WorldWideScience

Sample records for acneiform eruptions

  1. Morphology-Based Diagnosis of Acneiform Eruptions.

    McFarland, Sarah L; Polcari, Ingrid C

    2015-08-01

    Acne is the most common skin disease. Distinguishing between true acne vulgaris and the various acneiform eruptions is important yet sometimes challenging. Given the common nature of acne and acneiform eruptions, the pediatrician must be aware of these lesion patterns and possess the skills to effectively evaluate the pediatric presentation of these eruptions. This article discusses several of the most common acneiform eruptions, including neonatal acne and cephalic pustulosis, periorificial dermatitis (perioral dermatitis), facial angiofibromas, iatrogenic acneiform drug eruptions, and childhood rosacea. PMID:26312592

  2. Metasone furoate induced acneiform eruption

    M. Ravishankar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acne is the chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit, characterized by the formation of comedones, erythematous papules and pustules. Steroid induced acne is an acneiform eruption characterized by sudden onset of follicular papules and pustules shortly after starting topical or oral corticosteroid. Here, we report a case of a 25-year-old female patient who presented herself to the Dermatology out-patient department with the complaints of acne all over the face after the application of mometasone furoate ointment. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(4.000: 736-737

  3. Acneiform Eruption and Other Dermatologic Side Effects Induced by Targeted Cancer Therapy: A Retrospective Analysis

    Kurtuluş Didem Yazganoğlu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors may cause different adverse cutaneous reactions including acneiform (pustular, papulopustular eruption. Rarely, other specific targeted cancer therapy agents may cause similar pustular eruptions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse skin reactions, mainly acneiform eruptions caused by these chemotherapeutic agents. Material and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 23 patients who developed acneiform eruption due to chemotherapeutic agents between May 2007 and April 2011. The drugs causing acneiform eruption, clinical features of eruption, other associated dermatologic adverse reactions and the treatment modalities used for the acneiform reaction were noted. Results: EGFR inhibitors such as erlotinib and cetuximab were the main drugs causing acneiform eruption in 21 patients. Everolimus and bevacizumab in combination with irinotecan were responsible in two patients. The eruption occurred on the face in all patients. The trunk, neck and the scalp were other affected body parts in some patients. The periorbital area on the face was generally spared. Xerosis and paronychia were the main associated adverse cutaneous reactions. Trichomegaly was another finding in two patients. The patients, who could have been followed, responded to topical or systemic antibiotics, or some medications for acne vulgaris/rosacea. Chemotherapy could be continued in all patients. Conclusion: Dermatologists need to know the specific eruptions occurring with chemotherapy drugs, especially EGFR inhibitors in order to develop the best approach without discontinuation of cancer therapy. Acneiform eruptions due to chemotherapeutics are most commonly seen on the face sparing periorbital area. Other reactions including mainly xerosis, paronychia and trichomegaly can also occur.

  4. Follicular mucinosis presenting as an acneiform eruption: a follow-up study.

    Brau-Javier, Cristina N; Santos-Arroyo, Aileen E; De Sanctis-González, Ivette M; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed by many authors that follicular mucinosis is directly associated with mycosis fungoides (MF). Follicular mucinosis may be classified into 3 main clinical variants: a benign idiopathic form in children and young adults, which includes an acneiform presentation; an idiopathic form in older patients with a benign course; and a third variant that occurs in adults and is associated with MF. Our goal was to study the relationship between the acneiform variant of follicular mucinosis and MF. Eight patients previously diagnosed with the acneiform variant of follicular mucinosis were identified. Biopsy specimens were reviewed to evaluate the histopathologic attributes that characterize the disease and the infiltrate's immunohistochemistry. Also, patient follow-up was assessed to evaluate the clinical course of the disease. Median age of onset of disease was 29.5 years; 95% of lesions were located in the head and neck region. Biopsy specimens showed a moderate to dense perivascular, perifollicular, and interstitial infiltrate of lymphocytes with mucinous deposits within the follicular epithelium. On immunohistochemistry, the infiltrate showed prominent leukocyte common antigen (LCA) positivity and a CD3-positive and CD4-positive infiltrate with rare CD20-positive cells. None of the study patients showed evidence of MF after a mean follow-up of 3 years. The benign course of disease demonstrated in the study patients suggests that the acneiform variant of follicular mucinosis probably represents a subpopulation of the benign idiopathic form of the disease. However, given that histopathologically this variant cannot be distinguished from the lymphoma-associated variant of follicular mucinosis, longitudinal evaluation is still warranted in these patients. PMID:24257190

  5. [Erlotinib-induced acneiform eruption].

    Wahl, R U; Megahed, M

    2013-05-01

    A 73-year-old man has been suffering from a pulmonary adenocarcinoma for three years. He has been treated with the EGF-inhibitor erlotinib for the past 18 months. While taking this medication he developed a progressive papulopustular rash on his face and trunk which later spread to his thighs. Topical treatment with methylprednisolone and nadifloxacin, as well as short courses of systemic doxycycline and ciprofloxacin, led to marked improvement and control of his skin condition. PMID:23535946

  6. Pattern of drug eruptions in a tertiary care hospital

    Background: An adverse drug reaction is unintentional which occurs at doses used for prophylaxis, diagnosis or treatment. Objectives: To determine the frequency of various cutaneous drug eruptions that occur in patients in a tertiary care hospital setting. Patients and Methods: All patients with cutaneous drug eruptions seen at the Dermatology Department of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, over 6 months were enrolled and the pattern of drug eruptions like urticaria, angioedema, fixed drug eruption, maculopapular rash, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis etc. were recorded, along with drugs that caused it. Results:A total of 160 patients (86 males, 74 females) were included in the study. Mean age of patients was 30.7+-15.4 years. Major eruptions were fixed drug eruption (21.3%) followed by urticaria without angioedema (10%), maculopapular rash (9.3%), lichenoid drug eruption (8.7%), acneiform drug eruption (7.5%), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (6.9%), vesiculobullous eruption (5.6%), erythema multiforme and eczematous eruption (5% each). Common drugs causing eruptions were sulfonamides (16.3%), followed by NSAIDs (14.4%), herbal and homeopathic medications (12.5%), penicillins (9.3%), tetracyclines (8.7%), antituberculous drugs, cephalosporins and antiepileptics (6.3% each). Conclusion: Fixed drug eruption and urticaria without angioedema were commonest eruptions while, sulfonamides and NSAIDs were the major causative drugs. Policy message: Reporting of adverse drug reactions is not done in Pakistan and needs to be done in each hospital. (author)

  7. Analysis of sebum lipid composition and the development of acneiform rash before and after administration of egfr inhibitor

    Nakahara, T; Moroi, Y; Takayama, K.; Nakanishi, Y; Furue, M

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (egfri) in patients having non-small-cell lung cancer can cause frequent and diverse skin toxicities, an acneiform rash being one of the commonest. Although the exact pathophysiology of this rash and its development mechanisms remain unknown, investigators have noted that egfri-induced skin toxicity might be partly associated with sebaceous gland function. Sebum is composed mainly of the lipids squalene (sq), wax ester (we), triglyc...

  8. Changes in sebum levels and the development of acneiform rash in patients with non–small cell lung cancer after treatment with EGFR inhibitors

    Nakahara T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Takeshi Nakahara,1,2 Yoichi Moroi,2 Koichi Takayama,3 Eriko Itoh,1,2 Makiko Kido-Nakahara,2 Yoichi Nakanishi,3 Masutaka Furue2 1Division of Skin Surface Sensing, 2Department of Dermatology, 3Research Institute for Diseases of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan Background: It has recently been shown that patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors often develop various cutaneous adverse events. While the pathogenesis underlying these events remains unclear, the relationship between skin toxicity induced by EGFR inhibitors and the sebaceous glands that express EGFR has been previously reported. Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to determine the relationship between cutaneous sebum levels and acneiform rash, a typical skin toxicity of EGFR inhibitors, by measuring the sebum levels before and after EGFR inhibitor treatment. Methods: Eight patients diagnosed with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC (three men and five women with an average age of 69.3 years who were initiated on treatment with EGFR inhibitors (either gefitinib [Iressa®] or erlotinib [Tarceva®] were enrolled. Using a Sebumeter®, sebum levels in the face, chest, and back of each patient were measured before and after EGFR inhibitor treatment. The development of acneiform rash in each skin region was also assessed. Results: Changes in sebum level along with the development of an acneiform rash were observed after patients were started on EGFR inhibitor treatment. Patients who developed an EGFR inhibitor–induced acneiform rash tended to have higher pretreatment sebum levels (baseline than did patients who did not experience an acneiform rash. At each time point measurement, sebum levels were found to be significantly higher in patients who had developed an acneiform rash at that time. Patients who developed rash during treatment showed greater differences in sebum level compared with

  9. Popocatepetl Erupts

    2002-01-01

    The Popocatepetl Volcano, almost 30 miles south of Mexico City, erupted yesterday (December 18, 2000) in what authorities are calling its most spectacular eruption since 800 A.D. This morning, Popocatepetl (pronounced poh-poh-kah-TEH-peh-til) continued spewing red-hot rocks as well as a column of smoke and ash about 2.5 miles high into the atmosphere. This true-color image of the volcano was acquired today by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite. In this image, Popocatepetl's plume (greyish pixels) can be seen blowing southward, away from Mexico City. There is a large cloud bank (bright white pixels) just to the east of the volcanic plume. Although Popocatepetl has been active since 1994-when it awoke from a 70-year slumber-this most recent eruption is most concerning to the greater Mexico City region's 20 million residents. The volcano demonstrated what it can do in 800 A.D. when it belched forth enough lava to fill many of the valleys in the surrounding region. Earlier, scientists warned the citizens of Mexico that there is a dome of lava at the base of the volcano that is causing pressure to build inside. They are concerned that, if it continues to build unabated, this pressure could cause even larger eruptions in the future. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  10. Jupiter Eruptions

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  11. An erupted compound odontoma.

    Gupta, Anil; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Malhotra, Ritika

    2014-01-01

    Odontomas are familiar entities but their eruption into the oral cavity is an extraordinary occurrence, which may be associated with pain, infection, malocclusion, etc. Not many cases of erupted odontomas have been reported in the literature. This paper puts forth a case of erupting odontoma in an attempt to add to the list of reported cases of this unique pathology. PMID:24729109

  12. Mechanism of human tooth eruption

    Kjær, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Human eruption is a unique developmental process in the organism. The aetiology or the mechanism behind eruption has never been fully understood and the scientific literature in the field is extremely sparse. Human and animal tissues provide different possibilities for eruption analyses, briefly......, and the ability of the periodontal ligament to adapt to eruptive movements. Animal studies and studies on normal and pathological eruption in humans can support and explain different aspects in the new theory. The eruption mechanism still needs elucidation and the paper recommends that future research...... discussed in the introduction. Human studies, mainly clinical and radiological, have focused on normal eruption and gender differences. Why a tooth begins eruption and what enables it to move eruptively and later to end these eruptive movements is not known. Pathological eruption courses contribute to...

  13. Multiple asymptomatic cutaneous pilar leiomyoma versus spontaneous eruptive keloids - a case report.

    Morariu, Silviu Horia; Suciu, Mircea; Badea, Mihai Alexandru; Vartolomei, Mihai Dorin; Buicu, Corneliu Florin; Cotoi, Ovidiu Simion

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous piloleiomyoma, angioleiomyoma and genital leiomyoma are variants of superficial cutaneous leiomyoma. The main purpose of this paper was to present clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis criteria for an unusual case of pilar leiomyoma in an 18-year-old male patient. The initial clinical aspect was very similar to spontaneous eruptive keloids: red-violet color, painless, aspect of "crab pincers" of some of the lesions, epidermis atrophy, telangiectasia, located on acneiform zones and compliance with cephalic extremity. The patient had no history of trauma, surgery or acne. Local treatment of one lesion was performed with cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen (-172°C) together with intra-lesion steroid injections, occlusive dressings and silicone gel. Local therapy did not showed notable results, moreover the lesion become painful. Skin biopsy with histological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the diagnosis of multiple cutaneous pilar leiomyoma without atypia. The particularity of the case stands in the atypical onset followed by explosive increasing of lesions number and the appearance of pathognomonic pain after local therapy. PMID:27151722

  14. Generalized eruptive syringomas.

    Jamalipour, Mahnaz; Heidarpour, Mitra; Rajabi, Parvin

    2009-01-01

    Generalized eruptive syringoma is a rare clinical presentation of a benign adnexal tumor that derives from the intraepidermal portion of the eccrine sweat ducts. It presents as successive crops of small flesh-colored papules on the anterior body surfaces. It generally occurs in the peripubertal period. Treatment of this benign condition is cosmetic only. A case of a 28-year-old female with an eight-year history of eruptive syringoma is presented. PMID:20049275

  15. Generalized eruptive syringomas

    Jamalipour Mahnaz; Heidarpour Mitra; Rajabi Parvin

    2009-01-01

    Generalized eruptive syringoma is a rare clinical presentation of a benign adnexal tumor that derives from the intraepidermal portion of the eccrine sweat ducts. It presents as successive crops of small flesh-colored papules on the anterior body surfaces. It generally occurs in the peripubertal period. Treatment of this benign condition is cosmetic only. A case of a 28-year-old female with an eight-year history of eruptive syringoma is presented.

  16. Generalized eruptive syringomas

    Jamalipour Mahnaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized eruptive syringoma is a rare clinical presentation of a benign adnexal tumor that derives from the intraepidermal portion of the eccrine sweat ducts. It presents as successive crops of small flesh-colored papules on the anterior body surfaces. It generally occurs in the peripubertal period. Treatment of this benign condition is cosmetic only. A case of a 28-year-old female with an eight-year history of eruptive syringoma is presented.

  17. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  18. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  19. Erupted compound odontome

    Shekar S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are considered to be hamartomas rather than a true neoplasm. They consist chiefly of enamel and dentin, with variable amount of pulp and cementum when fully developed. They are generally asymptomatic and are included under the benign calcified odontogenic tumors. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Eruption of an odontoma in the oral cavity is rare. Peripheral compound odontomas arise extraosseously and have a tendency to exfoliate. In this article we are reporting a case of a 15-year-old girl with peripheral compound odontoma, with a single rudimentary tooth-like structure in the mandibular right second molar region, which is about to be exfoliated. Its eruption in the oral cavity and location in the mandibular posterior region is associated with aplasia of the mandibular right second molar, making it an interesting case for reporting.

  20. Early eruption of permanent canines

    S Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local factors can modify the eruption time of teeth. Generalized eruption time changes could be due to some systemic diseases like hyperthyroidism, hypophosphatasia, precocious puberty, Proteus syndrome, etc. Localized early eruption of permanent teeth could be due to early extraction of deciduous teeth. Presented here is an extremely rare case of early eruption of permanent canines in a 7-year old female child. Though the number of such cases is very limited, the clinician should poses adequate knowledge and keeps an open eye to identify such cases.

  1. Will Teide erupt again?

    Marti, Joan; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of hazard in volcanic systems characterised by long repose period is difficult because the lack of knowledge of the past volcanic history and also because in many cases volcanism is not perceived as a potential problem, being only regarded as an attraction for tourism or a source of economic benefit, thus hiding the need to conduct hazard assessment. Teide, in the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands), is not an exception to this general rule and, despite being one of the largest composite volcanoes in the World, it is generally considered as a non-active volcano by population, visitors and even by some scientists. However, geological and geophysical evidence, including a large diversity of monitoring signals recorded during last decades, as well as a simple comparison with similar volcanoes that have erupted in recent times after hundreds or even thousands of years of quiescence, recommend to consider Teide as an active volcano and to take the necessary precaution in an island with nearly one million of permanent inhabitants and nearly 5 millions of visitors per year. What is the potential of Teide to erupt again? is the question that relies behind the fact of considering it as active, and that needs to be answered first. Based on the current volcanological, petrological and geophysical knowledge We propose a conceptual model on the magma recharge mechanisms, structure of the plumbing system, and eruption triggers and dynamics of Teide volcano that helps to understand its behaviour and to anticipate future activity. Ramón y Cajal contract (RYC-2012-11024)

  2. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  3. Eruptive solar magnetic fields

    This paper considers the quasi-steady evolution of solar magnetic fields in response to gradual photospheric changes. Special interest is taken in the threshold of a sudden eruption in the solar atmosphere. The formal model of an evolving, force-free field dependent on two Cartesian coordinates has been treated previously, and we extend it to a field which is not force free but in static equilibrium with plasma pressure and gravity. The basic physics is illustrated by the evolution of a loop-shaped electric current sheet enclosing a potential bipolar field with footpoints rooted in the photosphere. A free-boundary problem is posed and solved for the equilibrium configuration of the current sheet in a hydrostatically supported isothermal atmosphere. As the footpoints move appart to spread a constant photospheric magnetic flux over a larger region, the equilibria available extend the field to increasingly great heights. Two basic behaviors are possible, depending on the ratio of the total magnetic flux to an equivalent flux constructed dimensionally from the pressure difference across the current sheet and the density scale height. For a small, total magnetic flux, nonequilibrium can set in with the appearance of a marginally stable equilibriu, as demonstrated previously for the frece-free fields. For a total magnetic flux exceeding a certain critical value, the field lines rise high enough for gravity to play a significant role. The sequence of equilibria in this case suggests that nonequilibrium can set in with the opening of the field lines by magnetic buoyancy. This eruption can also take place with a prominence filament and may be the origin of the white light coronal transient

  4. Investigation of Solar Eruptive Prominences

    Su, Yingna; McCauley, Patrick; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Ji, Haisheng; Reeves, Katharine; DeLuca, Edward

    2015-08-01

    At first, we will present an investigation of the polar crown prominence that erupted on 2012 March 12. This prominence is observed at the southeast limb by SDO/AIA (end-on view) and displays a quasi vertical-thread structure. Bright U-shape (horn-like) structure is observed surrounding the upper portion of the prominence (171 Angstrom) before the eruption and becomes more prominent during the eruption. When viewed on the disk, STEREO-B shows that this long prominence is composed of a series of vertical threads and displays a half loop-like structure during the eruption. We focus on the magnetic support of the prominence by studying the structure and dynamics of the prominence before and during the eruption using observations from SDO and STEREO. We construct a series of magnetic field models (including sheared arcade model, twisted flux rope model, and model with HFT), then compare with observations. Various observational characteristics appear to support the twisted flux rope model. Our study suggests that the flux rope supporting the prominence enters the regime of torus instability at the onset of the fast rise phase, and signature of reconnection appears about one hour later. In the second part, we will present a statistical study on the kinematics of limb eruptive prominences observed by SDO/AIA. A brief introduction on an online catalog of prominence eruptions observed by SDO/AIA will also be presented.

  5. Climatic Impact of Volcanic Eruptions

    Gregory A. Zielinski

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions have the potential to force global climate, provided they are explosive enough to emit at least 1–5 megaton of sulfur gases into the stratosphere. The sulfuric acid produced during oxidation of these gases will both absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation, thus warming the stratosphere and cooling the Earth’s surface. Maximum global cooling on the order of 0.2–0.3°C, using instrumental temperature records, occurs in the first 2 years after the eruption, with lesser cooling possibly up to the 4th year. Equatorial eruptions are able to affect global climate, whereas mid- to high-latitude events will impact the hemisphere of origin. However, regional responses may differ, including the possibility of winter warming following certain eruptions. Also, El Niño warming may override the cooling induced by volcanic activity. Evaluation of different style eruptions as well as of multiple eruptions closely spaced in time beyond the instrumental record is attained through the analysis of ice-core, tree-ring, and geologic records. Using these data in conjunction with climate proxy data indicates that multiple eruptions may force climate on decadal time scales, as appears to have occurred during the Little Ice Age (i.e., roughly AD 1400s–1800s. The Toba mega-eruption of ~75,000 years ago may have injected extremely large amounts of material into the stratosphere that remained aloft for up to about 7 years. This scenario could lead to the initiation of feedback mechanisms within the climate system, such as cooling of sea-surface temperatures. These interacting mechanisms following a mega-eruption may cool climate on centennial time scales.

  6. Comparing Dynamics in Eruptive and Non-Eruptive Flares

    Nitta, Nariaki; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Slater, Gregory L.; Frank, Zoe Anne

    2016-05-01

    Close comparison of EUV and coronagraph data suggests that there may not be clear distinction between eruptive and non-eruptive flares as far as the coronal and chromospheric signatures are concerned. Here we define eruptive and non-eruptive flares in terms of the presence and absence of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). We have studied several flares in both categories using Hinode/SOT and IRIS data. The pointing of the Hinode/SOT data has been updated by correlating them with AIA 1700 A images. We show our initial results about how the flare development compares in eruptive and non-eruptive flares, including the reconnection rate as derived from the magnetic field swept over by flare ribbons (in SOT Ca images), and the line-of-sight velocities at different locations and temperatures (in IRIS spectral data). We also discuss large-scale disturbances and related CMEs in SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO data as context information.

  7. Volcanic Eruptions in Kamchatka

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Sheveluch Stratovolcano Click on the image for full resolution TIFF Klyuchevskoy Stratovolcano Click on the image for full resolution TIFF One of the most volcanically active regions of the world is the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Siberia, Russia. It is not uncommon for several volcanoes to be erupting at the same time. On April 26, 2007, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radioneter (ASTER) on NASA's Terra spacecraft captured these images of the Klyuchevskoy and Sheveluch stratovolcanoes, erupting simultaneously, and 80 kilometers (50 miles) apart. Over Klyuchevskoy, the thermal infrared data (overlaid in red) indicates that two open-channel lava flows are descending the northwest flank of the volcano. Also visible is an ash-and-water plume extending to the east. Sheveluch volcano is partially cloud-covered. The hot flows highlighted in red come from a lava dome at the summit. They are avalanches of material from the dome, and pyroclastic flows. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and

  8. Historical Significant Volcanic Eruption Locations

    Department of Homeland Security — A significant eruption is classified as one that meets at least one of the following criteriacaused fatalities, caused moderate damage (approximately $1 million or...

  9. Volcanic eruption plumes on Io

    The detection of an umbrella-shaped plume extending about 280 km above the bright limb of Io was one of the most important discoveries made during the Voyager 1 encounter with the jovian system. This discovery proves that Io is volcanically active at present, and the number and magnitude of these eruptions indicate that Io is the most volcanically active body so far discovered in the Solar System. Preliminary analyses of these eruptive plumes are presented. (U.K.)

  10. Premature dental eruption: report of case.

    McNamara, C M

    2011-08-05

    This case report reviews the variability of dental eruption and the possible sequelae. Dental eruption of the permanent teeth in cleft palate children may be variable, with delayed eruption the most common phenomenon. A case of premature dental eruption of a maxillary left first premolar is demonstrated, however, in a five-year-old male. This localized premature dental eruption anomaly was attributed to early extraction of the primary dentition, due to caries.

  11. Infrasound research of volcanic eruptions

    Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are efficient sources of infrasound produced by the rapid perturbation of the atmosphere by the explosive source. Being able to propagate up to large distances from the source, infrasonic waves from major (VEI 4 or larger) volcanic eruptions have been recorded for many decades with analogue micro-barometers at large regional distances. In late 1980s, near-field observations became progressively more common and started to have direct impact on the understanding and modeling of explosive source dynamics, to eventually play a primary role in volcano research. Nowadays, infrasound observation from a large variety of volcanic eruptions, spanning from VEI 0 to VEI 5 events, has shown a dramatic variability in terms of signature, excess pressure and frequency content of radiated infrasound and has been used to infer complex eruptive source mechanisms for the different kinds of events. Improved processing capability and sensors has allowed unprecedented precise locations of the explosive source and is progressively increasing the possibility to monitor volcanoes from distant records. Very broadband infrasound observations is also showing the relation between volcanic eruptions and the atmosphere, with the eruptive mass injection in the atmosphere triggering acoustic-gravity waves which eventually might control the ash dispersal and fallout.

  12. Eruptions from the Sun

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  13. Featured Image: Solar Prominence Eruptions

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    In these images from the Solar Dynamics Observatorys AIA instrument (click for the full resolution!), two solar prominence eruptions (one from June 2011 and one from August 2012) are shown in pre- and post-eruption states. The images at the top are taken in the Fe XII 193 bandpass and the images at the bottom are taken in the He II 304 bandpass. When a team of scientists searched through seven years of solar images taken by the STEREO (Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory) spacecraft, these two eruptions were found to extend all the way out to a distance of 1 AU. They were the only two examples of clear, bright, and compact prominence eruptions found to do so. The scientists, led by Brian Wood (Naval Research Laboratory), used these observations to reconstruct the motion of the eruption and model how prominences expand as they travel away from the Sun. Theimage to the rightshowsa STEREO observation compared to the teams 3D model of theprominences shape and expansion. To learn more about theresults from this study, check out the paper below.CitationBrian E. Wood et al 2016 ApJ 816 67. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/816/2/67

  14. Bayesian analysis of volcanic eruptions

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1990-10-01

    The simple Poisson model generally gives a good fit to many volcanoes for volcanic eruption forecasting. Nonetheless, empirical evidence suggests that volcanic activity in successive equal time-periods tends to be more variable than a simple Poisson with constant eruptive rate. An alternative model is therefore examined in which eruptive rate(λ) for a given volcano or cluster(s) of volcanoes is described by a gamma distribution (prior) rather than treated as a constant value as in the assumptions of a simple Poisson model. Bayesian analysis is performed to link two distributions together to give the aggregate behavior of the volcanic activity. When the Poisson process is expanded to accomodate a gamma mixing distribution on λ, a consequence of this mixed (or compound) Poisson model is that the frequency distribution of eruptions in any given time-period of equal length follows the negative binomial distribution (NBD). Applications of the proposed model and comparisons between the generalized model and simple Poisson model are discussed based on the historical eruptive count data of volcanoes Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Etna (Italy). Several relevant facts lead to the conclusion that the generalized model is preferable for practical use both in space and time.

  15. Can rain cause volcanic eruptions?

    Mastin, Larry G.

    1993-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are renowned for their violence and destructive power. This power comes ultimately from the heat and pressure of molten rock and its contained gases. Therefore we rarely consider the possibility that meteoric phenomena, like rainfall, could promote or inhibit their occurrence. Yet from time to time observers have suggested that weather may affect volcanic activity. In the late 1800's, for example, one of the first geologists to visit the island of Hawaii, J.D. Dana, speculated that rainfall influenced the occurrence of eruptions there. In the early 1900's, volcanologists suggested that some eruptions from Mount Lassen, Calif., were caused by the infiltration of snowmelt into the volcano's hot summit. Most such associations have not been provable because of lack of information; others have been dismissed after careful evaluation of the evidence.

  16. Sub-glacial volcanic eruptions

    White, Donald Edward

    1956-01-01

    The literature on sub-glacial volcanic eruptions and the related flood phenomena has been reviewed as a minor part of the larger problem of convective and conductive heat transfer from intrusive magma. (See Lovering, 1955, for a review of the extensive literature on this subject.) This summary of data on sub-glacial eruptions is part of a program that the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting in connection with its Investigations of Geologic Processes project on behalf of the Division of Research, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  17. Erupted odontoma: a case report.

    Raval, Nilesh; Mehta, Dhaval; Vachhrajani, Kanan; Nimavat, Abhishek

    2014-07-01

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations or lesions of odontogenic origin, which consist of enamel, dentin, cementum and pulpal tissue 'Erupted odontoma' is a term used to specifically denote odontomas, which are exposed into the oral cavity. These are rare entities with only 25-30 cases being reported so far in the dental literature. Here, we present a rare case of an erupted odontoma in an adolescent patient who came with a complaint of bad aesthetics due to the presence of multiple small teeth like structures in the upper front teeth region. PMID:25177649

  18. Predicting Major Solar Eruptions

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    , whether an active region that produces a flare will also produce a CME. Bobra and Ilonidis then use a feature-selection algorithm to try to understand which features distinguish between flaring regions that dont produce a CME and those that do.Predictors of CMEsThe authors reach several interesting conclusions:Under the right conditions, their algorithm is able to predict whether an active region with a given set of features will produce a CME as well as a flare with a fairly high rate of success.None of the 18 features they tested are good predictors in isolation: its necessary to look at a combination of at least 6 features to have success predicting whether a flare will be accompanied by a CME.The features that are the best predictors are all intensive features ones that stay the same independent of the active regions size. Extensive features ones that change as the active region grows or shrinks are less successful predictors.Only the magnetic field properties of the photosphere were considered, so a logical next step is to extend this study to consider properties of the solar corona above active regions as well. In the meantime, these are interesting first results that may well help us better predict these major solar eruptions.BonusCheck out this video for a great description from NASA of the difference between solar flares and CMEs (as well as some awesome observations of both).CitationM. G. Bobra and S. Ilonidis 2016 ApJ 821 127. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/127

  19. Volcanic eruptions are cooling the earth

    The article discusses how volcanic eruptions may influence the climate. The environmental impacts both on the earth surface and the atmosphere are surveyed. Some major eruptions in modern times are mentioned

  20. Holocene Eruptions of Machin Volcano: Stratigraphy and Eruptive Dynamics

    Rueda, H.; Macias, J.; Siebe, C.; Cepeda, H.; Mendez, R.; Cortes, G.

    2005-12-01

    Cerro Machin (2,750 m a.s.l.) is a Quaternary dacitic volcano located in the Central Cordillera of the Andes in Colombia. It is a 2.4-km wide tuff ring that hosts three domes with fumarolic activity. The volcano's origin is linked to the development of a pull apart basin bounded by the Machin and Cajamarca faults. Detailed stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating indicate that six eruptions have taken place during the Holocene. Each eruptive event established a Plinian column that deposited pumice fall deposits followed by the collapse of the column ensuing pumiceous pyroclastic flows, surges and secondary lahars. These eruptive events are dubbed and dated (average age) as the Espartillal (5000 yr.), P0 (4600 yr.), P1 (3600 yr.), Guaico (2600 yr.), P2 (1200 yr.), and Anillo (900 yr.). The pyroclastic fall deposits have dispersal axes to the NW, they are exposed up to 60 km from the crater and cover a total approximated area of 2000 km2 and have a total volume of 4.9 km3. Calculated column heights oscillate between 19 and 32 km. The collapse of these columns generated pyroclastic flow deposits that traveled up to 15 km around the volcano infilling the Coello valley. Some pyroclastic flows were able to surmmount 200-m high topographic barriers. Remobilization by water of this unconsolidated material generated lahars that followed the Coello and Magdalena Rivers and traveled up to 115 km from the volcano covering and area of 1000 km2. The deposits of all these eruptions have affected large areas where the modern important cities of Colombia are now located, as well as routes of great economic importance. Although the volcano is in a quiescent state it must be closely monitored since it has produced cataclysmic eruptions ca. every 1000 yrs.

  1. About the Mechanism of Volcanic Eruptions

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to the volcanic eruption theory is proposed. It is based on a simple physical mechanism of the imbalance in the system "magma-crust-fluid". This mechanism helps to explain from unified positions the different types of volcanic eruptions. A criterion of imbalance and magma eruption is derived. Stratovolcano and caldera formation is analyzed. High explosive eruptions of the silicic magma is discussed

  2. An Unusual Case Report of Erupted Odontoma

    Dhaval Mehta; Nilesh Raval; Sneha Udhani; Viral Parekh; Chintan Modi

    2013-01-01

    Odontomas are the most common of the odontogenic tumors of the jaws, which are benign, slow growing, and nonaggressive. They are usually asymptomatic and found in routine dental radiographic examination. Odontomas are usually associated with tooth eruption disturbances. Eruption of odontoma in oral cavity is rare entity. Here we report a case of an unusual erupted compound odontoma.

  3. The Longevity of Lava Dome Eruptions

    Wolpert, Robert L; Calder, Eliza S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the duration of past, on-going and future volcanic eruptions is an important scientific goal and a key societal need. We present a new methodology for forecasting the duration of on-going and future lava dome eruptions based on a database (DomeHaz) recently compiled by the authors. The database includes duration and composition for 177 such eruptions, with "eruption" defined as the period encompassing individual episodes of dome growth along with associated quiescent periods during which extrusion pauses but unrest continues. In a key finding we show that probability distributions for dome eruption durations are both heavy-tailed and composition-dependent. We construct Objective Bayes statistical models featuring heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto distributions with composition-specific parameters to make forecasts about the durations of new and on-going eruptions that depend on both eruption duration-to-date and composition. Our Bayesian predictive distributions reflect both uncertainty about mode...

  4. Nyiragongo Volcano before the Eruption

    2002-01-01

    Nyiragongo is an active stratovolcano situated on the Eastern African Rift; it is part of Africa's Virunga Volcanic Chain. In a massive eruption that occurred on January 17, 2002, Nyiragongo sent a vast plume of smoke and ash skyward, and three swifly-moving rivers of lava streaming down its western and eastern flanks. Previous lava flows from Nyiragongo have been observed moving at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour (60 kph). The lava flows from the January 17 eruption destroyed more than 14 villages in the surrounding countryside, forcing tens of thousands to flee into the neighboring country of Rwanda. Within one day the lava ran to the city of Goma, situated on the northern shore of Lake Kivu about 12 miles (19 km) south of Nyiragongo. The lava cut a 200 foot (60 meter) wide swath right through Goma, setting off many fires, as it ran into Lake Kivu. Goma, the most heavily populated city in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is home to about 400,000 people. Most of these citizens were forced to flee, while many have begun to return to their homes only to find their homes destroyed. This true-color scene was captured by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite, on December 11, 2001, just over a month before the most recent eruption. Nyiragongo's large crater is clearly visible in the image. As recently as June 1994, there was a large lava lake in the volcano's crater which had since solidified. The larger Nyamuragira Volcano is located roughly 13 miles (21 km) to the north of Nyiragongo. Nyamuragira last erupted in February and March 2001. That eruption was also marked by columns of erupted ash and long fluid lava flows, some of which are apparent in the image as dark greyish swaths radiating away from Nyamuragira. Both peaks are also notorious for releasing large amounts of sulfur dioxide, which presents another health hazard to people and animals living in close proximity. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data supplied

  5. Volcanic eruption detection with TOMS

    Krueger, Arlin J.

    1987-01-01

    The Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) is designed for mapping of the atmospheric ozone distribution. Absorption by sulfur dioxide at the same ultraviolet spectral wavelengths makes it possible to observe and resolve the size of volcanic clouds. The sulfur dioxide absorption is discriminated from ozone and water clouds in the data processing by their spectral signatures. Thus, the sulfur dioxide can serve as a tracer which appears in volcanic eruption clouds because it is not present in other clouds. The detection limit with TOMS is close to the theoretical limit due to telemetry signal quantization of 1000 metric tons (5-sigma threshold) within the instrument field of view (50 by 50 km near the nadir). Requirements concerning the use of TOMS in detection of eruptions, geochemical cycles, and volcanic climatic effects are discussed.

  6. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  7. Fixed drug eruptions with modafinil

    Loknath Ghoshal; Mausumi Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Modafinil is a psychostimulant drug, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of narcolepsy associated excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep disorder related to shift work, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, presently it is being used as a lifestyle medicine; in India, it has been misused as an "over the counter" drug. Modafinil is known to have several cutaneous side effects. Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a distinctive drug induced reaction pa...

  8. Eruption patterns of parasitic volcanoes

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2015-01-01

    Eruption patterns of parasitic volcanoes are discussed in order to study their correlation to the activities of their parental polygenetic volcanoes. The distribution density of parasitic vents on polygenetic volcanoes is diversified, probably corresponding to the age and structure of parental volcanoes. Describing existing parasitic cones contextually in relation to parental volcanoes is as indispensable as collecting observational data of their actual formations. In the present paper, spati...

  9. Medical effects of volcanic eruptions

    Baxter, Peter J.

    1990-09-01

    Excluding famine and tsunamis, most deaths in volcanic eruptions have been from pyroclastic flows and surges (nuées ardentes) and wet debris flows (lahars). Information on the causes of death and injury in eruptions is sparse but the available literature is summarised for the benefit of volcanologists and emergency planners. In nuées, thermal injury may be at least as important as asphyxia in causing immediate deaths. The high temperature of the gases and entrained particles readily causes severe burns to the skin and the air passages and the presence of both types of injury in an individual may combine to increase the delayed mortality risk from respiratory complications or from infection of burns. Trauma from missiles or body displacement is also common, but the role of asphyxiant or irritant gases, and steam, remains unclear. The ratio of dead: injured is much higher than in other natural disasters. At the periphery of a nuée being protected inside buildings which remain intact appears to greatly increase the chances of survival. In lahars, infected wounds and crush injury are the main delayed causes of death, and the scope for preventive measures, other than evacuation, is small. The evidence from Mount St. Helens, 1980, and other major eruptions indicates that, although mortality is high within the main zone of devastation and in the open, emergency planning should concentrate on the periphery of a nuée where preventive measures are feasible and could save many lives in densely populated areas.

  10. Forces in Erupting Flux Ropes: CMEs and Failed Eruptions

    Chen, James

    2016-05-01

    A range of dynamical behaviors that can be exhibited by a quasi-statically evolving flux rope is studied. Starting with a CME-like flux rope in equilibrium balanced by the ambient coronal pressure (non-force-free) and an overlying coronal magnetic field (Bc), the poloidal flux is slowly increased, on a timescale much longer than the eruptive timescale of several to tens of minutes. In this configuration, the overlying field Bc provides an external downward restraining force, constituting an effective potential barrier. Slowly increasing poloidal flux causes the flux rope to gradually rise, following a sequence of quasi-static equilibria. As the apex of the flux rope rises past a critical height Z*, slightly higher than the peak of the potential barrier Bc(Z), it expands on a faster, dynamical (Alfvenic) timescale determined by the magnetic field and geometry of the flux rope. The expanding flux rope may reach a new equilibrium at height Z1. Observationally, this behavior would be recognized as a ``failed eruption.'' The new equilibrium flux rope is established if the magnetic tension force due to the toroidal magnetic field component Bt can balance the outward hoop force due to the poloidal component Bp. The flux rope may also expand without reaching a new equilibrium, provided a sufficiennt amount of poloidal flux is injected on a dynamical timescale so that the tension force cannot balance the hoop force. This scenario would result in a CME eruption. The influence of the poloidal flux injection, the Bc(Z) profile, and boundary conditions on the quantitative balance of the forces in an expanding flux rope is elucidated. Potentially observable consequences of the difference scenarios/models are discussed.Work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Research Program

  11. How and Why Do Geysers Erupt?

    Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are features that produce episodic eruptions of water, steam and sometimes non-condensable gases. Natural geysers are rare, with fewer than 1,000 worldwide. They are more than curiosities and popular tourist attractions: they offer a direct window into geothermal processes, and may serve as a natural small-scale laboratory to study larger-scale eruptive process such as those at volcanoes, and other self-organized, intermittent processes that result from phase separation and localized input of energy and mass. Despite > 200 years of scientific study, basic questions remain: Do eruptions begin from the bottom or top of the geyser? What controls eruption duration? Why do eruptions end? What are the required special subsurface geometries? Why are some geysers periodic, and others irregular? How and why do they respond to external influences such as weather, tides, and earthquakes? This presentation will review new insights from field studies at Lone Star geyser, Yellowstone National Park, geysers in the El Tatio geyser field, Chile, and laboratory models. At Lone Star we infer that dynamics are controlled by thermal and mechanical coupling between the conduit and a deeper, laterally-offset reservoir (called a "bubble trap" in previous studies). At El Tatio, we measured pressure and temperature within geysers over multiple eruption cycles: this data document the heating of liquid water by steam delivered from below. The laboratory experiments reveal how episodic release of steam from a bubble trap prepares a conduit for eruption and can generate a range of eruption intensities. In all cases, the eruption initiation, duration and termination are controlled by the interaction between the accumulation and transport of steam and liquid, and modulated by the geometry of the geyser's plumbing. Time series of thousands of eruptions confirm that internal processes control eruptions, with only pool geysers showing a sensitivity to air temperature; only very large stress

  12. Nova Eruptions with Infrared Interferometric Observations

    Ribeiro, Valério A R M

    2015-01-01

    Infrared interferometric observations have a great deal of potential to unravel the nature of the nova eruptions. We suggest that techniques, already in place, to derive the ejection details at optical wavelengths be used with infrared interferometric observations to derive parameters such as the ejected mass in a nova eruption. This is achievable based on modelling the initial phase of the eruption when the infrared light is dominated by the free-free thermal process.

  13. Adverse reaction of topical etofenamate: petechial eruption.

    Orbak, Z; Yildirim, Z K; Sepetci, O; Karakelleoglu, C; Alp, H

    2012-10-01

    Etofenamate is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Clinical findings caused by etofenamate are uncommon. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most common cutaneous reaction reported. But petechial eruption due to etofenamate had not been reported yet. This report concerns an 11-year old male with petechial eruption after application of topical etofenamate. Physicians need to be aware that patients can develop an asymptomatic purpuric eruption when etofenamate is ordered. PMID:23620980

  14. Winter warming from large volcanic eruptions

    Robock, Alan; Mao, Jianping

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95-percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  15. Excitation of atmospheric oscillations by volcanic eruptions

    Kanamori, Hiroo; Mori, Jim; Harkrider, David G.

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of atmospheric oscillations with periods of about 300 s which were observed for the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1982 El Chichón eruptions. Two distinct spectral peaks, at T = 270 and 230 s for the Pinatubo eruption and at T = 195 and 266 s for the El Chichón eruptions, have been reported. We found similar oscillations for the 1980 Mount St. Helens and the 1883 Krakatoa eruptions. To explain these observations, we investigated excitation problems for two types of ideali...

  16. An ergodic approach to eruption hazard scaling

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The complexity and indeterminacy of volcanic processes demand the use of statistical methods to analyze the expectations of the occurrence and size of future eruptions. The probability of a volcano producing potentially destructive eruptions in a given time interval may be estimated analyzing the sequence of past eruptions assuming a physically plausible process. Since the threat posed by eruptions depends on their mass or energy release (magnitude) and on their emission rate (intensity), the Volcanic Explosivity Index is a suitable measure to quantify the eruptive events, particularly considering that the largest available global catalogues use that measure. The definition of volcanic hazard is thus posed here in terms of the expected annual release of energy by eruptions in each VEI category. This concept is based on the ergodic property of a large set of volcanoes to release about the same amount of energy in each VEI category over a sufficiently large time interval. This property is however constrained to the VEI range of eruptions that constitute complete catalogues (VEI >2) in the lower end, and to the extreme eruptions that may destroy or significantly alter a volcanic system, such as the large caldera-forming eruptions (VEI Popocatepetl are presented to illustrate the method, aimed to provide an objective criterion to assess the relative hazard posed by different volcanoes.

  17. Melt eruptions during molten corium concrete interactions

    Robb, Kevin Richard

    The melt eruption phenomenon could occur during severe accidents at existing light water nuclear reactors. A postulated beyond-design basis accident includes the melting and relocation of the reactor core onto the concrete basemat of containment. The continually heated melt can reach high temperatures and thermally attack the underlying concrete, MCCI. As the melt cools, a crust forms on the upper surface of the melt pool. Melt eruptions occur when gases from the decomposing concrete passes through channels in the crust ejecting melt onto the upper surface of the crust. The impact of melt eruptions on the coolability of the melt is important when estimating the probability and timing of containment failure. This work focuses on understanding and modeling the melt eruption phenomenon. A model has been developed to predict the amount of melt ejected during melt eruptions. This entrainment model has been verified against an experimental database developed as part of this work. Several phenomena have been identified and modeled which may predict the creation and closure of eruptions sites. The models have been integrated into a MCCI systems code. The new melt eruption model predicted reasonable rates of melt ejection and the number and diameter of eruption sites for a sample simulation of a postulated reactor scale MCCI. Results from the new melt eruption model suggest an ex-vessel core melt under flooded conditions could readily quench.

  18. El Cobreloa: A geyser with two distinct eruption styles

    Namiki, Atsuko; Muñoz-Saez, Carolina; Manga, Michael

    2014-08-01

    We performed field measurements at a geyser nicknamed "El Cobreloa," located in the El Tatio Geyser Field, Northern Andes, Chile. The El Cobreloa geyser has two distinct eruption styles: minor eruptions and more energetic and long-lived major eruptions. Minor eruptions splash hot water intermittently over an approximately 4 min time period. Major eruptions begin with an eruption style similar to minor eruptions, but then transition to a voluminous liquid water-dominated eruption, and finally end with energetic steam discharge that continues for approximately 1 h. We calculated eruption intervals by visual observations, acoustic measurements, and ground temperature measurements and found that each eruption style has a regular interval: 4 h and 40 min for major eruptions and ˜14 min for minor eruptions. Eruptions of El Cobreloa and geochemical measurements suggest interaction of three water sources. The geyser reservoir, connected to the surface by a conduit, is recharged by a deep, hot aquifer. More deeply derived magmatic fluids heat the reservoir. Boiling in the reservoir releases steam and hot liquid water to the overlying conduit, causing minor eruptions, and heating the water in the conduit. Eventually the water in the conduit becomes warm enough to boil, leading to a steam-dominated eruption that empties the conduit. The conduit is then recharged by a shallow, colder aquifer, and the eruption cycle begins anew. We develop a model for minor eruptions which heat the water in the conduit. El Cobreloa provides insight into how small eruptions prepare the geyser system for large eruptions.

  19. Global Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database, 4360 BC to present

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database is a global listing of over 600 eruptions from 4360 BC to the present. A significant eruption is classified as one that...

  20. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers. This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007. Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena. According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  1. Fixed drug eruptions with modafinil

    Loknath Ghoshal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modafinil is a psychostimulant drug, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of narcolepsy associated excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep disorder related to shift work, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, presently it is being used as a lifestyle medicine; in India, it has been misused as an "over the counter" drug. Modafinil is known to have several cutaneous side effects. Fixed drug eruption (FDE is a distinctive drug induced reaction pattern characterized by recurrence of eruption at the same site of the skin or mucous membrane with repeated systemic administration. Only two case reports exist in the literature describing modafinil induced FDE until date. Here, we report two similar cases. The increasing use of this class of drug amongst the medical personnel might be posing a threat to the proper use and encouraging subsequent abuse. There might be a considerable population using these drugs unaware of the possible adverse effects. Authorities should be more alert regarding the sale and distribution of such medicines.

  2. Chronology of Postglacial Eruptive Activity and Calculation of Eruption Probabilities for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    Nathenson, Manuel; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano has had 4 eruptive episodes in its postglacial history (since 13,000 years ago) comprising 16 eruptions. Time intervals between events within the episodes are relatively short, whereas time intervals between the episodes are much longer. An updated radiocarbon chronology for these eruptions is presented that uses paleomagnetic data to constrain the choice of calibrated ages. This chronology is used with exponential, Weibull, and mixed-exponential probability distributions to model the data for time intervals between eruptions. The mixed exponential distribution is the best match to the data and provides estimates for the conditional probability of a future eruption given the time since the last eruption. The probability of an eruption at Medicine Lake volcano in the next year from today is 0.00028.

  3. Forecasting eruptions using pre-eruptive seismic patterns at Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia

    McCausland, W. A.; White, R. A.; Hendrasto, M.; Gunawan, H.; Indrastuti, N.; Triastuti, H.; Suparman, Y.; Putra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Forecasting the size, timing and style of volcanic eruptions is of primary interest to observatories and civil authorities world-wide, yet most observatories only have access to long-term data at a very limited number of volcanoes under their jurisdiction. When extensive long-term data sets are available to responsible agencies, volcanic eruptive size, timing and style can usually be successfully forecast using current monitoring data and knowledge of precursory eruptive patterns, enabling the communication of timely forecasts to civil authorities. Experienced agencies, such as Indonesia's Center for Volcanology and Geologic Hazards Mitigation and the USAID-USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, utilize extensive collective experiences with multiple monitoring streams over multiple eruption cycles and across volcano types to successfully forecast eruption size, style and onset, as well as changes in eruptive style and size within ongoing eruptions. The longest-term real-time monitoring parameter commonly available at volcanoes worldwide is seismic data. Seismic data is a direct measure of rate-dependent strain changes in the magmatic system from the deep magmatic input to shallow eruptive processes. Patterns of pre-eruptive earthquakes coupled with other available monitoring data and conceptual models of magma ascent enable short-term forecasting of eruption size, style, and onset. First order event locations, characterization of background seismicity, and changes in earthquake types and energy release are most important to successful eruption forecasting. This study demonstrates how this approach has been used to successfully forecast eruption onsets, changes in eruptive style, and to change alert levels and extend or contract evacuation zones during the ongoing eruption of Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia.

  4. The longevity of lava dome eruptions

    Wolpert, Robert L.; Ogburn, Sarah E.; Calder, Eliza S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the duration of past, ongoing, and future volcanic eruptions is an important scientific goal and a key societal need. We present a new methodology for forecasting the duration of ongoing and future lava dome eruptions based on a database (DomeHaz) recently compiled by the authors. The database includes duration and composition for 177 such eruptions, with "eruption" defined as the period encompassing individual episodes of dome growth along with associated quiescent periods during which extrusion pauses but unrest continues. In a key finding, we show that probability distributions for dome eruption durations are both heavy tailed and composition dependent. We construct objective Bayesian statistical models featuring heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto distributions with composition-specific parameters to make forecasts about the durations of new and ongoing eruptions that depend on both eruption duration to date and composition. Our Bayesian predictive distributions reflect both uncertainty about model parameter values (epistemic uncertainty) and the natural variability of the geologic processes (aleatoric uncertainty). The results are illustrated by presenting likely trajectories for 14 dome-building eruptions ongoing in 2015. Full representation of the uncertainty is presented for two key eruptions, Soufriére Hills Volcano in Montserrat (10-139 years, median 35 years) and Sinabung, Indonesia (1-17 years, median 4 years). Uncertainties are high but, importantly, quantifiable. This work provides for the first time a quantitative and transferable method and rationale on which to base long-term planning decisions for lava dome-forming volcanoes, with wide potential use and transferability to forecasts of other types of eruptions and other adverse events across the geohazard spectrum.

  5. Mechanism of Human Tooth Eruption: Review Article Including a New Theory for Future Studies on the Eruption Process

    Inger Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Human eruption is a unique developmental process in the organism. The aetiology or the mechanism behind eruption has never been fully understood and the scientific literature in the field is extremely sparse. Human and animal tissues provide different possibilities for eruption analyses, briefly discussed in the introduction. Human studies, mainly clinical and radiological, have focused on normal eruption and gender differences. Why a tooth begins eruption and what enables it to move eruptive...

  6. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions.

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J; Kendrick, Jackie E; von Aulock, Felix W; Kennedy, Ben M; Andrews, Benjamin J; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-24

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the 'strength' of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  7. Andesitic Plinian eruptions at Mt. Ruapehu: quantifying the uppermost limits of eruptive parameters

    Pardo, Natalia; Cronin, Shane; Palmer, Alan; Procter, Jonathan; Smith, Ian

    2012-07-01

    New tephro-stratigraphic studies of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre (TgVC) on the North Island (New Zealand) allowed reconstruction of some of the largest, andesitic, explosive eruptions of Mt. Ruapehu. Large eruptions were common in the Late Pleistocene, before a transition to strombolian-vulcanian and phreatomagmatic eruptive styles that have predominated over the past 10,000 years. Considering this is the most active volcano in North Island of New Zealand and the uppermost hazard limits are unknown, we identified and mapped the pyroclastic deposits corresponding to the five largest eruptions since ~27 ka. The selected eruptive units are also characterised by distinctive lithofacies associations correlated to different behaviours of the eruptive column. In addition, we clarify the source of the ~10-9.7 ka Pahoka Tephra, identified by previous authors as the product of one of the largest eruptions of the TgVC. The most common explosive eruptions taking place between ~13.6 and ~10 ka cal years BP involved strongly oscillating, partially collapsing eruptive columns up to 37 km high, at mass discharge rates up to 6 × 108 kg/s and magnitudes of 4.9, ejecting minimum estimated volumes of 0.6 km3. Our results indicate that this volcano (as well as the neighbouring andesitic Mt. Tongariro) can generate Plinian eruptions similar in magnitude to the Chaitén 2008 and Askja 1875 events. Such eruptions would mainly produce pyroclastic fallout covering a minimum area of 1,700 km2 ESE of the volcano, where important touristic, agricultural and military activities are based. As for the 1995/1996 eruption, our field data indicate that complex wind patterns were critical in controlling the dispersion of the eruptive clouds, developing sheared, commonly bilobate plumes.

  8. Solar Eruptions Initiated in Sigmoidal Active Regions

    Savcheva, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    active regions that have been shown to possess high probability for eruption. They present a direct evidence of the existence of flux ropes in the corona prior to the impulsive phase of eruptions. In order to gain insight into their eruptive behavior and how they get destabilized we need to know their 3D magnetic field structure. First, we review some recent observations and modeling of sigmoidal active regions as the primary hosts of solar eruptions, which can also be used as useful laboratories for studying these phenomena. Then, we concentrate on the analysis of observations and highly data-constrained non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) models over the lifetime of several sigmoidal active regions, where we have captured their magnetic field structure around the times of major flares. We present the topology analysis of a couple of sigmoidal regions pointing us to the probable sites of reconnection. A scenario for eruption is put forward by this analysis. We demonstrate the use of this topology analysis to reconcile the observed eruption features with the standard flare model. Finally, we show a glimpse of how such a NLFFF model of an erupting region can be used to initiate a CME in a global MHD code in an unprecedented realistic manner. Such simulations can show the effects of solar transients on the near-Earth environment and solar system space weather.

