombus tricornis. These organs are constantly concealed within the upper whorls of the snail's shell. Light penetration was 5 15% of the incident light reaching the shell. Pigment analysis indicated the presence of chlorophyll a, c and peridinin, a composition resembling the Dinoflagellata. Chlorophyll a concentration in the algae was 1.18±0.36 pg chl/cell. 14C assimilation of isolated algae incubated in the light exceeded that of dark controls, demonstrating the photosynthetic activity of the endozoic algae.

  6. Genotoxic potency of mercuric chloride in gill cells of marine gastropod Planaxis sulcatus using comet assay

    Bhagat, J.; Ingole, B.S.

    Introduction The increase in the discharge of genotoxic chemical from either industrial or municipal waste waters into the aquatic ecosystem has become a great concern to environmentalists around the world. Heavy metals are of great ecological concern due... in sediments and coastal waters of India are presented in table 1. Karunasagar et al., 2006 has reported mercury pollution in Kodaikanal lake due to a thermometer factory. Aquatic mercury pollution of the Ulhas estuary, India have been reported by Ram et al...

  7. Genetic diversification in the Tropical Western Atlantic Ocean: Phylogeography of the gastropod Bulla occidentalis

    Aarø, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    The region under study is the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA) which includes the Caribbean Sea with adjacent coastlines, the Gulf of Mexico, Bermuda and the coast of South America down to the tropical/temperate transitional zone near Uruguay. There are several examples of genetic breaks within the Caribbean that have been attributed to oceanographic factors, transient allopatry, as well as ecological factors, but no common biogeographical pattern has been found and mechanisms behind div...

  8. Relationships and origin of endemic Lake Baikal gastropods (Caenogastropoda: Rissooidea) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Hausdorf, Bernhard; Röpstorf, Peter; Riedel, Frank

    2003-03-01

    The phylogenetic relationships and the origin of two groups of rissooid freshwater snails endemic to Lake Baikal were investigated using partial mitochondrial COI, 12S rDNA, and 16S rDNA sequences. The Baikalian Benedictiinae proved to be closely related to the Lithoglyphinae. According to a molecular clock estimate the two groups diverged in the Paleogene. The Benedictiinae might have evolved autochthonously in precursors of Lake Baikal. The Baikalian Baicaliidae are probably most closely related to the Amnicolidae and the Bithyniidae. These groups diverged at the latest during the Cretaceous. Thus the origin of the Baicaliidae predates the origin of the Baikal rift zone. The Baicaliidae evolved probably in other Central Asian freshwater reservoirs. However, the radiation of the extant Baicaliidae only started in the Neogene and might have occurred autochthonously in Lake Baikal. The conchological similarity of the Baicaliidae and the Pyrgulidae is due to convergence. The Pyrgulidae diverged from the common stem lineage of the other hydrobiid families at the latest in the Jurassic. The Bithyniidae is derived from hydrobiids and is related to the Amnicolidae. PMID:12644402

  9. Foraminiferan Prey in the Annual Life-cycle of the Predatory Opisthobranch Gastropod Retusa obtusa (Montagu)

    Berry, A. J.

    1994-06-01

    From February to June species of Foraminifera were the only food found in gizzards of young Retusa obtusa (Montagu) in the Forth Estuary, Scotland. Then, in July, newly settled Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant) also began to be eaten although foraminiferans continued to be consumed in increasing frequency until September. Foraminiferans became scarce in R. obtusa from October to January during which time H. ulvae increasingly dominated the diet. Foraminiferans and H. ulvae both reached their highest frequencies in the gizzards of adults during February-April. Finally, foraminiferans became predominant again as H. ulvae became rare in older, post-reproductive R. obtusa in April and May prior to the death of predators in May and June. The highest count was 31 foraminiferans in one gizzard, the overall mean was 5·6 per gizzard and monthly means ranged from 1·6 in January to 9·7 in February 1993. Throughout most of the period of predation on H. ulvae (August-January), counts of foraminiferans were markedly higher in those gizzards which lacked H. ulvae than where H. ulvae was also present. Only earlier (July) and later (February and March), did counts with H. ulvae present approach and even exceed (in March) those where H. ulvae was absent. Foraminiferans in the gizzards reflected the mudflat population in species composition [almost all Haynesina germanica (Ehrenburg)]. Yet the snails, even the biggest ones, largely restricted their diet to the smaller foraminiferans (mostly 100-150 μm diameter), rarely taking the abundant individuals measuring 200-350 μm. Foraminiferans were cleared from the gizzard in ˜12 h, implying maximum consumption in the field of ˜4800 Foraminifera m -2 day -1 in September, and a total of ˜2747 by a single R. obtusa in the course of a year's growth from February to February, after which the biggest specimens of R. obtusa soon die. It is estimated that foraminiferans supply ˜60% more food than do H. ulvae during a lifetimes's growth but that H. ulvae become most important during late growth and reproduction.

  10. A gastropod scavenger serving as paratenic host for larval helminth communities in shore crabs

    Latham, A D M; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; McFarland, L H; Poulin, R

    2003-01-01

    The whelk Cominella glandiformis is an important predator-scavenger of New Zealand intertidal ecosystems; a few whelks can quickly eat all the soft tissues of recently dead crabs. In this study, we demonstrate that whelks can also ingest and act as paratenic hosts for at least 4 helminth species ...

  11. Pleistocene gastropods from Toca da Esperança, municipality of Central, State of Bahia, Brazil

    Lais Clark Lima

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Fossil shells collected during excavations in Toca da Esperança, BA, were identified on morphological grounds as: Artemon intermedius intermedius (Albers, 1857; Gastrocopta (Privatula corticaria (Say; Bulimulus (Rhinus heterotrichus (Moricand, 1836 and Polygyratia polygyrata polygyrata (Born, 1780. Bone samples found associated with these shells were dated by the Uranium - Thorium method as being between 204,000 and 295,000 years old (Middle - Upper Pleistocene. Species of the mastofauna also found associated, on the other hand, were identified as being of the Upper Pleistocene or even of the beginning of the Holocene. The material studied here was not dated.

  12. Attachment to gastropod veliger shells - a possible mechanism of dispersal in benthic foraminiferans

    Cedhagen, Tomas; Middelfart, Peter

    1998-01-01

    that the swimming veliger larva is able to carry this load. Most other dispersal mechanisms described in foraminiferans occur in shallow water or are of local importance. In contrast to them, this mechanism may be important for long- distance dispersal also over the sublittoral or in the deep-sea and...

  13. Novel Forms of Structural Integration between Microbes and a Hydrothermal Vent Gastropod from the Indian Ocean

    Goffredi, Shana K.; Warén, Anders; Orphan, Victoria J; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    Here we describe novel forms of structural integration between endo- and episymbiotic microbes and an unusual new species of snail from hydrothermal vents in the Indian Ocean. The snail houses a dense population of {gamma}-proteobacteria within the cells of its greatly enlarged esophageal gland. This tissue setting differs from that of all other vent mollusks, which harbor sulfur-oxidizing endosymbionts in their gills. The significantly reduced digestive tract, the isotopic signatures of the ...

  14. Novel forms of structural integration between microbes and a hydrothermal vent gastropod from the Indian Ocean.

    Goffredi, Shana K; Warén, Anders; Orphan, Victoria J; Van Dover, Cindy L; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2004-05-01

    Here we describe novel forms of structural integration between endo- and episymbiotic microbes and an unusual new species of snail from hydrothermal vents in the Indian Ocean. The snail houses a dense population of gamma-proteobacteria within the cells of its greatly enlarged esophageal gland. This tissue setting differs from that of all other vent mollusks, which harbor sulfur-oxidizing endosymbionts in their gills. The significantly reduced digestive tract, the isotopic signatures of the snail tissues, and the presence of internal bacteria suggest a dependence on chemoautotrophy for nutrition. Most notably, this snail is unique in having a dense coat of mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, a feature seen in no other living metazoan. The scales are coated with iron sulfides (pyrite and greigite) and heavily colonized by epsilon- and delta-proteobacteria, likely participating in mineralization of the sclerites. This novel metazoan-microbial collaboration illustrates the great potential of organismal adaptation in chemically and physically challenging deep-sea environments. PMID:15128570

  15. Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) Concentrations in Marine Gastropod Strombus Canarium in Johor Coastal Areas

    Strombus canarium is a popular food source with high commercial value in southern part of Peninsular Malaysia. As a deposit feeder, Strombus canarium can accumulate pollutants especially heavy metals in their system. Study on this species was conducted at Teluk Sengat and Mersing, Johor where samples of seawater and Strombus canarium were collected during spring low tides around 0 to 0.2 meters. Lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were investigated to determine pollution status in the area. Samples from Teluk Sengat showed that Zn has higher concentration in both water and S. canarium with 0.055 mg/ L and 20.257 mg/ kg wet weight respectively. However the concentrations were within permissible limit of Malaysia Marine Water Quality Criteria and Standard (MMWQS). In contrast, Pb concentration at Teluk Sengat exceeded the MMWQS and its concentration in soft tissues of S. canarium also exceeded the permissible limit recommended by Food and Agriculture Organisation (0.5 mg/ kg wet weight) and World Health Organisation (0.2 mg/ kg wet weight). (author)

  16. Escalation and trophic specialization drive adaptive radiation of freshwater gastropods in ancient lakes on Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Rintelen, Thomas von; Wilson, Anthony Bruce; Meyer, Axel; Glaubrecht, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Species flocks in ancient lakes have long been appreciated as ideal model systems for the study of speciation and adaptive processes. We here present data from a new invertebrate model system with intrinsic parameters distinct from those of other documented radiations. The ancient lakes on Sulawesi harbour an endemic species flock of at least 33 species of viviparous snails. Molecular data reveal multiple independent colonizations of the lakes by riverine ancestors. In each colonizing clade, ...

  17. Evolution of poecilogony from planktotrophy: cryptic speciation, phylogeography, and larval development in the gastropod genus Alderia.

    Ellingson, Ryan A; Krug, Patrick J

    2006-11-01

    Poecilogony, a rare phenomenon in marine invertebrates, occurs when alternative larval morphs differing in dispersal potential or trophic mode are produced from a single genome. Because both poecilogony and cryptic species are prevalent among sea slugs in the suborder Sacoglossa (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia), molecular data are needed to confirm cases of variable development and to place them in a phylogenetic context. The nominal species Alderia modesta produces long-lived, feeding larvae throughout the North Atlantic and Pacific, but in California can also produce short-lived larvae that metamorphose without feeding. We collected morphological, developmental, and molecular data for Alderia from 17 sites spanning the eastern and western Pacific and North Atlantic. Estuaries south of Bodega Harbor, California, contained a cryptic species (hereafter Alderia sp.) with variable development, sister to the strictly planktotrophic A. modesta. The smaller Alderia sp. seasonally toggled between planktotrophy and lecithotrophy, with some individuals differing in development but sharing mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. The sibling species overlapped in Tomales Bay, California, but showed no evidence of hybridization; laboratory mating trials suggest postzygotic isolation has arisen. Intra- and interspecific divergence times were estimated using a molecular clock calibrated with geminate sacoglossans. Speciation occurred about 4.1 million years ago during a major marine radiation in the eastern Pacific, when large inland embayments in California may have isolated ancestral populations. Atlantic and Pacific A. modesta diverged about 1.7 million years ago, suggesting trans-Arctic gene flow was interrupted by Pleistocene glaciation. Both Alderia species showed evidence of late Pleistocene population expansion, but the southern Alderia sp. likely experienced a more pronounced bottleneck. Reduced body size may have incurred selection against obligate planktotrophy in Alderia sp. by limiting fecundity in the face of high larval mortality rates in warm months. Alternatively, poecilogony may be an adaptive response to seasonal opening of estuaries, facilitating dispersal by long-lived larvae. An improved understanding of the forces controlling seasonal shifts in development in Alderia sp. may yield insight into the evolutionary forces promoting transitions to nonfeeding larvae. PMID:17236422

  18. Discrete potential waves in the photoreceptors of a gastropod mollusc, Hermissenda crassicornis.

    Takeda, T

    1982-01-01

    Intracellular recording of dark adapted photoreceptors of Hermissenda crassicornis (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda, Mollusca) revealed the occurrence of depolarizing waves even after blockade of synaptic transmission and postsynaptic potentials by application of low Ca2+ and high Mg2+ solution. Dim illumination increased the frequency of depolarizing waves. These observations show that Hermissenda photoreceptors have discrete waves which have been demonstrated mainly in arthropod photoreceptors. An histogram of intervals between successive discrete waves under continuous dim illumination was exponential, which is characteristic of a Poisson process. Frequency of discrete waves increased linearly depending on numbers of incident photons to the eye. Comparison of probabilities of eliciting a response to brief dim flashes of various intensities to theoretical Poisson sum curves, together with statistical analysis, indicate that the absorption of single photon is sufficient to evoke a discrete wave. PMID:7101766

  19. Shells of Nerita gastropod bio-monitors of heavy metals pollution around the Indian Ocean

    Minor and heavy metals Mg, Sr, Mn, Fe and Zn were measured in individual shells of four different Nerita species collected from Phuket Island, Thailand. Shell weight and crystallography were also recorded. Heavy metal concentrations were poorly correlated with both shell weight and crystallography. Out of the four species, N. albicilla acquired the highest heavy metal concentrations. Subsequently shells of N. albicilla collected from different sites around the Indian Ocean were compared for their metal concentrations. Shells of industrial sites in Kenya and India had significantly higher heavy metal concentrations than shells from pristine sites in Mauritius and Aldabra. Discussing the factors that may affect the shell metal concentration, the variations encountered herein are best attributed to the ambient bio-available metal concentration. (author)

  20. Assembly and annotation of a non-model gastropod (Nerita melanotragus) transcriptome: a comparison of De novo assemblers

    Amin, Shorash; Prentis, Peter J.; Gilding, Edward K.; Pavasovic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background The sequencing, de novo assembly and annotation of transcriptome datasets generated with next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled biologists to answer genomic questions in non-model species with unprecedented ease. Reliable and accurate de novo assembly and annotation of transcriptomes, however, is a critically important step for transcriptome assemblies generated from short read sequences. Typical benchmarks for assembly and annotation reliability have been performed with mode...

  1. X-irradiation effects on growth and metamorphosis of gastropod larvae (Crepidula fornicata): A model for environmental radiation teratogenesis

    Little information is available on the effects of x-irradiation on multicellular marine organisms. C. fornicata larvae were irradiated at 200 rad/min, 250 kVp x-rays to doses between 50 and 20,000 rad in a single fraction. Shell length, biomass, metamorphosis to the next stage of development, and mortality were measured. The results demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in 20 day shell length at doses above 2000 rad (control 850 +- 110 μm length, 820 +- 100μm for 50 rad, 750 +- 30 μm for 2000 rad, 710 +- 30 μm for 5000 rad, 620 +- 30 μm for 10,000 rad, 580 +- 15 μm for 20,000 rad). There was a dose dependent decrease in shell length growth between days 1 and 20. Biomass was significantly decreased per 100μm shell length for doses above 10,000 rad. A significant increase in larvae mortality was detected with doses above 2000 rad. Most significantly, the cumulative percent of larval metamorphosis was significantly decreased by doses as low as 500 rad and was detectable as early as 18 days after irradiation. C. fornicata may provide a very sensitive system in which to study teratogenic effects of x-irradiation on multicellular organisms

  2. The Gastropod Menace: Slugs on Brassica Plants Affect Caterpillar Survival through Consumption and Interference with Parasitoid Attraction.

    Desurmont, Gaylord A; Zemanova, Miriam A; Turlings, Ted C J

    2016-03-01

    Terrestrial molluscs and insect herbivores play a major role as plant consumers in a number of ecosystems, but their direct and indirect interactions have hardly been explored. The omnivorous nature of slugs makes them potential disrupters of predator-prey relationships, as a direct threat to small insects and through indirect, plant-mediated effects. Here, we examined the effects of the presence of two species of slugs, Arion rufus (native) and A. vulgaris (invasive) on the survivorship of young Pieris brassicae caterpillars when feeding on Brassica rapa plants, and on plant attractiveness to the main natural enemy of P. brassicae, the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata. In two separate predation experiments, caterpillar mortality was significantly higher on plants co-infested with A. rufus or A. vulgaris. Moreover, caterpillar mortality correlated positively with slug mass and leaf consumption by A. vulgaris. At the third trophic level, plants infested with slugs and plants co-infested with slugs and caterpillars were far less attractive to parasitoids than plants damaged by caterpillars only, independently of slug species. Chemical analyses confirmed that volatile emissions, which provide foraging cues for parasitoids, were strongly reduced in co-infested plants. Our study shows that the presence of slugs has the potential to affect insect populations, directly via consumptive effects, and indirectly via changes in plant volatiles that result in a reduced attraction of natural enemies. The fitness cost for P. brassicae imposed by increased mortality in presence of slugs may be counterbalanced by the benefit of escaping its parasitoids. PMID:27002323

  3. THE EFFECTS OF OCEAN ACIDIFICATION AND SEA SURFACE WARMING ON THE EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE OPISTHOBRANCH GASTROPOD STYLOCHEILUS STRIATUS

    Allen, Trevor Riley

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO2 compound the rates of long-term changes in the abiotic conditions of the Earth’s oceans. Because many physiological processes, including calcification rate, depend on these physical factors, there is mounting concern over how changes in temperature (T) and the CaCO3 saturation of seawater will affect marine organisms.  These effects may be particularly relevant during development— many organisms produce protective calcified structures critical for pe...

  4. Effects of test design and temperature in a partial life-cycle study with the freshwater gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    Macken, Ailbhe; Le Page, Gareth; Hayfield, Amanda; Williams, Timothy D; Brown, Rebecca J

    2012-09-01

    Potamopyrgus antipodarum is a candidate for a standardized mollusk partial life-cycle study. This is a comparative study of two test designs (microplate and beaker), with additional endpoints to the proposed guideline methods, for example, tracking of continuous reproductive output over 28 d and attributing it to individual female snails. In addition, an investigation of the effects of temperature (16, 20, and 25°C) on reproduction was also conducted employing the microplate design. PMID:22573501

  5. Genotoxicity of cadmium chloride in the marine gastropod Nerita chamaeleon using comet assay and alkaline unwinding assay

    Sarkar, A.; Bhagat, J.; Ingole, B.S.; Rao, P.V.S.S.D.P.; Markad, V.L.

    of DNA damage in gill cells of N. chamaeleon was measured after in vivo exposure to four different concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 75 mu g/L) of CdCl2. In vitro exposure of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 1, 10, 25, and 50 mu M...

  6. Conservation of ParaHox genes' function in patterning of the digestive tract of the marine gastropod Gibbula varia

    Steiner Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of all three ParaHox genes has been described in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans, but to date one of these three genes, Xlox has not been reported from any ecdysozoan taxa and both Xlox and Gsx are absent in nematodes. There is evidence that the ParaHox genes were ancestrally a single chromosomal cluster. Colinear expression of the ParaHox genes in anterior, middle, and posterior tissues of several species studied so far suggest that these genes may be responsible for axial patterning of the digestive tract. So far, there are no data on expression of these genes in molluscs. Results We isolated the complete coding sequences of the three Gibbula varia ParaHox genes, and then tested their expression in larval and postlarval development. In Gibbula varia, the ParaHox genes participate in patterning of the digestive tract and are expressed in some cells of the neuroectoderm. The expression of these genes coincides with the gradual formation of the gut in the larva. Gva-Gsx patterns potential neural precursors of cerebral ganglia as well as of the apical sensory organ. During larval development this gene is involved in the formation of the mouth and during postlarval development it is expressed in the precursor cells involved in secretion of the radula, the odontoblasts. Gva-Xolx and Gva-Cdx are involved in gut patterning in the middle and posterior parts of digestive tract, respectively. Both genes are expressed in some ventral neuroectodermal cells; however the expression of Gva-Cdx fades in later larval stages while the expression of Gva-Xolx in these cells persists. Conclusions In Gibbula varia the ParaHox genes are expressed during anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive system. This colinearity is not easy to spot during early larval stages because the differentiated endothelial cells within the yolk permanently migrate to their destinations in the gut. After torsion, Gsx patterns the mouth and foregut, Xlox the midgut gland or digestive gland, and Cdx the hindgut. ParaHox genes of Gibbula are also expressed during specification of cerebral and ventral neuroectodermal cells. Our results provide additional support for the ancestral complexity of Gsx expression and its ancestral role in mouth patterning in protostomes, which was secondarily lost or simplified in some species.

  7. Assembly processes of gastropod community change with horizontal and vertical zonation in ancient Lake Ohrid: a metacommunity speciation perspective

    Hauffe, Torsten; Albrecht, Christian; Wilke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Balkan Lake Ohrid is the oldest and most diverse freshwater lacustrine system in Europe. However, it remains unclear whether species community composition, as well as the diversification of its endemic taxa, is mainly driven by dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, or species interaction. This calls for a holistic perspective involving both evolutionary processes and ecological dynamics, as provided by the unifying framework of the “metacommunity speciation mode...

  8. Gastropod shell as a substrate for cocoon deposition by the deep-sea fish leech Notostomum cyclostomum (Hirudinida: Piscicolidae)

    Nagasawa,Kazuya; Ueda, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Cocoons of the piscicolid leech Notostomum cyclostomum Johansson, 1898 were found on the shell of the whelk Buccinum striatissimum collected at 200 m in depth in the southern Sea of Japan off Hyogo Prefecture, central Japan. The leech appears to utilize whelks as well as snow crabs Chionoecetes opilio as a substrate for cocoon deposition.

  9. Responses of primary cultured haemocytes from the marine gastropod Haliotis tuberculata under 10-day exposure to cadmium chloride

    Latire, Thomas; Le Pabic, Charles; Mottin, Elmina; Mottier, Antoine; Costil, Katherine; Koueta, Noussithe; Lebel, Jean-Marc [UMR 100 IFREMER ' Physiologie et Ecophysiologie des Mollusques Marins' - IFR 146 ICORE - IBFA - Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Campus 1, Science C, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex (France); Serpentini, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.serpentini@unicaen.fr [UMR 100 IFREMER ' Physiologie et Ecophysiologie des Mollusques Marins' - IFR 146 ICORE - IBFA - Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Campus 1, Science C, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex (France)

    2012-03-15

    Among metals, cadmium, a non-essential element, is an important pollutant that is released into aquatic environments. Due to its persistence and bioaccumulation, this metal has been shown to exert immunological effects on organisms. The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro effects of cadmium chloride using a haemocyte primary culture from the European abalone, Haliotis tuberculata. Most studies have maintained viable haemocytes in vitro for periods ranging from several hours to several days during acute exposures. Few investigations have reported the effects of metals using longer in vitro exposures, which are more realistic with regard to mimicking environmental conditions. In this study, we exposed abalone haemocytes to concentrations from 0.5 to 50,000 {mu}g L{sup -1} of CdCl{sub 2} for 10 days. The effects of cadmium chloride were reflected in a significant decrease in the number of viable cells and morphological modifications in a concentration-dependent manner beginning at a concentration of 500 {mu}g L{sup -1} as well as in some physiological processes, such as phagocytotic activity and the number of lysosome-positive cells. In contrast, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were increased beginning at a concentration of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}, which is consistent with environmental concentrations in polluted sites. For PO activity and ROS production, maximally 9-fold and 130% inductions, respectively, were recorded under the highest dose. These results thus indicate that cadmium chloride alters immune parameters of abalone haemocytes and that the long-term (10 days) primary culture system used here represents a suitable, sensitive in vitro model for assessing cytotoxic responses.

  10. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    Lyons Deirdre C; Perry Kimberly J; Lesoway Maryna P; Henry Jonathan Q

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition...

  11. Mechanisms driving diversity-productivity relationships differ between exotic and native communities and are affected by gastropod herbivory.

    Korell, Lotte; Schmidt, Robin; Bruelheide, Helge; Hensen, Isabell; Auge, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Biodiversity experiments have shown that productivity usually increases with plant species richness. However, most of those studies disregarded the importance of trophic interactions to the diversity-productivity relationship, and focused on the loss of native species while ignoring invasions by exotic species. Yet, as functional complementarity and the impact of plant antagonists are likely to differ between native and exotic communities, the diversity-productivity relationship may change when native communities are invaded by exotic species. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to test how diversity effects, evenness, and productivity differed between exotic and native assemblages of grassland plants, and how these communities were influenced by slug herbivory. In line with other experiments, we found higher productivity in exotic than in native communities. However, different mechanisms (complementarity vs. selection effect) contributed to the positive diversity-productivity relationships in exotic vs. native communities. Against expectations, native communities showed much lower evenness and a greater selection effect, suggesting that competitive dominance among native species may be even stronger than among exotic species. Slug herbivory decreased productivity independently of species origin and species diversity. However, exotic communities showed a threefold higher complementarity effect than native communities in the absence of slugs, which was mainly driven by differences in the responses of native and exotic legumes and nonleguminous herbs. Our results imply that underlying mechanisms for the positive diversity-productivity relationship differ between native and exotic communities in the early stages of community development, and that differential responses of plant functional groups to generalist herbivory can contribute to this pattern. PMID:26235964

  12. Detection of Bioactive Compounds in the Mucus Nets of Dendropoma maxima, Sowerby 1825 (Prosobranch Gastropod Vermetidae, Mollusca

    Anne Klöppel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The sessile suspension-feeding wormsnail Dendropoma maxima, Sowerby 1825 (Vermetidae secretes a mucus net to capture planktonic prey. The nets are spread out over the corals and often have remarkable deleterious effects on them like changes in growth form and pigmentation shifts not uncommonly resulting in tissue necrosis. Until now, there is no explanation for this phenomenon although the indication as well as theories about its genesis is mentioned in several publications. Vermetids are well studied concerning the intraspecific competition with neighboring individuals but not in their interaction with other taxa like corals or fish. We did extensive in situ video recording and observed that fish avoided the plankton-load nets although several specialized taxa are known to be molluscivores, mucivores, and/or feed on plankton. As many molluscs use chemical weapons to combat feeding pressure and to defend themselves against predators, we screened empty and plankton-load mucus nets for potential bioactive metabolites. Bioactivity testing was performed with a recently developed system based on a chromatographic separation (high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC and a bioassay with luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. Thus, we found at least two active compounds exclusively accumulated by the wormsnails themselves. This is the first record of bioactive properties in the whole family of Vermetidae.

  13. Determination of Acetylcholinesterase activities in marine gastropod (Morula granulata) as a biomarker of neurotoxic contaminants along the Goan coast.

    Sarkar, A.; Tegur, P.M.; Jana, S.; Rao, P.V.S.S.D.P.

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that degrades the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, producing choline and acetate. group. It is mainly found at neuromuscular junctions and cholinergic synapses in the central nervous system, where its activity...

  14. Retraction notice to "Antimicrobial secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsules and egg masses" [APJTB Volume 2 Issue 11(2012) 916-922

    Kaviarasan; T; Siva; Sankar; R; Yogamoorthi; A

    2015-01-01

    <正>This article has been retracted:please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal(http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy).This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and the First Author.Both the first author and the journal’s editor confirmed that Dr.A Yogamoorthi is not responsible for the plagiarism since his/her name was added without consent.

  15. Freshwater gastropods of the Baixada Maranhense Microregion, an endemic area for schistosomiasis in the State of Maranhão, Brazil: I - qualitative study

    Selma Patricia Diniz Cantanhede

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Baixada Maranhense Microregion currently has the highest prevalence of schistosomiasis in the State of Maranhão, likely because this parasitosis is characterized as an occupational disease, and increased contact with water increases the risk of infection by Schistosoma mansoni. This paper reports the results of the first comprehensive freshwater malacological survey performed in the Baixada Maranhense Microregion. Methods: Freshwater mollusks were collected from the twenty-one municipalities of the Baixada Maranhense Microregion and from Bacurituba and Cajapió and were evaluated for infection by trematodes. Results: A total of 9,129 mollusks were collected (sixteen species, which included the first records of six species in the State of Maranhão: Gundlachia radiata, G. ticaga, Hebetancylus moricandi, Plesiophysa guadeloupensis, Pomacea bridgesii diffusa and Omalonyx sp. Biomphalaria glabrata was found in five municipalities, whereas B. straminea was found in nine. Biomphalaria glabrata and B. straminea were observed in syntopy in Pinheiro and São Bento. Of the 990 specimens of B. glabrata and the 2,109 specimens of B. straminea that were exposed to and/or analyzed for the presence of larval trematodes, only a single specimen of B. glabrata (0.1% from São Bento shed S. mansoni. Other larval trematodes were first observed in mollusks from the State of Maranhão. Conclusions: These results indicate that the study area is epidemiologically important due to the presence of two natural vectors of schistosomiasis and the active transmission of schistosomiasis, which was confirmed in the infected specimen that was collected in this study.

  16. Gastropod (Otala lactea) shell nanomechanical and structural characterization as a biomonitoring tool for dermal and dietary exposure to a model metal

    Allison, Paul G. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Seiter, Jennifer M. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Diaz, Alfredo [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico); Lindsay, James H. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Moser, Robert D. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Tappero, Ryan V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kennedy, Alan J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Metallic tungsten (W) was initially assumed to be environmentally benign and a green alternative to lead. However, subsequent investigations showed that fishing weights and munitions containing elemental W can fragment and oxidize into complex monomeric and polymeric tungstate (WO4) species in the environment; this led to increased solubility and mobility in soils and increased bioaccumulation potential in plant and animal tissues. Here we expand on the results of our previous research, which examined tungsten toxicity, bioaccumulation, and compartmentalization into organisms, and present in this research that the bioaccumulation of W was related to greater than 50% reduction in the mechanical properties of the snail (Otala lactea), based on depth-sensing nanoindentation. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence maps and X-ray diffraction measurements confirm the integration of W in newly formed layers of the shell matrix with the observed changes in shell biomechanical properties, mineralogical composition, and crystal orientation. With further development, this technology could be employed as a biomonitoring tool for historic metals contamination since unlike the more heavily studied bioaccumulation into soft tissue, shell tissue does not actively eliminate contaminants.

  17. Running crabs, walking crinoids, grazing gastropods: behavioral diversity and evolutionary implications in the Cabeço da Ladeira lagerstätte (Middle Jurassic, Portugal)

    Carvalho, Carlos Neto de; Pereira, Bruno Claro; Klompmaker, Adiel; Baucon, Andrea; Moita, José António; Pereira, Pedro; Machado, Susana; Belo, João; Carvalho, Jorge; Mergulhão, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Ichnology is a powerful tool for understanding the evolutionary paths of animal clades, through the paleobiology of behavior preserved in Lagerstätten such as the Cabeço da Ladeira (Portugal) site. Here, the peritidal carbonates of the Chão das Pias Formation (Middle Jurassic, upper Bajocian) record the development of microbial mats in a tidal flat. Episodically, the flat was expanded during periods of equinoctial spring tides that may have been responsible for the in situ killing of several ...

  18. Evaluation of impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods (Cronia contracta) as a biomarker of genotoxic contaminants in coastal water around Goa, west coast of India

    Sarkar, A.; Gaitonde, D.C.S.; Sarkar, Amit; Vashistha, D.; DeSilva, C.; Dalal, S.G.

    , Palolem, were deployed at indicate that the risk of cancer increased alarmingly due to occurrence of carcinogenic compounds in the environment (Ruddon, 1995; Vogelstein and Kinzler, 1998). In order to ARTICLE IN PRESS accordance with national... and institutional guidelines for the protection of human subjects and animal welfare. C3 Corresponding author. E-mail addresses: asarkar@nio.org (A. Sarkar), understand the mechanisms and to characterise high-risk toxicants, the application of biomarkers...

  19. Preliminary observations on the effects of vector-averaged gravity on the embryonic and larval development of the gastropod mollusk, Ilyanassa obsoleta Stimpson

    Conrad, G. W.; Stephens, A. P.; Conrad, A. H.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of Ilyanassa obsoleta Stimpson were collected immediately after their deposition in egg capsules. Unopened egg capsules then were affixed to glass slides, and incubated either statically (controls) or on a clinostat (experimentals). After incubation for 9-14 days, hatching occurred sooner and in a higher percentage of clinostated capsules than in controls. Embryos that hatched while undergoing clinostat incubation were abnormal in morphology, whereas other embryos present in non-hatched capsules in the same tubes appeared normal, as did embryos in the control tubes. Although the results are compatible with a conclusion that vector-averaged gravity in the experimental tubes caused the altered development, some other aspects of how the incubations were done may have contributed to the differences between the control and experimental results.

  20. A new species of Miocene terrestrial gastropod Gastrocopta from Poland and the validity of 'Pupa (Vertigo) suevica'

    Stworzewicz, E.; Prisyazhnyuk, V.A. [Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland)

    2006-03-15

    We describe Gastrocopta sandbergeri sp. nov. from the Miocene brown coal deposits of the open-cast mine Belchatow (central Poland) and identify it as conspecific with Pupa (Vertigo) suevica Sandberger, 1875 (nomen nudum) from the Miocene of Steinheim. The new species is most similar to Gastrocopta nouletiana (Dupuy, 1850) but differs in having smaller and always slender shell, less convex whorls, much weaker crest on the body whorl (or even absent) and generally rather weakly developed teeth (6-7) in the aperture.

  1. Recieps for the Mesogastropod - Strombus canarium

    S. Arularasan

    2010-01-01

    Shellfish and other aquatic organisms suitable for food and feed are of worldwide importance. Thelipid components of the gastropods are attaining unpredicted popularity as important nutritional contributionto man’s diet. The gastropod meat is not only tasty but also a nourishing food. As the gastropod meat is freeof cholesterol, it is considered good for cardiac disorders. In the present study, the gastropod Strombuscanarium meat is used for the preparation of good recipes such as dog conch s...

  2. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-01-01

    postmetamorphic stages exhibit only few congruencies with other gastropod taxa investigated to date, which is probably due to common larval but different adult life styles within gastropods. Accordingly, this study provides further evidence for morphological plasticity in gastropod myogenesis and stresses the...

  3. Control biológico del fouling en tanques de cultivo de macroalgas mediante el gasterópodo Osilinus atratus (Wood, 1828)

    Portillo, E.

    2002-01-01

    We tested the use of the gastropod Osilinus atratus (Wood, 1828) to control and eliminate fouling on the walls of macroalgae culture tanks. These gastropods use such fouling as a food source, and their continuous grazing excursions prevent the attachment and development of propagules. This system of biological fouling control via the co-culture of gastropods and macroalgae, besides being an environmentally friendly, is effective in reducing production costs and in limiting the negative effect...

  4. Efecto de la conversión del manglar a potrero sobre la densidad y tallas de dos gasterópodos en el delta del río Turbo (golfo de Urabá, Caribe colombiano) Effects mangrove conversion to pasture on density and shell size of two gastropods in the Turbo River Delta (Urabá Gulf, Caribbean coast of Colombia)

    Blanco, Juan F.; María C. Castaño

    2012-01-01

    El delta del río Turbo es una de las áreas del golfo de Urabá, Colombia donde la tala de manglar es más extensa y activa, por lo tanto, se evaluó el impacto de la conversión de manglar a potrero, comparando la densidad y talla promedio de dos gasterópodos (Neritina virginea y Melampus coffeus), variables dasonómicas, físico-químicas intersticiales y granulométricas del suelo entre varios parches de: 1) manglar de franja, 2) manglar de cuenca, 3) manglar de cuenca mixto y 4) manglar de cuenca ...

  5. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Southern California: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for sensitive bivalves, gastropods, insects, crustaceans, and other invertebrate species in Southern...

  6. Role of marine pollutants in impairment of DNA integrity.

    Sarker, S.; Sarkar, A.

    In this article, we present an overview on the role of marine pollutants in impairment of DNA integrity in marine gastropods exposed to xenobiotics released from various sources into the coastal ecosystem. We provide an insight into the impact...

  7. Evaluation and selection of test methods for assessment of contaminated sediments in the Baltic Sea

    Lehtonen, Kari; Ahvo, Aino; Berezina, Nadya; Breitholtz, Martin; Eklund, Brita; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Strand, Jakob; Sundelin, Brita

    toxicity), sediment avoidance (C. volutator), bacterial luminescence (Vibrio fischeri), algae growth inhibition (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Ceramium tenuicorne), SOS/umu genotoxicity (Salmonella) and imposex in female gastropods (Nassarius reticulata). The results of this first round of experiments...