  9. Investigation on Eruptive Prominences Observed by SDO

    Su, Yingna; McCauley, Patrick; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Ji, Haisheng; Reeves, Katharine; DeLuca, Edward

    2015-04-01

    We will present an investigation of the polar crown prominence that erupted on 2012 March 12. This prominence is observed at the southeast limb by SDO/AIA (end-on view) and displays a quasi vertical-thread structure. Bright U-shape (horn-like) structure is observed surrounding the upper portion of the prominence (171 Angstrom) before the eruption and becomes more prominent during the eruption. When viewed on the disk, STEREO-B shows that this long prominence is composed of a series of vertical threads and displays a half loop-like structure during the eruption. We focus on the magnetic support of the prominence by studying the structure and dynamics of the prominence before and during the eruption using observations from SDO and STEREO. During the eruption, AIA observes dark ribbons seen in absorption at 171 Angstrom in corresponding to the bright ribbons at 304 Angstrom. We construct a series of magnetic field models (including sheared arcade model, twisted flux rope model, and model with HFT), then compare with observations. Various observational characteristics appear to support the twisted flux rope model. Our study suggests that the flux rope supporting the prominence enters the regime of torus instability at the onset of the fast rise phase, and evidence of reconnection (post-eruption arcade, new U-shape Structure, rising blobs) appears about one hour later. We will also present a statistical study on the kinematics of limb eruptive prominences observed by SDO/AIA. A brief introduction on an online catalog of prominence eruptions observed by SDO/AIA will also be presented.

  10. Forecasting volcanic eruptions: the narrow margin between eruption and intrusion

    Steele, Alexander; Kilburn, Christopher; Wall, Richard; Charlton, Danielle

    2016-04-01

    Volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity is one of the primary geophysical signals for monitoring volcanic unrest. It measures the brittle response of the crust to changes in stress and provides a natural proxy for gauging the stability of a pressurizing body of magma. Here we apply a new model of crustal extension to observations from the 2015 unrest of Cotopaxi, in Ecuador. The model agrees well with field data and is consistent with accelerating unrest during the pressurization and rupture of a vertically-extended magma source within the volcanic edifice. At andesitic-dacitic stratovolcanoes in subduction zones, unrest after long repose is often characterised by increases in VT event rate that change from an exponential to hyperbolic trend with time. This sequence was observed when renewed unrest was detected in April 2015 at Cotopaxi, following at least 73 years of repose. After about 80 days of elevated seismicity at an approximately steady rate, the numbers of VT events increased exponentially with time for c. 80 days, before increasing for c. 15 days along a faster, hyperbolic trend. Both trends were characterised by the same value of 2 for the ratio of maximum applied stress SF to tensile strength of the crust σT, consistent with the pressurization of an approximately vertical, cylindrical magma body. The hyperbolic trend indicated a potential rupture on 25 September. Rupture appears to have occurred on 21-22 September, when the VT rate rapidly decreased. However, no major eruption accompanied the change, suggesting that a near-surface intrusion occurred instead. Although the quantitative VT trends were consistent with the rupture of a magmatic body, they could not on their own distinguish between an eruptive or intrusive outcome. An outstanding goal remains to identify additional precursory characteristics for quantifying the probability that magma will reach the surface after escaping from a ruptured parent body. Data for this analysis were kindly made available

  11. Toward Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions using Seismic Noise

    Brenguier, Florent; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Duputel, Zacharie; Coutant, Olivier; Nercessian, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    During inter-eruption periods, magma pressurization yields subtle changes of the elastic properties of volcanic edifices. We use the reproducibility properties of the ambient seismic noise recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano to measure relative seismic velocity variations of less than 0.1 % with a temporal resolution of one day. Our results show that five studied volcanic eruptions were preceded by clearly detectable seismic velocity decreases within the zone of magma injection. These precursors reflect the edifice dilatation induced by magma pressurization and can be useful indicators to improve the forecasting of volcanic eruptions.

  12. Permanent molars: Delayed development and eruption

    Arathi R

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Delayed development and eruption of all the permanent molars is a rare phenomenon, which can cause disturbance in the developing occlusion. The eruption of permanent first and second molars is very important for the coordination of facial growth and for providing sufficient occlusal support for undisturbed mastication. In the case described, the first permanent molars were delayed in their development and were seen erupting at the age of nine and a half years. Severe disparity between the left and the right side of the dentition with respect to the rate of development of molars were also present.

  13. [Lichenoid drug eruption induced by olanzapine].

    Fernández-Torres, R; Almagro, M; del Pozo, J; Robles, O; Martínez-González, C; Mazaira, M; Fonseca, E

    2008-04-01

    Lichenoid drug eruptions can mimic idiopathic lichen planus and other dermatoses. The list of drugs that can cause them is long and growing steadily. Although cutaneous side effects of antipsychotics are rare, various cutaneous manifestations have been reported in association with olanzapine. We present the case of a patient who developed an atypical lichenoid eruption due to olanzapine. A review of the literature in Medline from 1951 to 2007 and in the Indice Médico Español (Spanish Medical Index) revealed no previous cases of lichenoid eruptions associated with the use of this drug. PMID:18358199

  14. Eruption and emplacement timescales of ignimbrite super-eruptions from thermo-kinetics of glass shards

    Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Russell, James K.; Andrews, Graham D. M.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Tuffen, Hugh; Biggin, Andrew J.; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Super-eruptions generating hundreds of cubic kilometers of pyroclastic density currents are commonly recorded by thick, welded and lava-like ignimbrites. Despite the huge environmental impact inferred for this type of eruption, little is yet known about the timescales of deposition and post-depositional flow. Without these timescales, the critical question of the duration of any environmental impact, and the ensuing gravity of its effects for the Earth system, eludes us. The eruption and weld...

  15. Active Volcanic Eruptions on Io

    1996-01-01

    Six views of the volcanic plume named Prometheus, as seen against Io's disk and near the bright limb (edge) of the satellite by the SSI camera on the Galileo spacecraft during its second (G2) orbit of Jupiter. North is to the top of each frame. To the south-southeast of Prometheus is another bright spot that appears to be an active plume erupting from a feature named Culann Patera. Prometheus was active 17 years ago during both Voyager flybys, but no activity was detected by Voyager at Culann. Both of these plumes were seen to glow in the dark in an eclipse image acquired by the imaging camera during Galileo's first (G1) orbit, and hot spots at these locations were detected by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer.The plumes are thought to be driven by heating sulfur dioxide in Io's subsurface into an expanding fluid or 'geyser'. The long-lived nature of these eruptions requires that a substantial supply of sulfur dioxide must be available in Io's subsurface, similar to groundwater. Sulfur dioxide gas condenses into small particles of 'snow' in the expanding plume, and the small particles scatter light and appear bright at short wavelengths. The images shown here were acquired through the shortest-wavelength filter (violet) of the Galileo camera. Prometheus is about 300 km wide and 75 km high and Culann is about 150 km wide and less than 50 km high. The images were acquired on September 4, 1996 at a range of 2,000,000 km (20 km/pixel resolution). Prometheus is named after the Greek fire god and Culann is named after the Celtic smith god.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can

  16. Seasonal variations of volcanic eruption frequencies

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Do volcanic eruptions have a tendency to occur more frequently in the months of May and June? Some past evidence suggests that they do. The present study, based on the new eruption catalog of Simkin et al.(1981), investigates the monthly statistics of the largest eruptions, grouped according to explosive magnitude, geographical latitude, and year. At the 2-delta level, no month-to-month variations in eruption frequency are found to be statistically significant. Examination of previously published month-to-month variations suggests that they, too, are not statistically significant. It is concluded that volcanism, at least averaged over large portions of the globe, is probably not periodic on a seasonal or annual time scale.

  17. Polymorphous light eruption - some interesting aspects

    A study of polymorphous light eruption (PLE) is Latin America is reported. The clinical lesions, the course, histopathology, differential diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment and systemic photoprotection are discussed. Treatment with ultraviolet radiation is included. (C.F.)

  18. Fixed drug eruption due to paracetamol

    Anjali Kushwah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruption is a common type of drug eruption seen in dermatology OPD’s. Usually it is seen with sulphonamides, salicylates, tetracyclines, oxyphenbutazones, dapsone, barbiturates, phenolphthalein, morphine, codeine, quinine, phenacetin, erythromycin, griseofulvin, mebendazole etc. We hereby report a case of fixed drug eruption due to single dose of oral paracetamol in an otherwise healthy male after one hour of consuming it. A provisional diagnosis of Paracetamol induced fixed drug eruption was made. Paracetamol was stopped and patient advised never to take Paracetamol in future. Patient was managed with prednisolone 10mg /day, cetirizine 10 mg/day, and amoxicillin 500 mg twice a day and mometasone + fusidic acid cream to be applied over the lesions. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 833-835

  19. Toward Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions using Seismic Noise

    Brenguier, Florent; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Duputel, Zacharie; Coutant, Olivier; Nercessian, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    During inter-eruption periods, magma pressurization yields subtle changes of the elastic properties of volcanic edifices. We use the reproducibility properties of the ambient seismic noise recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano to measure relative seismic velocity variations of less than 0.1 % with a temporal resolution of one day. Our results show that five studied volcanic eruptions were preceded by clearly detectable seismic velocity decreases within the zone of magma injection. The...

  20. A Nanolite Record of Eruption Style Transition

    Mujin, M.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-12-01

    Microlites in pyroclasts have been intensively studied to understand magma ascent processes. However, microlites do not record the explosive-effusive transitions in sub-Plinian eruptions when such transitions are governed by the shallow level degassing rather than by the magma ascent rate. To overcome this limitation, we studied the "nanolites" in the quenched products of the 2011 Shinmoedake, Kirishima Volcanic Group, Kyusyu Japan1. Nanolites are the nanometer-scale components of the groundmass minerals and exhibit a steeper slope of crystal size distribution than that of the microlites2. In the 2011 Shinmoedake eruption, the style of activity had undergone transformations from sub-Plinian eruption to Vulcanian explosion and intermittent effusion of lava3. We found that, although the products formed by different eruptive activities have similar microlite characteristics, such products can be distinguished clearly by their mineral assemblage of nanolites. The samples of pumices of sub-Plinian eruptions and Vulcanian explosions and the dense juvenile fragments of lava (in descending order of explosivity) contained, respectively, nanolites of low-Ca pyroxene, low-Ca pyroxene + plagioclase, and low-Ca pyroxene + plagioclase + Fe-Ti oxides. Nanolites are assumed to crystallize when undercooling of the magma due primarily to dehydration increases rapidly near the surface. The water contents of the interstitial glass indicate that the quenched depths did not differ greatly between eruption styles. Hence, the different nanolite assemblages of each eruption style are assumed to have resulted from differences in magma residence time near the surface. Thus, we propose that nanolites in pyroclasts have the potential to indicate the physicochemical conditions of magma at the transition points of eruption styles. References 1) Mujin and Nakamura, 2014, Geology, v.42, p.611-614 2) Sharp et al., 1996, Bull. Volcanol, v.57, p.631-640 3) Miyabuchi et al, 2013, J. Volcanol

  1. Azithromycin induced bullous fixed drug eruption

    Das, Anupam; Sancheti, Karan; Podder, Indrashis; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a common type of drug eruption seen in skin clinics. It is characterized by solitary or multiple, round to oval erythematous patches with dusky red centers, some of which may progress to bulla formation. Bullous FDE may be caused by a number of drugs. We hereby describe a case of azithromycin-induced bullous FDE; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case being reported. PMID:26997729

  2. Electrostatic phenomena in volcanic eruptions

    Electrostatic phenomena have long been associated with the explosive eruption of volcanoes. Lightning generated in volcanic plumes is a spectacular atmospheric electrical event that requires development of large potential gradients over distances of up to kilometres. This process begins as hydrated liquid rock (magma) ascends towards Earth's surface. Pressure reduction causes water supersaturation in the magma and the development of bubbles of supercritical water, where deeper than c. 1000 m, and water vapour at shallower depths that drives flow expansion. The generation of high strain rates in the expanding bubbly magma can cause it to fracture in a brittle manner, as deformation relaxation timescales are exceeded. The brittle fracture provides the initial charge separation mechanism, known as fractoemission. The resulting mixture of charged silicate particles and ions evolves over time, generating macro-scale potential gradients in the atmosphere and driving processes such as particle aggregation. For the silicate particles, aggregation driven by electrostatic effects is most significant for particles smaller than c. 100 μm. Aggregation acts to change the effective aerodynamic behaviour of silicate particles, thus altering the sedimentation rates of particles from volcanic plumes from the atmosphere. The presence of liquid phases also promotes aggregation processes and lightning.

  3. Volcanic eruptions; energy and size

    de la Cruz-Reyna, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth is a dynamic planet. Many different processes are continuously developing, creating a delicate balance between the energy stored and generated in its interior and the heat lost into space. The heat in continuously transferred through complex self-regulating convection mechanisms on a planetary scale. The distribution of terrestrial heat flow reveals some of the fine structure of the energy transport mechanisms in the outer layers of the Earth. Of these mechanisms in the outer layers of the Earth. Of these mechanisms, volcanism is indeed the most remarkable, for it allows energy to be transported in rapid bursts to the surface. In order to maintain the subtle balance of the terrestrial heat machine, one may expect that some law or principle restricts the ways in which these volcanic bursts affect the overall energy transfer of the Earth. For instance, we know that the geothermal flux of the planet amounts to 1028 erg/year. On the other hand, a single large event like the Lava Creek Tuff eruption that formed Yellowstone caldera over half a million years ago may release the same amount of energy in a very small area, over a short period of time. 

  4. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  5. Flux emergence and coronal eruption

    Archontis, V; 10.1051/0004-6361/200913502

    2010-01-01

    Our aim is to study the photospheric flux distribution of a twisted flux tube that emerges from the solar interior. We also report on the eruption of a new flux rope when the emerging tube rises into a pre-existing magnetic field in the corona. To study the evolution, we use 3D numerical simulations by solving the time-dependent and resistive MHD equations. We qualitatively compare our numerical results with MDI magnetograms of emerging flux at the solar surface. We find that the photospheric magnetic flux distribution consists of two regions of opposite polarities and elongated magnetic tails on the two sides of the polarity inversion line (PIL), depending on the azimuthal nature of the emerging field lines and the initial field strength of the rising tube. Their shape is progressively deformed due to plasma motions towards the PIL. Our results are in qualitative agreement with observational studies of magnetic flux emergence in active regions (ARs). Moreover, if the initial twist of the emerging tube is sma...

  6. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', presents information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. Many aspects of this work are aimed at resolution of the Igneous Activity Key Technical Issue (KTI) as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1998, p. 3), Subissues 1 and 2, which address the probability and consequence of igneous activity at the proposed repository site, respectively. Within the framework of the Disruptive Events Process Model Report (PMR), this AMR provides information for the calculations in two other AMRs ; parameters described herein are directly used in calculations in these reports and will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Compilation of this AMR was conducted as defined in the Development Plan, except as noted. The report begins with considerations of the geometry of volcanic feeder systems, which are of primary importance in predicting how much of a potential repository would be affected by an eruption. This discussion is followed by one of the physical and chemical properties of the magmas, which influences both eruptive styles and mechanisms for interaction with radioactive waste packages. Eruptive processes including the ascent velocity of magma at depth, the onset of bubble nucleation and growth in the rising magmas, magma fragmentation, and velocity of the resulting gas-particle mixture are then discussed. The duration of eruptions, their power output, and mass discharge rates are also described. The next section summarizes geologic constraints regarding the interaction between magma and waste packages. Finally, they discuss bulk grain size produced by relevant explosive eruptions and grain shapes

  7. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    G. Valentine

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', presents information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. Many aspects of this work are aimed at resolution of the Igneous Activity Key Technical Issue (KTI) as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1998, p. 3), Subissues 1 and 2, which address the probability and consequence of igneous activity at the proposed repository site, respectively. Within the framework of the Disruptive Events Process Model Report (PMR), this AMR provides information for the calculations in two other AMRs ; parameters described herein are directly used in calculations in these reports and will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Compilation of this AMR was conducted as defined in the Development Plan, except as noted. The report begins with considerations of the geometry of volcanic feeder systems, which are of primary importance in predicting how much of a potential repository would be affected by an eruption. This discussion is followed by one of the physical and chemical properties of the magmas, which influences both eruptive styles and mechanisms for interaction with radioactive waste packages. Eruptive processes including the ascent velocity of magma at depth, the onset of bubble nucleation and growth in the rising magmas, magma fragmentation, and velocity of the resulting gas-particle mixture are then discussed. The duration of eruptions, their power output, and mass discharge rates are also described. The next section summarizes geologic constraints regarding the interaction between magma and waste packages. Finally, they discuss bulk grain size produced by relevant explosive eruptions and grain

  8. Reconstructing eruptive source parameters from tephra deposit: a numerical approach for medium-sized explosive eruptions

    Spanu, A; Barsotti, S

    2015-01-01

    Since the seventies, several reconstruction techniques have been proposed, and are currently used, to extrapolate and quantify eruptive parameters from sampled deposit datasets. Discrete numbers of tephra ground loadings or stratigraphic records are usually processed to estimate source eruptive values. Reconstruction techniques like Pyle, Power law and Weibull are adopted as standard to quantify the erupted mass (or volume) whereas Voronoi for reconstructing the granulometry. Reconstructed values can be affected by large uncertainty due to complexities occurring within the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of volcanic particles. Here we want to quantify the sensitivity of reconstruction techniques, and to quantify how much estimated values of mass and grain size differ from emitted and deposited ones. We adopted a numerical approach simulating with a dispersal code a mild explosive event occurring at Mt. Etna, with eruptive parameters similar to those estimated for eruptions occurred in the last decade. T...

  9. Eruption and degassing dynamics of the major August 2015 Piton de la Fournaise eruption

    Di Muro, Andrea; Arellano, Santiago; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Bachelery, Patrick; Boudoire, Guillaume; Coppola, Diego; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Galle, Bo; Giudice, Gaetano; Gurioli, Lucia; Harris, Andy; Liuzzo, Marco; Metrich, Nicole; Moune, Severine; Peltier, Aline; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Vlastelic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano is one of the most active basaltic volcanoes in the World with one eruption every nine months, on average. This frequent volcanic activity is broadly bimodal, with frequent small volume, short lived eruptions (DOAS, MultiGaS, diffuse CO2 soil emissions). Regular lava and tephra sampling was also performed for geochemical and petrological analysis. The eruption was preceded by a significant increase in CO2 soil emissions at distal soil stations (ca. 15 km from the summit), with CO2 enrichment also being recorded at summit low temperature fumaroles. Eruptive products were spectacularly zoned, with plagioclase and pyroxene being abundant in the early erupted products and olivine being the main phase in the late-erupted lavas. Total gas emissions at the eruptive vent underwent a decrease during the first half of the eruption and then an increase, mirroring the time evolution of magma discharge rate (from 5-10 m3/s in September to 15-30 m3/s in late-October) and the progressive change in magma composition. In spite of significant evolution in magma and gas output, CO2/SO2 ratios in high temperature gases remained quite low (< 0.3) and with little temporal change. Geochemical data indicated that this relatively long-lived eruption corresponded to the progressive drainage of most of the shallow part of PdF plumbing system, triggered by a new pulse of deep magma. While erupted magma and high temperature gases were mostly provided by the shallow part of the system, distal sites and summit low temperature fumaroles recorded a deeper triggering mechanism.

  10. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 109 cm–3. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  11. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    M. Toohey

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year. Sensitivity to eruption season of aerosol optical depth (AOD, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux is quantified by first integrating each field for four years after the eruption, then calculating for each cumulative field the absolute or percent difference between the maximum and minimum response from the four eruption seasons. Eruption season has a significant influence on AOD and clear-sky SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~75 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for Pinatubo-magnitude eruption, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to

  12. Io Eclipse/Volcanic Eruption

    1997-01-01

    This image was acquired while Io was in eclipse (in Jupiter's shadow) during Galileo's eighth orbit, and reveals several dynamic processes. The most intense features are red, while glows of lesser intensity are yellow or green, and very faint glows appear blue in this color-coded image. The small red or yellow spots mark the sites of high-temperature magma erupting onto the surface in lava flows or lava lakes.This image reveals a field of bright spots near Io's sub-Jupiter point (right-hand side of image). The sub-Jupiter hemisphere always faces Jupiter just as the Moon's nearside always faces Earth. There are extended diffuse glows on the equatorial limbs or edges of the planet (right and left sides). The glow on the left is over the active volcanic plume Prometheus, but whereas Prometheus appears to be 75 kilometers (46.6 miles) high in reflected light, here the diffuse glow extends about 800 kilometers (497 miles) from Io's limb. This extended glow indicates that gas or small particles reach much greater heights than the dense inner plume. The diffuse glow on the right side reaches a height of 400 kilometers (249 miles), and includes a prominence with a plume-like shape. However, no volcanic plume has been seen at this location in reflected light. This type of observation is revealing the relationships between Io's volcanism, atmosphere and exosphere.Taken on May 6, 1997, north is toward the top. The image was taken with the clear filter of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft at a range of 1.8 million kilometers (1.1 million miles).The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational

  13. Solar eruptions - soil radon - earthquakes

    For the first time a new natural phenomenon was established: a contrasting increase in the soil radon level under the influence of solar flares. Such an increase is one of geochemical indicators of earthquakes. Most researchers consider this a phenomenon of exclusively terrestrial processes. Investigations regarding the link of earthquakes to solar activity carried out during the last decade in different countries are based on the analysis of statistical data ΣΕ (t) and W (t). As established, the overall seismicity of the Earth and its separate regions depends of an 11-year long cycle of solar activity. Data provided in the paper based on experimental studies serve the first step on the way of experimental data on revealing cause-and-reason solar-terrestrials bonds in a series solar eruption-lithosphere radon-earthquakes. They need further collection of experimental data. For the first time, through radon constituent of terrestrial radiation objectification has been made of elementary lattice of the Hartmann's network contoured out by bio location method. As found out, radon concentration variations in Hartmann's network nodes determine the dynamics of solar-terrestrial relationships. Of the three types of rapidly running processes conditioned by solar-terrestrial bonds earthquakes are attributed to rapidly running destructive processes that occur in the most intense way at the juncture of tectonic massifs, along transformed and deep failures. The basic factors provoking the earthquakes are both magnetic-structural effects and a long-term (over 5 months) bombing of the surface of lithosphere by highly energetic particles of corpuscular solar flows, this being approved by photometry. As a result of solar flares that occurred from 29 October to 4 November 2003, a sharply contrasting increase in soil radon was established which is an earthquake indicator on the territory of Yerevan City. A month and a half later, earthquakes occurred in San-Francisco, Iran, Turkey

  14. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  15. Research oriented MSc course on solar eruptions

    Vainio, Rami; Heber, Bernd; Agueda, Neus; Kilpua, Emilia; Isavnin, Alexey; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Ganse, Urs; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.

    2014-05-01

    Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, organized a five-credit-point Master-level course on "Solar Eruptions and Space Environment" in spring 2013. The course, attended by nine students, included twenty hours of introductory lectures on solar eruptive phenomena (focusing on energetic particle emissions) as well as experimental and theoretical methods to analyze them. In addition, the course contained ten hours of exercise sessions, where solutions on short calculation exercises were presented and discussed. The main learning method on the course was, however, a coordinated scientific analysis of five solar eruptions observed by the STEREO spacecraft in 2010-2011. The students were grouped in four teams to study the solar eruptive events from four different view points: (1) Analysis of morphology and kinematics of coronal mass ejections, (2) analysis of EUV imaging observations of coronal wave-like transients, (3) solar and interplanetary magnetic field conditions during the eruptions, and (4) emission and transport modelling of near-relativistic electron events associated with the eruptions. Each group of students was assigned a scientist to oversee their work. The students reported weekly on their progress and gave a final presentation (of 30 minutes) in a seminar session at the end of the seven-week course. Grading of the course was based on the home exercises and final presentations. Students were also asked to give anonymous feedback on the course. Learning results on the course were very encouraging, showing that research oriented courses with practical research exercises on specific topics give students deeper knowledge and more practical skills than traditional lectures and home exercises alone.

  16. Multiple eruptive keratoacanthomas arising in a tattoo.

    Vitiello, Magalys; Echeverria, Begoña; Romanelli, Paolo; Abuchar, Adriana; Kerdel, Francisco

    2010-07-01

    Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, keratinizing, epithelial neoplasms that tend to spontaneously involute and are rarely multiple or eruptive. There is still disagreement on whether or not this condition is a malignancy or a benign epidermal neoplasm; nevertheless, its appearance on tattoos has been reported in rare instances. When waiting for spontaneous involution is not an option, surgery is the preferred treatment. Other therapeutic modalities used for the treatment of this condition include radiotherapy; cryotherapy; laser therapy; and multiple intralesional, topical, and systemic agents. The authors report a patient who developed multiple, eruptive keratoacanthomas in the red ink portions of a tattoo and was successfully treated with acitretin. PMID:20725558

  17. Homologous prominence non-radial eruptions: A case study

    Duchlev, P; Madjarska, M S; Dechev, M

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides important details on homologous eruptions of a solar prominence that occurred in active region NOAA 10904 on 2006 August 22. We report on the preeruptive phase of the homologous feature as well as the kinematics and the morphology of a forth from a series of prominence eruptions that is critical in defining the nature of the previous consecutive eruptions. The evolution of the overlying coronal field during homologous eruptions is discussed and a new observational criterion for homologous eruptions is provided. We find a distinctive sequence of three activation periods each of them containing preeruptive precursors such as a brightening and enlarging of the prominence body followed by small surge- like ejections from its southern end observed in the radio 17 GHz. We analyse a fourth eruption that clearly indicates a full reformation of the prominence after the third eruption. The fourth eruption although occurring 11 hrs later has an identical morphology, the same angle of propagati...

  18. Relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption inferred from historical records

    陈洪洲; 高峰; 吴雪娟; 孟宪森

    2004-01-01

    A large number of seismic records are discovered for the first time in the historical materials about Wudalianchi volcanic group eruption in 1720~1721, which provides us with abundant volcanic earthquake information. Based on the written records, the relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption is discussed in the paper. Furthermore it is pointed that earthquake swarm is an important indication of volcanic eruption. Therefore, monitoring volcanic earthquakes is of great significance for forecasting volcanic eruption.

  19. The variation of magma discharge during basaltic eruptions

    Wadge, G.

    1981-12-01

    The rate at which basaltic magma is discharged varies substantially during many eruptions. An individual eruption has an eruption rate ( Qe), the volumetric rate of discharge averaged over the whole or a major part of an eruption, and an effusion rate ( Qf), the volumetric flux rate at any given time. In many examples Qf soon reaches a maximum value after a short period of waxing flow, partly because of magmatic expansion, and then falls more slowly in the later parts of the eruption. The release of elastic strain energy from stored magma and the sub-volcanic reservoir during eruption can produce an exponential form of such waning flow. Comparison of the eruption rates of the historic eruptions of Mauna Loa, Kilauea and Etna shows that for each volcano there is a trend of decreasing Qe with increasing duration of eruption. This relationship is not predicted by a simple elastic model of magma release. Two additional processes are invoked to explain the eruptive histories of these volcanoes: modification of the eruptive conduits, and the continued supply of magma from depth during eruption. Conduits evolving from dikes to plugs by wall-rock erosion or freezing of magma can result in increased early values of Qf and the maintenance of very low values of Qf values for long periods later in the eruption. Discharge variations during three specific eruptions are discussed in detail. Paricutin (1943-1952) had exponentially waning flow, with a time constant of about three years, that is consistent with a deep reservoir. The waning flow of Hekla's 1947-1948 eruption showed some of the characteristics of conduit modification, whilst the 1959 Kilauea Iki eruption is interpreted in terms of a closed system with varying magma rheology.

  20. Sulphur-rich volcanic eruptions and stratospheric aerosols

    Rampino, M. R.; Self, S.

    1984-01-01

    Data from direct measurements of stratospheric optical depth, Greenland ice-core acidity, and volcanological studies are compared, and it is shown that relatively small but sulfur-rich volcanic eruptions can have atmospheric effects equal to or even greater than much larger sulfur-poor eruptions. These small eruptions are probably the most frequent cause of increased stratospheric aerosols. The possible sources of the excess sulfur released in these eruptions are discussed.

  1. Burst conditions of explosive volcanic eruptions recorded on microbarographs

    Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate pressure disturbances in the atmosphere that propagate away either as acoustic or as shock waves, depending on the explosivity of the eruption. Both types of waves are recorded on microbarographs as 1- to 0.1-hertz N-shaped signals followed by a longer period coda. These waveforms can be used to estimate burst pressures end gas concentrations in explosive volcanic eruptions and provide estimates of eruption magnitudes.

  2. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  3. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-05-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  4. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    AgustGudmundsson

    2014-01-01

    The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released (transformed) elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy) associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage) during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, ela...

  5. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2014-01-01

    The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released or transformed elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy) associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage) during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, el...

  6. The influence of magma supply rate on eruption style and textures of erupted ash particles

    Wright, H. M.; Cashman, K. V.

    2011-12-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of basaltic to andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates can cause abrupt transitions in eruption style. Direct measurement of magma ascent rate is not possible; therefore, we must develop indirect measures of ascent rate. Here, we use a petrologic approach to this problem. We quantify textural variations in Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptive products (erupted between 1999-2006) from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We compare average crystallinities of pyroclasts from a succession of ash eruptions with magma supply rates determined using satellite observations of plume heights and seismic recordings of explosion frequency. We show that tephra crystallinity correlates inversely with magma supply rate, similar to correlations described from decompression experiments of intermediate composition magma. We further suggest that the range of textures present in any individual sample indicates recycling from one eruption to the next and/or simultaneous eruption of particles with different crystallization histories. The correlation between crystallinity and magma supply rate is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures and degassing-driven crystallization between eruptions. A similar correlation has been shown at Crater Peak, USA (Gardner et al. 1998); Merapi, Indonesia (Hammer et al. 2000); Unzen, Japan (Nakada and Motomura, 1999); and Sakurajima, Japan (Miwa et al., 2009). Futhermore, systematic changes in crystallinity have been shown to extend across a range of eruption styles (including Vulcanian and Strombolian), as at Etna, Italy (Taddeucci et al. 2002) and Croscat, Spain (Cimarelli et al., 2010). This variation with eruption style suggests that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains can be explained simply by changes in the average crystal content of the

  7. Emotional Eruptions, Volcanic Activity and Global Mobilities

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April 2010 set off a number of environmental, economic and cultural effects obstructing thousands of people in the midst of their global mobility flows. It halted, as well, the exchange of goods and commodities and exposed the vulnerability of...

  8. The puzzle of dating the Santorini eruption

    Full text: Some 3500 years ago the Aegean island of Thera (modern Santorini) exploded in a cataclysmal volcanic eruption. This event provides, in principle, a distinct time marker in the Second Millennium B.C. An exact date would be of particular importance for the synchronization of ancient civilizations in the East Mediterranean in this time period. However, despite great efforts from different fields there is no consensus on the date. In essence, new 14C dating measurements determined the eruption to a period between 1650 to 1600 B.C., whereas archaeological evidence linked to the Egyptian historical chronology favors a date well after the beginning of the New Kingdom in Egypt (1530 B.C.). Although the difference of 100 to 140 years translates into an uncertainty of only 3 to 4 % in the absolute age of the eruption, it is nevertheless decisive for a correct understanding of the interactions of cultures in this time period. The radiocarbon evidence and the prospects of identifying Thera eruptive material in ice cores from Greenland - at present also controversial - will be discussed. (author)

  9. Imaging Prominence Eruptions Out to 1 AU

    Wood, Brian E; Linton, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3-D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to a poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed ...

  10. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    M. Toohey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year, and sensitivity to eruption season is quantified as the difference between the maximum and minimum cumulative anomalies.

    Eruption season has a significant influence on aerosol optical depth (AOD and clear-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~80 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to eruption season of the global mean all-sky SW anomalies is comparable to the sensitivity of global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies. Our estimates of sensitivity to eruption season

  11. The Mechanisms for the Onset and Explosive Eruption of Coronal Mass Ejections and Eruptive Flares

    Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, Carl Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the onset and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive flares. To isolate the eruption physics, our study uses the breakout model, which is insensitive to the energy buildup process leading to the eruption. We performed 2.5D simulations with adaptive mesh refinement that achieved the highest overall spatial resolution to date in a CME/eruptive flare simulation. The ultra-high resolution allows us to separate clearly the timing of the various phases of the eruption. Using new computational tools, we have determined the number and evolution of all X- and O-type nulls in the system, thereby tracking both the progress and the products of reconnection throughout the computational domain. Our results show definitively that CME onset is due to the start of fast reconnection at the breakout current sheet. Once this reconnection begins, eruption is inevitable; if this is the only reconnection in the system, however, the eruption will be slow. The explosive CME acceleration is triggered by fast reconnection at the flare current sheet. Our results indicate that the explosive eruption is caused by a resistive instability, not an ideal process. Moreover, both breakout and flare reconnections begin first as a form of weak tearing characterized by a slowly evolving plasmoids, but eventually transition to a fast form with well-defined Alfvenic reconnection jets and rapid flux transfer. This transition to fast reconnection is required for both CME onset and explosive acceleration. We discuss the key implications of our results for CME/flare observations and for theories of magnetic reconnection.

  12. 2014 Mount Ontake eruption: characteristics of the phreatic eruption as inferred from aerial observations

    Kaneko, Takayuki; Maeno, Fukashi; Nakada, Setsuya

    2016-05-01

    The sudden eruption of Mount Ontake on September 27, 2014, led to a tragedy that caused more than 60 fatalities including missing persons. In order to mitigate the potential risks posed by similar volcano-related disasters, it is vital to have a clear understanding of the activity status and progression of eruptions. Because the erupted material was largely disturbed while access was strictly prohibited for a month, we analyzed the aerial photographs taken on September 28. The results showed that there were three large vents in the bottom of the Jigokudani valley on September 28. The vent in the center was considered to have been the main vent involved in the eruption, and the vents on either side were considered to have been formed by non-explosive processes. The pyroclastic flows extended approximately 2.5 km along the valley at an average speed of 32 km/h. The absence of burned or fallen trees in this area indicated that the temperatures and destructive forces associated with the pyroclastic flow were both low. The distribution of ballistics was categorized into four zones based on the number of impact craters per unit area, and the furthest impact crater was located 950 m from the vents. Based on ballistic models, the maximum initial velocity of the ejecta was estimated to be 111 m/s. Just after the beginning of the eruption, very few ballistic ejecta had arrived at the summit, even though the eruption plume had risen above the summit, which suggested that a large amount of ballistic ejecta was expelled from the volcano several tens-of-seconds after the beginning of the eruption. This initial period was characterized by the escape of a vapor phase from the vents, which then caused the explosive eruption phase that generated large amounts of ballistic ejecta via sudden decompression of a hydrothermal reservoir.

  13. On the origin of Mount Etna eruptive cycles and Stromboli volcano paroxysms: implications for an alternative mechanism of volcanic eruption

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    New mechanism of imbalance between magma column and fluid volume, accumulated in the magmatic system, is considered as a driving force of the volcanic eruption. Conditions of eruption based on this mechanism are used to explain main features of the volcanic activity (eruptive cycles and paroxysms) of the volcanoes Etna and Stromboli (Italy).

  14. 2-D Numerical Simulation of Eruption Clouds : Effects of Turbulent Mixing between Eruption Cloud and Air

    Suzuki, Y.; KOYAGUCHI, T.; OGAWA, M.; Hachisu, I.

    2001-05-01

    Mixing of eruption cloud and air is one of the most important processes for eruption cloud dynamics. The critical condition of eruption types (eruption column or pyroclastic flow) depends on efficiency of mixing of eruption cloud and the ambient air. However, in most of the previous models (e.g., Sparks,1986; Woods, 1988), the rate of mixing between cloud and air is taken into account by introducing empirical parameters such as entrainment coefficient or turbulent diffusion coefficient. We developed a numerical model of 2-D (axisymmetrical) eruption columns in order to simulate the turbulent mixing between eruption column and air. We calculated the motion of an eruption column from a circular vent on the flat surface of the earth. Supposing that relative velocity of gas and ash particles is sufficiently small, we can treat eruption cloud as a single gas. Equation of state (EOS) for the mixture of the magmatic component (i.e. volcanic gas plus pyroclasts) and air can be expressed by EOS for an ideal gas, because volume fraction of the gas phase is very large. The density change as a function of mixing ratio between air and the magmatic component has a strong non-linear feature, because the density of the mixture drastically decreases as entrained air expands by heating. This non-linear feature can be reproduced by changing the gas constant and the ratio of specific heat in EOS for ideal gases; the molecular weight increases and the ratio of specific heat approaches 1 as the magmatic component increases. It is assumed that the dynamics of eruption column follows the Euler equation, so that no viscous effect except for the numerical viscosity is taken into account. Roe scheme (a general TVD scheme for compressible flow) is used in order to simulate the generation of shock waves inside and around the eruption column. The results show that many vortexes are generated around the boundary between eruption cloud and air, which results in violent mixing. When the size of

  15. Recent Two Distinct Eruptions at Sinabung and Kelud, Indonesia

    Nakada, S.; Yoshimoto, M.; Maeno, F.; Iguchi, M.; Zaenudin, A.; Hendrasto, M.

    2014-12-01

    Two distinct eruptions occurred in 2014 at Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes in Indonesia. Lava dome-forming eruption started at Sinabung volcano, N Sumatra, in the end of 2013, which was preceded by the phreatic events since 2010 and shallow inflation with high seismicity since 3 months before eruption. The 2010 eruption was the first historic eruption, and the latest eruption geologically recorded occurred in the 9 to 10th Century. The eruption had continued in a nearly constant rate of magma effusion as of the summer of 2014. The lava complex extended on the SE slope (~2.5 km long from the source), frequently generating pyroclastic flows. The volume of erupted magma reached about 0.1 km3 in the 2014 summer. The lava is porphyritic andesite (SiO2 ~57%). The existence of mafic blobs in rocks and plagioclase microlites more calcic than the phenocryst rims, and the absence of breakdown rim on hornblende phenocrysts suggest magma mixing prior to eruption and relatively fast magma ascent. On the other hand, the Plinian eruption began at Kelud volcano, W Java on the evening of February 13, 2014, which had declined almost within about 6 hours. The eruption cloud rose to 18-25 km in altitude, and tephra deposited on extensive areas. The precursory seismic activity started two weeks before eruption and the intensity increased with time. This short but explosive eruption was one of recent large eruptions (VEI 4) at Kelud, which had repeated every ~20 years. A lava dome of 0.035 km3 was accidentally (?) formed within the crater in 2007-2008. The total volume of tephra of the 2014 eruption is 0.2-0.3 km3 in DRE. The magma is crystal-rich basaltic andesite (SiO2 ~56%; phenocryst proportion of ~60%). The petrological characteristics are close to the 2007-2008 dome lava except higher crystallinity in the latter. Mobilization of crystal-rich chamber magma probably was brought by intrusion of new magma. Thus, these recent examples in Indonesia are less-explosive and explosive

  16. Thermodynamics of gas and steam-blast eruptions

    Mastin, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    Eruptions of gas or steam and non-juvenile debris are common in volcanic and hydrothermal areas. From reports of non-juvenile eruptions or eruptive sequences world-wide, at least three types (or end-members) can be identified: (1) those involving rock and liquid water initially at boiling-point temperatures ('boiling-point eruptions'); (2) those powered by gas (primarily water vapor) at initial temperatures approaching magmatic ('gas eruptions'); and (3) those caused by rapid mixing of hot rock and ground- or surface water ('mixing eruptions'). For these eruption types, the mechanical energy released, final temperatures, liquid water contents and maximum theoretical velocities are compared by assuming that the erupting mixtures of rock and fluid thermally equilibrate, then decompress isentropically from initial, near-surface pressure (???10 MPa) to atmospheric pressure. Maximum mechanical energy release is by far greatest for gas eruptions (??????1.3 MJ/kg of fluid-rock mixture)-about one-half that of an equivalent mass of gunpowder and one-fourth that of TNT. It is somewhat less for mixing eruptions (??????0.4 MJ/kg), and least for boiling-point eruptions (??????0.25 MJ/kg). The final water contents of crupted boiling-point mixtures are usually high, producing wet, sloppy deposits. Final erupted mixtures from gas eruptions are nearly always dry, whereas those from mixing eruptions vary from wet to dry. If all the enthalpy released in the eruptions were converted to kinetic energy, the final velocity (vmax) of these mixtures could range up to 670 m/s for boiling-point eruptions and 1820 m/s for gas eruptions (highest for high initial pressure and mass fractions of rock (mr) near zero). For mixing eruptions, vmax ranges up to 1150 m/s. All observed eruption velocities are less than 400 m/s, largely because (1) most solid material is expelled when mr is high, hence vmax is low; (2) observations are made of large blocks the velocities of which may be less than the

  17. Magma viscosity estimation based on analysis of erupted products. Potential assessment for large-scale pyroclastic eruptions

    After the formulation of guidelines for volcanic hazards in site evaluation for nuclear installations (e.g. JEAG4625-2009), it is required to establish appropriate methods to assess potential of large-scale pyroclastic eruptions at long-dormant volcanoes, which is one of the most hazardous volcanic phenomena on the safety of the installations. In considering the volcanic dormancy, magma eruptability is an important concept. The magma eruptability is dominantly controlled by magma viscosity, which can be estimated from petrological analysis of erupted materials. Therefore, viscosity estimation of magmas erupted in past eruptions should provide important information to assess future activities at hazardous volcanoes. In order to show the importance of magma viscosity in the concept of magma eruptability, this report overviews dike propagation processes from a magma chamber and nature of magma viscosity. Magma viscosity at pre-eruptive conditions of magma chambers were compiled based on previous petrological studies on past eruptions in Japan. There are only 16 examples of eruptions at 9 volcanoes satisfying data requirement for magma viscosity estimation. Estimated magma viscosities range from 102 to 107 Pa·s for basaltic to rhyolitic magmas. Most of examples fall below dike propagation limit of magma viscosity (ca. 106 Pa·s) estimated based on a dike propagation model. Highly viscous magmas (ca. 107 Pa·s) than the dike propagation limit are considered to lose eruptability which is the ability to form dikes and initiate eruptions. However, in some cases, small precursory eruptions of less viscous magmas commonly occurred just before climactic eruptions of the highly viscous magmas, suggesting that the precursory dike propagation by the less viscous magmas induced the following eruptions of highly viscous magmas (ca. 107 Pa·s). (author)

  18. Eruptive history of the youngest Mexican Shield and Mexico's most voluminous Holocene eruption: Cerro El Metate

    Oryaëlle Chevrel, Magdalena; Guilbaud, Marie-Noelle; Siebe, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Small to medium-sized shield volcanoes are an important component of many volcanic fields on Earth. The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, one of the most complex and active continental arcs worldwide, displays a large number of such medium-sized volcanoes. In particular the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF) situated in central Mexico, is the largest monogenetic volcanic field in the world and includes more than 1000 scoria cones and about four hundred medium-sized volcanoes, also known as Mexican shields. The Mexican shields nevertheless represent nearly 70% of the total volume erupted since 1 Ma and hence played a considerable role in the formation of the MGVF. However, the source, storage, and transport as well as the physical properties (density, viscosity, volatile content, etc.) of the magmas involved in these eruptions remain poorly constrained. Here, we focus on Cerro El Metate, the youngest monogenetic andesite shield volcano of the field. New C14 dates for the eruption yield a young age (~AD 1250), which briefly precedes the initial rise of the Tarascan Empire (AD 1350-1521) in this region. This volcano has a minimum volume of ~9.2 km3 DRE, and its viscous lava flows were emplaced during a single eruption over a period of ~35 years covering an area of 103 km2. By volume, this is certainly the largest eruption during the Holocene in Mexico, and it is the largest andesitic effusive eruption known worldwide for this period. Such a large volume of lava erupted in a relatively short time had a significant impact on the environment (modification of the hydrological network, forest fires, etc.), and hence, nearby human populations probably had to migrate. Its eruptive history was reconstructed through detailed mapping, and geochemical and rheological analyses of its thick hornblende-bearing andesitic flows. Early and late flows have distinct morphologies, chemical and mineralogical compositions, and isotopic signatures which show that these lavas were fed by

  19. Ionospheric disturbances by volcanic eruptions by GNSS-TEC: Comparison between Vulcanian and Plinian eruptions

    Nakashima, Y.; Heki, K.; Takeo, A.; Cahyadi, M. N.; Aditiya, A.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic waves from volcanic eruptions are often observed as infrasound in near fields. Part of them propagate upward and disturb the ionosphere, and can be observed in Total Electron Content (TEC) data derived by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In the past, Heki (2006 GRL) detected ionospheric disturbances by the 2004 explosion of the Asama Volcano, central Japan, and Dautermann et al. (2009 JGR) studied the 2003 eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano in Montserrat, West Indies. Here we present new examples, and try to characterize such disturbances. We first show TEC disturbances by the 2014 February Plinian eruption (VEI 4) of the Kelud volcano, East Java, Indonesia (Figure), observed with a regional GNSS network.The 2014 Kelud eruption broke a lava dome made by 2007 eruption and created a new creator. Significant disturbances were detected with four GPS and two GLONASS satellites, and the wavelet analyses showed that harmonic oscillations started at ~16:25 UT and continued nearly one hour. The frequency of the oscillation was ~3.8 mHz, which coincides with the atmospheric fundamental mode. We also confirmed concentric wavefronts, moving outward by ~0.8m/sec (stronger signals on the northern side). These features are similar to the 2003 Soufriere Hills case, although the signals in the present Kelud case is much clearer. Next, we compare them with ionospheric disturbances by Vulcanian explosions that occurred recently in Japan, i.e. the 2004 Asama case and the 2009 Sakurajima, and the 2011 Shin-moedake eruptions. They are characterized with one-time N-shaped disturbances possibly excited by the compression of the air above the vents. On the other hand, data from nearby seismometers suggested that atmospheric oscillations of various frequencies were excited by this continuous Plinian eruption. Part of such oscillations would have grown large due to atmospheric resonance.

  20. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation.

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagra, Amritpreet; Singh, Gurkeerat; Nagpal, Archna; Soin, Atul; Bhardwaj, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature. PMID:26989523

  1. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E.; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7–C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  2. Learning to recognize volcanic non-eruptions

    Poland, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of volcanology is to answer the questions of when, where, and how a volcano will erupt—in other words, eruption prediction. Generally, eruption predictions are based on insights from monitoring data combined with the history of the volcano. An outstanding example is the A.D. 1980–1986 lava dome growth at Mount St. Helens, Washington (United States). Recognition of a consistent pattern of precursors revealed by geophysical, geological, and geochemical monitoring enabled successful predictions of more than 12 dome-building episodes (Swanson et al., 1983). At volcanic systems that are more complex or poorly understood, probabilistic forecasts can be useful (e.g., Newhall and Hoblitt, 2002; Marzocchi and Woo, 2009). In such cases, the probabilities of different types of volcanic events are quantified, using historical accounts and geological studies of a volcano's past activity, supplemented by information from similar volcanoes elsewhere, combined with contemporary monitoring information.

  3. Solar Eruptions and Energetic Particles: An Introduction

    N. Gopalswamy; Mewaldt, R. A.; J. Torsti

    2006-01-01

    This introductory article highlights current issues concerning two related phenomena involving mass emission from the Sun: solar eruptions and solar energetic particles. A brief outline of the chapters is provided indicating how the current issues are addressed in the monograph. The sections in this introduction roughly group the chapters dealing with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar energetic particles (SEPs), shocks, and space weather. The concluding remarks include a brief summar...

  4. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  5. Giant eruptions of very massive stars

    Davidson, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Giant eruptions or supernova-impostor events are far more mysterious than true supernovae. An extreme example can release as much radiative energy as a SN, ejecting several M_sun of material. These events involve continuous radiation-driven outflows rather than blast waves. They constitute one of the main unsolved problems in stellar astrophysics, but have received surprisingly little theoretical effort. Here I note some aspects that are not yet familiar to most astronomers.

  6. Multiple Eruptive Keratoacanthomas Arising in a Tattoo

    Vitiello, Magalys; Echeverria, Begoña; Romanelli, Paolo; Abuchar, Adriana; Kerdel, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, keratinizing, epithelial neoplasms that tend to spontaneously involute and are rarely multiple or eruptive. There is still disagreement on whether or not this condition is a malignancy or a benign epidermal neoplasm; nevertheless, its appearance on tattoos has been reported in rare instances. When waiting for spontaneous involution is not an option, surgery is the preferred treatment. Other therapeutic modalities used for the treatment of this condition i...

  7. Crossing the glass transition during volcanic eruptions

    Richard, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence and the evolving nature of volcanic eruptions remains an outstanding challenge. The complexity of volcanic Systems requires the use of many different approaches to gain a more profound understanding of the interplay of parameters such as magma temperature, composition, volatile content, cooling rate and viscosity as they interactively control the rheology of magma. This study focusses on three different scenarios in which the glass transition, a kinetic boundar...

  8. Eruption products of the 1883 eruption of Krakatau and their final settlement

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Firstly the volume of pyroclastic ejecta during the 1883 eruption of Krakatau is re-examined. To revise the volume of flow deposits, the author basically follows Verbeek’s observation while to estimate the fall deposits, as the last resort, the author assumes that volume ratios fall / flow are common to similar caldera eruptions, and the ratios determined by the caldera- forming eruptions of Novarupta and Pinatubo are applied to the Krakatau eruption. Verbeek’s estimation of the total volume of ejecta, 12 km3 is revised to 19 km3. This is significantly different from the volume of disrupted volcano edifice, 8 km3. Such a result does not support the predecessors’ hypothesis that calderas are formed by collapses of volcano edifices into magma reservoirs in replacement of the total ejecta. Through the discussion on the volume estimation of volcanic ejecta on and around Krakatau, the author recognizes that such estimation should be originally very difficult to attain enough accuracy. Much importance of “caldera deposits” to post-eruption settlements of the ejecta is emphasized. In relation to caldera formation, mechanical stability of a cavity in the crust is discussed. Lastly, upon the basis of subsurface structure, especially caldera deposits, a structural image of Krakatau caldera is presented.

  9. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report, ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', is to present information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a repository at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report provides information to four other reports: ''Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion'', (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170001]); ''Atmospheric Dispersal and Deposition of Tephra from Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170026]); ''Dike/Drift Interactions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170028]); ''Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027], Section 6.5). This report is organized into seven major sections. This section addresses the purpose of this document. Section 2 addresses quality assurance, Section 3 the use of software, Section 4 identifies the requirements that constrain this work, and Section 5 lists assumptions and their rationale. Section 6 presents the details of the scientific analysis and Section 7 summarizes the conclusions reached

  10. Chain Reconnections observed in Sympathetic Eruptions

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Magara, Tetsuya; Guo, Yang; Aulanier, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    The nature of various plausible causal links between sympathetic events is still a controversial issue. In this work, we present multi-wavelength observations of sympathetic eruptions, associated flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurring on 2013 November 17 in two close-by active regions. Two filaments i.e., F1 and F2 are observed in between the active regions. Successive magnetic reconnections, caused by different reasons (flux cancellation, shear and expansion) have been identified during the whole event. The first reconnection occurred during the first eruption via flux cancellation between the sheared arcades overlying filament F2, creating a flux rope and leading to the first double ribbon solar flare. During this phase we observed the eruption of overlaying arcades and coronal loops, which leads to the first CME. The second reconnection is believed to occur between the expanding flux rope of F2 and the overlying arcades of the filament F1. We suggest that this reconnection destabilized the equi...

  11. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    D. Krier

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report, ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', is to present information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a repository at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report provides information to four other reports: ''Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion'', (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170001]); ''Atmospheric Dispersal and Deposition of Tephra from Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170026]); ''Dike/Drift Interactions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170028]); ''Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027], Section 6.5). This report is organized into seven major sections. This section addresses the purpose of this document. Section 2 addresses quality assurance, Section 3 the use of software, Section 4 identifies the requirements that constrain this work, and Section 5 lists assumptions and their rationale. Section 6 presents the details of the scientific analysis and Section 7 summarizes the conclusions reached.

  12. Hubble Captures Volcanic Eruption Plume From Io

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a picture of a 400-km-high (250-mile-high) plume of gas and dust from a volcanic eruption on Io, Jupiter's large innermost moon.Io was passing in front of Jupiter when this image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in July 1996. The plume appears as an orange patch just off the edge of Io in the eight o'clock position, against the blue background of Jupiter's clouds. Io's volcanic eruptions blasts material hundreds of kilometers into space in giant plumes of gas and dust. In this image, material must have been blown out of the volcano at more than 2,000 mph to form a plume of this size, which is the largest yet seen on Io.Until now, these plumes have only been seen by spacecraft near Jupiter, and their detection from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope opens up new opportunities for long-term studies of these remarkable phenomena.The plume seen here is from Pele, one of Io's most powerful volcanos. Pele's eruptions have been seen before. In March 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft recorded a 300-km-high eruption cloud from Pele. But the volcano was inactive when the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Jupiter in July 1979. This Hubble observation is the first glimpse of a Pele eruption plume since the Voyager expeditions.Io's volcanic plumes are much taller than those produced by terrestrial volcanos because of a combination of factors. The moon's thin atmosphere offers no resistance to the expanding volcanic gases; its weak gravity (one-sixth that of Earth) allows material to climb higher before falling; and its biggest volcanos are more powerful than most of Earth's volcanos.This image is a contrast-enhanced composite of an ultraviolet image (2600 Angstrom wavelength), shown in blue, and a violet image (4100 Angstrom wavelength), shown in orange. The orange color probably occurs because of the absorption and/or scattering of ultraviolet light in the plume. This light from Jupiter passes through the plume and is

  13. Eruption Source Parameters for forecasting ash dispersion and deposition from vulcanian eruptions at Tungurahua volcano: Insights from field data from the July 2013 eruption

    Parra, René; Bernard, Benjamin; Narváez, Diego; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Hasselle, Nathalie; Folch, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Tungurahua volcano, located in the central area of the Ecuadorian Sierra, is erupting intermittently since 1999 alternating between periods of quiescence and explosive activity. Volcanic ash has been the most frequent and widespread hazard provoking air contamination episodes and impacts on human health, animals and crops in the surrounding area. After two months of quiescence, Tungurahua erupted violently on 14th July 2013 generating short-lived eruptive columns rising up to 9 km above the vent characterized as a vulcanian eruption. The resulting fallout deposits were sampled daily during and after the eruptions to determine grain size distributions and perform morphological and componentry analyses. Dispersion and sedimentation of ash were simulated numerically coupling the meteorological Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) with the volcanic ash dispersion FALL3D models. The combination of field and numerical studies allowed constraining the Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) for this event, which could be used to forecast ash dispersion and deposition from future vulcanian eruptions at Tungurahua. This set of pre-defined ESP was further validated using two different eruptions, as blind test, occurring on 16th December 2012 and 1st February 2014.