  8. River Floodplains as Habitat and Bio-Corridors for Distribution of Land Snails: Their Past and Present

    Horáčková Jitka; Podroužková Štěpánka; Juřičková Lucie

    2015-01-01

    River floodplains of Czech rivers serve as refugia to woodland or hydrophilous gastropods, in current intensively agriculturally utilised, urbanised and largely fragmented landscape. This habitat often form one of the last refuge and replace the natural habitat of these species. River floodplains also represent linear bio-corridors in landscape and allow gastropods to spread through the landscape in both directions, up and down the stream. We showed based on available fossil mollusc successio...

  9. Functional-ecological and age-specific regularities of radionuclide concentration by freshwater molluscs of Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone

    The results of the studies on 90Sr and 137Cs content in the tissues of bivalve and gastropod mollusks of water basins in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP have been analyzed. The dependence of radionuclide accumulation factors on the peculiarities of morphological structure, functional ecology and nutrition type was found. The age dynamics of 137Cs content in some species of Gastropod was studied

  10. カゴシマケン クロシマ ニオケル キバアマガイ Nerita plicata ノ カラモヨウ タヨウセイ

    河合, 渓; カワイ, ケイ; KAWAI, Kei

    2011-01-01

    The gastropod Nerita plicata is widely distributed over the upper parts of the intertidal zone in the Indo-Pacif ic Ocean and is reported to exhibit a shell colour polymorphism. This study examined the shell colour polymorphism related to size class. The study was performed on two islands in the Kuroshima Islands on 22 May 2010. Three different shell colour morphs (completely black-banded, partially black-banded, and completely white) were observed for this gastropod. There is ...

  11. Effect of mangroves on distribution, diversity and abundance of molluscs in mangrove ecosystem: a review

    Milad Kabir; Marziye Abolfathi; Abdolmajid Hajimoradloo; Saeed Zahedi; Kandasamy Kathiresan; Sheyda Goli

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to identify relationship between the structural and ecological characteristics of mangrove ecosystem and mollusc communities. Bivalve and gastropod are considered as the main molluscs of mangrove forests and often show marked zonation patterns both horizontally and vertically. Gastropods have high distribution in the mangrove forests probably due to their mobile characteristic, while bivalves are often confined to a narrow seaward zone, due to feeding, larva...

  12. Ocean acidification impairs vermetid reef recruitment

    Milazzo, Marco; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Chan, Vera Bin San; Fine, Maoz; Alessi, Cinzia; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.; Chemello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Vermetids form reefs in sub-tropical and warm-temperate waters that protect coasts from erosion, regulate sediment transport and accumulation, serve as carbon sinks and provide habitat for other species. The gastropods that form these reefs brood encapsulated larvae; they are threatened by rapid environmental changes since their ability to disperse is very limited. We used transplant experiments along a natural CO2 gradient to assess ocean acidification effects on the reef-building gastropod ...

  13. Utilization of shells of the snail Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda) by the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802) (Decapoda, Anomura) in the São Vicente Estuary, São Paulo, Brazil Utilización de conchas de caracoles terrestres Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda) por el cangrejo ermitaño Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802) (Decapoda, Anomura) en el estuario de São Vicente, São Paulo, Brasil

    Bruno S. Sant'Anna; Cilene M. Zangrande; Alvaro L. D. Reigada

    2005-01-01

    Hermit crabs depend on mollusc shells for housing. In this study, an unusual resource is reported for a hermit crab that usually inhabits marine gastropod shells. During a field study conducted from May 2001 to April 2003 in an estuarine area in São Vicente, state of São Paulo, Brazil, 21 individuals of Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802) were found inhabiting the shells of the terrestrial gastropod Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822. A. fulica occurs in nearshore grass patches, where occasional con...

  14. Composição de gastrópodes terrestres em duas áreas do Centro de Estudos Ambientais e Desenvolvimento Sustentado (CEADS, Vila Dois Rios, Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil: um estudo-piloto Composition of terrestrial gastropods in two areas of the Center to Environmental Studies and Sustainable Development (CEADS, Vila Dois Rios, Ilha Grande, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a preliminary study

    Sonia Barbosa dos Santos

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the Ilha Grande land snails was carried out in order to compare the diversity and similarity among two regions of secondary Atlantic Rain Forest. The diversity was estimated using the richness and the equitatibility; the alpha diversity was calculated using the Simpson index (γ. The Sörensen and Jaccard indexes were used to calculate the similarity. A quantitative survey of two 600 m² area, one in each studied region, recorded 336 individuals snails distributed in 23 species and 13 families. The region with more altered secondary forest showed higher richness (17 and diversity (γ = 3,6 than the region more preserved (richness = 14; γ = 2,78, but, the same equitatibility (0,20. The similarity was medium by Jaccard index (IJ = 0,52 and low by Sorensen index (IS = 0,15. These differences could be explained by the dominance of Subulinidae (four species and 117 specimens in the more altered region and Systrophiidae in the more preserved (four species and 97 specimens.

  15. Composição de gastrópodes terrestres em duas áreas do Centro de Estudos Ambientais e Desenvolvimento Sustentado (CEADS), Vila Dois Rios, Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil: um estudo-piloto Composition of terrestrial gastropods in two areas of the Center to Environmental Studies and Sustainable Development (CEADS), Vila Dois Rios, Ilha Grande, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a preliminary study

    Sonia Barbosa dos Santos; Daniele Pedrosa Monteiro

    2001-01-01

    A survey of the Ilha Grande land snails was carried out in order to compare the diversity and similarity among two regions of secondary Atlantic Rain Forest. The diversity was estimated using the richness and the equitatibility; the alpha diversity was calculated using the Simpson index (γ). The Sörensen and Jaccard indexes were used to calculate the similarity. A quantitative survey of two 600 m² area, one in each studied region, recorded 336 individuals snails distributed in 23 species...

  16. Recieps for the Mesogastropod - Strombus canarium

    S. Arularasan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish and other aquatic organisms suitable for food and feed are of worldwide importance. Thelipid components of the gastropods are attaining unpredicted popularity as important nutritional contributionto man’s diet. The gastropod meat is not only tasty but also a nourishing food. As the gastropod meat is freeof cholesterol, it is considered good for cardiac disorders. In the present study, the gastropod Strombuscanarium meat is used for the preparation of good recipes such as dog conch soup, conch noodles, conch curry,conch cutlet, chilli conch. The may also be marketed as fresh, frozen, cooked (whole or as pickled meat. Thepickled gastropod meat is also marketed in the canned form . Differences in food habits over the length andbreadth of the nation is so much that available food resources are not being utilized properly due to lack ofknowledge about their importance. The panel of judges vouched safe for taste and delicacy of the dishes in thepresent study. The panel pointed out that the dishes were as good as those made out of the much sought afterseafood in taste, smell and flavour.

  17. Trace metal pollution and its influence on the community structure of soft bottom molluscs in intertidal areas of the Dar es Salaam coast, Tanzania

    The influence of trace metal pollution on the community structure of soft bottom molluscs was investigated in intertidal areas of the Dar es Salaam coast. Significant enrichment of As, Mn, Mo, Sb, and Zn in sediments was recorded. Redundancy analysis indicated that trace metal pollution contributed 68% of the variation in community structure. Monte Carlo permutation test showed that As and Sb contributed significantly to variation in species composition. T-value biplots and van Dobben circles showed that the gastropods Acteon fortis, Assiminea ovata, and Littoraria aberrans, were negatively affected by As and Sb, while the bivalve Semele radiata and the gastropod Conus litteratus were only negatively affected by As. Bioaccumulation of As, Cd, Cu, Mo and Zn occurred in the bivalve Mactra ovalina and the gastropod Polinices mammilla. This calls for regular monitoring and management measures.

  18. Ecotoxicological assessment of diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) pond habitat, prey and eggs in Bermuda.

    Outerbridge, Mark E; O'Riordan, Ruth; Fort, Douglas J; Davenport, John

    2016-01-15

    Total petroleum hydrocarbons, PAH and various trace metal residues were extracted and analyzed from fresh whole diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) eggs, whole brackish-water gastropods (terrapin prey) and benthic sediment from anchialine pond environments in Bermuda inhabited by terrapins. Gastropods and terrapin eggs showed higher concentrations of trace metals and organic contaminants than sediments. Conversely, PAHs were mostly found within the sediment and smaller amounts detected in gastropods and terrapin eggs. Results indicated that contaminants in prey were transferred to terrapin eggs, and that concentrations of several contaminants exceeded potentially toxic concentrations for aquatic vertebrates. Necropsy of unhatched eggs from nests that had yielded viable hatchlings showed significantly compromised embryonic development. Bermudian diamondback terrapins reside and feed in brackish wetland habitats characterized by widespread, multifactorial contamination. This study suggests that environmental contamination plays a role in the recorded low hatching success in terrapin eggs in Bermuda. PMID:26707979

  19. Studies on Cercariae from Kuwait Bay. XI. Description and surface topography of Cercaria kuwaitae XI sp.n. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae

    Abdul-Salam J

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new echinostome cercaria, Cercaria kuwaitae XI sp.n., from the prosobranch gastropod Cerithidea cingulata (Gmelin from Kuwait Bay is described. The new cercaria is characterized by 23 collar spines and primary excretory tubules with distinct diverticula. The cercaria encysts in the snail host and is similar to those of Acanthoparyphium sp. The surface topography of the redia, cercaria and metacercarial cyst wall is studied by scanning electron microscopy. This is the first echinostome cercaria to be recorded in a gastropod from the Arabian Gulf region.

  20. Rich and rare—First insights into species diversity and abundance of Antarctic abyssal Gastropoda (Mollusca)

    Schwabe, Enrico; Michael Bohn, Jens; Engl, Winfried; Linse, Katrin; Schrödl, Michael

    2007-08-01

    The abyssal depths of the polar oceans are thought to be low in diversity compared with the shallower polar shelves and temperate and tropical deep-sea basins. Our recent study on the gastropod fauna of the deep Southern Ocean gives evidence of the existence of a rich gastropod assemblage at abyssal depths. During the ANDEEP I and II expeditions to the southern Drake Passage, Northwestern Weddell Sea, and South Sandwich Trench, gastropods were collected by bottom and Agassiz trawls, epibenthic sledge, and multicorer, at 40 stations in depths between 127 and 5194 m. On the whole, 473 specimens, corresponding to 93 species of 36 families, were obtained. Of those, 414 specimens were caught below 750 m depth and refer to 84 (90%) benthic species of 32 (89%) families. Most families were represented by a single species only. The numerically dominant families were Skeneidae and Buccinidae (with 10 and 11 species, respectively), Eulimidae and Trochidae (with 9 species each), and Turridae (6 species). Thirty-Seven benthic deep-sea species (44%) were represented by a single specimen, and another 20 species (24%) were found at a single station, suggesting that more than two thirds of Antarctic deep-sea gastropod species are very rare or have a very scattered distribution. Of the 27 species occurring at two or more deep-sea stations, 14 were collected with different gear. Approximately half of the deep-water species are new to science or have been recently described. The present investigation increases the total number of recorded benthic Antarctic deep-sea gastropods (below 750 m) from 115 to 177. The previously known depth ranges have been extended, often considerably, for 31 species. The collected deep-sea gastropods comprise both eurybathic shelf species (29%) and apparently true deep-sea species (58%); some of the latter may belong to a so far unknown Antarctic abyssal fauna. Geographical ranges of the collected Antarctic benthic deep-sea gastropod species appear limited

  1. An in situ study using caged Nucella lapillus and Crassostrea gigas to monitor TBT induced bio-effects in Irish coastal waters

    Giltrap, M.; Macken, A.; Minchin, D.;

    Tributyltin (TBT) is recognised as an effective antifouling agent for use in marine paints for shipping and on aquaculture fish cages and in other marine applications. It has however been found to be toxic to many species of gastropods and can affect these species at concentrations as low as 2ng....../L. TBT has been linked to shell thickening and reduced meat yields in oysters and perhaps more significantly to the onset of imposex, i.e. the imposition of male sexual organs on female gastropods, with this index being internationally recognised as a bio-indicator of TBT pollution. Species of the...

  2. Accumulation and kinetics of 90Sr in fishes and other components of an artificial aquatic system

    Regularities are described of 90Sr transfer from water into the particular components of a simplified experimental aquatic system - the sediments, algae, invertebrates (gastropods) and fish - based on a model experiment simulating conditions of a section of the Jihlava River as influenced by the release of liquid wastes from the Dukovany nuclear power plant. Owing to their high abundance, both in nature and in the experiment, the aquatic algae and sediments are the most important accumulators of 90Sr. Nevertheless, the highest increase in the specific radionuclide concentrations and in the accumulation coefficients were found in aquatic gastropods and in fish bones. (author). 1 tab., 12 refs

  3. Shell utilization pattern of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Crustacea, Anomura) in an estuary at São Vicente, State of São Paulo, Brazil Padrão de utilização de conchas do ermitão Clibanarius vittatus (Crustacea, Anomura), no Estuário de São Vicente, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Bruno S. Sant'Anna; Cilene M. Zangrande; Alvaro L. D. Reigada; Marcelo A.A. Pinheiro

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the gastropod shell utilization pattern of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802) at Pescadores Beach in São Vicente, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Specimens were collected monthly from May 2001 through April 2003, in the intertidal zone at low tide. The crabs were weighed and their carapace shield length measured. All gastropod shells were identified and had their shell biometric parameters (total length and aperture length) measured (mm) and weighed (g). A total of 2,3...

  4. The response of Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) and Steinernema feltiae (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) to different host-associated cues

    Nermuť, Jiří; Půža, Vladimír; Mráček, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2012), s. 201-206. ISSN 1049-9644 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10078 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : chemoattraciton * entomopathogenic nematode * gastropod parasitic nematode Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.917, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1049964412000436

  5. Can essential oils be used as novel drench treatments for the eggs and juveniles of the pest snail Cornu aspersum in potted plants?

    The horticultural trade is an important pathway for the introduction and spread of invasive gastropods because potted plants are essentially portable microhabitats, which protect snails and slugs, especially buried eggs and juveniles, from desiccation and molluscicides. The identification of a drenc...

  6. Does bisphenol A induce superfeminization in Marisa cornuarietis? Part II

    Forbes, Valery E.; Aufderheide, John; Warbritton, Ryan;

    2007-01-01

    This study presents results of the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on adult egg production, egg hatchability, egg development rates and juvenile growth rates in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. We observed no adult mortality, substantial inter-snail variability in reproductive output...

  7. Antimicrobial activities of the tissue extracts of Babylonia spirata Linnaeus, 1758 (Mollusca:Gastropoda) from Thazhanguda, southeast coast of India

    Periyasamy N; Srinivasan M; Balakrishnan S

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial activity of the tissue extracts of Babylonia spirata (B. spirata) against nine bacterial and three fungal pathogens. Methods: Crude extract of gastropod was tested for inhibition of bacterial and fungal growth. Antibacterial assay was carried out by disc diffusion method and in vitro antifungal activity was determined against Czapex Dox agar. The antimicrobial activity was measured accordingly based on the inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with gastropod extract. Molecular size of muscle protein was determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). And fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectro photometry analysis was also studied. Results:The maximum inhibition zone (12 mm) was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the crude ethanol extract of B. spirata and the minimum inhibition zone (2 mm) was noticed againstStaphylococcus aureus in the crude methanol extract of B. spirata. Water extract of B. spirata showed the highest activity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus and Candidaalbicans. Ethanol, acetone, methanol, chloroform and water extracts showed antimicrobial activity against almost all the bacteria and fungus. Compared with water extracts, ethanol and methanol extracts showed higher activity against all pathogens. The molecular weight of protein of the gastropod sample ranged from 2-110 kDa on SDS-PAGE. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of bioactive compounds signals at different ranges. Conclusions: The research shows that the great medicinal value of the gastropod muscle of B. spirata may be due to high quality of antimicrobial compounds.

  8. Stereoscan electron microscope observations on opisthobranch radulae and shell-sculpture

    Thompson, T.E.; Hinton, H.E.

    1968-01-01

    Traditional methods of observation applied to the sculpture of tectibranch shells and to the radulae of gastropods in general, have yielded a great deal of information regarding the structure of these organs, which are so important in taxonomy. In the genus Philine, for instance, the numerous Europe

  9. A note on Antarctic benthic mollusks collected with a beam-trawl from Breid Bay by the 25th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition

    Takashi, Okutani

    1986-01-01

    The molluscan specimens sorted out from benthos samples trawled from depths of 310 and 215m in Breid Bay were studied. A single species of Polyplacophora, 7 gastropods, one scaphopod, 6 bivalves and 2 octopod cephalopods were identified. The general compositions of the present collection represents typical shelf fauna in the Antarctic.

  10. Fine structure and immunocytochemistry of a new chemosensory system in the Chiton larva (Mollusca: Polyplacophora)

    Haszprunar, Gerhard; Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas;

    2002-01-01

    sensory organs of other molluscs, such as the apical complex of gastropod and bivalve larvae, osphradia of vetigastropods, and olfactory organs of cephalopods, and nuchal organs of certain polychaetes. The ampullary cells and their nerves are densely stained by anti-FMRF-amide fluorescence dyes, whereas...

  11. Molluscan Evolutionary Development

    Wanninger, Andreas Wilhelm Georg; Koop, Damien; Moshel-Lynch, Sharon;

    2008-01-01

    anatomical diversity and include the bivalves (scallops, oysters, and clams), gastropods (limpets, snails, and slugs), and cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish, and octopus). This study treats each major taxon and supplies general information as well as overviews of evolution and phylogeny using data from...

  12. [Certain biological traits and morphobiochemical adaptations to nutrition in Strombus decorus raybaudii Nicolay and Manoja, 1983].

    Aliakrinskaia, I O

    2003-01-01

    Habitat locations, behavioral properties, as well as external and internal structure of poorly explored Mediterranean gastropod Strombus decorus raybaudii were analyzed. The data on the dimensions and weight of the crystalline style are presented. Morphobiochemical adaptations to nutrition are discussed in terms of weights of the main parts of the radular apparatus and hemoglobin content in the radular tissues of the mollusk. PMID:12712583

  13. FRESHWATER SNAILS (MOLLUSCA: GASTROPODA) OF NORTH AMERICA

    Freshwater gastropod mollusks are represented in North America (north of Mexico) by 15 families, 78 genera and, as treated in this manual, 499 species. They are grouped into two large subclasses, the gill-breathing, operculated Prosobranchia and the lung-breathing, non-operculate...

  14. The first record of Anisus vorticulus (Troschel, 1834 (Gastropoda: Planorbidae in Croatia?

    Luboš Beran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A threatened planorbid gastropod Anisus vorticulus (Troschel, 1834, listed in the EU Habitat Directive, was found in the Krka National Park in Croatia in August 2009. This find is the first known record at least in the western part of Croatia belonging to the Adriatic Sea drainage area.

  15. Novas ocorrências de gastrópodes e bivalves marinhos no Brasil (Mollusca

    Absalão Ricardo Silva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastropods Costaclis egregia (Dall, 1889, Thaleia nisonis (Dall, 1889, Tjaernoeia michaeli Engl, 2001 and the bivalves Bathyarca sp., Myonera aff. ruginosa (Jeffreys, 1882 are recorded for the first time in Brazilian waters. This paper presents a brief description of these species and also include ilustrations.

  16. Tandonia rustica (Millet 1843) (Mollusca : Gastropoda), nouvelle espèce de limace pour la Vendée

    Eulin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    The slug Tandonia rustica has recently been discovered in the forest of Mervent, in Vendée. After a brief description of the site where the gastropod was found, the author describes the biology, ethology and distribution in France of this species.

  17. On the distribution of the genus Xerocerastus Kobelt & Von Möllendorff, 1902 (Mollusca, Gastropoda Pulmonata, Subulinidae)

    Bruggen, van A.C.

    1964-01-01

    Opgedragen aan Prof. Dr. H. Boschma ter gelegenheid van zijn 70ste verjaardag. The subfamily Rumininae of the pulmonate gastropod family Subulinidae is represented in Southern Africa by the endemic genus Xerocerastus Kobelt & von Möllendorff, 1902. Xerocerastus has been divided into three subgenera,

  18. Conceptual model for improving the link between exposure and effects in the aquatic risk assessment of pesticides

    Boesten, JJTI; Koepp, H; Adriaanse, PI;

    2007-01-01

    It has been claimed that bisphenol A (BPA) induces superfeminization in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. To explore the reproducibility of prior work, here we present results from a three-laboratory study, the objectives of which were to determine the mean and variability in test en...

  19. Preference for different prey allows the coexistence of several land planarians in areas of the Atlantic Forest.

    Boll, Piter Kehoma; Leal-Zanchet, Ana Maria

    2016-06-01

    Land planarians are recognized as important predators, yet studies on their feeding habits are usually restricted to invasive species. Thus, it is difficult to determine the real ecological role of this group in ecosystems and how their communities are structured. In the present study, we analyzed the diet of six co-occurring Neotropical land planarians and their success in capturing prey, based on experiments in the laboratory, in order to determine how they share resources in the same environment. We also calculated indices of food niche breadth and food niche overlap for land planarians for the first time. The diet of Luteostriata abundans comprises only woodlice and the diets of Obama ficki and Obama ladislavii are composed only of gastropods, while Paraba multicolor and Obama anthropophila feed on both gastropods and other land planarians. An invasive species recently found in Western Europe, Obama nungara, showed the highest food niche breadth, feeding on gastropods, earthworms and planarians. We found the highest niche overlap between O. anthropophila and P. multicolor. The results suggest that land planarians are frequent predators of woodlice and land gastropods in the Neotropical ecozone and thus are important for the maintenance of native ecosystems and for the control of invasive species. The coexistence of several species in the same habitat is possible due to the use of different species as main prey, which reduces interspecific competition. PMID:27156235

  20. A new type of symbiosis: Heterocyathus japonicus (Cnidaria: Scleractinia) living on Fissidentalium vernedei (Mollusca: Scaphopoda)

    Zibrowius, H.

    1998-01-01

    After introductory remarks on the solitary coral genera Heterocyathus and Heteropsammia, commonly known to be symbiotic with a sipunculan inhabiting a gastropod shell, Heterocyathus japonicus is redescribed in detail. It occurs from Taiwan to northern Honshu, Japan. It is the first of these symbioti

  1. New record of a headshield slug Phanerophthalmus smaragdinus (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia from Andaman Islands, India

    S. Narayana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Opisthobranchs are the least studied group of marine gastropod molluscs in India. They are purely marine animals and display a wide array of colours and forms. This paper presents a new record of an opisthobranch, Phanerophthalmus smaragdinus, from Andaman Islands. The species was found inhabiting the intertidal area on rocks covered with green and brown algae.

  2. How well-known is the Cephalaspidean fauna (Mollusca: Opisthobranchia) in the Indo-Pacific region?

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    The gastropod group Cephalaspidea contains about 700 recent species worldwide. The status of the research on the group, indicated as the number of described species, in the tropical Indo-Pacific region is compared with other areas. The number ofspecies are 118 in the Indo-Pacific, 168 in Japan, a...

  3. The snails' tale in deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic

    L. Génio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bridging the Atlantic and Mediterranean continental margins, the South Iberian region has recently been the focus for geological and biological investigations. In this region, the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC encompasses a great variety of deep-sea habitats that harbour highly diverse biological communities. In this study, we describe the composition of gastropod assemblages obtained from in situ colonization experiments and benthic sampling of deep-sea habitats in the GoC. Gastropod distributional patterns, such as bathymetric ranges, bathymetric turnover, affinity to substrate types and abundance-occupancy relationships, are analysed and interpreted in relation to their inferred dispersal capabilities and substrate availability. Overall, the GoC comprises a high diversity of gastropods (65 species, and distinct assemblages were found in typical sedimentary environments at mud volcanoes and in association with carbonate and coral samples or organic substrata. The number of taxa peaked at the Carbonate Province in the middle slope (600–1200 m depth, a highly heterogeneous area with numerous mud volcanoes, carbonate mounds and corals. Darwin (1100 m and Captain Arutyunov (1300 m mud volcanoes harboured the most species-rich and abundant gastropod assemblages, respectively. Colonization experiments with organic substrata (wood and alfalfa grass also yielded diverse and abundant gastropod assemblages. These organic inputs allowed the recruitment of local species but mainly of wood specialist taxa that were not previously known from the GoC. Our results suggest that the distribution of gastropod assemblages may be primarily determined by the occurrence of suitable habitats, probably due to the effect of the substrate type on the structural complexity of the habitat and availability and diversity of adequate food sources. The type of larval development is apparently not a limiting factor for colonization of deep-sea habitats. However, the predominance of non

  4. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis.

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-07-01

    To date only few comparative approaches tried to reconstruct the ontogeny of the musculature in invertebrates. This may be due to the difficulties involved in reconstructing three dimensionally arranged muscle systems by means of classical histological techniques combined with light or transmission electron microscopy. Within the scope of the present study we investigated the myogenesis of premetamorphic, metamorphic, and juvenile developmental stages of the anaspidean opisthobranch Aplysia californica using fluorescence F-actin-labeling in conjunction with modern confocal laser scanning microscopy. We categorized muscles with respect to their differentiation and degeneration and found three true larval muscles that differentiate during the embryonic and veliger phase and degenerate during or slightly after metamorphosis. These are the larval retractor, the accessory larval retractor, and the metapodial retractor muscle. While the pedal retractor muscle, some transversal mantle fibers and major portions of the cephalopedal musculature are continued and elaborated during juvenile and adult life, the buccal musculature and the anterior retractor muscle constitute juvenile/adult muscles which differentiate during or after metamorphosis. The metapodial retractor muscle has never been reported for any other gastropod taxon. Our findings indicate that the late veliger larva of A. californica shares some common traits with veligers of other gastropods, such as a larval retractor muscle. However, the postmetamorphic stages exhibit only few congruencies with other gastropod taxa investigated to date, which is probably due to common larval but different adult life styles within gastropods. Accordingly, this study provides further evidence for morphological plasticity in gastropod myogenesis and stresses the importance of ontogenetic approaches to understand adult conditions and life history patterns. PMID:18157859

  5. Discovery of new hydrothermal activity and chemosynthetic fauna on the Central Indian Ridge at 18°-20° S.

    Kentaro Nakamura

    Full Text Available Indian Ocean hydrothermal vents are believed to represent a novel biogeographic province, and are host to many novel genera and families of animals, potentially indigenous to Indian Ocean hydrothermal systems. In particular, since its discovery in 2001, much attention has been paid to a so-called 'scaly-foot' gastropod because of its unique iron-sulfide-coated dermal sclerites and the chemosynthetic symbioses in its various tissues. Despite increasing interest in the faunal assemblages at Indian Ocean hydrothermal vents, only two hydrothermal vent fields have been investigated in the Indian Ocean. Here we report two newly discovered hydrothermal vent fields, the Dodo and Solitaire fields, which are located in the Central Indian Ridge (CIR segments 16 and 15, respectively. Chemosynthetic faunal communities at the Dodo field are emaciated in size and composition. In contrast, at the Solitaire field, we observed faunal communities that potentially contained almost all genera found at CIR hydrothermal environments to date, and even identified previously unreported taxa. Moreover, a new morphotype of 'scaly-foot' gastropod has been found at the Solitaire field. The newly discovered 'scaly-foot' gastropod has similar morphological and anatomical features to the previously reported type that inhabits the Kairei field, and both types of 'scaly-foot' gastropods genetically belong to the same species according to analyses of their COI gene and nuclear SSU rRNA gene sequences. However, the new morphotype completely lacks an iron-sulfide coating on the sclerites, which had been believed to be a novel feature restricted to 'scaly-foot' gastropods. Our new findings at the two newly discovered hydrothermal vent sites provide important insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of vent-endemic ecosystems in the Indian Ocean.

  6. BIOGEOGRAPHY. The dispersal of alien species redefines biogeography in the Anthropocene.

    Capinha, César; Essl, Franz; Seebens, Hanno; Moser, Dietmar; Pereira, Henrique Miguel

    2015-06-12

    It has been argued that globalization in human-mediated dispersal of species breaks down biogeographic boundaries, yet empirical tests are still missing. We used data on native and alien ranges of terrestrial gastropods to analyze dissimilarities in species composition among 56 globally distributed regions. We found that native ranges confirm the traditional biogeographic realms, reflecting natural dispersal limitations. However, the distributions of gastropods after human transport are primarily explained by the prevailing climate and, to a smaller extent, by distance and trade relationships. Our findings show that human-mediated dispersal is causing a breakdown of biogeographic barriers, and that climate and to some extent socioeconomic relationships will define biogeography in an era of global change. PMID:26068851

  7. Shell use and partitioning of two sympatric species of hermit crabs on a tropical mudflat

    Teoh, Hong Wooi; Chong, Ving Ching

    2014-02-01

    Shell use and partitioning of two sympatric hermit crab species (Diogenes moosai and Diogenes lopochir), as determined by shell shape, size and availability, were examined from August 2009 to March 2011 in a tropical mudflat (Malaysia). Shells of 14 gastropod species were used but > 85% comprised shells of Cerithidea cingulata, Nassarius cf. olivaceus, Nassarius jacksonianus, and Thais malayensis. Shell partitioning between hermit crab species, sexes, and developmental stages was evident from occupied shells of different species, shapes, and sizes. Extreme bias in shell use pattern by male and female of both species of hermit crabs suggests that shell shape, which depends on shell species, is the major determinant of shell use. The hermit crab must however fit well into the shell so that compatibility between crab size and shell size becomes crucial. Although shell availability possibly influenced shell use and hermit crab distribution, this is not critical in a tropical setting of high gastropod diversity and abundance.

  8. Macrozoobenthos of the danubean lake Crivoe in the conditions of anthropogenous influence

    Y. M. Dzhurtubaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 2009 macrozoobenthos of the danubean Lake Crivoe, located in the Odessaarea was studied. 26 species of sponges, annelids, crustaceans, insects, gastropods and bivalves were revealed. In the upper and middle part of the lake 24 were found, in the lower one 9 species were detected. Oligochetes, and larvae of dragonflies and chironomids are characterised by the greatest number (up to 300 spec/m², the greatest biomass was found for gastropod molluscs (to 17 g/m². The total maximal number of the macrozoobenthos reached 880 spec/m² and biomass – 40.2 g/m². Benthic faunas of two lakes, Crivoe and Lung, were compared.

  9. Initial results on the molecular phylogeny of the Nudibranchia (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) based on 18S rDNA data.

    Wollscheid, E; Wägele, H

    1999-11-01

    This study investigated nudibranch phylogeny on the basis of 18S rDNA sequence data. 18S rDNA sequence data of 19 taxa representing the major living orders and families of the Nudibranchia were analyzed. Representatives of the Cephalaspidea, Anaspidea, Gymnomorpha, Prosobranchia, and Pulmonata were also sequenced and used as outgroups. An additional 28 gastropod sequences taken from GenBank were also included in our analyses. Phylogenetic analyses of these more than 50 gastropod taxa provide strong evidence for support of the monophyly of the Nudibranchia. The monophyly of the Doridoidea, Cladobranchia, and Aeolidoidea within the Nudibranchia are also strongly supported. Phylogenetic utility and information content of the 18S rDNA sequences for Nudibranchia, and Opisthobranchia in general, are examined using the program SplitsTree as well as phylogenetic reconstructions using distance and parsimony approaches. 0Results based on these molecular data are compared with hypotheses about nudibranch phylogeny inferred from morphological data. PMID:10603252

  10. Abundance, diversity, and resource use in an assemblage of Conus species in Enewetak lagoon

    Kohn, A.J.

    1980-10-01

    Eight species of the gastropod genus Conus co-occur in sand substrate and an adjacent meadow of Halimeda stuposa in Enewetak lagoon, an unusually diverse assemblage for this type of habitat. Population density is high, and large species predominate; they represent all major feeding groups in the genus: predators on polychaetes, enteropneusts, gastropods, and fishes. Although the two most common Conus species eat primarily the same prey species, they mainly take prey of different sizes in different microhabitats. The results suggest that sufficient microhabitat heterogeneity and prey diversity exist to permit spatial segregation and specialization on different prey resources by the different Conus species present. Between-species dissimilarity in resource use thus agrees with previous observations on more diverse Conus assemblages of subtidal coral reef platforms. Prey species diversity is inversely related to body size, confirming and extending a previously identified pattern among Conus species that prey on sedentary polychaetes.

  11. Seasonal Variation in the Diet of the Fan-throated Lizard, Sitana ponticeriana (Sauria: Agamidae.

    Arttatrana Pal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Insects constituted the largest portion of the total diet. Insects comprised the majority of food items during the rainy andwinter seasons, when this prey was most common. During the summer dry season, plant material was the dominant food type.Gastropod intake increased during the dry months, when availability of insect prey was low. The dietary composition of thesexes did not differ. Prey size was closely associated with body size.

  12. Environmental versus Anthropogenic Effects on Population Adaptive Divergence in the Freshwater Snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Bouetard, Anthony; Côte, Jessica; Besnard, Anne-Laure; Collinet, Marc; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Repeated pesticide contaminations of lentic freshwater systems located within agricultural landscapes may affect population evolution in non-target organisms, especially in species with a fully aquatic life cycle and low dispersal ability. The issue of evolutionary impact of pollutants is therefore conceptually important for ecotoxicologists. The impact of historical exposure to pesticides on genetic divergence was investigated in the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis, using a set of 14 ...

  13. Revisiting species delimitation within the genus Oxystele using DNA barcoding approach

    Herman Van Der Bank; Dai Herbert; Richard Greenfield; Kowiyou Yessoufou

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genus Oxystele, a member of the highly diverse marine gastropod superfamily Trochoidea, is endemic to southern Africa. Members of the genus include some of the most abundant molluscs on southern African shores and are important components of littoral biodiversity in rocky intertidal habitats. Species delimitation within the genus is still controversial, especially regarding the complex O. impervia / O. variegata. Here, we assessed species boundaries within the genus using DNA bar...

  14. Herbivorie terestrických plžů jako faktor ovlivňující složení lučního společenstva - vliv na semenáče

    HRUBÁ, Karolína

    2016-01-01

    In a manipulative experiment, I examined the effect of terrestrial gastropod herbivory and of gaps in vegetation on seedlings in a meadow community. This study demonstrated positive effect of both, herbivory removal and gaps on the establishment and growth of the seedlings. The negative effect of herbivory was more pronounced in gaps than in intact vegetation. Sensitivity of species to herbivory and positive response to gaps differed among the species.

  15. Synoptic review of the Literature on the southern oyster drill Thais haemastoma floridana

    Butler, Phillip A.

    1985-01-01

    This literature search identifies a majority of the publications in the period 1880-1980 concerned with the marine gastropod, Thais haemastomafloridmul (Conrad). The southern oyster drill is an economically important oyster predator in the western Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico littoral. Major contributions of each paper to our knowledge of the drill's biology are briefly categorized. Hitherto unpublished research by the author on the snail's biology is documented. (PDF file contains 15 pages.)

  16. SILENT WITNESS OF WATER POLLUTION: BIOINDICATOR FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES

    ARSLAN, Naime; Kara, Deniz; ODABAŞI, Deniz Anıl

    2015-01-01

    During the last years, not only industrial activities, but also anthropogenic activities have had negative consequences for the freshwater ecosystems. All aquatic organisms accumulate organic or inorganic elements in their bodies whether or not these elements are essential to metabolism. Community compositions of freshwater invertebrates such as gastropods, oligochaetes and chironomids, reflect the states and changes in aquatic ecosystems. Many factors regulate the occurrence and distribution...

  17. Ecological and human health risks associated with organotin contamination in the marine environment of Hong Kong and Shenzhen, China

    Ho, King-yan; 何景欣

    2014-01-01

    Organotin compounds (OTs), in particular tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), have caused widespread adverse effects on marine organisms ever since their wide application as biocides in 1960s. For instance, TBT can induce the abnormal development of imposex in marine gastropods, and inhibit development and growth in oysters. A mandatory global ban on the use of OT-based antifouling systems, therefore, has been enacted by the International Maritime Organization to minimize their environme...

  18. The diversity of macro invertebrates in the Victoria and Kyoga lake basin and their relationship to ecosystem functioning

    Pabire Ghandi, W.; Ndawula, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic macro-invertebrates encompass all those organisms that be seen with unaided eyes. Most macro-invertebrates are categorised as semi-aquatic in that they are aquatic in early stages, but live as terrestrial organisms as adults, while others like gastropods, bivalves, Oligochaetae, Hirudinae and ostracods are exclusively aquatic. Some of them such as mayflies lay eggs in water and subsequent stages also live in water until adulthood when they emerge to live a terrestrial life. In others,...

  19. Aminocronoestratigrafía e historia térmica de los depósitos cuaternarios de las Islas Canarias (España): resultados preliminares de la Isla de Lanzarote

    Torres Pérez-Hidalgo, Trinidad José de

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals on the first results of an Amino acid racemization dating campaing carried out on coastal and archaeological mollusca deposits of Lanzarote and Gran Canaria islands (Canary Islands, Spain). First results pointed out to a marked difference into amino acid kinetics, when compared with Iberian Peninsula one: leucine, AI isoleucine and aspartic acid racemizate faster (100%) than in the Iberian Peninsula gastropod samples. Glutamic acid and phenilalanine racemizate muc...

  20. Aminocronoestratigrafía e historia térmica de los depósitos cuaternarios de las Islas Canarias (España). Resultados preliminares de la Isla de Lanzarote

    García Alonso, P.; Hoyos, M.; Llamas, J.; V. Soler; Torres, T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals on the first results of an Amino acid racemization dating campaing carried out on coastal and archaeological mollusca deposits of Lanzarote and Gran Canaria islands (Canary Islands, Spain). First results pointed out to a marked difference into amino add kinetics, when compared with Iberian Peninsula one: leucine, Al isoleuclne and aspartic acid racemizate faster (100%) than in the Iberian Peninsula gastropod samples. Glutamic acid and phenilalanine racemizate much more faster...

  1. Individual and population-level responses to ocean acidification

    Harvey, Ben P; Niall J. McKeown; Rastrick, Samuel P. S.; Camilla Bertolini; Andy Foggo; Helen Graham; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.; Marco Milazzo; Shaw, Paul W.; Daniel P. Small; Pippa J. Moore

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have detrimental effects on many marine organisms and ecological processes. Despite growing evidence for direct impacts on specific species, few studies have simultaneously considered the effects of ocean acidification on individuals (e.g. consequences for energy budgets and resource partitioning) and population level demographic processes. Here we show that ocean acidification increases energetic demands on gastropods resulting in altered energy allocation...

  2. Bioavailable metals and cellular effects in the digestive gland of marine limpets living close to shallow water hydrothermal vents.

    Cunha, Luís; Amaral, André; Medeiros, Vera; Martins, Gustavo M.; Wallenstein, Francisco; Couto, Ruben P.; Neto, Ana I.; Rodrigues, Armindo

    2008-01-01

    Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The pressure exerted by shallow water hydrothermal vents on edible gastropods and their cellular responses triggered by these stresses are almost unknown. The aims of this study were to evaluate the bioavailability of metals in the Macaronesian endemic limpet Patella candei gomesii living close to shallow water hydrothermal vents, and the structural differences in their digestive gland as well as the levels of apoptosis in that organ. L...

  3. Circadian behaviour of Tectus (Trochus) niloticus in the southwest Pacific inferred from accelerometry

    Jolivet, Aurélie; Chauvaud, Laurent; Thébault, Julien; Robson, Anthony A.; Dumas, Pascal; Amos, George; Lorrain, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Behaviour and time spent active and inactive are key factors in animal ecology, with important consequences for bioenergetics. For the first time, here, we equipped the gastropod Tectus (= Trochus) niloticus with accelerometers to describe activity rhythms at two sites in the Southwest Pacific with different temperature regimes: New Caledonia and Vanuatu. Results Based on a 24-hour cycle, T. niloticus activity began at dusk and gradually stopped during the night, before sunrise. Th...

  4. Studies on the feeding biology of an airbreathing fish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch)

    Sivareddy, Y.; Babu Rao, M.

    1989-01-01

    The food and feeding habits of an air-breathing fish, Heteropneustes fossilis were studied from an eutrophic lake, Hussainsagar, Hyderabad, (Andhra Pradesh, India), during 1981-1983. The major preferred items of food were insect larvae, insects, ostracods, plant material and gastropods. Due to the mixed feeding habits of both plant and animal matter, this species is considered as an omnivorous feeder. Bryozoans were recorded for the first time in the diet of H. fossilis.

  5. Multidisciplinary study of trophic diversity and functional role of amphipod crustaceans associated to Posidonia oceanica meadows

    Michel, Loïc

    2011-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica is the most abundant seagrass of the Mediterranean Sea. It can cover extensive areas with monospecific formations, called meadows. These meadows, whose extent is estimated to about 40,000 km2, are critical features of the Mediterranean coastal zones. Moreover, they shelter important biomass and biodiversity of vagile invertebrates. Among these invertebrates, amphipod crustaceans are, alongside gastropod mollusks and polychaete annelids, one of the dominant groups. Amphip...

  6. Transient Enhancement of Spike-Evoked Calcium Signaling by a Serotonergic Interneuron

    Hill, Evan S.; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    Enhancement of presynaptic Ca2+ signals is widely recognized as a potential mechanism for heterosynaptic potentiation of neurotransmitter release. Here we show that stimulation of a serotonergic interneuron increased spike-evoked Ca2+ in a manner consistent with its neuromodulatory effect on synaptic transmission. In the gastropod mollusk, Tritonia diomedea, stimulation of a serotonergic dorsal swim interneuron (DSI) at physiological rates heterosynaptically enhances the strength of output sy...

  7. Abundance and composition of benthic fauna in Penaeus monodon Fabricius culture pond on the west coast of Malaysia peninsular

    M.K. Abu Hena; Hishamuddin, O.; K. Misri

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the benthic faunal abundance and diversity of tiger shrimp P. monodon culture ponds in Perak, west coast of Malaysia Peninsular. Sampling was carried out at three weeks interval throughout the 116 days culture period. In addition, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, transparency, pH and organic matter of soil were also measured. Results showed that the major groups of macro-benthos comprised of gastropod, foraminifera, polychaetes, bivalve and insects;...

  8. First occurrence of Schistosomatidae infecting Aplexa hypnorum (Gastropoda, Physidae) in France

    Gérard C.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the recrudescence of cercarial dermatitis in the world, larval Schistosomatidae have been researched during 20 months in gastropods of stagnant fresh waters in a wetland. Brevifurcate ocellate cercariae have been detected after crushing in a species of Physidae, Aplexa hypnorum, with a prevalence of 6.52 %. Up to now, this species had never been found infected by larval trematodes. Lymnaeidae, Planorbidae and other Physidae didn't harbour schistosomatids. Cercariae of A. hypnorum prese...

  9. Studies on Cercariae from Kuwait Bay. XI. Description and surface topography of Cercaria kuwaitae XI sp.n. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae)

    1999-01-01

    A new echinostome cercaria, Cercaria kuwaitae XI sp.n., from the prosobranch gastropod Cerithidea cingulata (Gmelin) from Kuwait Bay is described. The new cercaria is characterized by 23 collar spines and primary excretory tubules with distinct diverticula. The cercaria encysts in the snail host and is similar to those of Acanthoparyphium sp. The surface topography of the redia, cercaria and metacercarial cyst wall is studied by scanning electron microscopy. This is the first echinostome cerc...

  10. Carbonate production and deposition in a warm-temperate macroalgal environment, Investigator Strait, South Australia

    James, Noel P.; Bone, Yvonne

    2011-08-01

    The prolific macroalgal forests in shallow (red algae that are grazed by herbivorous gastropods, 2) an intermediate, 5-20 cm-high community of fleshy red algae, and 3) a 20-100 cm+-high canopy of large phaeophytes (especially Ecklonia, Cystophora and Xiophora) whose blades are locally encrusted with bryozoans, such as Membranipora membranacea, and spirorbids. Concealed surfaces of subvertical rock walls and cryptic habitats behind the macroalgal curtain have two tiers; 1) a cornucopia of encrusting plants and animals, especially crustose and geniculate corallines in shallow water, that give way in water depths > 4 m to numerous bryozoans (especially fenestrates), serpulid worms, numerous and diverse demosponges, ascidians, small solitary corals, epifaunal echinoids, and gastropods, and 2) a veil of macroalgae (mainly Cystophora and Ecklonia) that drapes down and shades the rock walls. Most carbonate sediment production does not come from calcareous epiphytes on the macroalgae but comes from the coralline algae and calcareous invertebrates living on the rock walls and in concealed depressions. Mollusks (gastropods and bivalves) and geniculate coralline algae with numerous lithoclasts, crustose coralline fragments, barnacle plates, serpulid worms, bryozoans, and large benthic foraminifers (especially Amphistegina) dominate the resultant gravels and sands; but there is little or no mud. This is because carbonate sediment is the result of production not only in the macrophyte factory but also in adjacent seagrass factories. Particles produced in the macroalgal factory are shed onto the adjacent seafloor, where they form the requisite sandy substrates for quick colonization by seagrasses. Thus, over time the sediment in this shallow but hydrodynaically energetic environment becomes a mixture of materials from the two sources with seagrasses contributing gastropods, large benthic foraminifers, spirorbids, bryozoans and articulated corallines to the sediment milieu. If

  11. [Functional-ecological and age-specific regularities in radionuclide concentration in freshwater molluscs from the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exclusion zone].

    Gudkov, D I; Derevets, V V; Kuz'menko, M I; Nazarov, A B

    2001-01-01

    The results of the studies on 90Sr and 137Cs content in the tissues of bivalve and gastropod mollusks of water basins in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP have been analyzed. The dependence of radionuclide accumulation factors on the peculiarities of morphological structure, functional ecology and nutrition type was found. The age dynamics of 137Cs content in some species of Gastropoda was studied. PMID:11458648

  12. Biological control of fouling incrustation on the scallop Nodipecten nodosus (Linnaeus, 1758) cultured in Ubatuba, SP, Brazil

    Rogerio Stojanov Bueno; Rafael Pasin Corrente Rangel Roma; Helcio Luis de Almeida Marques

    2009-01-01

    This experiment was developed at the marine farm of the São Paulo State Fisheries Institute in Ubatuba, SP, Brazil, aiming to compare the efficiency of three organisms (the sea urchins Echinometra lucunter, Lytechinus variegatus and the gastropod Tegula viridula) in controlling fouling incrustation in lantern net and on Nodipecten nodosus valves. Scallops measuring 32.6 + 4.9mm of initial height were cultivated in eight Japanese lanterns with five floors each, at a density of 25 scallops/floo...

  13. A new phylogeny of the Cephalaspidea (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia) based on expanded taxon sampling and gene markers

    Oskars, Trond Roger; Bouchet, Philippe; Malaquias, Manuel Antonio E.

    2015-01-01

    The Cephalaspidea is a diverse marine clade of euthyneuran gastropods with many groups still known largely from shells or scant anatomical data. The definition of the group and the relationships between members has been hampered by the difficulty of establishing sound synapomorphies, but the advent of molecular phylogenetics is helping to change significantly this situation. Yet, because of limited taxon sampling and few genetic markers employed in previous studies, many questions about the s...

  14. A model of fluff layer erosion and subsequent bed erosion in the presence of the bioturbator, Hydrobia ulvae

    Orvain, Francis; Le Hir, Pierre; Sauriau, Pierre-guy

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae destabilizes the top layers of fine-grained sediments. This process is mediated by the formation of a "biogenic" fluff layer that includes tracks, faecal pellets and mucus. This fluff layer has been shown to be easily resuspended before general bed erosion. In order to examine how fluff layer and bed. erosion interact, flume experiments were performed with fluid sediments of varying water contents. Ten thousand snails were placed a...

  15. Evolution of the Toxoglossa Venom Apparatus as Inferred by Molecular Phylogeny of the Terebridae

    Holford, Mandë; Puillandre, Nicolas; Terryn, Yves; Cruaud, Corinne; Olivera, Baldomero; Bouchet, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Toxoglossate marine gastropods, traditionally assigned to the families Conidae, Terebridae, and Turridae, are one of the most populous animal groups that use venom to capture their prey. These marine animals are generally characterized by a venom apparatus that consists of a muscular venom bulb and a tubular venom gland. The toxoglossan radula, often compared with a hypodermic needle for its use as a conduit to inject toxins into prey, is considered a major anatomical breakthrough that assist...

  16. Microhabitats within Venomous Cone Snails Contain Diverse Actinobacteria▿ †

    Peraud, Olivier; Biggs, Jason S.; Hughen, Ronald W.; Alan R. Light; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Baldomero M. Olivera; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2009-01-01

    Actinomycetes can be symbionts in diverse organisms, including both plants and animals. Some actinomycetes benefit their host by producing small molecule secondary metabolites; the resulting symbioses are often developmentally complex. Actinomycetes associated with three cone snails were studied. Cone snails are venomous tropical marine gastropods which have been extensively examined because of their production of peptide-based neurological toxins, but no microbiological studies have been rep...

  17. THE CHANGES IN THE POPULATION OF THEODOXUS FLUVIATILIS IN THE RIVER TYWA WESTERN POMERANIA (POMORZE ZACHODNIE IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE ABIOTIC HABITAT

    Tadeusz Zamkowski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research on the concentration and biomass of the gastropod Theodoxus fluviatilis found in the river Tywa (Western Pomerania. It has been stated that the strongest influence on the size of the concentration of those species had the following elements of habitat: the kind of the bed, amount of food, depth of water, degree of its transformation. However, the interrelation between the concentration of species and their biomass has not been noticed.

  18. Ascidia subterranea sp. nov. (Phlebobranchia: Ascidiidae), a new tunicate belonging to the A. sydneiensis Stimpson, 1855 group, found as burrow associate of Axiopsis serratifrons A. Milne-Edwards, 1873 (Decapoda: Axiidae) on Derawan Island, Indonesia.

    Kneer, Dominik; Monniot, Francoise; Stach, Thomas; Christianen, Marjolijn J A

    2013-01-01

    A new tunicate, Ascidia subterranea sp. nov., was found in burrows of the axiid crustacean Axiopsis serratifrons on Derawan Island, Indonesia. It differs from other ascidians in its habitat as well as numerous morphological peculiarities which are described in detail. The shrimp Rostronia stylirostris Holthuis, 1952 was found inside A. subterranea sp. nov., and 4 species of bivalves, 3 species of polychaetes, 1 gastropod, 1 polyplacophoran and 1 sponge species were found as burrow associates besides the ascidian. PMID:24758824

  19. Circadian Rhythms of Crawling and Swimming in the Nudibranch Mollusc Melibe leonina

    Newcomb, James M; Kirouac, Lauren E.; NAIMIE, AMANDA A.; BIXBY, KIMBERLY A.; Lee, Colin; MALANGA, STEPHANIE; RAUBACH, MAUREEN; Watson, Winsor H.

    2014-01-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothe...

  20. Thematic mapping of reefs by processing of simulated SPOT satellite data : application to the Trochus niloticus biotope on Tetembia reef (New Caledonia)

    Bour, William; Loubersac, L.; Rual, Pierre

    1986-01-01

    Exploitation of Trochus niloticus is important for Pacific islanders. The shell yields valuable mother of pearl of wich 2.000 tons were exported from New Caledonia in 1978. Knowledge of the exploitable stock requires a good estimate of the surface area occupied by this gastropod which colonises dead coral reefs. Because trochus environments in New Caledonia are very extensive and access is difficult, synoptic methods of estimation are called for. High resolution remote sensing appears to be a...

  1. Développement et faisabilité de marqueurs de la perturbation endocrinienne chez des gastéropodes d'eau douce. Application au laboratoire et au terrain

    M. Gust

    2010-01-01

    A major issue in ecotoxicology is the effect of endocrine disrupting compounds on aquatic ecosystems. However, this issue is not well assessed on invertebrates and particularly gastropods molluscs. They are sensitive to endocrine disrupters although the mechanisms are unknown, due to the lack of knowledge about their endocrine system. Two model species were used, because of similar life history, but different mode of reproduction. We developed tools at different levels of biological organizat...

  2. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from aqueous media by the marine fungus NIOCC 312: Involvement of lignin-degrading enzymes and exopolysaccharides

    Raghukumar, C.; Shailaja, M.S.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Singh, S.K.

    as pollutants in sediments, estuarine waters and other aquatic sites 1 . Phenanthrene has been shown to be toxic to marine diatoms 2 , gastropods 3 , mussels, crustaceans and fish 4 . These biomagnified contaminants ultimately pose a serious threat to human... in water, washed repeatedly with distilled water and sterilized. These were soaked with LNM and inoculated with macerated mycelia of the fungus grown in LNM. Within 7 days, the foam cubes were covered with the fungal mycelium and were introduced...

  3. Hábitos de Vida dos Gastropoda e Bellerophontida da Formação Maecuru,Devoniano Médio, Bacia do Amazonas, Brasil

    Luiza Corral Martins de Oliveira Ponciano

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The Maecuru Formation comprises the Devonian-Carboniferous sedimentary sequence of Amazonas Basin and consists of fluvialdeltaics and pelites layers. Its fossiliferous sediments (the uppermost part of the Lontra Member consists of hummocky cross-stratified fine-grained to very coarse sandstones beds.With the purpose of adding more information about the palaeoecology of The Maecuru Formation fossils, the life habits of gastropods and bellerophontids were inferred based on functional analysis and similarities with the living forms. The more significant features used were: (1 total frontal cross-sectional area, (2height and relative positions of pressure point and center of gravity, (3 apertural margin morphology, (4 kind of symmetry and (5surface smoothness. The species Platyceras (Orthonychia steinmanni; Platyceras (Tumbophalus hartti; Platyceras (Platyostomadarwini; Platyceras (Platyostoma (? agassizi; Platyceras (Orthonychia meerwarthi; Platyceras (Orthonychia gracilis; Platyceras (Tumbophalus coutoanus; “Platyceras” tschernischewi; “Platyceras” subconicum; “Platyceras” (Ortonychia hussaki; “Platyceras” (Ortonychia whitii; “Platyceras” (Ortonychia whitii var. curua and “Platyceras” symmetricum var. maecuruensis represent the epifaunal gastropods with low mobility (coprophagous/suspension feeders of the Maecuru Formation, living symbiotically directly over the anus of a crinoid or nearby. This coprophagous mode of life was probably a non-obligate relationship, because only the closest organisms will get all the advantages of using the crinoid host as a nutrient source. The others adult platyceratids would have a broader feeding repertoire, like as suspension feeders. The bellerophonts Plectonotus (Plectonotus derbyi, Plectonotus (? (Plectonotus salteri e Bucanella reissi would have an epifaunal medium to high mobility, showing a predator habit preferably. On the other hand Bucania freitasi, Ptomatis forbesi and

  4. Feeding preferences of mesograzers on aquacultured Gracilaria and sympatric algae

    Cruz-Rivera, Edwin; Friedlander, Michael

    2011-01-01

    While large grazers can often be excluded effectively from algal aquaculture operations, smaller herbivores such as small crustaceans and gastropods may be more difficult to control. The susceptibility of three Gracilaria species to herbivores was evaluated in multiple-choice experiments with the amphipod Ampithoe ramondi and the crab Acanthonyx lunulatus. Both mesograzers are common along the Mediterranean coast of Israel. When given a choice, the amphipod preferred to consume Gracilaria lem...

  5. The toxic impact of petro-chemical and oil-refining waste on hydrobionts

    Kuramshina, N.G.; Kuramshin, E.M.; Pavlov, S.V. [Institute for Problems of Applied Ecology and Natural Resources Use, Ufa, Bashkortostan (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes research carried out on the potential impacts of petro-chemical and oil refining wastes on molluscs. The acute and chronic effects of 4,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane on gastropod molluscs are described. Studies were also conducted on the effects of diesel fuel, aviation fuel and multigrade oil. The results indicate the importance of assessing both lethal and sub-lethal effects. Sub-lethal effects noted included behavioural changes and effects on hemolymph. (Author)

  6. Differences in osmotolerance in freshwater and brackish water populations of Theodoxus fluviatilis (Gastropoda: Neritidae) are associated with differential protein expression

    Symanowski, Frauke; Hildebrandt, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    The euryhaline gastropod Theodoxus fluviatilis is found in northern Germany in freshwater or in brackish water habitats in the Baltic Sea. Previous studies have revealed that individuals from both habitats are not distinguishable by morphological characters or by sequence comparison of DNA encoding 16S RNA or cytochrome C. As reported in this study, animals collected in the two habitats differ substantially in their physiological ability to adapt to different salinities. Comparison of accumul...

  7. Macroevolution of venom apparatus innovations in auger snails (Gastropoda; Conoidea; Terebridae)

    Castelin, M.; Puillandre, N.; Kantor, Y.I.; Modica, M.V.; Terryn, Y.; Cruaud, C.; Bouchet, P.; Holford, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Terebridae are a diverse family of tropical and subtropical marine gastropods that use a complex and modular venom apparatus to produce toxins that capture polychaete and enteropneust preys. The complexity of the terebrid venom apparatus suggests that venom apparatus development in the Terebridae could be linked to the diversification of the group and can be analyzed within a molecular phylogenetic scaffold to better understand terebrid evolution. Presented here is a molecular phylogeny o...

  8. ConoServer: updated content, knowledge, and discovery tools in the conopeptide database

    Kaas, Quentin; Yu, Rilei; Jin, Ai-Hua; Dutertre, Sébastien; David J. Craik

    2011-01-01

    ConoServer (http://www.conoserver.org) is a database specializing in the sequences and structures of conopeptides, which are toxins expressed by marine cone snails. Cone snails are carnivorous gastropods, which hunt their prey using a cocktail of toxins that potently subvert nervous system function. The ability of these toxins to specifically target receptors, channels and transporters of the nervous system has attracted considerable interest for their use in physiological research and as dru...

  9. Predatory efficiency of crayfish: comparison between indigenous and non-indigenous species.

    Renai, B.; Gherardi, F.

    2004-01-01

    The invasive crayfish Procambarus clarkii is highly dispersed within lentic waters in northern and central Italy. It is a polytrophic predator, exerting a strong influence on animal communities, including amphibians, fish, gastropods, and insect larvae. The indigenous speciesAustropotamobius italicus, inhabiting loticwaters, behaves as a generalist – but not opportunistic – species. The object of this study was to compare the predatory pressure exercised by the two species on potential prey, ...

  10. Food habits of the blue swimming crab portunus pelagicus along the coast of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Mgaya, Y. D.; Chande, A.I.

    2004-01-01

    The food habits of the blue swimming crab Portunus pelagicus were investigated using the stomachs of 3948 crabs collected from Kunduchi sub-littoral shallow waters, Msasani Bay and Mzinga creek along the coast of Dar es Salaam. The main food items included mollusks (51.3%), crustaceans (24.1%), fish bones (18%) and unidentified food items (6.6%). The dominant food item was the bivalve Arcuatula arcuatula Hanley, 1844. Other molluscs included the gastropod genera Nassarius, Littoraria and Conu...

  11. "Protected" marine shelled molluscs: thriving in Greek seafood restaurants

    S. KATSANEVAKIS; D. POURSANIDIS; Y. ISSARIS; A. PANOU; D. PETZA; Vassilopoulou, V.; I. CHALDAIOU; M. SINI

    2012-01-01

    International agreements as well as European and national legislation prohibit exploitation and trading of a number of edible marine shelled molluscs, due to either significant declines in their populations or destructive fishing practices. However, enforcement of existing legislation in Greece is ineffective and many populations of “protected” species continue to decline, mainly due to poaching. The extent of illegal trading of protected bivalves and gastropods in Greek seafood restaurants w...

  12. Distribuição vertical e flutuação sazonal da macrofauna vágil associada a Sargassum cymosum C. Agardh, na praia do Lázaro, Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brasil Depth distribution and seasonal fluctuations of vagile macrofauna associated with Sargassum cymosum C. Agardh at Lázaro beach, Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brazil

    Giuliano Buzá Jacobucci; Fosca Pedini Pereira Leite

    2002-01-01

    Seasonal fluctuations and depth distribution of the vagile macrofauna associated with Sargassum cymosum at Lazaro beach, Ubatuba, São Paulo State, were evaluated through density comparison of higher taxonomic groups among three depth intervals in four periods of the year. Ten groups were identified and among them gammarid and caprellid amphipods were numerically dominant in all sampling periods and did not show any consistent zonation trend. Gastropods, polychaetes and ophiuroids ocurred in l...

  13. The heart of a dragon: 3D anatomical reconstruction of the ‘scaly-foot gastropod’ (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Neomphalina) reveals its extraordinary circulatory system

    Chen, Chong; Copley, Jonathan T.; Linse,Katrin; Rogers, Alex D.; Sigwart, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ‘scaly-foot gastropod’ (Chrysomallon squamiferum Chen et al., 2015) from deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems of the Indian Ocean is an active mobile gastropod occurring in locally high densities, and it is distinctive for the dermal scales covering the exterior surface of its foot. These iron-sulfide coated sclerites, and its nutritional dependence on endosymbiotic bacteria, are both noted as adaptations to the extreme environment in the flow of hydrogen sulfide. We present...

  14. Moluscos bivalvos y gasteropodos

    Lasta, M.L.; Ciocco, N.F.; Bremec, C.; Roux, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main life history characteristics, ecology and fishing interest of bivalve and gastropod species from the Argentine Sea are described. Exploited bivalve species are: mussel Mytilus edulis platensis, cholga Aulacomya ater, tehuelche scallop Aequipecten tehuelchus, Patagonian scallop Zygochlamys patagonica. Bivalve species irregularly exploited are: yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides, purple clam Amiantis purpurata, hard shell clam Ameghinomya antiqua and wedge shell Donax hanleyanus. It is a...

  15. Tool use by aquatic animals

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool ...

  16. Bioavailability of metals in weight materials for drilling muds

    Schaanning, M.; Ruus, A.; Bakke, T.; Hylland, K; Olsgard, F.

    2002-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of metals from various weight materials used in drilling muds was determined after 28 days exposure of polychaetes (Nereis diversicolor) and gastropodes (Hinia (Nassarius) reticulata) to spiked sediments. The test was performed in a standard experimental set-up at Solbergstrand Marine Research Station and showed significantly higher concentrations of barium, titanium, lead, mercury and copper in organisms exposed to various test substances than in organisms exposed to non-spik...

  17. Imaging Oxygen Distribution in Marine Sediments. The Importance of Bioturbation and Sediment Heterogeneity

    Pischedda, Laura; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck

    2008-01-01

    The influence of sediment oxygen heterogeneity, due to bioturbation, on diffusive oxygen flux was investigated. Laboratory experiments were carried out with 3 macrobenthic species presenting different bioturbation behaviour patterns:the polychaetes Nereis diversicolor and Nereis virens, both constructing ventilated galleries in the sediment column, and the gastropod Cyclope neritea, a burrowing species which does not build any structure. Oxygen two-dimensional distribution in sediments was qu...

  18. Global biogeography and evolution of Cuvierina pteropods

    Burridge, A.K.; Goetze, E.; Raes, N.; Huisman, J.; Peijnenburg, K.T.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shelled pteropods are planktonic gastropods that are potentially good indicators of the effects of ocean acidification. They also have high potential for the study of zooplankton evolution because they are metazoan plankton with a good fossil record. We investigated phenotypic and genetic variation in pteropods belonging to the genus Cuvierina in relation to their biogeographic distribution across the world’s oceans. We aimed to assess species boundaries and to reconstruct their ev...

  19. Biodiversity on the Rocks: Macrofauna Inhabiting Authigenic Carbonate at Costa Rica Methane Seeps

    Levin, Lisa A.; Mendoza, Guillermo F.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Gonzalez, Jennifer P.; Jellison, Brittany; Rouse, Greg; Thurber, Andrew R.; Waren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate communities: The activity of anaerobic methane oxidizing microbes facilitates precipitation of vast quantities of authigenic carbonate at methane seeps. Here we demonstrate the significant role of carbonate rocks in promoting diversity by providing unique habitat and food resources for macrofaunal assemblages at seeps on the Costa Rica margin (400–1850 m). The attendant fauna is surprisingly similar to that in rocky intertidal shores, with numerous grazing gastropods (limpets and sn...

  20. Sequestration and possible role of dietary alkaloids in the sponge-feeding mollusk Tylodina perversa.

    Thoms, C; Ebel, R; Proksch, P

    2006-01-01

    Opisthobranchs of the genus Tylodina are found at exceedingly distant geographical regions in the marine environment but are always associated with sponges of the order Verongida (e.g., Aplysina species) which serve as prey for these gastropods. We investigated the chemical ecology of the Mediterranean species T. perversa that commonly feeds on A. aerophoba. The gastropod sequesters a set of sponge-derived brominated isoxazoline alkaloids which are accumulated in the mantle and egg masses and are furthermore exuded as part of the mucus when the animal is molested. Based on the documented feeding deterrent properties of the sponge alkaloids against fish, it is speculated that the sequestered sponge alkaloids serve also as a defense for T. perversa. Interestingly, specimens of T. perversa that were either collected while feeding on A. aerophoba or had been kept on these sponges under controlled conditions for several weeks almost always contained the brominated alkaloid aerothionin, which is not detected in A. aerophoba but occurs in the sibling species A. cavernicola instead. The latter sponge is also accepted as a food source by the gastropod, at least under experimental conditions. The possible origin of aerothionin in T. perversa is discussed. PMID:17153347

  1. River Floodplains as Habitat and Bio-Corridors for Distribution of Land Snails: Their Past and Present

    Horáčková Jitka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available River floodplains of Czech rivers serve as refugia to woodland or hydrophilous gastropods, in current intensively agriculturally utilised, urbanised and largely fragmented landscape. This habitat often form one of the last refuge and replace the natural habitat of these species. River floodplains also represent linear bio-corridors in landscape and allow gastropods to spread through the landscape in both directions, up and down the stream. We showed based on available fossil mollusc successions that development of the floodplain mollusc fauna took place quite different way in various river floodplains, depending on their specifics and geographical location, because especially the ones situated in the chernozem area of the Czech Republic had very different history in comparison with those in higher altitudes. The species richness and composition of recent floodplain malacofauna arises from historical development of particular area/site and depends also on environmental factors such as an elevation, humidity gradient, vegetation type and its biomass, light conditions of the site and soil reaction. Recently, the invasive plants represent a serious problem for current floodplain ecosystems; species richness and abundances of terrestrial mollusc floodplain assemblages are changing due to their effect. The impact on gastropods is species-specific and was described for the following species: Impatiens glandulifera, Fallopia japonica subsp. japonica, F. sachalinensis, F. ×bohemica.

  2. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  3. Morphology does not predict performance: jaw curvature and prey crushing in durophagous stingrays.

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Crofts, Stephanie B; Dean, Mason N; Summers, Adam P; Lovejoy, Nathan R

    2015-12-01

    All stingrays in the family Myliobatidae are durophagous, consuming bivalves and gastropods, as well as decapod crustaceans. Durophagous rays have rigid jaws, flat teeth that interlock to form pavement-like tooth plates, and large muscles that generate bite forces capable of fracturing stiff biological composites (e.g. mollusk shell). The relative proportion of different prey types in the diet of durophagous rays varies between genera, with some stingray species specializing on particular mollusk taxa, while others are generalists. The tooth plate module provides a curved occlusal surface on which prey is crushed, and this curvature differs significantly among myliobatids. We measured the effect of jaw curvature on prey-crushing success in durophagous stingrays. We milled aluminum replica jaws rendered from computed tomography scans, and crushed live mollusks, three-dimensionally printed gastropod shells, and ceramic tubes with these fabricated jaws. Our analysis of prey items indicate that gastropods were consistently more difficult to crush than bivalves (i.e. were stiffer), but that mussels require the greatest work-to-fracture. We found that replica shells can provide an important proxy for investigations of failure mechanics. We also found little difference in crushing performance between jaw shapes, suggesting that disparate jaws are equally suited for processing different types of shelled prey. Thus, durophagous stingrays exhibit a many-to-one mapping of jaw morphology to mollusk crushing performance. PMID:26567348

  4. COMPARATIVE SPERM ULTRASTRUCTURE IN FIVE GENERA OF THE NUDIBRANCH FAMILY CHROMODORIDIDAE (GASTROPODA: OPISTHOBRANCHIA).

    Wilson, NERIDA G.; Healy, JOHN M.

    2002-05-01

    Sperm ultrastructure is examined in representatives of five genera of the nudibranch gastropod family Chromodorididae: (Chromodoris, Hypselodoris, Glossodoris, Risbecia and Pectenodoris) and the results compared with previous work on other gastropods, especially other nudibranchs. As chromodoridid phylogeny is still incompletely understood, this study partly focuses on the search for new and as yet untapped sources of informative characters. Like spermatozoa of most other heterobranch gastropods, those of the Chromodorididae are elongate, complex cells composed of an acrosomal complex (small, rounded acrosomal vesicle, and columnar acrosomal pedestal), a condensed nucleus, sub-nuclear ring, a highly modified mid-piece (axoneme + coarse fibres surrounded by a glycogen-containing, helically-coiled mitochondrial derivative) and terminally a glycogen piece (or homologue thereof). The finely striated acrosomal pedestal is a synapomorphy of all genera examined here, but interestingly also occurs in at least one dorid (Rostanga arbutus). Substantial and potentially taxonomically informative differences were also observed between genera in the morphology of the nucleus, the neck region of the mid-piece, and also the terminal glycogen piece. The subnuclear ring is shown for the first time to be a segmented, rather than a continuous structure; similarly, the annular complex is shown to consist of two structures, the annulus proper and the herein-termed annular accessory body. PMID:12011239

  5. Chemosynthesis-based communities through time

    Kaim, Andrzej

    2010-05-01

    The discovery of chemosynthesis-based communities in late 1970s was probably one of the biggest surprises in the marine biology of 20th century. There are three basic types of locations where such communities may develop: hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, and vertebrate falls. Also sunken wood communities are partially chemosynthetically fueled. Reports of these unusual aggregation of benthic animals in the deep sea prompted a quest for their counterparts in the fossil record. Soon it has been revealed that a number of exotic carbonate rocks rich in fossils in otherwise siliciclastic deep water facies could easily be interpreted as a result of ancient cold seeps' activity. Later on also numerous hot vent, whale fall, and sunken wood associations have been described from the geological past. The earliest-known chemosynthesis-based association containing metazoan animals has been described from Silurian of Ural Mountains. This and the other Paleozoic chemosynthesis-based associations are dominated by worm tubes, mollusks (monoplacophorans, bivalves, and gastropods), and brachiopods. Nothing is known from the period encompassing Permian and Triassic and the Mesozoic record of chemosynthesis-based communities starts in Jurassic. The Lower Jurassic hydrothermal vent association from California consists of worm tubes, gastropods, and brachiopods which are not really comparable to their counterparts from Recent chemosynthesis-based communities. First associations composed of fossils recollecting animals from the Recent chemosynthesis-based communities appear in Late Jurassic. Oxfordian cold seep deposits from France are dominated by lucinid bivalves and similar deposits from Tithonian of Alexander Island in the Antarctic are known to contain lucinids and mass aggregations of hokkaidoconchids-extinct group of gastropods related to Recent Provannidae. Early Cretaceous is an epoch of rhynchonellide brachiopod Peregrinella which occurs worldwide abundantly at hydrocarbon seep

  6. Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in wildlife: A review.