  14. Geomorphic Consequences of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska: A Review

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta–Katmai eruption, the 1989–1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed.A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment–water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite

  15. Predicting eruptions from precursory activity using remote sensing data hybridization

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M. S.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    Many volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. This activity may or may not be detected depending on the available monitoring technology. In certain cases, precursors such as thermal output can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Kamchatka (Russia) provides an ideal natural laboratory to study a wide variety of eruption styles and precursory activity prior to an eruption. At Bezymianny volcano for example, a clear increase in thermal activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. Conversely, the eruption of Tolbachik volcano in 2012 produced no discernable thermal precursors before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes fall between the extremes of consistently behaved and completely undetectable, which is the case with neighboring Kliuchevskoi volcano. This study tests the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to track volcanic thermal precursors using data from both the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors. It focuses on three large eruptions that produced different levels and durations of effusive and explosive behavior at Kliuchevskoi. Before each of these eruptions, TIR spaceborne sensors detected thermal anomalies (i.e., pixels with brightness temperatures > 2 °C above the background temperature). High-temporal, low-spatial resolution (i.e., ~ hours and 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting large thermal events occurring over shorter time scales, such as the hot material ejected following strombolian eruptions. In contrast, high-spatial, low-temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks and 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower thermal activity; however, activity with a shorter duration will commonly be missed. ASTER and AVHRR data are combined to track low

  16. Quantifying the condition of eruption column collapse during explosive volcanic eruptions

    Koyaguchi, Takehiro; Suzuki, Yujiro

    2016-04-01

    During an explosive eruption, a mixture of pyroclasts and volcanic gas forms a buoyant eruption column or a pyroclastic flow. Generation of a pyroclastic flow caused by eruption column collapse is one of the most hazardous phenomena during explosive volcanic eruptions. The quantification of column collapse condition (CCC) is, therefore, highly desired for volcanic hazard assessment. Previously the CCC was roughly predicted by a simple relationship between magma discharge rate and water content (e.g., Carazzo et al., 2008). When a crater is present above the conduit, because of decompression/compression process inside/above the crater, the CCC based on this relationship can be strongly modified (Woods and Bower, 1995; Koyaguchi et al., 2010); however, the effects of the crater on CCC has not been fully understood in a quantitative fashion. Here, we have derived a semi-analytical expression of CCC, in which the effects of the crater is taken into account. The CCC depends on magma properties, crater shape (radius, depth and opening angle) as well as the flow rate at the base of crater. Our semi-analytical CCC expresses all these dependencies by a single surface in a parameter space of the dimensionless magma discharge rate, the dimensionless magma flow rate (per unit area) and the ratio of the cross-sectional areas at the top and the base of crater. We have performed a systematic parameter study of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of eruption column dynamics to confirm the semi-analytical CCC. The results of the 3D simulations are consistent with the semi-analytical CCC, while they show some additional fluid dynamical features in the transitional state (e.g., partial column collapse). Because the CCC depends on such many parameters, the scenario towards the generation of pyroclastic flow during explosive eruptions is considered to be diverse. Nevertheless, our semi-analytical CCC together with the existing semi-analytical solution for the 1D conduit flow

  17. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity.

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A Sri Kennath J; Arul, A Sri Sennath J; Chitra, S

    2015-08-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic. PMID:26604611

  18. The Association Between childhood Obesity and Tooth Eruption

    Must, Aviva; Phillips, Sarah M.; Tybor, David J.; Lividini, Keith; Hayes, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a growth-promoting process as evidenced by its effect on the timing of puberty. Although studies are limited, obesity has been shown to affect the timing of tooth eruption. Both the timing and sequence of tooth eruption are important to overall oral health. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between obesity and tooth eruption. Data were combined from three consecutive cycles (2001–2006) of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and analy...

  19. First recorded eruption of Nabro volcano, Eritrea, 2011

    Goitom, Berhe; Oppenheimer, Clive; Hammond, James O.S.; Grandin, Raphael; Barnie, Talfan; Donovan, Amy; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Yohannes, Ermias; Kibrom, Goitom; Kendall, J-Michael; Carn, Simon A.; Fee, David; Sealing, Christine; Keir, Derek; Ayele, Atalay

    2015-01-01

    We present a synthesis of diverse observations of the first recorded eruption of Nabro volcano, Eritrea, which began on 12 June 2011. While no monitoring of the volcano was in effect at the time, it has been possible to reconstruct the nature and evolution of the eruption through analysis of re- gional seismological and infrasound data and satellite remote sensing data, supplemented by petrological analysis of erupted products and brief field surveys. The event is notable for the comparative ...

  20. The August 2010 Phreatic Eruption of Mount Sinabung, North Sumatra

    Igan S. Sutawidjaja; O. Prambada; D. A. Siregar

    2014-01-01

    DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.155Mount Sinabung, located in Karo Regency, North Sumatra Province, is a strato volcano having four active craters. Since its latest eruption about 1,200 year ago, a phreatic eruption occurred on August 27th, 2010. The eruption took place in Crater-I, which was initiated by a greyish white plume and then followed by black plumes as high as 2000 m above the crater. Altered rock fragments and ash were erupted during this event. The altered rocks show a development of arg...

  1. The largest holocene eruption of the Central Andes found

    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; J. Saavedra; Perez-Torrado, J. F.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Carracedo, Juan Carlos; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading 110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high conte...

  2. Setting of the Father's Day Eruption at Kilauea

    Swanson, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Father's Day eruption and associated intrusion took place within a 10-km segment of Kilauea's east rift zone between Hi`iaka and Napau Craters--a segment that has had more numerous eruptions and intrusions than any other of comparable length during the past 200, probably the past 1000, years. Fifteen known eruptions started in this area in the past 200 years: 1840, 1922, 1923, 1962, August and October 1963, March and December 1965, August and October 1968, February and May 1969, May and November 1973, and March 1980 (only 3 cubic meters!). Three others, not previously designated as distinct eruptions despite having all the appropriate characteristics, took place during on-going eruptions: two in `Alo`i Crater in 1970 and 1972, and one in Napau Crater in 1997. Two of the largest shields on the east rift zone formed during long-lasting eruptions within this area--Kane Nui o Hamo at an unknown date, perhaps the 11-12th century, and Mauna Ulu (1969-1974). In addition, many small intrusions without eruptions are known. Seven short eruptions punctuated a prolonged eruption: four within the segment during the Mauna Ulu eruption, two at the summit and southwest rift zone during that same eruption, and one in Napau Crater in 1997 during the Pu`u `O`o eruption. Thus the Father's Day eruption is not unique by virtue of taking place during an ongoing eruption elsewhere along the rift zone. The increased frequency of activity in the segment during the 20th century is obvious, particularly after 1962. For most of the past 1,000 years, eruptions were centered at Kilauea's summit, with significant but lesser activity along the rift zones. A large summit deflation in 1924 ended the nearly continuous lava lake in Halemaumau, eventually leading to the past 5 decades of dominantly east rift zone activity. This segment of the rift zone contains most of the pit craters on Kilauea and gradually changes from a SE trend near the caldera to an ENE trend that characterizes the rest of

  3. Stratospheric sulfate from the Gareloi eruption, 1980: Contribution to the ''ambient'' aerosol by a poorly documented volcanic eruption

    While sampling stratospheric aerosols during July--August 1980 a plume of ''fresh'' volcanic debris was observed in the Northern hemisphere. The origin of this material seems to be a poorly documented explosive eruption of Gareloi valcano in the Aleutian Islands. The debris was sampled at an altitude of 19.2 km: almost twice the height of observed eruption clouds. Such remote, unobserved or poorly documented eruptions may be a source that helps maintain the ''ambient'' stratospheric aerosol background

  4. The intensities and magnitudes of volcanic eruptions

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1991-01-01

    Ever since 1935, when C.F Richter devised the earthquake magnitude scale that bears his name, seismologists have been able to view energy release from earthquakes in a systematic and quantitative manner. The benefits have been obvious in terms of assessing seismic gaps and the spatial and temporal trends of earthquake energy release. A similar quantitative treatment of volcanic activity is of course equally desirable, both for gaining a further understanding of the physical principles of volcanic eruptions and for volcanic-hazard assessment. A systematic volcanologic data base would be of great value in evaluating such features as volcanic gaps, and regional and temporal trends in energy release.  

  5. Fixed Drug Eruption due to Achiote Dye

    Tattersall, Ian; Reddy, Bobby Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a localized type IV sensitivity reaction to a systemically introduced allergen. It usually occurs as a result of new medication, making identification and avoidance of the trigger medication straightforward; however, in a rare subset of cases no pharmacological source is identified. In such cases, the causative agent is often a food or food additive. In this report we describe a case of a FDE in a 12-year-old girl recently immigrated to the United States from Ecua...

  6. A Comparison Study of a Solar Active-Region Eruptive Filament and a Neighboring Non-Eruptive Filament

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using a CESE-MHD-NLFFF code (Jiang & Feng 2013) reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) co-spatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match H{\\alpha} observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much ...

  7. Catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions II: The subordinate role of magma buoyancy as an eruption trigger

    Gregg, Patricia M.; Grosfils, Eric B.; de Silva, Shanaka L.

    2015-10-01

    Recent analytical investigations have suggested that magma buoyancy is critical for triggering catastrophic caldera forming eruptions. Through detailed assessment of these approaches, we illustrate how analytical models have been misapplied for investigating buoyancy and are, therefore, incorrect and inconclusive. Nevertheless, the hypothesis that buoyancy is the critical trigger for larger eruptions warrants further investigation. As such, we utilize viscoelastic finite element models that incorporate buoyancy to test overpressure evolution and mechanical failure in the roof due to the coalescence of large buoyant magma bodies for two model cases. In the first case, we mimic empirical approaches and include buoyancy as an explicit boundary condition. In the second set of models, buoyancy is calculated implicitly due to the density contrast between the magma in the reservoir and the host rock. Results from these numerical experiments indicate that buoyancy promotes only minimal overpressurization of large silicic magma reservoirs (implementations and the results from the numerical experiments, we conclude that buoyancy does not provide an eruption triggering mechanism for large silicic systems. Therefore, correlations of buoyancy with magma residence times, the eruption frequency-volume relationship, and the dimensions of calderas are re-assessed. We find a causal relationship with magma reservoir volume that implicates the mechanical conditions of the host rock as a primary control on eruption frequency. As magma reservoirs grow in size (> 100 km3) they surpass a rheological threshold where their subsequent evolution is controlled by host rock mechanics. Consequently, this results in a thermomechanical division between small systems that are triggered "internally" by magmatic processes and large systems that are triggered "externally" by faulting related to roof uplift or tectonism. Finally, critical assessment of recent analytical approaches illustrates that care

  8. Disentangling the eruption source parameters that control the climate effects of volcanic eruptions

    Marshall, Lauren; Schmidt, Anja; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Kenneth; Dhomse, Sandip; Haywood, Jim; Jones, Andy

    2016-04-01

    Climatic cooling in the 1-2 years following a major volcanic eruption does not scale linearly with the mass of SO2 injected into the atmosphere. The injection height of the emissions, the latitude of the volcano, the season and large scale atmospheric circulations, also influence the climatic response. Complex couplings exist between stratospheric chemistry and circulations, and aerosol induced heating and aerosol microphysical processes such as condensation and evaporation. As yet, there has been no systematic assessment of these relationships when considering different eruption source parameters. A series of simulations with a global composition-climate model with interactive stratospheric chemistry and aerosol microphysics are conducted, in which the eruption latitude and injection height are varied. Parameter combinations are chosen such that injections sample areas in the atmosphere where different chemical and dynamical influences are important (e.g. tropical vs. high latitude eruptions, injections near the tropopause vs. injections in the upper stratosphere). Each experiment is repeated for varying SO2 injection magnitudes. We focus on the analysis of aerosol properties such as the stratospheric aerosol optical depth, effective radius and heating rates, and resultant perturbations to radiative fluxes. Initial results demonstrate the non-linearity in the climatic response as the injection magnitude is increased. Future work will focus on disentangling the contribution of each parameter to the climatic response with additional simulations to investigate the effect of season and the Quasi Biennial Oscillation. Results will aid in the understanding of the impact of past, present and future volcanic eruptions. By analysing sulfate deposition to the polar ice caps, we will assess the uncertainty in, and validity of, the historic volcanic radiative forcing deduced from ice cores.

  9. Structural analysis of the eruptive fissures at Mount Etna (Italy

    Francesco Mazzarini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mount Etna produces frequent eruptions from its summit craters and from fissures on its flanks. The flank fissures trend approximately radially to the summit, and are mainly concentrated in three rift zones that are located on the NE, S and W flanks. Many flank eruptions result from lateral magma transfer from the central conduit into fractures intersecting the flanks, although some eruptions are fed through newly formed conduits that are not directly linked to the central conduit. We analyzed the structural features of eruptions from 1900 to the present, one of the most active periods in the documented eruptive history of Etna, which comprised 35 summit and 33 flank events. Except for a small eruption on the W flank in 1974, all of the flank eruptions in this interval occurred on or near the NE and S rifts. Eruptions in the NE sector were generally shorter, but their fissure systems developed more rapidly and were longer than those in the S sector. In contrast, summit eruptions had longer mean durations, but generally lower effusion rates (excluding paroxysmal events characterized by very high effusion rates that lasted only a few hours. This database was examined considering the main parameters (frequency and strike of the eruptive fissures that were active over the last ~2 ka. The distribution in time and space of summit and flank eruptions appears to be closely linked to the dynamics of the unstable E to S flank sector of Etna, which is undergoing periodic displacements induced by subvolcanic magma accumulation and gravitational pull. In this framework, magma accumulation below Etna exerts pressure against the unbuttressed E and S flanks, which have moved away from the rest of the volcano. This has caused an extension to the detachment zones, and has facilitated magma transfer from the central conduit into the flanks.

  10. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2014-05-01

    The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released (transformed) elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy) associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage) during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, elastic energy derives from two sources: (1) the strain energy stored in the volcano/fault zone before rupture, and (2) the external applied load (force, pressure, stress, displacement) on the volcano/fault zone. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that the elastic energy released or transformed (dU) during an eruption is directly proportional to the excess pressure (pe) in the magma chamber at the time of rupture multiplied by the volume decrease (-dVc) of the chamber, so that . This formula can be used as a basis for a new eruption magnitude scale, based on elastic energy released, which can be related to the moment-magnitude scale for earthquakes. For very large eruptions (>100 km3), the volume of the feeder-dike is negligible, so that the decrease in chamber volume during an eruption corresponds roughly to the associated volume of erupted materials , so that the elastic energy is . Using a typical excess pressures of 5 MPa, it is shown that the largest known eruptions on Earth, such as the explosive La Garita Caldera eruption (27-28 million years ago) and largest single (effusive) Colombia River basalt lava flows (15-16 million years ago), both of which have estimated volumes of about 5000 km3, released elastic energy of the order of 10EJ. For comparison, the seismic moment of the largest earthquake ever recorded, the M9.5 1960 Chile earthquake, is estimated at 100 ZJ and the associated elastic energy release at 10EJ.

  11. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    Agust eGudmundsson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released (transformed elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, elastic energy derives from two sources: (1 the strain energy stored in the volcano/fault zone before rupture, and (2 the external applied load (force, pressure, stress, displacement on the volcano/fault zone. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that the elastic energy released or transformed (dU during an eruption is directly proportional to the excess pressure (pe in the magma chamber at the time of rupture multiplied by the volume decrease (-dVc of the chamber, so that . This formula can be used as a basis for a new eruption magnitude scale, based on elastic energy released, which can be related to the moment-magnitude scale for earthquakes. For very large eruptions (>100 km3, the volume of the feeder-dike is negligible, so that the decrease in chamber volume during an eruption corresponds roughly to the associated volume of erupted materials , so that the elastic energy is . Using a typical excess pressures of 5 MPa, it is shown that the largest known eruptions on Earth, such as the explosive La Garita Caldera eruption (27-28 million years ago and largest single (effusive Colombia River basalt lava flows (15-16 million years ago, both of which have estimated volumes of about 5000 km3, released elastic energy of the order of 10EJ. For comparison, the seismic moment of the largest earthquake ever recorded, the M9.5 1960 Chile earthquake, is estimated at 100 ZJ and the associated elastic energy release at 10EJ.

  12. Base surge in recent volcanic eruptions

    Moore, J.G.

    1967-01-01

    A base surge, first identified at the Bikini thermonuclear undersea explosion, is a ring-shaped basal cloud that sweeps outward as a density flow from the base of a vertical explosion column. Base surges are also common in shallow underground test explosions and are formed by expanding gases which first vent vertically and then with continued expansion rush over the crater lip (represented by a large solitary wave in an underwater explosion), tear ejecta from it, and feed a gas-charged density flow, which is the surge cloud. This horizontally moving cloud commonly has an initial velocity of more than 50 meters per second and can carry clastic material many kilometers. Base surges are a common feature of many recent shallow, submarine and phreatic volcanic eruptions. They transport ash, mud, lapilli, and blocks with great velocity and commonly sandblast and knock down trees and houses, coat the blast side with mud, and deposit ejecta at distances beyond the limits of throw-out trajectories. Close to the eruption center, the base surge can erode radial channels and deposit material with dune-type bedding. ?? 1967 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  13. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  14. Fixed Drug Eruption due to Achiote Dye

    Tattersall, Ian; Reddy, Bobby Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a localized type IV sensitivity reaction to a systemically introduced allergen. It usually occurs as a result of new medication, making identification and avoidance of the trigger medication straightforward; however, in a rare subset of cases no pharmacological source is identified. In such cases, the causative agent is often a food or food additive. In this report we describe a case of a FDE in a 12-year-old girl recently immigrated to the United States from Ecuador who had no medication exposure over the course of her illness. Through an exhaustive patient history and literature review, we were able to hypothesize that her presentation was caused by a dietary change of the natural achiote dye used in the preparation of yellow rice to a locally available commercial dye mix containing tartrazine, or Yellow 5, which has previously been implicated in both systemic hypersensitivity reactions and specifically in FDE. This report adds to the small body of available literature on non-pharmacological fixed hypersensitivity eruptions and illustrates an effective approach to the management of such a presentation when history is not immediately revealing. PMID:26933409

  15. Imaging a Magnetic-breakout Solar Eruption

    Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Zhao, Di; Wu, Zhao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Ruan, Guiping; Feng, Shiwei; Song, Hongqiang

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental mechanism initiating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) remains controversial. One of the leading theories is magnetic breakout, in which magnetic reconnection occurring high in the corona removes the confinement on an energized low-corona structure from the overlying magnetic field, thus allowing it to erupt. Here, we report critical observational evidence of this elusive breakout reconnection in a multi-polar magnetic configuration that leads to a CME and an X-class, long-duration flare. Its occurrence is supported by the presence of pairs of heated cusp-shaped loops around an X-type null point and signatures of reconnection inflows. Other peculiar features new to the breakout picture include sequential loop brightening, coronal hard X-rays at energies up to ∼100 keV, and extended high-corona X-rays above the later restored multi-polar structure. These observations, from a novel perspective with clarity never achieved before, present crucial clues to understanding the initiation mechanism of solar eruptions.

  16. Fixed Drug Eruption due to Achiote Dye.

    Tattersall, Ian; Reddy, Bobby Y

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a localized type IV sensitivity reaction to a systemically introduced allergen. It usually occurs as a result of new medication, making identification and avoidance of the trigger medication straightforward; however, in a rare subset of cases no pharmacological source is identified. In such cases, the causative agent is often a food or food additive. In this report we describe a case of a FDE in a 12-year-old girl recently immigrated to the United States from Ecuador who had no medication exposure over the course of her illness. Through an exhaustive patient history and literature review, we were able to hypothesize that her presentation was caused by a dietary change of the natural achiote dye used in the preparation of yellow rice to a locally available commercial dye mix containing tartrazine, or Yellow 5, which has previously been implicated in both systemic hypersensitivity reactions and specifically in FDE. This report adds to the small body of available literature on non-pharmacological fixed hypersensitivity eruptions and illustrates an effective approach to the management of such a presentation when history is not immediately revealing. PMID:26933409

  17. Surface Flux Emergence and Coronal Eruption

    Fang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Among various active regions, delta-sunspots of aggregated spots of opposite polarities, are of particular interest due to their high productivity in energetic and recurrent eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact delta-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line (PIL). The formation of the delta-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the delta-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  18. Realistic Modeling of Spontaneous Flow Eruptions in the Quiet Sun

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Yoon, Seokkwan S

    2014-06-01

    Ground and space observations reveal that the solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The origin and driving forces of the observed eruptions are still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale plasma eruptions can be produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated in the Sun's turbulent convection. The vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and strengthen the background magnetic field, and push surrounding material up, generating impulses of Alfven waves and shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flows, thermodynamic, and magnetic structures in the erupting vortex tubes. We find that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers, and initially are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere, and are accelerated by the Lorentz force in the higher atmospheric layers. The eruptions are often quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 min. These vortex eruptions have a complicated flow helical pattern, with predominantly downward flows in the vortex tube cores and upward flows in their surroundings. For comparison with observations we calculate full Stokes profiles in different wavelength for different space and ground instruments, such as HMI/SDO, Hinode, NST/BBSO, IMaX/Sunrise. In particular, we find that the observed eruption events are not always associated with strong magnetic field concentrations, and that strong field patches can be a source of several simultaneous eruptions.

  19. Large eruption complex odontome in a Saudi patient

    Ahmed, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Odontomas are odontogenic tumors formed of various dental tissues.They are classified into: central odontomas that are common, eruption odontomas that are rare with only 23 cases reported to date, and peripheral odontomas that are also rare. We present a case of a large complex eruption odontome in a 24-year-old Saudi male.

  20. Large eruption complex odontome in a Saudi patient.

    Ahmed, Khalid A

    2015-02-01

    Odontomas are odontogenic tumors formed of various dental tissues. They are classified into: central odontomas that are common, eruption odontomas that are rare with only 23 cases reported to date, and peripheral odontomas that are also rare. We present a case of a large complex eruption odontome in a 24-year-old Saudi male.  PMID:25719590

  1. Idiopathic eruptive macular pigmentation: Report on two cases

    Grover Sanjiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic eruptive macular pigmentation (IEMP is a rather under-reported condition of unknown etiology. Clinically consisting of benign hyperpigmented macules, the condition is characterized histopathologically by dermal melanization. It must be differentiated from lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans, fixed drug eruption and mastocytosis.

  2. Aspirin induced fixed drug eruptions: a case report

    Rama R. Bhosale

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruptions are common cutaneous adverse drug reactions, commonly caused by anticonvulsants, antibiotics and analgesics. Here, we report a case of a 27-year-old male of fixed drug eruptions due to Aspirin which was used in treatment of headache. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 220-221

  3. Textural constraints on the dynamics of the 2000 Miyakejima eruption

    Garozzo, Ileana; Romano, Claudia; Giordano, Guido; Geshi, Nobuo; Vona, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Miyakejima Volcano is a basaltic-andesite stratovolcano active from ~10.000 years, located on the north of the Izu-Bonin arc. During the last 600 years the volcano has been characterized mainly by flank fissure activity, with explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions on the coastal areas. In the last century, the activity became more frequent and regular with intervals of 20 to 70 years (1940, 1962, 1983 and 2000). The last activity started on 27 June 2000, with a minor submarine eruption on the west coast of the volcano, and proceeded with six major summit eruptions from July 8 to August 29. The eruptions led to the formation of a collapse caldera ~1.6 km across. The total erupted tephra represents only 1.7% in volume of the caldera, the high fragmentation of magma produced mainly fine-grained volcanic ash. In order to improve the understanding on the triggering and dynamics of this explosive eruption, we carried out a detailed investigation of the erupted materials with particular attention to the textural features of juvenile pyroclasts (Vesicle and Crystal Size Distributions). The stratigraphic record can be divided into six fall units, corresponding to the six summit eruptions, although juvenile materials were identified only in 4 units (unit 2, 4, 5, 6). We selected about 100 juvenile grains sampled from the bottom to the top of each level, to be analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The study of juvenile morphological features allowed us to recognize the existence of three characteristic morphotypes, showing marked differences in their external morphologies and internal textures (from poorly to highly crystallized and vesiculated clasts). The distribution of these morphotypes is non-homogeneous along the eruptive sequence indicating changes of dynamics during magma ascent. Juveniles do not show features inherited from the interaction with external water. Vesicle Volume Distributions of the selected ash grains show that the three types of pyroclasts experienced

  4. Do volcanic eruptions affect climate? Sulfur gases may cause cooling

    Self, Stephen; Rampino, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between volcanic eruptions on earth and the observed climatic changes is investigated. The results of the comparison and analyses of volcanologic and climatologic data sets for the years between 1880 and 1980 indicate that changes in temperature caused by even of the largest eruptions recorded during this time were about the same as normal variations in temperature. However, when temperature records for several months or years preceding and following a given eruption were analyzed, a statistically significant temperature decrease of 0.2-0.5 C was found for the periods of one to two years immediately following some of the 19th and 20th century explosive events that prodiced large aerosol clouds (e.g., Krakatau and Agung eruptions). It is suggested that the content of sulfur in the erupted magma determines the size of aerosol cloud producing the cooling effect.

  5. Magnetic field restructuring associated with two successive solar eruptions

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong, E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-08-20

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the 'implosion' phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  6. Magnetic field restructuring associated with two successive solar eruptions

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the 'implosion' phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  7. Spontaneous Eruption of Premolar Associated with a Dentigerous Cyst

    Luna, Anibal Henrique Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Dentigerous cyst (DC) is the second most common odontogenic cyst with greater incidence in young patients. It presents as a unilocular, asymptomatic radiolucency involving the crown of an impacted tooth, commonly noticed in X-rays to investigate absence, wrong tooth position, or delay in the chronology of eruption. Decompression/marsupialization (D/M) is the most implemented treatment, especially when preserving the tooth involved is advised. The aim of this study is to discuss the DC characteristics that contribute to spontaneous eruption of premolars, by reporting the case of a conservative treatment of DC. This eruption depends on factors such as age, angulation of inclusion, rate of root formation, depth of inclusion, and eruption space. This paper reports the case of a 10-year-old patient with a radiolucent lesion diagnosed as DC involving element 35, which erupted as a result of treatment. The patient was observed during 1 year and 6 months. PMID:27313912

  8. Erupted odontomas: a report of two unusual cases

    Santosh Patil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumors of the jaws which are benign, slow growing and nonaggressive. They are usually asymptomatic and are diagnosed on routine radiological examination. The eruptions of odontomas are uncommon and very few cases are reported in the literature. Objective: To report two rare cases of erupted compound odontomas. Case report: Two cases of erupted compound odontomas are reported in middle aged patients. Erupted miniature teeth-like structure were seen on clinical examination. The condition was diagnosed on the basis of conventional intraoral radiographs and histopathological examination. Both cases were treated by surgical excision under local anaesthesia without any complications. Conclusion: Odontomas are benign tumors with uncertain etiology. Odontomas erupting in the oral cavity is an infrequent situation. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice in all such cases followed by histopathological examination to confirm the clinical diagnosis.

  9. Mid-ocean ridge eruptions as a climate valve

    Tolstoy, Maya

    2015-03-01

    Seafloor eruption rates and mantle melting fueling eruptions may be influenced by sea level and crustal loading cycles at scales from fortnightly to 100 kyr. Recent mid-ocean ridge eruptions occur primarily during neap tides and the first 6 months of the year, suggesting sensitivity to minor changes in tidal forcing and orbital eccentricity. An ~100 kyr periodicity in fast-spreading seafloor bathymetry and relatively low present-day eruption rates at a time of high sea level and decreasing orbital eccentricity suggest a longer-term sensitivity to sea level and orbital variations associated with Milankovitch cycles. Seafloor spreading is considered a small but steady contributor of CO2 to climate cycles on the 100 kyr time scale; however, this assumes a consistent short-term eruption rate. Pulsing of seafloor volcanic activity may feed back into climate cycles, possibly contributing to glacial/interglacial cycles, the abrupt end of ice ages, and dominance of the 100 kyr cycle.

  10. Drawing the Curtain on Enceladus' South-Polar Eruptions

    Spitale, Joseph N.; Hurford, Terry A.; Rhoden, Alyssa R.; Berkson, Emily E.; Platts, Symeon S.

    2015-11-01

    For a comprehensive description of Enceladus' south-polar eruptions observed at high resolution, they must be represented as broad curtains rather than discrete jets. Meanders in the fractures from which the curtains of material erupt give rise to optical illusions that look like discrete jets, even along fractures with no local variations in eruptive activity, implying that many features previously identified as "jets" are in fact phantoms. By comparing Cassini images with model curtain eruptions, we are able to obtain maps of eruptive activity that are not biased by the presence of those phantom jets. The average of our activity maps over all times agrees well with thermal maps produced by Cassini CIRS. We can best explain the observed curtains by assuming spreading angles with altitude of up to 14° and zenith angles of up to 8°, for curtains observed in geometries that are sensitive to those quantities.

  11. Predictions of volcanic eruptions at Mt Vesuvius, Italy

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1992-06-01

    We present a mathematically-based model for predicting the likelihood of future eruptions of Vesuvius and, by implication, other volcanoes. The volcanic activity of Vesuvius in the period 1630-1989 is described by a compound Poisson distribution with a gamma compounding density. The frequency distribution of eruptions in any given interval of equal length follows a negative binomial distribution (NBD). The assumptions of the NBD model are less restrictive, so the observation time can be extended to include the long repose following the 1944 eruption of Vesuvius. Moreover, this exceedingly flexible model has only two parameters which can be determined easily from the eruptive count data. The future probability of x number of eruptions is predicted on the aggregate behaviour of past volcanic activity. This capability would be useful for long-term planning, such as for land-use development, although not for short-term forecasts of volcanic hazards.

  12. Magnetic Field Restructuring Associated with Two Successive Solar Eruptions

    Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-01-01

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity, and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the "implosion" phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  13. Case study of a complex active-region filament eruption

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Deng, L. H.; Xue, Z. K.

    2013-09-01

    Context. We investigated a solar active-region filament eruption associated with a C6.6 class flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME) in NOAA active region 08858 on 2000 February 9. Aims: We aim to better understand the relationship between filament eruptions and the associated flares and CMEs. Methods: Using BBSO, SOHO/EIT, and TRACE observational data, we analyzed the process of the active-region filament eruption in the chromosphere and the corona. Using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms, we investigated the change of the magnetic fields in the photosphere. Using the GOES soft X-ray flux and the SOHO/LASCO images, we identified the flare and CME, which were associated with this active-region filament eruption. Results: The brightenings in the chromosphere are a precursor of the filament expansion. The eruption itself can be divided into four phases: In the initial phase, the intertwined bright and dark strands of the filament expand. Then, the bright strands are divided into three parts with different expansion velocity. Next, the erupting filament-carrying flux rope expands rapidly and combines with the lower part of the expanding bright strands. Finally, the filament erupts accompanied by other dark strands overlying the filament.The overlying magnetic loops and the expansion of the filament strands can change the direction of the eruption. Conclusions: The time delay between the velocity peaks of the filament and that of the two parts of the bright strands clearly demonstrates that the breakup of the bright loops tying on the filament into individual strands is important for its eruption. The eruption is a collection of multiple processes that are physically coupled rather than a single process.

  14. Extrusion cycles during dome-building eruptions

    de' Michieli Vitturi, M.; Clarke, A. B.; Neri, A.; Voight, B.

    2013-06-01

    We identify and quantify controls on the timescales and magnitudes of cyclic (periodic) volcanic eruptions using the numerical model DOMEFLOW (de' Michieli Vitturi et al., 2010) which was developed by the authors for magma systems of intermediate composition. DOMEFLOW treats the magma mixture as a liquid continuum with dispersed gas bubbles and crystals in thermodynamic equilibrium with the melt and assumes a modified Poiseuille form of the viscous term for fully developed laminar flow in a conduit of cylindrical cross-section. During ascent, magma pressure decreases and water vapor exsolves and partially degasses from the melt as the melt simultaneously crystallizes, causing changes in mixture density and viscosity. Two mechanisms previously proposed to cause periodic eruption behavior have been implemented in the model and their corresponding timescales explored. The first applies a stick-slip model in which motion of a shallow solid plug is resisted by static/dynamic friction, as described in Iverson et al. (2006). For a constant magma supply rate at depth, this mechanism yields cyclic extrusion with timescales of seconds to tens of seconds with values generally depending on assumed friction coefficients. The second mechanism does not consider friction but treats the plug as a high-viscosity Newtonian fluid. During viscous resistance, pressure beneath the degassed plug can increase sufficiently to overcome dome overburden, plug weight, and viscous forces, and ultimately drive the plug from the conduit. In this second model cycle periods are on the order of hours, and decrease with increasing magma supply rate until a threshold is reached, at which point periodicity disappears and extrusion rate becomes steady (vanishingly short periods). Magma volatile content for fixed chamber pressure has little effect on cycle timescales, but increasing volatile content increases mass flow rate and cycle magnitude as defined by the difference between maximum and minimum

  15. Discovery of the 2010 Eruption and the Pre-Eruption Light Curve for Recurrent Nova U Scorpii

    Schaefer, Bradley E; Xiao, Limin; Darnley, Matthew J; Bode, Michael F; Harris, Barbara G; Dvorak, Shawn; Menke, John; Linnolt, Michael; Templeton, Matthew; Henden, Arne A; Pojmański, Grzegorz; Pilecki, Bogumil; Szczygiel, Dorota M; Watanabe, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery by B. G. Harris and S. Dvorak on JD 2455224.9385 (2010 Jan 28.4385 UT) of the predicted eruption of the recurrent nova U Scorpii (U Sco). We also report on 815 magnitudes (and 16 useful limits) on the pre-eruption light curve in the UBVRI and Sloan r' and i' bands from 2000.4 up to 9 hours before the peak of the January 2010 eruption. We found no significant long-term variations, though we did find frequent fast variations (flickering) with amplitudes up to 0.4 mag. We show that U Sco did not have any rises or dips with amplitude greater than 0.2 mag on timescales from one day to one year before the eruption. We find that the peak of this eruption occurred at JD 2455224.69+-0.07 and the start of the rise was at JD 2455224.32+-0.12. From our analysis of the average B-band flux between eruptions, we find that the total mass accreted between eruptions is consistent with being a constant, in agreement with a strong prediction of nova trigger theory. The date of the next eruption can be ant...

  16. Estimating rates of decompression from textures of erupted ash particles produced by 1999-2006 eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Wright, Heather M.N.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Hall, Minard L.; Ruiz, Andrés Gorki; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates may cause abrupt transitions in eruptive style. As direct measurement of magma supply is not possible, robust techniques for indirect measurements must be developed. Here we demonstrate that crystal textures of ash particles from 1999 to 2006 Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, provide quantitative information about the dynamics of magma ascent and eruption that is difficult to obtain from other monitoring approaches. We show that the crystallinity of erupted ash particles is controlled by the magma supply rate (MSR); ash erupted during periods of high magma supply is substantially less crystalline than during periods of low magma supply. This correlation is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures (<<50 MPa) and degassing-driven crystallization controlled by the time available prior to eruption. Our data also suggest that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions at low MSR to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains at high MSR can be explained by the rise of bubbles through (Strombolian) or trapping of bubbles beneath (Vulcanian) vent-capping, variably viscous (and crystalline) magma.

  17. Dermatological Diseases Associated with Pregnancy: Pemphigoid Gestationis, Polymorphic Eruption of Pregnancy, Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy, and Atopic Eruption of Pregnancy

    Christine Sävervall; Freja Lærke Sand; Simon Francis Thomsen

    2015-01-01

    Dermatoses unique to pregnancy are important to recognize for the clinician as they carry considerable morbidity for pregnant mothers and in some instances constitute a risk to the fetus. These diseases include pemphigoid gestationis, polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, and atopic eruption of pregnancy. This review discusses the pathogenesis, clinical importance, and management of the dermatoses of pregnancy.

  18. Eruption and emplacement timescales of ignimbrite super-eruptions from thermo-kinetics of glass shards

    Yan eLavallée

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-eruptions generating hundreds of cubic kilometres of pyroclastic density currents are commonly recorded by thick, welded and lava-like ignimbrites. Despite the huge environmental impact inferred for this type of eruption, little is yet known about the timescales of deposition and post-depositional flow. Without these timescales, the critical question of the duration of any environmental impact, and the ensuing gravity of its effects for the Earth system, eludes us. The eruption and welding of ignimbrites requires three transects of the glass transition. Magma needs to: 1 fragment during ascent, 2 liquefy and relax during deposition, agglutination and welding (sintering, and 3 quench by cooling into the glassy state. Here we show that welding is a rapid, syn-depositional process and that the welded ignimbrite sheet may flow for up to a few hours before passing through the glass transition a final time. Geospeedometry reveals that the basal vitrophyre of the Grey’s Landing ignimbrite underwent the glass transition at a rate of ~0.1 °C.min^-1 at 870 °C; that is, 30-180 °C below pre-eruptive geothermometric estimates. Application of a 1-D cooling model constrains the timescale of deposition, agglutination, and welding of the basal vitrophyre to less than 1 hour, and possibly even tens of minutes. Thermo-mechanical iteration of the sintering process indicates an optimal temperature solution for the emplacement of the vitrophyres at 966 °C. The vitrophyres reveal a Newtonian rheology up to 46 MPa, which suggests that the ash particles annealed entirely during welding and that viscous energy dissipation is unlikely from loading conditions alone, unless shear stresses imposed by the overlying ash flow were excessively high and sustained over long distances. The findings underline the value of the term 'lava-like' flow to describe the end rheology of Snake River-type ignimbrites, fully consistent with the typical lithofacies observed.

  19. Eruption and emplacement timescales of ignimbrite super-eruptions from thermo-kinetics of glass shards

    Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jérémie; Russell, James; Andrews, Graham; Hess, Kai-Uwe; von Aulock, Felix; Kendrick, Jackie; Tuffen, Hugh; Biggin, Andy; Dingwell, Donald

    2015-02-01

    Super-eruptions generating hundreds of cubic kilometres of pyroclastic density currents are commonly recorded by thick, welded and lava-like ignimbrites. Despite the huge environmental impact inferred for this type of eruption, little is yet known about the timescales of deposition and post-depositional flow. Without these timescales, the critical question of the duration of any environmental impact, and the ensuing gravity of its effects for the Earth system, eludes us. The eruption and welding of ignimbrites requires three transects of the glass transition. Magma needs to: 1) fragment during ascent, 2) liquefy and relax during deposition, agglutination and welding (sintering), and 3) quench by cooling into the glassy state. Here we show that welding is a rapid, syn-depositional process and that the welded ignimbrite sheet may flow for up to a few hours before passing through the glass transition a final time. Geospeedometry reveals that the basal vitrophyre of the Grey’s Landing ignimbrite underwent the glass transition at a rate of ~0.1 °C.min^-1 at 870 °C; that is, 30-180 °C below pre-eruptive geothermometric estimates. Application of a 1-D cooling model constrains the timescale of deposition, agglutination, and welding of the basal vitrophyre to less than 1 hour, and possibly even tens of minutes. Thermo-mechanical iteration of the sintering process indicates an optimal temperature solution for the emplacement of the vitrophyres at 966 °C. The vitrophyres reveal a Newtonian rheology up to 46 MPa, which suggests that the ash particles annealed entirely during welding and that viscous energy dissipation is unlikely from loading conditions alone, unless shear stresses imposed by the overlying ash flow were excessively high and sustained over long distances. The findings underline the value of the term 'lava-like' flow to describe the end rheology of Snake River-type ignimbrites, fully consistent with the typical lithofacies observed.

  20. MHD Equilibria and Triggers for Prominence Eruption

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the emergence of twisted magnetic flux tubes from the solar interior into the corona are discussed to illustrate how twisted and sheared coronal magnetic structures (with free magnetic energy), capable of driving filament eruptions, can form in the corona in emerging active regions. Several basic mechanisms that can disrupt the quasi-equilibrium coronal structures and trigger the release of the stored free magnetic energy are discussed. These include both ideal processes such as the onset of the helical kink instability and the torus instability of a twisted coronal flux rope structure and the non-ideal process of the onset of fast magnetic reconnections in current sheets. Representative MHD simulations of the non-linear evolution involving these mechanisms are presented.

  1. Fixed drug eruption due to levocetirizine.

    Jhaj, Ratinder; Asati, Dinesh Prasad; Chaudhary, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a cutaneous adverse drug reaction due to Type IV or delayed cell-mediated hypersensitivity. Antihistamines, which antagonize the action of histamine during an allergic reaction by blocking the H1 histamine receptors, are used routinely for the treatment of various allergic disorders such as urticaria, eczemas, and also in itchy lesions of skin like scabies. Levocetirizine, an active (R)-enantiomer of cetirizine, is a newer or second generation antihistamine, with more specific actions and fewer side effects, including cutaneous reactions. FDE due to levocetirizine as well as with cetirizine are rare. We report a case of levocetirizine induced FDE in a 49-year-old male patient with scabies. The patient had a history of cetirizine induced FDE in the past. PMID:27440959

  2. Fixed drug eruption due to levocetirizine

    Ratinder Jhaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A fixed drug eruption (FDE is a cutaneous adverse drug reaction due to Type IV or delayed cell-mediated hypersensitivity. Antihistamines, which antagonize the action of histamine during an allergic reaction by blocking the H 1 histamine receptors, are used routinely for the treatment of various allergic disorders such as urticaria, eczemas, and also in itchy lesions of skin like scabies.Levocetirizine, an active (R-enantiomer of cetirizine, is a newer or second generation antihistamine, with more specific actions and fewer side effects, including cutaneous reactions. FDE due to levocetirizine as well as with cetirizine are rare. We report a case of levocetirizine induced FDE in a 49-year-old male patient with scabies. The patient had a history of cetirizine induced FDE in the past.

  3. Meprobamate-induced fixed drug eruption.

    Zaïem, Ahmed; Kaabi, Widd; Badri, Talel; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Sahnoun, Rym; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh; Lakhal, Mohamed; El Aidli, Sihem

    2014-01-01

    Meprobamate is usually a safe drug prescribed for anxiety disorders. Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is an exceptional cutaneous adverse effect of this drug. We report a case of FDE induced by meprobamate with positive patch test. A 22-year-old woman was prescribed for depression meprobamate, aceprometazine, valpromide and lorazepam. On the second day of treatment, the patient presented red erythematous and pruriginous plaques in the limbs and the face. After stopping the previous treatment, the patient's lesions resolved completely within 3 weeks with residual pigmentation. One month later, patch tests were performed and were positive to meprobamate. Exceptional cases of FDE were reported in literature with meprobamate. None has reported the use of patch test to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:24446836

  4. POLYMORPHOUS LIGHT ERUPTION – A REVIEW

    Yogeesh Hosahalli Rajaiah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymprhouos light eruption is the most common idiopathic photodermatosis. It is a sun induced cutaneous reaction characterized by onset itchy erathematous papules, plaques, vesicles or erythema multiforme type of lesions after brief exposure to sunlight. Sun-exposed areas of the body or rarely the partially covered areas are commonly involved. PLE is more common in temperate climates than in tropics. It begins usually at the onset of summer and moderates as the summer progresses. In most patients it usually runs a benign course. Diagnosis is mainly on clinical grounds. Therapy involves avoidance of sun-exposure and use of sunscreens. Cases not responding to simple measures require PUVA (Psoralen and Ultraviolet A or UVB (ultraviolet B therapy. Other alternative suggested therapies with variable success include oral hydroxychloroquine, beta-carotene, thalidomide and nicotinamide.

  5. Introduction to the 2012-2013 Tolbachik eruption special issue

    Edwards, Benjamin R.; Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Volynets, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The Tolbachik volcanic complex in central Kamchatka holds a special place in global volcanological studies. It is one of 4 areas of extensive historic volcanic activity in the northern part of the Central Kamchatka Depression (the others being Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Shiveluch), and is part of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group, which is one of the most active areas of volcanism on Earth. Tolbachik is especially well-known due largely to the massive 1975-1976 eruption that became known as the Great Tolbachik Fissure eruption (GTFE; Fedotov, 1983; Fedotov et al., 1984). This was one of the first eruptions in Russia to be predicted based on precursory seismic activity, based on M5 earthquakes approximately one week before the eruption started, and was intensively studied during its course by a large number of Russian scientists. A summary of those studies was published, first in Russian and then in English, and it became widely read for many reasons. One in particular is that the eruption was somewhat unusual for a subduction zone setting; although many subduction zone stratovolcanoes have associated basaltic tephra cone-lava fields, this was the first such Hawaiian-style eruption to be widely observed. After the end of the eruption in 1976, the complex showed no signs of activity until 27 November 2012, when increased seismic activity was registered by the Kamchatka Branch of the Russian Geophysical Survey and a red glow from the eruption site was first noticed through the snowstorm haze. This prompted them, and then the Kamchatka Volcanic Emergency Response Team (KVERT) to issue an alert that activity was coming from the south flank of Plosky Tolbachik volcano, the younger of two volcanic edifices (the older is Ostry Tolbachik) that together make up the bulk of the complex along with tephra cone-lava fields that lie along a NE-SW fissure zone that transects Plosky Tolbachik. The new eruption lasted for more than 250 days and, like the 1975-1976 eruption, was

  6. Using Infrasound and Machine Learning for Monitoring Plinian Volcanic Eruptions

    Ham, F. M.; Iyengar, I.; Hambebo, B. M.; Garces, M. A.; Deaton, J.; Perttu, A.; Williams, B.

    2012-12-01

    Large plinian volcanic eruptions can inject a substantial amount of volcanic gas and ash into the stratosphere. This can present a severe hazard to commercial air traffic. A hazardous Icelandic volcanic ash-eruption was reported on April 14, 2010. This resulted in London's aviation authority to issue an alert that an ash plume was moving from an eruption in Iceland towards northwestern Europe. This eruption resulted in the closure of large areas of European airspace. Large plinian volcanic eruptions radiate infrasonic signals that can be detected by a global infrasound array network. To reduce potential hazards for commercial aviation from volcanic ash, these infrasound sensor arrays have been used to detect infrasonic signals released by sustained volcanic eruptions that can inject ash into the stratosphere at aircraft's cruising altitudes, typically in the order of 10km. A system that is capable of near, real-time eruption detection and discrimination of plinian eruptions from other natural phenomena that can produce infrasound with overlapping spectral content (0.01 to 0.1 Hz) is highly desirable to provide ash-monitoring for commercial aviation. In the initial study, cepstral features were extracted from plinian volcanic eruptions and mountain associated wave infrasound signals. These feature vectors were then used to train and test a two-module neural network classifier (radial basis function neural networks were used for each module). One module is dedicated to classifying plinian volcanic eruptions, the other mountain associated waves. Using an independent validation dataset, the classifier's correct classification rate was 91.5%. Then a different two-module neural network classifier was designed to discriminate between plinian volcanic eruptions and a collection of infrasound signals that are not-of-interest but have spectral content that overlaps with the volcano signals. One module is again dedicated to classifying plinian volcanic eruptions, however, in

  7. Impact of explosive eruption scenarios at Vesuvius

    Zuccaro, G.; Cacace, F.; Spence, R. J. S.; Baxter, P. J.

    2008-12-01

    In the paper the first attempt at the definition of a model to assess the impact of a range of different volcanic hazards on the building structures is presented. This theoretical approach has been achieved within the activities of the EXPLORIS Project supported by the EU. A time history for Sub-Plinian I eruptive scenario of the Vesuvius is assumed by taking advantage of interpretation of historical reports of volcanic crises of the past [Carafa, G. 1632. In opusculum de novissima Vesuvij conflagratione, epistola isagogica, 2 a ed. Napoli, Naples; Mascolo, G.B., 1634. De incendio Vesuvii excitato xvij. Kal. Ianuar. anno trigesimo primo sæculi Decimiseptimi libri X. Cum Chronologia superiorum incendiorum; & Ephemeride ultimi. Napoli; Varrone, S., 1634. Vesuviani incendii historiae libri tres. Napoli], numerical simulations [Neri, A., Esposti Ongaro, T., Macedonio, G., Gidaspow, D., 2003. Multiparticle simulation of collapsing volcanic columns and pyroclastic flows. J. Geophys. Res. Lett. 108, 2202. doi:10.1029/2001 JB000508; Macedonio, G., Costa, A., Longo, A., 2005. HAZMAP: a computer model for volcanic ash fallout and assessment of subsequent hazard. Comput. Geosci. 31,837-845; Costa, A., Macedonio, G., Folch, A., 2006. A three-dimensional Eulerian model for transport and deposition of volcanic ashes. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 241,634-647] and experts' elicitations [Aspinall, W.P., 2006. Structured elicitation of expert judgment for probabilistic hazard and risk assessment in volcanic eruptions. In: Mader, H.M. Coles, S.G. Connor, C.B. Connor, L.J. (Eds), Statistics in Volcanology. Geological Society of London on behalf of IAVCEI, pp.15-30; Woo, G., 1999. The Mathematics of Natural Catastrophes. Imperial College Press, London] from which the impact on the building structures is derived. This is achieved by an original definition of vulnerability functions for multi-hazard input and a dynamic cumulative damage model. Factors affecting the variability of the final

  8. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  9. On a Possible Unified Scaling Law for Volcanic Eruption Durations

    Cannavò, Flavio; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Volcanoes constitute dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom. Their eruptions are the result of complex processes that involve interacting chemical-physical systems. At present, due to the complexity of involved phenomena and to the lack of precise measurements, both analytical and numerical models are unable to simultaneously include the main processes involved in eruptions thus making forecasts of volcanic dynamics rather unreliable. On the other hand, accurate forecasts of some eruption parameters, such as the duration, could be a key factor in natural hazard estimation and mitigation. Analyzing a large database with most of all the known volcanic eruptions, we have determined that the duration of eruptions seems to be described by a universal distribution which characterizes eruption duration dynamics. In particular, this paper presents a plausible global power-law distribution of durations of volcanic eruptions that holds worldwide for different volcanic environments. We also introduce a new, simple and realistic pipe model that can follow the same found empirical distribution. Since the proposed model belongs to the family of the self-organized systems it may support the hypothesis that simple mechanisms can lead naturally to the emergent complexity in volcanic behaviour.

  10. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  11. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream Disturbances

    Rajendra Shelke

    2006-06-01

    Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced density turbulence in the interplanetary medium driven by the high-speed flows of low-density plasma trailing behind for several days. Here, an attempt has been made to investigate the solar cause of erupting stream disturbances, mapped by Hewish & Bravo (1986) from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made between August 1978 and August 1979 at 81.5 MHz. The position of the sources of 68 erupting stream disturbances on the solar disk has been compared with the locations of newborn coronal holes and/or the areas that have been coronal holes previously. It is found that the occurrence of erupting stream disturbances is linked to the emergence of newcoronal holes at the eruption site on the solar disk. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity. The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support high-speed flow trailing behind the compression zone of the erupting stream for several days.

  12. A basalt trigger for the 1991 eruptions of Pinatubo volcano?

    Pallister, J.S.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Reyes, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    THE eruptive products of calc-alkaline volcanos often show evidence for the mixing of basaltic and acid magmas before eruption (see, for example, refs 1, 2). These observations have led to the suggestion3 that the injection of basaltic magma into the base of a magma chamber (or the catastrophic overturn of a stably stratified chamber containing basaltic magma at its base) might trigger an eruption. Here we report evidence for the mixing of basaltic and dacitic magmas shortly before the paroxysmal eruptions of Pinatubo volcano on 15 June 1991. Andesitic scoriae erupted on 12 June contain minerals and glass with disequilibrium compositions, and are considerably more mafic than the dacitic pumices erupted on 15 June. Differences in crystal abundance and glass composition among the pumices may arise from pre-heating of the dacite magma by the underlying basaltic liquid before mixing. Degassing of this basaltic magma may also have contributed to the climatologically important sulphur dioxide emissions that accompanied the Pinatubo eruptions.

  13. The Eruption Forecasting Information System (EFIS) database project

    Ogburn, Sarah; Harpel, Chris; Pesicek, Jeremy; Wellik, Jay; Pallister, John; Wright, Heather

    2016-04-01

    The Eruption Forecasting Information System (EFIS) project is a new initiative of the U.S. Geological Survey-USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) with the goal of enhancing VDAP's ability to forecast the outcome of volcanic unrest. The EFIS project seeks to: (1) Move away from relying on the collective memory to probability estimation using databases (2) Create databases useful for pattern recognition and for answering common VDAP questions; e.g. how commonly does unrest lead to eruption? how commonly do phreatic eruptions portend magmatic eruptions and what is the range of antecedence times? (3) Create generic probabilistic event trees using global data for different volcano 'types' (4) Create background, volcano-specific, probabilistic event trees for frequently active or particularly hazardous volcanoes in advance of a crisis (5) Quantify and communicate uncertainty in probabilities A major component of the project is the global EFIS relational database, which contains multiple modules designed to aid in the construction of probabilistic event trees and to answer common questions that arise during volcanic crises. The primary module contains chronologies of volcanic unrest, including the timing of phreatic eruptions, column heights, eruptive products, etc. and will be initially populated using chronicles of eruptive activity from Alaskan volcanic eruptions in the GeoDIVA database (Cameron et al. 2013). This database module allows us to query across other global databases such as the WOVOdat database of monitoring data and the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) database of eruptive histories and volcano information. The EFIS database is in the early stages of development and population; thus, this contribution also serves as a request for feedback from the community.