    Spratt, David M

    2015-08-01

    Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100-500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where captive

  7. Saxitoxins and okadaic acid group: accumulation and distribution in invertebrate marine vectors from Southern Chile.

    García, Carlos; Pérez, Francisco; Contreras, Cristóbal; Figueroa, Diego; Barriga, Andrés; López-Rivera, Américo; Araneda, Oscar F; Contreras, Héctor R

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algae blooms (HABs) are the main source of marine toxins in the aquatic environment surrounding the austral fjords in Chile. Huichas Island (Aysén) has an history of HABs spanning more than 30 years, but there is limited investigation of the bioaccumulation of marine toxins in the bivalves and gastropods from the Region of Aysén. In this study, bivalves (Mytilus chilenses, Choromytilus chorus, Aulacomya ater, Gari solida, Tagelus dombeii and Venus antiqua) and carnivorous gastropods (Argobuccinum ranelliformes and Concholepas concholepas) were collected from 28 sites. Researchers analysed the accumulation of STX-group toxins using a LC with a derivatisation post column (LC-PCOX), while lipophilic toxins (OA-group, azapiracids, pectenotoxins and yessotoxins) were analysed using LC-MS/MS with electrospray ionisation (+/-) in visceral (hepatopancreas) and non-visceral tissues (mantle, adductor muscle, gills and foot). Levels of STX-group and OA-group toxins varied among individuals from the same site. Among all tissue samples, the highest concentrations of STX-group toxins were noted in the hepatopancreas in V. antiqua (95 ± 0.1 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)), T. dombeii (148 ± 1.4 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)) and G. solida (3232 ± 5.2 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1); p mantle > adductor muscle for the STX-group toxins and foot > digestive gland for the OA-group toxins. These results gave a better understanding of the variability and compartmentalisation of STX-group and OA-group toxins in different bivalve and gastropod species from the south of Chile, and the analyses determined that tissues could play an important role in the biotransformation of STX-group toxins and the retention of OA-group toxins. PMID:25769036

  8. Trophic relationships on a fucoid shore in south-western Iceland as revealed by stable isotope analyses, laboratory experiments, field observations and gut analyses

    Steinarsdóttir, M. B.; Ingólfsson, A.; Ólafsson, E.

    2009-04-01

    Rocky shores in the North Atlantic are known for their zonation patterns of both algae and animals, which can be expected to greatly affect food availability to consumers at different height levels on the shore. We tested the hypothesis that consumers would feed on the most abundant suitable food source in their surroundings. In total 36 species/taxa of common primary producers and consumers were sampled for stable isotope analyses from a sheltered fucoid shore at Hvassahraun in south-western Iceland. A selection of these species was also collected seasonally and from different height levels. Feeding experiments, field observations and gut analyses were also conducted. Our results were in good overall agreement with pre-existing knowledge of trophic relationships in the rocky intertidal. Consumers often appeared to be assimilating carbon and nitrogen from the most common diet in their immediate surroundings. The predator Nucella lapillus was thus feeding on different prey at different height levels in accordance with different densities of prey species. When tested in the laboratory, individuals taken from low on the shore would ignore the gastropod Littorina obtusata, uncommon at that height level, even when starved, while individuals from mid-shore readily ate the gastropod. This indicated that some kind of learned behaviour was involved. There were, however, important exceptions, most noteworthy the relatively small contribution to herbivores, both slow moving (the gastropod L. obtusata) and fast moving (the isopod Idotea granulosa and the amphipod Gammarus obtusatus) of the dominant alga at this site, Ascophyllum nodosum. The recent colonizer Fucus serratus seemed to be favoured. Selective feeding was indicated both by isotope signatures as well as by results of feeding experiments. Seasonal migrations of both slow and fast moving species could partly explain patterns observed.

  9. Carbonate facies changes in the Upper Ordovician (Late Katian) of the Cincinnati Arch region: Implications for paleoclimate

    Schwalbach, C. E.; Brett, C. E.; Aucoin, C. D.; Dattilo, B. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Upper Ordovician Rowland Member (Drakes Formation) exposed in the Cincinnati Arch region displays a suite of unusual facies that appear to record an environmental transition during the Late Ordovician. The Rowland displays four well-defined lithofacies, each containing a distinct biofacies. Proximal facies consist of green to gray shaly lime mudstones (often dolomitized), with ripples and desiccation cracks; these facies are sparsely fossiliferous, but show an abundance of infaunal filter feeders indicated by glauconite-filled burrows. These facies pass downramp into pale medium-bedded argillaceous micritic limestones, which are also sparsely fossiliferous but locally contain abundant deposit feeding organisms including brachiopods, small bryozoans, mollusks, and non-calcified algae. Select horizons yield rugosan and large colonial corals. These micritic beds often interfinger with a series of thick skeletal grainstone lenses that represent tidally influenced high-energy shoals and are exceptionally rich in well-preserved gastropods. To the north, these grainstones pass abruptly into offshore gray shaly packstone facies more typical of the Cincinnatian and contain a higher diversity of epifaunal brachiopods and ramose bryozoans. Compared to upramp facies of older Cincinnatian cycles, those of the Rowland show a greater thickness, relatively more micrite and glauconite, and higher abundance of corals and gastropods. These changes appear to be associated with a strong transgression underlain by a regional (and possibly global) lowstand erosional surface, as well as the Waynesville carbon isotope excursion. Additionally, these facies are correlative with similar transgressive facies in other regions, which also overlie regional lowstand unconformities. Increased micrite production instead of skeletal carbonates and the abundance of herbivorous? gastropods rather than echinoderms and bryozoans may indicate large-scale eutrophication and algal production

  10. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks.

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr-Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr-Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr-Lox genes and the Acr-Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co-opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. PMID:27098677

  11. Cenozoic Methane-Seep Faunas of the Caribbean Region.

    Steffen Kiel

    Full Text Available We report new examples of Cenozoic cold-seep communities from Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, and Venezuela, and attempt to improve the stratigraphic dating of Cenozoic Caribbean seep communities using strontium isotope stratigraphy. Two seep faunas are distinguished in Barbados: the late Eocene mudstone-hosted 'Joes River fauna' consists mainly of large lucinid bivalves and tall abyssochrysoid gastropods, and the early Miocene carbonate-hosted 'Bath Cliffs fauna' containing the vesicomyid Pleurophopsis, the mytilid Bathymodiolus and small gastropods. Two new Oligocene seep communities from the Sinú River basin in Colombia consist of lucinid bivalves including Elongatolucina, thyasirid and solemyid bivalves, and Pleurophopsis. A new early Miocene seep community from Cuba includes Pleurophopsis and the large lucinid Meganodontia. Strontium isotope stratigraphy suggests an Eocene age for the Cuban Elmira asphalt mine seep community, making it the oldest in the Caribbean region. A new basal Pliocene seep fauna from the Dominican Republic is characterized by the large lucinid Anodontia (Pegophysema. In Trinidad we distinguish two types of seep faunas: the mudstone-hosted Godineau River fauna consisting mainly of lucinid bivalves, and the limestone-hosted Freeman's Bay fauna consisting chiefly of Pleurophopsis, Bathymodiolus, and small gastropods; they are all dated as late Miocene. Four new seep communities of Oligocene to Miocene age are reported from Venezuela. They consist mainly of large globular lucinid bivalves including Meganodontia, and moderately sized vesicomyid bivalves. After the late Miocene many large and typical 'Cenozoic' lucinid genera disappeared from the Caribbean seeps and are today known only from the central Indo-Pacific Ocean. We speculate that the increasingly oligotrophic conditions in the Caribbean Sea after the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene may have been unfavorable for such large

  12. Molluscan life and death assemblages of a sheltered lagoon in the northern Red Sea: Implications for paleoecology, regional diversity and conservation

    Zuschin, Martin; Gützer, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    Life-death (LD) studies of shelly macrofauna are important to evaluate how well a fossil assemblage can reflect the original living community, but can also serve as a proxy for recent ecological shifts in marine habitats. In addition, death assemblages (DAs) also preserve important information on regional diversity which is not available from single censuses of the life assemblages (LAs). Most case studies on LD agreement were performed in temperate environments. We studied the distribution and abundance of living and dead bivalve and gastropod species in the physically stressful environments (tidal flat and shallow sublittoral soft bottoms) of a sheltered lagoon in the northern Red Sea, which is under increasing anthropogenic pressure from tourism. A total of 3,566 molluscs from nine tidal flat and nine sublittoral stations were analyzed for species composition and distribution of living and dead molluscs. Of 97 recorded species, one potamidid gastropod dominated strongly and another 4 species were numerically abundant. There were many more dead (70.3%) than living individuals, with large differences between gastropods (57.5% dead) and bivalves (95.5% dead), and between the intertidal (49.3% dead) and the subtidal (96.2% dead). The mean number of species per sample is lower in the intertidal than in the subtidal, and this difference is much higher in the death assemblage than in the life assemblage. Distinct assemblages characterized intertidal and sublittoral habitats, however, and the distribution and abundance of empty shells generally corresponded to that of the living species. More samples would be necessary to account for the diversity of living molluscs in the study area, which is, however, well recorded in the death assemblages. There is no indication of a major environmental change over the last decades in this area.

  13. Cell-cell interactions determine the dorsoventral axis in embryos of an equally cleaving opisthobranch mollusc.

    Boring, L

    1989-11-01

    Dorsoventral polarity in molluscan embryos can arise by two distinct mechanisms, where the mechanism employed is strongly correlated with the cleavage pattern of the early embryo. In species with unequal cleavage, the dorsal lineage, or "D quadrant", is determined in a cell-autonomous manner by the inheritance of cytoplasmic determinants. However, in gastropod molluscs with equal cleavage, cell-cell interactions are required to specify the fate of the dorsal blastomere. During the fifth cleavage interval in equally cleaving embryos, one of the vegetal macromeres makes exclusive contacts with the animal micromeres, and this macromere will give rise to the mesodermal precursor cell at the next division, thereby identifying the dorsal quadrant. This study examines D-quadrant determination in an equally cleaving species from a group of previously uninvestigated gastropods, the subclass Opisthobranchia. Blastomere ablation experiments were performed on embryos of Haminoea callidegenita to (i) determine the developmental potential of macromeres before and after fifth cleavage, and (ii) examine the role of micromere-macromere interactions in the establishment of bilateral symmetry. The results suggest that the macromeres are developmentally equivalent prior to fifth cleavage, but become nonequivalent soon afterward. The dorsoventral axis corresponds to the displacement of the micromeres over one macromere early in the fifth cleavage interval. This unusual cellular topology is hypothesized to result from constraints imposed on micromere-macromere interactions in an embryo that develops from a large egg and forms a stereoblastula (no cleavage cavity). Ablation of the entire first quarter of micromeres results in embryos which remain radially symmetrical in the vegetal hemisphere, indicating that micromere-macromere interactions are required for the elaboration of bilateral symmetry properties. Therefore, inductive interactions between cells may represent a general strategy

  14. Příspěvek k poznání vodních měkkýšů severní části CHKO Orlické hory

    Luboš Beran

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings a review of a malacological survey of the northern part of the Orlické Hory Protected Landscape Area, situated in northwestern part of Bohemia (Czech Republic near boundary between the Czech Republic and Poland. Altogether, only 12 common species of aquatic molluscs (8 gastropods, 4 bivalves were found. Galba truncatula, Radix peregra, Ancylus fluviatilis, Pisidium personatum, and P. casertanum belong to the most frequent molluscs found during this research. Occurrence of vulnerable or endangered molluscs as well as non-native molluscs was not documented in this area.

  15. Měkkýši PR Velké Doly u Českého Těšína (Slezsko, Česká republika) Molluscs of the Velké Doly Natural Reserve near the town of Český Těšín (Silesia, Czech Republic)

    Jiří Kupka

    2006-01-01

    The molluscan fauna of the Velké Doly Natural Reserve was surveyed in 1999 and 2006. In total, 27 snail species were found (26 terrestrial gastropods and 1 bivalve). The Natural Reserve is only 1.5 km far from ironworks “Třinecké železárny”. In the 18th century, there was a limestone quarry and beech plantation (as a fuel for ironworks) in the reserve. At the present time the reserve represents the secondary forests society Tilio cordatae-Carpinetum with protected and regional notable plants ...

  16. Host specificity and phylogenetic relationships among Atlantic Ovulidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda)

    Reijnen, B.T.; Hoeksema, B.W.; Gittenberger, E.

    2010-01-01

    Ovulid gastropods and their octocoral hosts were collected along the leeward coast of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. New molecular data of Caribbean and a single Atlantic species were combined with comparable data of Indo-Pacific Ovulidae and a single East-Pacific species from GenBank. Based on two DNA markers, viz. CO-I and 16S, the phylogenetic relationships among all ovulid species of which these data are available are reconstructed. The provisional results suggest a dichotomy between the ...

  17. Emerged Holocene South American Shorelines.

    Richards, H G; Broecker, W

    1963-09-13

    A pelecypod from the Salina beds of northern Peru at elevation 4.5 m ( 15 ft) shows a date of about 3000 years B. P., while a gastropod from elevation 22.5 m (75 ft) was older than 30,000 years B. P. A pelecypod from the island of Tierrabomba, near Cartagena, Colombia, at elevation 2.7 m ( 9 ft) gave a date of about 2850 years, while a pelecypod from Comodoro Rividavia, Argentina, at elevation 9 m ( 30 ft) gave a date of 5350 years B. P. PMID:17739497

  18. Freshwater snails and Schistosomiasis mansoni in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: III - Baixadas Mesoregion

    Silvana C Thiengo

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the third of a series dealing with the survey of freshwater gastropods of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the results of collections carried out in the Mesoregion Baixadas from 2000 to 2002 are presented. Twenty-two species, belonging to seven families, were found. As to the snail intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, the most frequent species was Biomphalaria tenagophila besides some new findings of Biomphalaria straminea. No specimens were found harboring larval forms of S. mansoni although different kinds of cercariae had been observed.

  19. [Radioecological studies of freshwater mollusks in the Chernobyl accident exclusion zone].

    Gudkov, D I; Nazarov, A B; Dziubenko, E V; Kaglian, A E; Klenus, V G

    2009-01-01

    Species-specificity and dynamics of 90Sr, 137Cs and some transuranic elements accumulation in bivalve and gastropod freshwater molluscs of the Chernobyl exclusion zone during 1997-2008 was analyzed. The results of radiation dose and chromosome aberration rate estimation and the analysis of hemolymph composition of freshwater snail (Lymnaea stagnalis L.) was produced. The absorbed dose rate was registered in the range of 0.3-85.0 microGy/h. In closed water bodies the heightened chromosome aberration rate (up to 27%) in embryo tissues, and also the change of haematological indexes for the adult individuals of snails was registered. PMID:20143583

  20. Isolation-hypoxia and re-oxygenation of the pallial cavity of female Crepipatella dilatata during estuarine salinity changes requires increased glyoxylase activity and antioxidant metabolism to avoid oxidative damage to female tissues and developing embryos.

    Cubillos, Víctor; Chaparro, Oscar; Segura, Cristian; Montory, Jaime; Cruces, Edgardo; Burritt, David

    2016-08-01

    The estuarine slipper limpet Crepipatella dilatata is a gastropod that can survive prolonged periods of low salinities (GST). As a result the levels of oxidative damage decline to basal levels within 24 h of reoxygenation. Thus the combination of isolation, a behavioural strategy, combined with encapsulation of embryos and a capacity to up regulate relatively rapidly the glyoxylase pathway and general antioxidant metabolism, play major roles in facilitating the survival of C. dilatata in the small estuaries of Southern Chile. PMID:27232979

  1. Accumulation and effects of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles to sediment-dwelling invertebrates

    Ramskov, Tina; Forbes, Valery E; Gilliland, Douglas;

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is increasingly recognized as the major sink for contaminants including nanoparticles (NPs). Thus, sediment-living organisms are especially susceptible to NP exposure. Studies of the fate and effects of NPs in the sediment matrix are still in their infancy, and data from such studies are...... in high demand. Here, we examine the effects of exposure to sediment mixed with either aqueous Ag (administered as AgNO3) or Ag NPs (13 nm, citrate-capped) at a nominal exposure concentration of 100 μg Ag/g dry weight sediment on four benthic invertebrates: two clones of the gastropod Potamopyrgus...

  2. Comprehensive enzymatic analysis of the amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of the sea hare, Aplysia kurodai: Unique properties of two α-amylases and two α-glucosidases

    Akihiko Tsuji; Nami Nishiyama; Miki Ohshima; Saori Maniwa; Shuji Kuwamura; Masataka Shiraishi; Keizo Yuasa

    2014-01-01

    Sea lettuce (Ulva pertusa) is a nuisance species of green algae that is found all over the world. East-Asian species of the marine gastropod, the sea hare Aplysia kurodai, shows a clear feeding preference for sea lettuce. Compared with cellulose, sea lettuce contains a higher amount of starch as a storage polysaccharide. However, the entire amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of A. kurodai has not been studied in detail. We purified α-amylases and α-glucosidases from the digestive fluid ...

  3. Sediment core fossils in ancient Lake Ohrid: testing for faunal change since the Last Interglacial

    Albrecht, C.; H. Vogel; Hauffe, T.; Wilke, T.

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is probably of early Pleistocene or Pliocene origin and amongst the few lakes in the world harbouring an outstanding degree of endemic biodiversity. Although there is a long history of evolutionary research in Lake Ohrid, particularly on molluscs, a mollusc fossil record has been missing up to date. For the first time, gastropod and bivalve fossils are reported from the basal, calcareous part of a 2.6 m long sediment succession (core Co1200) from the north-eastern part of L...

  4. Sediment core fossils in ancient Lake Ohrid: testing for faunal change in molluscs since the Last Interglacial period

    Albrecht, C.; H. Vogel; Hauffe, T.; Wilke, T.

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is probably of early Pleistocene or Pliocene origin and amongst the few lakes in the world harboring an outstanding degree of endemic biodiversity. Although there is a long history of evolutionary research in Lake Ohrid, particularly on molluscs, a mollusc fossil record has been missing up to date.

    For the first time, gastropod and bivalve fossils are reported from the basal, calcareous part of a 2.6 m long sediment succession (core Co1200) from the nor...

  5. The Vermetidae of the Gulf of Kachchh, western coast of India (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    Joshi, Devanshi MukundRay; Mankodi, Pradeep C

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are often termed underwater wonderlands due to the presence of an incredible biodiversity including numerous invertebrates and vertebrates. Among the dense population of benthic and bottom-dwelling inhabitants of the reef, many significant species remain hidden or neglected by researchers. One such example is the vermetids, a unique group of marine gastropods. The present study attempts for the first time to assess the density and identify preferred reef substrates in the Gulf of Kachchh, state of Gujarat, on the western coast of India. A total of three species of the family Vermetidae were recorded during the study and their substrate preferences identified. PMID:26877684

  6. New records of Omalonyx matheroni (Pontiez & Michaud, 1835 (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Succineidae for the São Paulo and Paraná States.

    Maria Cristina Dreher Mansur

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Omalonyx matheroni is a succineid gastropod that lives on aquatic macrophytes and on emergent vegetation in the wetlands of inner deltas, lakes and dikes. Occurrences of this species were recorded in the municipalities of Ibitinga (SP and Paranaguá (PR, broadening its distribution southwards in South America. Until now this species had been recorded in Demerara (Guiana, Zanderij and Belwaarde (Suriname, Guiana Francesa, Peru, Limoncocha (Equador, Amazonas, Pará, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais (Brazil, as well as on the islands of Guadalupe and Trinidade.

  7. Threatened freshwater and terrestrial molluscs (Mollusca, Gastropoda et Bivalvia of Santa Catarina State, Southern Brazil: check list and evaluation of regional threats

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of nineteen continental native mollusc species are confirmed for the Santa Catarina State (SC(organized in ten Genera and seven Families, one aquatic Prosobranchia/Caenogastropoda (Ampullariidae,six Pulmonata terrestrial gastropods (one Ellobiidae, three Megalobulimidae and two micro-snails –Charopidae and Streptaxidae and twelve freshwater mussels (eight Mycetopodidae and four Hyriidae. Thesespecies are designated by the International Union for Conservation of the Nature – IUCN as follows: seven as"Vulnerable", six "In Danger" and six “Without Category Established”. The general regional threats that thesespecies are subjected to are briefly analyzed.

  8. Status of butyltin contamination in Thailand coastal waters

    WATTAYAKORN, Gullaya

    2008-01-01

    The aquatic pollution by tributyltin (TBT) arising from anti-fouling paints has been of great concern due to their effect of shell malformation in oysters, mortality of the larvae of mussels and imposex in gastropods, which occur at a very few nanogram per liter of aqueous TBT concentrations. Studies show that TBT is a widespread problem and posing a threat to sensitive species in coastal areas where shipping traffic intensities are above a certain level and in the vicinity of harbours. The o...

  9. A checklist of malacofauna of the Vellar Estuarine Mangroves, India

    K. Kesavan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey conducted to know the diversity of malacofauna in Vellar estuarine mangroves (southeast coast of India. In this study, 13 species of molluscs (10 species of gastropods - Melampus ceylonicus, Cerithidea cingulata, Cassidula nucleus, Pythia plicata, Neritina (Dostia violacea, Littorina scabra, Littorina melanostoma, Ellobium aurisjudae, C. obtusa T. telescopium and Assiminea nitida and 3 species of bivalves - Perna viridis, Crassostrea madrasensis and Modiolus metcalfei were recorded. M. pulchella, C. obtusa, L. scabra and N. violacea were found arboreal. T. telescopium, C. cingulata and E. aurisjudae were found crawling on the intertidal mud.

  10. Faunal impact on vegetation structure and ecosystem function in mangrove forests: A review

    Cannicci, S.; Burows, D.; Fratini, S.;

    2008-01-01

    processes acting from the bottom-up, while, at ecosystem level, the outwelling hypothesis stated that mangroves primary production was removed via tidal action and carried to adjacent nearshore ecosystems where it fuelled detrital based food-webs. The sesarmid crabs were the first macrofaunal taxon...... engineers, change particle size distribution and enhance soil aeration. Our understanding of the strong impact of gastropods, by means of high intake rates of mangrove products and differential consumption of propagules, has changed only recently. The role of insects must also be stressed. It is now clear...

  11. Shelled opisthobranchs.

    Mikkelsen, Paula M

    2002-01-01

    In his contributions to the monographic series "Manual of Conchology", Henry Pilsbry reviewed the subgroup Tectibranchiata, comprising those opisthobranch snails that (at least primitively) still possess a shell (Pilsbry, 1894-1896). Exemplified by the Cephalaspidea (bubble shells), others included in this group at Pilsbry's time and since were Anaspidea (sea hares) and the shelled members of Notaspidea (side-gilled slugs) and Sacoglossa (leaf slugs). Pilsbry (and others since his time) considered tectibranchs to be the "root stock" from which more advanced gastropods such as Nudibranchia and Pulmonata were derived. Tectibranch systematics is firmly based on conchology and most species were originally described from empty shells. However, soft-anatomical characters were acknowledged quite early on as equally important in tectibranchs, due to the reduction of their shells and their evolutionary proximity to unshelled gastropods. Today, Tectibranchiata is not recognized as a natural taxon although the word "tectibranch" (like "prosobranch" and "mesogastropod") continues in vernacular use. Shelled opisthobranchs have been redistributed among various taxa, including several new ones--the unresolved basal opisthobranchs (Architectibranchia) and the "lower Heterobranchia", an enigmatic and currently much-studied group of families considered basal to all of Euthyneura (Opisthobranchia and landsnails (Pulmonata)). Despite their polyphyletic status, shelled opisthobranchs remain important subjects in evolutionary studies of gastropods--as the most basal members of nearly every opisthobranch clade and as organisms with mosaic combinations of primitive and derived features within evolutionary "trends" (e.g., loss of the shell, detorsion, concentration of the nervous system, ecological specialization, etc.). Although they play a pivotal role, the shelled opisthobranchs have received minimal attention in more comprehensive gastropod studies, often relegated to token

  12. First Report of a Trilobite in the Carboniferous of Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey

    LEROSEY-AUBRIL, RAİF KANDEMİR & RUDY

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Mesozoic basement of the Eastern Pontides consists of a Permo-Carboniferous sedimentary sequence including the Çatalçeşme and Hardişi formations. The Çatalçeşme Formation has yielded rich assemblages of fusulinids, corals, gastropods, brachiopods, bryozoans, algae, conodonts and plants. Hitherto trilobites were unknown from this formation; here we report the discovery of a pygidium from a dark grey limestone bed near the top. Trilobites are a minor component of benthic marine communit...

  13. Bioinspired bioadhesive polymers: dopa-modified poly(acrylic acid) derivatives.

    Laulicht, Bryan; Mancini, Alexis; Geman, Nathanael; Cho, Daniel; Estrellas, Kenneth; Furtado, Stacia; Hopson, Russell; Tripathi, Anubhav; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2012-11-01

    The one-step synthesis and characterization of novel bioinspired bioadhesive polymers that contain Dopa, implicated in the extremely adhesive byssal fibers of certain gastropods, is reported. The novel polymers consist of combinations of either of two polyanhydride backbones and one of three amino acids, phenylalanine, tyrosine, or Dopa, grafted as side chains. Dopa-grafted hydrophobic backbone polymers exhibit as much as 2.5 × the fracture strength and 2.8 × the tensile work of bioadhesion of a commercially available poly(acrylic acid) derivative as tested on live, excised, rat intestinal tissue. PMID:23008096

  14. Physiological advantages of dwarfing in surviving extinctions in high-CO2 oceans

    Garilli, V.; APEMA Paleosofia, Research & Educational Service, Via Alla Falconara 34, 90136 Palermo, Italy.; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R.; UMR ENTROPIE—Laboratoire d’Excellence CORAIL, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, BP A5, 98848 Nouméa cedex, New Caledonia - IAEA EL—International Atomic Energy Agency, Environmental Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er , 98000, Principality of Monaco; Scuderi, D.; BIOMLG—Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Via Mauro de Mauro 15b, Piano Tavola, 95032 Belpasso, Catania, Italy; Brusca, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Parrinello, D.; STEBICEF—Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 18, 90123 Palermo, Italy; Rastrick, S. P. S.; IMR—Institute of Marine Research, PO Box 1870 Nordnes, 5817 Bergen, Norway; Foggo, A.; MBERC—Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre, School of Marine Science and Engineering, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK; Twitchett, R. J.; NHM—Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK; Hall-Spencer, J. M.; MBERC—Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre, School of Marine Science and Engineering, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK; Milazzo, M.; DiSTeM—Department of Earth and Marine Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Archirafi 28, 90123 Palermo, Italy

    2015-01-01

    Excessive CO2 in the present-day ocean–atmosphere system is causing ocean acidification, and is likely to cause a severe biodiversity decline in the future1, mirroring e ects in many past mass extinctions2–4. Fossil records demonstrate that organisms surviving such eventswere often smaller than those before5,6, a phenomenon called the Lilliput e ect7. Here, we showthat two gastropod species adapted to acidified seawater at shallow-water CO2 seeps were smaller than those f...

  15. Utilization of shells of the snail Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda by the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802 (Decapoda, Anomura in the São Vicente Estuary, São Paulo, Brazil Utilización de conchas de caracoles terrestres Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda por el cangrejo ermitaño Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802 (Decapoda, Anomura en el estuario de São Vicente, São Paulo, Brasil

    Bruno S. Sant'Anna

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Hermit crabs depend on mollusc shells for housing. In this study, an unusual resource is reported for a hermit crab that usually inhabits marine gastropod shells. During a field study conducted from May 2001 to April 2003 in an estuarine area in São Vicente, state of São Paulo, Brazil, 21 individuals of Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802 were found inhabiting the shells of the terrestrial gastropod Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822. A. fulica occurs in nearshore grass patches, where occasional contact with sea water kills them, and their shells then become available to the hermit crabsEl cangrejo ermitaño depende de conchas de moluscos para hacer de ella su casa. Este estudio ha descubierto una manera inusual de como vive este cangrejo, que generalmente habita la concha de gastrópodos marinos. El estudio fue realizado en la estación marítima de São Vicente, provincia de São Paulo, de mayo de 2001 hasta abril de 2003. Durante ese periodo, un total de 21 cangrejos Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802 fueron encontrados viviendo en las conchas del caracol terrestre Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822. A. fulica ocurre en áreas de césped cercanos a la costa, donde el contacto ocasional con el agua de mar provoca su muerte y sus conchas quedan disponibles para el cangrejo ermitaño

  16. Esterification of vertebrate like steroids in molluscs: a target of endocrine disruptors?

    Giusti, Arnaud; Joaquim-Justo, Célia

    2013-11-01

    Alterations of the reproductive organs of gastropod molluscs exposed to pollutants have been reported in natural populations for more than 40 years. In some cases, these impacts have been linked to exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are known to induce adverse impacts on vertebrates, mainly by direct binding to steroid receptors or by altering hormone synthesis. Investigations on the mechanisms of action of endocrine disruptors in molluscs show that EDCs induce modifications of endogenous titres of androgens (e.g., testosterone, androstenedione) and oestrogens (e.g., 17ß-oestradiol). Alterations of the activity of enzymes related to steroid metabolism (i.e., cytochrome P-450 aromatase, acyltransferases) are also often observed. In bivalves and gastropods, fatty acid esterification of steroids might constitute the major regulation of androgen and oestrogen homeostasis. The present review indicates that metabolism of steroid hormones to fatty acid esters might be a target of synthetic EDCs. Alterations of this process would impact the concentrations of free, potentially bioactive, form of steroids. PMID:24004916

  17. The diversity of shell matrix proteins: genome-wide investigation of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Endo, Hirotoshi; Hashimoto, Naoki; Limura, Kurin; Isowa, Yukinobu; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Miki, Takumi; Nakayama, Seiji; Nogawa, Chihiro; Notazawa, Atsuto; Ohmori, Fumito; Sarashina, Isao; Suzuki, Michio; Takagi, Ryousuke; Takahashi, Jun; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Yokoo, Naoki; Satoh, Nori; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Wada, Hiroshi; Samata, Tetsuro; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-10-01

    In molluscs, shell matrix proteins are associated with biomineralization, a biologically controlled process that involves nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. Identification and characterization of shell matrix proteins are important for better understanding of the adaptive radiation of a large variety of molluscs. We searched the draft genome sequence of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and annotated 30 different kinds of shell matrix proteins. Of these, we could identified Perlucin, ependymin-related protein and SPARC as common genes shared by bivalves and gastropods; however, most gastropod shell matrix proteins were not found in the P. fucata genome. Glycinerich proteins were conserved in the genus Pinctada. Another important finding with regard to these annotated genes was that numerous shell matrix proteins are encoded by more than one gene; e.g., three ACCBP-like proteins, three CaLPs, five chitin synthase-like proteins, two N16 proteins (pearlins), 10 N19 proteins, two nacreins, four Pifs, nine shematrins, two prismalin-14 proteins, and 21 tyrosinases. This diversity of shell matrix proteins may be implicated in the morphological diversity of mollusc shells. The annotated genes reported here can be searched in P. fucata gene models version 1.1 and genome assembly version 1.0 ( http://marinegenomics.oist.jp/pinctada_fucata ). These genes should provide a useful resource for studies of the genetic basis of biomineralization and evaluation of the role of shell matrix proteins as an evolutionary toolkit among the molluscs. PMID:24125645

  18. Nurse egg consumption and intracapsular development in the common whelk Buccinum undatum (Linnaeus 1758)

    Smith, Kathryn E.; Thatje, Sven

    2013-03-01

    Intracapsular development is common in marine gastropods. In many species, embryos develop alongside nurse eggs, which provide nutrition during ontogeny. The common whelk Buccinum undatum is a commercially important North Atlantic shallow-water gastropod. Development is intracapsular in this species, with individuals hatching as crawling juveniles. While its reproductive cycle has been well documented, further work is necessary to provide a complete description of encapsulated development. Here, using B. undatum egg masses from the south coast of England intracapsular development at 6 °C is described. Number of eggs, veligers and juveniles per capsule are compared, and nurse egg partitioning, timing of nurse egg consumption and intracapsular size differences through development are discussed. Total development took between 133 and 140 days, over which 7 ontogenetic stages were identified. The number of both eggs and veligers were significantly related to capsule volume, with approximately 1 % of eggs developing per capsule. Each early veliger consumed nurse eggs rapidly over just 3-7 days. Within each capsule, initial development was asynchronous, but it became synchronous during the veliger stage. No evidence for cannibalism was found during development, but large size differences between embryos developing within each capsule were observed, and occasionally `empty' veligers were seen, which had not successfully consumed any nurse eggs. These results indicate a high level of competition for nurse eggs within each capsule during development in the common whelk. The initial differences observed in nurse egg uptake may affect individual predisposition in later life.

  19. Protostrongylid nematodes in caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou and moose (Alces alces of Newfoundland

    Murray W. Lankester

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Two species of protostrongylid nematodes with dorsal-spined, first-stage larvae, are present in caribou and moose of Newfoundland. Elaphostrongyius rangiferi Mitskevich, 1958, a parasite introduced from Scandinavia, causes periodic epizootics of a severe neurological disease in caribou. Sick animals exhibiting signs of cerebrospinal elaphostrongylosis (CSE were particularly noticeable in central Newfoundland each winter between 1981 and 1985. Those collected for examinarion were mostly male calves. The disease again became prominent in caribou on the Avalon Peninsula in the winters of 1996 and 1997; it may have spread to that isolated part of the province as recently as 1990. E. rangiferi was also found in moose but no cases of neurologic disease have been reported in this host. Parelapbostrongylus andersoni Prestwood, 1972, was found in caribou, both in central Newfoundland and on the Avalon Peninsula. Moose may also be infected. Of 1407 terrestrial gastropod intermediate hosts examined, 9 (0.6% contained infective, third-stage, protostrongylid larvae resembling those of E. rangiferi and P. andersoni which are indistinguishable. The small dark slug, Deroceras laeve, dominated gastropod collections and was the only species infected.

  20. The potential utility of nested PCR for investigation ofCoxiella burnetii in Iranian snails

    Mina Dehghani-Samani; Abbas Doosti; Asghar Arshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To detect the prevalence ofCoxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) in two species of snails consisted ofLymnaea palustris (L. palustris) andPomacea canaliculata (P. canaliculata) by using nestedPCR method in Chaharmahel Va Bakhtiari Province which is located in the southwest of Iran. Methods:A total of160 snail samples consisted of 100L. palustris and 60P. canaliculata were collected from 4 rice paddy fields in the southwest of Iran between June and August 2014. Snails'DNA was extracted by a genomicDNA purification kit according to the manufacturer's instructions. Detection of the presence ofC. burnetii'sDNA was carried out by using a nested PCR assay with [specific primers outer membrane protein 1 (OMP1)-OMP2 and OMP3-OMP4] targeting the com1 gene. Results: In this study, a total of 160 snail samples were tested and 15 (9.37%) samples were found positive forC. burnetii, 15 samples were positive from theL. palustris and there were no positive samples fromP. canaliculata. Conclusions: Snails are kind of gastropods which seem to be harmless in life, but these small gastropods can be very dangerous for farmers, especially in humid climates. Also,C. burnetii in snails showed that this bacterium can be a factor of transmission of contamination to human beings and animals.

  1. [Diversity and abundance of mollusks in the sublittoral epifaunal community of Punta Patilla, Venezuela].

    Prieto, Antulio; Ruiz, Lilia J; García, Natividad

    2005-01-01

    The diversity of a sublittoral epifaunal mollusk community of Punta Patilla, Sucre State, Venezuela, was studied from September 1990 to September 1991. We identified 25 species (14 bivalves and 11 gastropods) of mollusks that inhabit gravel, soft sand and bottoms covered by Thalassia testudinum. Total diversity indices were H' = 3.42. J' = 0.74 and 1-D = 0.85. Monthly diversity reached its maximum in March 1991 (3.12 bits/ ind.), June 1991 (2.88 bits/ind.) and September 1991 (2.95 bits/ind.); minimum diversity was recorded in August 1991 (1.20 bits/ind.). A log series model showed a diversity index alpha = 4.56 for species abundance data and alpha = 3.11 for biomass data. The more abundant species were Chione cancellata, Anigona listeri, Chione granulata and Area zebra among the bivalves, and Chicoreus brevifrons, Turritella variegata and Phllonotus pomum among the gastropods (which present maximum biomass). The average total biomass (56.80 g/m2) is low when compared to reports from other tropical zones. PMID:17354426

  2. Growth of nacre in abalone: Seasonal and feeding effects

    The processes of aggregation of mineral and organic materials to the growing surfaces in red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) are analyzed. The flat pearl implantation method is used to observe the transient stages of calcium carbonate deposition, the structure of the organic interlayer, and the steady-state growth of aragonite tiles. The morphology of the organic interlayer is characterized by scanning electron microscopy. These results enable a realistic depiction of the formation of the terraced cones that comprise the principal biomineralization mechanism in this gastropod. In all cases, the growth initiated through spherulites, followed by tile formation. The transient stage with spherulitic formation was shorter at higher temperature; this is indicative of a greater activity of the animal at 21 deg. C. The growth rate in a normally fed gastropod was found to be higher compared with one provided with limited food. The effect of water temperature (seasonal) was also established, with growth proceeding faster in the summer (T ∼ 21 deg. C) than in winter (15 deg. C). The structures of the organic interlayer and of the epithelium are revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Histamine Immunoreactive Elements in the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Snail, Biomphalaria spp., Intermediate Host for Schistosoma mansoni.

    Mohamed R Habib

    Full Text Available Histamine appears to be an important transmitter throughout the Animal Kingdom. Gastropods, in particular, have been used in numerous studies establishing potential roles for this biogenic amine in the nervous system and showing its involvement in the generation of diverse behaviours. And yet, the distribution of histamine has only previously been described in a small number of molluscan species. The present study examined the localization of histamine-like immunoreactivity in the central and peripheral nervous systems of pulmonate snails of the genus Biomphalaria. This investigation demonstrates immunoreactive cells throughout the buccal, cerebral, pedal, left parietal and visceral ganglia, indicative of diverse regulatory functions in Biomphalaria. Immunoreactivity was also present in statocyst hair cells, supporting a role for histamine in graviception. In the periphery, dense innervation by immunoreactive fibers was observed in the anterior foot, perioral zone, and other regions of the body wall. This study thus shows that histamine is an abundant transmitter in these snails and its distribution suggest involvement in numerous neural circuits. In addition to providing novel subjects for comparative studies of histaminegic neurons in gastropods, Biomphalaria is also the major intermediate host for the digenetic trematode parasite, which causes human schistosomiasis. The study therefore provides a foundation for understanding potential roles for histamine in interactions between the snail hosts and their trematode parasites.

  4. Depositional Environment of Permian Tak Fa Formation, Nakhonsawan, Northern Thailand

    Ketwetsuriya, Chatchalerm; Nützel, Alexander; Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate rocks of the study area at Amphoe Tak Fa and Amphoe Takhli, Changwat Nakhon Sawan belong to the Tak Fa Formation, Saraburi Group. This formation crops out in the Khao Khwang Platform and consists of late Palaeozoic carbonate platform deposits. It reaches a thickness of 900 meters and crops out in a vast area. The exposures have been measured and samples were collected for petrographic study. The rock consists of limestones, argillaceous limestones, mudstones and dolomites with nodular and banded cherts, which comprise many invertebrate fossils such as fusulinids, ammonoid, pelecypod, gastropod, coral and bryozoa. Many of the fossils are silicified. The gastropod assemblage is currently under study and represents one of the most diverse faunas reported from SE Asia. The age of the rock is Yakhtashian or Artinskian (late Early Permian) to Midian or Capitanian (late Middle Permian). The study of carbonate facies and fauna indicates that the depositional environment was on shelf lagoon within the carbonate platform varying from shallow marine to barrier bar.

  5. DISCRIMINATION 28S RIBOSOMAL GENE OF TREMATODE CERCARIAE IN SNAILS FROM CHIANG MAI PROVINCE, THAILAND.

    Wongsawad, Chalobol; Wongsawad, Pheravut; Sukontason, Kom; Phalee, Anawat; Noikong-Phalee, Waraporn; Chai, Jong Yil

    2016-03-01

    Trematode cercariae are commonly found in many freshwater gastropods. These cercariae can serve to identify the occurrence of such trematodes as Centrocestus formosanus, Haplorchis taichui, Haplorchoides sp, and Stellantchasmus falcatus, which are important parasites in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. As the species of these cercariae cannot be identified accurately based on morphology, this study employed sequencing of a fragment of 28S ribosomal DNA and phylogenetic analysis to identify the trematode cercariae found in freshwater gastropods in Chiang Mai Province. Eight types of trematode cercariae were identified, namely, distome cercaria (grouped with Philophthalmus spp clade), echinostome cercaria (grouped with Echinostoma spp clade), furcocercous cercaria (grouped with Posthodiplostomum sp/Alaria taxideae/Hysteromorpha triloba clade), monostome cercaria (grouped with Catatropis indicus clade), parapleurolophocercous cercaria (grouped with Haplorchoides sp clade), pleurolophocercous cercaria (grouped with Centrocestusformosanus clade), transversotrema cercaria (grouped with Transversotrema spp clade), and xiphidiocercaria (grouped with Prosthodendrium spp clade). These results provide important information that can be used for identifying these parasites in epidemiological surveys. PMID:27244956

  6. Concentration of technetium by marine organisms

    Accumulation and excretion of technetium by marine organisms were observed in radioisotope tracer experiments to determine concentration factors for estimating radiation dose to humans from radioactive pollution of marine environments. Marine fish, crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, and seaweeds were reared in sea water labeled with 95mTc to observe uptake from sea water. The organisms were then transferred into unlabeled sea water for depuration experiments. Concentration factors were calculated from uptake and excretion rates. Also considered was the contribution of food-chain transfer of technetium, observed by administering labeled seaweeds to mollusks or echinoderms. Low accumulations were shown by fish, crustaceans, pelecypods and cephalopods, whereas high concentration factors were observed in gastropods and seaweeds. Species specificity or specific accumulation in special organs or tissues was not evident except in seaweed, where the difference was clearly species-associated. Relatively high rates of technetium retention were observed in the organisms administered labeled seaweed. The higher concentrations observed in gastropods, compared to those in pelecypods, were thought to result from different feed habits. The adaptability of some species as indicator organisms for monitoring 99Tc in sea water was recognized, but the contribution of technetium to radiation dose was considered insignificant

  7. Tectonics, climate, and the rise and demise of continental aquatic species richness hotspots.

    Neubauer, Thomas A; Harzhauser, Mathias; Georgopoulou, Elisavet; Kroh, Andreas; Mandic, Oleg

    2015-09-15

    Continental aquatic species richness hotspots are unevenly distributed across the planet. In present-day Europe, only two centers of biodiversity exist (Lake Ohrid on the Balkans and the Caspian Sea). During the Neogene, a wide variety of hotspots developed in a series of long-lived lakes. The mechanisms underlying the presence of richness hotspots in different geological periods have not been properly examined thus far. Based on Miocene to Recent gastropod distributions, we show that the existence and evolution of such hotspots in inland-water systems are tightly linked to the geodynamic history of the European continent. Both past and present hotspots are related to the formation and persistence of long-lived lake systems in geological basins or to isolation of existing inland basins and embayments from the marine realm. The faunal evolution within hotspots highly depends on warm climates and surface area. During the Quaternary icehouse climate and extensive glaciations, limnic biodiversity sustained a severe decline across the continent and most former hotspots disappeared. The Recent gastropod distribution is mainly a geologically young pattern formed after the Last Glacial Maximum (19 ky) and subsequent formation of postglacial lakes. The major hotspots today are related to long-lived lakes in preglacially formed, permanently subsiding geological basins. PMID:26305934

  8. Scanning transmission electron microscopic study of molluscan hemocyanins in various aggregation states: comparison with light scattering molecular weights.

    Hamilton, M G; Herskovits, T T; Furcinitti, P S; Wall, J S

    1989-12-01

    The masses of individual particles of the hemocyanins of six members of two molluscan classes, Polyplacophora and Gastropoda, have been determined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of unstained specimens dried from the frozen state. The decameric hemocyanins of two chitons, Mopalia muscosa and Stenoplax conspicua, had masses of 4.20 +/- 0.18 and 4.47 +/- 0.56 MDa, respectively; the didecameric hemocyanins of two gastropods, Fasciolaria tulipa and Pleuroploca gigantea, had masses of 8.67 +/- 0.44 and 8.96 +/- 0.39 MDa, respectively; and the tridecameric hemocyanin of Lunatia heros had a mass of 13.50 +/- 0.44 MDa. The STEM values were in close agreement with those obtained by light scattering measurements of the same samples in solution. For Busycon contrarium, a gastropod with a multidecameric hemocyanin, nine size classes from didecamers to decadecamers with masses that corresponded to multiples of a basic decamer (4.4 MDa) were detected. The appearance of unstained specimens of the cylindrical particles differs from negatively stained specimens. Viewed end-on the cylinders show no internal structure, but in well-preserved specimens cavities are apparent in the side views of the cylinders that resemble those seen in negatively stained specimens. Although they lack the characteristic "tiered" appearance, the number of decameric units can be counted and their arrangement within the particle seen. PMID:2634708

  9. Distribution and shell selection by two hermit crabs in different habitats on Egyptian Red Sea Coast

    El-Kareem Ismail, Tarek Gad

    2010-05-01

    The present work aims to assess the spatial distribution, analyze shell utilization, shell fitness and determine the effect of coexistence of two hermit crabs Calcinus latens and Clibanarius signatus on used shell resources in various habitats on the Red Sea Coast. Also, to determine the choice of shells and investigate the shell species preference of C. latens and C. signatus in the laboratory. The hermit crabs C. latens and C. signatus were found to occupy shells of 39 gastropod species. The most commonly occupied gastropod shells are those belonging to genera Strombus, Nerita, Cerithium and Planaxis. The results showed that crab individuals utilized mainly the shell with elongate aperture. Laboratory experiments showed that two crab species preferred shells of Strombus followed by Cerithium and Nerita when offered shells of nearly similar size (optimal). Crab individuals showed a significant preference for optimal sized shells when given suboptimal shells as an alternative choice. Also, the hermit crabs avoid damaged shells when given a choice of optimal sized damaged shell and optimal sized intact one. In addition, two hermit crab species chose shells of smaller than optimal size when given a choice of damaged optimal sized shells and smaller intact ones. On the other hand, field observations showed that most crab individuals lived in adequate sized shells. The present data conclude that shell selection by hermit crabs C. latens and C. signatus depends mostly on shell internal volume, shell quality and shell aperture size than other factors, because they provide a maximum protection for hermit crabs.

  10. Changes in the behavioral and immunological parameters of the mollusk Biomphalaria tenagophila induced by disruption of the circadian cycle as a consequence of continuous illumination

    Waissel I.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation we studied some behavioral and immunological parameters of adult gastropod mollusk, Biomphalaria tenagophila, which have been reproducing for several generations under laboratory conditions. One group of gastropods was kept on a 14-h light/10-h dark cycle, corresponding to a regular circadian cycle, and another group was exposed to continuous light for 48 h. Animals were studied along (behavioral groups or immediately after (immunological groups 48 h of regular circadian cycle or continuous light conditions. Stopping/floating, dragging and sliding were the behavioral aspects considered (N = 20 for regular cycle; N = 20 for continuous illumination and number of hemocytes/µl hemolymph was the immunological parameter studied (N = 15 for regular cycle, N = 14 for continuous illumination. Animals under continuous illumination were more active (sliding = 33 episodes, dragging = 48 episodes and displayed a lower number of hemocytes (78.0 ± 24.27/µl when compared with mollusks kept on a regular circadian cycle (sliding = 18 episodes, dragging = 27 episodes; hemocytes = 157.6 ± 53.27/µl. The data are discussed in terms of neural circuits and neuroimmunological relations with the possible stressful effect of continuous illumination.

  11. Inducible ASABF-Type Antimicrobial Peptide from the Sponge Suberites domuncula: Microbicidal and Hemolytic Activity in Vitro and Toxic Effect on Molluscs in Vivo

    Werner E. G. Müller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Since sponges, as typical filter-feeders, are exposed to a high load of attacking prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, they are armed with a wide arsenal of antimicrobial/cytostatic low-molecular-weight, non-proteinaceous bioactive compounds. Here we present the first sponge agent belonging to the group of ASABF-type antimicrobial peptides. The ASABF gene was identified and cloned from the demospongeSuberites domuncula. The mature peptide, with a length of 64 aa residues has a predicted pI of 9.24, and comprises the characteristic CSαβ structural motif. Consequently, the S. domuncula ASABF shares high similarity with the nematode ASABFs; it is distantly related to the defensins. The recombinant peptide was found to display besides microbicidal activity, anti-fungal activity. In addition, the peptide lyses human erythrocytes. The expression ofASABF is upregulated after exposure to the apoptosis-inducing agent 2,2'-dipyridyl. During the process of apoptosis of surface tissue of S. domuncula, grazing gastropods (Bittium sp. are attracted by quinolinic acid which is synthesized through the kynurenine pathway by the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAD. Finally, the gastropods are repelled from the sponge tissue by the ASABF. It is shown that the effector peptide ASABF is sequentially expressed after the induction of the HAD gene and a caspase, as a central enzyme executing apoptosis.

  12. Reprint of: Growth of nacre in abalone: Seasonal and feeding effects

    The processes of aggregation of mineral and organic materials to the growing surfaces in red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) are analyzed. The flat pearl implantation method is used to observe the transient stages of calcium carbonate deposition, the structure of the organic interlayer, and the steady-state growth of aragonite tiles. The morphology of the organic interlayer is characterized by scanning electron microscopy. These results enable a realistic depiction of the formation of the terraced cones that comprise the principal biomineralization mechanism in this gastropod. In all cases, the growth initiated through spherulites, followed by tile formation. The transient stage with spherulitic formation was shorter at higher temperature; this is indicative of a greater activity of the animal at 21 deg. C. The growth rate in a normally fed gastropod was found to be higher compared with one provided with limited food. The effect of water temperature (seasonal) was also established, with growth proceeding faster in the summer (T ∼ 21 deg. C) than in winter (15 deg. C). The structures of the organic interlayer and of the epithelium are revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    Tanja Bulat

    Full Text Available The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications.

  14. Paleoecology of the Niland Tongue

    Robbins, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    The swamp or paludal ecosystem is preserved in coals and carbonaceous shales. Remains of organisms of the swamp communities consist of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, ostracodes, and insects; vertebrates such as a hard-shelled turtle and crocodiles; and vascular plant remains. Aquatic communities are found in dark shale and are represented by the remains of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, and insects; and vertebrates such as crocodiles, fish, and a soft-shelled turtle. No vascular macrophytes (rooted aquatic vegetation) could be identified in the pollen and spore assemblage. Charophytes are abundant and show that colonies of the aquatic alga lived on the lake bottoms. The great variety of organisms suggests that the environment had a high input of nutrients. The phosphate-rich Phosphoria Formation, which could serve as a good source of nutrients, cropped out in the watershed of the Niland Tongue basin. The ostracode-crocodile association, calcareous charophytes, and good preservation of plant tissues and palynomorphs put limits on the alkaline geochemical environment in which the lacustrine rocks were deposited. The palynomorphs in the Niland Tongue rocks are dark yellow and light brown in color. These colors suggest that rocks containing them have been buried deeper in the past than they are today.

  15. Anthropogenic effects on marine mollusks diversity and abundance; mangrove mollusks along an environmental gradient at Teyab, Persian gulf

    Azarmanesh, H.; Javanshir, A.

    2009-04-01

    Management of coastal environments requires understanding of ecological relationships among different habitats and their biotas.. The mollusk diversity and density and sedimentological properties of mangrove (Avicennia marina) stands of two different seasons in Teyab have been compared. Pollutant area and cleaner area showed clear separation on the basis of environmental characteristics and benthic mollusks. Numbers of mollusks taxa were generally larger at cleaner sites, and numbers of individuals of several taxa were also larger at other sites. The total number of individuals was not different between the two seasons, largely due to the presence of large numbers of the Mud-living gastropod Cerithium cingulata at the pollutant sites. Differences in the Mollusks were coincident with differences in the nature of the sediment. Sediments in cleaner stands were more compacted and contained lesser organic matter and leaf litter.Analysis of sediment chemistry suggested that mangrove sediment in the Cleaner sites were able to take up more N and P than those in the other sites. Key Words: Sustainable development, Impact, Gastropods, Bivalves, Persian Gulf

  16. Temporal variation of the algae-associated molluscan assemblage of artificial substrata in Bay of Tunis (Tunisia

    M. ANTIT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The molluscan assemblage inhabiting the photophilous algae from artificial rocky shores in theBay of Tunis was studied from February 2009 to February 2010. Five monthly replicates were taken with a quadrat of 25 × 25 cm .. A total of 16105 individuals of molluscs, belonging to 93 species, were collected. Gastropods were the most species-rich group, with 66 species (70.96%, followed by bivalves with 26 species (27.95%. Gastropods were also the most abundant with 11529 individuals (71.60%, followed by bivalves with 4575 individuals (28.41%. Nevertheless,Mytilaster minimus was the dominant species overall during the studied period (15.6% of total abundance, followed by Tricolia miniata (11.6%, Bittium reticulatum (11.5%, Gibbula racketti (10.4% and Rissoa similis (9.8%. The high abundance of juveniles of soft (e.g. Venerupis aurea, Nassarius corniculum and hard bottom species (e.g. M. minimus, Fissurella nubecula point out the important role   of this habitat as nursery for species from nearby located habitats. The presence of the alien molluscs Mitrella psilla (2.5% dominance and Arcuatula senhousia highlights the importance of algae as vehicle and/or receptor habitat for alien species. Species richness and abundance displayed significant seasonal changes, with maxima in winter 2009, but the Shannon-Wiener diversity index showed similar values throughout the year. Multivariate analyses also indicated the presence of significant seasonal differences of this molluscan assemblage.

  17. [Feeding changes for three Sphoeroides species (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae) after Isidore hurricane impact in Carbonera Inlet, Southeastern Gulf of Mexico].

    Palacios-Sánchez, Sonia Eugenia; Vega-Cendejas, María Eugenia

    2010-12-01

    The coexistence of ecologically similar species may occur because of resources distribution, such as prey and habitat type and segregation time, that minimizes the interspecific competition. The changes brought about by Hurricane Isidore in the distribution of food resources by three coexisting fish species of the family Tetraodontidae (Sphoeroides nephelus, S. spengleri and S testudineus), were analyzed at the Carbonera Inlet. Sphoeroides spp. based their food on benthic organisms; principally, they consume mussels (Brachidontes sp.), barnacles (Balanus sp.) and gastropods (Crepidula sp). Before hurricane impact, the three species share the available food resources in different proportions (bivalves, gastropods, barnacles and decapods), according to different strategies that enabled them to coexist and reduce interspecific competition. After the impact, the abundance of available prey decreased and the interespecific competition for food increased, leading to S. testudines and S. nephelus change their trophic spectrum (xiphosurans, amphipods, isopods and detritus) and displacing S. splengleri of the inlet. The distribution of food resources was conditioned by the abundance and diversity of prey, as well as the adaptive response of each species. PMID:21250477

  18. Differential concentration of Technetium-99 (99Tc) in common intertidal molluscs with different food habits

    Highlights: → 99Tc-concentrations were measured in fucoids and four mollusc species. → Study was done in an intertidal locality on the southwestern coast of Norway. → The results showed that the 99Tc-concentrations differed between the mollusc species. → Fucoids at the locality showed very high 99Tc-concentrations. → Highest 99Tc-concentrations in the herbivorous gastropods Patella vulgata and Littorina obtusata. - Abstract: Concentration of 99Tc has been measured in fucoids and molluscs, sampled in a sheltered intertidal at the southwest coast of Norway from February to November 2006. The concentrations of 99Tc in molluscs differed significantly between species. The filtering bivalve Mytilus edulis had the lowest concentrations with averages of 2.3-5.9 Bq kg-1 d.w., while the herbivorous gastropods Littorinalittorina, Littorina obtusata and Patella vulgata had higher concentrations. P. vulgata and L. obtusata had the highest concentrations, 40-47 and 26-30 Bq kg-1 d.w., respectively. L. obtusata has a specialized habit of living, and prefers to feed on fucoids. P. vulgata can graze extensively on the fucoid Ascophyllum nodosum when available. Fucoids are known to have very high uptake of 99Tc, and this was also found in the present study. The high 99Tc-concentrations of L. obtusata and P. vulgata are most likely due to their habit of feeding on fucoids.

  19. Variation in worm assemblages associated with Pomacea canaliculata (Caenogastropoda, Ampullariidae) in sites near the Río de la Plata estuary, Argentina.

    Damborenea, C; Brusa, E; Paola, A

    2006-12-01

    Pomacea canaliculata is a common gastropod in freshwater habitats from Central and Northern Argentina, extending northwards into the Amazon basin. Several Platyhelminthes have been reported associated to P. canaliculata, sharing an intimate relationship with this gastropod host. The objectives of this study were to describe the symbiotic species assemblages associated to P. canaliculata in the study area, and to disclose differences among them. Samples were taken in three typical small streams and one artificial lentic lagoon, all connected with the Rio de la Plata estuary. The 81.53% were infested with different symbiotic (sensu lato) species. Among the Platyhelminthes, the commensal Temnocephala iheringi Haswell, 1893 was highly prevalent in all samples, always in the mantle cavity. Four trematode taxa were recognized: (a) metacercariae of Echinostoma parcespinosum Lutz, 1924 in the mantle cavity and sporocysts in the digestive gland; (b) metacercariae of Dietziella egregia (Dietz, 1909) in the pericardial cavity; (c) unidentified xiphidiocercariae and (d) unidentified sporocysts and furcocercariae in the digestive gland. Nematode larvae and oligochaetes were found in two localities in the mantle cavity. Among the Annelida, Helobdella ampullariae Ringuelet, 1945 was found in the mantle cavity and lung of snails only from one locality. Our results show that although some of the symbionts are present in all localities, others are restricted to some particular ones, whether in their absolute numbers or in their relative abundance. Thus, each hosting population at the studied localities may be defined by the particular combination of symbionts that bears. PMID:17375466

  20. Fauna and paleoecological setting of the La Meseta Formation (Eocene), Antarctica

    Feldmann, R.M.; Wiedman, L.A.; Zinsmeister, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The La Meseta Formation, an Eocene sandstone from Seymour Island, Palmer Peninsula, Antarctica, has yielded a diverse fossil assemblage of body and trace fossils representative of a cool temperate, littoral to shallow sublittoral habitat. Over 61 taxa of macroinvertebrates, excluding gastropod body fossils, and more than 18 ichnogenera collected from the La Meseta represent the largest, most comprehensive and most diverse assemblage of Paleogene fossils from Antarctica. Included in the body fossil assemblage are species representative of at least 26 taxa of bivales, four taxa of echinoids, two of crinoids, two of ophiuroids, two of asteroids, one inarticulate and four articulate brachiopods, two barnacles, six decapod crustaceans, two cyclostome and two cheilostome bryozoans, a scaphopod and one coral. The traces include several burrow forms characteristic of the Skolithos ichnofacies of Seilacher (1967), several halo and rind burrows, gastropod predation borings, and abundant examples of teredid bivalve borings in lithified wood.Autecological analyses of the preserved organisms and environmental interpretations of the ichnogenera indicate a littoral to very shallow sublittoral environment of deposition, generally above wave base, for the la Meseta Sandstone. Modern congeneric descendants of the body fossils are known to inhabit both deep water and shallow water habitats. Of the 20 extant genera of bivalves reported from the La Meseta, 19 generally occur only in cool temperate habitats. Only one genus is known to occur south of 60/sup 0/. Most of the shallow water forms are known from cool temperate, austral regimes.

  1. Molecular phylogeny of euthyneura (mollusca: gastropoda).

    Grande, Cristina; Templado, José; Cervera, J Lucas; Zardoya, Rafael

    2004-02-01

    A new phylogenetic hypothesis for Euthyneura is proposed based on the analysis of primary sequence data (mitochondrial cox1, trnV, rrnL, trnL(cun), trnA, trnP, nad6, and nad5 genes) and the phylogenetic utility of two rare genomic changes (the relative position of the mitochondrial trnP gene, and an insertion/deletion event in a conserved region of the mitochondrial Cox1 protein) is addressed. Both sources of phylogenetic information clearly rejected the monophyly of pulmonates, a group of gastropods well supported so far by morphological evidence. The marine basommatophoran pulmonate Siphonaria was placed within opisthobranchs and shared with them the insertion of a Glycine in the Cox 1 protein. The marine systellommatophoran pulmonate Onchidella was recovered at the base of the opisthobranch + Siphonaria clade. Opisthobranchs, Siphonaria, and Onchidella shared the relative position of the mitochondrial trnP gene between the mitochondrial trnA and nad6 genes. The land snails and slugs (stylommatophoran pulmonates) were recovered as an early split in the phylogeny of advanced gastropods. The monophyly of the Euthyneura (Opisthobranchia + Pulmonata) was rejected by the inclusion of the heterostrophan Pyramidella. PMID:14660702

  2. Deep-sea food web analysis using cross-reacting antisera

    Feller, Robert J.; Zagursky, Gregory; Day, Elizabeth A.

    1985-04-01

    The high incidence of unrecognizable prey in the stomachs of deep-sea predators prompted the application of serological methods for identification of trophic connections. Antisera to whole-organism extracts of estuarine taxa cross-reacted with antigenic protein extracts of mid-water and deep-sea taxa along phylogenetically correct lines, indicating their potential as tools for gut contents immunoassay. Stomach, intestine, and rectum contents of grenadiers ( Coryphaenoides armatus) trapped at 2500 m in the North Atlantic were analyzed visually and with 32 antisera representing taxa from 10 common deep-sea phyla. While visual analysis only revealed the presence of fluids, parasites, crustacean exoskeletons, and gastropod opercula, the immunoassay indicated the presence of antigenic proteins from holothurian, anemone, gastropod, decapod, and foraminiferan prey in the same samples. This qualitative serological identification of prey at non-specific taxonomic levels provides evidence that benthic predation may be important within deep-sea communities. The immunoassay technique, although not a panacea for elucidating food web dynamics in remote environments, may be useful when other methods fail to identify trophic pathways.

  3. Gradients in the number of species at reef-seagrass ecotones explained by gradients in abundance.

    Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mathew A; Wernberg, Thomas; Thomsen, Mads S

    2011-01-01

    Gradients in the composition and diversity (e.g. number of species) of faunal assemblages are common at ecotones between juxtaposed habitats. Patterns in the number of species, however, can be confounded by patterns in abundance of individuals, because more species tend to be found wherever there are more individuals. We tested whether proximity to reefs influenced patterns in the composition and diversity ('species density'  =  number of species per area and 'species richness'  =  number of species per number of individuals) of prosobranch gastropods in meadows of two seagrasses with different physiognomy: Posidonia and Amphibolis. A change in the species composition was observed from reef-seagrass edges towards the interiors of Amphibolis, but not in Posidonia meadows. Similarly, the abundance of gastropods and species density was higher at edges relative to interiors of Amphibolis meadows, but not in Posidonia meadows. However, species richness was not affected by proximity to reefs in either type of seagrass meadow. The higher number of species at the reef-Amphibolis edge was therefore a consequence of higher abundance, rather than species richness per se. These results suggest that patterns in the composition and diversity of fauna with proximity to adjacent habitats, and the underlying processes that they reflect, likely depend on the physiognomy of the habitat. PMID:21629654

  4. Gradients in the Number of Species at Reef-Seagrass Ecotones Explained by Gradients in Abundance

    Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mathew A.; Wernberg, Thomas; Thomsen, Mads S.

    2011-01-01

    Gradients in the composition and diversity (e.g. number of species) of faunal assemblages are common at ecotones between juxtaposed habitats. Patterns in the number of species, however, can be confounded by patterns in abundance of individuals, because more species tend to be found wherever there are more individuals. We tested whether proximity to reefs influenced patterns in the composition and diversity (‘species density’ = number of species per area and ‘species richness’ = number of species per number of individuals) of prosobranch gastropods in meadows of two seagrasses with different physiognomy: Posidonia and Amphibolis. A change in the species composition was observed from reef-seagrass edges towards the interiors of Amphibolis, but not in Posidonia meadows. Similarly, the abundance of gastropods and species density was higher at edges relative to interiors of Amphibolis meadows, but not in Posidonia meadows. However, species richness was not affected by proximity to reefs in either type of seagrass meadow. The higher number of species at the reef-Amphibolis edge was therefore a consequence of higher abundance, rather than species richness per se. These results suggest that patterns in the composition and diversity of fauna with proximity to adjacent habitats, and the underlying processes that they reflect, likely depend on the physiognomy of the habitat. PMID:21629654

  5. Gradients in the number of species at reef-seagrass ecotones explained by gradients in abundance.

    Fernando Tuya

    Full Text Available Gradients in the composition and diversity (e.g. number of species of faunal assemblages are common at ecotones between juxtaposed habitats. Patterns in the number of species, however, can be confounded by patterns in abundance of individuals, because more species tend to be found wherever there are more individuals. We tested whether proximity to reefs influenced patterns in the composition and diversity ('species density'  =  number of species per area and 'species richness'  =  number of species per number of individuals of prosobranch gastropods in meadows of two seagrasses with different physiognomy: Posidonia and Amphibolis. A change in the species composition was observed from reef-seagrass edges towards the interiors of Amphibolis, but not in Posidonia meadows. Similarly, the abundance of gastropods and species density was higher at edges relative to interiors of Amphibolis meadows, but not in Posidonia meadows. However, species richness was not affected by proximity to reefs in either type of seagrass meadow. The higher number of species at the reef-Amphibolis edge was therefore a consequence of higher abundance, rather than species richness per se. These results suggest that patterns in the composition and diversity of fauna with proximity to adjacent habitats, and the underlying processes that they reflect, likely depend on the physiognomy of the habitat.

  6. Accumulation of free and covalently bound microcystins in tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda) following toxic cyanobacteria or dissolved microcystin-LR exposure

    Accumulation of free microcystins (MCs) in freshwater gastropods has been demonstrated but accumulation of MCs covalently bound to tissues has never been considered so far. Here, we follow the accumulation of total (free and bound) MCs in Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to i) dissolved MC-LR (33 and 100 μg L-1) and ii) Planktothrix agardhii suspensions producing 5 and 33 μg MC-LR equivalents L-1 over a 5-week period, and after a 3-week depuration period. Snails exposed to dissolved MC-LR accumulated up to 0.26 μg total MCs g-1 dry weight (DW), with no detection of bound MCs. Snails exposed to MCs producing P. agardhii accumulated up to 69.9 μg total MCs g-1 DW, of which from 17.7 to 66.7% were bound. After depuration, up to 15.3 μg g-1 DW of bound MCs were detected in snails previously exposed to toxic cyanobacteria, representing a potential source of MCs transfer through the food web. - The study concerns accumulation and elimination of both free and bound microcystins (MCs) in tissues of a gastropod exposed to MCs producing cyanobacteria or dissolved MC-LR.

  7. Fatal Paratanaisia bragai (Digenea: Eucotylidae) infection in scarlet macaws (Ara macao) in Costa Rica.

    Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Morales, Juan Alberto; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Santoro, Mario

    2015-09-01

    We report on four fatal cases of renal infection due to Paratanaisia bragai in scarlet macaws (Ara macao) from two rescue centres in Costa Rica. At necropsy, birds had severe dehydration and cachexia. Two birds had hydropericardium, oedematous lungs, and liver lipidic degeneration. All birds had enlarged kidneys with brown pale discoloration and diffuse white spots on the cortical and sliced surfaces. Ureters were filled with many specimens of P. bragai. Histopathologically, the urinary system revealed multifocal interstitial lymphocytic-plasmacytic nephritis, multifocal mineralization of renal tubules, and interstitial fibrosis associated with flukes. Death of all scarlet macaws was related to severe nephritis leading to chronic renal failure due to P. bragai infection. It is plausible that P. bragai infection of scarlet macaws was accidental due to ingestion of the gastropod intermediate host inside the cages during the rainy season when humidity is higher and gastropods are more active. This represents the second report of parasitism by Eucotylidae digeneans in birds of Psittaciformes and the first in scarlet macaws. PMID:26204012

  8. Geochemistry and bioavailability of mudflats and mangrove sediments and their effect on bioaccumulation in selected organisms within a tropical (Zuari) estuary, Goa, India.

    Dias, Heidy Q; Nayak, G N

    2016-04-15

    Metals are non-degradable in the aquatic environment and play a vital role in estuarine biogeochemistry but could also be detrimental to associated biota. A comparative evaluation of the trace metal concentrations (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co) was carried out in the Zuari estuary, Goa during the post-monsoon season of 2013 at six locations, each representing three mangrove and three mudflat regions. In addition, fractionation of trace metals in sediments was performed to provide information on the mobility, distribution, bioavailability and toxicity. Special attention was paid to the marine mollusks viz. bivalves and gastropods that are extensively used as bio-indicators in coastal pollution. Considering the percentage of metals in the sequentially extracted fractions, the order of mobility from most to least bioavailable forms was Mn > Zn > Cu > Ni > Co > Fe. Mn maintained high bioavailability (average around 60%) in Fe-Mn oxide and carbonate bound forms indicating that Mn is readily available for biota uptake. The bioavailability of Fe was on an average of around 6% whereas other metals like Cu, Zn, Ni and Co were around 19% to 34%. When the bioavailable values were compared with standard Screening Quick Reference Table (SQUIRT), Zn showed higher toxicity level and bioavailability in the lower estuary. On the basis of calculated Bio Sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAF's), overall trend in bioaccumulation was in the order of Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Fe. Metal Pollution Index (MPI) computed was higher for gastropods than bivalves. PMID:26920425

  9. INTRODUCTION After fourteen years of pioneering systematic work spanning from 1996 to 2010, carried out in the territory of Santa Catarina State, SC, within the Brazilian Southern region, framed in the socalled Atlantic Slope of the Southern Cone of South America (Agudo-Padrón, 2008a, a basic list of continental (land and freshwater and marine mollusc species was compiled. Besides constant interactions and consultations with numerous national and international specialists, such a list was mostly based on available literature and/or analyses of voucher specimens deposited in collections belonging to research centers or environmental education institutes. To date (up to the first semester of 2010, this list comprises a total of 878 taxa (species and subspecies, including 695 marine and 183 continental forms, and these numbers are likely to increase as field surveys ensue. In the present study, results obtained from the author’s active participation in three recent regional field sampling expeditions dealing with marine and continental mollusc taxa, are reported. I. Official State program for listing and control of invasive exotic species Starting from November 2009, and for the first time in the history of Santa Catarina State, the presence of invasive allochthonous mollusc species in Santa Catarina State was studied and discussed through the organisation of seminars by the Official Foundation for the Environment of the State of Santa Catarina (Fundação do Meio Ambiente – FATMA jointly with the Hórus Institute for Development and Environmental Conservation (Instituto Hórus de Desenvolvimento e Conservação Ambiental, with the main goal to compile the Official State List of Species. To date, the occurrence of a total of twenty allochthonous (exotic forms of mollusc species has been confirmed, 14 Gastropoda and 6 Bivalvia [namely, 11 terrestrial gastropods, 5 freshwater taxa (3 gastropods and 2 bivalves and 4 marine bivalves]. Taking into account the

    A. Ignacio Agudo-Padrón

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Available knowledge of malacofauna (mollusc species conservation in the territory of Santa Catarina State,SC, central Southern Brazil region, is shortly analyzed and discussed herein. Present data originate from theauthor's active participation in three recent regional unpublished events dealing with biodiversity conservationin the State, carried out to cope the sensitive lack of population studies which is the main difficulty to face inorder to provide accurate and detailed evaluations on biodiversity and its conservation status.