  14. First recorded eruption of Nabro volcano, Eritrea, 2011

    Goitom, Berhe; Oppenheimer, Clive; Hammond, James O. S.; Grandin, Raphaël; Barnie, Talfan; Donovan, Amy; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Yohannes, Ermias; Kibrom, Goitom; Kendall, J.-Michael; Carn, Simon A.; Fee, David; Sealing, Christine; Keir, Derek; Ayele, Atalay; Blundy, Jon; Hamlyn, Joanna; Wright, Tim; Berhe, Seife

    2015-10-01

    We present a synthesis of diverse observations of the first recorded eruption of Nabro volcano, Eritrea, which began on 12 June 2011. While no monitoring of the volcano was in effect at the time, it has been possible to reconstruct the nature and evolution of the eruption through analysis of regional seismological and infrasound data and satellite remote sensing data, supplemented by petrological analysis of erupted products and brief field surveys. The event is notable for the comparative rarity of recorded historical eruptions in the region and of caldera systems in general, for the prodigious quantity of SO2 emitted into the atmosphere and the significant human impacts that ensued notwithstanding the low population density of the Afar region. It is also relevant in understanding the broader magmatic and tectonic significance of the volcanic massif of which Nabro forms a part and which strikes obliquely to the principal rifting directions in the Red Sea and northern Afar. The whole-rock compositions of the erupted lavas and tephra range from trachybasaltic to trachybasaltic andesite, and crystal-hosted melt inclusions contain up to 3,000 ppm of sulphur by weight. The eruption was preceded by significant seismicity, detected by regional networks of sensors and accompanied by sustained tremor. Substantial infrasound was recorded at distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometres from the vent, beginning at the onset of the eruption and continuing for weeks. Analysis of ground deformation suggests the eruption was fed by a shallow, NW-SE-trending dike, which is consistent with field and satellite observations of vent distributions. Despite lack of prior planning and preparedness for volcanic events in the country, rapid coordination of the emergency response mitigated the human costs of the eruption.

  15. Hybrid Pyroclastic Deposits Accumulated From The Eruptive Transitional Regime of Plinian Eruptions.

    di Muro, Andrea; Rosi, Mauro

    In the past 15 years sedimentological studies (Valentine and Giannetti, 1995; Wilson and Hildreth, 1997; Rosi et al., 2001), physical models (Neri et al., 1988; Veitch and Woods, 2000; Kaminski and Jaupart, 2001) and laboratory experiments (Carey et al., 1988) converge at defining a new eruptive regime transitional between the fully convective and the fully collapsing end -members. Buoyant columns and density currents are contemporaneously fed in the transitional dynamic regime and fall beds are intercalated with the density current deposits in the area invested by them. The sedimentological analysis of the well exposed 800yr B.P. plinian eruption of the volcano Quilotoa (Ecuador) enabled us to i) recognize a gradual evolution of the eruptive regime, ii) characterize the fall and density current deposits emplaced during the transitional regime. The eruptive activity began with at least two phreatic explosions and the effusion of a small volume lava dome. Eruptive behaviour then switched to explosive and fed a purely convective column that accumulated a reverse graded pumice fall while rising up to an height of 30 km. A small volume, diluted and slow density current (S1 current) was emplaced in the proximal SW sector just before the column reached its maximum height. Two group s of more voluminous and faster intra-plinian density currents (S2 and S3 currents) were subsequently emplaced contemporaneously with the accumulation of the lower and upper part respectively of a normal graded pumice fall bed. S2 and S3 currents were radially distributed around the crater and deposited bedded layers with facies of decreasing energy when moving away from the crater. Massive beds of small volume were emplaced only i) inside the proximal valley channel near the topography break in slope, ii) outside the valley channel in medial area where the currents impinged against relieves. A thick sequence of pyroclastic flow deposits (S4 currents) accumulated in the valley channels around

  16. Management of Large Erupting Complex Odontoma in Maxilla

    Murphy, Colm; O'Connell, John Edward; Cotter, Edward; Kearns, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    We present the unusual case of a large complex odontoma erupting in the maxilla. Odontomas are benign developmental tumours of odontogenic origin. They are characterized by slow growth and nonaggressive behaviour. Complex odontomas, which erupt, are rare. They are usually asymptomatic and are identified on routine radiograph but may present with erosion into the oral cavity with subsequent cellulitis and facial asymmetry. This present paper describes the presentation and management of an erupting complex odontoma, occupying the maxillary sinus with extension to the infraorbital rim. We also discuss various surgical approaches used to access this anatomic area. PMID:25580339

  17. Magnetic Field Restructuring Associated with Two Successive Solar Eruptions

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-01-01

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity, and ...

  18. Dike mechanism of the Etna May 2008 eruption

    Aloisi, M.; Bonaccorso, A.; Cannavò, F.; Mattia, M.; Gambino, S.; Puglisi, G.; Boschi, E.

    2009-04-01

    After a recharge phase begun in 2007, on May 13, 2008 a new eruption started on Mt. Etna volcano. The final intrusion was very fast, accompanied by a violent seismic swarm and marked ground deformation changes recorded at the permanent tilt and GPS networks. The frame of the eruptive event and the associated phenomena (earthquakes, deformation, lava emission, fracture propagation) generated great concern and fears that the eruptive fractures might propagate dangerously downslope. We modelled the ground deformation pattern and inferred a double phase dike which explains both the mechanism of the vertical intrusion and also the attempt of the dike to propagate in the northern sector in its shallower part. We show that the 2008 intrusion was characterized by a mechanism which is new and different to the ones modelled in previous eruptions.

  19. Ubiquitous Solar Eruptions Driven by Magnetized Vortex Tubes

    Kitiashvili, I N; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

    2013-01-01

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruptions events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push surrounding material up, generating quasiperiodic shocks. Our simulations reveal a complicated high-speed flow patterns, and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. We found that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by the high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere, and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers.

  20. Steam explosions, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions -- what's in Yellowstone's future?

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Smith, Robert B.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Heasler, Henry

    2005-01-01

    Yellowstone, one of the world?s largest active volcanic systems, has produced several giant volcanic eruptions in the past few million years, as well as many smaller eruptions and steam explosions. Although no eruptions of lava or volcanic ash have occurred for many thousands of years, future eruptions are likely. In the next few hundred years, hazards will most probably be limited to ongoing geyser and hot-spring activity, occasional steam explosions, and moderate to large earthquakes. To better understand Yellowstone?s volcano and earthquake hazards and to help protect the public, the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Utah, and Yellowstone National Park formed the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, which continuously monitors activity in the region.

  1. Smelters as Analogs for a Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain

    The distribution of trace radionuclides in secondary metal smelters provides an analog for spent fuel released from packages during a volcanic eruption. The fraction of the inventory of a radionuclide that would be released into the air in a volcanic eruption is called the dust partitioning factor. In consequence analyses of a volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, a value of one has been used for this parameter for all elements. This value is too high for the refractory elements. Reducing the dust partitioning factor for refractory elements to a value equal to the fraction of the magma that becomes ash would still yield conservative estimates of how much radioactivity would be released in an eruption

  2. Recent Developments of NEMO: Detection of Solar Eruptions Characteristics

    Podladchikova, Olena; Leontiev, Pavel; Van der Linden, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The recent developments in space instrumentation for solar observations and telemetry have caused the necessity of advanced pattern recognition tools for the different classes of solar events. The Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) of solar corona on-board SOHO spacecraft has uncovered a new class of eruptive events which are often identified as signatures of Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) initiations on solar disk. It is evident that a crucial task is the development of an automatic detection tool of CMEs precursors. The Novel EIT wave Machine Observing (NEMO) (http://sidc.be/nemo) code is an operational tool that detects automatically solar eruptions using EIT image sequences. NEMO applies techniques based on the general statistical properties of the underlying physical mechanisms of eruptive events on the solar disc. In this work, the most recent updates of NEMO code - that have resulted to the increase of the recognition efficiency of solar eruptions linked to CMEs - are presented. These updates pro...

  3. Eruption of Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount Saint Helens was the most destructive in the history of the United States. Mt. Saint Helens is located in southwest Washington in...

  4. Eruption Forecasting: Success and Surprise at Kasatochi and Okmok Volcanoes

    Prejean, S.; Power, J.; Brodsky, E.

    2008-12-01

    In the summer of 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) successfully forecast eruption at an unmonitored volcano, Kasatochi, and was unable to forecast eruption at a well monitored volcano, Okmok. We use these case studies to explore the limitations and opportunities of seismically monitored and unmonitored systems and to evaluate situations when we can expect to succeed and when we must expect to fail in eruption forecasting. Challenges in forecasting eruptions include interpreting seismicity in context of volcanic history, developing a firm understanding of distance scales over which pre- and co-eruptive seismic signals are observed, and improving our ability to discriminate processes causing tremor. Kasatochi Volcano is a 3 km wide island in the central Aleutian Islands with no confirmed historical activity. Little is known about the eruptive history of the volcano. It was not considered an immediate threat until 3 days prior to eruption. A report of ground shaking by a biology field crew on the island on August 4 was the first indication of unrest. On August 6 a vigorous seismic swarm became apparent on the nearest seismic stations 40 km distant. The aviation color code/volcano alert level at Kasatochi was increased to Yellow/Advisory in response to increasing magnitude and frequency of earthquakes. The color code/alert level was increased to Orange/Watch on August 7 when volcanic tremor was observed in the wake of the largest earthquake in the sequence, a M 5.6. Three hours after the onset of volcanic tremor, eruption was confirmed by satellite data and the color code/alert level increased to Red/Warning. Eruption forecasting was possible only due to the exceptionally large moment release of pre-eruptive seismicity. The key challenge in evaluating the situation was distinguishing between tectonic activity and a volcanic swarm. It is likely there were weeks to months of precursory seismicity, however little instrumental record exists due to the lack of a

  5. Helical Kink Instability in a Confined Solar Eruption

    Hassanin, Alshaimaa

    2016-01-01

    A model for strongly writhing confined solar eruptions suggests an origin in the helical kink instability of a coronal flux rope which remains stable against the torus instability. This model is tested against the well observed filament eruption on 2002 May 27 in a parametric MHD simulation study which comprises all phases of the event. Good agreement with the essential observed properties is obtained. These include the confinement, terminal height, writhing, distortion, and dissolution of the filament, and the flare loops. The agreement is robust against variations in a representative range of parameter space. Careful comparisons with the observation data constrain the ratio of the external toroidal and poloidal field components to $B_\\mathrm{et}/B_\\mathrm{ep}\\approx1$ and the initial flux rope twist to $\\Phi\\approx4\\pi$. Different from ejective eruptions, two distinct phases of strong magnetic reconnection can occur. First, the erupting flux is cut by reconnection with overlying flux in the helical current ...

  6. Subaqueous explosive eruption and welding of pyroclastic deposits.

    Kokelaar, P; Busby, C

    1992-07-10

    Silicic tuffs infilling an ancient submarine caldera, at Mineral King in California, show microscopic fabrics indicative of welding of glass shards and pumice at temperatures >500 degrees C. The occurrence indicates that subaqueous explosive eruption and emplacement of pyroclastic materials can occur without substantial admixture of the ambient water, which would cause chilling. Intracaldera progressive aggradation of pumice and ash from a thick, fast-moving pyroclastic flow occurred during a short-lived explosive eruption of approximately 26 cubic kilometers of magma in water >/=150 meters deep. The thickness, high velocity, and abundant fine material of the erupted gas-solids mixture prevented substantial incorporation of ambient water into the flow. Stripping of pyroclasts from upper surfaces of subaqueous pyroclastic flows in general, both above the vent and along any flow path, may be the main process giving rise to buoyant-convective subaqueous eruption columns and attendant fallout deposits. PMID:17794750

  7. Forecasting the duration of volcanic eruptions: an empirical probabilistic model

    Gunn, L. S.; Blake, S.; Jones, M. C.; Rymer, H.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to forecast future volcanic eruption durations would greatly benefit emergency response planning prior to and during a volcanic crises. This paper introduces a probabilistic model to forecast the duration of future and on-going eruptions. The model fits theoretical distributions to observed duration data and relies on past eruptions being a good indicator of future activity. A dataset of historical Mt. Etna flank eruptions is presented and used to demonstrate the model. The data have been compiled through critical examination of existing literature along with careful consideration of uncertainties on reported eruption start and end dates between the years 1300 AD and 2010. Data following 1600 is considered to be reliable and free of reporting biases. The distribution of eruption duration between the years 1600 and 1669 is found to be statistically different from that following it and the forecasting model is run on two datasets of Mt. Etna flank eruption durations: 1600-2010 and 1670-2010. Each dataset is modelled using a log-logistic distribution with parameter values found by maximum likelihood estimation. Survivor function statistics are applied to the model distributions to forecast (a) the probability of an eruption exceeding a given duration, (b) the probability of an eruption that has already lasted a particular number of days exceeding a given total duration and (c) the duration with a given probability of being exceeded. Results show that excluding the 1600-1670 data has little effect on the forecasting model result, especially where short durations are involved. By assigning the terms `likely' and `unlikely' to probabilities of 66 % or more and 33 % or less, respectively, the forecasting model based on the 1600-2010 dataset indicates that a future flank eruption on Mt. Etna would be likely to exceed 20 days (± 7 days) but unlikely to exceed 86 days (± 29 days). This approach can easily be adapted for use on other highly active, well

  8. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions

    Fei Liu; Jing Chai; Bin Wang; Jian Liu; Xiao Zhang; Zhiyuan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Comm...

  9. Particle-water heat transfer during explosive volcanic eruptions

    Woodcock, D. C.; Gilbert, Jennie; Lane, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal interaction between volcanic particles and water during explosive eruptions has been quantified using a numerical heat transfer model for spherical particles. The model couples intraparticle conduction with heat transfer from the particle surface by boiling water in order to explore heat loss with time for a range of particle diameters. The results are combined with estimates of particle settling times to provide insight into heat removal during eruption from samples of volcanic parti...

  10. A case of colistin-induced fixed drug eruption

    İsmail Necati Hakyemez; Abdulkadir Küçükbayrak; Aslıhan Burcu Yıkılgan; Elif Sultan Bolaç; Nebil Yıldız; Çetin Boran; Hayrettin Akdeniz

    2013-01-01

    Several medicines, especially antimicrobials, play a rolein the etiology of fixed drug eruption (FDE). The clinicalmanifestation is quite typical for a drug-induced reaction.FDE which developed in an 83-year-old male patientwho has been administered colistin due to Acinetobacterpneumonia is presented here since it is very rarely seen.Therefore colistin should also be considered in the differentialdiagnosis of FDE. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3):374-376Key words: Fixed drug eruption, etiology, ...

  11. Recurrent patterns in fluid geochemistry data prior to phreatic eruptions

    Rouwet, Dmitri; Sandri, Laura; Todesco, Micol; Tonini, Roberto; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Diliberto, Iole Serena

    2016-04-01

    Not all volcanic eruptions are magma-driven: the sudden evaporation and expansion of heated groundwater may cause phreatic eruptions, where the magma involvement is absent or negligible. Active crater lakes top some of the volcanoes prone to phreatic activity. This kind of eruption may occur suddenly, and without clear warning: on September 27, 2014 a phreatic eruption of Ontake, Japan, occurred without timely precursors, killing 57 tourists near the volcano summit. Phreatic eruptions can thus be as fatal as higher VEI events, due to the lack of recognised precursory signals, and because of their explosive and violent nature. In this study, we tackle the challenge of recognising precursors to phreatic eruptions, by analysing the records of two "phreatically" active volcanoes in Costa Rica, i.e. Poás and Turrialba, respectively with and without a crater lake. These volcanoes cover a wide range of time scales in eruptive behaviour, possibly culminating into magmatic activity, and have a long-term multi-parameter dataset mostly describing fluid geochemistry. Such dataset is suitable for being analysed by objective pattern recognition techniques, in search for recurrent schemes. The aim is to verify the existence and nature of potential precursory patterns, which will improve our understanding of phreatic events, and allow the assessment of the associated hazard at other volcanoes, such as Campi Flegrei or Vulcano, in Italy. Quantitative forecast of phreatic activity will be performed with BET_UNREST, a Bayesian Event Tree tool recently developed within the framework of FP7 EU VUELCO project. The study will combine the analysis of fluid geochemistry data with pattern recognition and phreatic eruption forecast on medium and short-term. The study will also provide interesting hints on the features that promote or hinder phreatic activity in volcanoes that host well-developed hydrothermal circulation.

  12. Can Volcanic Eruptions Produce Ice Ages or Mass Extinctions?

    Robock, A.; Ammann, C.; Oman, L.; Shindell, D.; Stenchikov, G.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are well known to be important causes of interannual and even interdecadal climate change. But can very large eruptions initiate ice ages, as has been suggested for the Toba eruption ~74,000 years ago? Could flood basalt eruptions, such as the Deccan Traps 65,000,000 years ago or the Siberian Traps 250,000,000 years ago, have produced climate change large enough and long-lasting enough, along with other atmospheric pollution, to have caused mass extinctions? Here we conduct climate model simulations of the effects of a volcanic eruption 100 times larger than the 1991 Pinatubo eruption as a test of the climatic effects of Toba. We use two different state-of-the-art climate models, CCSM 3.0 from the National Center for Atmospheric Research and ModelE from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, to investigate the dependence of the results on the climate model used. We find that although the "Toba" eruption produces very large global cooling for a couple years, of up to 10°C, the volcanic aerosols leave the atmosphere quickly and the climate largely recovers in a decade. We investigated the mechanism of vegetation response to the cold and dark, but this mechanism was not strong enough to prolong the response enough to allow ice sheets to grow. On the other hand, continuous emissions from massive flood basalt eruptions lasting several decades could make it so cold and dark at the Earth's surface that many species would find it hard to survive. On longer time scales, however, continued large greenhouse gas emissions would have a significant warming effect. With good estimates of the amount and timing of gas and particle emissions into the atmosphere, we have the climate modeling tools to calculate their impact on climate.

  13. Fixed drug eruptions to ciprofloxacin - a case report

    Rama R. Bhosale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruptions (FDE are common adverse drug reactions and they recur at the same site with each exposure to a particular drug. Drugs inducing FDE are usually those taken intermittently. Most common drugs causing fixed drug eruptions are antibiotics and analgesics. Here, we report a case of FDE to ciprofloxacin which was used in treatment of upper respiratory tract infection. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(3.000: 221-222

  14. Risk factors for seabather's eruption: a prospective cohort study.

    Kumar, S.; Hlady, W. G.; Malecki, J M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A prospective cohort study was performed to identify risk factors for seabather's eruption. METHODS: Study participants were recruited at four beaches in Palm Beach County, Florida, during three weekends of May and June 1993. Participants were interviewed by telephone after 48 hours regarding medical history, beach activities, development of rashes, and use of possible preventive measures. RESULTS: Seabather's eruption, defined by the occurrence of a rash within two days of exposur...

  15. The Chronology of Third Molar Eruption in the Croatian Population

    Brkić, Hrvoje; Vodanović, Marin; Dumančić, Jelena; Lovrić, Željka; Čuković-Bagić, Ivana; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Dental age estimation is common in orthodontics, paedodontics, paleodontology and forensic dentistry. The aim of this study was to assess chronological course of eruptive developmental phases of third molar and to establish parameters for the Croatian population. Sample of this study consisted of 1249 orthopantomograms of 530 (42.4%) male and 719 (57.6%) female subjects, aged 10 to 25 years. Eruptive phases were classified in 4 stages. No significant sex difference was found. Esta...

  16. Tracking effusive eruptions in near real-time: 2014 Fogo (Cape Verde) eruption

    Laiolo, Marco; Coppola, Diego; Cigolini, Corrado; Faria, Bruno; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The Fogo volcano (Cape Verde), after almost 20 years of inactivity, entered in a new effusive phase on November 23, 2014. The eruption occurred on the Fogo's Pico cone inside the Cha Caldera where the lava flow caused the evacuation of the Bangaeira and Portela inhabitants. To track the thermal evolution of this eruption, we extended the near-real time processing of the MIROVA (Middle InfraRed Observation of Volcanic Activity) algorithm to Fogo island. MIROVA is a hot-spot detection system based on the analysis of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data that provide thermal maps (1 km resolution) and radiant flux estimates, in near real time (1-4 hours from satellite overpass). Thermal output retrieved by MIROVA can be converted into time-average lava discharge rates allowing the identification of ongoing effusive trends. During the first 45 days of activity the eruption shows a waxing-waning trend typical of pressurized closed systems. Preliminary results indicate that MIROVA is particularly efficient to provide near real-time data that are critical for better assessing volcanic risk, and to help the decision-makers during volcanic crisis. Data requested by the UNDAC (United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination) team operating in Cape Verde, through the Emergency Response Coordination Center (ERCC) of the European Mechanism of Civil Protection, were provided in near real-time via web to the National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics and to National Civil Protection. Once compared to seismological data, information provided by MIROVA have been successfully used during the volcanic crisis.

  17. Challenges modeling clastic eruptions: applications to the Lusi mud eruption, East Java, Indonesia.

    Collignon, Marine; Schmid, Daniel; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    Clastic eruptions involve brecciation and transport of the hosting rocks by ascent fluids (gas and/or liquids), resulting in a mixture of rock clasts and fluids (i.e. mud breccia). This kind of eruptions is often associated with geological features such as mud volcanoes, hydrothermal vents or more generically with piercement structures. Over the past decades, several numerical models, often based on those used in volcanology, have been employed to better understand the behavior of such clastics systems. However, modeling multiphase flow is challenging, and therefore most of the models are considering only one phase flow. Many chemical, mechanical and physical aspects remain still poorly understood. In particular, the rheology of the fluid is one of the most important aspects, but also the most difficult to characterize. Experimental flow curves can be obtained on the finest fraction, but coarser particles (> 1mm) are usually neglected. While these experimental measurements usually work well on magma, they are much more difficult to perform when clay minerals are involved. As an initial step, we use analytical and simplified numerical models (flow in a pipe) to better understand the flow dynamics within a main conduit connected to an overpressured reservoir. The 2D numerical model solves the stokes equations, discretized on a finite element mesh. The solid phase is treated as rigid particles in suspension in the liquid. The gaseous phase (methane and carbon dioxide) is treated in an analytical manner using the equations of state of the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CH4 systems. Here, we present an overview of the state-of-the-art in modeling clastic eruptions as well as the limitations and challenges of such numerical models. We also discuss the challenges associated to the specific case of Lusi. In particular the difficulty to characterize the mud properties and the technical challenges associated with the acquisition of new data and development of more sophisticated models

  18. Modulations of stratospheric ozone by volcanic eruptions

    Blanchette, Christian; Mcconnell, John C.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a time series of aerosol surface based on the measurements of Hofmann to investigate the modulation of total column ozone caused by the perturbation to gas phase chemistry by the reaction N2O5(gas) + H2O(aero) yields 2HNO3(gas) on the surface of stratospheric aerosols. We have tested a range of values for its reaction probability, gamma = 0.02, 0.13, and 0.26 which we compared to unperturbed homogeneous chemistry. Our analysis spans a period from Jan. 1974 to Oct. 1994. The results suggest that if lower values of gamma are the norm then we would expect larger ozone losses for highly enhanced aerosol content that for larger values of gamma. The ozone layer is more sensitive to the magnitude of the reaction probability under background conditions than during volcanically active periods. For most conditions, the conversion of NO2 to HNO3 is saturated for reaction probability in the range of laboratory measurements, but is only absolutely saturated following major volcanic eruptions when the heterogeneous loss dominates the losses of N2O5. The ozone loss due to this heterogeneous reaction increases with the increasing chlorine load. Total ozone losses calculated are comparable to ozone losses reported from TOMS and Dobson data.

  19. The mysterious eruption of V838 Mon

    Munari, U; Kiyota, S; Laney, D; Marang, F; Zwitter, T; Corradi, R L M; Desidera, S; Marrese, P M; Giro, E; Boschi, F; Schwartz, M B

    2002-01-01

    V838 Mon is marking one of the most mysterious stellar outbursts on record. The spectral energy distribution of the progenitor resembles an under-luminous F main sequence star (at V=15.6 mag), that erupted into a cool supergiant following a complex and multi-maxima lightcurve (peaking at V=6.7 mag). The outburst spectrum show BaII, LiI and lines of several s-elements, with wide P-Cyg profiles and a moderate and retracing emission in the Balmer lines. A light-echo discovered expanding around the object helped to constrain the distance (d=790+/-30 pc), providing M_V=+4.45 in quiescence and M_V=-4.35 at optical maximum (somewhat dependent on the still uncertain E(B-V)=0.5 reddening). The general outburst trend is toward lower temperatures and larger luminosities, and continuing so at the time of writing. The object properties conflict with a classification within already existing categories: the progenitor was not on a post-AGB track and thus the similarities with the born-again AGB stars FG Sge, V605 Aql and Sa...

  20. Solar Eruptive Events (SEE) 2020 Mission Concept

    Lin, R P; Krucker, S; Hudson, H; Hurford, G; Bandler, S; Christe, S; Davila, J; Dennis, B; Holman, G; Milligan, R; Shih, A Y; Kahler, S; Kontar, E; Wiedenbeck, M; Cirtain, J; Doschek, G; Share, G H; Vourlidas, A; Raymond, J; Smith, D M; McConnell, M; Emslie, G

    2013-01-01

    Major solar eruptive events (SEEs), consisting of both a large flare and a near simultaneous large fast coronal mass ejection (CME), are the most powerful explosions and also the most powerful and energetic particle accelerators in the solar system, producing solar energetic particles (SEPs) up to tens of GeV for ions and hundreds of MeV for electrons. The intense fluxes of escaping SEPs are a major hazard for humans in space and for spacecraft. Furthermore, the solar plasma ejected at high speed in the fast CME completely restructures the interplanetary medium (IPM) - major SEEs therefore produce the most extreme space weather in geospace, the interplanetary medium, and at other planets. Thus, understanding the flare/CME energy release process(es) and the related particle acceleration processes are major goals in Heliophysics. To make the next major breakthroughs, we propose a new mission concept, SEE 2020, a single spacecraft with a complement of advanced new instruments that focus directly on the coronal e...

  1. Ubiquitous Solar Eruptions Driven by Magnetized Vortex Tubes

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

  2. Volcanic eruptions on Io: Heat flow, resurfacing, and lava composition

    Blaney, Diana L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.

    1995-01-01

    We model an infrared outburst on Io as being due to a large, erupting lava flow which increased its area at a rate of 1.5 x 10(exp 5)/sq m and cooled from 1225 to 555 K over the 2.583-hr period of observation. The inferred effusion rate of 3 x 10(exp 5) cu m/sec for this eruption is very high, but is not unprece- dented on the Earth and is similar to the high eruption rates suggested for early lunar volcanism. Eruptions occur approxi- mately 6% of the time on Io. These eruptions provide ample resurfacing to explain Io's lack of impact craters. We suggest that the large total radiometric heat flow, 10(exp 14) W, and the size and temperature distribution of the thermal anomalies (McEwen et al. 1992; Veeder et al. 1994) can be accounted for by a series of silicate lava flows in various stages of cooling. We propose that the whole suite of Io's currently observed thermal anomalies was produced by multiple, high-eruptive-rate silicate flows within the past century.

  3. UBIQUITOUS SOLAR ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A., E-mail: irinasun@stanford.edu [Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

  4. Potential Hazards of Eruptions around the Tianchi Caldera Lake, China

    WEI Haiquan; HONG Hanjing; R.S.J. SPARKS; J.S. WALDER; HAN Bin

    2004-01-01

    Since the eruption of the Tianchi volcano about 1000 years ago, there have been at least 3 to 5 eruptions of small to moderate size. In addition, hazardous avalanches, rock falls and debris flows have occurred during periods between eruptions. A future eruption of the Tianchi volcano is likely to involve explosive interaction between magma and the caldera lake. The volume of erupted magma is almost in a range of 0.1-0.5 km3. Tephra fallout may damage agriculture in a large area near the volcano. If only 1% of the lake water were ejected during an eruption and then precipitated over an area of 200 km2, the average rainfall would be 100 mm. Moreover, lahars are likely to occur as both tephra and water ejected from the caldera lake fall onto flanks of the volcano. Rocks avalanching into the caldera lake also would bring about grave hazards because seiches would be triggered and lake water with the volume equal to that of the landslide would spill out of the existing breach in the caldera and cause flooding downstream.

  5. Volcanic pollution and climate: the 1783 Laki eruption

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1982-08-10

    The atmospheric impact of volcanic eruptions on the earth's climate is not simply related to the volume of erupted material, but relfects the chemistry of the magma, specifically the concentration of the volatile constituents SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S, and to a lesser extent Cl and F. Ice cores extracted by drilling reveal peak acidity values in the 1783 ice layer are higher than any others in the last thousand years and correspond to a global fallout of 100 x 10/sup 9/ kg of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ from the Laki eruption. Analyses indicate that the magma contained 800 to 1000 parts per million of S before eruption and that only 150 ppm were retained by the volcanic deposits, or 85% released to the atmosphere. Volcanoes deposit two types of aerosols - volcanic ash, which is so coarse it settles out of the atmosphere in a few days, and sulfates. Sulfates are mainly in the form of liquid H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ droplets which absorb incoming solar radiation and cause cooling at the earth's surface. The Laki event resulted in a two-hundredfold increase in atmospheric S loading over that which is usually emitted by volcanoes. The results from Laki indicate that the S content of the Magma and the erupted volume are the critical parameters in determining the impact of a volcanic eruption on climate. 19 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  6. Volcanic pollution and climate: The 1783 Laki eruption

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur

    The global temperature rise of 0.4°C in the past century is now generally attributed to the greenhouse effect, i.e., the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide through manmade pollution. Superimposed on this general warming trend are sharp temporary cooling events, usually 1 to 3 years in duration, that coincide with large volcanic eruptions. These events mark a massive natural pollution of the stratosphere, resulting in backscattering of solar radiation and cooling of the earth [Hansen et al., 1981]. The latest of these events was the 1963 eruption of Agung volcano on Bali Island that resulted in 0.2°C global cooling, whereas paradoxically the Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980 had no detectable effect [Robock, 1981], although of comparable magnitude. On the other hand, one of the most severe volcano-related climate effects in historical times was associated with a largely nonexplosive eruption that produced mostly lava and volcanic gases but little volcanic ash: the 1783 eruption of the Laki crater-row in Iceland [Thorarinsson, 1979]. Thus, although volcanism clearly affects climate, it appears that this effect is not simply related to the magnitude or the explosivity of the eruption, i.e., the production of volcanic ash, but rather to some other properties of the magma.

  7. High-Resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the sympathetic eruptions of two solar filaments side by side as observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. These two filaments start from the complex active region NOAA 12434 (north) and end in a large quiescent region (south). The corresponding SDO/HMI magnetic field observations suggest that the two small filaments are located above two different polarity inversion lines in the northern part. The SDO/AIA observations of the eruption show that these two filaments appear to merge into one in the southern quiescent region. The north-eastern filament starts eruption firstly, which is followed by the north-western filament eruption about 20 minutes later. Clear untwisting motions (i.e., signature of flux ropes) are observed in both filaments during the eruption. After the lifts off of the north-western filament, mini filaments are observed to emerge from the surface and rise up multiple times. The high-resolution observations reveal the fact that the filament is composed of multiple sections and multiple layers. The filament in the lower layer can merge into the upper layer, which leads to the increase of non-potentiality of the upper layer. Magnetic field models using the flux rope insertion method are also constructed in order to understand the complex magnetic configuration as well as the initiation and dynamics of the eruptions.

  8. Contracting and Erupting Components of Sigmoidal Active Regions

    Liu, Rui; Török, Tibor; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Haimin

    2012-01-01

    It is recently noted that solar eruptions can be associated with the contraction of coronal loops that are not involved in magnetic reconnection processes. In this paper, we investigate five coronal eruptions originating from four sigmoidal active regions, using high-cadence, high-resolution narrowband EUV images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO}). The magnitudes of the flares associated with the eruptions range from the GOES-class B to X. Owing to the high-sensitivity and broad temperature coverage of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO, we are able to identify both the contracting and erupting components of the eruptions: the former is observed in cold AIA channels as the contracting coronal loops overlying the elbows of the sigmoid, and the latter is preferentially observed in warm/hot AIA channels as an expanding bubble originating from the center of the sigmoid. The initiation of eruption always precedes the contraction, and in the energetically mild events (B and C flares), ...

  9. UBIQUITOUS SOLAR ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

  10. A subaqueous eruption model for shallow-water, small volume eruptions: Evidence from two Precambrian examples

    Mueller, Wulf U.

    Ancient, shallow-water, pyroclastic deposits are identified in the Paleoproterozoic Ketilidian Mobile belt, southeast Greenland at Kangerluluk and in the Neoproterozoic Gariep belt of Namibia in the Schakalsberg Mountains. The 1-30 m-thick tuff and lapilli tuff deposits are interpreted as eruption-fed density current deposits emanating from tephra jets that collapsed under subaqueous conditions due to water ingress. The presence of 1-10 mm diameter armoured lapilli, with a central vesicular lapillus or shard, suggests the existence of high velocity, gas, water vapour, and particle-rich tephra jets. A transition from a gas-steam supported tephra jet to a cold water-laden density current without an intermediate stage of storage and remobilization is inferred. Interpretation of a 5-15 m-thick lapilli tuff breccia further supports explosive subaqueous mechanisms. Pyroclasts in the lapilli tuff breccia are interpreted as bombs emplaced ballistically. Multiple bomb sags produced by the impact of rounded juvenile crystal-rich pyroclasts required a water-exclusion zone formed either by a continuous magma uprush or multiple jet activity occurring concurrently, rather than as isolated tephra jets. Intercalated density current deposits indicate uprush events of limited duration and their recurrence with rapid collapse after each pulse. A new subaqueous Surtseyan-type eruption model is proposed based on observations from these two Precambrian study areas.

  11. Potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    Miller, C. Dan

    1989-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the last 10,000 years. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State\\'s citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. The potentially more hazardous eruptions in the State are those that involve explosive eruption of large volumes of silicic magma. Such eruptions could occur at vents in as many as four areas in California. They could eject pumice high into the atmosphere above the volcano, produce destructive blasts, avalanches, or pyroclastic flows that reach distances of tens of kilometers from a vent, and produce mudflows and floods that reach to distances of hundreds of kilometers. Smaller eruptions produce similar, but less severe and less extensive, phenomena. Hazards are greatest close to a volcanic vent; the slopes on or near a volcano, and valleys leading away from it, are affected most often and most severely by such eruptions. In general, risk from volcanic phenomena decreases with increasing distance from a vent and, for most flowage processes, with increasing height above valley floors or fan surfaces. Tephra (ash) from explosive eruptions can affect wide areas downwind from a vent. In California, prevailing winds cause the 180-degree sector east of the volcano to be affected most often and most severely. Risk to life from ashfall decreases rapidly with increasing distance from a vent, but thin deposits of ash could disrupt communication

  12. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Dangerous, loud, sensational, exciting - natural hazards have what it takes to get students attention around the globe. Arising interest is the first step to develop an intrinsic motivation to learn about the matter and endure the hardships that students might discover along the way of the unit. Natural hazards thereby establish a close-knit connection between physical and anthropological geography through analyzing the hazardous event and its consequences for the people living in the affected area. Following a general principle of didactics we start searching right on our doorsteps to offer students the possibility to gain knowledge on the familiar and later transfer it to the unknown example. Even in Southwest Germany - a region that is rather known for its wine than its volcanic activity - we can find a potentially hazardous region. The "Laacher See" volcano (a caldera lake) in northern Rhineland-Palatinate is according to Prof. H.U. Schminke a "potentially active volcano" . Its activity can be proven by seismic activities, or experienced when visiting the lake's southeastern shore, where carbondioxid and sulphur gases from the underlying magma chamber still bubble up. The Laacher See is part of a range of volcanoes (classified from 'potentially active' to 'no longer active') of the East Eifel Volcanic Field. Precariously the Laacher See is located closely to the densely populated agglomerations of Cologne (NE, distance: 45 km) and the former capital Bonn (NE: 35km), as well as Koblenz (E: 24km) and the Rhine river. Apart from that, the towns of Andernach (E: 8km ± 30 000 inhabitants) and Mayen (SW: 11km ±20 000 inhabitants) and many smaller towns and villages are nearby due to economic reasons. The number of people affected by a possible eruption easily exceeds two million people considering the range as prime measurement. The underlying danger, as projected in a simulation presented by Prof. Schminke, is a lava stream running down the Brohltal valley

  13. Keck observations of eruptions on Io in 2003-2005

    de Pater, Imke; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Marchis, Franck

    2016-08-01

    We report observations of four energetic volcanic eruptions on Io: at Tupan Patera on UT 8 March 2003; Tung Yo Patera on UT 28 May 2004; Sui Jen Patera on UT 30 May 2004; and south of Babbar Patera on UT 31 May 2005. The Tung Yo, Sui Jen and south of Babbar Paterae eruptions are in locations where no activity had been seen before. Our observations were obtained at near-infrared wavelengths (1.2-4.7 μm) with the 10-m Keck telescope equipped with adaptive optics. We report single and two-temperature blackbody fits, as well as single-component and dual-component Io Flow Model (IFM) fits (Davies, 1996, Icarus, 124, 45-61) to all four eruptions where applicable. We use 2-μm and 5-μm radiant fluxes, the 2:5-μm radiant flux ratio, and radiant flux density of each thermal source to constrain the likely style of volcanic eruption. All eruptions are characterized by a high temperature IFM component (ranging from 1475 to ∼900 K) from a relatively small area (<1 km2 to several tens of km2), and a lower temperature component with a more extensive surface area. The relationship of the areas at the highest temperatures to the cooler, more extensive area is of particular importance in deriving eruption style. Model fits to the Sui Jen Patera data are strongly suggestive of lava fountaining, although not at a level consistent with a large "outburst" eruption. Activity at Tupan Patera suggests that the entire floor of the patera may have been resurfaced with silicate lava in 2003.

  14. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  15. Natural radioactivity in volcanic ash from Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    Last June 15, 1991, a major pyroclastic eruption occurred from Mt. Pinatubo volcano located in Zambales, Central Luzon. The radiological impact of this eruption was assessed based on the concentrations of the principal naturally occurring radionuclides observed in volcanic ash. The volcanic ash samples were collected from locations which are within 50-km radius of Mt. Pinatubo at various times after the eruption. The mean activity concentrations in Bq/kg wet weight of the natural radionuclides in volcanic ash were as follows: 12.6 for 238U, 14.0 for 232Th and 330 for 40K. These values are significantly higher than the mean activity concentrations of these radionuclides observed in topsoil in the same provinces before the eruption. This suggests that with the deposition of large quantities of volcanic ash and lahar in Central Luzon and concomitant topographic changes, the distribution and quantities of radionuclides which gave rise to terrestrial radiation may have also changed. Outdoor radon concentrations measured three days and later after the eruption were within normal background values. (auth.). 4 refs.; 5 tabs.; 1 fig

  16. Assessment of the atmospheric impact of volcanic eruptions

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1988-01-01

    The dominant global impact of volcanic activity is likely to be related to the effects of volcanic gases on the Earth's atmosphere. Volcanic gas emissions from individual volcanic arc eruptions are likely to cause increases in the stratospheric optical depth that result in surface landmass temperature decline of 2 to 3 K for less than a decade. Trachytic and intermediate magmas are much more effective in this regard than high-silica magmas, and may also lead to extensive ozone depletion due to effect of halogens and magmatic water. Given the assumed relationship between arc volcanism and subduction rate, and the relatively small variation in global spreading rates in the geologic record, it is unlikely that the rates of arc volcanism have varied greatly during the Cenozoic. Hotspot related basaltic fissure eruptions in the subaerial environment have a higher mass yield of sulfur, but lofting of the valcanic aerosol to levels above the tropopause is required for a climate impact. High-latitude events, such as the Laki 1783 eruption can easily penetrate the tropopause and enter the stratosphere, but formation of a stratospheric volcanic aerosol form low-latitude effusive basaltic eruptions is problematical, due to the elevated low-latitude tropopause. Due to the high sulfur content of hotspot-derived basaltic magmas, their very high mass eruption rates and the episodic behavior, hotspots must be regarded as potentially major modifiers of Earth's climate through the action of their volcanic volatiles on the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere.

  17. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-01

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do.

  18. Critical decay index at the onset of solar eruptions

    Zuccarello, F P; Gilchrist, S A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are topological structures consisting of twisted magnetic field lines that globally wrap around an axis. The torus instability model predicts that a magnetic flux rope of major radius $R$ undergoes an eruption when its axis reaches a location where the decay index $-d(\\ln B_{ex})/d(\\ln R)$ of the ambient magnetic field $B_{ex}$ is larger than a critical value. In the current-wire model, the critical value depends on the thickness and time-evolution of the current channel. We use magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate if the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is affected by the magnetic flux rope's internal current profile and/or by the particular pre-eruptive photospheric dynamics. The evolution of an asymmetric, bipolar active region is driven by applying different classes of photospheric motions. We find that the critical value of the decay index at the onset of the eruption is not significantly affected by either the pre-eruptive photospheric e...

  19. The August 2010 Phreatic Eruption of Mount Sinabung, North Sumatra

    Igan S. Sutawidjaja

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.155Mount Sinabung, located in Karo Regency, North Sumatra Province, is a strato volcano having four active craters. Since its latest eruption about 1,200 year ago, a phreatic eruption occurred on August 27th, 2010. The eruption took place in Crater-I, which was initiated by a greyish white plume and then followed by black plumes as high as 2000 m above the crater. Altered rock fragments and ash were erupted during this event. The altered rocks show a development of argillic alterations which was formed in the hydrothermal system in depth. The alteration zone is formed along the northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast trend across the three craters. All of the craters are actively discharging solfataric gases, of which sulphur deposits are resulted, and they have been quarried by the local people. The age of the latest magmatic eruption was dated by 14C method from the charcoal sample found in the pyroclastic flow deposits near Bekerah Village.

  20. Solar filament eruptions and their physical role in triggering CMEs

    Schmieder, Brigitte

    2012-07-01

    CMEs are due to physical phenomena that drive both, eruptions and flares in active regions. Eruptions/CMEs must be driven from initially force-free current-carrying magnetic field. Twisted flux ropes, sigmoids, current lanes and pattern in photospheric current maps show a clear evidence of currents parallel to the magnetic field. Eruptions occur starting from equilibriums , which have reached some instability threshold. Boundary motions related to magnetic flux emergence and shearing favour the increase of coronal currents leading to the large flares. On the other hand, during the rising solar cycle phase, filament eruptions are characterized by a gradual (slow) and weak acceleration and therefore not accompanied by significant flaring. The gradual acceleration is due to a rather shallow profile of the overlying magnetic field. As the solar cycle is progressing, the magnetic field increases and stronger flares may occur due to the diffusion of the magnetic field, then reducing the magnetic tension. The basic driving mechanism is the torus instability or loss of equilibrium in both types of eruptions.

  1. Reducing discrepancies in ground and satellite-observed eruption heights

    Tupper, Andrew; Wunderman, Rick

    2009-09-01

    The plume height represents a crucial piece of evidence about an eruption, feeding later assessment of its size, character, and potential impact, and feeding real-time warnings for aviation and ground-based populations. There have been many observed discrepancies between different observations of maximum plume height for the same eruption. A comparison of maximum daily height estimates of volcanic clouds over Indonesia and Papua New Guinea during 1982-2005 shows marked differences between ground and satellite estimates, and a general tendency towards lower height estimates from the ground. Without improvements in the quality of these estimates, reconciled among all available methods, warning systems will be less effective than they should be and the world's record of global volcanism will remain hard to quantify. Examination of particular cases suggests many possible reasons for the discrepancies. Consideration of the satellite and radar cloud observations for the 1991 Pinatubo eruptions shows that marked differences can exist even with apparently good observations. The problem can be understood largely as a sampling issue, as the most widely reported parameter, the maximum cloud height, is highly sensitive to the frequency of observation. Satellite and radar cloud heights also show a pronounced clumping near the height of the tropopause and relative lack of eruptions reaching only the mid-troposphere, reinforcing the importance of the tropopause in determining the eruption height in convectively unstable environments. To reduce the discrepancies between ground and satellite estimates, a number of formal collaboration measures between vulcanological, meteorological and aviation agencies are suggested.

  2. Preliminary impact assessment of effusive eruptions at Etna volcano

    Cappello, Annalisa; Michaud-Dubuy, Audrey; Branca, Stefano; De Beni, Emanuela; Del Negro, Ciro

    2016-04-01

    Lava flows are a recurring and widespread form of volcanic activity that threaten people and property around the world. The growing demographic congestion around volcanic structures increases the potential risks and costs that lava flows represent, and leads to a pressing need for faster and more accurate assessment of lava flow impact. To fully evaluate potential effects and losses that an effusive eruption may cause to society, property and environment, it is necessary to consider the hazard, the distribution of the exposed elements at stake and the associated vulnerability. Lava flow hazard assessment is at an advanced state, whereas comprehensive vulnerability assessment is lacking. Cataloguing and analyzing volcanic impacts provide insight on likely societal and physical vulnerabilities during future eruptions. Here we quantify the lava flow impact of two past main effusive eruptions of Etna volcano: the 1669, which is the biggest and destructive flank eruption to have occurred on Etna in historical time, and the 1981, lasting only 6 days, but characterized by an intense eruptive dynamics. Different elements at stake are considered, including population, hospitals, critical facilities, buildings of historic value, industrial infrastructures, gas and electricity networks, railways, roads, footways and finally land use. All these elements were combined with the 1669 and 1981 lava flow fields to quantify the social damage and economic loss.

  3. SDO/AIA observations of a partially erupting prominence

    We report an observation of a partially erupting prominence and its associated dynamical plasma processes based on observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The prominence first went through a slow rise (SR) phase followed by a fast rise (FR) phase. The SR phase began after a couple of small brightenings were seen toward the footpoints. When the prominence had transitioned from SR to FR, it had already become kinked. The prominence shows strong brightening at the central kink location during the start of FR. We interpret this as an internal magnetic reconnection occurring at a vertical current sheet forming between the two legs of the erupting prominence (flux rope). The brightening at the central kink location is seen in all EUV channels of AIA. The contributions of differential emission at higher temperatures are larger compared to that for typical coronal temperatures supporting a reconnection scenario at the central kink location. The plasma above the brightening location is ejected as a hot plasmoid-like structure embedded in a coronal mass ejection, and those below the brightening move down in the form of blobs moving toward the Sun's surface. The unique time resolution of the AIA has allowed these eruptive aspects, including SR-to-FR, kinking, central current sheet formation, plasmoid-like eruption, and filament 'splitting', to be observed in a single event, providing strong and comprehensive evidence in favor of the model of partially erupting flux ropes.

  4. Immune sensitization against epidermal antigens in polymorphous light eruption

    Gonzalez-Amaro, R.; Baranda, L.; Salazar-Gonzalez, J.F.; Abud-Mendoza, C.; Moncada, B. (Univ. of San Luis Potosi (Mexico))

    1991-01-01

    To get further insight into the pathogenesis of polymorphous light eruption, we studied nine patients with polymorphous light eruption and six healthy persons. Two skin biopsy specimens were obtained from each person, one from previously ultraviolet light-irradiated skin and another one from unirradiated skin. An epidermal cell suspension, skin homogenate, or both were prepared from each specimen. Autologous cultures were made with peripheral blood mononuclear cells combined with irradiated or unirradiated skin homogenate and peripheral blood mononuclear cells combined with irradiated or unirradiated epidermal cell suspension. Cell proliferation was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation assay. The response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to unirradiated epidermal cells or unirradiated skin homogenate was similar in both patients and controls. However, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with polymorphous light eruption showed a significantly increased proliferative response to both irradiated epidermal cells and irradiated skin homogenate. Our results indicate that ultraviolet light increases the stimulatory capability of polymorphous light eruption epidermal cells in a unidirectional mixed culture with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This suggests that an immune sensitization against autologous ultraviolet light-modified skin antigens occurs in polymorphous light eruption.

  5. Immune sensitization against epidermal antigens in polymorphous light eruption

    To get further insight into the pathogenesis of polymorphous light eruption, we studied nine patients with polymorphous light eruption and six healthy persons. Two skin biopsy specimens were obtained from each person, one from previously ultraviolet light-irradiated skin and another one from unirradiated skin. An epidermal cell suspension, skin homogenate, or both were prepared from each specimen. Autologous cultures were made with peripheral blood mononuclear cells combined with irradiated or unirradiated skin homogenate and peripheral blood mononuclear cells combined with irradiated or unirradiated epidermal cell suspension. Cell proliferation was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation assay. The response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to unirradiated epidermal cells or unirradiated skin homogenate was similar in both patients and controls. However, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with polymorphous light eruption showed a significantly increased proliferative response to both irradiated epidermal cells and irradiated skin homogenate. Our results indicate that ultraviolet light increases the stimulatory capability of polymorphous light eruption epidermal cells in a unidirectional mixed culture with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This suggests that an immune sensitization against autologous ultraviolet light-modified skin antigens occurs in polymorphous light eruption

  6. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions on 2015 March 15

    Wang, Rui; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for ...

  7. The June 2014 eruption at Piton de la Fournaise: Robust methods developed for monitoring challenging eruptive processes

    Villeneuve, N.; Ferrazzini, V.; Di Muro, A.; Peltier, A.; Beauducel, F.; Roult, G. C.; Lecocq, T.; Brenguier, F.; Vlastelic, I.; Gurioli, L.; Guyard, S.; Catry, T.; Froger, J. L.; Coppola, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Favalli, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Liuzzo, M.; Giudice, G.; Boissier, P.; Brunet, C.; Catherine, P.; Fontaine, F. J.; Henriette, L.; Lauret, F.; Riviere, A.; Kowalski, P.

    2014-12-01

    After almost 3.5 years of quiescence, Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) produced a small summit eruption on 20 June 2014 at 21:35 (GMT). The eruption lasted 20 hours and was preceded by: i) onset of deep eccentric seismicity (15-20 km bsl; 9 km NW of the volcano summit) in March and April 2014; ii) enhanced CO2 soil flux along the NW rift zone; iii) increase in the number and energy of shallow (<1.5 km asl) VT events. The increase in VT events occurred on 9 June. Their signature, and shallow location, was not characteristic of an eruptive crisis. However, at 20:06 on 20/06 their character changed. This was 74 minutes before the onset of tremor. Deformations then began at 20:20. Since 2007, PdF has emitted small magma volumes (<3 Mm3) in events preceded by weak and short precursory phases. To respond to this challenging activity style, new monitoring methods were deployed at OVPF. While the JERK and MSNoise methods were developed for processing of seismic data, borehole tiltmeters and permanent monitoring of summit gas emissions, plus CO2 soil flux, were used to track precursory activity. JERK, based on an analysis of the acceleration slope of a broad-band seismometer data, allowed advanced notice of the new eruption by 50 minutes. MSNoise, based on seismic velocity determination, showed a significant decrease 7 days before the eruption. These signals were coupled with change in summit fumarole composition. Remote sensing allowed the following syn-eruptive observations: - INSAR confirmed measurements made by the OVPF geodetic network, showing that deformation was localized around the eruptive fissures; - A SPOT5 image acquired at 05:41 on 21/06 allowed definition of the flow field area (194 500 m2); - A MODIS image acquired at 06:35 on 21/06 gave a lava discharge rate of 6.9±2.8 m3 s-1, giving an erupted volume of 0.3 and 0.4 Mm3. - This rate was used with the DOWNFLOW and FLOWGO models, calibrated with the textural data from Piton's 2010 lava, to run lava flow

  8. Analysis of noise-induced eruptions in a geyser model

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V.; Bashkirtseva, Irina A.; Ryashko, Lev B.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by important geophysical applications we study a non-linear model of geyser dynamics under the influence of external stochastic forcing. It is shown that the deterministic dynamics is substantially dependent on system parameters leading to the following evolutionary scenaria: (i) oscillations near a stable equilibrium and a transient tendency of the phase trajectories to a spiral sink or a stable node (pre-eruption regime), and (ii) fast escape from equilibrium (eruption regime). Even a small noise changes the system dynamics drastically. Namely, a low-intensity noise generates the small amplitude stochastic oscillations in the regions adjoining to the stable equilibrium point. A small buildup of noise intensity throws the system over its separatrix and leads to eruption. The role of the friction coefficient and relative pressure in the deterministic and stochastic dynamics is studied by direct numerical simulations and stochastic sensitivity functions technique.

  9. A segmental neurofibromatosis case with eruptive seborrheic keratoses.

    Takci, Zennure; Simsek, Gulcin Guler; Tekin, Ozlem

    2012-09-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis (SNF) is a rare variant of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 characterized by a restricted distribution of cafe-au-lait macules, and/or neurofibromas, and rarely freckling to a single dermatomal segment. Patients with NF type 1 have an associated increased risk for benign or malignant tumours. The prevalence of typical NF type 1 complications including malignancies in SNF is much lower than the generalized form. Seborrheic keratosis is one of the more common benign epidermal tumour which can be a paraneoplastic syndrome when it arises with an eruptive appearance. To our knowledge in the literature no case of SNF associated with eruptive seborrheic keratoses has been defined. We report the case of a man, aged 51, who had SNF and abruptly developed eruptive seborrheic keratoses. PMID:23139984

  10. Observation of Low Level Heating in an Erupting Prominence

    Kucera, Therese A.