  10. Drilling predation on molluscs in the northern Adriatic Sea: Spatial variability and temporal trends over the last millennia

    Dengg, Markus; Wurzer, Sandra; Gallmetzer, Ivo; Haselmair, Alexandra; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Competition and predation are essential ecological factors influencing biodiversity. In a palaeontological context, the rate of predatory interactions between animal species is difficult to reconstruct because traces of predation are rarely incorporated into the fossil record. In the marine environment, the calcareous shells of molluscs, however, have good, long-time preservation potential, and predation in this group is often exerted by carnivorous gastropods that drill holes into mollusc shells. The prey's perforated shells remain in the sediment and can be used to study rates and intensities of predatory interactions in past marine molluscan communities. Differences in drilling frequencies along a sediment core not only reflect changes in local species richness and predation pressure, but may also mirror ecosystem changes through space and time. This makes the analysis of drilling predation an important tool when investigating the historical ecology of marine habitats. We used 1.5-m-long sediment cores from seven shelf locations spread throughout the northern Adriatic Sea basin to investigate regional and down-core variations in drilling frequencies. In total, about 54,000 bivalve and 40,000 gastropod shells were analysed to determine the following parameters: 1) overall drill frequency (DF), the proportion of shells drilled by predators; 2) edge drill frequency (EDF, only in bivalve shells), the proportion of shells with drilling traces at the shell edge; 3) multiple drill frequency (MDF), the percentage of individuals with more than one drill hole, 4) incomplete drill frequency (IDF), the percentage of shells unsuccessfully drilled; 5) prey effectiveness (PE), the proportion of individuals resisting the predator's attacks. Total drill frequency across all cores is 18% for bivalves and 13% for gastropods, but there are marked regional differences, with minima in the Po Delta (5%) and maxima in Panzano Bay (24%). Edge-drilled shells and multiple drill holes on

  11. Depositional environment, foraminifer content and ESR ages of Quaternary Gediz Delta Sediments (Eastern Aegean Sea, İzmir-Western Turkey)

    Gökçe Benli, Ekin; Aydın, Hülya; İşintek, İsmail; Engin, Birol; Şengöçmen, Berna

    2016-04-01

    Sediments and fossil content of Gediz Delta (Eastern Aegean Sea - İzmir) were examined based on the drilling core samples of the YSK-C and SK-246 drilling. W-SW part of the Delta is represented by continental delta sediments up to 6 meters and shallow marine detritic sediments up to 35 meters in the YSK-C drilling. Continental part consists of an soiled, graveled, muddy and sandy sediment in terms of rich organic substance. As for marine part, it consists of bioclast, muddy, fine graveled sand and by repetition of pebble, sand and bioclast bearing mud layers. Bioclasts comprise of bivalvia, echinoid, ostracod, gastropod, foramifer and bryozoa fragments. Benthic foraminiferal fauna determinated in the marine levels are represented by 55 bethic, 2 planktonic species. These foraminifers and bioclasts reflect that the W-SW part of the delta, has been occured in marine conditions between 8-31m deep. E-NE part of the delta is generally represented by continental sediments up to 43.5m in SK-246 drilling. In addition, it includes marine levels in 18-19 m, 23-24 m and 36-37,5 m intervals. Continental sediments of E-NE part is generally represented by calcareous and sandy mud rocks which mostly includes ash, tuff, and pebble derived from Neogene volcanic rocks. As for marine levels, it is composed of calcareous mud stones and calcareous clay stones including very thin gastropod, bivalvia and ostracod in 18- 19 and 36-37.5 meters whereas it is represented by sandy mud stones including a great deal of bentic foraminifer, bivalvia, bryozoa, echinoid, gastropod in 23-24 metres. Thus show that E-NE part of the delta is usually in continental condition but it is occasionally covered by sea. In aging studies of YSK-C core done by ESR method, age of 8-9 m interval is determined to be 11. 376 ± 0,067 Ka; however ages of 10-11m and 24-25 m intervals are revealed to be 16.466 ± 0,016 Ka and 15.344 ± 0,021 Ka respectively; finally age of 25-26 m interval is found to be 19.995 ± 0

  12. Fatty acid compositions and trophic relationships of shelled molluscs from the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the adjacent abyssal plain

    Kharlamenko, Vladimir I.; Würzberg, Laura; Peters, Janna; Borisovets, Evgeny E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) compositions of 12 species of shelled molluscs (gastropods, bivalves, and scaphopods) from the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the adjacent abyssal plain were studied. According to the results of multivariate statistical analysis, molluscs were divided into three groups. Group I consisted of three scaphopod species, the bivalve Nucula profundorum and the gastropod Solariella delicata. FA compositions of this group were characterized by high levels of 20:4(n-6). We suggest that the FA pattern found in scaphopods with high values of 20:4(n-6) is most likely typical for that of benthic organisms feeding preferentially on foraminiferans. Group II included the bivalves Neilonella politissima, Bentharca asperula, and Rhinoclama filatovae. Bivalves from the second group had elevated concentrations of 22:6(n-3), and the ratio of 20:4(n-6) to 20:5(n-3) was lower than 1. Bivalves from the second group had elevated concentrations of 22:6(n-3). We propose that high concentrations of this FA can be used as a specific marker for a carnivorous feeding mode of deep-sea benthic invertebrates. The bivalve Bathyspinula calcarella as well as the scaphopod Polyschides sakuraii could not unambiguously be assigned to one group. Within the similarity analysis they rather clustered together with the foraminiferans feeders (group I), but forming an own subgroup. In the PCA on the other hand, P. sakuraii showed a position close to the other bivalves, while B. calcarella had an intermediate position between all three groups. Group III consisted of the gastropods Tacita holoserica and Paracteocina sp., which contained high concentrations of 20:5(n-3) and 22:5(n-3). Both are known to exhibit a carnivorous/scavenging feeding strategy. The very low content of DHA in both species is on first sight not consistent with the suggested carnivorous feeding behavior. A characteristic feature of Paracteocina sp. and T. holoserica was a high level of 22:5(n-3), and HUFA ratios indicate that DHA

  13. PRELIMINARY PALAEOSYNECOLOGICAL ANALYSES ON THE UPPER ANISIAN (MIDDLE TRIASSIC)QINGYAN FAUNA%中三叠世青岩生物群的群体古生态学初步研究

    2001-01-01

    The Qingyan fauna (Upper Anisian, Middle Triassic) was found from a section located at about 30km south of Guiyang, the provincial capital of Guizhou Province, SW China. Here yields abundant well-preserved and highly diversed fossils, involving 16-17 groups of organisms, among which gastropods, frachiopods and bivalves are dominant. Some macrofossils are a eommon sight here including corals, sponges, crinoids, scaphapods, ammonoids, nautilids, bryozoaus and echinoids. whereas others such as porifers, cnidarians and annelids are rare in occurrence but visible sometimes. Among microfossils abounded in this fauna, snch groups as ostracods, foraminiferans and calcareous algae were analysed.   After a palaeosynecologic study combining with palaeogeographic analyses we believe that the Qingyan fauna might have developed in an environment of a protected shallow marine habitat, which was lacated at a position of the upper part of basin slope. The sea bottom was fine-grained and stable. The rates of sedimentation were generally relatively low. The water was relatively deep and the organisms lived in the photic zone above the storm wave base and below the fair-weather wave base.   Epibenthic forms are the main groups in this primarily benthic fauna. Shallow burrowing in fauna and semiinfauna form smaller portions. In traphic habits, suspension-feeders are the dominant group. In a ddition, there are herbivores (gastropods), detritus-feeders, scavengers, and omnivores, a few deposit-feeders and few micro- and macro-carnivores.   The high percentage of suspension-feeders in the fauna indicates that the water was clean and clear, gently moving, and rich in oxygen and nutrients. The highly diverse associations, especially bivalves and gastropods, most probablyre present selics of community which had lived in patches of macroalgae.%根据群体古生态学的初步研究,认为青岩生物群的富集是因为发育一个较为特殊的生态环境,即位于斜坡

  14. Mineral bridges in nacre revisited

    Checa, Antonio G; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2012-01-01

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200 nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (> 100 nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (< 60 nm), earlier reported to be mineral bridges, found to be such.

  15. Influence of Biological Factors on Connectivity Patterns for Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile

    Garavelli, Lysel; Colas, François; Verley, Philippe; Kaplan, David Michael; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Lett, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In marine benthic ecosystems, larval connectivity is a major process influencing the maintenance and distribution of invertebrate populations. Larval connectivity is a complex process to study as it is determined by several interacting factors. Here we use an individual-based, biophysical model, to disentangle the effects of such factors, namely larval vertical migration, larval growth, larval mortality, adults fecundity, and habitat availability, for the marine gastropod Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile. Lower transport success and higher dispersal distances are observed including larval vertical migration in the model. We find an overall decrease in larval transport success to settlement areas from northern to southern Chile. This spatial gradient results from the combination of current direction and intensity, seawater temperature, and available habitat. From our simulated connectivity patterns we then identify subpopulations of loco along the Chilean coast, which could serve as a basis for spatial management of this resource in the future. PMID:26751574

  16. [Microsymbiocenosis of Codiella mollusks as a basis for symbiotic relations in the parasite-host system in opisthorchiasis].

    Kataeva, L V; Karpukhina, N F; Stepanova, K B; Kolotova, O N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the first step of microparasitocenosis investigation was to study the microbiocenosis of the first intermediate hosts of O. felineus--prosobranch gastropods of the genus Codiella, as well as their habitats. Materials were collected in the Iryum River of the Ob-Irtysh basin. The microflora of mollusks, water, and soil from their habitats was examined. The predominant flora was Aeromonas species in the biocenosis of mollusks and Enterobacteriaceae in the microbiocenosis of the water basin and soil. Examination of the microbial communities in the mollusks and their habitats showed that the range of microbial populations of mollusks was wider in species composition as compared to the microbiocenosis of soil and water. PMID:25286543

  17. Seasonal variation in imposex intensity of Thais clavigera

    LI Zhengyan

    2005-01-01

    Imposex,specifically caused by TBT pollution,refers to the superimposition of male sexual characteristics in gastropod females.Seasonal variation of imposex intensity in Thais clavigera from both slightly and severely contaminated sites in Hong Kong waters was studied from 1988 to 1999. The male penis length showed significant difference between both sites and seasons. It was shortest during late autumn and early winter (October to December) and longest during spring and early summer (February to June). Female penis length also showed significant difference between sites. It did not change seasonally, however. The RPS (Relative Penis Size) index was the highest during autumn and early winter, and the lowest during spring and early summer. The VDS (Vas Deferens Sequence) index remained stable throughout the sampling period. This study showed that VDS index is a better indicator when we compare relative intensity of imposex. The comparison can only be meaningful provided the samples from different locations are taken during the same season.

  18. IMPOSEX IN THE MARINE SNAIL XANTHOCHORUS BUXEA (BRODERIP, 1833 (MURICIDAE FROM THE SOUTH AMERICAN PACIFIC

    Guabloche, Angélica

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The imposex phenomenon is the emergence of male sexual characteristics on the reproductive system of female prosobranch gastropod snails. This alteration was historically associated with contamination with organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT. In this study we evaluated the incidence of imposex in the marine snail Xanthochorus buxea (Broderip, 1833 (Muricidae from Hermosa Beach, Ancon, Lima, Peru. Imposex percentage was 97.6%. The rate of the relative length of the penis (RPLI was equal to 94.3. Astatistically significant relationship was found between the shell length and length of the penis in males and females. This research is the first application of X. buxea as a bioindicator of organotin components in Peru from the South American Pacific coast.

  19. Dietary shift in corallivorous Drupella snails following a major bleaching event at Koh Tao, Gulf of Thailand

    Hoeksema, B. W.; Scott, C.; True, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    The island Koh Tao in the western Gulf of Thailand suffered severe coral bleaching in 2010. Its mushroom coral fauna of 20 species was surveyed during the bleaching in 2010 and after the bleaching in 2011. Multi-species assemblages of free-living mushroom corals occurred around the island, two of which were invaded by corallivorous Drupella snails after the bleaching. Previously these gastropods were known to mainly consume branching corals and hardly any mushroom corals. The snails were found preying on four fungiid species, three of which were susceptible to bleaching. The dietary shift became apparent after populations of preferred prey species (Acroporidae and Pocilloporidae) had died during the bleaching event. It seems that bleaching mortality reduced the availability of preferred prey, causing the corallivores to switch to less preferred species that occur in dense aggregations.

  20. Upper Miocene Echinoderms and Crabs OF Mishan Formation in Firuzabad Fars, Iran (Zagros Mountain)

    Dehbozorgi Dehbozorgi, Mehdi; Sabouhi Sabouhi, Mostafa; Nabavi Nabavi, Hamid

    2010-05-01

    The out crapes of Mishan Formation located in Aghar area(Firuzabad city) south west of Fars and 70km south west of Firuzabad. this Formation mostly consist of limestone, marly limestone and marlstone with 800m thickness. 6key beds distinctive from limestone beds are recognized in this area. In order to paleontological studies Mishan formation Middle- Upper Miocene beds in south west Firuzabad city investigated. Upper and lower boundaries of Mishan formation are conformable with Razak and Aghajari formations. In addition, assemblage of Gastropods, Bivalves, calcareous alga, bentic foraminifera, beryozoa were obtained that showing shallow sedimentation environment and open marine platform. Echinoderms are assigned to order Clypeasteroida and genus Scutella faujast, Schizaster sp, Oligopygus wetherbyi, Periarchus lyelli. Crabs be assigned to subphylum Crustacea and order Decapods: Portunus cf. gibbesii(1859). With due attention to rang and distribution of the Macrofossils, 5 local assmblage biozone were recognized, that is confirming time limit from Early- Upper Miocene.

  1. Variation in the response of the invasive species Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Smith) to natural (cyanobacterial toxin) and anthropogenic (herbicide atrazine) stressors

    In the context of increasing freshwater pollution, the impact on life-traits (survival, growth and fecundity) and locomotion of Potamopyrgus antipodarum of a 5-week field-concentration exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR and the triazine herbicide, atrazine was studied. Whatever the age of exposed snails (juveniles, subadults, adults), microcystin-LR induced a decrease in survival, growth and fecundity but had no effect on locomotion. Atrazine induced a decrease in locomotory activity but had no significant effect on the life-traits. These results are discussed in terms of consequences to field populations. - At concentrations relevant to the field, cyanobacterial toxins (natural) and atrazine (anthropogenic) are detrimental to the gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum, with a greater toxicity for the natural (vs anthropogenic) stressor

  2. Evidence of weaker phenotypic plasticity by prey to novel cues from non-native predators.

    Hollander, Johan; Bourdeau, Paul E

    2016-08-01

    A central question in evolutionary biology is how coevolutionary history between predator and prey influences their interactions. Contemporary global change and range expansion of exotic organisms impose a great challenge for prey species, which are increasingly exposed to invading non-native predators, with which they share no evolutionary history. Here, we complete a comprehensive survey of empirical studies of coevolved and naive predator-prey interactions to assess whether a shared evolutionary history with predators influences the magnitude of predator-induced defenses mounted by prey. Using marine bivalves and gastropods as model prey, we found that coevolved prey and predator-naive prey showed large discrepancies in magnitude of predator-induced phenotypic plasticity. Although naive prey, predominantly among bivalve species, did exhibit some level of plasticity - prey exposed to native predators showed significantly larger amounts of phenotypic plasticity. We discuss these results and the implications they may have for native communities and ecosystems. PMID:27551388

  3. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization. PMID:26297577

  4. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere. Oxidative rock weathering on land induces oxidation of immobile Cr(III) to mobile Cr(VI). Isotopically relatively heavy Cr(VI) is released to runoff, and transported by rivers to the oceans, where it is incorporated into chemical sediments and carbonate shells. In the...... laterite soils from India, formed on ultramafic rocks, indicates extensive leaching of isotopically heavy Cr(VI). Transferring this knowledge to ancient weathering profiles, negatively fractionated Cr is clear evidence for the presence of free oxygen in the atmosphere. The second part demonstrates that the...... processes (biological productivity). In the third part the potential use of the Cr-isotope system in the marine environment is discussed. Incorporation into biogenic carbonates (bivalves, gastropods, corals) is accompanied by Cr-isotope fractionation, causing negative seawater-shell offsets. None of the...

  5. Defining Boundaries for Ecosystem-Based Management: A Multispecies Case Study of Marine Connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    Robert J. Toonen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the geographic scale at which to apply ecosystem-based management (EBM has proven to be an obstacle for many marine conservation programs. Generalizations based on geographic proximity, taxonomy, or life history characteristics provide little predictive power in determining overall patterns of connectivity, and therefore offer little in terms of delineating boundaries for marine spatial management areas. Here, we provide a case study of 27 taxonomically and ecologically diverse species (including reef fishes, marine mammals, gastropods, echinoderms, cnidarians, crustaceans, and an elasmobranch that reveal four concordant barriers to dispersal within the Hawaiian Archipelago which are not detected in single-species exemplar studies. We contend that this multispecies approach to determine concordant patterns of connectivity is an objective and logical way in which to define the minimum number of management units and that EBM in the Hawaiian Archipelago requires at least five spatially managed regions.

  6. ENERGY FLOW OF BELLAMYA AERUGINOSA IN A SHALLOW ALGAL LAKE, HOUHU LAKE (WUHAN, CHINA)

    2001-01-01

    The energy budget of Bellamya earuginosa in a shallow algal lake, Houhu Lake (Wuhan, China) was investigated by the measurement of flesh production (32.8kJ/(m2*a)), egestion (337.7 kJ/(m2*a)), metabolism (246.7 kJ/(m2*a)), and estimation of excretion (21.4kJ/(m2*a)). The net growth efficiency of the species is about 10.9%, which accords with the generally reported value for gastropods. In addition, the relationships between starvation respiration (R, mgO2/(Ind*d)), body weight (Wd, mg in dry wt) and temperature (T, ℃) were also determined. The regression equation R=0.044 Wd0.537 e0.061T was obtained by the least square method, The measured SDA of the species is 26.51% of its gross metabolism.

  7. Production of marine trematode cercariae: a potentially overlooked path of energy flow in benthic systems

    Thieltges, David W.; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Fredensborg, Brian;

    2008-01-01

    . We use published data on rates at which trematodes produce free-swimming infective larvae (cercariae) that are released from their gastropod intermediate hosts to investigate patterns in cercarial output as a function of different variables, and to calculate the annual production of cercariae in...... different marine benthic systems. Across 18 trematode species, cercarial output (no. cercariae shed snail-1 d-1) ranged over 4 orders of magnitude and was positively correlated with snail host species size. While cercarial output did not correlate with latitude, it did correlate negatively with the size of...... cercariae, and was influenced by the type of downstream host sought by cercariae, being highest when this host was a vertebrate. Our estimates of annual cercarial production (kJ m-2 yr-1), which take into account the density of infected snails in the habitat, were within the range of production values...

  8. Faunal impact on vegetation structure and ecosystem function in mangrove forests

    Cannicci, S.; Burrows, Damien; Fratini, Sara;

    2008-01-01

    The last 20 years witnessed a real paradigm shift concerning the impact of biotic factors on ecosystem functions as well as on vegetation structure of mangrove forests. Before this small scientific revolution took place, structural aspects of mangrove forests were viewed to be the result of abiotic...... ecosystem engineers, change particle size distribution and enhance soil aeration. Our understanding of the strong impact of gastropods, by means of high intake rates of mangrove products and differential consumption of propagules, has changed only recently. The role of insects must also be stressed. It is...... now clear that older techniques used to assess herbivory rates by insects strongly underestimate their impact, both in case of leaf eating and wood boring species and that herbivorous insects can potentially play a strong role in many aspects of mangrove ecology. Moreover, researchers only recently...

  9. Mollusks of the Upper Jurassic (upper Oxfordian-lower Kimmeridgian) shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation, northeastern Mexico

    Zell, Patrick; Beckmann, Seija; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Götte, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We present the first systematic description of Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) invertebrates from the shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation of northeastern Mexico. The unit was generally considered to be extremely poor in fossils, due to an overall evaporitic character. The collection described here includes three taxa of ammonites, 10 taxa of bivalves and five taxa of gastropods. The fossils were discovered near Galeana and other localities in southern Nuevo León and northeastern San Luis Potosí, in thin-bedded marly limestones intercalated between gypsum units. Due to complex internal deformation of the sediments, fossils used for this study cannot be assigned to precise layers of origin. However, the taxa identified suggest a Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) age for these fossil-bearing layers and allow us, for the first time, to assign a biostratigraphic age to Upper Jurassic strata in the region underlying the La Caja and La Casita formations.

  10. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of the cephalopod mollusc, Idiosepius notoides

    Wollesen, Tim; Loesel, R; Wanninger, Andreas Wilhelm Georg

    2008-01-01

    For more than a century, cephalopod molluscs have been the subject of extensive studies with respect to their complex neuroanatomy and behavior. In comparison to gastropod molluscs surprisingly little work has been carried out on the characterization of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS......) of cephalopods with respect to their neurotransmitter phenotypes. This study presents preliminary results on the distribution of FMRFamide-like immunoreactive neurons within the CNS of the pygmy squid Idiosepius notoides . Its gross neuroanatomy resembles that of other cephalopods. FMRFamide...... the vertical lobes. Although certain immunohistochemical traits are shared with other cephalopods, such as a wall-like arrangement of FMRFamide-like immunoreactive cell somata within the dorsal basal lobe, others have so far only been found in Idiosepius . However, future investigations on other...

  11. Ciliary and mucus-net filter feeding, with special reference to fluid mechanical characteristics

    Jørgensen, C.B.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.;

    1984-01-01

    Filter characteristics were determined and compared in ciliary and mucus-net filter feeders. The ciliary feeders include the polychaete Sabella penicillus, the brachiopod Terebratulina retusa, the marine bivalves Monia squama, Cardium glaucum, and Petricola pholadiformis, and the freshwater...... bivalves Dreissena polymorpha, Unio pictorum and Anodonta cygnea. The mucus-net feeders are the polychaete Chaetopterus variopedatus, the gastropod Crepidula fornicata and the ascidians Styela clava, Ciona intestinalis, Ascidia virginea, A. obliqua and A. mentula. Efficiencies of particle retention as a...... function of particle size was determined by counting of particles in samples of inhalant and exhalant water. The lower threshold for efficient particle retention varied from .apprx. 6 .mu.m in T. retuso to .apprx. 1 .mu.m in D. polymorpha. Mucus nets efficiently retained particles down to 1-2 .mu.m. Filter...

  12. A conotoxin from Conus textile with unusual posttranslational modifications reduces presynaptic Ca2+ influx

    Rigby, A C; Lucas-Meunier, E; Kalume, D E;

    1999-01-01

    Cone snails are gastropod mollusks of the genus Conus that live in tropical marine habitats. They are predators that paralyze their prey by injection of venom containing a plethora of small, conformationally constrained peptides (conotoxins). We report the identification, characterization, and...... structure of a gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing peptide, conotoxin epsilon-TxIX, isolated from the venom of the molluscivorous cone snail, Conus textile. The disulfide bonding pattern of the four cysteine residues, an unparalleled degree of posttranslational processing including bromination......2+ in a slow and reversible fashion. The three-dimensional structure, determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy, identifies an electronegative patch created by the side chains of two gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues that extend outward from a cavernous cleft. The glycosylated threonine...

  13. Conotoxins: Structure, Therapeutic Potential and Pharmacological Applications.

    Mir, Rafia; Karim, Sajjad; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Wilson, Cornelia M; Mirza, Zeenat

    2016-01-01

    Cone snails, also known as marine gastropods, from Conus genus produce in their venom a diverse range of small pharmacologically active structured peptides called conotoxins. The cone snail venoms are widely unexplored arsenal of toxins with therapeutic and pharmacological potential, making them a treasure trove of ligands and peptidic drug leads. Conotoxins are small disulfide bonded peptides, which act as remarkable selective inhibitors and modulators of ion channels (calcium, sodium, potassium), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, noradrenaline transporters, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and neurotensin receptors. They are highly potent and specific against several neuronal targets making them valuable as research tools, drug leads and even therapeutics. In this review, we discuss their gene superfamily classification, nomenclature, post-translational modification, structural framework, pharmacology and medical applications of the active conopeptides. We aim to give an overview of their structure and therapeutic potential. Understanding these aspects of conopeptides will help in designing more specific peptidic analogues. PMID:26601961

  14. Anthropogenic mortality on coral reefs in Caribbean Panama predates coral disease and bleaching.

    Cramer, Katie L; Jackson, Jeremy B C; Angioletti, Christopher V; Leonard-Pingel, Jill; Guilderson, Thomas P

    2012-06-01

    Caribbean reef corals have declined precipitously since the 1980s due to regional episodes of bleaching, disease and algal overgrowth, but the extent of earlier degradation due to localised historical disturbances such as land clearing and overfishing remains unresolved. We analysed coral and molluscan fossil assemblages from reefs near Bocas del Toro, Panama to construct a timeline of ecological change from the 19th century-present. We report large changes before 1960 in coastal lagoons coincident with extensive deforestation, and after 1960 on offshore reefs. Striking changes include the demise of previously dominant staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis and oyster Dendrostrea frons that lives attached to gorgonians and staghorn corals. Reductions in bivalve size and simplification of gastropod trophic structure further implicate increasing environmental stress on reefs. Our paleoecological data strongly support the hypothesis, from extensive qualitative data, that Caribbean reef degradation predates coral bleaching and disease outbreaks linked to anthropogenic climate change. PMID:22462739

  15. Taxonomic diversity and structure of the molluscan fauna in Oualidia lagoon (Moroccan Atlantic coast).

    El Asri, F; Zidane, H; Maanan, M; Tamsouri, M; Errhif, A

    2015-08-01

    The spatial distribution of the molluscan fauna of Oualidia lagoon (Moroccan Atlantic coast) was studied during winter 2013. Samples were collected from 43 stations over the whole of the lagoon. Twenty-eight taxa (19 species of gastropods, 7 species of bivalves, 1 species of polyplacophora, and 1 species of cephalopod) were listed, 21 of which are newly reported for Oualidia lagoon. Four taxa, Hydrobia sp. (78.29%), followed by Abra alba (13.99 ), Nassarius pfeifferi (5.07%), and Cerastoderma edule (1.32%), were accounted for 98% of the total abundance. A classification analysis used to characterize the lagoon on the basis of molluscs showed the existence of three main clusters from downstream to upstream: a Nassarius pfeifferi community, a Hydrobia sp.-Abra alba community and a Hydrobia sp.-Cerastoderma edule community. PMID:26231976

  16. Investigation of molluscan phylogeny on the basis of 18S rRNA sequences.

    Winnepenninckx, B; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1996-12-01

    The 18S rRNA sequences of 12 molluscs, representing the extant classes Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Polyplacophora, Scaphopoda, and Caudofoveata, were determined and compared with selected known 18S rRNA sequences of Metazoa, including other Mollusca. These data do not provide support for a close relationship between Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria) and Mollusca, but rather suggest that the latter group belongs to a clade of eutrochozoan coelomates. The 18S rRNA data fail to recover molluscan, bivalve, or gastropod monophyly. However, the branching pattern of the eutrochozoan phyla and classes is unstable, probably due to the explosive Cambrian radiation during which these groups arose. Similarly, the 18S rRNA data do not provide a reliable signal for the molluscan interclass relationships. Nevertheless, we obtained strong preliminary support for phylogenetic inferences at more restricted taxonomic levels, such as the monophyly of Polyplacophora, Caenogastropoda, Euthyneura, Heterodonta, and Arcoida. PMID:8952075

  17. Marine pollution effects on the southern surf crab Ovalipes trimaculatus (Crustacea: Brachyura: Polybiidae) in Patagonia Argentina.

    Lezcano, Aníbal Hernán; Rojas Quiroga, María Laura; Liberoff, Ana Laura; Van der Molen, Silvina

    2015-02-28

    We compared the carapace shape and thickness as well as the energy density of Ovalipes trimaculatus inhabiting areas comprising a gradient of marine pollution: high, moderate and undetected, in the Nuevo gulf (Patagonia Argentina). The carapace shape was evaluated by means of individual asymmetry scores (=fluctuating asymmetry) whereas the carapace thickness was assessed by measuring the carapace dry weight. The energy density was analyzed through its negative relationship with water content in muscle tissue. The individual asymmetry scores as well as the percentage of water content in muscle tissue were proportional to the marine pollution gradient, whereas the carapaces thickness did not differ among sampling sites. Our results are consistent with previous findings and demonstrate the direct effect of marine pollution on other taxa different from gastropods, cephalopods and polyplacophora and add to long-standing concerns about detrimental effects caused by marine pollution on the benthic community of the Nuevo gulf. PMID:25293645

  18. Assessment of arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Tarut Island, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Youssef, Mohamed; Al-Kahtany, Khaled; Al-Otaiby, Naif

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess arsenic on the Tarut coast, Saudi Arabian Gulf, 38 sediment samples, 26 seawater samples and 40 gastropod and bivalve specimens were collected for analyses by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer. The Enrichment Factor (EF), the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) and the Contamination Factor (CF) indicated that coastal sediments of Tarut Island are severely enriched, strongly polluted and very highly contaminated with arsenic as a result of anthropogenic inputs. Comparison with arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Red Sea, the Arabian Gulf and abroad coasts suggested that the studied samples have higher concentrations of As. The suggested natural sources of arsenic in the study area are the weathering and decomposition of neighboring deserts. The anthropogenic sources include the land reclamation, petrochemical industries, boat exhaust emissions, oil leakage, desalination plants and sewage effluents. These anthropogenic sources are the dominant sources of As in the study area and mostly came from Al Jubail industrial city to the north.

  19. Are intertidal soft sediment assemblages affected by repeated oil spill events? A field-based experimental approach.

    Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Martins, César C; Lana, Paulo C

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the impact of repeated diesel spills on the structure of intertidal macrofaunal assemblages of a subtropical estuary. Three frequencies of exposure events were compared against two dosages of oil in a factorial experiment with asymmetrical controls. Hypotheses were tested to distinguish between (i) the overall effect of oil spills, (ii) the effect of diesel dosage via different exposure regimes, and (iii) the effect of time since last spill. Repeated oil spills dramatically altered the overall structure of assemblages and reduced the total density of macrofauna and densities of dominant taxa. Increasing the frequency of oil spills negatively affected macrofauna. In general, frequent low-dosage oil spills were more deleterious than infrequent high-dosage ones. However, increases in densities of some taxa, mainly the gastropod Heleobia australis, were observed in response to infrequent spills. Our results highlight the importance of repeated exposure events in determining the extent of oil impacts. PMID:26890483

  20. Purification and functional analysis of a 40 kD protein extracted from the Strombus decorus persicus mollusk shells.

    Pokroy, Boaz; Zolotoyabko, Emil; Adir, Noam

    2006-02-01

    A 40 kD protein has been extracted from the biomineral matrix of the calcium carbonate gastropod shell of Strombus decorus persicus. The protein was isolated by decalcification and ion exchange HPLC. We have named this protein ACLS40, i.e., aragonite crossed-lamellar structure protein. A partial sequence of the isolated ACLS40 and amino acid analysis both indicate that it does not belong to the family of very acidic proteins, i.e., rich in aspartic and glutamic residues. The shell-extracted protein shows the ability to stabilize calcium carbonate in vitro, in the form of thermodynamically unstable vaterite polymorph, and to inhibit the growth of calcite. PMID:16471929

  1. Monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in seafoods from Lake Timsah.

    Mostafa, Gamal A

    2002-03-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrpcarvons (PAHs) in some seafoods caught from Lake Timsah were determined. The tested samples were tilapia fish (Oreochromis aureus), crabs (Portuns pelagicus), bivalves (Venerupis decussata), clams (Strombus tricornis) and gastropods (Munes Sp.). Where these seafoods are locally and favorite consumed foods in the area around the lake (Ismailia governorate). Results showed that crabs contained significantly higher concentrations of both total and carcinogenic PAHs ranging from 1318.6 to 3767.4 and 1230.3 to 3442.2 microg kg(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, clams contained significantly lower levels with mean value of 28.4 microg kg(-1) for total and 24.4 microg kg(-1) for carcinogenic PAHs. The most frequently detected PAHs in the tested samples were indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene followed by benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene which are characterized as carcinogenic compounds. PMID:11970818

  2. Multiple forms of octopine dehydrogenase in Strombus luhuanus (mollusca, gastropoda, strombidae): genetic basis of polymorphism, properties of the enzymes, and relationship between the octopine dehydrogenase phenotype and the accumulation of anaerobic end products during exercise.

    Baldwin, J; England, W R

    1982-10-01

    Octopine dehydrogenase (ODH) is electrophoretically polymorphic in the gastropod mollusk Strombus luhuanus. The frequencies of the six electrophoretic phenotypes in the Heron Island population, together with the molecular weight values of 38,000 obtained for each of the three forms of the enzyme, demonstrate that the monomeric enzyme is encoded by three codominant alleles at a single locus. The purified allozymes are indistinguishable in terms of Km values for substrates, product inhibition by octopine and NAD, pH optima, and substrate inhibition by pyruvate. No statistically significant correlations were found between the ODH phenotype and the maximum activities of ODH or alanopine dehydrogenase, the capacity for anaerobic muscle work, or the accumulation of octopine or strombine/alanopine during exercise. It would appear that the ODH allozymes may be functionally equivalent both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:7181845

  3. A NEW DAONELLA FROM THE LADINIAN PLATFORM OF THE ESINO LIMESTONE (SOUTHERN ALPS, ITALY

    CRISTIANO LARGHI

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve Daonella Mojsisovics, 1874 is very common in the Middle Triassic pelagic facies, whereas the record of this genus from shallow water limestones is rare. In the present paper a new species of Daonella, named D. pseudograbensis, is described from the Esino Limestone, a Ladinian (Middle Triassic carbonate platform in the central Southern Alps. The species is described from Brembana Valley, where the Esino Limestone is rather rich in bioclastic lenses yielding faunas with bivalves, cephalopods, gastropods, brachiopods, corals and calcareous algae. Daonella pseudograbensis n. sp. is based on very well preserved specimens, which are often articulated and closed, all coming from the same locality. The new species shows a narrow range of intraspecific and ontogenetic morphologic variations. It is easy distinguishable from the other species of the genus for the outline and ornamentation; it therefore differs from D. grabensis Kittl, 1912, the most similar species, for the longer anterior dorsal margin.Pdf

  4. Ecological Networks: Structure, Interaction Strength, and Stability

    Bhattacharyya, Samit; Sinha, Somdatta

    The fundamental building blocks of any ecosystem, the food webs, which are assemblages of species through various interconnections, provide a central concept in ecology. The study of a food web allows abstractions of the complexity and interconnectedness of natural communities that transcend the specific details of the underlying systems. For example, Fig. 1 shows a typical food web, where the species are connected through their feeding relationships. The top predator, Heliaster (starfish) feeds on many gastropods like Hexaplex, Morula, Cantharus, etc., some of whom predate on each other [129]. Interactions between species in a food web can be of many types, such as predation, competition, mutualism, commensalism, and ammensalism (see Section 1.1, Fig. 2).

  5. The inventory of mollusc species and its potent on seagrass bed in Kei Kecil Islands, Southeast Moluccas

    AGUS KUSNADI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Inventory of mollusk species and its potential on sea grass bed in Kei Kecil islands, Southeast Moluccas have been conducted by using quadrate-transect line method. The study was carried out in February-August 2007. There were 103 species of mollusk observed, 80 species belong to gastropods and 23 belong to bivalves. From the total species, 72 of them were reported as the potential species and the others still unknown. Most of potential group was used as food resources (55 species and other species were potential as decoration, souvenir, ornament, and accessories (31 species. Some species were potential for building material, knife tool, barter tool and bioactive compounds. The top shells (Trochus niloticus, the giant clams (Tridacna spp. and Hippopus hippopus and the abalone (Haliotis spp. were the major trading commodities for shellfish fisheries.

  6. Biodiversity of benthic fauna in the seagrass ecosystem of Kung Krabaen Bay, Chantaburi Province, Thailand

    Suvaluck Satumanatpan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity of benthic fauna was high in the seagrass ecosystem in Kung Krabaen Bay even though the bay’s coasthad many intensive shrimp farms. Halodule pinifolia and Enhalus acoroides were two species of seagrasses distributedwidely in the bay. Their biomass was higher in summer than in the rainy season. 27 families of polychaetes and 10 species ofgastropods were predominantly distributed in the seagrass beds and their biodiversity indices were not different amongtransects (North, East, South. At the same time, 18 species of bivalves were distributed among seagrass beds, but they hada greater diversity index in the north and east than in the south. The abundance of gastropods, bivalves and polychaeteswere significantly correlated with the biomass of H. pinifolia (65%, 39% and 27%, respectively; whereas only bivalvescorrelated significantly with the biomass of E. acoroides (36%. Treated wastewater effluents from shrimp farms did not affectthe seagrass ecosystem. Water quality in the bay was suitable for natural resources preservation.