    2007-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of low level heating in an erupting prominence observed in the UV and EUV over a wide range of temperatures and wavelengths by SOHO's SUMER instrument, TRACE and also in H-alpha by the Yunnan Astronomical Observatory. The eruption occurred on 2004 April 30. The heating is relatively mild, leading only to the ionization of neutral hydrogen and probably helium. It is also localized, occurring along the bottom edge of the erupting prominence and in a kink-like feature in the prominence. The heating is revealed as a decrease in the Lyman absorption. This decrease results in an apparent increase in emission in all the lines observed by SUMER, especially those formed at temperatures -1 0A5. However, this is due to the disappearance of cooler absorbing material in the prominence rather than an increase in these higher temperature species.

  11. Acetaminophen-induced cellulitis-like fixed drug eruption

    Neila Fathallah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic drug. Its adverse reactions are rare but severe. An 89-year-old man developed an indurated edematous and erythematous plaque on his left arm 1 day after acetaminophen ingestion. Cellulitis was suspected and antibiotictherapy was started but there was no improvement of the rash; there was a spectacular extension of the lesion with occurrence of flaccid vesicles and blisters in the affected sites. The diagnosis of generalized-bullous-fixed drug eruption induced by acetaminophen was considered especially with a reported history of a previous milder reaction occurring in the same site. Acetaminophen was withdrawn and the rash improved significantly. According to the Naranjo probability scale, the eruption experienced by the patient was probably due to acetaminophen. Clinicians should be aware of the ability of acetaminophen to induce fixed drug eruption that may clinically take several aspects and may be misdiagnosed.

  12. Rosacea-like eruption due to topical pimecrolimus.

    El-Heis, S; Buckley, D A

    2015-05-01

    Topical calcineurin inhibitors have been used outside their approved indications for a number of conditions, including topical steroid-induced rosacea. However, tacrolimus ointment itself has been reported to trigger rosacea in a small number of cases. We report a case of a rosacea-like eruption in a 39-year-old woman occurring after the use of pimecrolimus cream for 12 months for atopic dermatitis. Withdrawal of pimecrolimus combined with treatment with oral lymecycline, topical metronidazole, and an emollient resulted in resolution of the eruption. There have been 5 previously reported cases of a topical pimecrolimus-induced rosacea-like eruption suggesting that this rare side-effect may be a class effect of all topical calcineurin inhibitors. Dermatologists prescribing these drugs should be aware of this uncommon complication and may wish to warn patients of its occurrence as a potential side-effect when using topical calcineurin inhibitors in facial skin in adults. PMID:26295863

  13. Greenland ice core evidence of the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption

    C. Barbante

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic tephra are independent age horizons and can synchronize strata of various paleoclimate records including ice and sediment cores. The Holocene section of the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP ice core is dated by multi-parameter annual layer counting, and contains peaks in acidity, SO42− and microparticle concentrations at a depth of 429.1 to 429.3 m, which have not previously been definitively ascribed to a volcanic eruption. Here, we identify tephra particles and determine that volcanic shards extracted from a depth of 429.3 m in the GRIP ice core are likely due to the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption. The chemical composition of the tephra particles is consistent with the K-phonolitic composition of the Vesuvius juvenile ejecta and differs from the chemical composition of other major eruptions (≥ VEI 4 between 50–100 AD.

  14. Vulcanian explosions: precursory and eruptive signatures from a multiparameteric perspective

    Gottsmann, J.; De Angelis, S.; Fournier, N.; Sacks, S. I.; Van Camp, M. J.; Linde, A. T.; Ripepe, M.

    2012-12-01

    Vulcanian explosions: precursory and eruptive signatures from a multiparameteric perspective Vulcanian eruptions form a continuum ranging from the weaker Strombolian-type to violent sub-Plinian activity. They are short-lived (tens of seconds to tens of minutes) events commonly associated with a Volcanic Eruption Index (VEI) of 2-3. Extrusion of viscous magma and the formation of a lava dome is often interspersed by short-lived vigorous (Vulcanian) explosions. The causes for and the timing of the transition from effusive to explosive activity during dome formation are poorly understood and forecasting this transition remains a challenge. Previous investigations have pointed towards pressure sources at shallow levels in volcanic conduits, which ultimately fuel Vulcanian explosions. Here, we describe and interpret a robust and unique multi-parameter data set documenting the subsurface processes associated with Vulcanian explosions at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat. We show that explosion priming can be driven by processes in the shallow or the deep magmatic system. The geophysical constraints on the eruption dynamics are consitent with the geological evidence of eruptive products. One geophysical signature is related exclusively to shallow dynamics including conduit destabilisation, syn-eruptive decompression and magma fragmentation, conduit emptying and expulsion of juvenile pumice. By contrast, another explosion was triggered by unprecedented sudden pressurisation of the entire plumbing system from depths of about 10 km resulting in the partial failure of the dome carapace, a violent cannon-like explosion, propagation of pressure waves and pronounced ballistic ejection of dome fragments. The timescale for explosion precursors is on the order of few minutes for both types of explosions, however, the precursory geophysical signatures are indicative of the nature of ensuing explosions. The short precursory phases characterise Vulcanian explosions as freak events

  15. INSIGHTS INTO FILAMENT ERUPTION ONSET FROM SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY OBSERVATIONS

    We examine the buildup to and onset of an active region filament confined eruption of 2010 May 12, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Array and line-of-sight magnetic data from the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. Over the hour preceding eruption the filament undergoes a slow rise averaging ∼3 km s-1, with a step-like trajectory. Accompanying a final rise step ∼20 minutes prior to eruption is a transient preflare brightening, occurring on loops rooted near the site where magnetic field had canceled over the previous 20 hr. Flow-type motions of the filament are relatively smooth with speeds ∼50 km s-1 prior to the preflare brightening and appear more helical, with speeds ∼50-100 km s-1, after that brightening. After a final plateau in the filament's rise, its rapid eruption begins, and concurrently an outer shell 'cocoon' of the filament material increases in emission in hot EUV lines, consistent with heating in a newly formed magnetic flux rope. The main flare brightenings start ∼5 minutes after eruption onset. The main flare arcade begins between the legs of an envelope-arcade loop that is nearly orthogonal to the filament, suggesting that the flare results from reconnection among the legs of that loop. This progress of events is broadly consistent with flux cancellation leading to formation of a helical flux rope that subsequently erupts due to onset of a magnetic instability and/or runaway tether cutting.

  16. Quaternary Eruptions of the Mono-Inyo Craters, California

    Bursik, M. I.; Pouget, S.; Mangan, M.; Marcaida, M.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The eruptive products of the Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain include the tephra and associated volcanic rocks of Black Point, islands of Mono Lake, Mono Craters, Inyo Craters, late eruptions of Mammoth Mountain and Red Cones. Most of the eruptions were explosive, and generated numerous pyroclastic flows, surges and falls as well as the prominent domes and lava flows that now cover vents. The eruptions range in age from several hundred years to at least 60,000 yr BP. The Mono-Inyo tephras are dispersed throughout the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range, providing key time-stratigraphic marker layers. Recent work has not only resulted in high-precision radiometric dating of many of the tephras, but also detailed geochemical data that for the first time provides fingerprinting sufficiently precise to discriminate among the tephras. Lithostratigraphy of many of the layers is herein described for the first time, based on careful sampling and description in the field, and laboratory grain size, grain shape and componentry analyses of the late Pleistocene tephras of the Wilson Creek Formation. Most of the Wilson Creek volcanic layers are fall deposits accumulated within paleolake Russell, which were generated by eruptions of variable intensity and influenced by paleowinds of different orientation. Prevailing winds were generally to the North and East, but often the Pleistocene layers less than 25 ka were dispersed to the West. Many of the fall layers show evidence of wave reworking, generally near the top, although in some cases it is pervasive. Only near the vent do some layers of apparent debris flow origin occur. Maximum pumice sizes range up to nearly 3 cm, and lithics range up to 1 cm in the rhyolitic fall beds, while thicknesses range up to c. 30 cm. These data are consistent with relatively low volume, subplinian style eruptive behavior for most of the life of the Mono-Inyo Craters.

  17. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Laakso, A.; Kokkola, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Niemeier, U.; Timmreck, C.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hakkarainen, H.; Korhonen, H.

    2016-01-01

    Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate changes occurring after an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM). According to our simulations the radiative impacts of the eruption and SRM are not additive and the radiative effects and climate changes occurring after the eruption depend strongly on whether SRM is continued or suspended after the eruption. In the former case, the peak burden of the additional stratospheric sulfate as well as changes in global mean precipitation are fairly similar regardless of whether the eruption takes place in a SRM or non-SRM world. However, the maximum increase in the global mean radiative forcing caused by the eruption is approximately 21 % lower compared to a case when the eruption occurs in an unperturbed atmosphere. In addition, the recovery of the stratospheric sulfur burden and radiative forcing is significantly faster after the eruption, because the eruption during the SRM leads to a smaller number and larger sulfate particles compared to the eruption in a non-SRM world. On the other hand, if SRM is suspended immediately after the eruption, the peak increase in global forcing caused by the eruption is about 32 % lower compared to a corresponding eruption into a clean background atmosphere. In this simulation, only about one-third of the global ensemble-mean cooling occurs after the eruption, compared to that occurring after an eruption under unperturbed atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the global cooling signal is seen only for the 12 months after the eruption in the former scenario compared to over 40 months in the latter. In terms of global precipitation rate, we obtain a 36 % smaller decrease in the

  18. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  19. Interactions of adjacent pulsating, erupting and creeping solitons

    Song Li-Jun; Li Lu; Zhou Guo-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the adjacent interactions of three novel solitons for the quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, which are plain pulsating, erupting and creeping solitons. It is found that different performances are presented for different solitons due to isolated regions of the parameter space where they exist. For example, plain pulsating and erupting solitons exhibit mutual annihilation during collisions with the decrease of total energy, but for creeping soliton,the two adjacent pulses present soliton fusion without any loss of energy. Otherwise, the method for restraining the interactions is also found and it can suppress interacions between these two adjacent pulses effectively.

  20. Video monitoring analysis of the dynamics at fissure eruptions

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    At basaltic eruption often lava fountains occur. The fountains mainly develop at erupting fissures, underlain by a magma-filled dike transporting the magma horizontally and vertically. Understanding of the dynamics of the deep dike and fracture mechanisms are mainly based on geophysical data as well as observations from seismic or geodetic networks. At the surface, however, new methods are needed to allow detailed interpretation on the eruption velocities, interactions between vents and complexities in the magma paths. With video cameras we collected imaging data from different erupting fissures. We find that lava fountaining is often correlated at distinct vents. From the frames of the videos we calculated the height and velocities of fountains as a function of time. Lava fountains often show a pulsating regime, that may change over time. Comparing the fountain height as a function of time of different vents by an time-dependent cross-correlation, we find a time lag between the pulses at adjacent vents. From this we derive an apparent velocity of temporal separation between vents, associated with the fountaining activity based on the calculated time lag and the vent distances. Although the correlation system can change episodically and sporadically, both the frequency of the fountains and eruption and the rest time between single fountains remain remarkably similar for adjacent lava fountains imply a controlling process in the magma feeder system itself. We present and compare our method for the Kamoamoa eruption 2011 (Hawaii) and the Holuhraun eruption 2014/2015 (Iceland). Both sites show a significant time shift between the single pulses of adjacent vents. We compare our velocities determined by this time shift to the assumed magma flow velocity in the dike as determined by independent models. Therefore we conjecture that the time shift of venting activity may allow to estimate the dynamics of magma and fluid migration at depth, as well as to identify the

  1. Eruptive collagenoma: A rarely reported entity in Indian literature

    Prachi Barad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eruptive collagenomas are non familial connective tissue nevi of unknown etiology presented with an abrupt onset. While most cases are reported in young adults, there is a paucity of literature in children. We report a case of a 4-year-old girl, who presented with multiple asymptomatic, papules, plaques and nodules on the face, trunk and upper extremities with no systemic involvement. Histopathologically, the lesion showed thickened homogenized collagen fibres highlighted by Masson′s trichrome stain and paucity in elastic fibres by Verhoeff-van Gieson stain, confirming the diagnosis of eruptive collagenoma.

  2. Unusually large erupted complex odontoma: A rare case report.

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B; Kukreja, Rahul; Suma, Gundareddy N; Yadav, Bhawna; Sharma, Havi

    2015-03-01

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations composed of mature tooth substances and may be compound or complex depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or on their resemblance to normal teeth. Among them, complex odontomas are relatively rare tumors. They are usually asymptomatic in nature. Occasionally, these tumors become large, causing bone expansion followed by facial asymmetry. Odontoma eruptions are uncommon, and thus far, very few cases of erupted complex odontomas have been reported in the literature. Here, we report the case of an unusually large, painless, complex odontoma located in the right posterior mandible. PMID:25793183

  3. Laboratory studies on electrical effects during volcanic eruptions

    R. Büttner

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study reports on electrical phenomena during the explosive eruption of a basaltoid silicate melt. Contact electricity is produced in the phase of thermo-hydraulic fracturing of magma during the explosive interaction with water. The electrical charge produced is directly proportional to the force of the explosion, as the force of explosion is linearly proportional to the surface generated by the thermo-hydraulic fracturing. Simulation of the ejection history using inerted gas as a driving medium under otherwise constant conditions did not result in significant electric charging. The results have the potential to explain in nature observed lightening in eruption clouds of explosive volcanic events.

  4. A case of colistin-induced fixed drug eruption

    İsmail Necati Hakyemez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several medicines, especially antimicrobials, play a rolein the etiology of fixed drug eruption (FDE. The clinicalmanifestation is quite typical for a drug-induced reaction.FDE which developed in an 83-year-old male patientwho has been administered colistin due to Acinetobacterpneumonia is presented here since it is very rarely seen.Therefore colistin should also be considered in the differentialdiagnosis of FDE. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3:374-376Key words: Fixed drug eruption, etiology, colistin

  5. The 2000 AD eruption of Copahue Volcano, Southern Andes

    José Antonio Naranjo; Edmundo Polanco

    2004-01-01

    Although all historic eruptions of the Copahue volcano (37°45'S-71°10.2'W, 3,001 m a.s.l.) have been of low magnitude, the largest (VEI=2) and longest eruptive cycle occurred from July to October 2000. Phreatic phases characterized the main events as a former acid crater lake was blown up. Low altitude columns were deviated by low altitude winds in variable directions, but slightly predominant to the NNE. The presence of the El Agrio caldera depression to the east of Copahue volcano may have ...

  6. Unusually large erupted complex odontoma: A rare case report

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B.; Kukreja, Rahul; Suma, Gundareddy N.; Yadav, Bhawn; Sharma, Havi [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, ITS Centre for Dental Studies and Research, Murad Nagar (India)

    2015-03-15

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations composed of mature tooth substances and may be compound or complex depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or on their resemblance to normal teeth. Among them, complex odontomas are relatively rare tumors. They are usually asymptomatic in nature. Occasionally, these tumors become large, causing bone expansion followed by facial asymmetry. Odontoma eruptions are uncommon, and thus far, very few cases of erupted complex odontomas have been reported in the literature. Here, we report the case of an unusually large, painless, complex odontoma located in the right posterior mandible.

  7. Effects of Volcanic Eruptions on Stratospheric Ozone Recovery

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer associated with the Mt. Pinatubo volcano and future volcanic eruptions on the recovery of the ozone layer is studied with an interactive two-dimensional photochemical model. The time varying chlorine loading and the stratospheric cooling due to increasing carbon dioxide have been taken into account. The computed ozone and temperature changes associated with the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in 1991 agree well with observations. Long model runs out to the year 2050 have been carried out, in which volcanoes having the characteristics of the Mount Pinatubo volcano were erupted in the model at 10-year intervals starting in the year 2010. Compared to a non-volcanic run using background aerosol loading, transient reductions of globally averaged column ozone of 2-3 percent were computed as a result of each of these eruptions, with the ozone recovering to that computed for the non-volcanic case in about 5 years after the eruption. Computed springtime Arctic column ozone losses of from 10 to 18 percent also recovered to the non-volcanic case within 5 years. These results suggest that the long-term recovery of ozone would not be strongly affected by infrequent volcanic eruptions with a sulfur loading approximating Mt. Pinatubo. Sensitivity studies in which the Arctic lower stratosphere was forced to be 4 K and 10 K colder resulted in transient ozone losses of which also recovered to the non-volcanic case in 5 years. A case in which a volcano five times Mt. Pinatubo was erupted in the year 2010 led to maximum springtime column ozone losses of 45 percent which took 10 years to recover to the background case. Finally, in order to simulate a situation in which frequent smaller volcanic eruptions result in increasing the background sulfate loading, a simulation was made in which the background aerosol was increased by 10 percent per year. This resulted in a delay of the recovery of column ozone to 1980 values of more than 10 years.

  8. Unusually large erupted complex odontoma: A rare case report

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations composed of mature tooth substances and may be compound or complex depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or on their resemblance to normal teeth. Among them, complex odontomas are relatively rare tumors. They are usually asymptomatic in nature. Occasionally, these tumors become large, causing bone expansion followed by facial asymmetry. Odontoma eruptions are uncommon, and thus far, very few cases of erupted complex odontomas have been reported in the literature. Here, we report the case of an unusually large, painless, complex odontoma located in the right posterior mandible.

  9. FIXED DRUG ERUPTION OF THE EYELIDS. A DERMOSCOPIC EVALUATION

    Manuel Valdebran

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruption (FDE usually appears as a solitary or a small number of pruritic, well circumscribed, erythematous macules that evolve into edematous plaques; these lesions typically resolve after discontinuation of the offending drug, leaving hyperpigmentation at the site of lesions. Fixed drug eruption has been mentioned previously as a disease model for elucidating the mechanism of how skin inflammation is caused by skin-resident T cells, a multistep process that results in eventual tissue damage. In this article we discuss the utility of dermoscopy as an additional tool which gives significant information aiding us to infer these complex processes seen in FDE and thus to confirm the diagnosis

  10. Ionospheric response to EUV emission from post-eruptive arcades

    Hinrichs, Johannes; Bothmer, Volker; Venzmer, Malte; Erdogan, Eren; Dettmering, Denise; Limberger, Marco; Schmidt, Michael; Seitz, Florian; Börger, Klaus; Brandert, Sylvia; Görres, Barbara; Kersten, Wilhelm F.; Bernert, Barbara; Florczak, Josua

    2015-04-01

    Commonly, an arcade of post-eruptive loops is formed beneath the trailing edge of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The loop system emits EUV radiation for several hours after the CME lift-off, in addition to the commonly associated, classical X-ray flare. We present results of a systematic study of the ionospheric response to the EUV emission from these post-eruptive arcades, taking into account their position on the solar disk, size, lifetime and underlying photospheric field. The solar observations are provided by telescopes on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Proba2 satellite, the ionospheric data is derived from analysis of GNSS and radio wave data.

  11. Eyjafjallajökull Volcanic Eruption: Ice Nuclei and Particle Characterization

    Gianni Santachiara; Franco Belosi; Franco Prodi

    2011-01-01

    The Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption was an extraordinary event in that it led to widespread and unprecedented disruption to air travel over Europe – a region generally considered to be free from the hazards associated with volcanic eruptions, excluding the extreme south influenced by Mt. Etna. In situ measurements were performed at the research centre of the National Research Council (CNR) area of Bologna (44?31′ N; 11?20′ E), an urban background site, in order to contribute to knowledge conce...

  12. Onset of a Solar Filament Eruption Without a Slow-Rise Phase

    Knox, J. M.; Sterling, A.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    We observe a filament eruption of 23 Jan 2012 using Atmospheric Imaging Array (AIA) data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Relatively cool emissions (193 Ang. channel) show a filament with a rise-toward-eruption trajectory that is relatively smooth, without a distinct, linearly-increasing "slow rise" followed by an abrupt "fast rise," as is often seen in other events. Detailed investigations of some of those two-phase events suggested that they were triggered by magnetic flux cancellation. Here however, observations of hotter emissions (335 Ang. channel) show an adjacent eruption, invisible in 193 Ang., occurred just prior to the filament's eruption start. We surmise that the hotter eruption destabilized the 193 Ang. filament, triggering its eruption onset. In this way, the filament's smooth eruption trajectory is indicative of a non-tether-cutting eruption-onset mechanism for the filament.

  13. Mare Basalt Volcanism: Generation, Ascent, Eruption, and History of Emplacement of Secondary Crust on the Moon

    Head, J. W.; Wilson, L.

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analyses of the generation, ascent, intrusion and eruption of basaltic magma provides new insight into magma source depths, supply processes, transport and emplacement mechanisms (dike intrusions, effusive and explosive eruptions).

  14. Katmai volcanic cluster and the great eruption of 1912

    Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.

    2000-01-01

    In June 1912, the world's largest twentieth century eruption broke out through flat-lying sedimentary rocks of Jurassic age near the base of Trident volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. The 60 h ash-flow and Plinian eruptive sequence excavated and subsequently backfilled with ejecta a flaring funnel-shaped vent since called Novarupta. The vent is adjacent to a cluster of late Quaternary stratocones and domes that have released about 140 km3 of magma in the past 150 k.y. Although the 1912 vent is closest to the Trident group and is also close to Mageik and Griggs volcanoes, it was the summit of Mount Katmai, 10 km east of Novarupta, that collapsed during the eruption to form a 5.5 km3 caldera. Many earthquakes, including 14 in the range M 6-7, took place during and after the eruption, releasing 250 times more seismic energy than the 1991 caldera-forming eruption of the Philippine volcano, Pinatubo. The contrast in seismic behavior may reflect the absence of older caldera faults at Mount Katmai, lack of upward (subsidence opposing) magma flow owing to lateral magma withdrawal in 1912, and the horizontally stratified structure of the thick shale-rich Mesozoic basement. The Katmai caldera compensates for only 40% of the 13 km3 of 1912 magma erupted, which included 7-8 km3 of slightly zoned high-silica rhyolite and 4.5 km3 of crystal-rich dacite that grades continuously into 1 km3 of crystal-rich andesite. We have now mapped, sampled, and studied the products of all 20 components of the Katmai volcanic cluster. Pyroxene dacite and silicic andesite predominate at all of them, and olivine andesite is also common at Griggs, Katmai, and Trident volcanoes, but basalt and rhyodacite have erupted only at Mount Katmai. Rhyolite erupted only in 1912 and is otherwise absent among Quaternary products of the cluster. Pleistocene products of Mageik and Trident and all products of Griggs are compositionally distinguishable from those of 1912 at Novarupta. Holocene products of Mount

  15. Petrological analysis of the pre-eruptive magmatic process prior to the 2006 explosive eruptions at Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    Samaniego, Pablo; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Robin, Claude; Hidalgo, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the processes at the origin of explosive events is crucial for volcanic hazard mitigation, especially during long-lasting eruptions at andesitic volcanoes. This work exposes the case of Tungurahua volcano, whose unrest occurred in 1999. Since this date, the eruptive activity was characterized by low-to moderate explosiveness, including phases with stronger canon-like explosions and regional ash fallout. However, in 2006, a sudden increase of the explosiveness led to pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions on July 14th (VEI 2) and August 16-17th (VEI 3). All magmas emitted from 1999 to 2005, as well as the samples from the 2006 eruptions, have homogeneous bulk-rock andesitic compositions (58-59 wt.% SiO 2), and contain the same mineral assemblage consisting of pl + cpx + opx + mag ± ol. However, during the August 16-17th event, the erupted tephra comprise two types of magmas: a dominant, brown andesitic scoria; and scarce, light-grey pumice representing a subordinate, silica-rich juvenile component. For the andesitic magma, thermobarometric data point to magmatic temperatures ranging from 950 to 1015 °C and pressures in the range of 200 to 250 MPa, which corresponds to 7.5-9.5 km below the summit. Disequilibrium textures in plagioclase and pyroxene phenocrysts, particularly thin overgrowth rims, indicate the recharge of this magma body by mafic magma. Between 1999 and 2005, repeated injections from depth fed the intermittent eruptive activity observed while silica-rich melts were produced by in-situ crystallization in the peripheral parts of the reservoir. In April 2006, the recharge of a primitive magma produced strong convection and homogenisation in the reservoir, as well as pressure increase and higher magma ascent rate after seven years of only moderately explosive activity. This work emphasizes the importance of petrological studies in constraining the pre-eruptive magmatic conditions and processes, as a tool for understanding the fundamental causes

  16. Animal Health and Productivity Status of Cattle After The Eruption of Mount Merapi

    Yulvian Sani; E S Estuningsih

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Merapi from October 26th to November 6th, 2010 has affected social life and environment around the Merapi. The eruption has caused destruction of land and water resources, plants, death of animals and human casualities. The lava, dust and stones released from the eruption of Merapi had caused residential destruction, casualities, agricultural land and plants destruction, and contamination of water. The eruption has directly affected 4 districts including Sleman (Yogyakarta), M...

  17. Compound composite odontome erupting into the oral cavity: A rare entity

    Sunira Chandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and are often discovered during routine radiography. Eruption of an odontome into the oral cavity is rare. Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and are often discovered during routine radiography. Eruption of an odontome into the oral cavity is rare. We report an unusual case of erupting compound composite odontoma. we report an unusual case of erupting compound composite odontoma.

  18. The limits of predictability of volcanic eruptions from accelerating rates of earthquakes

    Bell, A.F.; Naylor, M.; I. G. Main

    2013-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are commonly preceded by increased rates of earthquakes. Previous studies argue that in some instances these sequences follow the inverse Omori law (IOL) and that this model could be the basis for forecasting the timing of eruption onset. However, the catalogue of pre-eruptive sequences is small, and the performance of the IOL as a forecasting tool remains largely untested. Here, we use simulations to quantify upper limits to the accuracy and bias of forecast eruption times...

  19. Enhancements in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation following volcanic eruptions

    Vogelmann, A. M.; Ackerman, T. P.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to estimate the changes in biologically effective radiation (UV-BE) at the earth's surface produced by the El Chichon (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991) eruptions. It is found that in both cases surface intensity can increase because the effect of ozone depletion outweighs the increased scattering.

  20. The lateral extent of volcanic interactions during unrest and eruption

    Biggs, Juliet; Robertson, Elspeth; Cashman, Katharine

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions often occur simultaneously or tap multiple magma reservoirs. Such lateral interactions between magmatic systems are attributed to stress changes or hydraulic connections but the precise conditions under which coupled eruptions occur have yet to be quantified. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar satellite data to analyse the surface deformation generated by volcanic unrest in the Kenyan Rift. We identify several magma sources located at depths of 2-5 km importantly, sources that are spaced less than about 10 km apart interact, whereas those spaced more than about 25 km apart do not. However, volcanoes up to 25 km apart have interacted in the geologic past. Thus, volcanic coupling is not simply controlled by the distance between the magma reservoirs. We then consider different tectonic settings globally, including intraplate volcanoes such as Hawaii and Yellowstone, arc volcanism in Alaska and Chile, and other rift settings, such as New Zealand, Iceland and Afar. We find that the most closely spaced magmatic interactions are controlled by the extent of a shallow crystal mush layer, stress changes can couple large eruptions over distances of about 20-40 km, and only large dyke intrusions or subduction earthquakes could generate coupled eruptions over distances of about 50-100 km.

  1. Predictability of Volcano Eruption: lessons from a basaltic effusive volcano

    Grasso, J R

    2003-01-01

    Volcano eruption forecast remains a challenging and controversial problem despite the fact that data from volcano monitoring significantly increased in quantity and quality during the last decades.This study uses pattern recognition techniques to quantify the predictability of the 15 Piton de la Fournaise (PdlF) eruptions in the 1988-2001 period using increase of the daily seismicity rate as a precursor. Lead time of this prediction is a few days to weeks. Using the daily seismicity rate, we formulate a simple prediction rule, use it for retrospective prediction of the 15 eruptions,and test the prediction quality with error diagrams. The best prediction performance corresponds to averaging the daily seismicity rate over 5 days and issuing a prediction alarm for 5 days. 65% of the eruptions are predicted for an alarm duration less than 20% of the time considered. Even though this result is concomitant of a large number of false alarms, it is obtained with a crude counting of daily events that are available fro...

  2. Eruption age of the Sverrefjellet volcano, Spitsbergen Island, Norway

    Allan H. Treiman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sverrefjellet is a Pleistocene-age basaltic volcanic construct on north-western Spitsbergen Island (Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. Published ages for the Sverrefjellet eruption range between 6000 years and ca. 1 million years before present. The age of eruption is dated here as 1.05±0.07 (1σ My, consistent with Ar–Ar isochron and plateau ages of several analysed samples. Radiogenic Ar represents a small proportion of the released Ar, <15% in nearly all samples. Non-radiogenic Ar components include air, excess 40Ar (seen as inverse isochron intercept values >40Ar/36Ar = 295.5, low-temperature alterations (Ar release at low temperature, with high Cl/K, carbonates and zeolites (Ar release at intermediate temperature and xenolithic material (Ar release at high temperature, high Ca/K. The effects of the largely non-radiogenic argon sources are also seen in the total-gas Ar–Ar “ages”, which range from 1.3 to 10.3 My, significantly larger than the inferred eruption age. It is likely that total-gas Ar–Ar “ages” and whole-rock K–Ar “ages” of similar basalts also exceed their true eruption ages.To access the supplementary material to this article please see Supplementary files under Article Tools online.

  3. Vesicularity of basalt erupted at Reykjanes Ridge crest

    Duffield, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Average vesicularity of basalt drilled at three sites on the west flank of the Reykjanes Ridge increases with decreasing age. This change apparently records concomitant decrease in water depth at the ridge crest where the basalt was erupted and suggests substantial upward growth of the crest during the past 35 Myr. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  5. SOHO/SUMER Observations of Prominence Oscillation Before Eruption

    Chen, P F; Solanki, S K

    2008-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), as a large-scale eruptive phenomenon, often reveal some precursors in the initiation phase, e.g., X-ray brightening, filament darkening, etc, which are useful for CME modeling and space weather forecast. With the SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic observations of the 2000 September 26 event, we propose another precursor for CME eruptions, namely, long-time prominence oscillations. The prominence oscillation-and-eruption event was observed by ground-based H$\\alpha$ telescopes and space-borne white-light, EUV imaging and spectroscopic instruments. In particular, the SUMER slit was observing the prominence in a sit-and-stare mode. The observations indicate that a siphon flow was moving from the proximity of the prominence to a site at a projected distance of 270$''$, which was followed by repetitive H$\\alpha$ surges and continual prominence oscillations. The oscillation lasted 4 hours before the prominence erupted as a blob-like CME. The analysis of the multiwavelength data indicates that th...

  6. Hydrogeomorphic effects of explosive volcanic eruptions on drainage basins

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Major, Jon J.

    2014-01-01

    Explosive eruptions can severely disturb landscapes downwind or downstream of volcanoes by damaging vegetation and depositing large volumes of erodible fragmental material. As a result, fluxes of water and sediment in affected drainage basins can increase dramatically. System-disturbing processes associated with explosive eruptions include tephra fall, pyroclastic density currents, debris avalanches, and lahars—processes that have greater impacts on water and sediment discharges than lava-flow emplacement. Geo-morphic responses to such disturbances can extend far downstream, persist for decades, and be hazardous. The severity of disturbances to a drainage basin is a function of the specific volcanic process acting, as well as distance from the volcano and magnitude of the eruption. Postdisturbance unit-area sediment yields are among the world's highest; such yields commonly result in abundant redeposition of sand and gravel in distal river reaches, which causes severe channel aggradation and instability. Response to volcanic disturbance can result in socioeconomic consequences more damaging than the direct impacts of the eruption itself.

  7. Eruptive Current Sheets Trailing SOHO/LASCO CMEs

    Webb, David F.

    2015-04-01

    Current sheets are important signatures of magnetic reconnection during the eruption of solar magnetic structures. Many models of eruptive flare/Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) involve formation of a current sheet connecting the ejecting CME flux rope with the post-eruption magnetic loop arcade. Current sheets have been interpreted in white light images as narrow rays trailing the outward-moving CME, in ultraviolet spectra as narrow, bright hot features, and with different manifestations in other wavebands. This study continues that of Webb et al. (2003), who analyzed SMM white light CMEs having candidate magnetic disconnection features at the base of the CME. About half of those were followed by coaxial, bright rays suggestive of newly formed current sheets, and Webb et al. (2003) presented detailed results of analysis of those structures. In this work we extend the study of white light eruptive current sheets to the more sensitive and extensive SOHO/LASCO coronagraph data on CMEs. We comprehensively examined all LASCO CMEs during two periods that we identify with the minimum and maximum activity of solar cycle 23. We identified ~130 ray/current sheets during these periods, nearly all of which trailed CMEs with concave-outward backs. The occurrence rate of the ray/current sheets is 6-7% of all CMEs, irrespective of the solar cycle. We analyze the rays for durations, speeds, alignments, and motions and compare the observational results with some model predictions.

  8. Estimation of age from development and eruption of teeth

    B. S. Manjunatha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The developing dentition is used to assess maturity and estimate the age in many disciplines including anthropology, archeology, forensic science, pediatric dentistry and orthodontics. There is evidence that dental development is less effected than skeletal development by malnutrition and hormonal disorders. There are two methods of dental age assessment, radiographically and by clinically visualization of eruption of teeth. The clinical method to assess dental age is based on the emergence of teeth in the mouth. This method is more suitable since it does not require any special equipment, expertise and is more economical. Tooth formation is the best choice for estimating the age as variations are less as compared to other development factors. Eruption of teeth is one of the changes observed easily among the various dynamic changes that occur from the formation of teeth to the final shedding of teeth. The times of eruption of teeth are fairly constant and this can be made use of in ascertaining the average age of eruption of the tooth. Assessment of age of an individual by examination of teeth is one of the accepted methods of age determination.

  9. Eruption probabilities for the Lassen Volcanic Center and regional volcanism, northern California, and probabilities for large explosive eruptions in the Cascade Range

    Nathenson, Manuel; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Chronologies for eruptive activity of the Lassen Volcanic Center and for eruptions from the regional mafic vents in the surrounding area of the Lassen segment of the Cascade Range are here used to estimate probabilities of future eruptions. For the regional mafic volcanism, the ages of many vents are known only within broad ranges, and two models are developed that should bracket the actual eruptive ages. These chronologies are used with exponential, Weibull, and mixed-exponential probability distributions to match the data for time intervals between eruptions. For the Lassen Volcanic Center, the probability of an eruption in the next year is 1.4x10-4 for the exponential distribution and 2.3x10-4 for the mixed exponential distribution. For the regional mafic vents, the exponential distribution gives a probability of an eruption in the next year of 6.5x10-4, but the mixed exponential distribution indicates that the current probability, 12,000 years after the last event, could be significantly lower. For the exponential distribution, the highest probability is for an eruption from a regional mafic vent. Data on areas and volumes of lava flows and domes of the Lassen Volcanic Center and of eruptions from the regional mafic vents provide constraints on the probable sizes of future eruptions. Probabilities of lava-flow coverage are similar for the Lassen Volcanic Center and for regional mafic vents, whereas the probable eruptive volumes for the mafic vents are generally smaller. Data have been compiled for large explosive eruptions (>≈ 5 km3 in deposit volume) in the Cascade Range during the past 1.2 m.y. in order to estimate probabilities of eruption. For erupted volumes >≈5 km3, the rate of occurrence since 13.6 ka is much higher than for the entire period, and we use these data to calculate the annual probability of a large eruption at 4.6x10-4. For erupted volumes ≥10 km3, the rate of occurrence has been reasonably constant from 630 ka to the present, giving

  10. Evolution of magnetic topology of an erupting arched laboratory magnetoplasma

    Tripathi, S.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2013-12-01

    Arched magnetoplasma structures ubiquitously exist in the solar atmosphere and affect energetic phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections. Presence of an electrical current in such structures generates a twisted magnetic-field and the term arched magnetic flux rope (AMFR) is used for them. In the limit of low electrical current (compared to the current-threshold for the kink instability), the magnetic twist in an AMFR becomes small and it resembles the structure of an arched magnetic flux tube. However, the term arched magnetic flux rope can be used for arched magnetoplasma structures without any loss of generality. We report results on the evolution of the magnetic topology of an erupting laboratory AMFR during its eruption. The AMFR (plasma β ≈ 10-3, Lundquist number ≈ 102-105, AMFR radius/ion-gyroradius ≈ 20, B ≈ 1000 Gauss at footpoints) is created using a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) plasma source and it evolves in an ambient magnetoplasma produced by another LaB6 source (See Ref. [2] for details of the experiment). The eruption is triggered by gradually increasing the electrical current in the AMFR and its evolution is captured by a fast-CCD camera. The relative magnitudes of the parameters of the AMFR and the ambient magnetoplasma can be varied to simulate a variety of conditions relevant to solar eruptions. The experiment runs continuously with a 0.5 Hz repetition rate. Hence, the plasma parameters of the AMFR are recorded with a good spatiotemporal resolution (spatial-resolution/AMFR-length ≈ 10-2 - 10-3, temporal-resolution/eruption-time ≈ 10-3) using computer-controlled movable probes. The three-dimensional magnetic-field of the AMFR is directly measured using a three-axis magnetic-loop probe. The pre-eruption phase of the AMFR remains quiescent for ≈ 100 Alfven transit times and the camera images evince a persistent appearance of the AMFR during this phase. In contrast, the post-eruption phase of the AMFR is associated with

  11. UK Hazard Assessment for a Laki-type Volcanic Eruption

    Witham, Claire; Felton, Chris; Daud, Sophie; Aspinall, Willy; Braban, Christine; Loughlin, Sue; Hort, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Vieno, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Following the impacts of the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in 2010, two types of volcanic eruption have been added to the UK Government's National Risk Register for Civil Emergencies. One of these, a large gas-rich volcanic eruption, was identified as a high impact natural hazard, one of the three highest priority natural hazards faced by the UK. This eruption scenario is typified by the Laki eruption in Iceland in 1783-1784. The Civil Contingency Secretariat (CCS) of the UK's Cabinet Office, responsible for Civil Protection in the UK, has since been working on quantifying the risk and better understanding its potential impacts. This involves cross-cutting work across UK Government departments and the wider scientific community in order to identify the capabilities needed to respond to an effusive eruption, to exercise the response and develop increased resilience where possible. As part of its current work, CCS has been working closely with the UK Met Office and other UK agencies and academics (represented by the co-authors and others) to generate and assess the impacts of a 'reasonable worst case scenario', which can be used for decision making and preparation in advance of an eruption. Information from the literature and the findings of an expert elicitation have been synthesised to determine appropriate eruption source term parameters and associated uncertainties. This scenario is then being used to create a limited ensemble of model simulations of the dispersion and chemical conversion of the emissions of volcanic gases during such an eruption. The UK Met Office's NAME Lagrangian dispersion model and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology's EMEP4UK Eulerian model are both being used. Modelling outputs will address the likelihood of near-surface concentrations of sulphur and halogen species being above specified health thresholds. Concentrations at aviation relevant altitudes will also be evaluated, as well as the effects of acid deposition of volcanic species on

  12. Critical review of a new volcanic eruption chronology

    Neuhäuser, Dagmar L.; Neuhäuser, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Sigl. et al. (2015, Nature) present historical evidence for 32 volcanic eruptions to evaluate their new polar ice core 10-Be chronology - 24 are dated within three years of sulfur layers in polar ice. Most of them can be interpreted as weather phenomena (Babylonia: disk of sun like moon, reported for only one day, e.g. extinction due to clouds), Chinese sunspot reports (pellet, black vapor, etc.), solar eclipses, normal ice-halos and coronae (ring, bow, etc.), one aurora (redness), red suns due to mist drops in wet fog or fire-smoke, etc. Volcanic dust may facilitate detections of sunspots and formation of Bishop's ring, but tend to inhibit ice-halos, which are otherwise often reported in chronicles. We are left with three reports possibly indicating volcanic eruptions, namely fulfilling genuine criteria for atmospheric disturbances due to volcanic dust, e.g. bluish or faint sun, orange sky, or fainting of stars for months (BCE 208, 44-42, and 32). Among the volcanic eruptions used to fix the chronology (CE 536, 626, 939, 1257), the reports cited for the 930s deal only with 1-2 days, at least one reports an eclipse. In the new chronology, there is a sulfur detection eight years after the Vesuvius eruption, but none in CE 79. It may appear surprising that, from BCE 500 to 1, all five northern sulfur peaks labeled in figure 2 in Sigl et al. are systematically later by 2-4 years than the (corresponding?) southern peaks, while all five southern peaks from CE 100 to 600 labeled in figure 2 are systematically later by 1-4 years than the (corresponding?) northern peaks. Furthermore, in most of their six strongest volcanic eruptions, temperatures decreased years before their sulfur dating - correlated with weak solar activity as seen in radiocarbon, so that volcanic climate forcing appears dubious here. Also, their 10-Be peaks at CE 775 and 994 are neither significant nor certain in dating.

  13. SO2 flux and the thermal power of volcanic eruptions

    Henley, Richard W.; Hughes, Graham O.

    2016-09-01

    A description of the dynamics, chemistry and energetics governing a volcanic system can be greatly simplified if the expansion of magmatic gas can be assumed to be adiabatic as it rises towards the surface. The conditions under which this assumption is valid are clarified by analysis of the transfer of thermal energy into the low conductivity wallrocks traversed by fractures and vents from a gas phase expanding over a range of mass flux rates. Adiabatic behavior is predicted to be approached typically within a month after perturbations in the release of source gas have stabilized, this timescale being dependent upon only the characteristic length scale on which the host rock is fractured and the thermal diffusivity of the rock. This analysis then enables the thermal energy transport due to gas release from volcanoes to be evaluated using observations of SO2 flux with reference values for the H2O:SO2 ratio of volcanic gas mixtures discharging through high temperature fumaroles in arc and mantle-related volcanic systems. Thermal power estimates for gas discharge are 101.8 to 104.1 MWH during quiescent, continuous degassing of arc volcanoes and 103.7 to 107.3 MWH for their eruptive stages, the higher value being the Plinean Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Fewer data are available for quiescent stage mantle-related volcanoes (Kilauea 102.1 MWH) but for eruptive events power estimates range from 102.8 MWH to 105.5 MWH. These estimates of thermal power and mass of gas discharges are commensurate with power estimates based on the total mass of gas ejected during eruptions. The sustained discharge of volcanic gas during quiescent and short-lived eruptive stages can be related to the hydrodynamic structure of volcanic systems with large scale gaseous mass transfer from deep in the crust coupled with episodes of high level intrusive activity and gas release.

  14. Characterization of juvenile pyroclasts from the Kos Plateau Tuff (Aegean Arc): insights into the eruptive dynamics of a large rhyolitic eruption

    Bouvet De Maisonneuve, Caroline; Bachmann, Olivier; Burgisser, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Silicic pumices formed during explosive volcanic eruptions are faithful recorders of the state of the magma in the conduit, close to or at the fragmentation level. We have characterized four types of pumices from the non-welded rhyolitic Kos Plateau Tuff, which erupted 161,000 years ago in the East Aegean Arc, Greece. The dominant type of pumice (>90 vol.%) shows highly elongated tubular vesicles. These tube pumices occur throughout the eruption. Less common pumice types include: (1) “frothy”...

  15. The c.2030 yr BP Plinian eruption of El Misti volcano, Peru: Eruption dynamics and hazard implications

    Cobeñas, Gisela; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Bonadonna, Costanza; Boivin, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    'El Misti' volcano near the city of Arequipa in south Peru produced a Plinian eruption c.2030 yr BP that resulted in a tephra deposit consisting of three fallout layers, several pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits, a late stage, small debris-avalanche deposit, and lahar deposits. This VEI 4 Plinian eruption of El Misti has been selected as one of the reference eruptions for the hazard assessment and risk mitigation plan for the city of Arequipa. The Plinian column of this eruption rose up to 21-24 km and produced a tephra deposit over an area of at least 2580 km2 within the 5 cm-isopach line. The dispersal axis is oriented SW, i.e. towards the area of the basin and city of Arequipa. Later pumice- and lithic-rich PDC deposits were emplaced into radial valleys extending from the volcano up to a distance of at least 13 km. The eruption produced a minimum total bulk volume of 1.2 km3 (0.71 km3 DRE volume) of tephra and PDC deposits. Components of the tephra deposit consist of beige, gray and banded pumices, lithic fragments, a minor amount of cogenetic dacite clasts, and free crystals. The minimum volume of the tephra deposit varies between 0.2 and 0.6 km3 (exponential, power-law integration and inversion of TEPHRA2 analytical model). The tephra deposit is characterized by a bulk density of 1500 kg/m3 which results in a mass of 2.5-9.0 × 1011 kg. The maximum mass discharge rate (MDR) is 1.1 × 108 kg/s based on a plume height of 24 km. The estimated duration of the Plinian eruption ranges between 0.6 and 2.3 h. Grain size distribution, componentry, and SEM analyses of both the tephra and PDC deposits, combined with the reconstructed stratigraphic sequence of the deposit, suggest that the eruption took place in five stages: (1) generation of a 21-24 km-high eruptive column that deposited the lower tephra layer; (2) collapse of the crater walls and partial obstruction of the vent during a period of decreased intensity, which led to the formation of a thin sand

  16. Gas and hydrogen isotopic analyses of volcanic eruption clouds in Guatemala sampled by aircraft

    Rose, W.I., Jr.; Cadle, R.D.; Heidt, L.E.; Friedman, I.; Lazrus, A.L.; Huebert, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Gas samples were collected by aircraft entering volcanic eruption clouds of three Guatemalan volcanoes. Gas chromatographic analyses show higher H2 and S gas contents in ash eruption clouds and lower H2 and S gases in vaporous gas plumes. H isotopic data demonstrate lighter isotopic distribution of water vapor in ash eruption clouds than in vaporous gas plumes. Most of the H2O in the vaporous plumes is probably meteoric. The data are the first direct gas analyses of explosive eruptive clouds, and demonstrate that, in spite of atmospheric admixture, useful compositional information on eruptive gases can be obtained using aircraft. ?? 1980.

  17. Statistical analysis of eruptions detected and characterized by spatiotemporal data mining of SDO/AIA images

    Hurlburt, Neal E.

    2016-05-01

    Identifying and characterizing motions near the solar surface are essential to advance our understanding the drivers of space weather. A method for automatically identifying eruptions near the solar surface (either from filaments or otherwise) has recently been developed and integrated into the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase. Here we present a survey of eruptions identified by the EruptionPatrol and EruptionCharacterize modules run over six years of SDO/AIA 30.4 nm images. Over twenty-thousand distinct eruptions were identified with velocities ranging from 4-120km/sec, sizes from 20 to 1,000Mm and durations from 2 to 180 minutes.

  18. Volcanic hazards from Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions

    Siebert, L.; Glicken, H.; Ui, T.

    1987-01-01

    Major slope failures are a significant degradational process at volcanoes. Slope failures and associated explosive eruptions have resulted in more than 20 000 fatalities in the past 400 years; the historic record provides evidence for at least six of these events in the past century. Several historic debris avalanches exceed 1 km3 in volume. Holocene avalanches an order of magnitude larger have traveled 50-100 km from the source volcano and affected areas of 500-1500 km2. Historic eruptions associated with major slope failures include those with a magmatic component (Bezymianny type) and those solely phreatic (Bandai type). The associated gravitational failures remove major segments of the volcanoes, creating massive horseshoe-shaped depressions commonly of caldera size. The paroxysmal phase of a Bezymianny-type eruption may include powerful lateral explosions and pumiceous pyroclastic flows; it is often followed by construction of lava dome or pyroclastic cone in the new crater. Bandai-type eruptions begin and end with the paroxysmal phase, during which slope failure removes a portion of the edifice. Massive volcanic landslides can also occur without related explosive eruptions, as at the Unzen volcano in 1792. The main potential hazards from these events derive from lateral blasts, the debris avalanche itself, and avalanche-induced tsunamis. Lateral blasts produced by sudden decompression of hydrothermal and/or magmatic systems can devastate areas in excess of 500km2 at velocities exceeding 100 m s-1. The ratio of area covered to distance traveled for the Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny lateral blasts exceeds that of many pyroclastic flows or surges of comparable volume. The potential for large-scale lateral blasts is likely related to the location of magma at the time of slope failure and appears highest when magma has intruded into the upper edifice, as at Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny. Debris avalanches can move faster than 100 ms-1 and travel tens of

  19. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  20. Human responses to the 1906 eruption of Vesuvius, southern Italy

    Chester, David; Duncan, Angus; Kilburn, Christopher; Sangster, Heather; Solana, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    Cultural and political contexts are important in determining the ways in which communities respond to volcanic eruptions. Understanding the manner in which communities and the State apparatus have coped with historic eruptions can provide insights into how responses have influenced vulnerability and resilience. The 1906 eruption of Vesuvius is well suited for such a study as it was one of the first major eruptions in which there was a significant element of State control, and this worked alongside more traditional pre-industrial responses. This eruption was extensively reported in the regional, national and international press and in archives which include still photography. One feature is the rich archive of material published in English language newspapers of record which are analysed fully in the paper for the first time. Many of these data sources are now accessible on-line. The eruption started on April 4th with mild explosive activity and the eruption of lava from 5th to 7th April. On the night of the 7th/8th, activity intensified when a vigorous lava fountain inclined obliquely to the north east, deposited a thick layer of tephra on the towns of Ottaviano and San Giuseppe. This led to roof collapse and a large number of fatalities. There was increased lava emission and a flow progressed south through the outskirts of Boscotrecase cutting the Circumvesuviana railway line and almost reaching Torre Annunziata. Following April 8th the eruption declined and ended on April 21st. In the initial responses to the eruption pre-industrial features were prominent, with the local communities showing social cohesion, self-reliance and little panic. A more negative aspect was the traditional religious response that involved the use of liturgies of divine appeasement and which included the use of saintly relics and images. There is interesting evidence, however, that this coping strategy was driven by the populace rather than by the clergy. The inhabitants of San Giuseppe

  1. Investigating the explosivity of shallow sub-aqueous basaltic eruptions

    Murtagh, R.; White, J. D. L.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce pyroclasts containing vesicles, clearly implying exsolution of volatiles from the magma has occurred. Our aim is to understand the textural characteristics of vesiculated clasts as a quantitative indicator of the eruptive behaviour of a volcano. Assessing water's role in volatile degassing and outgassing has been and is being well documented for terrestrial eruptions; the same cannot be said, however, for their shallow subaqueous counterparts. The eruptive behaviour of Surtseyan volcanoes, which include both subaqueous and subaerial phases (for example, the type-location Surtsey, Iceland in 1963) is under investigation here and for good reason. Volcanic eruptions during which water and basaltic magma come into contact appear to ignite violent eruptions of many of the small "monogenetic" volcanoes so abundant on Earth. A key problem remains that detailed conditions of water-magma interactions are not yet fully understood. Field samples obtained from exposed sequences deposited originally in a subaqueous environment allow for the necessary analysis of lapilli. With the aid of experimental data, mathematical modelling and terrestrial analogues the ambition is to unravel volatile degassing, ascent histories and fragmentation processes, allowing us ultimately to identify both the role water plays in the explosivity of shallow subaqueous eruptions, and the rise history of magma to the point of interaction. The first site, Pahvant Butte is located in southwest Utah, U.S. It is a well preserved tuff cone overlying a subaqueously deposited mound of glassy ash composed of sideromelane and tachylite. It was erupted under ~85m of water into Lake Bonneville approximately 15,300 years ago. Our focus is on samples collected from a well-bedded, broadly scoured coarse ash and lapilli lithofacies on the eastern flank of the edifice. Vesicularity indices span from 52.6% - 60.8%, with very broad vesicularity ranges, 20.6% - 81.0% for one extreme sample. The

  2. Eruption time of permanent first molars and incisors among female primary school children of riyadh

    To determine the mean eruption time of permanent first molars, central and lateral incisors and to compare the relationship of mean eruption time with body mass index (BMI) in Saudi female primary school children from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The mean age of children was 89.3 (SD 9.6) months ranging from 71 months to 109 months. The maxillary right first molar had the lowest mean eruption time of 77.4 (SD 3.9) months and the maxillary right lateral incisor was the last tooth to erupt with eruption time of 98.4 (SD 6.5) months. Furthermore, the mandibular incisors erupted significantly earlier than maxillary incisors. By the age of 100 months, 97% of the girls had all their first permanent molars erupted. There was no significant correlation observed between eruption times with BMI of the studied teeth except the maxillary right lateral incisor. However, an inverse relationship may exist between the eruption times and BMI. The Saudi female primary school children showed later eruption time of permanent first molars, central and lateral incisors when compared with the reported results of other national studies. Key words: Eruption time, permanent teeth, Saudi Arabia, female children. (author)

  3. Data-driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a flux-emerging active region leading to solar eruption

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xuesheng; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar eruptions are well-recognized as major drivers of space weather but what causes them remains an open question. Here we show how an eruption is initiated in a non-potential magnetic flux-emerging region using magnetohydrodynamic modelling driven directly by solar magnetograms. Our model simulates the coronal magnetic field following a long-duration quasi-static evolution to its fast eruption. The field morphology resembles a set of extreme ultraviolet images for the whole process. Study of the magnetic field suggests that in this event, the key transition from the pre-eruptive to eruptive state is due to the establishment of a positive feedback between the upward expansion of internal stressed magnetic arcades of new emergence and an external magnetic reconnection which triggers the eruption. Such a nearly realistic simulation of a solar eruption from origin to onset can provide important insight into its cause, and also has the potential for improving space weather modelling. PMID:27181846

  4. On the geochemistry of the Kyra eruption sequence of Nisyros volcano on Nisyros and Tilos, Greece

    The Kyra sequence is a volcanic eruption sequence originating from the eastern flank of Nisyros volcano, Greece. Its eruptions products can be found not only on Nisyros itself but also on the nearby non-volcanic island of Tilos. In an extensive sampling campaign, outcrops of the Kyra eruption products on Nisyros were sampled and corresponding samples on Tilos were taken. The clear stratigraphical relationship between the different units within in the individual outcrops, combined with the chemical information gained by the application of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to the samples, made a detailed chemo-stratigraphy of the complete eruption sequence possible. It can be shown that the sequence is separated into eight distinguishable eruptions. Furthermore, no eruption products of the caldera-forming eruptions from Nisyros (Lower- and Upper Caldera Pumice) or from Santorin were found on Tilos.