  7. Neurogenesis of cephalic sensory organs of Aplysia californica

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2007-01-01

    The opisthobranch gastropod Aplysia californica serves as a model organism in experimental neurobiology because of its simple and well-known nervous system. However, its nervous periphery has been less intensely studied. We have reconstructed the ontogeny of the cephalic sensory organs (labial...... microscopy to analyze the ciliary distribution of these sensory epithelia. Labial tentacles and the lip develop during metamorphosis, whereas rhinophores appear significantly later, in stage 10 juveniles. Our study has revealed immunoreactivity against FMRFamides and serotonin in all major nerves. The common...... of conspicuous transient FMRFamide-like cell somata. We have further found two distinct populations of FMRFamide-positive cell somata located both subepidermally and in the inner regions of the cephalic sensory organs in juveniles. The latter population partly consists of sensory cells, suggesting an...

  8. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar).

    Andrianavalona, Tsiory H; Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand; Ward, David J; Ali, Jason R; Samonds, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura). In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals) were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar's Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine. PMID:26075723

  9. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar.

    Tsiory H Andrianavalona

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura. In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar's Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine.

  10. Marine Meiofauna in Songculan Lagoon, Songculan, Dauis, Bohol Philippines

    Hongayo, Menelo C

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Meiofaunal organisms are small animals found living in the benthic zones of both freshwater and marine habitats and are considered numerically dominant metazoans. Their presence in the benthic zone is important since they serve as links to higher trophic levels in the ecosystems. This study aimed to identify meiofaunal organisms found in Songculan Lagoon, Songculan Dauis, Bohol, Philippines; determine the physico – chemical properties of water and sediments in Songculan Lagoon; and compute and compare for relative abundance of the meiofaunal taxa. This study was limited to meiofaunal taxa identification up to class level. Sampling involves coring method. The results identified eleven (11 meiofaunal taxa namely; Netamoda, Copepod, Ostracod, Turbellaria, Gastropod, Flatworms, Gastroticha, Polychaeta, Oligochaeta, Rotifera and Tardigrada.

  11. Mucin Reactivity after Acute Exposure to Mercury and Zinc Chloride in Neurocytes of Freshwater Snail Bellamya bengalensis: A Histochemical Study

    Sunil Londhe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS of gastropods is extensively studied for its pathology and immunocytology; there is scanty information on histochemical alterations in neuronal cells due to heavy metal. This study was designed to investigate histochemical alterations in cerebral neurons of freshwater snail Bellamya bengalensis after intoxication with mercuric chloride (HgCl2 and zinc chloride (ZnCl2. As per chemical components cerebral ganglia of Bellamya bengalensis showed three different zones, namely, periganglionic connective tissue sheath, interperikaryonal space, and neuropil. After intoxication, increased acidic content in extracellular matrix (ECM of neuronal cells was found. These alterations were directly proportional to time of exposure period. From results, HgCl2 proved its highly toxic nature over chemical composition of cerebral neuronal cells of freshwater snail Bellamya bengalensis compared to ZnCl2 intoxication.

  12. Molluscs associated with a Sardinian deep water population of Corallium rubrum (Linnι, 1758

    F. CROCETTA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Molluscan species living in association with Corallium rubrumcolonies are poorly known. Specimensfound on the branches of red coral colonies located off Capo Caccia (Alghero – SS, West Sardinia,Mediterranean Sea were studied by analyzing red coral branches collected at a depth of between 100 and120 m; their assemblage was made up of 44 species, all belonging to the classes Gastropoda and Bivalvia.Some data on the geographical distribution, ecology, taxonomy and dominance of these species, bothalive and dead, are given and the most interesting are commented on. Among the recorded species Triviamultilirata, Simnia purpurea, Coralliophila brevis, Ocinebrina paddeui, Pleurotomella demosia, Palliolumstriatum and Pseudamussium sulcatum deserve attention. Moreover, the second finding of livingspecimens of Asperarca secreta, described only on loose valves, is reported, and finally the prey-predatorrelationships among several gastropods and Cnidarians are confirmed.

  13. Stylobates birtlesi sp. n., a new species of carcinoecium-forming sea anemone (Cnidaria, Actiniaria, Actiniidae from eastern Australia

    Andrea Crowther

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of carcinoecium-forming sea anemone, Stylobates birtlesi sp. n., from sites 680-960 m deep in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia. An anemone of this genus settles on a gastropod shell inhabited by a hermit crab, then covers and extends the shell to produce a chitinous structure termed a carcinoecium. Stylobates birtlesi sp. n. is symbiotic with the hermit crab Sympagurus trispinosus (Balss, 1911. The nature of marginal sphincter muscle and nematocyst size and distribution distinguish Stylobates birtlesi sp. n. from other species in the genus. The four known species are allopatric, each inhabiting a separate ocean basin of the Indo-west Pacific. We also extend the known range of Stylobates loisetteae in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Western Australia.

  14. Southern hemisphere deep-water stylasterid corals including a new species, Errina labrosa sp. n. (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Stylasteridae, with notes on some symbiotic scalpellids (Cirripedia, Thoracica, Scalpellidae

    Daniela Pica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of stylasterid corals are known to act as host species and create refuges for a variety of mobile and sessile organisms, which enhances their habitat complexity. These include annelids, anthozoans, cirripeds, copepods, cyanobacteria, echinoderms, gastropods, hydroids and sponges. Here we report the first evidence of a diverse association between stylasterids and scalpellid pedunculate barnacles and describe a new stylasterid species, Errina labrosa, from the Tristan da Cunha Archipelago. Overall, five stylasterid species are found to host eight scalpellid barnacles from several biogeographic regions in the southern hemisphere (Southern Ocean, temperate South America and the southern Indo-Pacific realms. There is an apparent lack of specificity in this kind of association and different grades of reaction to the symbiosis have been observed in the coral. These records suggest that the association between pedunculate barnacles and hard stylasterid corals has a wide distribution among different biogeographic realms and that it is relatively rare and confined largely to deep water.

  15. Benthic Macrofaunal Assemblage in the Arid Zone Mangroves of Gulf of Kachchh - Gujarat

    2007-01-01

    The total benthic macrofauna consisting of 62 species in 5 groups, viz. crustaceans (18), gastropods (17), bivalves (16), polychaetes (9) and fishes (2), was recorded in western Kachchh mangroves near Gujarat. The population densities of benthic macrofauna ranged from 424 to 2393 ind.m-2, the diversity ranged from 1.84 to 2.45 bits ind.-1, the richness varied between 0.82 and 0.98, and the evenness varied between 0.64 and 0.81. Two maximum diversity values were recorded during winter and summer. The salinity ranged from 34 to 44, temperature varied between 17 and 37 ℃, and the acidity ranged from 7 to 8.9.

  16. Characterization of multi-layered fish scales (Atractosteus spatula) using nanoindentation, X-ray CT, FTIR, and SEM.

    Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Williams, Brett A; Poda, Aimee R; Seiter, Jennifer M; Lafferty, Brandon J; Kennedy, Alan J; Chandler, Mei Q

    2014-01-01

    The hierarchical architecture of protective biological materials such as mineralized fish scales, gastropod shells, ram's horn, antlers, and turtle shells provides unique design principles with potentials for guiding the design of protective materials and systems in the future. Understanding the structure-property relationships for these material systems at the microscale and nanoscale where failure initiates is essential. Currently, experimental techniques such as nanoindentation, X-ray CT, and SEM provide researchers with a way to correlate the mechanical behavior with hierarchical microstructures of these material systems1-6. However, a well-defined standard procedure for specimen preparation of mineralized biomaterials is not currently available. In this study, the methods for probing spatially correlated chemical, structural, and mechanical properties of the multilayered scale of A. spatula using nanoindentation, FTIR, SEM, with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and X-ray CT are presented. PMID:25046233

  17. Effects of body size on the diet of Rivulus haraldsiolii (Aplocheiloidei: Rivulidae in a coastal Atlantic Rainforest island stream, southern Brazil

    Vinícius Abilhoa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of body size on the feeding habits of the little-known killifi sh Rivulus haraldsiolii, collected in a coastal Atlantic Rainforest island stream, was investigated. Samples were collected during a study trip on 13 July 2009 in a brackish stream located in the northern part of Ilha do Mel Island, one of the most important southern Atlantic Forest areas in southern Brazil. The diet included aquatic immature insects (Diptera pupae and Chironomidae, aquatic insects (Hemiptera – Vellidae, microcrustaceans (Cladocera, aquatic ticks (Acarina, gastropods (Pomacea sp., terrestrial insects (Coleoptera, Formicidae and Isoptera, insect fragments, and plant fragments. The species presented an omnivorous feeding habit, and differences in diet could be related to variations in body sizes. Adults (large individuals feed mainly on Formicidae, plant fragments and aquatic ticks, whereas juveniles (small individuals feed basically on aquatic immature insects (Chironomidae and aquatic ticks.

  18. Use of black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) in biological control of intermediate host snails of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in nursery ponds in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    Hung, Nguyen M.; Duc, Nguyen V.; Stauffer, Jay R.;

    2013-01-01

    Background: The risks of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) to human health constitute an important problem in Vietnam. The infection of humans with these trematodes, such as small liver trematodes (Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini), intestinal trematodes (Heterophyidae) and others...... is often thought to be linked to fish culture in areas where the habit of eating raw fish is common. Juvenile fish produced in nurseries are often heavily infected with FZT and since fishes are sold to aquaculture facilities for growth, control of FZT in these fishes should be given priority....... Controlling the first intermediate host (i.e., freshwater gastropods), would be an attractive approach, if feasible. The black carp, Mylopharyngodon piceus, is a well-known predator of freshwater snails and is already used successfully for biological control of snails in various parts of the world including...

  19. Chloroplasts as functional organelles in animal tissues.

    Trench, R K; Greene, R W; Bystrom, B G

    1969-08-01

    The marine gastropod molluscs Tridachia crispata, Tridachiella diomedea, and Placobranchus ianthobapsus (Sacoglossa, Opisthobranchia) possess free functional chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive diverticula, as determined by observations on ultrastructure, pigment analyses, and experiments on photosynthetic capacity. In the light, the chloroplasts incorporate H(14)CO(3) (-)in situ. Reduced radiocarbon is translocated to various chloroplast-free tissues in the animals. The slugs feed on siphonaceous algae from which the chloroplasts are derived. Pigments from the slugs and from known siphonaceous algae, when separated chromatographically and compared, showed similar components. Absorption spectra of extracts of slugs and algae were very similar. The larvae of the slugs are pigment-free up to the post-veliger stage, suggesting that chloroplasts are acquired de novo. with each new generation. PMID:5792329

  20. Sperm tail differentiation in the nudibranch mollusc Hypselodoris tricolor (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia).

    Medina, A; Moreno, F J; García-Herdugo, G

    1988-06-01

    The sperm axoneme of Hypselodoris tricolor forms from a single centriole that is located initially beneath the plasma membrane and then migrates to the nuclear surface. A conspicuous centriolar adjunct-like formation is present in the neck of midspermatids, but it becomes very reduced at the end of spermiogenesis. In spermatocyte and spermatid mitochondria, intracristal bodies originate from the accumulation of a dense material in some cristae. From our observations and foregoing reports, it may be concluded that the process of sperm tail differentiation in opisthobranchs resembles that in pulmonates, whereas it differs in many respects from that occurring in prosobranchs. The appearance of intracristal bodies in modified mitochondria seems to be a special feature of spermatogenesis in the opisthobranchs that does not occur in the two other groups of gastropod molluscs. PMID:3235038

  1. Granular chitin in the epidermis of nudibranch molluscs.

    Martin, Rainer; Hild, Sabine; Walther, Paul; Ploss, Kerstin; Boland, Wilhelm; Tomaschko, Karl-Heinz

    2007-12-01

    Chitin is usually found in stiff extracellular coatings typified by the arthropod exoskeleton, and is not associated with the soft, flexible mollusc skin. Here, we show, however, that chitin in nudibranch gastropods (Opisthobranchia, Mollusca) occurs as intracellular granules that fill the epidermal cells of the skin and the epithelial cells of the stomach. In response to nematocysts fired by tentacles of prey Cnidaria, the epidermal cells of eolid nudibranchs (Aeolidacea) release masses of chitin granules, which then form aggregates with the nematocyst tubules, having the effect of insulating the animal from the deleterious action of the Cnidaria tentacles. Granular chitin, while protecting the animal, does not interfere with the suppleness and flexibility of the skin, in contrast to the stiffness of chitin armor. The specialized epidermis enables nudibranchs to live with and feed on Cnidaria. PMID:18083970

  2. Optimizing the design of a reproduction toxicity test with the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Charles, Sandrine; Ducrot, Virginie; Azam, Didier;

    2016-01-01

    nine countries participated in these ring-tests. Survival and reproduction were evaluated in L. stagnalis exposed to cadmium, tributyltin, prochloraz and trenbolone according to an OECD draft Test Guideline. In total, 49 datasets were analysed to assess the practicability of the proposed experimental......This paper presents the results from two ring-tests addressing the feasibility, robustness and reproducibility of a reproduction toxicity test with the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis (RENILYS strain). Sixteen laboratories (from inexperienced to expert laboratories in mollusc testing) from...... statistical analysis, the optimal test duration was established and the most sensitive and cost-effective reproduction toxicity endpoint was identified, to be used as the core endpoint. This validation process and the resulting optimized protocol were used to consolidate the OECD Test Guideline for the...

  3. A deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Sea

    Vestheim, Hege

    2015-02-26

    Approximately 25 deep sea brine pools occur along the mid axis of the Red Sea. These hypersaline, anoxic, and acidic environments have previously been reported to host diverse microbial communities. We visited the Kebrit brine pool in April 2013 and found macrofauna present just above the brine–seawater interface (~1465 m). In particular, inactive sulfur chimneys had associated epifauna of sea anemones, sabellid type polychaetes, and hydroids, and infauna consisting of capitellid polychaetes, gastropods of the genus Laeviphitus (fam. Elachisinidae), and top snails of the family Cocculinidae. The deep Red Sea generally is regarded as extremely poor in benthos. We hypothesize that the periphery along the Kebrit holds increased biomass and biodiversity that are sustained by prokaryotes associated with the brine pool or co-occurring seeps.

  4. Occurrence of limnic molluscs and crustaceous on clusters of the golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857, formed on “sarandi” at Guaíba Lake (rs, Brazil

    Regina Maria de Fraga Alberto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to verify the occurrence of invetebrates associated with macro clusters of Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857 formed on branches of “sarandi” (Chephalanthus glabratus (Spreng. K. Schum, quantitative samplings (N=28 were conducted for two years (2002 to 2004 at Veludo Beach on Guaíba Lake (municipality of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. From the results, the gastropod Heleobia piscium (Orbigny, 1835 was identified as a constant (78.57% species, while Potamolithus jacuyensis Pilsbry 1899 (35.71% and the crustaceous Hyalella curvispina Shoemaker 1942 (26% were indicated as accessory species. The other taxa were accidental (<25%: Ampullariidae (young individuals, Heleobia davisi (Silva & Thomé, 1985, Chilina parva (Martens, 1868 and Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774. Currently, the interspecific relationships among these taxa are poorly known.

  5. Měkkýši Jindřišského údolí u Jindřichova Hradce (jižní Čechy, Česká republika

    Vilém Hrdlička

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research of mollusc communities in the floodplain of Hamerský potok Brook (Nežárka River tributary, South Bohemia, Czech Republic. Altogether, 42 mollusc species (39 species of gastropods, three species of bivalves were recorded in the study area during the research in 2015, representing 17% of the total Czech malacofauna. More than a half of all species represents common forest species, but several sensitive woodland species as Causa holosericea, Ena montana and Macrogastra plicatula and the vulnerable wetland species, such as Euconulus praticola were also found. The occurrence of these rare species (three near threatened and one vulnerable makes the valley of Hamerský potok Brook an important mollusc refugium of prime conservation importance in this fragmented Bohemian landscape of a long-term agricultural land-use.

  6. The rice agroecosystem of the MUDA irrigation scheme: an overview

    The Green Revolution technologies were introduced to the Muda area of Malaysia in the late 1960s. These technological innovations have resulted in rapid modification of the crop habitat and triggered a chain reaction in the rice agroecosystem. The impact of these technologies on the pest flora and fauna are significant. Indiscriminate use of pesticides causes disruption of natural enemy equilibrium and other undesirable effects to the farmers and the rice environment. The main emphasis of this paper is focused on the interactions between the various biological factors such as pathogenic microorganisms, arthropods, gastropods, fishes, birds, rodents, weeds, and the physical factors in the rice agroecosystem. The impact of double cropping of rice, the provision of irrigation facilities, the changes of crop establishment methods, and the adoption of pesticides on the rice agroecosystem are found to have far reaching effects on the sustainability of rice production in the Muda area. (Author)

  7. Replacement names and nomenclatural comments for problematic species-group names in Europe's Neogene freshwater Gastropoda. Part 2

    Thomas Neubauer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a new database project on Miocene to Recent freshwater gastropods of Europe, a great many of primary and secondary homonyms were revealed. Such nomenclatural issues need clarification in order to avoid misunderstandings and wrong statements about geographical distributions and temporal ranges. The following 16 new names are introduced to replace existing homonyms: Theodoxus militaris jurisicpolsakae nom. n., Viviparus stevanovici nom. n., Melanopsis haueri ripanjensis nom. n., Melanopsis wolfgangfischeri nom. n., Micromelania ramacanensis nom. n., Pseudamnicola welterschultesi nom. n., Muellerpalia haszprunari nom. n., Muellerpalia pseudovalvatoides nom. n., Lithoglyphus gozhiki nom. n., Valvata heidemariae willmanni nom. n., Radix macaleti nom. n., Gyraulus okrugljakensis nom. n., Gyraulus rasseri nom. n., Gyraulus vrapceanus nom. n., Planorbarius halavatsi nom. n., and Segmentina mosbachensis nom. n. Additionally, six cases of homonyms are discussed that are not replaced by new names, because they are considered junior synonyms.

  8. Molluscicidal activity of Hammada scoparia (Pomel Iljin leaf extracts and the principal alkaloids isolated from them against Galba truncatula

    R Mezghani-Jarraya

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The molluscicidal activity of Hammada scoparia leaf extracts and the principal alkaloids isolated from them (carnegine and N-methylisosalsoline were tested against the mollusc gastropod, Galba truncatula, the intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica in Tunisia. The results indicated that the molluscicidal activity was correlated with the presence of alkaloids. A significant molluscicidal value, according to the World Health Organization, was found with the methanol extract (LC50 = 28.93 ppm. Further fractionation of the methanolic extract led to the isolation of two principal alkaloids: carnegine and N-methylisosalsoline. These alkaloids are isoquinolines that have not previously been characterised for their molluscicidal activity. The N-methylisosalsoline possesses the highest molluscicidal activity (LC50 = 0.47 μM against G. truncatula.

  9. Perkinsosis in the clams Ruditapes decussatus and R. philippinarum in the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea: A review.

    Ruano, Francisco; Batista, Frederico M; Arcangeli, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Perkinsosis is a disease of gastropod and bivalve molluscs caused by protozoan parasites of the Perkinsus genus. These parasites have been responsible for mass mortalities worldwide, with a significant impact in both fisheries and aquaculture, and resulting in severe economic losses. This review focuses mainly on current knowledge of diagnostic methods and on the distribution of Perkinsus spp. in the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea, which infect the grooved carpet shell clam Ruditapes decussatus and the Japanese carpet shell clam Ruditapes philippinarum. The association between perkinsosis and high mortality rates of R. decussatus and R. philippinarum in southern European countries such as Portugal and Italy is discussed as is the role of environmental factors in those mortality outbreaks. The putative introduction of Perkinsus olseni into the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea is also discussed, as are management strategies that could be used to mitigate the impact of perkinsosis in production of R. decussatus and R. philippinarum. PMID:26239015

  10. Biodiversity on the Rocks: Macrofauna Inhabiting Authigenic Carbonate at Costa Rica Methane Seeps.

    Lisa A Levin

    Full Text Available Carbonate communities: The activity of anaerobic methane oxidizing microbes facilitates precipitation of vast quantities of authigenic carbonate at methane seeps. Here we demonstrate the significant role of carbonate rocks in promoting diversity by providing unique habitat and food resources for macrofaunal assemblages at seeps on the Costa Rica margin (400-1850 m. The attendant fauna is surprisingly similar to that in rocky intertidal shores, with numerous grazing gastropods (limpets and snails as dominant taxa. However, the community feeds upon seep-associated microbes. Macrofaunal density, composition, and diversity on carbonates vary as a function of seepage activity, biogenic habitat and location. The macrofaunal community of carbonates at non-seeping (inactive sites is strongly related to the hydrography (depth, temperature, O2 of overlying water, whereas the fauna at sites of active seepage is not. Densities are highest on active rocks from tubeworm bushes and mussel beds, particularly at the Mound 12 location (1000 m. Species diversity is higher on rocks exposed to active seepage, with multiple species of gastropods and polychaetes dominant, while crustaceans, cnidarians, and ophiuroids were better represented on rocks at inactive sites. Macro-infauna (larger than 0.3 mm from tube cores taken in nearby seep sediments at comparable depths exhibited densities similar to those on carbonate rocks, but had lower diversity and different taxonomic composition. Seep sediments had higher densities of ampharetid, dorvilleid, hesionid, cirratulid and lacydoniid polychaetes, whereas carbonates had more gastropods, as well as syllid, chrysopetalid and polynoid polychaetes. Stable isotope signatures and metrics: The stable isotope signatures of carbonates were heterogeneous, as were the food sources and nutrition used by the animals. Carbonate δ13Cinorg values (mean = -26.98‰ ranged from -53.3‰ to +10.0‰, and were significantly heavier than

  11. Biodiversity on the Rocks: Macrofauna Inhabiting Authigenic Carbonate at Costa Rica Methane Seeps.

    Levin, Lisa A; Mendoza, Guillermo F; Grupe, Benjamin M; Gonzalez, Jennifer P; Jellison, Brittany; Rouse, Greg; Thurber, Andrew R; Waren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate communities: The activity of anaerobic methane oxidizing microbes facilitates precipitation of vast quantities of authigenic carbonate at methane seeps. Here we demonstrate the significant role of carbonate rocks in promoting diversity by providing unique habitat and food resources for macrofaunal assemblages at seeps on the Costa Rica margin (400-1850 m). The attendant fauna is surprisingly similar to that in rocky intertidal shores, with numerous grazing gastropods (limpets and snails) as dominant taxa. However, the community feeds upon seep-associated microbes. Macrofaunal density, composition, and diversity on carbonates vary as a function of seepage activity, biogenic habitat and location. The macrofaunal community of carbonates at non-seeping (inactive) sites is strongly related to the hydrography (depth, temperature, O2) of overlying water, whereas the fauna at sites of active seepage is not. Densities are highest on active rocks from tubeworm bushes and mussel beds, particularly at the Mound 12 location (1000 m). Species diversity is higher on rocks exposed to active seepage, with multiple species of gastropods and polychaetes dominant, while crustaceans, cnidarians, and ophiuroids were better represented on rocks at inactive sites. Macro-infauna (larger than 0.3 mm) from tube cores taken in nearby seep sediments at comparable depths exhibited densities similar to those on carbonate rocks, but had lower diversity and different taxonomic composition. Seep sediments had higher densities of ampharetid, dorvilleid, hesionid, cirratulid and lacydoniid polychaetes, whereas carbonates had more gastropods, as well as syllid, chrysopetalid and polynoid polychaetes. Stable isotope signatures and metrics: The stable isotope signatures of carbonates were heterogeneous, as were the food sources and nutrition used by the animals. Carbonate δ13Cinorg values (mean = -26.98‰) ranged from -53.3‰ to +10.0‰, and were significantly heavier than carbonate δ13

  12. Baseline growth and reproductive parameters in Lymnaea stagnalis for OECD test guideline development: optimization of diets and culturing conditions

    Holbech, Henrik; Hutchinson, Tom

    The OECD has successfully validated reproductive toxicity test guidelines with fish and frogs for diverse chemicals (including endocrine disrupters). Since molluscs are especially sensitive to chronic exposure to a number of chemicals, the OECD supports the complementary development and validation...... of a mollusc reproduction test guideline. An ad hoc mollusc expert group has been formed in Europe to validate methods that can meet this need. Currently, a key species for use in this context is the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis. An important aspect of this work is to first develop a...... specific pathogen free defined strain of L. stagnalis and second to establish a historical database of growth and reproductive rates under defined culturing conditions. A mass culture of the RENILYS® strain of L. stagnalis have been established at INRA (France) since 2002 and has been distributed to...

  13. Introducción al estudio de los gasterópodos (Mollusca de la laguna de Montcortès (Pallars Sobirà, Cataluña, NE de la península ibérica

    V. Bros

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to the study of gastropods (Mollusca on the Montcortés lake (Pallars Sobirà, Catlonia, NE of the Iberian peninsulaThe check-list of 50 species of terrestrial gastro­pod and freshwater molluscs in the Montcortès lake (Catalonia, Spain and its environs, pertaining to 24 different families, is shown. Thirty-three species are cited for the first time in the area of study. The unpublished data on their distribution and ecological requirements are contributed. The preliminary results indicate us that the communities of molluscs that accompany to the helofitic vegetation and the higrofits well are formed with elements of high faunistic and ecological interest. Simultaneously, some recommendations for the protection of the malacological fauna of the lake are commented.

  14. Characteristics of Feeding Preference and Nutrients Utilization of Golden Apple Snail (Pomacea canaliculata on Macrophytes in Paddy Fields

    Benliang Zhao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Golden apple snail was a harmful invasive gastropod in Asian wetlands. In order to clarify the effect of Pomacea canaliculata on macrophytes in paddy fields, feeding preference and nutrients utilization of snail were studied. Feeding preference of snail was Alternanthera philoxenoides>Monochoria vaginalis>Oryza sativa L. Snail showed a higher approximate digestion coefficient on Oryza sativa L. than that on Monochoria vaginalis. Nitrogen utilization coefficient of snail on Alternanthera philoxenoides was significantly higher than that on Oryza sativa L. Snail exhibited a higher calcium utilization coefficient on Alternanthera philoxenoides and Monochoria vaginalis than that on Oryza sativa L. Oryza sativa L. was not preferred among three plants under the same available and exposure condition.

  15. Soil calcium availability influences shell ecophenotype formation in the sub-antarctic land snail, Notodiscus hookeri.

    Maryvonne Charrier

    Full Text Available Ecophenotypes reflect local matches between organisms and their environment, and show plasticity across generations in response to current living conditions. Plastic responses in shell morphology and shell growth have been widely studied in gastropods and are often related to environmental calcium availability, which influences shell biomineralisation. To date, all of these studies have overlooked micro-scale structure of the shell, in addition to how it is related to species responses in the context of environmental pressure. This study is the first to demonstrate that environmental factors induce a bi-modal variation in the shell micro-scale structure of a land gastropod. Notodiscus hookeri is the only native land snail present in the Crozet Archipelago (sub-Antarctic region. The adults have evolved into two ecophenotypes, which are referred to here as MS (mineral shell and OS (organic shell. The MS-ecophenotype is characterised by a thick mineralised shell. It is primarily distributed along the coastline, and could be associated to the presence of exchangeable calcium in the clay minerals of the soils. The Os-ecophenotype is characterised by a thin organic shell. It is primarily distributed at high altitudes in the mesic and xeric fell-fields in soils with large particles that lack clay and exchangeable calcium. Snails of the Os-ecophenotype are characterised by thinner and larger shell sizes compared to snails of the MS-ecophenotype, indicating a trade-off between mineral thickness and shell size. This pattern increased along a temporal scale; whereby, older adult snails were more clearly separated into two clusters compared to the younger adult snails. The prevalence of glycine-rich proteins in the organic shell layer of N. hookeri, along with the absence of chitin, differs to the organic scaffolds of molluscan biominerals. The present study provides new insights for testing the adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity in response to spatial

  16. Multistep Fractionation and Mass Spectrometry Reveal Zwitterionic and Anionic Modifications of the N- and O-glycans of a Marine Snail.

    Eckmair, Barbara; Jin, Chunsheng; Abed-Navandi, Daniel; Paschinger, Katharina

    2016-02-01

    Various studies in the past have revealed that molluscs can produce a wide range of rather complex N-glycan structures, which vary from those occurring in other invertebrate animals; particularly methylated glycans have been found in gastropods, and there are some reports of anionic glycans in bivalves. Due to the high variability in terms of previously described structures and methodologies, it is a major challenge to establish glycomic workflows that yield the maximum amount of detailed structural information from relatively low quantities of sample. In this study, we apply differential release with peptide:N-glycosidases F and A followed by solid-phase extraction on graphitized carbon and reversed-phase materials to examine the glycome of Volvarina rubella (C. B. Adams, 1845), a margin snail of the clade Neogastropoda. The resulting four pools of N-glycans were fractionated on a fused core RP-HPLC column and subject to MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS in conjunction with chemical and enzymatic treatments. In addition, selected N-glycan fractions, as well as O-glycans released by β-elimination, were analyzed by porous graphitized carbon-LC-MS and MS(n). This comprehensive approach enabled us to determine a number of novel modifications of protein-linked glycans, including N-methyl-2-aminoethylphosphonate on mannose and N-acetylhexosamine residues, core β1,3-linked mannose, zwitterionic moieties on core Galβ1,4Fuc motifs, additional mannose residues on oligomannosidic glycans, and bisubstituted antennal fucose; furthermore, typical invertebrate N-glycans with sulfate and core fucose residues are present in this gastropod. PMID:26598642

  17. Observations and Experiments on the Biology and Life History of Riseriellus occultus (Heteronemertea: Lineidae).

    Beckers, Patrick; Bartolomaeus, Thomas; von Döhren, Jörn

    2015-12-01

    Studies on the biology and life history of nemerteans are scarce, mostly because these animals are nocturnal. In order to broaden the knowledge base on the life history of nemerteans as a prerequisite for comparative analyses, we studied a population of Riseriellus occultus (Heteronemertea: Lineidae) inhabiting the rocky intertidal in southern Brittany near Concarneau (France) for more than 10 years. Our studies show that R. occultus is an iteroparous, perennial species exclusively inhabiting rocky shore crevices that result from onionskin weathering of the granite. From September through October R. occultus reproduces by external fertilization and develops via a planktonic pilidium larva, which, under laboratory conditions, metamorphoses after about six weeks. Adults of R. occultus are nocturnal macrophagous predators that preferentially feed on the gastropods Gibbula umbilicalis and Patella species, but also consume the bivalve Mytilus edulis. Since R. occultus devours the snail inside the shell, we fixed individuals while feeding, and serially sectioned them. Reconstruction of the sections shows that R. occultus swallows the entire soft body and finally detaches the columellar muscle from the shell. Estimates on the density of R. occultus inside the rock crevices provide evidence for clustered distribution and locally high abundance on the rocky shore. These data strongly suggest that R. occultus affects the structure of the rocky shore gastropod community. Although our data are still fragmentary with respect to the ecology of this species and its role in the local food web, our knowledge has grown to such extent that R. occultus can now be regarded as one of the few well characterized nemertean species. PMID:26654036

  18. Paleoecology of an early Holocene faunal and floral assemblage from the Dows Local Biota of north-central Iowa

    Hudak, Curtis M.

    1984-05-01

    The faunas and floras from the Dows Local Biota provide an opportunity to compare Holocene taxa without a cultural bias. The Dows Local Biota is located in a large depression on the back side (north) of the Altamont I Moraine complex within the Des Moines Lobe. The Dows Silt Fauna/Flora ( = DSF; ca. 9380 ± 130 yr B.P.), one horizon of the Dows Local Biota, was collected for plant macrofossils, mollusks, and micromammals. DSF terrestrial gastropods are upland mesic forest dwellers although one species, Strobilops affinis, is characteristic of more xeric forests and may represent open woods. The aquatic gastropods reflect both permanent and periodic waters. DSF micromammals prefer an open, mesic, deciduous forest. The micromammal sympatry is restricted to a small area within the tension zone and deciduous forest belt of west-central Wisconsin. DSF plants are characteristic of upland forests, moist meadowlands or disturbed areas, and aquatic habitats. The DSF plant sympatry is large but restricted to the conifer-hardwood and deciduous forests along the Great Lakes-New England regions. Quantitative climatic data for the combined DSF sympatries suggest that Dows (ca. 9380 yr B.P.) was cooler than at present, and is nearly identical to that achieved by pollen analyses at the Cherokee Sewer-Lake West Okoboji sites (ca. 9000 yr B.P.) in northwest Iowa. Based on common habitat interpretations and sympatries, about 9380 yr B.P. north-central Iowa was cooler and moister than at present and was occupied by an open deciduous forest.

  19. Fossil-bearing deposits from the Bukpyeong Formation (Miocene) in the Bukpyeong Basin at Donghae city, Gangwon-do, South Korea: occurrences, taphonomy and paleoenvironmental implications

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Jeong, Eun Kyoung; Uemura, Kazuhiko; Kim, Kyungsik; Paik, In Sung

    2016-04-01

    Abundant and diverse plant fossils such as land plants and subaqueous plants, freshwater mollusc fossils and invertebrate trace fossils are found in the Miocene Bukpyeong Formation at Donghae city, Gangwon-do, South Korea. Occurrences and taphofacies of the fossil-bearing deposits from the Bukpyeong Formation are described and their taphonomy and paleoenvironmental implications are interpreted. Based on fossil occurrences, lithofacies and sedimentary features of the fossil-bearing deposits, eight taphofacies are classified as the following: (1) Taphofacies 1: Gastropod fossils in massive silty mudstone; (2) Taphofacies 2: Bivalve fossils in massive silty mudstone; (3) Taphofacies 3: Plant fossils (leaf fossils) in massive silty mudstone; (4) Taphofacies 4: Gastropod and plant fossils in massive silty mudstone; (5) Taphofacies 5: Plant fossils in weakly fissile silty mudstone; (6) Taphofacies 6: Plant fossils (leaf fossils) in thin-bedded and graded silty mudstone to mudstone (claystone); (7) Taphofacies 7: Plant fragment fossils in thin-bedded and graded silty mudstone to mudstone (claystone); (8) Taphofacies 8: Plant debris in planar- to cross-laminated fine-grained sandstone. Taphonomy of taphofacies 1, 2, and 4 including freshwater mollusc fossils is interpreted to have been reworked or transported by turbidity currents after death and deposited in shallow lake to open lake. Taphonomy of taphofacies 3, 5, 6, and 7 including plant fossils is interpreted to have been transported by input of episodic flooding in the land and deposited by settling down in open lake. Taphofacies 8 including plant debris has been deposited in shallow lake by input of intensive episodic flooding from the land. The occurrences and taphofacies of the fossil-bearing deposits indicate that most of the fossils were transported by turbidity current induced by input of episodic flooding in the land and deposited in shallow lake to open lake. Moreover, plant fossils from the Bukpyeong

  20. The macroalgal carbonate factory at a cool-to-warm temperate marine transition, Southern Australia

    James, Noel P.; Reid, Catherine M.; Bone, Yvonne; Levings, Andrew; Malcolm, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    The shallow neritic seafloor to depths of ~ 30 m along the coast of southwestern Victoria Australia, is the site of rocky reefs on volcanic and aeolianite bathymetric highs. The region, located near the warm- to cool-temperate environmental transition, is a site of prolific macroalgae (kelp) growth. Kelps are most prolific and diverse in high-energy, open-ocean environments whereas broad-leafed seagrasses, at their cold-water eastern limit, are restricted to local protected embayments. The seagrasses are reduced to one species of Amphibolis whereas the kelps are diverse and include the large intertidal bull kelp (Durvillaea), not present in warmer waters. The macroalgal forest extends from the intertidal to ~ 30 mwd (metres water depth) as a series of distinct biomes; 1) the Peritidal, 2) the Phaeophyte Forest (0-17 mwd), 3) the Rhodophyte Thicket (17-15 mwd), and 4) the Invertebrate Coppice (> 25 mwd). The Phaeophyte Forest is partitioned into a Durvillaea zone (0-2 mwd), a Phyllospora zone (2-10 mwd) and an Ecklonia zone (10-17mwd). The two major habitats within each biome comprise 1) an upward facing illuminated surface that supports a macroalgal canopy over an understorey of coralline algae and herbivorous gastropods, and 2) a separate, cryptic, shaded habitat dominated by a diverse community of filter-feeding invertebrates. These communities produce two different sediments; 1) geniculate and encrusting corallines and diverse gastropods from the upper surface, and 2) bryozoans, molluscs, barnacles, chitons, serpulids, and benthic foraminifers from the shaded, cryptic habitats. These particles are blended together with the latter becoming proportionally more abundant with increasing depth. Results of this study, when integrated with recent investigations in warm-temperate (South Australia) and cool-temperate (New Zealand) environments now define carbonate sedimentology of the macroalgal reef depositional system in this part of the northern Southern Ocean.

  1. The nuclear receptors of Biomphalaria glabrata and Lottia gigantea: implications for developing new model organisms.

    Satwant Kaur

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are transcription regulators involved in an array of diverse physiological functions including key roles in endocrine and metabolic function. The aim of this study was to identify nuclear receptors in the fully sequenced genome of the gastropod snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni and compare these to known vertebrate NRs, with a view to assessing the snail's potential as a invertebrate model organism for endocrine function, both as a prospective new test organism and to elucidate the fundamental genetic and mechanistic causes of disease. For comparative purposes, the genome of a second gastropod, the owl limpet, Lottia gigantea was also investigated for nuclear receptors. Thirty-nine and thirty-three putative NRs were identified from the B. glabrata and L. gigantea genomes respectively, based on the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain and/or ligand-binding domain. Nuclear receptor transcript expression was confirmed and sequences were subjected to a comparative phylogenetic analysis, which demonstrated that these molluscs have representatives of all the major NR subfamilies (1-6. Many of the identified NRs are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, however differences exist, most notably, the absence of receptors of Group 3C, which includes some of the vertebrate endocrine hormone targets. The mollusc genomes also contain NR homologues that are present in insects and nematodes but not in vertebrates, such as Group 1J (HR48/DAF12/HR96. The identification of many shared receptors between humans and molluscs indicates the potential for molluscs as model organisms; however the absence of several steroid hormone receptors indicates snail endocrine systems are fundamentally different.

  2. Sublittoral soft bottom communities and diversity of Mejillones Bay in northern Chile (Humboldt Current upwelling system)

    Laudien, Jürgen; Rojo, Manuel E.; Oliva, Marcelo E.; Arntz, Wolf E.; Thatje, Sven

    2007-06-01

    The macrozoobenthos of Mejillones Bay (23°S; Humboldt Current) was quantitatively investigated over a 7-year period from austral summer 1995/1996 to winter 2002. About 78 van Veen grab samples taken at six stations (5, 10, 20 m depth) provided the basis for the analysis of the distribution of 60 species and 28 families of benthic invertebrates, as well as of their abundance and biomass. Mean abundance (2,119 individuals m-2) was in the same order compared to a previous investigation; mean biomass (966 g formalin wet mass m-2), however, exceeded prior estimations mainly due to the dominance of the bivalve Aulacomya ater. About 43% of the taxa inhabited the complete depth range. Mean taxonomic Shannon diversity (H', Log e) was 1.54 ± 0.58 with a maximum at 20 m (1.95 ± 0.33); evenness increased with depth. The fauna was numerically dominated by carnivorous gastropods, polychaetes and crustaceans (48%). About 15% of the species were suspensivorous, 13% sedimentivorous, 11% detritivorous, 7% omnivorous and 6% herbivorous. Cluster analyses showed a significant difference between the shallow and the deeper stations. Gammarid amphipods and the polychaete family Nephtyidae characterized the 5-m-zone, the molluscs Aulacomya ater, Mitrella unifasciata and gammarids the intermediate zone, while the gastropod Nassarius gayi and the polychaete family Nereidae were most prominent at the deeper stations. The communities of the three depth zones did not appear to be limited by hypoxia during non-El Niño conditions. Therefore, no typical change in community structure occurred during El Niño 1997-1998, in contrast to what was observed for deeper faunal assemblages and hypoxic bays elsewhere in the coastal Humboldt Current system.

  3. The response of abyssal organisms to low pH conditions during a series of CO2-release experiments simulating deep-sea carbon sequestration

    Barry, J. P.; Buck, K. R.; Lovera, C.; Brewer, P. G.; Seibel, B. A.; Drazen, J. C.; Tamburri, M. N.; Whaling, P. J.; Kuhnz, L.; Pane, E. F.

    2013-08-01

    The effects of low-pH, high-pCO2 conditions on deep-sea organisms were examined during four deep-sea CO2 release experiments simulating deep-ocean C sequestration by the direct injection of CO2 into the deep sea. We examined the survival of common deep-sea, benthic organisms (microbes; macrofauna, dominated by Polychaeta, Nematoda, Crustacea, Mollusca; megafauna, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Pisces) exposed to low-pH waters emanating as a dissolution plume from pools of liquid carbon dioxide released on the seabed during four abyssal CO2-release experiments. Microbial abundance in deep-sea sediments was unchanged in one experiment, but increased under environmental hypercapnia during another, where the microbial assemblage may have benefited indirectly from the negative impact of low-pH conditions on other taxa. Lower abyssal metazoans exhibited low survival rates near CO2 pools. No urchins or holothurians survived during 30-42 days of exposure to episodic, but severe environmental hypercapnia during one experiment (E1; pH reduced by as much as ca. 1.4 units). These large pH reductions also caused 75% mortality for the deep-sea amphipod, Haploops lodo, near CO2 pools. Survival under smaller pH reductions (ΔpH<0.4 units) in other experiments (E2, E3, E5) was higher for all taxa, including echinoderms. Gastropods, cephalopods, and fish were more tolerant than most other taxa. The gastropod Retimohnia sp. and octopus Benthoctopus sp. survived exposure to pH reductions that episodically reached -0.3 pH units. Ninety percent of abyssal zoarcids (Pachycara bulbiceps) survived exposure to pH changes reaching ca. -0.3 pH units during 30-42 day-long experiments.

  4. Comparative studies on transuranium nuclide biokinetics in sediment-dwelling invertebrates

    Sediment-dwelling molluscs (bivalve and gastropod), echinoderms (ophiuroid and holothurian) and annelids (polychaete) were analyzed for accumulation tissue distribution and loss of 237Pu, 241Am and 242Cm. After a 3-week exposure to a given radionuclide organisms were transferred to clean sea water for the depuration phase. Some individuals were dissected following both the uptake and loss period. Concentration factors varied widely (1-103), strongly dependent on species and radionuclide. All species tested took up more 241Am than 237Pu with the exception of the brittle star Ophiura texturata which showed a preference for 237Pu over 241Am by a factor of 5. The highest uptake of 241Am was noted in the polychaete Hermione hystrix which reached concentration factors of 103 and showed no indication of approaching steady state after 20 days. The detritivorous gastropod Aporrhais pespelicani attained somewhat higher 241Am concentration factors (550) than did the suspension-feeding clam (330). The lowest 241Am concentration factors were found in the brittle star (60) and the sea cucumber Stichopus regalis (20). Transuranics accumulated in polyaetes > molluscs > echinoderms, with ophiuroids reaching higher levels than holothurians, most of the radionuclides (80-90%) associating with shell or body wall. Particularly high concentration factors (103-104) were noted in chitinous setae of the polychaete and digestive tissues and gonads of the ophiuroid. Tranfer probably takes place via the coelomic fluid. Tbsub(1/2) ranged from 2-13 months, a function of species rather than the transuranic element. Benthic species of the sediment-water interface can readily accumulate transuranic elements retaining them for relatively long periods of time

  5. Fine morphology of the jaw apparatus of Puncturella noachina (Fissurellidae, Vetigastropoda).

    Vortsepneva, Elena; Ivanov, Dmitry; Purschke, Günter; Tzetlin, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Jaws of various kinds occur in virtually all groups of Mollusca, except for Polyplacophora and Bivalvia. Molluscan jaws are formed by the buccal epithelium and either constitute a single plate, a paired formation or a serial structure. Buccal ectodermal structures in gastropods are rather different. They can be nonrenewable or having final growth, like the hooks in Clione (Gastropoda, Gymnosomata). In this case, they are formed by a single cell. Conversely, they can be renewable during the entire life span and in this case they are formed by a set of cells, like the formation of the radula. The fine structure of the jaws was studied in the gastropod Puncturella noachina. The jaw is situated in the buccal cavity and consists of paired elongated cuticular plates. On the anterior edge of each cuticular plate there are numerous longitudinally oriented rodlets disposed over the entire jaw surface and immersed into a cuticular matrix. The jaw can be divided into four zones situated successively toward the anterior edge: 1) the posterior area: the zone of formation of the thick cuticle covering the entire jaw and forming the electron-dense outer layer of the jaw plate; 2) the zone of rodlet formation; 3) the zone of rodlet arrangement; and 4) the anterior zone: the free scraping edge of the plate, or the erosion zone. In the general pattern of jaw formation, Puncturella noachina resembles Testudinalia tessulata (Patellogastropoda) studied previously. The basis of the jaw is a cuticular plate formed by the activity of the strongly developed microvillar apparatus of the gnathoepithelium. However, the mechanism of renewal of the jaw anterior part in P. noachina is much more complex as its scraping edge consists not just of a thick cuticular matrix rather than of a system of denticles being the projecting endings of rodlets. PMID:24549973

  6. On the Ultrastructure and Function of Rhogocytes from the Pond Snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Maria Kokkinopoulou

    Full Text Available Rhogocytes, also termed "pore cells", occur as solitary or clustered cells in the connective tissue of gastropod molluscs. Rhogocytes possess an enveloping lamina of extracellular matrix and enigmatic extracellular lacunae bridged by cytoplasmic bars that form 20 nm diaphragmatic slits likely to act as a molecular sieve. Recent papers highlight the embryogenesis and ultrastructure of these cells, and their role in heavy metal detoxification. Rhogocytes are the site of hemocyanin or hemoglobin biosynthesis in gastropods. Based on electron microscopy, we recently proposed a possible pathway of hemoglobin exocytosis through the slit apparatus, and provided molecular evidence of a common phylogenetic origin of molluscan rhogocytes, insect nephrocytes and vertebrate podocytes. However, the previously proposed secretion mode of the respiratory proteins into the hemolymph is still rather hypothetical, and the possible role of rhogocytes in detoxification requires additional data. Although our previous study on rhogocytes of the red-blooded (hemoglobin-containing freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata provided much new information, a disadvantage was that the hemoglobin molecules were not unequivocally defined in the electron microscope. This made it difficult to trace the exocytosis pathway of this protein. Therefore, we have now performed a similar study on the rhogocytes of the blue-blooded (hemocyanin-containing freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The intracellular hemocyanin could be identified in the electron microscope, either as individual molecules or as pseudo-crystalline arrays. Based on 3D-electron microscopy, and supplemented by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and stress response experiments, we provide here additional details on the structure and hemocyanin biosynthesis of rhogocytes, and on their response in animals under cadmium and starvation stress. Moreover, we present an advanced model on the release of synthesized

  7. Marine Mollusca of isotope stages of the last 2 million years in New Zealand. Part 3, Gastropoda (Vetigastropoda - Littorinimorpha)

    Three new species: Grandicrepidula hemispherica (Nukumaruan, S Hawke's Bay), Pelicaria Granttaylori (Mangapanian-early Nukumaruan, Wanganui-Hawke's Bay), Pelicaria arahura (Waipipian-early Mangapanian, Westland and Hawke's Bay). Drawings of marine species in Smith's (1874) three plates of New Zealand molluscan types are republished. Further Australian molluscs in Wanganui Basin: Sabia australis (Lamarck), Clanculus plebejus (Philippi), both early Nukumaruan. Further northern New Zealand molluscs in Wanganui Basin: Stephopoma roseum (Quoy and Gaimard), OIS 13, 9. Distinctive gastropods extinct at end Nukumaruan: Struthiolaria frazeri (Hutton), Taxonia suteri (Marwick). Taniella planisuturalis (Marwick) (Opoitian-Nukumaruan, southern NZ) and Trivia (Ellatrivia) zealandica (Kirk) (Nukumaruan, Hawke's Bay-Wanganui; Castlecliffian, North Canterbury) occur in Castlecliffian (OIS 15?) rocks at Whakatane. Cantharidella tessellate (A. Adams) and Risellopsis varia (Hutton), formerly Haweran, are recorded from Nukumaruan and Castlecliffian rocks, respectively. New fossil late Nukumaruan-early Castlecliffian records listed from Mikonui-1 offshore well, Westland, include Malluvium calcareum (Suter) and 10 other species. Other biostratigraphically useful gastropods: Calliostoma (Maurea) nukumaruense (Laws) (Mangapanian-OIS 17); Argobuccinum pustulosum (Lightfoot), Semicassis labiate (Perry) (both earliest in OIS 7). New synonymy: Zeacumantus perplexus (Marshall and Murdoch) =Z. lutulentus (Kiener); Pelicaria vermis (Martyn) =all named Nukumaruan-Recent forms (other than P. rugosa (Marwick) and P. granttaylori n. sp.); Trivia flora Marwick =T.zealandica Kirk. Taxonomy revised: Zelippistes benhami (Suter) (OIS 13 and 9 at Wanganui), distinguished from Lippistes and Separatista; Stiracolpus species, informally; Maoricrypta profunda (Hutton), Waipipian-early Castlecliffian (- OIS 19); M. radiata (Hutton) (=incurva Zittel,=hochetteriana Woods, =wilckensi Finlay), (Middle Miocene

  8. The Early Origin of the Antarctic Marine Fauna and Its Evolutionary Implications.

    Crame, J Alistair; Beu, Alan G; Ineson, Jon R; Francis, Jane E; Whittle, Rowan J; Bowman, Vanessa C

    2014-01-01

    The extensive Late Cretaceous - Early Paleogene sedimentary succession of Seymour Island, N.E. Antarctic Peninsula offers an unparalleled opportunity to examine the evolutionary origins of a modern polar marine fauna. Some 38 modern Southern Ocean molluscan genera (26 gastropods and 12 bivalves), representing approximately 18% of the total modern benthic molluscan fauna, can now be traced back through at least part of this sequence. As noted elsewhere in the world, the balance of the molluscan fauna changes sharply across the Cretaceous - Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, with gastropods subsequently becoming more diverse than bivalves. A major reason for this is a significant radiation of the Neogastropoda, which today forms one of the most diverse clades in the sea. Buccinoidea is the dominant neogastropod superfamily in both the Paleocene Sobral Formation (SF) (56% of neogastropod genera) and Early - Middle Eocene La Meseta Formation (LMF) (47%), with the Conoidea (25%) being prominent for the first time in the latter. This radiation of Neogastropoda is linked to a significant pulse of global warming that reached at least 65°S, and terminates abruptly in the upper LMF in an extinction event that most likely heralds the onset of global cooling. It is also possible that the marked Early Paleogene expansion of neogastropods in Antarctica is in part due to a global increase in rates of origination following the K/Pg mass extinction event. The radiation of this and other clades at ∼65°S indicates that Antarctica was not necessarily an evolutionary refugium, or sink, in the Early - Middle Eocene. Evolutionary source - sink dynamics may have been significantly different between the Paleogene greenhouse and Neogene icehouse worlds. PMID:25493546

  9. Factors influencing the distribution of epibenthic megafauna across the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    Mosch, Thomas; Sommer, Stefan; Dengler, Marcus; Noffke, Anna; Bohlen, Lisa; Pfannkuche, Olaf; Liebetrau, Volker; Wallmann, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Current de-oxygenation of the oceans is associated with severe habitat loss and distinct changes in the species composition of bentho-pelagic communities. We investigated the distributions of epibenthic megafauna across the Peruvian OMZ (11°S) at water depths ranging from ˜80 to 1000 m water depth using sea floor images. Likely controls of distributions were adressed by combining the abundances of major groups with geochemical parameters and sea-floor topography. In addition to bottom-water oxygen levels and organic-carbon availability, particular emphasis is laid on the effects of local hydrodynamics. Beside the occurrence of microbial mats at the shelf and upper slope, distinct zones of highly abundant megafauna, dominated by gastropods (900 ind. m-2), ophiuroids (140 ind. m-2), and pennatulaceans (20 ind. m-2), were observed at the lower boundary of the OMZ. Their distribution extended from 460 m water depth (O2 levels local hydrodynamics caused by the energy dissipation of incipient internal M2 tides affecting the suspension, transport and deposition of food particles. This was particularly evident in certain sections of the investigated transect. At these potentially critical sites, energy dissipation of internal tides is associated with high bottom shear stress and high turbulences and coincides with elevated turbidity levels in the benthic boundary layer, increased Zr/Al-ratios, low sedimentation rates as well as a shift in the grain size towards coarser particles. In or near such areas, abundant suspension-feeding organisms, such as ophiuroids, pennatulaceans, and tunicates were present, whereas deposit-feeding gastropods were absent. The influence of local hydrodynamic conditions on the distribution of epibenthic organisms has been neglected in OMZ studies, although it has been considered in other settings.

  10. Fluctuating helical asymmetry and morphology of snails (Gastropoda in divergent microhabitats at 'Evolution Canyons I and II,' Israel.

    Shmuel Raz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developmental instability of shelled gastropods is measured as deviations from a perfect equiangular (logarithmic spiral. We studied six species of gastropods at 'Evolution Canyons I and II' in Carmel and the Galilee Mountains, Israel, respectively. The xeric, south-facing, 'African' slopes and the mesic, north-facing, 'European' slopes have dramatically different microclimates and plant communities. Moreover, 'Evolution Canyon II' receives more rainfall than 'Evolution Canyon I.' METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined fluctuating asymmetry, rate of whorl expansion, shell height, and number of rotations of the body suture in six species of terrestrial snails from the two 'Evolution Canyons.' The xeric 'African' slope should be more stressful to land snails than the 'European' slope, and 'Evolution Canyon I' should be more stressful than 'Evolution Canyon II.' Only Eopolita protensa jebusitica showed marginally significant differences in fluctuating helical asymmetry between the two slopes. Contrary to expectations, asymmetry was marginally greater on the 'European' slope. Shells of Levantina spiriplana caesareana at 'Evolution Canyon I,' were smaller and more asymmetric than those at 'Evolution Canyon II.' Moreover, shell height and number of rotations of the suture were greater on the north-facing slopes of both canyons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data is consistent with a trade-off between drought resistance and thermoregulation in snails; Levantina was significantly smaller on the 'African' slope, for increasing surface area and thermoregulation, while Eopolita was larger on the 'African' slope, for reducing water evaporation. In addition, 'Evolution Canyon I' was more stressful than Evolution Canyon II' for Levantina.

  11. New Mediterranean Biodiversity Records (December 2012

    M. THESSALOU-LEGAKI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents records extending or confirming the distribution of Mediterranean species. Three alien algae are included, namely Codium taylorii reported for the first time from the Aegean and Turkey (Izmir Gulf, Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea (Karpathos and Chalki Isl., Aegean Sea and Ganonema farinosum (Karpathos Isl., Aegean Sea. As far as animals are concerned, Litarachna divergens (Acari: Hydrachnidia was recorded (Side, Eastern Mediterranean and represents a new amendment at genus level for Turkish fauna. Other invertebrates include alien species such as the crabs Dyspanopeus sayi (Lago Fusaro, SW Italy, Percnon gibbesi (Larnaca, Cyprus; Karpathos and Chalki Isl., Aegean Sea and Callinectes sapidus (Voda estuary, NW Greece, the nudibranch Aplysia dactylomela (Boka Kotorska Bay, Montenegro, the gastropod Conomurex persicus (Karpathos and ChalkiIsl., Aegean Sea and the bryozoan Electra tenella (Livorno harbour and Messina Straits area. The alien fish Siganus luridus, Siganus rivulatus, Fistularia commersonii, Sphyraena chrysotaenia and Sargocentron rubrum are also reported from the islands of Karpathos and Chalki, and Pteragogus pelycus from Heraklion Bay, Crete. In addition, new localities for four rare Mediterranean inhabitants are given: the cephalopod Thysanoteuthis rhombus (NW Sardinia and the fish: Lampris guttatus (Calabria, S Italy, Petromyzon marinus (Gokova Bay and Remora australis (Saronikos Gulf, while the opisthobranch gastropod Cerberilla bernadettae is reported for the first time from the E Mediterranean (Cyprus. Finally, three species of the Aegean ascidiofauna are recorded for the first time: Lissoclinum perforatum, Ciona roulei and Ecteinascidia turbinata. Furthermore, it was established that Phallusia nigra has extended its distributional range to the north of the Aegean Sea.

  12. An assemblage of mollusks associated with the high latitude scleractinian coral Alveopora japonica (Eguchi 1968) in Jeju Island, off the south coast of Korea

    Noseworthy, Ronald G.; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Keshavmurthy, Shashank; Lee, Hee-Jung; Jeung, Hee-Do; Ju, Se-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bin; Jung, Sukgeun; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2016-03-01

    Corals reefs and communities support a wide range of flora and fauna. The complete richness and abundance of faunal communities in either coral reefs or communities is not fully understood. This is especially true for high-latitude coral communities. In this work, we carried out an analysis of an Alveopora japonica associated mollusk assemblage, in Jeju Island, Korea. A. japonica is one of the major coral species present in high abundance (88-155 colonies m-2), with a high recruitment rate (7.8 juvenile corals m-2 yr-1) in Jeju Island, and may serve as a habitat for other benthic organisms. In 2012, a total number of 579 A. japonica colonies with sizes ranging between 15.1-346.7 cm2 in the surface area were collected from a 1m× 10m quadrat installed at a depth of 10 m at Keumneung, on the northwest coast of Jeju Island. Numerous benthic invertebrates were found to be associated with A. japonica colonies. Twenty-seven bivalves and gastropods were identified, including a boring mytilid, Lithophaga curta, and an arcid, Barbatia stearnsi. A zonalgeographical examination of the distribution ranges of these mollusks revealed a majority of warmer water species. Our observations also showed that A. japonica may be providing a habitat to grazing gastropod, Turbo cornutus, and encrusting Spondylidae and Chamidae bivalves. A. japonica forms a coral carpet with a distinct assemblage of bivalves. It is thought that the presence of these mollusks species in the coral indicates its use as a nursery for juvenile species, a ready food supply of organic detritus, and a refuge from predators.

  13. Spatial differences in East scotia ridge hydrothermal vent food webs: influences of chemistry, microbiology and predation on trophodynamics.

    William D K Reid

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal vents on the East Scotia Ridge are the first to be explored in the Antarctic and are dominated by large peltospiroid gastropods, stalked barnacles (Vulcanolepas sp. and anomuran crabs (Kiwa sp. but their food webs are unknown. Vent fluid and macroconsumer samples were collected at three vent sites (E2, E9N and E9S at distances of tens of metres to hundreds of kilometres apart with contrasting vent fluid chemistries to describe trophic interactions and identify potential carbon fixation pathways using stable isotopes. δ(13C of dissolved inorganic carbon from vent fluids ranged from -4.6‰ to 0.8‰ at E2 and from -4.4‰ to 1.5‰ at E9. The lowest macroconsumer δ(13C was observed in peltospiroid gastropods (-30.0‰ to -31.1‰ and indicated carbon fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle by endosymbiotic gamma-Proteobacteria. Highest δ(13C occurred in Kiwa sp. (-19.0‰ to -10.5‰, similar to that of the epibionts sampled from their ventral setae. Kiwa sp. δ(13C differed among sites, which were attributed to spatial differences in the epibiont community and the relative contribution of carbon fixed via the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA and CBB cycles assimilated by Kiwa sp. Site differences in carbon fixation pathways were traced into higher trophic levels e.g. a stichasterid asteroid that predates on Kiwa sp. Sponges and anemones at the periphery of E2 assimilated a proportion of epipelagic photosynthetic primary production but this was not observed at E9N. Differences in the δ(13C and δ(34S values of vent macroconsumers between E2 and E9 sites suggest the relative contributions of photosynthetic and chemoautotrophic carbon fixation (rTCA v CBB entering the hydrothermal vent food webs vary between the sites.

  14. A study on Polonium-210 distribution in the Koraiyar river ecosystem, Tiruchirappalli - India

    The present work reports the distribution of naturally occurring alpha emitting radionuclide 210Po in the environmental matrices of Koraiyar river. Koraiyar is a seasonal river and it is situated 5 Km West of Tiruchirappalli. Environmental samples such as water, sediment, plankton, weeds (Eichhornia crassipes), crab (Barytelphusa jacguemonti), gastropods (Pila virens and Bellamya dissimilis) and fishes (Anabas testudineus, Catla catla, Clarias batrachus, Channa punctatus, Macrognathus acculeatus, Mystus vittatus and Oreochromis mossambicus) were collected and subjected to the analyses of 210Po activity. The concentration of 210Po in water sample and sediment sample was 0.75 mBq/l and 3.1 Bq/Kg respectively. The roots and shoots of aquatic weeds and plankton sample showed concentration of 3.4, 1.2 and 22.2 Bq/Kg respectively. The concentration of 210Po in crab muscle and exoskeleton was 43.92 Bq/Kg and 11.34 Bq/Kg respectively. In soft tissue of gastropods the 210Po activity ranged from 38.16 (B. dissimilis) to 88.74 Bq/Kg (P. virens) and 2.9 to 9.45 Bq/Kg in shell. The 210Po activity in fishes ranged from 8.87 (Macrognathus acculeatus) to 45.29 (Clarias batrachus) Bq/Kg in muscle and 4.76 to 25.09 Bq/Kg in bone. Concentration factor of 210Po in edible portion of fish from river water ranged from 1.3 x 103 to 6.0 x 104. Among the samples analysed P. virens accumulated higher concentrations of 210Po and it could serve as a bioindicator organism in the absence of any bivalve mollusc. (author)

  15. Hallazgo de gasterópodos en la formación Sijes (Mioceno superior Salta, República Argentina

    Wayne, W. J.

    1992-08-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Miocene to Pliocene Sijes Formation consists of a thick sequence of continental sediments and is of major economic importance because it contains the beds of borate minerals that are being exploited in the Puna. Radiometrically dated as between 7 and 4 Ma, it contains only a few fossils, principally diatoms, the remains of birds, and plant fragments, none of which have stratigraphic significance. External molds of small gastropods discovered recently in the Esperanza (upper Member of the Sijes Formation near the Sol de Mañana borate mine in the Salar of Pastos Grandes represent the first identifiable remains of this kind of organism in these deposits. The Esperanza Member, about 780 m thick, is composed of beds of clastic alluvial fan sediments that are overlain by fine grained clastics, then gray tuffs and pumicites that have been dated at 5.9 Ma by the fission-track method. A sequence of rythmically bedded lacustrine muds and evaporites overlies the volcaniclastic beds. The gastropod-bearing sediment, an altered volcanic ash, is near the base of this lacustrine section. A fission-track date from a volcanic ash near the top of the section is 4.0 Ma. A disconformity separates the top of the Esperanza Member from a 2,000 m thick Pliocene conglomerate. The gastropods recovered are a new species of Littoridina, a lacustrine genus that is widely distributed in lakes that range from nearly fresh water to very salty water. Generally, living species of Littoridina are small, fragile, and unornamented; they live on a firm substrate of fine-grained sediments in a permanent body of water that does not become highly turbid. Their presence in lacustrine sediments of the Sijes Formation indicates that the lake, though undoubtedly salty at the time, probably was deep enough that the snails generally were below wave base or lived in an environment, perhaps on rooted plants, that did not become highly turbid. Littoridina probably was transported to

  16. Shell utilization pattern of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Crustacea, Anomura in an estuary at São Vicente, State of São Paulo, Brazil Padrão de utilização de conchas do ermitão Clibanarius vittatus (Crustacea, Anomura, no Estuário de São Vicente, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Bruno S. Sant'Anna

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the gastropod shell utilization pattern of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802 at Pescadores Beach in São Vicente, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Specimens were collected monthly from May 2001 through April 2003, in the intertidal zone at low tide. The crabs were weighed and their carapace shield length measured. All gastropod shells were identified and had their shell biometric parameters (total length and aperture length measured (mm and weighed (g. A total of 2,344 hermit crabs (644 males, 1,594 females, 45 ovigerous females and 61 individuals in intersex, using 13 species of gastropod shells, were collected. Stramonita haemastoma (Linnaeus, 1767, Cymatium parthenopeum (Von Salis, 1793 and Achatina fulica (Bowdich, 1822 comprised over 98% of all the shells. Male and intersex crabs were significantly larger than the females. This size difference strongly influenced the shell utilization pattern, principally in A. fulica, which has the largest shell size, that was only used by males and intersexual individuals of C. vittatus. Cymatium parthenopeum was the only shell species that showed a high determinant coefficient in all the biometric correlations evaluated. The high abundance of S. haemastoma shells and a strong correlation between crab size and shell aperture length established by a significant determination coefficient, indicated that C. vittatus uses this species as the principal resource for shell occupation at Pescadores Beach.O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a utilização de conchas de gastrópodes por Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802, na Praia dos Pescadores, em São Vicente (SP, Brasil. Foram realizadas amostras mensais no período de maio de 2001 a abril de 2003, na região intertidal durante a maré baixa. Todos os animais foram pesados e tiveram o comprimento de seu escudo cefalotorácico mensurados, suas conchas identificadas e medidas quanto ao comprimento (mm, abertura (mm e peso (g

  17. Diversidad de moluscos gasterópodos terrestres en la región del Pacífico de Nicaragua y sus preferencias de hábitat

    Antonio Mijail Pérez

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las comunidades de moluscos gasterópodos terrestres de la región del Pacífico de Nicaragua, con el método de cartografiado UTM. El área de estudio fue subdividida en 21 cuadrículas. Se recolectaron un total de 79 especies distribuidas en 43 géneros y 23 familias, lo que significa una alta riqueza de especies, géneros y familias. El valor más alto de riqueza de especies (S correspondió a la cuadrícula 11 (S=50, Península de Chiltepe, y el valor más bajo a la cuadrícula 1 (S=17, Península de Cosigüina. El índice biogeográfico calculado con base en la información sobre distribución de las especies, presentó los valores más altos en las cuadrículas 5 (3.04, 6 (3.03, 8 (2.96 y 11(2.96. La cuadrícula 11 tuvo la mayor riqueza de especies (S=50 y uno de los mayores índices biogeográficos (IB=2.96. Esta cuadrícula contiene dos áreas protegidas y se encuentra en un estado de conservación relativamente bueno. El hábitat idóneo para una comunidad de moluscos gasterópodos terrestres presenta una iluminación de sol filtrado, asociado con bosques de galería y sustrato de suelo húmedo suelto con hojarasca.Diversity of terrestrial gastropod mollusks in the Pacific region of Nicaragua, and their habitat preferences. Landsnail communities of the Nicaraguan Pacific Slope were studied. The study area was subdivided into 21 quadrats (ca. 40 x 40 km. A high taxonomic richness was found: 79 species, 43 genera and 23 families. Species richness (S per quadrat ranged from 17 through 50. The biogeographic index presented higher values on quadrats 5 (3.04, 6 (3.03, 8 (2.96 and 11(2.96. Quadrat 11 had the highest species richness (S=50, and one of the highest biogeographic index values (IB=2.96. Gastropod mollusk communities are favored by sites with an illumination of filtered sun, associated to riparian forests and with a susbtratum of wet soils and leaf litter. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 317-332. Epub 2008 March 31.

  18. Sediment core fossils in ancient Lake Ohrid: testing for faunal change since the Last Interglacial

    C. Albrecht

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ancient Lake Ohrid is probably of early Pleistocene or Pliocene origin and amongst the few lakes in the world harbouring an outstanding degree of endemic biodiversity. Although there is a long history of evolutionary research in Lake Ohrid, particularly on molluscs, a mollusc fossil record has been missing up to date. For the first time, gastropod and bivalve fossils are reported from the basal, calcareous part of a 2.6 m long sediment succession (core Co1200 from the north-eastern part of Lake Ohrid. Electron spin resonance (ESR dating of mollusc shells from the same stratigraphic level yielded an age of 130 ± 28 ka. Lithofacies III sediments, i.e. a stratigraphic subdivision comprising the basal succession of core Co1200 between 181.5–263 cm, appeared solid, greyish-white, and consisted almost entirely of silt-sized endogenic calcite (CaCO3>70% and intact and broken mollusc shells. Here we compare the faunal composition of the thanatocoenosis with recent mollusc associations in Lake Ohrid. A total of 13 mollusc species (9 gastropod and 4 bivalve species could be identified within Lithofacies III sediments. The value of sediment core fossils for reconstructing palaeoenvironmental settings was evaluated and the agreement between sediment and palaeontological proxies was tested.

    The study also aims at investigating major faunal changes since the Last Interglacial and searching for signs of extinction events.

    The combined findings of the ecological study and the sediment characteristics suggest deposition in a shallow water environment during the Last Interglacial. The fossil fauna exclusively included species also found in the present fauna, i.e. no extinction events are evident for this site since the Last Interglacial. The thanatocoenosis showed the highest similarity with recent Intermediate Layer (5–25 m water depth mollusc assemblages. The demonstrated existence of a mollusc fossil record in Lake Ohrid

  19. The Randeck Maar: Facies development and habitat differentiation of a Miocene lacustrine system

    Rasser, Michael W.; Kern, Andrea K.

    2015-04-01

    The Randeck Maar in S Germany is a well-known fossil lagerstätte (Early/Middle Miocene, MN5) with exceptionally preserved fossils. Although it is a locally restricted succession of lake sediments with a diameter of only 1200 m and less than 60 m of preserved sediments, it appears to comprise a complex structure with a high scientific potential on a global scale, because the lake sediments and their fossils can provide evidence for the impact of the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) on the environment and its organisms as well as the ecological interactions between animals and/or plants during that interval. No other European locality provides such a rich insight into an ecosystem that existed during the MMCO. Excavations of Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart provided new insights into the facies types of this maar lake. They showed that a high variety of facies types existed beside the traditional separation into a basal tuffitic development, followed by calcareous and bituminous ('dysodil') laminates, and terminal massive freshwater limestones. Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions are based on the mentioned excavations and re-evaluations of collection material. They show that the Randeck Maar was a typical maar lake with a rich flora and fauna. Based on all plant remains, the IPR vegetational analysis points towards subhumid sclerophyllous forests, suggesting seasonal drought. 380 taxa in all are known thus far, which are dominated by plants (168) and insects (79). The taxonomic re-evaluation combined with palaeoecological considerations allows for the reconstruction of a palaeoenvironmental model. In brief, three main sections can be differentiated for the habitats of the Randeck Maar lake system: (1) Deep- and open-water lake habitats with local and short-termed mass occurrences of insect larvae, amphibians, and/or gastropods, while fish are particularly scarce. The interpretation of the water chemistry is problematic because palaeoenvironmental

  20. Investigations of a novel fauna from hydrothermal vents along the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) (Invited)

    Rapp, H.; Schander, C.; Halanych, K. M.; Levin, L. A.; Sweetman, A.; Tverberg, J.; Hoem, S.; Steen, I.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic deep ocean hosts a variety of habitats ranging from fairly uniform sedimentary abyssal plains to highly variable hard bottoms on mid ocean ridges, including biodiversity hotspots like seamounts and hydrothermal vents. Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna, and since their discovery in 1977 more than 400 species of animals have been described. This fauna includes various animal groups of which the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. The newly discovered deep sea hydrothermal vents on the Mohns-Knipovich ridge north of Iceland harbour unique biodiversity. The Jan Mayen field consists of two main areas with high-temperature white smoker venting and wide areas with low-temperature seepage, located at 5-700 m, while the deeper Loki Castle vent field at 2400 m depth consists of a large area with high temperature black smokers surrounded by a sedimentary area with more diffuse low-temperature venting and barite chimneys. The Jan Mayen sites show low abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups have a few specialized representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas are absent. Slightly more than 200 macrofaunal species have been identified from this vent area, comprising mainly an assortment of bathyal species known from the surrounding area. Analysis of stable isotope data also indicates that the majority of the species present are feeding on phytodetritus and/or phytoplankton. However, the deeper Loki Castle vent field contains a much more diverse vent endemic fauna with high abundances of specialized polychaetes, gastropods and amphipods. These specializations also include symbioses with a range of chemosynthetic microorganisms. Our data show that the fauna composition is a result of high degree of local specialization with some similarities to the fauna of cold seeps along the Norwegian margin and wood-falls in the abyssal Norwegian Sea