  5. On the geochemistry of the Kyra eruption sequence of Nisyros volcano on Nisyros and Tilos, Greece

    Sterba, Johannes H., E-mail: jsterba@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut der oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Steinhauser, Georg; Bichler, Max [Atominstitut der oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    The Kyra sequence is a volcanic eruption sequence originating from the eastern flank of Nisyros volcano, Greece. Its eruptions products can be found not only on Nisyros itself but also on the nearby non-volcanic island of Tilos. In an extensive sampling campaign, outcrops of the Kyra eruption products on Nisyros were sampled and corresponding samples on Tilos were taken. The clear stratigraphical relationship between the different units within in the individual outcrops, combined with the chemical information gained by the application of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to the samples, made a detailed chemo-stratigraphy of the complete eruption sequence possible. It can be shown that the sequence is separated into eight distinguishable eruptions. Furthermore, no eruption products of the caldera-forming eruptions from Nisyros (Lower- and Upper Caldera Pumice) or from Santorin were found on Tilos.

  6. Ionospheric effects of the Mt. Kirishima volcanic eruption as seen from subionospheric VLF observations

    Rozhnoi, A.; Hayakawa, M.; Solovieva, M.; Hobara, Y.; Fedun, V.

    2014-01-01

    Data from the Pacific network of VLF receivers have been used to study the response of the lower ionosphere to the January 2011 Mt. Kirishima (South Japan) volcanic eruption. A major explosive eruption occurred on January 27, which was preceded by several small eruptions. Perturbations of nighttime subionospheric VLF signals have been detected on the day of the first small eruption on January 18 (UT) with the maximum observed about 1.5 h after the eruption. The nighttime signal remained disturbed during the subsequent pre-eruptive and eruptive activity of Mt. Kirishima. The daytime perturbations were not observed. The frequency of the maximum spectral amplitude was found to be in the range of periods of 6-30 min, which corresponds to the periods of internal gravity waves. These results suggest that the observed VLF ionospheric effects can possibly be produced by the penetration of gravity waves caused by the volcanic activity into the ionosphere.

  7. Data-driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a flux-emerging active region leading to solar eruption

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xuesheng; Hu, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Solar eruptions are well-recognized as major drivers of space weather but what causes them remains an open question. Here we show how an eruption is initiated in a non-potential magnetic flux-emerging region using magnetohydrodynamic modelling driven directly by solar magnetograms. Our model simulates the coronal magnetic field following a long-duration quasi-static evolution to its fast eruption. The field morphology resembles a set of extreme ultraviolet images for the whole process. Study of the magnetic field suggests that in this event, the key transition from the pre-eruptive to eruptive state is due to the establishment of a positive feedback between the upward expansion of internal stressed magnetic arcades of new emergence and an external magnetic reconnection which triggers the eruption. Such a nearly realistic simulation of a solar eruption from origin to onset can provide important insight into its cause, and also has the potential for improving space weather modelling.

  8. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity During Eruptive Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Priest, Eric; Janvier, Miho

    2016-01-01

    During eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections, a non-pot{\\-}ential magnetic arcade with much excess magnetic energy goes unstable and reconnects. It produces a twisted erupting flux rope and leaves behind a sheared arcade of hot coronal loops. We suggest that: the twist of the erupting flux rope can be determined from conservation of magnetic flux and magnetic helicity and equipartition of magnetic helicity. It depends on the geometry of the initial pre-eruptive structure. Two cases are considered, in the first of which a flux rope is not present initially but is created during the eruption by the reconnection. In the second case, a flux rope is present under the arcade in the pre-eruptive state, and the effect of the eruption and reconnection is to add an amount of magnetic helicity that depends on the fluxes of the rope and arcade and the geometry.

  9. IPLOR performance in detecting infrasound from volcanic eruptions

    Ghica, Daniela; Popa, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    Plostina infrasound array (IPLOR) is located in the central part of Romania, in Vrancea region, its current configuration consisting of 6 elements equipped with Chaparral Physics sensors deployed over a 2.5 km aperture. The array detectability observed after processing of more than 6 years of data has shown that IPLOR is more effective in measuring mainly infrasound signals produced by natural and anthropogenic impulsive sources. This can be explained by the sensors' characteristics (frequency response, dynamic range) and the large aperture of array. Among the types of events observed with IPLOR, an emphasis can be given to the Mt. Etna volcanic eruptions as one of the powerful infrasound source recorded by the array. Located at about 1320 km distance from volcano, the array has proved efficient in observing both large and small eruptions. In case of the most large eruptive episodes occurred lately (April and October 2013, December 2015), long duration infrasonic signals were detected, the initial impulsive signature of the volcanic explosion being followed by a long train of irregular waves with smaller amplitudes and higher frequency, extended over periods ranging from 6 hours to more than three days (in December 2015). For the purpose of assessing the IPLOR performance in detecting Etna eruptions, the signal interactive analysis was performed using WinPMCC, CEA/DASE version of PMCC software. The infrasound detections obtained were plotted in function of back-azimuth, velocity and frequency, showing that the detectability is dependent both on the diurnal variations of the noise around the array (during the night the human activity diminishes) and on the seasonally dependent stratospheric winds (westward propagation during summer and eastward propagation during winter). In case of the Etna eruptive episodes detected by IPLOR, the back azimuth observed is in good agreement with the expected value (230o), i.e. an average value of 232±2o could be resolved. The

  10. Rheology of the 2006 eruption at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Hanson, J. B.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; von Aulock, F. W.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2009-04-01

    During August 16th to 18th 2006, the eruptive crisis at Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) culminated in VEI 2 eruption with tens of pyroclastic flows and the extrusion of a lava flow. The nearly simultaneous occurrence of a lava flow and a pyroclastic flow from a single vent deserves attention. Generally, the rheology is a chief determinant of eruption style. Specifically, magmas are ductile (effusive) at low strain rates whereas they are brittle (explosive) at high strain rates. Although this distinction has been extensively described for single-phase magmas, there remain many questions as to the rheological implications of crystals and bubbles present in magmas. Here we present preliminary characterizations of the complex rheology of the magma involved in the 2006 eruption at Tungurahua volcano. The magma present in this eruption was andesitic with an interstitial melt composition averaging ~58 wt.% SiO2. The bombs present in the pyroclastic deposit show an open porosity ranging from 15 to 35 vol.% and a crystallinity generally greater than ~30 vol.% and occasionally up to 60 vol.% in samples affected by microlite growth. Petrographic analyses revealed magma batches with different crystallization histories. In high-porosity samples containing microlites, a recrystallization rim around clinopyroxene and resorption of the plagioclase were observed. In contrast, the dense samples show pristine, euhedral crystals and a near absence of microlites. The heterogeneous petrographic structures suggest the possibilities of mingling in the conduit or of magma batches with different decompression rates. Dilatometric analyses suggest glass transition temperatures (Tg) of ~974 °C for the dense material (porosity~15 vol.%) and as high as ~1060 °C for the high-porosity bombs (porosity~35 vol.%). Successive series of heating and cooling of the glass reveal an increase of Tg by as much as 60 °C indicative of significant water left in the melt. Preliminary analyses of images obtained

  11. The 2014 Submarine Eruption of Ahyi Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    Haney, M. M.; Chadwick, W.; Merle, S. G.; Buck, N. J.; Butterfield, D. A.; Coombs, M. L.; Evers, L. G.; Heaney, K. D.; Lyons, J. J.; Searcy, C. K.; Walker, S. L.; Young, C.; Embley, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    On April 23, 2014, Ahyi Volcano, a submarine cone in the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI), ended a 13-year-long period of repose with an explosive eruption lasting over 2 weeks. The remoteness of the volcano and the presence of several seamounts in the immediate area posed a challenge for constraining the source location of the eruption. Critical to honing in on the Ahyi area quickly were quantitative error estimates provided by the CTBTO on the backazimuth of hydroacoustic arrivals observed at Wake Island (IMS station H11). T-phases registered across the NMI seismic network at the rate of approximately 10 per hour until May 8 and were observed in hindsight at seismic stations on Guam and Chichijima. After May 8, sporadic T-phases were observed until May 17. Within days of the eruption onset, reports were received from NOAA research divers of hearing explosions underwater and through the hull on the ship while working on the SE coastline of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas), a distance of 20 km NW of Ahyi. In the same area, the NOAA crew reported sighting mats of orange-yellow bubbles on the water surface and extending up to 1 km from the shoreline. Despite these observations, satellite images showed nothing unusual throughout the eruption. During mid-May, a later cruise leg on the NOAA ship Hi'ialakai that was previously scheduled in the Ahyi area was able to collect some additional data in response to the eruption. Preliminary multibeam sonar bathymetry and water-column CTD casts were obtained at Ahyi. Comparison between 2003 and 2014 bathymetry revealed that the minimum depth had changed from 60 m in 2003 to 75 m in 2014, and a new crater ~95 m deep had formed at the summit. Extending SSE from the crater was a new scoured-out landslide chute extending downslope to a depth of at least 2300 m. Up to 125 m of material had been removed from the head of the landslide chute and downslope deposits were up to 40 m thick. Significant particle plumes were detected at all three

  12. Cryovolcanic Conduit Evolution and Eruption on Icy Satellites

    Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    In silicate volcanism, such as on Earth or Io, eruptions typically result from fracture formation caused by interaction of tectonic stresses with inflating, pressurized magma sources, leading to transport of melt through an evolving conduit. On icy satellites the paradigm may be similar, resulting from some combination of tidal stresses and expansion of freezing water within, or near the base of, an ice shell. Such a fracture will result in eruption if mass continuity can be established, with buoyancy aided by exsolution and expansion of dissolved volatiles. After onset, conduit shape evolves due to: (1) shear-stresses or frictional erosional; (2) wallrock "bursting" due to massive wall stresses; (3) wall melting or condensation of particles due to heat transfer; or (4) changes in applied stresses. Preliminary thermodynamic and fluid mechanical analysis suggests some initial cooling during ascent resulting from exsolution and expansion of volatiles, thermally buffered by freezing, Conduit contraction may occur, and so evolution towards a deep, gas-filled plume chamber is difficult to accommodate without evoking a co-incidental process. Conduit flaring occurs near the surface where velocities are greatest, enhancing erosion. Here, viscous dissipative heating exceeds adiabatic cooling, and so some boiling (a few wt%) may occur. In contrast with silicate volcanism, decompression to below the triple point will occur within conduit, vent or jet, resulting in rapid freezing and boiling of the remaining water at a 6.8:1 ratio. Subsequent isentropic or adiabatic expansion within erupting jets may result in a few percent net of condensation or sublimation. These effects combined lead to ~4:1-7:1 solid:vapor ratios in the jet for most eruption conditions. These figures are consistent with the ~6:1 inferred in Enceladus' jets, supporting the hypothesis that the Enceladus plume draws from a subsurface body of liquids through a conduit. Similar results are anticipated if

  13. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    A. Laakso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an earth system model to study the radiative and climate impacts of an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM. According to our simulations, the radiative impacts of an eruption and SRM are not additive: in the simulated case of concurrent eruption and SRM, the peak increase in global forcing is about 40 % lower compared to a corresponding eruption into a clean background atmosphere. In addition, the recovery of the stratospheric sulfate burden and forcing was significantly faster in the concurrent case since the sulfate particles grew larger and thus sedimented faster from the stratosphere. In our simulation where we assumed that SRM would be stopped immediately after a volcano eruption, stopping SRM decreased the overall stratospheric aerosol load. For the same reasons, a volcanic eruption during SRM lead to only about 1/3 of the peak global ensemble-mean cooling compared to an eruption under unperturbed atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the global cooling signal was seen only for 12 months after the eruption in the former scenario compared to over 40 months in the latter. In terms of the global precipitation rate, we obtain a 36 % smaller decrease in the first year after the eruption and again a clearly faster recovery in the concurrent eruption and SRM scenario. We also found that an explosive eruption could lead to significantly different regional climate responses depending on whether it takes place during geoengineering or into an unperturbed background atmosphere. Our results imply that observations from previous large eruptions, such as Mt Pinatubo in 1991, are not directly applicable when estimating the potential consequences of a

  14. Impact of Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions on the Environment

    In the past one decade earthquakes and volcanic eruptions affected approximately 32 million people globally, which include fatalities and displaced people. In Africa, earthquakes affected 828, 000 people; landslides 10,000 people and volcanoes 135 million people in the last decade. In terms of global fatalities, earthquakes killed about 3 million in the last two decades, while volcanic eruptions killed about 30,000 people in the past 50 years (Japan National Land Agency, 1993). These figures indicate that the world is vulnerable to natural disasters. Earthquakes have adverse effects on environment eg it generates violent ground shaking. The pressure caused by by ground shaking, the increase in faulting in the epicentre and increase of radioactive gas often change the groundwater level and quality

  15. Recovery from a Giant Eruption: The Case of Eta Car

    Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Martin, John C.; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Giant eruptions or SN Impostors are far more mysterious than "real" supernovae, because they are scarcer and because they have received far less theoretical effort. One rather special problem is the disequilibrium state of the post-eruption object. It may be partially observable by watching the star's gradual recovery; which, in principle, may offer clues to the basic instability mechanisms. So far, the only example that can be observed well enough is eta Carinae. This object's history offers tantalizing clues and counter-clues. For instance: (1) Before 2000, the recovery timescale seemed to be of order 150 years; but (2) around 2000, many attributes began to change much more rapidly; and (3) the 150-year recovery process has been punctuated by about three abrupt changes of state. This strange combination of facts has received almost no theoretical attention.

  16. Electrical activity during the 2006 Mount St. Augustine volcanic eruptions

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Edens, H. E.; Aulich, G. D.; McNutt, S.R.; Tytgat, Guy; Clark, E.

    2007-01-01

    By using a combination of radio frequency time-of-arrival and interferometer measurements, we observed a sequence of lightning and electrical activity during one of Mount St. Augustine's eruptions. The observations indicate that the electrical activity had two modes or phases. First, there was an explosive phase in which the ejecta from the explosion appeared to be highly charged upon exiting the volcano, resulting in numerous apparently disorganized discharges and some simple lightning. The net charge exiting the volcano appears to have been positive. The second phase, which followed the most energetic explosion, produced conventional-type discharges that occurred within plume. Although the plume cloud was undoubtedly charged as a result of the explosion itself, the fact that the lightning onset was delayed and continued after and well downwind of the eruption indicates that in situ charging of some kind was occurring, presumably similar in some respects to that which occurs in normal thunderstorms.

  17. Drugs causing fixed drug eruptions: Confirmed by provocation tests

    Gupta R

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug reactions ore very frequently seen by dermatologists in day to day practice. Fixed drug eruption though usually not fatal, can cause enough cosmetic embarrassment if present on the exposed part due to recurrence of the reaction on the previously affected site and residual hyperpigmeniation. 40 patients of fixed drug eruption were subjected to oral provocation test with all possible drug to find out the exact causative drug(s. Co-trimoxazole was the most common cause of the fixed reaction (21. Other drug found to cause reaction include oxyphenbutazone(9. Metamezole(3, tetracycline hydrocholoride (3 and pi roxicam (1. Lips were most commonly involved (14. Other frequently involved sites were genitals (6, arms (5, obdomen (4, hand(4, foce (4 and leg (3. To avoid false incrimination of the drugs, provocation test is the only reliable method to confirm the causative drug.

  18. Anticipating abrupt shifts in temporal evolution of probability of eruption

    Rohmer, Jeremy; Loschetter, Annick

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the probability of eruption by jointly accounting for different sources of monitoring parameters over time is a key component for volcano risk management. In the present study, we are interested in the transition from a state of low-to-moderate probability value to a state of high probability value. By using the data of MESIMEX exercise at the Vesuvius volcano, we investigated the potential for time-varying indicators related to the correlation structure or to the variability of th...

  19. Papulosquamous Drug Eruption and Nail Disorder Due to Use Entecavir

    Pınar Özuğuz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Papulosquamous drug eruptions are a group of skin lesions, triggered by various drugs. Hepatitis B is an important health problem all over the world as well as in our country. Entecavir is a nucleoside analogue used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Case: A 56-year-old female patient using entecavir for chronic hepatitis B for four years admitted to our outpatient clinics with dystrophic changes on the finger nails and toe nails, and scaling erythematous lesions of fingers and toes for one year. She had no drug history other than entecavir. Laboratory examination revealed: HbsAg: positive, HBeAg: negative, anti-HBe: positive, HBV DNA: negative, total anti-HDV: negative, and alanine aminotransferase: 32 U/L. Biopsies were taken from the patient's finger and toe nails after three negative fungal examination of native smears. Biopsy results were consistent with drug eruptions and according to these results, the lesions were thought to be a side effect of entecavir. Entecavir treatment was terminated and transaminase levels were followed at regular intervals. Mometasone fruat ointment and moisturizer containing urea (2 times a day/seven days were started for the treatment of skin lesions. Two weeks later the lesions were showed improvement and the patient was called to follow up at regular intervals. Conclusion: To our best knowledge there was only one case report in the literature so far, about drug eruptions with entecavir. Here we described the first case who developed papulosquamous skin eruptions and nail disorders due to treatment of entecavir.

  20. 3D Reconstruction of a Rotating Erupting Prominence

    Thompson, W. T.; Kliem, B.; Toeroek, T.

    2011-01-01

    A bright prominence associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) was seen erupting from the Sun on 9 April 2008. This prominence was tracked by both the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUVI and COR1 telescopes, and was seen to rotate about the line of sight a it erupted; therefore, the event has been nicknamed the "Cartwheel CME." The threads of the prominence in the core of the CME quite clearly indicate the structure of a weakly to moderately twisted flux rope throughout the field of view, up to heliocentric heights of 4 solar radii. Although the STEREO separation was 48 deg, it was possible to match some sharp features in the later part of the eruption as seen in the 304 A line in EUVI and in the H-alpha-sensitive bandpass of COR I by both STEREO Ahead and Behind. These features could then be traced out in three-dimensional space, and reprojected into a view in which the eruption is directed toward the observer. The reconstructed view shows that the alignment of the prominence to the vertical axis rotates as it rises up to a leading-edge height of approximately equal to 2.5 solar radii, and then remains approximately constant. The alignment at 2.5 solar radii differs by about 115 deg from the original filament orientation inferred from H-alpha and EUV data, and the height profile of the rotation, obtained here for the first time, shows that two thirds of the total rotation are reached within approximately equal to 0.5 solar radii above the photosphere. These features are well reproduced by numerical simulations of an unstable moderately twisted flux rope embedded in external flux with a relatively strong shear field component.

  1. Conduit flow experiments help constraining the regime of explosive eruptions

    Dellino, P.; Università di Bari; Dioguardi, F.; Università di Bari; Zimanowski, B.; University of Wurzburg; Buttner, R.; University of Wurzburg; Mele, D.; Università di Bari; La Volpe, L.; Università di Bari; Sulpizio, R.; Università di Bari, Centro Interdipartimentale per il Rischio Sismico e Vulcanico, c/o Dip.to Geomineralogico; Doronzo, D. M.; Università di Bari; Sonder, I.; University of Wurzburg; Bonasia, R.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Calvari, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Marotta, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia

    2009-01-01

    It is currently impractical to measure what happens in a volcano during an explosive eruption, and up to now much of our knowledge depends on theoretical models. Here we show, by means of large-scale experiments, that the regime of explosive events can be constrained based on the characteristics of magma at the point of fragmentation and conduit geometry. Our model, whose results are consistent with the literature, is a simple tool for defining the conditions at conduit exit th...

  2. Dental Eruption: A Survey of its Manifestations in Early Childhood

    Melissa Cabral de Queiroz SIMEÃO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify signs and symptoms related to eruption, understand the occurrence of these alterations, and finally, identify the frequency and intensity of their appearance. Method: Questionnaires and surveys were conducted with 100 parents or legal guardians of children between the ages of six months and five years of age, and also with 100 pediatricians in the city of Fortaleza. The factors researched were the incidence of signs and symptoms during dental eruption, aiming to discover which were most common, which methods of treatment were used and other aspects related to the quality of information received by the mothers. Results: Of the pediatricians interviewed, 93.9% reported clinical alterations in their patients during dental eruption. The manifestations most commonly found were, in a decreasing order of frequency, irritability, the habit of taking the hand to the mouth, syalorrhea, anorexia, fever, fitful sleep and diarrhea. A great number of mothers reported visiting a doctor upon occurrence of these alterations, and also using teething rings and ointments. The pediatricians, for the most part, reported giving exclusive orientation as a treatment option, and, in some cases, prescribing symptomatic medication. A small part of these professionals referred the patient to a dentist. The mothers reported having received minimum information with regards to dental eruption during the pre-natal period and showed a low level of satisfaction with the information received. Conclusion: The vast majority of the pediatricians and caregivers demonstrated the presence of systemic oral manifestations. Irritability was reported in a higher percentage, followed by the habit of hand-to-mouth, excessive salivation, anorexia, fever, disturbance in the sleep and diarrhea.

  3. Unilateral eruptive vellus hair cysts occurring on the face.

    Lew, B-L; Lee, M-H; Haw, C-R

    2006-11-01

    Eruptive vellus hair cysts (EVHC) are small, cystic papules that usually occur on the chest and extremities. Their aetiology is unknown. Fewer than 10 cases of a variant form of EVHC that occur exclusively on the face have been reported. We describe a case of EVHC limited to the right side of the face. To the best of our knowledge, no case of unilateral EVHC has been reported. PMID:17062051

  4. Acetaminophen-induced cellulitis-like fixed drug eruption

    Neila Fathallah; Chaker Ben Salem; Raoudha Slim; Lobna Boussofara; Najet Ghariani; Kamel Bouraoui

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic drug. Its adverse reactions are rare but severe. An 89-year-old man developed an indurated edematous and erythematous plaque on his left arm 1 day after acetaminophen ingestion. Cellulitis was suspected and antibiotictherapy was started but there was no improvement of the rash; there was a spectacular extension of the lesion with occurrence of flaccid vesicles and blisters in the affected sites. The diagnosis of generalized-bullous-fixed drug eruption ...

  5. Orthodontic force decreases the eruption rate of rat incisors.

    Drevensek, M; Volk, J; Sprogar, S; Drevensek, G

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a force applied in an antero-posterior direction would adequately reduce incisor eruption. This is needed to achieve a constant direction of force which is one of the demands for a good model for studying orthodontic tooth movement. Twenty male Wistar rats aged 11-12 weeks were divided into two equal groups: in the appliance group, a superelastic closed coil spring (25 cN) was placed between the upper left first molar and the incisors. The control group consisted of animals without an appliance. In both groups, cuts were created on the labial surfaces of the upper and lower incisors. The distance from the gingival reference point to the midpoint of the cut was measured for 10 days at 2 day intervals. Upper incisor inclination was determined as the distance from the most mesial point of the upper left first molar to the incisal edge of the ipsilateral incisor on days 0 and 10. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way analysis of variance and a Bonferroni post- test to estimate reliability. The eruption rates of the maxillary incisors in the appliance group were significantly decreased when compared with the control group during the whole experiment. In the appliance group, the eruption rates of the mandibular incisors were decreased more than those of the maxillary incisors (P<0.01). There was no difference in incisor inclination between the appliance and control groups on day 10 (P=0.81). The applied force of 25 cN in an antero-posterior direction diminished incisor eruption to a level which enabled a constant direction of orthodontic force for 10 days. PMID:19073954

  6. Rosacea-like eruption due to topical pimecrolimus

    El-Heis, S; Buckley, DA

    2015-01-01

    Topical calcineurin inhibitors have been used outside their approved indications for a number of conditions, including topical steroid-induced rosacea. However, tacrolimus ointment itself has been reported to trigger rosacea in a small number of cases. We report a case of a rosacea-like eruption in a 39-year-old woman occurring after the use of pimecrolimus cream for 12 months for atopic dermatitis. Withdrawal of pimecrolimus combined with treatment with oral lymecycline, topical metronidazol...

  7. Greenland ice core evidence of the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption

    C. Barbante; N. M. Kehrwald; P. Marianelli; B. M. Vinther; Steffensen, J. P.; Cozzi, G; C. U. Hammer; Clausen, H. B.; Siggaard-Andersen, M.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Volcanic tephra are independent age horizons and can synchronize strata of various paleoclimate records including ice and sediment cores. The Holocene section of the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ice core is dated by multi-parameter annual layer counting, and contains peaks in acidity, SO42− and microparticle concentrations at a depth of 429.1 to 429.3 m, which have not previously been definitively ascribed to a volcanic eruption. Here, we identify tephra particles...

  8. Structure and evolution of magnetic fields associated with solar eruptions

    This paper reviews the studies of solar photospheric magnetic field evolution in active regions and its relationship to solar flares. It is divided into two topics, the magnetic structure and evolution leading to solar eruptions and rapid changes in the photospheric magnetic field associated with eruptions. For the first topic, we describe the magnetic complexity, new flux emergence, flux cancelation, shear motions, sunspot rotation and magnetic helicity injection, which may all contribute to the storage and buildup of energy that trigger solar eruptions. For the second topic, we concentrate on the observations of rapid and irreversible changes of the photospheric magnetic field associated with flares, and the implication on the restructuring of the three-dimensional magnetic field. In particular, we emphasize the recent advances in observations of the photospheric magnetic field, as state-of-the-art observing facilities (such as Hinode and Solar Dynamics Observatory) have become available. The linkages between observations, theories and future prospectives in this research area are also discussed. (invited reviews)

  9. Explosive volcanism lessons learned from Mentos and soda eruptions

    Wright, H. M.; Rust, A. C.; Cashman, K. V.

    2006-12-01

    When hard Mentos candies are dropped into a bottle of carbonated beverage, the resultant rapid CO2 exsolution and gas expansion causes an impressive soda `eruption'. We explore the ways in which this simple example can be used to demonstrate explosive volcanic processes. Through hands-on experiments, students can vary the type of candy, the type of beverage, and the shape of the vent (by making a hole in the cap of the soda bottle) to understand the processes that are influencing the height and duration of the eruption column. The activity can be tailored to demonstrate basic principles of gas exsolution and expansion for young students, but can also be extended to more complex principles of heterogeneous bubble nucleation and decreasing surface tension for college students. We present results from Mentos and soda experiments by a group of college freshman in the elementary education program (with no real science background). We compare students' resultant understanding of the similarities and differences between volcanic eruptions and the experiments with the results from a similar activity performed by a group of graduate geology students. The Mentos and soda reaction is dramatic. Video clips of people, young and old, trying this experiment across the world can be found on the world wide web. We suggest that the popularity of this demonstration be used to help teach fundamental concepts in both volcanology and scientific experimentation.

  10. Uranium fallout from nuclear-powered satellites and volcanic eruptions

    Radiochemical measurements were carried out uranium isotopes in a total of 77 rain and snow samples collected at Fayetteville (360N, 940W), Arkansas, during the period between April 1983 and July 1985. The presence of excess 235U was detected in many of the rain samples and it was attributed to the fallout from the nuclear reactor on board the Soviet satellite Cosmos-1402, which fell over the South Atlantic Ocean on 7 February 1983 (Bakhtiar, 1985). Meanwhile, marked increases in the concentrations of naturally-occurring uranium and thorium isotopes were observed in rain samples collected during 1983 and these increases were attributed to the fallout from the 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano in Mexico. At the beginning of 1984, the 235U/238U ratio in rain water was rapidly decreasing and it appeared as if the effects of both the 1982 eruption of El Chichon and the 1983 fall of the nuclear-powered satellite Cosmos-1402 on the concentration of uranium isotopes in rain water would dissipate and the levels of uranium in rain would soon return to normal during the early part of 1985. Sharp increases in the 234U/238U ratios in rain were observed during the months of May and June 1085. These results most likely indicate the effects of delayed fallouts from the two events-the 1982 eruption of El Chichon and the 1983 fall of cosmos-1402

  11. Postglacial eruptive history of the Askja region, North Iceland

    Hartley, Margaret E.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; de Joux, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Temporal variations in magma discharge rates on Iceland's neovolcanic rift zones have been associated with deglaciation. We have used tephrochronological and stratigraphic dating of 175 separate eruptive units to estimate volumetric output and reconstruct eruption rates in the Askja region over the postglacial period. We have identified 14 tephra layers that can be used as time marker horizons in the near vicinity of Askja, including the Vatnaöldur (871 ± 2 AD) tephra which has not previously been reported in surface cover profiles in this region. Our improved tephrochronological resolution indicates that, over the past c. 1,500 years, Askja has been significantly more active than has previously been recognised. A minimum of 39 km3 of basaltic magma has been erupted at Askja since the area became ice-free at around 10.3 ka. The absence of the 7.2 ka Hekla 5 tephra from the Askja region suggests that all postglacial lavas now exposed at the surface are younger than 7.2 ka. Time-averaged magma discharge rates at Askja were highest between 7.2 and 4.3 ka. However, the available tephrochronological resolution is not sufficient to resolve any peak in volcanic activity following deglaciation.

  12. The role of filament activation in a solar eruption

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Romano, Paolo; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Observations show that the mutual relationship between filament eruptions and solar flares cannot be described in terms of an unique scenario. In some cases, the eruption of a filament appears to trigger a flare, while in others the observations are more consistent with magnetic reconnection that produces both the flare observational signatures (e.g., ribbons, plasma jets, post-flare loops, etc.) and later the destabilization and eruption of a filament. We study an event which occurred in NOAA 8471, where a flare and the activation of (at least) two filaments were observed on 28 February 1999. By using imaging data acquired in the 1216, 1600, 171 and 195 \\AA\\ TRACE channels and by BBSO in the continnum and in H$\\alpha$, a morphological study of the event is carried out. Using TRACE 1216 and 1600 \\AA\\ data, an estimate of the "pure" Ly$\\alpha$ power is obtained. The extrapolation of the magnetic field lines is done using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms and assuming a potential field. The potential magnetic field ext...

  13. ClC-7 Deficiency Impairs Tooth Development and Eruption.

    Wang, He; Pan, Meng; Ni, Jinwen; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yutao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; He, Huiming; Wu, Buling; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    CLCN7 gene encodes the voltage gated chloride channel 7 (ClC-7) in humans. The mutations in CLCN7 have been associated with osteopetrosis in connection to the abnormal osteoclasts functions. Previously, we found that some osteopetrosis patients with CLCN7 mutations suffered from impacted teeth and root dysplasia. Here we set up two in vivo models under a normal or an osteoclast-poor environment to investigate how ClC-7 affects tooth development and tooth eruption. Firstly, chitosan-Clcn7-siRNA nanoparticles were injected around the first maxillary molar germ of newborn mice and caused the delay of tooth eruption and deformed tooth with root dysplasia. Secondly, E13.5 molar germs infected with Clcn7 shRNA lentivirus were transplanted under the kidney capsule and presented the abnormal changes in dentin structure, periodontal tissue and cementum. All these teeth changes have been reported in the patients with CLCN7 mutation. In vitro studies of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and dental follicle cells (DFCs) were conducted to explore the involved mechanism. We found that Clcn7 deficiency affect the differentiation of these cells, as well as the interaction between DFCs and osteoclasts through RANKL/OPG pathway. We conclude that ClC-7 may affect tooth development by directly targeting tooth cells, and regulate tooth eruption through DFC mediated osteoclast pathway. PMID:26829236

  14. Possible sub-glacial eruptions in the Galaxias Quadrangle, Mars

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Wilson, Lionel

    2016-03-01

    We have identified several landforms in the Galaxias Quadrangle of Mars (MTM 35217), 33.0-35.5°N, 216.0-218.0°W which are consistent with this area having been covered by an ancient ice sheet concurrent with volcanic eruptions. Volcanic activity was initiated by the intrusion of several large dikes measuring ∼50-100 m wide and protruding up to ∼35 m above the present-day surface. These dikes appear to have originated from Elysium Planitia ∼600 km to the SE. In one instance, a dike (at an elevation of -3750 m) appears to have produced a subglacial mound (referred to here as "Galaxias Mons 2") that evolved into an extrusive eruption and produced copious volumes of melt water that carved an outflow channel that extends almost 300 km to the north. At a lower elevation (-3980 m), a second putative dike may have failed to break the surface of the ice sheet and formed Galaxias Mons as a laccolithic intrusion. We numerically model the formation of Galaxias Mons and find that at least 200 m of ice may once have existed at this latitude at the time of the dike intrusions. Such a conclusion supports the idea that enigmatic small domes in the area may be pingoes. Collectively, these observations suggest that the previous interpretations for the origin of near-by Hrad Vallis as a sub-aerial eruption may need to be revised.

  15. Recovery from Giant Eruptions in Very Massive Stars

    Kashi, Amit; Humphreys, Roberta M

    2015-01-01

    We use a hydro-and-radiative-transfer code to explore the behavior of a very massive star (VMS) after a giant eruption -- i.e., following a supernova impostor event. Beginning with a reasonable model for an evolved VMS, we simulate the change of state caused by a giant eruption via two methods that explicitly conserve total energy: 1. Synthetically removing outer layers of mass while reducing the energy of the inner layers. 2. Synthetically transferring energy from the core to the outer layers, an operation that automatically causes mass ejection. Our focus is on the aftermath, not the poorly-understood eruption itself. Then, using a radiation-hydrodynamic code in 1D with realistic opacities and convection, the interior disequilibrium state is followed for about 200 years. Typically the star develops a $\\sim 400 ~\\rm{km}~\\rm{s}^{-1}$ wind with a mass loss rate that begins around $0.1 ~M_\\odot~\\rm{yr^{-1}}$ and gradually decreases. This outflow is driven by $\\kappa$-mechanism radial pulsations. In some cases a...

  16. An imaging study of a complex solar coronal radio eruption

    Feng, S W; Song, H Q; Wang, B; Kong, X L

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal radio bursts are enhanced radio emission excited by energetic electrons accelerated during solar eruptions, studies on which are important for investigating the origin and physical mechanism of energetic particles and further diagnosing coronal parameters. Earlier studies suffered from a lack of simultaneous high-quality imaging data of the radio burst and the eruptive structure in the inner corona. Here we present a study on a complex solar radio eruption consisting of a type II and three reversely-drifting type III bursts, using simultaneous EUV and radio imaging data. It is found that the type II burst is closely associated with a propagating and evolving CME-driven EUV shock structure, originated initially at the northern shock flank and later transferred to the top part of the shock. This source transfer is co-incident with the presence of shock decay and enhancing signatures observed at the corresponding side of the EUV front. The electron energy accelerated by the shock at the flank is es...

  17. Earth's rotation variability triggers explosive eruptions in subduction zones

    Sottili, Gianluca; Palladino, Danilo M.; Cuffaro, Marco; Doglioni, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The uneven Earth's spinning has been reported to affect geological processes, i.e. tectonism, seismicity and volcanism, on a planetary scale. Here, we show that changes of the length of day (LOD) influence eruptive activity at subduction margins. Statistical analysis indicates that eruptions with volcanic explosivity index (VEI) ≥3 alternate along oppositely directed subduction zones as a function of whether the LOD increases or decreases. In particular, eruptions in volcanic arcs along contractional subduction zones, which are mostly E- or NE-directed, occur when LOD increases, whereas they are more frequent when LOD decreases along the opposite W- or SW-directed subduction zones that are rather characterized by upper plate extension and back-arc spreading. We find that the LOD variability determines a modulation of the horizontal shear stresses acting on the crust up to 0.4 MPa. An increase of the horizontal maximum stress in compressive regimes during LOD increment may favour the rupture of the magma feeder system wall rocks. Similarly, a decrease of the minimum horizontal stress in extensional settings during LOD lowering generates a larger differential stress, which may enhance failure of the magma-confining rocks. This asymmetric behaviour of magmatism sheds new light on the role of astronomical forces in the dynamics of the solid Earth.

  18. Conservation of erupting ungulate populations on islands – a comment

    Anne Gunn

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A generalised model for herbivores experiencing abundant forage over time is that their numbers erupt and then decline. This model has been applied to fluctuations in caribou (Rangifer tarandus populations especially those on islands. Since this generalised model for erupting herbivores was first proposed, two assumptions have slipped in (1 that an erupting population will crash; and (2 that the crash will be density-dependent. The problem with the assumptions is that, without testing, they can lead to inappropriate management such as culls. The first assumption arises from uncritical use of earlier accounts and the second assumption from not discriminating between the effects of environmental variation from the effects of the high herbivore numbers on forage availability (density-dependence. Often typical densitydependent effects such as lowered initial reproduction, reduced early survival of calves, and subsequent calf, yearling and juvenile survival are used to justify the contention that there are too many herbivores. But such reasoning is flawed unless cause/effect relationships are established and the role of environmental variation is evaluated. We argue that it is overly simplistic to believe that every population’s subsequent performance and fate will follow a singular pattern with only one paramount factor driving and ultimately dictating an inevitable outcome. The relative importance of unpredictable abiotic factors in influencing and causing variation in the response of ungulate populations should be investigated, no matter whether those factors are sporadic or periodic.

  19. Magnetic field re-arrangement after prominence eruption

    It has long been known that magnetic reconnection plays a fundamental role in a variety of solar events. Although mainly invoked in flare problems, large-scale loops interconnecting active regions, evolving coronal hole boundaries, the solar magnetic cycle itself, provide different evidence of phenomena which involve magnetic reconnection. A further example might be given by the magnetic field rearrangement which occurs after the eruption of a prominence. Since most often a prominence reforms after its disappearance and may be observed at about the same position it occupied before erupting, the magnetic field has to undergo a temporary disruption to relax back, via reconnection, to a configuration similar to the previous one. The above sequence of events is best observable in the case of two-ribbon (2-R) flares but most probably is associated with all filament eruptions. Even if the explanation of the magnetic field rearrangement after 2-R flares in terms of reconnection is generally accepted, the lack of a three-dimensional model capable of describing the field reconfiguration, has prevented, up to now, a thorough analysis of its topology as traced by Hα/x-ray loops. The purpose of the present work is to present a numerical technique which enables one to predict and visualize the reconnected configuration, at any time t, and therefore allows one to make a significant comparison of observations and model predictions throughout the whole process. 5 refs., 3 figs

  20. Sun-to-Earth Analysis of a Major Solar Eruption

    Patsourakos, Spiros

    During the interval of 7-10 March 2012, Earth's space environment experienced a barrage of space weather phenomena. Early during 7 March 2012, the biggest proton event of 2012 took place, while on 8 March 2012, an interplanetary shock and coronal mass ejection (CME) arrived at 1 AU. This sequence trigerred the biggest geomagnetic storm of cycle 24 so far. The solar source of these activities was a pair of homologous, eruptive X-class flares associated with two ultra-fast CMEs. The two eruptions originated from NOAA active region 11429 during the early hours of 7 March 2012 and within an hour from each other. Using satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions and monitors, we perform a synergistic Sun-to-Earth study of various observational aspects of the event sequences. We will present an attempt to formulate a cohesive scenario which couples the eruption initiation, interplanetary propagation, and geospace consequences. Our main focus is on building a framework that starting from solar and near-Sun estimates of the magnetic and dynamic content and properties of the Earth-directed CME assess in advance the subsequent geomagnetic response expected, once the associated interplanetary CME reaches 1 AU. This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  1. Greenland ice core evidence of the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption

    C. Barbante

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic tephra are indepenent age horizons and can synchronize strata of various paleoclimate records including ice and sediment cores. Before such paleoclimate records can be synchronized, it is essential to first confidently identify individual independent marker horizons. The Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP ice core from Central Greenland is often used as a "golden spike" to synchronize Northern Hemisphere paleoclimte records. The Holocene section of the GRIP ice core is dated by multi-parameter annual layer counting, and contains peaks in acidity, SO42− and microparticle concentrations at a depth of 428.4 to 429.6 m, which have not previously been definitively ascribed to a volcanic eruption. Here, we identify tephra particles and determine that volcanic shards extracted from a depth of 429.2 m in the GRIP ice core are likely due to the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption. The chemical compositon of the tephra particles is consistent with the K-phonolitic composition of the Vesuvius juvinile ejecta and differs from the chemical composition of other major eruptions (≥VEI 4 between 50–100 AD.

  2. Pre-eruptive volatile content, degassing paths and depressurisation explaining the transition in style at the subglacial rhyolitic eruption of Dalakvísl, South Iceland

    Owen, Jacqueline; Tuffen, Hugh; McGarvie, David W.

    2013-05-01

    Many volcanoes express a variety of contrasting eruptive styles with behavioural transitions between explosive and effusive activities. Understanding eruptive mechanisms is of key importance but we currently have little insight into the behavioural controls for rhyolitic eruptions beneath ice. This paper addresses a subglacial rhyolitic eruption at Dalakvísl in South Iceland that involved both explosive and effusive activities. We present measurements of pre- and post-eruptive magmatic volatile contents that we use to track magma degassing from the chamber to the surface and reconstruct pressure conditions during the eruption. Explosive and effusive phases involve significant differences in: (1) pre-eruptive volatile contents; (2) the ‘openness' of magma degassing; and (3) inferred confining pressure. This final factor is potentially associated with a jökulhlaup-induced decompression. Due to the combination of these factors Dalakvísl experienced a change from effusive to explosive behaviour, although we cannot currently resolve cause from effect. Our work points towards complex interactions between the dynamics of magma ascent and the response of overlying ice and meltwater during rhyolitic eruptions beneath ice.

  3. Eruptive history and magmatic stability of Erebus volcano, Antarctica: Insights from englacial tephra

    Iverson, Nels A.; Kyle, Philip R.; Dunbar, Nelia W.; McIntosh, William C.; Pearce, Nicholas J. G.

    2014-11-01

    tephrostratigraphy of the active Antarctic Erebus volcano was determined from englacial tephra on the ice-covered flanks of Erebus and an adjacent volcano. The tephra are used to reconstruct the eruptive history and magmatic evolution of Erebus. More fine-grained and blocky particles define tephra formed in phreatomagmatic eruptions and larger fluidal shards are characteristic of magmatic eruptions and in some cases both eruptive types are identified in a single mixed tephra. The eruptions forming the mixed tephra likely started as phreatomagmatic eruptions which transitioned into Strombolian eruptions as the nonmagmatic water source was exhausted. We reconstructed the eruptive history of Erebus using the tephra layers stratigraphic position, 40Ar/39Ar ages, shard morphology, and grain size. Major and trace element analyses of individual glass shards were measured by electron probe microanalysis and LA-ICP-MS. Trachybasalt, trachyte, and phonolite tephra were identified. All phonolitic tephra are Erebus-derived with compositions similar to volcanic bombs erupted from Erebus over the past 40 years. The tephra show that Erebus magma has not significantly changed for 40 ka. The uniformity of the glass chemical composition implies that the phonolite magma has crystallized in the same manner without change throughout the late Quaternary, suggesting long-term stability of the Erebus magmatic system. Trachyte and trachybasalt tephra were likely erupted from Marie Byrd Land and the McMurdo Sound area, respectively. The trachytic tephra can be regionally correlated and could provide an important time-stratigraphic marker in Antarctic ice cores.

  4. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  5. Hydrothermal alteration favoring phreatic eruption processes at Solfatara (Campi Flegrei)

    Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Montanaro, Cristian; Aßbichler, Donjá; Isaia, Roberto; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Solfatara and Pisciarelli fumaroles are the main surface manifestations of the strong hydrothermal activity within the Campi Flegrei caldera system and pointing to a significant risk for phreatic eruptions in this densely populated area. Phreatic eruptions, triggered by various processes are hardly predictable in occurrence time and size. Despite their hazard potential, these eruptions, as well as the influence of hydrothermal alteration on their likelihood, magnitude and style, have so far been largely overlooked in experimental volcanology. The physical properties and the mechanical behavior of volcanic rocks are highly dependent on their original magmatic microstructure and on any eventual alteration of those microstructures due to hydrothermal reactions. We have therefore investigated the potential effects of hydrothermal alteration on rock microstructure and, as a consequence, on fragmentation dynamics. Rock samples from the vicinity of the Solfatara and Pisciarelli fumaroles have been characterized 1) geochemically (X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction), 2) physically (density, porosity, permeability and elastic wave velocity) and 3) mechanically (uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength). We furthermore have investigated the effects of hydrothermal alteration on fragmentation processes using a shock-tube apparatus, operating with Argon gas, water vapor and superheated water at temperatures up to 400°C and maximum pressures of 20 MPa. Fragmentation and ejection dynamics in the presence of three different energy sources within the pores have been investigated: overpressure by 1) Argon gas; or 2) water vapor and due to 3) steam flashing of superheated water. Fragmentation speed, fragmentation efficiency and fragmented particle ejection velocity were measured. Our results indicate on the one hand, that steam flashing provides the highest energy - resulting in increased fragmentation speed and particle ejection velocity and also a significant higher

  6. Phenytoin/albendazole induced exanthematous eruptions: a case report

    M. Ravishankar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Exanthematous drug eruptions, often called and ldquo;drug rashes and rdquo; or and ldquo;maculopapular eruptions and rdquo; by non-dermatologists are the most common form of cutaneous drug eruption. Cutaneous reactions are among the most common adverse effects of drugs, including penicillins, cephalosporins, sulfonamides, and allopurinol (with an incidence of up to 50 cases per 1000 new users, and particularly the aromatic amine anti-seizure medications, including carbamazepine, phenytoin, and lamotrigine (with an incidence of up to 100 cases per 1000 new users. Phenytoin is a hydantoin derivative anticonvulsant drug used primarily in the management of complex partial seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Albendazole is a benzimidazole medication used for the treatment of a variety of parasitic worm infestations. Carbamazepine and phenytoin are among the most common causes of antiepileptic drug-related cutaneous adverse reactions. Manifestations range from a mild erythematous maculopapular rash to life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Albendazole induced rashes and urticaria have been reported in less than 1% of the patients. Here we present the case of a 12-year-old male patient who came to the dermatology outpatient department with complaints of itching and maculopapular eruptions all over the body. The patient gave a history of taking tablet phenytoin and tablet albendazole for neurocysticercosis since 1-week. There was no fever or any other systemic manifestations. There was no history of any other drug intake. A diagnosis of phenytoin/albendazole induced exanthematous eruptions was made. Both the medications were discontinued, and the patient was advised to take syrup sodium valproate 200 mg BD. For the rashes and itching, the patient was advised to take tablet hydroxyzine HCl 10 mg OD, tablet prednisolone and tablet levocetirizine for 5 days. Improvement was seen and the itching reduced

  7. Tidal Control of Jet Eruptions Observed by Cassini ISS

    Hurford, T. A.; Helfenstein, P.; Spitale, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Observations by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) of Enceladus' south polar region at high phase angles has revealed jets of material venting into space. Observations by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) have also shown that the south polar region is anomalously warm with hotspots associated with geological features called the Tiger Stripes. The Tiger Stripes are large rifts near the south pole of Enceladus, which are typically about 130 km in length, 2 km wide, with a trough 500 m deep, and are l1anked on each side by 100m tall ridges. Preliminary triangulation of jets as viewed at different times and with different viewing geometries in Cassini ISS images taken between 2005 and 2007 have constrained the locations of eight major eruptions of material and found all of them associated with the south polar fractures unofficially the 'Tiger Stripes', and found four of them coincident with the hotspots reported in 2006 by CIRS. While published ISS observations of jet activity suggest that individual eruption sites stay active on the timescale of years, any shorter temporal variability (on timescales of an orbital period, or 1.3 Earth days, for example) is more difficult to establish because of the spotty temporal coverage and the difficulty of visually isolating one jet from the forest of many seen in a typical image. Consequently, it is not known whether individual jets are continuously active, randomly active, or if they erupt on a predictable, periodic schedule. One mechanism that may control the timing of eruptions is diurnal tidal stress, which oscillates between compression/tension as well as right and left lateral shear at any given location throughout Enceladus' orbit and may allow the cracks to open and close regularly. We examine the stresses on the Tiger Stripe regions to see how well diurnal tidal stress caused by Enceladus' orbital eccentricity may possibly correlate with and thus control the observed eruptions. We then identify

  8. Volcanic eruptions with little warning: the case of Volcán Reventador's Surprise November 3, 2002 Eruption, Ecuador

    Minard Hall; Patricio Ramón; Patricia Mothes; Jean Luc LePennec; Alexander García; Pablo Samaniego; Hugo Yepes

    2004-01-01

    Successful mitigation of a possible volcanic disaster depends upon the early detection of renewed volcanic activity. With considerable optimism, volcano observatories instrument dangerous volcanoes, with the hope of an early recognition of the reactivation of a volcano. Reventador volcano's November 3, 2002 eruption came with little warning and had a tremendous socio-economic impact. Reventador volcano, a young andesitic cone in the Eastern Cordillera of Ecuador, has had, at least, 16 eruptio...

  9. Ascent and Eruption of Magma: A Planetary Perspective

    Head, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the generation, ascent, and eruption of magma on the Earth and planets provides substantial information about the geological history and thermal evolution of each body. A synthesis of the array of extrusive features and landforms seen on the terrestrial planets provides insight into eruption styles, lithospheric stress states, and mantle convection. Surface elemental compositions of the terrestrial planets are consistent with a range of mantle compositions, but all are likely to produce mafic to ultramafic melts. The main controls on the types of surface volcanic features and accumulations are differences in 1) magma composition/volatile content, 2) tectonic regimes, 3) crustal densities, 4) crust and lithosphere thicknesses, and 5) mantle convective style. Preferred locations for magma reservoirs are either at depth within a planetary interior or relatively shallow within a volcanic edifice. Deeper reservoirs can form near the rheological change at the base of the lithosphere, at upwellings due to pressure-release melting, or at vertical discontinuities in density such as at the base of the crust. Evidence for reservoirs in edifices is seen in calderas. Evidence for deeper magma bodies is seen in giant dike swarms. The position of ascending mantle flow is marked by broad rises formed from thermal uplift, enhanced crustal construction, and individual edifices built by surface eruptions. On Venus, volcanic complexes/rises are accompanied by large annular deformational features (coronae) produced by a combination of uplift and accommodation of intrusive and extrusive loads. Shallow magma reservoirs are commonly formed within volcanic edifices on Earth, Mars, and Venus. Building a volcanic edifice and reservoir requires multiple pulses of magma to rise frequently within a spatially restricted region over an extended period of time. On the Moon, in contrast, low eruption frequencies and great flow lengths ensure that typical large edifices will not form

  10. Eruptive dynamics during magma decompression: a laboratory approach

    Spina, L.; Cimarelli, C.; Scheu, B.; Wadsworth, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of eruptive styles characterizes the activity of a given volcano. Indeed, eruptive styles can range from effusive phenomena to explosive eruptions, with related implications for hazard management. Rapid changes in eruptive style can occur during an ongoing eruption. These changes are, amongst other, related to variations in the magma ascent rate, a key parameter affecting the eruptive style. Ascent rate is in turn dependent on several factors such as the pressure in the magma chamber, the physical properties of the magma and the rate at which these properties change. According to the high number of involved parameters, laboratory decompression experiments are the best way to achieve quantitative information on the interplay of each of those factors and the related impact on the eruption style, i.e. by analyzing the flow and deformation behavior of the transparent volatile-bearing analogue fluid. We carried out decompression experiments following different decompression paths and using silicone oil as an analogue for the melt, with which we can simulate a range of melt viscosity values. For a set of experiments we added rigid particles to simulate the presence of crystals in the magma. The pure liquid or suspension was mounted into a transparent autoclave and pressurized to different final pressures. Then the sample was saturated with argon for a fixed amount of time. The decompression path consists of a slow decompression from the initial pressure to the atmospheric condition. Alternatively, samples were decompressed almost instantaneously, after established steps of slow decompression. The decompression path was monitored with pressure transducers and a high-speed video camera. Image analysis of the videos gives quantitative information on the bubble distribution with respect to depth in the liquid, pressure and time of nucleation and on their characteristics and behavior during the ongoing magma ascent. Furthermore, we also monitored the evolution of

  11. Eruption rate, area, and length relationships for some Hawaiian lava flows

    Pieri, David C.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    1986-01-01

    The relationships between the morphological parameters of lava flows and the process parameters of lava composition, eruption rate, and eruption temperature were investigated using literature data on Hawaiian lava flows. Two simple models for lava flow heat loss by Stefan-Boltzmann radiation were employed to derive eruption rate versus planimetric area relationship. For the Hawaiian basaltic flows, the eruption rate is highly correlated with the planimetric area. Moreover, this observed correlation is superior to those from other obvious combinations of eruption rate and flow dimensions. The correlations obtained on the basis of the two theoretical models, suggest that the surface of the Hawaiian flows radiates at an effective temperature much less than the inner parts of the flowing lava, which is in agreement with field observations. The data also indicate that the eruption rate versus planimetric area correlations can be markedly degraded when data from different vents, volcanoes, and epochs are combined.

  12. Volatiles from the 1994 Eruptions of Rabaul: Understanding Large Caldera Systems

    Roggensack; Williams; Schaefer; Parnell

    1996-07-26

    The 1994 eruption of Rabaul, in Papua New Guinea, involved a small plinian eruption at Vulcan and a vulcanian eruption on the opposite side of the caldera at Tavurvur. Vulcan's ash leachates indicate seawater interaction that is consistent with earlier observations of low sulfur dioxide emissions and the presence of ice crystals in the initial plinian eruption cloud. In contrast, Tavurvur ash leachates indicate no seawater interaction, and later sulfur dioxide emissions remained high despite low-level eruptive activity. Silicic melt inclusions indicate that the andesitic melt contained about 2 weight percent water and negligible carbon dioxide. Mafic melt inclusions in Tavurvur ash have water and carbon dioxide contents that vary systematically over the course of the eruption. The mafic melt inclusions suggest that a mafic dike intruded from below the silicic chamber and provide further evidence that mafic intrusions drive caldera unrest. PMID:8662536

  13. How predictable are the volcano eruptions? from global scale to Piton de la Fournaise volcano.

    Schmid, Agathe,

    2011-01-01

    This PhD work focused on several aspects of the eruptions prediction. It allowed us to consider different space scales from global scale to a single volcano, Piton de la Fournaise, through statistical approaches. We then focused more specifically on the volcano-seismicity associated to its eruptive processes, using deterministic methods. First, we analyzed the statistical properties of the eruptive dynamics at the global scale. The emergence of recurrent power laws allowed us to relate the er...

  14. Radio Frequency Models of Novae in eruption. I. The Free-Free Process in Bipolar Morphologies

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Chomiuk, L.; Munari, U.; Steffen, W.; Koning, N.; O'Brien, T. J.; Simon, T.; Woudt, P. A.; Bode, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of novae at radio frequencies provide us with a measure of the total ejected mass, density profile and kinetic energy of a nova eruption. The radio emission is typically well characterized by the free-free emission process. Most models to date have assumed spherical symmetry for the eruption, although it has been known for as long as there have been radio observations of these systems, that spherical eruptions are to simplistic a geometry. In this paper, we build bipolar models o...

  15. A case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption and cross-reaction with piperazine derivatives

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Jo, Eun-Jung; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, Sae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption is an uncommon adverse drug reaction caused by delayed cell-mediated hypersensitivity. Levocetirizine is an active (R)-enatiomer of cetirizine and there have been a few reports of fixed drug eruption related to these antihistamines. We experienced a case of levocetirizine-induced fixed drug eruption and cross-reaction with other piperazine derivatives confirmed by patch test. A 73-year-old female patient presented with recurrent generalized itching, cutaneous bullae format...

  16. Multi Eruption Solar Energetic Particle Events Observed with SOHO/ERNE

    Al-Sawad, Amjad

    2007-01-01

    A combination of many Solar energetic particle (SEP) events, each one of which is associated with a single eruption, can create one complex intensity-time profile, that will result in masking the observation of the first injected particles detected near Earth for each participated eruption. We defined such SEP events as Multi Eruption Solar Energetic Particle (MESEP) events. We have investigated the intensity-time profile of 333 solar energetic particle events during the operation time of SOH...

  17. January 2002 volcano-tectonic eruption of Nyiragongo volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Tedesco, D.; Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Napoli 2, Italy; Vaselli, O.; Department of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Via La Pira 4, 50121 Florence, Italy; Papale, P.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Pisa, Pisa, Italia; Carn, S. A.; Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Voltaggio, M.; Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome, Italy; Sawyer, G. M.; Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK; Durieux, J.; Goma Volcano Observatory; Kasereka, M.; Goma Volcano Observatory, Mount Goma, Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo; Tassi, F.; Department of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

    2007-01-01

    In January 2002, Nyiragongo volcano erupted 14–34 × 106 m3 of lava from fractures on its southern flanks. The nearby city of Goma was inundated by two lava flows, which caused substantial socioeconomic disruption and forced the mass exodus of the population, leaving nearly 120,000 people homeless. Field observations showed marked differences between the lava erupted from the northern portion of the fracture system and that later erupted from the southern part. These observations are confirmed...

  18. Potential impact of the 74 ka Toba eruption on the Balkan region, SE Europe

    Wagner, B.; Leng, M. J.; Wilke, T.; A. Böhm; K. Panagiotopoulos; Vogel, H; Lacey, J.; G. Zanchetta; R. Sulpizio

    2013-01-01

    The 74 ka Toba eruption in Sumatra, Indonesia, is considered to be one of the largest volcanic events during the Quaternary. Tephra from the Toba eruption has been found in many terrestrial and marine sedimentary deposits, and acidity peaks related to the eruption have been used to synchronize ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica. Seismic profiles from Lake Prespa on the Balkan Peninsula, SE Europe, indicate a lake level lowstand, which is confirmed by the occurrence of an ex...

  19. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J.; White, James D. L.; Talling, Peter J.; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a sing...

  20. Geyser eruption intervals and interactions: Examples from El Tatio, Atacama, Chile

    Munoz-Saez, Carolina; Namiki, Atsuko; Manga, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We compare and contrast data collected in 2012 and 2014 from the El Tatio geyser field, Chile. We identify geyser systems that evolve over time, including changes in the interval between eruptions, development of new thermal features, and interactions between geysers. We study three different cases: (a) an isolated geyser, which is periodic and has nearly identical eruptions every cycle; (b) a geyser and coupled noneruptive pool, where the geyser has nonregular cycles and several preplay eruptions before the main eruption; and (c) two geysers and a mud volcano, which have nonregular cycles and are all interacting. Though geysers erupt with different styles, we recognize some common features: the conduit recharges with liquid during the quiescent period, bubbles enter the conduit before eruptions, and eruptions occur when water boils in the upper part of the conduit. The episodic addition of heat may govern the periodicity, while the depth where heat is added dictates the eruption style: conduits with deeper heat input are more likely to show preplay or minor eruptions. The interactions between thermal features can be explained by pressure transmission in subsurface permeable layers between geyser conduits.

  1. Eruption age of permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors in the south Indian population

    Gupta Rakhi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The existing eruption schedules for permanent and deciduous dentition are based on studies in the Western population. Since Indians differ from Westerners racially, genetically, and environmentally, these studies fail to provide relevant guidance on the eruption schedule in the Indian population. This study aims at determining the eruption pattern of permanent mandibular molars and central incisors in the south Indian population. Materials and Methods: 10,156 apparently healthy Indian children in the age-group of 6-9 years were examined with mouth mirror and probe under adequate illumination for the status of the eruption of the permanent mandibular first molar and permanent mandibular central incisor. Pearson′s Chi-square test with Yates′ continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value for comparison of proportion between girls and boys. The values obtained in our study were compared with the standard values. The Z-test with continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value. Results: As per our study, the permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors erupted one to two years later compared to the values reported in Westerners. The earlier eruption of the permanent mandibular first molars compared to the permanent mandibular central incisors, as well as the earlier eruption of both the teeth in girls compared to boys, were in accordance with the existing literature. Conclusion: The eruption age reported by us may form a standard reference for eruption age in Indians.

  2. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    Tilling, Robert I.; Rubin, Meyer; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Carey, Steven; Duffield, Wendell A.; Rose, William I., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichón was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated dome-growth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichón's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  3. Eruptive fracture location forecasts from high-frequency events on Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    De Barros, Louis; Bean, Christopher J.; Zecevic, Megan; Brenguier, Florent; Peltier, Aline

    2013-01-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion island) is a very active basaltic volcano, with five eruptions between Nov 2009 and Dec 2010. Pre-eruptive seismic crises usually last for a few hours and mainly consist of a volcano-tectonic swarm. During the quiescent period between the volcano-tectonic swarm and the eruptive tremor, we identify another swarm of events with a very high frequency content. These events are shallow and are located close to the future eruption site. They seem associated w...

  4. Causes and consequences of conduit wall permeability changes during explosive eruptions

    Rust, Alison; Hanson, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Magmatic volatiles, and in some cases external water, drive explosive volcanic eruptions and so the permeability of magma and conduit wall rocks can modulate the style and intensity of eruptions. Both modelling of eruption dynamics and field studies of lithic clasts indicate that fragmentation levels during explosive silicic eruptions commonly reach depths of kilometres. An important consequence is that substantial deviations from lithostatic pressure are sustained in the conduit during eruption, which, according to finite element modelling, are sufficient to damage a substantial volume of rock around the conduit. Underpressured regions will be susceptible to conduit erosion, widening the conduit; field data provide constraints on erosion rates and erosion depths where subsurface stratigraphy is known. Damage to wall rocks will also increase the rock permeability adjacent to the conduit, which could significantly affect magmatic degassing during and between eruptions. The degree to which external water can interact with magma in the conduit will also depend on wall rock permeability and spatial and temporal variations in pressure. When a major magmatic eruption ceases, deep magma is likely to ascend to fill the lower conduit, and the upper conduit may partially collapse forming vertically extensive breccia. Subvolcanic rocks exposed by exploration and mining of porphyry copper deposits (PCDs) and associated alteration and breccias may provide further field constraints on these models. Although syn- and post-mineralization explosive eruptions likely ruin potential PCDs, earlier eruptions might make space for vertical shallow intrusions and help establish permeable regions conducive to focussing of magmatic fluids required for PCD generation.

  5. Soil radon pulses related to the initial phase of volcanic eruptions

    Segovia, N. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City (Mexico); Mena, M. [IGFUNAM, Mexico City (Mexico)

    1999-08-01

    Soil radon behaviour related to the initial phase of volcanic eruptions is analysed from reported values related to the explosiveness of four American stratovolcaneos: El Chicon (1982) and Popocatepetl (1994) in Mexico, Poas (1987-1990) in Costa Rica and Cerro Negro (1982) in Nicaragua. The measurements in the field were performed with solid-state nuclear track detectors and electrets. The ratio between the magnitudes of the radon in soil peaks generated when the eruptive period started and the average radon values corresponding to quiescence periods indicate a dependence on the volcanic eruptive index for each one of the eruptive periods.

  6. Stereoscopic Analysis of the 31 August 2007 Prominence Eruption and Coronal Mass Ejection

    Liewer, P. C.; Panasenco, O.; Hall, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    The spectacular prominence eruption and CME of 31 August 2007 are analyzed stereoscopically using data from NASA's twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The technique of tie pointing and triangulation (T&T) is used to reconstruct the prominence (or filament when seen on the disk) before and during the eruption. For the first time, a filament barb is reconstructed in three-dimensions, confirming that the barb connects the filament spine to the solar surface. The chirality of the filament system is determined from the barb and magnetogram and confirmed by the skew of the loops of the post-eruptive arcade relative to the polarity reversal boundary below. The T&T analysis shows that the filament rotates as it erupts in the direction expected for a filament system of the given chirality. While the prominence begins to rotate in the slow-rise phase, most of the rotation occurs during the fast-rise phase, after formation of the CME begins. The stereoscopic analysis also allows us to analyze the spatial relationships among various features of the eruption including the pre-eruptive filament, the flare ribbons, the erupting prominence, and the cavity of the coronal mass ejection (CME). We find that erupting prominence strands and the CME have different (non-radial) trajectories; we relate the trajectories to the structure of the coronal magnetic fields. The possible cause of the eruption is also discussed.

  7. Lithofacies, eruptive phases and processes of Udo monogenetic multiple volcano near Jeju Island, South Sea, Korea

    HWANG Sang-koo

    2004-01-01

    A monogenetic multiple volcano was emergent on Udo island, 3 km offthe sea shore of the eastern promontory of Jeju Island, South Sea,Korea. All of the preserved volcanic successions occur in a regular pattern of sequences,representing an excellent example of an eruptive cycle. The island represents volcanic stratigraphy that comprises a horseshoe-shaped tuff cone, a nested cinder cone on the crater floor of the tuff cone,and basalt lavas which extend northwest from the moat between tuff and cinder cones. The volcanic stratigraphy suggests eruptive styles that start with emergent Surtseyan eruption, progressing through Strombolian eruption and end with lava effusion.

  8. Soil radon pulses related to the initial phase of volcanic eruptions

    Soil radon behaviour related to the initial phase of volcanic eruptions is analysed from reported values related to the explosivity of four American stratovolcaneos: El Chicon (1982) and Popocatepetl (1994) in Mexico, Poas (1987-1990) in Costa Rica and Cerro Negro (1982) in Nicaragua. The measurements in the field were performed with solid-state nuclear track detectors and electrets. The ratio between the magnitudes of the radon in soil peaks generated when the eruptive period started and the average radon values corresponding to quiescence periods indicate a dependence on the volcanic eruptive index for each one of the eruptive periods

  9. Late-stage volatile saturation as a potential trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions

    Stock, Michael J.; Humphreys, Madeleine C. S.; Smith, Victoria C.; Isaia, Roberto; Pyle, David M.

    2016-03-01

    Magma reservoirs are thought to grow relatively slowly, assembling incrementally under volatile-saturated conditions. Eruptions may be triggered by injections of volatile-rich melt, or generation of over-pressure due to protracted crystallization. Here, we analyse fluorine, chlorine and water in apatite crystals trapped at different stages of magma evolution, and in melt inclusions from clinopyroxene and biotite crystals expelled during an explosive eruption of the Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, about 4,000 years ago. We combine our geochemical analyses with thermodynamic modelling to reconstruct the evolution of magmatic volatile contents leading up to the explosive eruption. We find that the magma reservoir remained persistently water-undersaturated throughout most of its lifetime. Even crystals in contact with the melt shortly before eruption show that the magma was volatile-undersaturated. Our models suggest that the melt reached volatile saturation at low temperatures, just before eruption. We suggest that late-stage volatile saturation probably triggered the eruption, and conclude that `priming’ of the magma system for eruption may occur on timescales much shorter than the decadal to centennial timescales thought typical for magma reservoir assembly. Thus, surface deformation pulses that record magma assembly at depth beneath Campi Flegrei and other similar magmatic systems may not be immediately followed by an eruption; and explosive eruptions may begin with little warning.

  10. Forecasting volcanic ash dispersal and coeval resuspension during the April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption

    Reckziegel, F.; Bustos, E.; Mingari, L.; Báez, W.; Villarosa, G.; Folch, A.; Collini, E.; Viramonte, J.; Romero, J.; Osores, S.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric dispersion of volcanic ash from explosive eruptions or from subsequent fallout deposit resuspension causes a range of impacts and disruptions on human activities and ecosystems. The April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption in Chile involved eruption and resuspension activities. We overview the chronology, effects, and products resulting from these events, in order to validate an operational forecast strategy for tephra dispersal. The modelling strategy builds on coupling the meteorological Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF/ARW) model with the FALL3D dispersal model for eruptive and resuspension processes. The eruption modelling considers two distinct particle granulometries, a preliminary first guess distribution used operationally when no field data was available yet, and a refined distribution based on field measurements. Volcanological inputs were inferred from eruption reports and results from an Argentina-Chilean ash sample data network, which performed in-situ sampling during the eruption. In order to validate the modelling strategy, results were compared with satellite retrievals and ground deposit measurements. Results indicate that the WRF-FALL3D modelling system can provide reasonable forecasts in both eruption and resuspension modes, particularly when the adjusted granulometry is considered. The study also highlights the importance of having dedicated datasets of active volcanoes furnishing first-guess model inputs during the early stages of an eruption.

  11. The 1677 eruption of La Palma, Canary Islands

    Rodríguez Badiola, E.

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available The 1677 volcanic eruption, located close to the town of Fuencaliente at the south end of La Palma, has been associated with the large volcanic cone of San Antonio, an emission centre showing relatively high energy phreatomagmatic phases. However, detailed geological mapping and a reinterpretation of available eye-witness accounts elearly prove the San Antonio emission centre to be a preexisting volcano related to an eruption that occurred several thousands years earlier. The 1677 eruption, or Volcán de Fuencaliente is a low magnitude eruption composed of a small strombolian vent and a cluster of aligned spatter vents. About 75-125 x 106 m3 of lavas from these spatter vents covered an area of 4.5 x 106 m2 and formed a wide coastal platform with 1.6 x 106 m2 of new land gained from the sea. This modest magnitude eruption is in better accord with the negligible damage caused to the area reported in the contemporary accounts. This revision of the 1677 eruption and its magnitude is relevant for the precise reconstruction of the recent volcanism of La Palma and the correct definition of volcanic hazards in the island.La erupción de 1677, localizada cerca de la población de Fuencaliente en el S de la isla de La Palma, ha sido asociada hasta ahora con el cono volcánico denominado San Antonio. Este centro de emisión presenta fases eruptivas de energía relativamente elevada. El estudio geológico de detalle de esta erupción y la reinterpretación de los relatos de la época indican que el volcán San Antonio es, en realidad, un aparato volcánico preexistente, relacionado con algún episodio eruptivo de varios miles de años de antigüedad. La verdadera erupción de 1677 o Volcán de Fuencaliente, es de baja magnitud y está formada por pequeños centros eruptivos estrombolianos y conos alineados de escorias. El volumen de lavas emitidas es de unos 75-125 x 106 m3 y cubre una extensión de aproximadamente 4.5 x 106 m2, de los cuales 1.6 x 106 m2

  12. Effect of heterogeneities on evaluating earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions

    J. Takekawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent researches have indicated coupling between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Some of them calculated static stress transfer in subsurface induced by the occurrences of earthquakes. Most of their analyses ignored the spatial heterogeneity in subsurface, or only took into account the rigidity layering in the crust. On the other hand, a smaller scale heterogeneity of around hundreds of meters has been suggested by geophysical investigations. It is difficult to reflect that kind of heterogeneity in analysis models because accurate distributions of fluctuation are not well understood in many cases. Thus, the effect of the ignorance of the smaller scale heterogeneity on evaluating the earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions is also not well understood. In the present study, we investigate the influence of the assumption of homogeneity on evaluating earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions using finite element simulations. The crust is treated as a stochastic media with different heterogeneous parameters (correlation length and magnitude of velocity perturbation in our simulations. We adopt exponential and von Karman functions as spatial auto-correlation functions (ACF. In all our simulation results, the ignorance of the smaller scale heterogeneity leads to underestimation of the failure pressure around a chamber wall, which relates to dyke initiation. The magnitude of the velocity perturbation has a larger effect on the tensile failure at the chamber wall than the difference of the ACF and the correlation length. The maximum effect on the failure pressure in all our simulations is about twice larger than that in the homogeneous case. This indicates that the estimation of the earthquake triggering due to static stress transfer should take account of the heterogeneity of around hundreds of meters.

  13. Tidally modulated eruptions on Enceladus: Cassini ISS observations and models

    We use images acquired by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) to investigate the temporal variation of the brightness and height of the south polar plume of Enceladus. The plume's brightness peaks around the moon's apoapse, but with no systematic variation in scale height with either plume brightness or Enceladus' orbital position. We compare our results, both alone and supplemented with Cassini near-infrared observations, with predictions obtained from models in which tidal stresses are the principal control of the eruptive behavior. There are three main ways of explaining the observations: (1) the activity is controlled by right-lateral strike slip motion; (2) the activity is driven by eccentricity tides with an apparent time delay of about 5 hr; (3) the activity is driven by eccentricity tides plus a 1:1 physical libration with an amplitude of about 0.°8 (3.5 km). The second hypothesis might imply either a delayed eruptive response, or a dissipative, viscoelastic interior. The third hypothesis requires a libration amplitude an order of magnitude larger than predicted for a solid Enceladus. While we cannot currently exclude any of these hypotheses, the third, which is plausible for an Enceladus with a subsurface ocean, is testable by using repeat imaging of the moon's surface. A dissipative interior suggests that a regional background heat source should be detectable. The lack of a systematic variation in plume scale height, despite the large variations in plume brightness, is plausibly the result of supersonic flow; the details of the eruption process are yet to be understood.

  14. Erupted cumulate fragments in rhyolites from Lipari (Aeolian Islands)

    Forni, Francesca; Ellis, Ben S.; Bachmann, Olivier; Lucchi, Federico; Tranne, Claudio A.; Agostini, Samuele; Dallai, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Over the last ~267 ky, the island of Lipari has erupted magmas ranging in compositions from basaltic andesites to rhyolites, with a notable compositional gap in the dacite field. Bulk geochemical and isotopic compositions of the volcanic succession, in conjunction with major and trace elemental compositions of minerals, indicate that the rhyolites were dominantly generated via crystal fractionation processes, with subordinate assimilation. Radiogenic (Sr, Nd, and Pb) and stable (O) isotopes independently suggest ≤30 % of crustal contamination with the majority of it occurring in mafic compositions, likely relatively deep in the system. Within the rhyolites, crystal-rich, K2O-rich enclaves are common. In contrast to previous interpretations, we suggest that these enclaves represent partial melting, remobilization and eruption of cumulate fragments left-over from rhyolite melt extraction. Cumulate melting and remobilization is supported by the presence of (1) resorbed, low-temperature minerals (biotite and sanidine), providing the potassic signature to these clasts, (2) reacted Fo-rich olivine, marking the presence of mafic recharge, (3) An38-21 plagioclase, filling the gap in feldspar composition between the andesites and the rhyolites and (4) strong enrichment in Sr and Ba in plagioclase and sanidine, suggesting crystallization from a locally enriched melt. Based on Sr-melt partitioning, the high-Sr plagioclase would require ~2300 ppm Sr in the melt, a value far in excess of Sr contents in Lipari and Vulcano magmas (50-1532 ppm) but consistent with melting of a feldspar-rich cumulate. Due to the presence of similar crystal-rich enclaves within the rhyolites from Vulcano, we propose that the eruption of remobilized cumulates associated with high-SiO2 rhyolites may be a common process at the Aeolian volcanoes, as already attested for a variety of volcanic systems around the world.

  15. Tidally modulated eruptions on Enceladus: Cassini ISS observations and models

    Nimmo, Francis [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Porco, Carolyn; Mitchell, Colin, E-mail: carolyn@ciclops.org [CICLOPS, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We use images acquired by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) to investigate the temporal variation of the brightness and height of the south polar plume of Enceladus. The plume's brightness peaks around the moon's apoapse, but with no systematic variation in scale height with either plume brightness or Enceladus' orbital position. We compare our results, both alone and supplemented with Cassini near-infrared observations, with predictions obtained from models in which tidal stresses are the principal control of the eruptive behavior. There are three main ways of explaining the observations: (1) the activity is controlled by right-lateral strike slip motion; (2) the activity is driven by eccentricity tides with an apparent time delay of about 5 hr; (3) the activity is driven by eccentricity tides plus a 1:1 physical libration with an amplitude of about 0.°8 (3.5 km). The second hypothesis might imply either a delayed eruptive response, or a dissipative, viscoelastic interior. The third hypothesis requires a libration amplitude an order of magnitude larger than predicted for a solid Enceladus. While we cannot currently exclude any of these hypotheses, the third, which is plausible for an Enceladus with a subsurface ocean, is testable by using repeat imaging of the moon's surface. A dissipative interior suggests that a regional background heat source should be detectable. The lack of a systematic variation in plume scale height, despite the large variations in plume brightness, is plausibly the result of supersonic flow; the details of the eruption process are yet to be understood.

  16. Bullous Fixed Drug Eruption Probably Induced by Paracetamol

    Agarwala, Manoj Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sramana; Sekhar, M Raja; Peter, CV Dincy

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 42-year-old male who presented with second episode of bullous eruptions after ingestion of paracetamol. There were no systemic complaints. The temporal correlation with the drug, history of a similar episode and the quick improvement led us to a diagnosis of bullous fixed drug due to paracetamol. Applying Naranjo's algorithm, a causality score of 8 was obtained and was categorized as probable reaction to paracetamol. Clinicians should be vigilant of the possible adverse reactions to drugs with robust safety profiles. Drug alert cards could play an important role in preventing recurrences. PMID:26951737

  17. Video Observations Inside Channels of Erupting Geysers, Geyser Valley, Russia

    Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.; Nechaev, A.

    2011-12-01

    Geysers are a variety of hot springs characterized by violent ejections of water and steam separated by periods of repose. While ordinary boiling springs are numerous and occur in many places on Earth, geysers are very rare. In total, less than 1000 geysers are known worldwide, and most of them are located in three large geyser fields: Yellowstone (USA), Geyser Valley (Russia), and El Tatio (Chile). Several physical models were suggested to explain periodic eruptions of geysers, but realistic understanding of processes was hampered by the scarcity of field data on the internal plumbing of geyser systems. Here we present data based on video observations of interior conduit systems for geysers in Geyser Valley in Kamchatka, Russia. To investigate geyser plumbing systems we lowered a video camera (with thermal and water insulation) into the conduits of four erupting geysers. These included Velikan and Bolshoy, the largest geysers in the field, ejecting about 20 and 15 cub.m of water to heights of 25 and 15 m, respectively, with rather stable periods of approximately 5 h and 1 h. We also investigated Vanna and Kovarny, small geysers with irregular regimes, ejecting about ten liters of water to heights as much as 1.5 m, with periods of several minutes. The video footage reveals internal plumbing geometries and hydrodynamic processes that contradict the widely accepted "simple vertical conduit model", which regards geyser eruptions as caused by flashing of superheated water into steam. In contrast, our data fit the long-neglected "boiler model", in which steam accumulates in an underground cavity (boiler) and periodically erupts out through a water-filled, inverted siphon. We describe the physical rationale and conditions for the periodic discharge of steam from a boiler. Channels of the studied geysers are developed by ascending hot water in deposits of several voluminous prehistoric landslides (debris avalanches). The highly irregular contacts between adjacent debris

  18. Characterization of the volcanic eruption emissions using neutron activation analysis

    Characterization of the volcanic particulate material has been performed by analyzing aerosols and ashes with instrumental neutron activation analysis. Crustal enrichment factors were calculated using the elemental concentration and clustering techniques, and multivariate analysis were done. The analytical and data treatment methodologies allowed the sample differentiation from their geographical origin viewpoint, based on their chemical composition patterns, which are related to the deposit formation processes, which consist of direct deposition from the volcanic cloud, and removal by wind action after the end of the eruption, and and finally the deposition. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs

  19. Volcanic geology and eruption frequency, São Miguel, Azores

    Moore, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    Six volcanic zones comprise São Miguel, the largest island in the Azores. All are Quaternary in age except the last, which is partly Pliocene. From west to east the zones are (1) the trachyte stratovolcano of Sete Cidades, (2) a field of alkali-basalt cinder cones and lava flows with minor trachyte, (3) the trachyte stratovolcano of Agua de Pau, (4) a field of alkali-basalt cinder cones and lava flows with minor trachyte and tristanite, (5) the trachyte stratovolcano of Furnas, and (6) the Nordeste shield, which includes the Povoação caldera and consists of alkali basalt, tristanite, and trachyte. New radiocarbon and K-Ar ages augment stratigraphic data obtained during recent geologic mapping of the entire island and provide improved data to interpret eruption frequency. Average dormant intervals for the past approximately 3000 years in the areas active during that time are about 400 years for Sete Cidades, 145 for zone 2, 1150 for Agua de Pau, and 370 for Furnas. However, the average dormant interval at Sete Cidades increased from 400 to about 680 years before each of the past two eruptions, and the interval at Furnas decreased from 370 to about 195 years before each of the past four eruptions. Eruptions in zone 4 occurred about once every 1000 years during latest Pleistocene and early Holocene time; none has occurred for about 3000 years. The Povoação caldera truncates part of the Nordeste shield and probably formed during the middle to late Pleistocene. Calderas formed during latest Pleistocene time at the three younger stratovolcanoes in the sequence: outer Agua de Pau (between 46 and 26.5 ka), Sete Cidades (about 22 ka), inner Agua de Pau (15.2 ka), and Furnas (about 12 ka). Normal faults are common, but many are buried by Holocene trachyte pumice. Most faults trend northwest or west-northwest and are related to the Terceira rift, whose most active segment on São Miguel passes through Sete Cidades and zone 2. A major normal fault displaces Nordeste

  20. Lidar Observations of Stratospheric Clouds After Volcanic Eruption of Pinatubo

    Sun, Jinhui; Qiu, Jinhuan; Xia, Qilin; Zhang, Jinding

    1992-01-01

    A very large increase of backscattered light from the stratospheric aerosol layer was observed by using a ruby laser in Beijing (39 degrees 54 minutes N, 116 degrees 27 minutes E) from the end of July 1991 to March 1992. It was concluded that this increase was almost certainly due to the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines in June 1991. The measuring instruments used are described. Information is given in graphical form for vertical profiles, fluctuation of the maximum backscattering ratio above 20 km during the nine month period, and the time variation of the integrated backscattering coefficient at a height of 15 to 30 km.

  1. Atypical Papular Purpuric Eruption Induced by Parvovirus B19 Infection

    Şeyma Kayalı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 infection’s most common dermatological manifestation is erythema infectiosum as also known the fifth disease. Rare clinical presentations of parvovirus B 19 like papulopurpuric gloves and socks syndrome and acropetechial syndrome has also been described re­cently. This study presents report of a case with atypical feature and distribution of rash due to parvovirus B19 in­fection. We want to emphasize that pediatricians should consider parvovirus B19 infection of any patient who has leukopenia presenting with petechial/purpuric eruption of an unclear origin.

  2. Seismological aspects of the 1988 1989 Lonquimay (Chile) volcanic eruption

    Barrientos, Sergio E.; Acevedo-Aránguiz, Patricio S.

    1992-11-01

    More than 1600 earthquakes were recorded, in a four-month period, on portable seismographic stations installed in the Lonquimay area, immediately after the initiation of the volcanic eruption of December 25, 1988. Hypocentral parameters were calculated on a subset of 150 events showing clear P and S arrivals. Seismic activity was restricted to a north-south elongated region that included the main crater of the Lonquimay volcano. The new Navidad crater lies along the eastern margin of the area of seismicity. Most of the hypocenters are located at depths shallower than 6 km and none have depths exceeding 10 km. The largest earthquakes of the sequence took place on Dec. 28 ( M=4.7), Jan. 12-13 ( M= 4.8 and 5.0), and Feb. 24 ( M=5.3). The number of events per day varied; it peaked on Dec. 27 with more than 260 events, and more than 200 events were recorded on Jan. 13, both of which corresponded to the days of large earthquakes. The relation of large to small events given by the b value of the magnitude-frequency distribution Log N=a - bM is typical of volcanic sequences ( b=1.7) and much larger than the equivalent for tectonic environments. The rate of decay of the number of aftershocks of each large earthquake is proportional to t -P with p increasing from 0.63 to 1.08 as the eruption progressed in time. Initial low values of p indicate a slow stress release in the region. Larger absolute values of p are comparable with tectonic environments and might be indicators of the last stages of the eruption process. The total seismic energy release is 9.6 × 10 19 ergs , about five orders of magnitude less than the estimated thermal energy. The spatial distribution of earthquakes suggests that the sources of stress change associated with the eruption are located under, and possibly to the south of, the main crater of the Lonquimay volcano, and that the evacuation channels of magma occupied a zone of weakness in the region of the new crater.

  3. Kaposi′s Varicelliform Eruption In Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    Thappa Devinder Mohan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42 year old male having airborne allergic contact dermatitis suddenly developed high grade fever, chills and prostation on 7th day of admission. Two days later he developed generalized papulovescles which became haemorrhagic and crusted within one to two days. These lesions later evolved into grouped erosions. Simultaneously, he developed swelling of the face and generalized lymphadenopathy. Tzanck smear demonstrated giant cell and the patients was diagnosed as having kaposis’s varicelliform eruption. He responded to oral acycolvir. The case is reported for its rarity.

  4. Stratospheric sulfate from the Gareloi eruption, 1980: Contribution to the ''ambient'' aerosol by a poorly documented volcanic eruption

    Sedlacek, W.A.; Mroz, E.J.; Heiken, G.

    1981-07-01

    While sampling stratospheric aerosols during July--August 1980 a plume of ''fresh'' volcanic debris was observed in the Northern hemisphere. The origin of this material seems to be a poorly documented explosive eruption of Gareloi valcano in the Aleutian Islands. The debris was sampled at an altitude of 19.2 km: almost twice the height of observed eruption clouds. Such remote, unobserved or poorly documented eruptions may be a source that helps maintain the ''ambient'' stratospheric aerosol background.

  5. The large volcanic eruptions at different latitude bands and patterns of winter temperature changes over China

    Hao, Zhixin; Sun, Di

    2016-04-01

    Based on the chronology of 29 large volcanic eruptions events (Volcanic Explosivity Index≥4) since 1951 and gridded temperature dataset from China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System, we identified the patterns of winter temperature changes over China after the large volcanic eruptions, comparing with the mean temperature within the five years before, then we analyzed the related dynamic mechanisms of different patterns by NCEP reanalysis data and model output data from Community Earth System Model (CESM). The results showed that the winter temperature decreased more than 1°C in East China after volcanic eruptions on middle-lower latitudes and equatorial bands. After volcanic eruptions on different latitudes, the temperature spatial patterns were summarized as two types, which included that temperature was cooling centered on Northeast and warming in Tibets, and its opposite pattern. The first pattern was usually detected after tropical volcanic eruptions in spring/summer and it also appeared after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes in spring/autumn. After middle-lower latitude volcanic eruptions, the variation of geopotential height on 500hPa showed that the positive anomaly was existed at the East of Ural mountain, which caused the temperature decreased in Northwest , Central East and Southeast when east asian trough was intensified. After high latitudes volcanic eruptions, the zonal circulation was more obvious at middle latitudes, the cold air was not easy to transport,therefore winter temperature increased in China except for the Yangtze River Basin. The result of full forcing experiments by CESM showed that temperature decreased at most regions after large volcanic eruptions on equatorial /high bands, and troughs and wedges were developed on 500 hPa. The variation of geopotential height was nearly reversed after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes, only the temperature of Tibetan Plateau decreased. But how the variation of geopotential height

  6. The 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    Lynch, Rebecca; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2015-04-01

    The 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland, was much more explosive than previous eruptions, specifically its 2004 eruption. This research examines the degassing processes of the 2011 eruption, through density and vesicule analyses, to help uncover the reasons for the more vigorous eruption. Over 1200 collected tephra samples from the 2011 sequences are measured for density and vesicularity. Several samples are chosen to be representative of eruptive phases; samples from the beginning of the eruption, the mid-eruption and the end phases are chosen. These pumice samples are impregnated with epoxy and made into plugs for use in a Scanning Electron Microscope with which, a nested image approach is taken to image the vesicules of the samples at different magnifications. Each backscatter image is converted to binary and corrected using GIMP. Using ImageJ software, quantitative vesicularity analysis of the images is performed and results are converted to volume. The density, quantitative vesicularity, and volume results are assessed for patterns and the processes of the magma during the ascent in the conduit and eruptive phases are inferred. The objective of this research is to use the microscopic vesicularity analyses of the eruptive products to theorize the larger scale magmatic and degassing processes and to understand why the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption was uncharacteristically explosive. Currently, the results are being examined and have not been included in this abstract, however the research will be finalized in time for presentation at the EGU 2015 conference. Keywords: Grímsvötn volcano, quantitative vesicularity analysis, bubble size distribution, volcanic degassing, conduit processes

  7. Anticipating abrupt shifts in temporal evolution of probability of eruption

    Rohmer, J.; Loschetter, A.

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the probability of eruption by jointly accounting for different sources of monitoring parameters over time is a key component for volcano risk management. In the present study, we are interested in the transition from a state of low-to-moderate probability value to a state of high probability value. By using the data of MESIMEX exercise at the Vesuvius volcano, we investigated the potential for time-varying indicators related to the correlation structure or to the variability of the probability time series for detecting in advance this critical transition. We found that changes in the power spectra and in the standard deviation estimated over a rolling time window both present an abrupt increase, which marks the approaching shift. Our numerical experiments revealed that the transition from an eruption probability of 10-15% to > 70% could be identified up to 1-3 h in advance. This additional lead time could be useful to place different key services (e.g., emergency services for vulnerable groups, commandeering additional transportation means, etc.) on a higher level of alert before the actual call for evacuation.

  8. Atmospheric injections of polonium-210 from the recent volcanic eruptions

    The concentrations of 210Pb and 210Po in a total of 73 samples of individual rain and snow collected at Fayetteville (360N, 940W), Arkansas, were determined radiochemically during the period between October 1982 and January 1984. A clear seasonal pattern of variation of the 210Po/210Pb ratio in rain was observed: the ratio reaches a maximum during the months of November and December of January and February each year. The 210Po/210Pb ratio data obtained in our laboratories since 1971 were compared with the results of the studies on seasonal variation of the sulfate concentrations in the stratosphere reported by Sedlacek et al. (1983) and the following general trend was observed: the occurrence of a peak sulfate concentration in the stratosphere caused by a major volcanic eruption is followed by the occurrence of a peak 210Po/210Pb ratio in rain and snow samples collected several months later. Effect of the atmospheric injections of exess 210Po from major eruptions of volcanoes located in Alaska, Aleutian Islands, Kamchatka and Kurile Islands can be seen more clearly at Seattle (470N, 1220W), Washington, than at Fayetteville (360N, 940W), Arkansas. (author)

  9. Photospheric flux cancellation and associated flux rope formation and eruption

    Green, L M; Wallace, A J; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015146

    2010-01-01

    We study an evolving bipolar active region that exhibits flux cancellation at the internal polarity inversion line, the formation of a soft X-ray sigmoid along the inversion line and a coronal mass ejection. The evolution of the photospheric magnetic field is described and used to estimate how much flux is reconnected into the flux rope. About one third of the active region flux cancels at the internal polarity inversion line in the 2.5~days leading up to the eruption. In this period, the coronal structure evolves from a weakly to a highly sheared arcade and then to a sigmoid that crosses the inversion line in the inverse direction. These properties suggest that a flux rope has formed prior to the eruption. The amount of cancellation implies that up to 60% of the active region flux could be in the body of the flux rope. We point out that only part of the cancellation contributes to the flux in the rope if the arcade is only weakly sheared, as in the first part of the evolution. This reduces the estimated flux...

  10. NO2 column changes induced by volcanic eruptions

    Johnston, Paul V.; Keys, J. Gordon; Mckenzie, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide slant column amounts measured by ground-based remote sensing from Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S) and Campbell Island (53 deg S) during the second half of 1991 and early 1992 show anomalously low values that are attributed to the effects of volcanic eruptions. It is believed that the eruptions of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines in June 1991 and possibly Mount Hudson in Chile in August 1991 are responsible for the stratospheric changes, which first became apparent in July 1991. The effects in the spring of 1991 are manifested as a reduction in the retrieved NO2 column amounts from normal levels by 35 to 45 percent, and an accompanying increase in the overnight decay of NO2. The existence of an accurate long-term record of column NO2 from the Lauder site enables us to quantify departures from the normal seasonal behavior with some confidence. Simultaneous retrievals of column ozone agree well with Dobson measurements, confirming that only part of the NO2 changes can be attributed to a modification of the scattering geometry by volcanic aerosols. Other reasons for the observed behavior are explored, including the effects of stratospheric temperature increases resulting from the aerosol loading and the possible involvement of heterogeneous chemical processes.

  11. Chronology, eruption duration, and atmospheric contribution of Apollinaris Patera, Mars

    Robinson, M. S.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Wu, S. S. C.

    1993-01-01

    Geologic mapping from Viking image data of the Martian volcano Apollinaris Patera allowed identification of 6 major events that shaped its current morphology. Derivation of new topographic data allowed accurate estimates of the volume of erupted products from which estimates of an eruption duration are presented for the edifice and its corresponding atmospheric water contribution. Topographic data were acquired using stereophotogrammetric (Viking picnos 603A42, 639A92) techniques in both profiling and contouring modes (1 km contour). The profiling mode results in a more precise measurement than the contouring mode, but is limited in its areal coverage. The contour data are used in a more general sense to provide synoptic coverage for the volcano. These new stereophotogrammetric measurements constrain the topography to an accuracy of approximately 800 m vertically and approximately 1000 m horizontally. Conversion of the derived contour map to a raster based digital elevation model (DEM) was done by a growing contours interpolation. An ambiguity arises in this volume calculation due to an uncertainty regarding the actual base of the volcano relative to the pre-existing topography. Thus, the volume estimate was bracketed by using the 100 m and the 750 m elevations, which generally correspond to the lower and upper portions of the circumferential basal scarp, respectively. The resulting volumes are 103,000 cu km and 97,000 cu km; therefore the total volume of Apollinaris Patera is estimated to be approximately 100,000 cu km.

  12. Constraining explosive volcanism: subjective choices during estimates of eruption magnitude

    Klawonn, Malin; Houghton, Bruce F.; Swanson, Don; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wessel, Paul; Wolfe, Cecily J.

    2014-01-01

    When estimating the magnitude of explosive eruptions from their deposits, individuals make three sets of critical choices with respect to input data: the spacing of sampling sites, the selection of contour intervals to constrain the field measurements, and the hand contouring of thickness/isomass data, respectively. Volcanologists make subjective calls, as there are no accepted published protocols and few accounts of how these choices will impact estimates of eruption magnitude. Here, for the first time, we took a set of unpublished thickness measurements from the 1959 Kīlauea Iki pyroclastic fall deposit and asked 101 volcanologists worldwide to hand contour the data. First, there were surprisingly consistent volume estimates across maps with three different sampling densities. Second, the variability in volume calculations imparted by individuals’ choices of contours is also surprisingly low and lies between s = 5 and 8 %. Third, volume estimation is insensitive to the extent to which different individuals “smooth” the raw data in constructing contour lines. Finally, large uncertainty is associated with the construction of the thinnest isopachs, which is likely to underestimate the actual trend of deposit thinning. The net result is that researchers can have considerable confidence in using volume or dispersal data from multiple authors and different deposits for comparative studies. These insights should help volcanologists around the world to optimize design and execution of field-based studies to characterize accurately the volume of pyroclastic deposits.

  13. Records of Toba eruptions in the South China Sea

    LlANG; Xirong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Rose,W. I., Chesner, C. A., Dispersal of ash in the great Toba eruption, 75 ka, Geology, 1987, 15: 913-917.[2]Acharyya, S. K., Basu, P. K. ,Toba ash on the Indian subcontinent and its implications for correlation of late Pleistocene alluvium, Quaternary Research, 1993, 40: 10-19.[3]Shane, P., Westgate, J., Williams, M. et al., New geochemical evidence for the youngest Toba Tuff in India, Quaternary Research, 1995, 44: 200-204.[4]Westgate, J. A., Sha ne, P. A. R., Pearce, N. J. G. et al., All Toba occurrences across Peninsular India belong to the 75000yr B. P. eruption, Quaternary Research, 1998, 50:107-112.[5]Pattan, J. N., Shane, P., Banakar, V. K., New occurrences of youngest Toba Tuff in abyssal sediments of the Central Indian Basin, Marine Geology, 1999, 155: 243-248.[6]Gasparotto, G., Spadafora, E,, Summa, V. et al., Contribution of grain size and compositional data from the Bengal Fan sediment to the understanding of Toba volcanic event, Marine Geology, 2000, 162: 561-572.[7]Dehn, J., Farrell, J. W., Schmincke, H. U., Neogene tephrochronology from Site 758 on northern Ninetyeast Ridge: Indon isian arc volcanism of the Past 5 Ma, Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results (eds. Weissel, J. P.,Taylor, E., Alt, J. et al.), College Station, Texas, Ocean Drilling Program, 1991, 121: 273-295.[8]Lee M. Y., Wet, K. Y., Chen, Y. G., High-resolution oxygen isotope stratigraphy for the last 150000 years in the southern South China Sea, Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences TAO, 1999, 10: 239-254.[9]Biihring, C., Sarnthein, Toba ash layers in the South China Sea: Evidence of contrasting wind directions during eruption ca.74 ka, Geology, 2000, 28: 275-278.[10]Chesner, C. A., Petrogenesis of the Toba tuffs, Sumatra, Indonesia, Journal of Petrology, 1998, 39: 397-438.[11]Rampino, M. R., Self. S., Volcanic winter and accelerated glaciation follow ing the Toba super-eruption, Nature, 1992, 359:50-52.

  14. Multiple Outflows in the Giant Eruption of a Massive Star

    Humphreys, Roberta M; Gordon, Michael S; Jones, Terry J

    2016-01-01

    The supernova impostor PSN J09132750+7627410 in NGC 2748 reached a maximum luminosity of approximately -14 mag. It was quickly realized that its was not a true supernova, but another example of a non-terminal giant eruption. PSN J09132750+7627410 is distinguished by multiple P Cygni absorption minima in the Balmer emission lines that correspond to outflow velocities of -400, -1100, and -1600 km/s. Multiple outflows have been observed in only a few other objects. In this paper we describe the evolution of the spectrum and the P Cygni profiles for three months past maximum, the post-maximum formation of a cool, dense wind, and the identification of a possible progenitor. One of the possible progenitors is an infrared source. Its pre-eruption spectral energy distribution suggests a bolometric luminosity of -8.3 mag and a dust temperature of 780 degrees K. If it is the progenitor it is above the AGB limit unlike the intermediate luminosity red transients. The three P Cygni profiles could be due to ejecta from the...

  15. Records of Toba eruptions in the South China Sea

    LlANG; Xirong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Rose,W. I., Chesner, C. A., Dispersal of ash in the great Toba eruption, 75 ka, Geology, 1987, 15: 913-917.[2]Acharyya, S. K., Basu, P. K. ,Toba ash on the Indian subcontinent and its implications for correlation of late Pleistocene alluvium, Quaternary Research, 1993, 40: 10-19.[3]Shane, P., Westgate, J., Williams, M. et al., New geochemical evidence for the youngest Toba Tuff in India, Quaternary Research, 1995, 44: 200-204.[4]Westgate, J. A., Sha ne, P. A. R., Pearce, N. J. G. et al., All Toba occurrences across Peninsular India belong to the 75000yr B. P. eruption, Quaternary Research, 1998, 50:107-112.[5]Pattan, J. N., Shane, P., Banakar, V. K., New occurrences of youngest Toba Tuff in abyssal sediments of the Central Indian Basin, Marine Geology, 1999, 155: 243-248.[6]Gasparotto, G., Spadafora, E,, Summa, V. et al., Contribution of grain size and compositional data from the Bengal Fan sediment to the understanding of Toba volcanic event, Marine Geology, 2000, 162: 561-572.[7]Dehn, J., Farrell, J. W., Schmincke, H. U., Neogene tephrochronology from Site 758 on northern Ninetyeast Ridge: Indon isian arc volcanism of the Past 5 Ma, Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results (eds. Weissel, J. P.,Taylor, E., Alt, J. et al.), College Station, Texas, Ocean Drilling Program, 1991, 121: 273-295.[8]Lee M. Y., Wet, K. Y., Chen, Y. G., High-resolution oxygen isotope stratigraphy for the last 150000 years in the southern South China Sea, Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences TAO, 1999, 10: 239-254.[9]Biihring, C., Sarnthein, Toba ash layers in the South China Sea: Evidence of contrasting wind directions during eruption ca.74 ka, Geology, 2000, 28: 275-278.[10]Chesner, C. A., Petrogenesis of the Toba tuffs, Sumatra, Indonesia, Journal of Petrology, 1998, 39: 397-438.[11]Rampino, M. R., Self. S., Volcanic winter and accelerated glaciation follow ing the Toba super-eruption, Nature, 1992, 359:50-52.

  16. Thermodynamic Modelling of Volatiles in Kimberlite Ascent and Eruption

    Russell, J. K.; Gordon, T. M.

    2009-04-01

    The unique aspect of kimberlite magmas is their potential for having high dissolved contents of primary volatiles (e.g., H2O + CO2 > 15 wt. %) coupled to a high ascent rate. The high ascent rates help couple the exsolved fluid to the magma as it rises to the point of eruption. During ascent the system evolves from a system featuring 30-40% suspended solids in a silicate melt to a system that is volumetrically dominated by the exsolved fluids (due to exsolution and expansion). The physical-chemical properties of kimberlite melt govern the transport and eruption behaviour of kimberlite magmas. For example, exsolution of a CO2-H2O fluid phase provides a logical and efficient means of reducing magma density and promoting the buoyancy critical for rapid ascent and eruption. The composition of the exsolved fluid depends on the total dissolved fluid content of the melt as well as the T-P ascent path. Under conditions of equilibrium degassing (e.g., closed system), the original dissolved fluid content limits the range of fluid compositions produced during ascent. Under perfect fractional degassing (open system), increments of equilibrium fluid are released and "fractionated". Such situations arise when 2-phase flow (melt and gas) develops and the gas phase decouples from the host magma. Separated two-phase flow is likely to develop in kimberlite and allows for highly transient fluid compositions beginning with fluids extremely enriched in CO2, and ending with H2O-dominated fluid. The physical properties and behaviour of the fluids during ascent are, thus, constantly changing in response to the evolving fluid composition. Here we use computational models calibrated on experimental data for multicomponent melts (e.g., MELTS; Ghiorso & Sack 1995) saturated with a CO2-H2O fluid (e.g., Papale et al. 2006) to explore the physical-chemical properties of volatile-saturated kimberlite during ascent and eruption. The exsolved magmatic fluid is modelled as mixtures of CO2 and H2O. No

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies four loci associated with eruption of permanent teeth

    Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Zhang, Hao;

    2011-01-01

    The sequence and timing of permanent tooth eruption is thought to be highly heritable and can have important implications for the risk of malocclusion, crowding, and periodontal disease. We conducted a genome-wide association study of number of permanent teeth erupted between age 6 and 14 years...

  18. Radiocarbon dating of holocene eruptions of the Elbrus volcano (North Caucasus, Russia)

    Carbon-containing materials formed as a result of the Elbrus volcano eruptions during the recent 10 thousand years are studied the radiocarbon dating method. Three differing in age episodes of the Elbrus volcano eruptions in holocene: the oldest (7200-7500 years ago), the middle (4600-5500 years ago) and the youngest (at the start of our era) ones were identified

  19. The Te Rere and Okareka eruptive episodes : Okataina Volcanic Centre, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    The Te Rere and Okareka eruptive episodes occurred within the Okataina Volcanic Centre at c. 21 000 and 18 000 yr B.P., respectively. The widespread rhyolitic pumice fall deposits of Te Rere Ash (volume 5 km3) and Okareka Ash (6 km3) are only rarely exposed in near-source areas, and locations of their vent areas have been uncertain. New exposures and petrographic and chemical analyses show that the Te Rere episode eruptions occurred from multiple vents, up to 20 km apart, on the Haroharo linear vent zone. The Okareka episode eruptions occurred from vents since buried beneath the Tarawera volcanic massif. Eruption of the rhyolitic Okareka pumice fall was immediately preceded by a small basaltic scoria eruption, apparently from vents close to those for the following rhyolite eruptions. Dacitic mixed pumices scattered within the rhyolite pumice layers immediately overlying the scoria were formed by mixing of the basalt and rhyolite magmas. The Te Rere and Okareka pyroclastic eruptions were both followed by extrusion of voluminous rhyolite lavas. These eruptive episodes mark the commencement of growth of the present-day Haroharo and Tarawera volcanic complexes. (author). 27 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Selective environmental stress from sulphur emitted by continental flood basalt eruptions

    Schmidt, Anja; Skeffington, Richard A.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Self, Stephen; Forster, Piers M.; Rap, Alexandru; Ridgwell, Andy; Fowler, David; Wilson, Marjorie; Mann, Graham W.; Wignall, Paul B.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Several biotic crises during the past 300 million years have been linked to episodes of continental flood basalt volcanism, and in particular to the release of massive quantities of magmatic sulphur gas species. Flood basalt provinces were typically formed by numerous individual eruptions, each lasting years to decades. However, the environmental impact of these eruptions may have been limited by the occurrence of quiescent periods that lasted hundreds to thousands of years. Here we use a global aerosol model to quantify the sulphur-induced environmental effects of individual, decade-long flood basalt eruptions representative of the Columbia River Basalt Group, 16.5-14.5 million years ago, and the Deccan Traps, 65 million years ago. For a decade-long eruption of Deccan scale, we calculate a decadal-mean reduction in global surface temperature of 4.5 K, which would recover within 50 years after an eruption ceased unless climate feedbacks were very different in deep-time climates. Acid mists and fogs could have caused immediate damage to vegetation in some regions, but acid-sensitive land and marine ecosystems were well-buffered against volcanic sulphur deposition effects even during century-long eruptions. We conclude that magmatic sulphur from flood basalt eruptions would have caused a biotic crisis only if eruption frequencies and lava discharge rates had been high and sustained for several centuries at a time.

  1. Late Holocene Eruptive History of Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico: Implications for Future Hazards

    Abrams, M.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed mapping of the strata around the Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico indicates that there have been major eruptions every 1000 to 2000 years. The last two of these destroyed pre- Columbian cities in the area, and a similar level of eruption today might require evacuation of as many as 30 million people.

  2. Pigeonholing pyroclasts: Insights from the 19 March 2008 explosive eruption of Kīlauea volcano

    Houghton, B.F.; Swanson, D.A.; Carey, R.J.; Rausch, J.; Sutton, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    We think, conventionally, of volcanic explosive eruptions as being triggered in one of two ways: by release and expansion of volatiles dissolved in the ejected magma (magmatic explosions) or by transfer of heat from magma into an external source of water (phreatic or phreatomagmatic explosions). We document here an event where neither magma nor an external water source was involved in explosive activity at K??lauea. Instead, the eruption was powered by the expansion of decoupled magmatic volatiles released from deeper magma, which was not ejected by the eruption, and the trigger was a collapse of near-surface wall rocks that then momentarily blocked that volatile flux. Mapping of the advected fall deposit a day after this eruption has highlighted the difficulty of constraining deposit edges from unobserved or prehistoric eruptions of all magnitudes. Our results suggest that the dispersal area of advected fall deposits could be miscalculated by up to 30% of the total, raising issues for accurate hazard zoning and assessment. Eruptions of this type challenge existing classification schemes for pyroclastic deposits and explosive eruptions and, in the past, have probably been interpreted as phreatic explosions, where the eruptive mechanism has been assumed to involve flashing of groundwater to steam. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  3. The timing of tooth eruption and root development of permanent canine and premolars in Korean children

    The aim of this study was to investigate the timing and sequence of eruption of permanent canine and premolars, and to evaluate tooth calcification stage on emergence in Korean children. The sample was comprised of 1,266 children (male 720, female 546) aged from 7-13 years. Tooth eruption and calcification stages were determined through oral and panoramic radiographic examination, respectively. Probit analysis was used to calculate the timing of tooth eruption and tooth calcification stage from these cross-sectional data. In both males and females, eruption occurred around the time when one third of tooth root or more was formed. The sequence was as follows: first premolar, canine, and second premolar in maxilla, and canine, first premolar and second premolar in mandible. Tooth eruption occurred earlier in girls compared with boys, averaging 0.63 years. Eruption sequence is identical in males and females with a trend for females to erupt earlier than males. Tooth eruption becomes earlier over the past decades in Korean children.

  4. The timing of tooth eruption and root development of permanent canine and premolars in Korean children

    Cheong, Chang Shin; Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the timing and sequence of eruption of permanent canine and premolars, and to evaluate tooth calcification stage on emergence in Korean children. The sample was comprised of 1,266 children (male 720, female 546) aged from 7-13 years. Tooth eruption and calcification stages were determined through oral and panoramic radiographic examination, respectively. Probit analysis was used to calculate the timing of tooth eruption and tooth calcification stage from these cross-sectional data. In both males and females, eruption occurred around the time when one third of tooth root or more was formed. The sequence was as follows: first premolar, canine, and second premolar in maxilla, and canine, first premolar and second premolar in mandible. Tooth eruption occurred earlier in girls compared with boys, averaging 0.63 years. Eruption sequence is identical in males and females with a trend for females to erupt earlier than males. Tooth eruption becomes earlier over the past decades in Korean children.

  5. Observation of variability in radon concentration in the gases of eruptive seams

    The methods and the results of preliminary measurements of radon concentration in the gases emitted in coal seams threatened with gases and rocks eruptions have been presented. The changes of concentrations are given in the function of excavation progress. The nature of radon concentration changes points to relationship between radon concentration and the probability of the occurrence of eruption. 4 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  6. Interaction of Volcanic Forcing and El Nino: Sensitivity to the Eruption Magnitude and El Nino Intensity

    Predybaylo, Evgeniya

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic aerosols formed in the stratosphere after strong explosive eruptions influence Earth\\'s radiative balance, affecting atmospheric and oceanic temperatures and circulation. It was observed that the recent volcanic eruptions frequently occurred in El Nino years. Analysis of the paleo data confirms that the probability of a sequent El Nino occurrence after the eruption increases. To better understand the physical mechanism of this interaction we employed ocean-atmosphere coupled climate model CM2.1, developed in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, and conducted a series of numerical experiments using initial conditions with different El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) strengths forced by volcanic eruptions of different magnitudes, Pinatubo of June 1991 and Tambora of April 1815: (i) strong ENSO/Pinatubo, (ii) weak ENSO/Pinatubo, (iii) strong ENSO/Tambora. The amount of ejected material from the Tambora eruption was about three times greater than that of the Pinatubo eruption. The initial conditions with El Nino were sampled from the CM2.1 long control run. Our simulations show the enhancement of El Nino in the second year after an eruption. We found that the spatial-temporal structure of model responses is sensitive to both the magnitude of an eruption and the strength of El Nino. We analyzed the ocean dynamic in the tropical Pacific for all cases to uncover the physical mechanism, resulting in the enhanced and/or prolonged El Nino.

  7. The Agro Pontino region, refuge after the Early Bronze Age Avellino eruption of Mount Vesuvius, Italy?

    C. Bakels; J. Sevink; W. Kuijper; H. Kamermans

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was discovered that the Middle to Late Holocene infi ll of the Agro Pontino graben (Central Italy) held a tephra layer originating from the Avellino eruption of the Vesuvius volcano. The eruption is dated to 1995 ± 10 calBC and took therefore place during the Early Bronze Age. Thi

  8. Some observations regarding the thermal flux from Earth's erupting volcanoes for the period 2000 to 2014

    Wright, R.; Blackett, M.; Hill-Butler, C.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will describe 15 years of MODIS observations of the thermal flux from Earth's sub-aerially erupting volcanoes. The MODVOLC algorithm has been providing data regarding volcanic eruptions on Earth to the volcanological community since the launch of Terra MODIS, via the internet, in near-real-time (http:modis.higp.hawaii.edu). During this time, eruptions at 102 volcanoes have been observed, including activity associated with mafic lava flows, lava lakes, vent-based explosive activity and felsic lava domes. This presentation will present an overview of how MODIS has documented every eruption to occur on Earth since 2000, and will describe some of the more interesting result that have been obtained from the analysis of this archive. The total amount of energy radiated into the atmosphere can be divided into two parts: a baseline level of emission which has increased gradually over this 15 period, superimposed on which are large "spikes" attributable to large, lava-flow-forming eruptions. The most intense eruption during this period of time was the 2004 eruption of Nyamuragira, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, whilst the largest magnitude event was the 2012-2013 eruption of Tolbachik, Russia. Spatio-temporal patterns in thermal output will be addressed. Time-series analysis of heat flux from these 102 volcanoes has revealed while some volcanoes exhibit statistically significant periodicity in the magnitude of their heat output, many do not.

  9. Eruption dynamics inferred from microlite crystallization experiments: Application to Plinian and dome-forming eruptions of Mt Pelée (Martinique, Lesser Antilles).

    Martel, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    International audience Decompression experiments have been conducted to simulate syn-eruptive crystallization in the volcanic conduit, in order to infer magma ascent rates and conditions during dome-forming and Plinian eruptions of silicic arc volcanoes. The experiments were carried out starting from Mt Pelée rhyolitic interstitial melt (76 wt. % SiO2) and consisted in three consecutive steps: hydration, decompression, and annealing. Hydration (saturated and undersaturated) was performed a...

  10. SMALL-VOLUME BASALTIC VOLCANOES: ERUPTIVE PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES, AND POST-ERUPTIVE GEOMORPHIC EVOLUTION IN CRATER FLAT (PLEISTOCENE), SOUTHERN NEVADA

    G.A. Valentine; F.V. Perry; D. Krier; G.N. Keating; R.E. Kelley; A.H. Cogbill

    2006-04-04

    Five Pleistocene basaltic volcanoes in Crater Flat (southern Nevada) demonstrate the complexity of eruption processes associated with small-volume basalts and the effects of initial emplacement characteristics on post-eruptive geomorphic evolution of the volcanic surfaces. The volcanoes record eruptive processes in their pyroclastic facies ranging from ''classical'' Strombolian mechanisms to, potentially, violent Strombolian mechanisms. Cone growth was accompanied, and sometimes disrupted, by effusion of lavas from the bases of cones. Pyroclastic cones were built upon a gently southward-sloping surface and were prone to failure of their down-slope (southern) flanks. Early lavas flowed primarily southward and, at Red and Black Cone volcanoes, carried abundant rafts of cone material on the tops of the flows. These resulting early lava fields eventually built platforms such that later flows erupted from the eastern (at Red Cone) and northern (at Black Cone) bases of the cones. Three major surface features--scoria cones, lava fields with abundant rafts of pyroclastic material, and lava fields with little or no pyroclastic material--experienced different post-eruptive surficial processes. Contrary to previous interpretations, we argue that the Pleistocene Crater Flat volcanoes are monogenetic, each having formed in a single eruptive episode lasting months to a few years, and with all eruptive products having emanated from the area of the volcanoes main cones rather than from scattered vents. Geochemical variations within the volcanoes must be interpreted within a monogenetic framework, which implies preservation of magma source heterogeneities through ascent and eruption of the magmas.

  11. Volcanic eruption of the mid-ocean ridge along the East Pacific Rise crest at 9°45-52'N: direct submersible observations of seafloor phenomena associated with an eruption event in April, 1991

    Haymon, R.M.; Fornari, D.J.; Von Damm, K. L.; Lilley, M.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Edmond, J.M.; Shanks, Wayne C., III; Lutz, R.A.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Carbotte, S.; Wright, D.; McLaughlin, E.; Smith, M.; Beedle, N.; Olson, E.

    1993-01-01

    In April, 1991, we witnessed from the submersible Alvin a suite of previously undocumented seafloor phenomena accompanying an in-progress eruption of the mid-ocean ridge on the East Pacific Rise crest at 9°45′N–52′N. The volume of the eruption could not be precisely determined, although comparison of pre- and post-eruption SeaBeam bathymetry indicate that any changes in ridge crest morphology resulting from the eruption were < 10 m high.

  12. Futurvolc and the Bardarbunga eruption 2014-15 Iceland, success in the field and laboratory.

    Hoskuldsson, Armann; Jonsdottir, Ingibjorg; Thordarson, Thor

    2016-04-01

    The Bardarbunga volcanic system in Iceland started unrest in August 2014. Seismic activity gradually build up, until magma began to be extruded on surface. The first eruption occurred on the 28th of August and was small and subglacial, the second eruption took place outside the glacier, on the 29th of August and lasted for few hours. Third and largest eruption started on early morning 31st of August. This was to be the largest eruption in Iceland since Laki eruption 1783. The eruption used the same fissure that had opened up on the 28th but was much larger. The fissure was about 2 km long with a curtain of fire along the whole fissure, curtains reaching up to 150 m into the air. The area in which the eruption took place is a glacial river outwash plain, thus relatively flat. Although the eruption site is remote, being in the highlands north of the icecap Vatnajökull, at an average altitude of some 700 m, the flat sandur plain offered a unique opportunity to combine satellite and on site observations methods. The eruption ended on the 27th of February 2015, thus lasting for almost 6 months, during this time some 1.44 km3 of lava was erupted. From day one satellite data from NOAA AVHRR, MODIS, LANDSAT 7 and 8, ASTER, EO-1 ALI, EO-1 HYPERION, SENTINEL-1, RADARSAT-2 COSMO SKYMED and TERRASAR X where collected and used in combination with onsite observation. Resulting data give unique information on the effusion rates in basaltic fissure eruptions and its evolution with time. Further information on flow behavior and cooling of basaltic lava being emplaced in a relatively flat land can be used for future and past predictions. In this talk we shall show how valuable the combination of satellite data to field observation are to be able to precisely monitor on of the largest lava eruption on earth for the past 200 years. The role of Futurevolc and preparedness involved in that work greatly enhanced and facilitated synchronization of onsite and remote data during the

  13. Dueling Volcanoes: How Activity Levels At Kilauea Influence Eruptions At Mauna Loa

    Trusdell, F.

    2011-12-01

    The eruption of Kilauea at Pu`u `O`o is approaching its 29th anniversary. During this time, Mauna Loa has slowly inflated following its most recent eruption in 1984. This is Mauna Loa's longest inter-eruptive interval observed in HVO's 100 years of operation. When will the next eruption of Mauna Loa take place? Is the next eruption of Mauna Loa tied to the current activity at Kilauea? Historically, eruptive periods at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes appear to be inversely correlated. In the past, when Mauna Loa was exceptionally active, Kilauea Volcano was in repose, recovery, or in sustained lava lake activity. Swanson and co-workers (this meeting) have noted that explosive activity on Kilauea, albeit sporadic, was interspersed between episodes of effusive activity. Specifically, Swanson and co-workers note as explosive the time periods between 300 B.C.E.-1000 C.E and 1500-1800 C.E. They also point to evidence for low magma supply to Kilauea during these periods and few flank eruptions. During the former explosive period, Mauna Loa was exceedingly active, covering approximately 37% of its surface or 1882 km2, an area larger than Kilauea. This period is also marked by summit activity at Mauna Loa sustained for 300 years. In the 1500-1800 C.E. period, Mauna Loa was conspicuously active with 29 eruptions covering an area of 446 km2. In the late 19th and early 20th century, Kilauea was dominated by nearly continuous lava-lake activity. Meanwhile Mauna Loa was frequently active from 1843 C.E. to 1919 C.E., with 24 eruptions for an average repose time of 3.5 years. I propose that eruptive activity at one volcano may affect eruptions at the other, due to factors that impact magma supply, volcanic plumbing, and flank motion. This hypothesis is predicated on the notion that when the rift zones of Kilauea, and in turn its mobile south flank, are active, Mauna Loa's tendency to erupt is diminished. Kilauea's rift zones help drive the south flank seaward, in turn, as Mauna

  14. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. I. Unusual History of an Eruptive Filament

    Grechnev, V V; Slemzin, V A; Chertok, I M; Filippov, B P; Rudenko, G V; Temmer, M

    2013-01-01

    This is the first of four companion papers, which analyze a complex eruptive event of 18 November 2003 in AR 10501 and the causes of the largest Solar Cycle 23 geomagnetic storm on 20 November 2003. Analysis of a complete data set, not considered before, reveals a chain of eruptions to which hard X-ray and microwave bursts responded. A filament in AR 10501 was not a passive part of a larger flux rope, as usually considered. The filament erupted and gave origin to a CME. The chain of events was as follows: i) an eruption at 07:29 accompanied by a not reported M1.2 class flare associated with the onset of a first southeastern CME1, which is not responsible for the superstorm; ii) a confined eruption at 07:41 (M3.2 flare) that destabilized the filament; iii) the filament acceleration (07:56); iv) the bifurcation of the eruptive filament that transformed into a large cloud; v) an M3.9 flare in AR 10501 associated to this transformation. The transformation of the filament could be due to its interaction with the m...

  15. Mass eruption rates in pulsating eruptions estimated from video analysis of the gas thrust-buoyancy transition—a case study of the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    Dürig, Tobias; Gudmundsson, Magnús Tumi; Karmann, Sven; Zimanowski, Bernd; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Rietze, Martin; Büttner, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano was characterized by pulsating activity. Discrete ash bursts merged at higher altitude and formed a sustained quasi-continuous eruption column. High-resolution near-field videos were recorded on 8-10 May, during the second explosive phase of the eruption, and supplemented by contemporary aerial observations. In the observed period, pulses occurred at intervals of 0.8 to 23.4 s (average, 4.2 s). On the basis of video analysis, the pulse volume and the velocity of the reversely buoyant jets that initiated each pulse were determined. The expansion history of jets was tracked until the pulses reached the height of transition from a negatively buoyant jet to a convective buoyant plume about 100 m above the vent. Based on the assumption that the density of the gas-solid mixture making up the pulse approximates that of the surrounding air at the level of transition from the jet to the plume, a mass flux ranging between 2.2 and 3.5 · 104 kg/s was calculated. This mass eruption rate is in good agreement with results obtained with simple models relating plume height with mass discharge at the vent. Our findings indicate that near-field measurements of eruption source parameters in a pulsating eruption may prove to be an effective monitoring tool. A comparison of the observed pulses with those generated in calibrated large-scale experiments reveals very similar characteristics and suggests that the analysis of near-field sensors could in the future help to constrain the triggering mechanism of explosive eruptions.

  16. Partially-erupting prominences: a comparison between observations and model-predicted observables

    Tripathi, D; Qiu, J; Fletcher, L; Liu, R; Gilbert, H; Mason, H E

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate several partially-erupting prominences to study their relationship with other CME-associated phenomena and to compare these observations with observables predicted by a model of partially-expelled flux ropes (Gibson & Fan, 2006a, b). METHODS: We have studied 6 selected events with partially-erupting prominences using multi wavelength observations recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and soft X-ray telescope (SXT). The observational features associated with partially-erupting prominences were then compared with the predicted observables from the model. RESULTS: The partially-expelled-flux-rope (PEFR) model of Gibson & Fan (2006a, b) can explain the partial eruption of these prominences, and in addition predicts a variety of other CME-related observables that provide evidence for internal reconnection during eruption. We find that all of the pa...

  17. Interdisciplinary studies of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile

    Pallister, John S.; Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Holitt, Richard P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Eichelberger, John C.; Luis, Lara; Moreno, Hugo; Muñoz, Jorge; Castro, Jonathan M.; Iroumé, Andrés; Andreoli, Andrea; Jones, Julia; Swanson, Fred; Crisafulli, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    High-silica rhyolite magma fuels Earth's largest and most explosive eruptions. Recurrence intervals for such highly explosive eruptions are in the 100- to 100,000-year time range, and there have been few direct observations of such eruptions and their immediate impacts. Consequently, there was keen interest within the volcanology community when the first large eruption of high-silica rhyolite since that of Alaska's Novarupta volcano in 1912 began on 1 May 2008 at Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, a 3-kilometer-diameter caldera volcano with a prehistoric record of rhyolite eruptions [Naranjo and Stern, 2004semi; Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN), 2008semi; Carn et al., 2009; Castro and Dingwell, 2009; Lara, 2009; Muñoz et al., 2009]. Vigorous explosions occurred through 8 May 2008, after which explosive activity waned and a new lava dome was extruded.

  18. Measuring Water Vapor and Ash in Volcanic Eruptions with a Millimeter-Wave Radar/Imager

    Bryan, Sean; Vanderkluysen, Loÿc; Groppi, Christopher; Paine, Scott; Bliss, Daniel W; Aberle, James; Mauskopf, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter-wave remote sensing technology can significantly improve measurements of volcanic eruptions, yielding new insights into eruption processes and improving forecasts of drifting volcanic ash for aviation safety. Radiometers can measure water vapor density and temperature inside eruption clouds, improving on existing measurements with infrared cameras that are limited to measuring the outer cloud surface. Millimeter-wave radar can measure the 3D mass flow of volcanic ash inside eruption plumes and drifting fine ash clouds, offering better sensitivity than existing weather radar measurements and the unique ability to measure ash particle size in-situ. Here we present sensitivity calculations in the context of developing the WAMS (Water and Ash Millimeter-wave Spectrometer) instrument. WAMS, a radar/radiometer system constructed with off-the-shelf components, would be able to measure water vapor and ash throughout an entire eruption cloud, a unique capability.

  19. The eruption of Vesuvius of 79 AD and its impact on human environment in Pompeii

    LisettaGiacomelli; AnnamariaPerrotta; RobertoScandone; ClaudioScarpati

    2003-01-01

    The eruption of Vesuvius of 79 AD caused extensive destructions all over the Campanian area, engulfing the cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplonti and Stabiae.The eruption followed a long quiescence period and the inhabitants of the area were surprised by the volcanic events. The first part of the eruption was characterized by a widespread dispersal of pumices from a high erup-tive column. The second part of the eruption, character-ized by pyroclastic flows emplacement, caused the major damages with extensive life losses in most of the towns surrounding the volcano. In Pompeii, the major casual-ties during the first phase resulted from roof collapses;during the second phase, people were killed either by physical trauma due to the kinetic energy of the flow or by suffucation because of the ash-rich atmosphere.

  20. The 2011 El Hierro submarine eruption: estimation of erupted lava flow volume on the basis of helicopter thermal surveys

    Hernández, P. A.; Calvari, S.; Calvo, D.; Marquez, A.; Padron, E.; Pérez, N.; Melian, G.; Padilla, G.; Barrancos, J.; Dionis, S.; Rodríguez, F.; Nolasco, D.; Hernández, I.

    2012-04-01

    El Hierro represents the summit of a volcanic shield elevating from the surrounding seafloor at depth of 4000 m to up to 1501 m above sea level. The island is believed to be near the present hotspot location in the Canaries with the oldest subaerial rocks dated at 1.12 Ma. The subaerial parts of the El Hierro rift zones (NE, NW and S Ridges) are characterized by tightly aligned dyke complexes with clusters of cinder cones as their surface expressions. Since 16 July, an anomalous seismicity at El Hierro Island was recorded by IGN seismic network. After the occurrence of more than 10,000 seismic events, volcanic tremor started at 05:15 on 10 October, followed on the afternoon of 12 October by a green discolouration of seawater, strong bubbling and degassing, and abundant bombs on a decimetre scale found floating on the ocean surface offshore, southwest of La Restinga village. The Canary Government raised the alert level from green to yellow on 10 October (3 colour basis: green, yellow, and red). Further episodes have occurred during November, December 2011 and January 2012, with turbulent water, foam rings, and volcanic material again reaching the sea surface. Colour of the discoloured area has changed frequently from light green to dark brown, depending on the eruptive activity. During the whole eruptive period, The Volcanological Institute of Canary Islands and the Helicopter Unit of the Spanish Civil Guard have carried out regularly thermal surveys with a hand held FLIR Thermal Camera P65. The images have been collected taking care of avoiding solar reflection (with cloudy weather) or at times of the day without direct sun light. Air temperature and humidity were measured with a handled thermo-hygrometer every time before the thermal image collection, and measurements were always performed at two fixed heights: 2000 and 1000 feet, and images were collected as perpendicular as possible to the surface. Together with thermal images, digital photos of the surface have

  1. Evolution of magma conduits during the 1998-2000 eruptions of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Réunion Island

    Fukushima, Yo; Cayol, Valerie; Philippe, Durand; Didier, Massonnet

    2010-01-01

    At basaltic volcanoes, magma is transported to the surface through dikes (magmafilled fractures), but the evolution of these dikes as eruptions proceed is rarely documented. In March 1998, after five and a half years of quiescence, Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Réunion Island) entered into a new eruptive phase characterized by intense eruptive activity. Coeruptive displacements recorded by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for the first five eruptions of the cycle are analyzed...

  2. Intrusion of eccentric dikes: The case of the 2001 eruption and its role in the dynamics of Mt. Etna volcano

    Bonforte, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Gambino, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Neri, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia

    2009-01-01

    The 2001 eruption represents one of the most studied events both from volcanological and geophysical point of view on Mt. Etna. This eruption was a crucial event in the recent dynamics of the volcano, marking the passage from a period (March 1993–June 2001) of moderate stability with slow, continuous flank sliding and contemporaneous summit eruptions, to a period (July 2001 to present) of dramatically increased flank deformations and flank eruptions. We show new GPS data and high ...

  3. Weight, height and eruption times of permanent teeth of children aged 4–15 years in Kampala, Uganda

    Kutesa, Annet; Nkamba, Eriab Moses; Muwazi, Louis; Buwembo, William; Rwenyonyi, Charles Mugisha

    2013-01-01

    Background Tooth eruption is a continuous biological process by which developing teeth emerge through the jaws and the overlying mucosa to enter into the oral cavity. Tooth eruption time and sequence are important factors in dental treatment planning, particularly in orthodontics, but also in forensic dentistry to estimate age of a child. Tooth eruption time is influenced by many factors. In this study we set out to determine the timing of eruption of permanent teeth and assess its associatio...

  4. Volcanic geology and eruption frequency, lower east rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    Moore, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping and radiocarbon dating of tholeiitic basalts covering about 275 km2 on the lower east rift zone (LERZ) and adjoining flanks of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, show that at least 112 separate eruptions have occurred during the past 2360 years. Eruptive products include spatter ramparts and cones, a shield, two extensive lithic-rich tuff deposits, aa and pahoehoe flows, and three littoral cones. Areal coverage, number of eruptions and average dormant interval estimates in years for the five age groups assigned are: (I) historic, i.e. A D 1790 and younger: 25%, 5, 42.75; (II) 200-400 years old: 50%, 15, 14.3: (III) 400-750 years old: 20%, 54, 6.6; (IV) 750-1500 years old: 5%, 37, 20.8; (V) 1500-3000 years old: erupted from the LERZ during the past 1500 years. Estimated volumes of the exposed products of individual eruptions range from a few tens of cubic meters for older units in small kipukas to as much as 0.4 km3 for the heiheiahulu shield. The average dormant interval has been about 13.6 years during the past 1500 years. The most recent eruption occurred in 1961, and the area may be overdue for its next eruption. However, eruptive activity will not resume on the LERZ until either the dike feeding the current eruption on the middle east rift zone extends farther down rift, or a new dike, unrelated to the current eruption, extends into the LERZ. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Transitions between explosive and effusive phases during the cataclysmic 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano, Java, Indonesia

    Preece, Katie; Gertisser, Ralf; Barclay, Jenni; Charbonnier, Sylvain J.; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Herd, Richard A.

    2016-08-01

    Transitions between explosive and effusive activity are commonly observed during dome-forming eruptions and may be linked to factors such as magma influx, ascent rate and degassing. However, the interplay between these factors is complex and the resulting eruptive behaviour often unpredictable. This paper focuses on the driving forces behind the explosive and effusive activity during the well-documented 2010 eruption of Merapi, the volcano's largest eruption since 1872. Time-controlled samples were collected from the 2010 deposits, linked to eruption stage and style of activity. These include scoria and pumice from the initial explosions, dense and scoriaceous dome samples formed via effusive activity, as well as scoria and pumice samples deposited during subplinian column collapse. Quantitative textural analysis of groundmass feldspar microlites, including measurements of areal number density, mean microlite size, crystal aspect ratio, groundmass crystallinity and crystal size distribution analysis, reveal that shallow pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic processes acted to govern the changing behaviour during the eruption. High-An (up to ˜80 mol% An) microlites from early erupted samples reveal that the eruption was likely preceded by an influx of hotter or more mafic magma. Transitions between explosive and effusive activity in 2010 were driven primarily by the dynamics of magma ascent in the conduit, with degassing and crystallisation acting via feedback mechanisms, resulting in cycles of effusive and explosive activity. Explosivity during the 2010 eruption was enhanced by the presence of a `plug' of cooled magma within the shallow magma plumbing system, which acted to hinder degassing, leading to overpressure prior to initial explosive activity.

  6. Eruption Forecasting in Alaska: A Retrospective and Test of the Distal VT Model

    Prejean, S. G.; Pesicek, J. D.; Wellik, J.; Cameron, C.; White, R. A.; McCausland, W. A.; Buurman, H.

    2015-12-01

    United States volcano observatories have successfully forecast most significant US eruptions in the past decade. However, eruptions of some volcanoes remain stubbornly difficult to forecast effectively using seismic data alone. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has responded to 28 eruptions from 10 volcanoes since 2005. Eruptions that were not forecast include those of frequently active volcanoes with basaltic-andesite magmas, like Pavlof, Veniaminof, and Okmok volcanoes. In this study we quantify the success rate of eruption forecasting in Alaska and explore common characteristics of eruptions not forecast. In an effort to improve future forecasts, we re-examine seismic data from eruptions and known intrusive episodes in Alaska to test the effectiveness of the distal VT model commonly employed by the USGS-USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP). In the distal VT model, anomalous brittle failure or volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquake swarms in the shallow crust surrounding the volcano occur as a secondary response to crustal strain induced by magma intrusion. Because the Aleutian volcanic arc is among the most seismically active regions on Earth, distinguishing distal VT earthquake swarms for eruption forecasting purposes from tectonic seismicity unrelated to volcanic processes poses a distinct challenge. In this study, we use a modified beta-statistic to identify pre-eruptive distal VT swarms and establish their statistical significance with respect to long-term background seismicity. This analysis allows us to explore the general applicability of the distal VT model and quantify the likelihood of encountering false positives in eruption forecasting using this model alone.

  7. Using volcanic tremor for eruption forecasting at White Island volcano (Whakaari), New Zealand

    Chardot, Lauriane; Jolly, Arthur D.; M. Kennedy, Ben; Fournier, Nicolas; Sherburn, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Eruption forecasting is a challenging task because of the inherent complexity of volcanic systems. Despite remarkable efforts to develop complex models in order to explain volcanic processes prior to eruptions, the material Failure Forecast Method (FFM) is one of the very few techniques that can provide a forecast time for an eruption. However, the method requires testing and automation before being used as a real-time eruption forecasting tool at a volcano. We developed an automatic algorithm to issue forecasts from volcanic tremor increase episodes recorded by Real-time Seismic Amplitude Measurement (RSAM) at one station and optimised this algorithm for the period August 2011-January 2014 which comprises the recent unrest period at White Island volcano (Whakaari), New Zealand. A detailed residual analysis was paramount to select the most appropriate model explaining the RSAM time evolutions. In a hindsight simulation, four out of the five small eruptions reported during this period occurred within a failure window forecast by our optimised algorithm and the probability of an eruption on a day within a failure window was 0.21, which is 37 times higher than the probability of having an eruption on any day during the same period (0.0057). Moreover, the forecasts were issued prior to the eruptions by a few hours which is important from an emergency management point of view. Whereas the RSAM time evolutions preceding these four eruptions have a similar goodness-of-fit with the FFM, their spectral characteristics are different. The duration-amplitude distributions of the precursory tremor episodes support the hypothesis that several processes were likely occurring prior to these eruptions. We propose that slow rock failure and fluid flow processes are plausible candidates for the tremor source of these episodes. This hindsight exercise can be useful for future real-time implementation of the FFM at White Island. A similar methodology could also be tested at other

  8. Fluid Chemistry Through an Eruption Cycle at Axial Seamount 1998-2011

    Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, B.; Lilley, M. D.; Roe, K. K.; Lupton, J. E.; Dziak, R. P.; Walker, S. L.; Olson, E. J.; Evans, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    A primary goal for the NeMO seafloor observatory at Axial Seamount was to monitor and study a hydrothermal system through the cycle from one eruption to the next. With the January 1998 eruption and the April 2011 eruption discovered during Jason ROV operations in late July this year, that goal has now been accomplished. Based on observations and fluid temperature/chemistry measurements before and after both eruptions, there are common features leading up to and following the eruptions. Both eruptions at Axial originated in the SE corner of the caldera associated with the S Rift Zone. Isolated snowblower vents were found on new lava following both eruptions. Centimeter-thick orange hydrothermal mats formed rapidly on the new lava flows. There is some evidence that the fluids from ASHES vent field, located near the SW caldera wall, were hottest before the 1998 eruption. A second high-temperature vent field is located in the SE caldera just east of the recent lava flows. Lava flows came close to both high-temperature fields in 2011, but did not flow over any known chimneys. Recorded time series for several high-temperature vents show increasing temperatures from 2001 through 2010. Vent fluid chlorinity decreased at ASHES for 0.5 to 2 years following the 1998 eruption. As of 3.5 months after the 2011 eruption, ASHES fluid chlorinity did not change significantly. High gas contents reflect magma degassing throughout the entire history of fluid sampling at Axial. Spatial and temporal patterns of vent fluid chemistry will be presented.

  9. Satellite observations of lightning-generated NOx in volcanic eruption clouds

    Carn, Simon; Krotkov, Nickolay; Pickering, Ken; Allen, Dale; Bucsela, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The generation of NO2 by lightning flashes is known to be an important source of NOx in the free troposphere, particularly in the tropics, with implications for ozone production. Although UV-visible satellite observations of lightning-generated NOx (LNOx) in thunderstorms have been previously reported, here we present the first satellite observations of LNOx generated by lightning in explosive volcanic eruption clouds (vLNOx) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard NASA's Aura satellite. To date we have identified vLNOx in operational OMI NO2 measurements (OMNO2) during the high-latitude eruptions of Okmok (Aleutian Is; July 2008), Kasatochi (Aleutian Is; August 2008), Redoubt (Alaska; March 2009) and Grimsvötn (Iceland; May 2011), although analysis of OMNO2 data for other eruptions is underway. We use World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) observations to verify the occurrence and location of lightning flashes in the volcanic eruption clouds. All the vLNOx anomalies are associated with strong UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) signals due to volcanic ash. Preliminary analysis shows that the maximum vLNOx column detected by OMI decreases linearly with time since eruption, and suggests that the vLNOx signal is transient and can be detected up to ~5-6 hours after an eruption. Detection of vLNOx is hence only possible for eruptions occurring a few hours before the daytime OMI overpass. Based on the number of lightning flashes detected by WWLLN in each eruption cloud, we also estimate the vLNOx production efficiency (moles vLNOx per flash). Preliminary estimates for the 2008 Kasatochi eruption suggest that this is significantly higher than the production efficiency in thunderstorms, but may be biased high due to the low detection efficiency of WWLLN (models. Although vLNOx is undoubtedly a very minor fraction of global LNOx production, explosive volcanic eruptions may inject NOx into the stratosphere where it has implications for ozone chemistry.

  10. Deriving Lava Eruption Temperatures on Io Using Lava Tube Skylights

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The eruption temperature of Io's silicate lavas constrains Io's interior state and composition [1] but reliably measuring this temperature remotely is a challenge that has not yet been met. Previously, we established that eruption processes that expose large areas at the highest temperatures, such as roiling lava lakes or lava fountains, are suitable targets for this task [2]. In this study we investigate the thermal emission from lava tube skylights for basaltic and ultramafic composition lavas. Tube-fed lava flows are known on Io so skylights could be common. Unlike the surfaces of lava flows, lava lakes, and lava fountains which all cool very rapidly, skylights have steady thermal emission on a scale of days to months. The thermal emission from such a target, measured at multiple visible and NIR wavelengths, can provide a highly accurate diagnostic of eruption temperature. However, the small size of skylights means that close flybys of Io are necessary, requiring a dedicated Io mission [3]. We have modelled the thermal emission spectrum for different skylight sizes, lava flow stream velocities, end-member lava compositions, and skylight radiation shape factors, determining the flow surface cooling rates. We calculate the resulting thermal emission spectrum as a function of viewing angle. From the resulting 0.7:0.9 μm ratios, we see a clear distinction between basaltic and ultramafic compositions for skylights smaller than 20 m across, even if sub-pixel. If the skylight is not resolved, observations distributed over weeks that show a stationary and steady hot spot allow the presence of a skylight to be confidently inferred. This inference allows subsequent refining of observation design to improve viewing geometry of the target. Our analysis will be further refined as accurate high-temperature short-wavelength emissivity values become available [4]. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to

  11. Topographic and Structural Effects on Dike Propagation and Eruption

    We have modeled magma flow in a dike rising in a crack whose strike runs from a highland or ridge to an adjacent lowland to determine the effect of topography on the flow, using a 3D hydromechanical code, FLAC3D (http://www.itascacg.com). The aperture, a, is calculated as a variable in a sheet of zones of fixed width d during the simulation as a function of model deformation. The permeability tensor of each zone is adjusted at each time step in response to the pressure in the cell according to the relationship kij = (delta)ij α3/12μd, which is obtained by equating the flow through the layer of permeable zones from Darcy's law with Poiseuille's law under the same gradient. The fluid viscosity is μ, and the crack width is a We found a distinct tendency for the flow to be diverted away from the highland end of the strike toward the lowland. For the 4-km long strike length we modeled, eruption was offset between 500 and 1250 m toward the lowland from the center of the strike length. Separation of the geometric effect of the topography from the topographic overburden effect on lateral confining stresses at the crack indicates that both contribute to the effect. Although this analysis explains a tendency for volcanic eruptions to occur in low lands, it does not preclude eruptions on highlands. If the strike on the dike is parallel to the length of a ridge, the effect described here will not operate. Another possibility is that the strike length of a dike may be so short that its strike does not extend far beyond the edge of the ridge. A separate simulation used a 2D discrete element code, UDEC (http://www.itascacg.com) to investigate the interaction of magma in a vertical dike with normal faults and stratigraphy. We found that steeper faults are more easily intruded and that, as the magma rises to within a few hundred meters of the surface, sills are intruded into stratigraphic discontinuities in the hanging wall but not into the foot wall. The particular

  12. Gas release from the LUSI eruption site: large scale estimates.

    Sciarra, A.; Mazzini, A.; Etiope, G.; Husein, A.; Hadi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The spectacular Indonesian Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the island of Java. Previous studies investigated the mechanisms of reactivation of the Watukosek fault system that crosses Lusi locality and continues to the NE of Java. Results show that the quake triggered lateral movement of this strike-slip system resulting in several aligned eruptions sites including Lusi. Geochemical studies of the erupted fluids reveal a mantle signature and point to a connection with the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex indicating that Lusi is a sedimentary hosted geothermal system. In order to better understand 1) the geometry of the Lusi subsurface plumbing system, 2) to estimate the type and the amount of gas released, and 3) how tectonic structures may control this activity, we conducted a comprehensive survey around the Lusi crater. We sampled more than 60 seepage sites to analyze the composition of the gas released and conducted a flux measurements survey of over 350 stations (CO2 and CH4). In addition we completed three CO2, CH4, radon profiles (120 points) perpendicular to the NE-SW oriented Watukosek strike-slip fault system and complemented that with geoelectric surveys. Results show that the whole area is characterized by diffused gas release through seeps, fractures, microfractures and soil degassing. Overall the highest gas flux were recorded at stations crossing the fractured zones that coincide with the position of the Watukosek fault system. The fractures release mainly CO2 (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and display higher temperatures (up to 41°C). This main shear zone is populated by numerous seeps that expel mostly CH4. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that φCO2 is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fractures, and two orders of magnitude for φCH4. Radon measurements vary from 30 and 90 Bq/m3 on the edges of the study area to 6000 Bq/m3in the proximity of the faulted

  13. High resolution infrared acquisitions droning over the LUSI mud eruption.

    Di Felice, Fabio; Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The use of low-cost hand-held infrared (IR) thermal cameras based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays became more widespread during the recent years. Thermal cameras have the ability to estimate temperature values without contact and therefore can be used in circumstances where objects are difficult or dangerous to reach such as volcanic eruptions. Since May 2006 the Indonesian LUSI mud eruption continues to spew boiling mud, water, aqueous vapor, CO2, CH4 and covers a surface of nearly 7 km2. At this locality we performed surveys over the unreachable erupting crater. In the framework of the LUSI Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), in 2014 and 2015, we acquired high resolution infrared images using a specifically equipped remote-controlled drone flying at an altitude of m 100. The drone is equipped with GPS and an autopilot system that allows pre-programming the flying path or designing grids. The mounted thermal camera has peak spectral sensitivity in LW wavelength (μm 10) that is characterized by low water vapor and CO2 absorption. The low distance (high resolution) acquisitions have a temperature detail every cm 40, therefore it is possible to detect and observe physical phenomena such as thermodynamic behavior, hot mud and fluids emissions locations and their time shifts. Despite the harsh logistics and the continuously varying gas concentrations we managed to collect thermal images to estimate the crater zone spatial thermal variations. We applied atmosphere corrections to calculate infrared absorption by high concentration of water vapor. Thousands of images have been stitched together to obtain a mosaic of the crater zone. Regular monitoring with heat variation measurements collected, e.g. every six months, could give important information about the volcano activity estimating its evolution. A future data base of infrared high resolution and visible images stored in a web server could be a useful monitoring tool. An interesting development will be

  14. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-years Cohort Study

    Poureslami, Hamidreza; Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Erfanparast, Leila; Sohrabi, Azin; Jamali, Zahra; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina; Hazem, Kameliya; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES) in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods. 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy’s scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of firstprimary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P <0.001). No significant correlation was observed between the eruption time of first primary and first permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times. PMID:26236432

  15. Plinian vs. phreatomagmatic eruptions at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    Haddadi, Baptiste; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Larsen, Guðrún

    2016-04-01

    Grímsvötn is a subglacial central volcano located under the Vatnajökull ice cap, above the assumed centre of the Iceland mantle plume. Historical explosive eruptions are mostly of phreatomagmatic character whereas pure magmatic behaviour may characterize the largest eruptions. What causes this different eruption behaviour is uncertain. Here, we report petrological estimates of crystallization depth and volatile degassing as recorded by sulfur concentrations in melt inclusions (MI) hosted by ferromagnesian minerals and the groundmass glass. Tephra from four eruptions, AD 1823, 1873, 2004 and 2011, were selected. The 2011 and 1873 are the largest known historical eruptions, whereas the 2004 eruption is probably amongst the smallest. The repose time preceding those eruptions is surprisingly similar, or 6 to 7 years, and the major-element compositions are uniform. Plagioclase, clinopyroxene (cpx) and olivine are the three coexisting phases at the liquidus in the quartz-tholeiites of Grímsvötn. The cpx-melt geothermobarometer (Putirka 2008) applied to the 2011 tephra reveals that cpx crystallized over a large range of P from 60 to 640 MPa (depth range: 1.7-18km) and T between 1060 and 1175°C before the Plinian eruption, therefore mobilizing the entire crustal magma system. In contrast, the phreatomagmatic tephra do not record the shallowest crystallization but interestingly all four tephra have identical median entrapment pressure of approximately 400 MPa. Therefore, the depth from which the magma bodies are derived, does not explain the difference in explosivity between those eruptions nor the variable magma volume (V) produced. Sulfur concentrations in MI are only slightly higher in the Plinian products, the difference (10%) being insufficient to explain the different eruption regimes. The ΔS, the difference between the maximum S concentrations in MI and the mean of the groundmass glass for a given eruption, is higher in the Plinian tephra. Based on literature

  16. The 2011 Eruption of the Recurrent Nova T Pyxidis; the Discovery, the Pre-eruption Rise, the Pre-eruption Orbital Period, and the Reason for the Long Delay

    Schaefer, Bradley E; Linnolt, Michael; Stubbings, Rod; Pojmanski, Grzegorz; Plummer, Alan; Kerr, Stephen; Nelson, Peter; Carstens, Rolf; Streamer, Margaret; Richards, Thomas; Myers, Gordon; Dillon, William G

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery by M. Linnolt on JD 2455665.7931 (UT 2011 April 14.29) of the sixth eruption of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis. This discovery was made just as the initial fast rise was starting, so with fast notification and response by observers worldwide, the entire initial rise was covered (the first for any nova) with fine time resolution and in three filters. The speed of the rise peaked at 9 mag/day, while the light curve is well fit over only the first two days by a model with a uniformly expanding sphere. We also report the discovery by R. Stubbings of a pre-eruption rise starting 11 days before the eruption, peaking 1.1 mag brighter than its long-time average, and then fading back towards quiescence five days before the eruption. This unique and mysterious behavior is only the fourth known anticipatory rise/dip closely spaced before a nova eruption. We present 19 timings of photometric minima from 1986 to February 2011, where the orbital period is fast increasing with P/Pdot=+313,000 years. Fr...

  17. Modeling CO2 air dispersion from gas driven lake eruptions

    Chiodini, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Tassi, Franco

    2016-04-01

    The most tragic event of gas driven lake eruption occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) on 21 August 1986, when a dense cloud of CO2 suffocated more than 1700 people and an uncounted number of animals in just one night. The event stimulated a series of researches aimed to understand gas origins, gas release mechanisms and strategies for gas hazard mitigation. Very few studies have been carried out for describing the transport of dense CO2 clouds in the atmosphere. Although from a theoretical point of view, gas dispersion can be fully studied by solving the complete equations system for mass, momentum and energy transport, in actual practice, different simplified models able to describe only specific phases or aspects have to be used. In order to simulate dispersion of a heavy gas and to assess the consequent hazard we used a model based on a shallow layer approach (TWODEE2). This technique which uses depth-averaged variables to describe the flow behavior of dense gas over complex topography represents a good compromise between the complexity of computational fluid dynamic models and the simpler integral models. Recently the model has been applied for simulating CO2 dispersion from natural gas emissions in Central Italy. The results have shown how the dispersion pattern is strongly affected by the intensity of gas release, the topography and the ambient wind speed. Here for the first time we applied TWODEE2 code to simulate the dispersion of the large CO2 clouds released by limnic eruptions. An application concerns the case of the 1986 event at lake Nyos. Some difficulties for the simulations were related to the lack of quantitative information: gas flux estimations are not well constrained, meteorological conditions are only qualitatively known, the digital model of the terrain is of poor quality. Different scenarios were taken into account in order to reproduce the qualitative observations available for such episode. The observations regard mainly the effects of gas on

  18. Magnetic field in atypical prominence structures: Bubble, tornado and eruption

    Levens, P J; Ariste, A López; Labrosse, N; Dalmasse, K; Gelly, B

    2016-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of prominences have been obtained with the THEMIS telescope during four years of coordinated campaigns. Our aim is now to understand the conditions of the cool plasma and magnetism in `atypical' prominences, namely when the measured inclination of the magnetic field departs, to some extent, from the predominantly horizontal field found in `typical' prominences. What is the role of the magnetic field in these prominence types? Are plasma dynamics more important in these cases than the magnetic support? We focus our study on three types of `atypical' prominences (tornadoes, bubbles and jet-like prominence eruptions) that have all been observed by THEMIS in the He I D_3 line, from which the Stokes parameters can be derived. The magnetic field strength, inclination and azimuth in each pixel are obtained by using the Principal Component Analysis inversion method on a model of single scattering in the presence of the Hanle effect. The magnetic field in tornadoes is found to be more ...

  19. On the Bright Loop Top Emission in Post Eruption Arcades

    Sharma, Rohit; Isobe, Hiroaki; Ghosh, Avyarthana

    2016-01-01

    The observations of post eruption arcades (PEAs) in X-rays and EUV reveal strong localised brightenings at the loop top regions. The origin of these brightenings and their dynamics is not well understood to date. Here, we study the dynamics of PEAs using one-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling with the focus on the the understanding of the formation of localised brightening.Our findings suggest that these brightenings are the result of collisions between the counter-streaming chromospheric evaporation from both the foot points. We further perform forward modelling of the emission observed in simulated results in various spectral lines observed by the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope aboard Hinode. The forward modelled intensities in various spectral lines are in close agreement with a flare observed in December 17, 2006 by EIS.

  20. Observations of CMEs and Models of the Eruptive Corona

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-01-01

    Current theoretical ideas on the internal structure of CMEs suggest that a flux rope is central to the CME structure, which has considerable observational support both from remote-sensing and in-situ observations. The flux-rope nature is also consistent with the post-eruption arcades with high-temperature plasmas and the charge states observed within CMEs arriving at Earth. The model involving magnetic loop expansion to explain CMEs without flux ropes is not viable because it contradicts CME kinematics and flare properties near the Sun. The flux rope is fast, it drives a shock, so the global picture of CMEs becomes complete if one includes the shock sheath to the CSHKP model.

  1. Gas flux estimates at the LUSI eruption site.

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Mazzini, Adriano; Husein, Alwii; Hadi J., Soffian; Etiope, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Indonesian Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the island of Java (Mazzini et al., 2007). Previous studies investigated the mechanisms of reactivation of the Watukosek fault system that crosses Lusi locality (Mazzini et al., 2009) and continues to the NE of Java. Results show that the quake triggered lateral movement of this strike-slip system resulting in several aligned eruptions sites including Lusi. Geochemical studies of the erupted fluids reveal a mantle signature and point to a connection with the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex (Mazzini et al., 2012) indicating that Lusi is a sedimentary hosted geothermal system. In order to estimate the amount of gas that is being released around the Lusi crater (~7 km2), we recently conducted a survey of over 300 stations (CO2 and CH4 flux measurements) using a closed-chamber flux-meter system and collected gas samples to analyze the composition of the seeps. In addition 20 soil gas concentrations were collected using a steel probe driven into the ground to a depth of 0.7-0.8 m to avoid the major influence of meteorological variables. Results show that the highest CO2 flux is present along the NE-SW oriented Watukosek fault (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and along the ~E-W oriented Siring antithetic fault (with peaks up to 110 g/m2day). The pools have overall a CH4-dominated composition, while the dry fault-related fractures are CO2-dominated which is in agreement with higher recorded temperatures at these sites. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that CO2 flux is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fault zones, and two order of magnitude for CH4 flux. C02 and CH4 microseepage is occurring in significant amount throughput the mud-covered area with average values of 297 and 95 g/m2day, respectively. CH4 flux shows the highest values in the W and NW sector of the Lusi area, while CO2 flux highlights the presence of three

  2. Precursors and electron-positron pair loading from erupting fireballs

    Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Lazzati, D; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Fadyen, Andrew I. Mac; Lazzati, Davide

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that long-duration gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows are produced by highly relativistic jets emitted in core-collapse explosions. As the jet makes its way out of the stellar mantle, a bow shock runs ahead and a strong thermal precursor is produced as the shock breaks out. Such erupting fireballs produce a very bright gamma-ray precursor as they interact with the thermal break-out emission. The prompt gamma-ray emission propagates ahead of the fireball before it becomes optically thin, leading to electron-positron pair loading and radiative acceleration of the external medium. The detection of such precursors would offer the possibility of diagnosing not only the radius of the stellar progenitor and the initial Lorentz factor of the collimated fireball, but also the density of the external environment.

  3. The 2000 AD eruption of Copahue Volcano, Southern Andes

    José Antonio Naranjo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Although all historic eruptions of the Copahue volcano (37°45'S-71°10.2'W, 3,001 m a.s.l. have been of low magnitude, the largest (VEI=2 and longest eruptive cycle occurred from July to October 2000. Phreatic phases characterized the main events as a former acid crater lake was blown up. Low altitude columns were deviated by low altitude winds in variable directions, but slightly predominant to the NNE. The presence of the El Agrio caldera depression to the east of Copahue volcano may have caused the variable plume divergences and disturb the prevailing wind direction which is normally to the southeast. Larger magnitude events, comparable to prehistoric eruptions, could occur in the future at Copahue volcano, seriously impacting the tourist localities on the Argentinean (eastern flanks of this frontier volcano. Unless a constant educational program is implemented, emergency plans will not be enough to prevent catastrophic effects, because the local population strongly believes that only low magnitude eruptions such as those of the sixties, nineties and 2000 AD can be produced at the Copahue volcanoLa erupción de 2000 AD del volcán Copahue, Andes del Sur. Aunque todas las erupciones históricas del volcán Copahue (37°45'S-71°10.2'W, 3.001 m s.n.m. han sido de baja magnitud, entre julio y octubre de 2000 ocurrió el mayor y más prolongado ciclo eruptivo. Las áreas más vulnerables de este volcán fronterizo se ubican sobre su flanco (este argentino. Las fases más características de las principales erupciones fueron del tipo freático, habiendo sido evaporado su habitual lago ácido del cráter activo. Los vientos de baja altura desviaron según variadas direcciones las columnas eruptivas de baja altitud, aunque con cierto predominio hacia el NNE. La presencia de la gran depresión de la caldera El Agrio hacia el este, podría haber causado la distorsión de tan variable dispersión de la pluma eruptiva, modificando la direcci

  4. Role of Volatiles in Kimberlite Ascent and Eruption

    Russell, J. K.; Gordon, T. M.

    2009-05-01

    The unique aspect of kimberlite magmas is their potential for having high dissolved contents of primary volatiles (e.g., H2O and CO2) coupled to a high ascent rate. The high ascent rates help couple the exsolved fluid to the magma as it rises to the point of eruption. During ascent the system evolves from a system featuring 30-40% suspended solids in a silicate melt to a system that is volumetrically dominated by the exsolved fluids (due to exsolution and expansion). The physical-chemical properties of kimberlite melt govern the transport and eruption behaviour of kimberlite magmas. For example, exsolution of a CO2-H2O fluid phase provides a logical and efficient means of reducing magma density and promoting the buoyancy critical for rapid ascent and eruption. The composition of the exsolved fluid depends on the total dissolved fluid content of the melt as well as the T-P ascent path (e.g., Holloway & Blank 1994). Under conditions of equilibrium degassing (e.g., closed system), the original dissolved fluid content limits the range of fluid compositions produced during ascent. Under perfect fractional degassing (open system), increments of equilibrium fluid are released and "fractionated". Such situations arise when 2-phase flow (melt and gas) develops and the gas phase decouples from the host magma. Separated two-phase flow is likely to develop in kimberlite and allows for highly transient fluid compositions beginning with fluids extremely enriched in CO2, and ending with H2O-dominated fluid. The physical properties and behaviour of the fluids during ascent are, thus, constantly changing in response to the evolving fluid composition. Here we use computational models calibrated on experimental data for multicomponent melts (e.g., MELTS; Ghiorso & Sack 1995) saturated with a CO2-H2O fluid (e.g., Papale et al. 2006) to explore the physical-chemical properties of volatile-saturated kimberlite during ascent and eruption. The exsolved magmatic fluid is modelled as

  5. Radiocarbon dating of the last volcanic eruption of the Ciomadul volcano, Southest Carpathians

    Complete text of publication follows. The last volcanic eruption in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region occurred within the Ciomadul volcano, Southeast Carpathians. It is a lava dome complex active for about 900 ka. Following the effusive activity, at least two major explosive volcanic eruptions occurred forming two craters (Mohos and St. Anna). These eruptions resulted in pumiceous pyroclastic fall and flow deposits. In order to understand the behavior of this volcano and evaluate the possible renewal of the volcanic eruption, it is crucial to constrain the length of the active and repose periods and know the date of the last eruption. The former K/Ar and radiocarbon data are controversial and give only a rough estimate for the active phases. The age data for the last eruption is in the range from 10000 and 40000. In this study, we focus on the time of the last volcanic eruptions. We analyzed charcoal fragments found in pumiceous pyroclastic flow deposits from two localities. C-14 dating from the first locality (Bx) was executed by GPC technique in the ATOMKI, and the following five dating (one repeated dating of the ATOMKI sample, with excellent match; one resampled charcoal from the first locality, and one sample from a second locality (Tf), and dating of NaOH-soluble fractions coming from sample prep for all the three charcoal samples) in NSF Lab in Tucson, AZ by AMS technique. The new radiocarbon data provided valuable information on the behaviour of the Ciomadul volcano and help to constrain the time of the last eruption of the volcano. The main conclusions are the following: 1. The last volcanic eruption occurred at about 27000 BP. 2. The product of the youngest eruption is exposed at the southern margin of the volcano (Bx locality) and not at west (Tf locality) as was previously thought. 3. A striking new result is that there were at least two major explosive eruptions, not a single one, related to the formation of the St. Anna crater. The youngest one followed

  6. Building the Volcanic Oceanic Crust One Eruption at a Time (Invited)

    Sinton, J. M.; Rubin, K. H.; White, S. M.; Colman, A.; Bowles, J. A.; Gronvold, K.

    2010-12-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of lava flow fields formed during individual volcanic eruptions provides critical information on the nature of underlying magma reservoirs and the diking events that feed magma to the surface. Chemical variability of individual flow fields can constrain important parameters, such as the depth, geometry, melt percentage, and cooling rate of magma reservoirs and, in some case, whether or not dikes traveled vertically from magma reservoirs to the surface, with examples from the East Pacific Rise, Juan de Fuca Ridge and Iceland. Lava flow morphology and the length of ridge activated during individual eruptions constrain eruption rates and, in some cases, how eruption rates and magma sources vary during the course of long-lived eruptions. Although the study of submarine volcanic eruptions has historically been dominated by study of very recent flow fields or remotely detected “events”, a recent cruise to the Galápagos Spreading Center demonstrated that volcanic geology can be deciphered for areas of seafloor using the same basic methods commonly employed on-land: near-bottom geological observations, remote images at the appropriate spatial resolution, and petrologic and geochronologic study of samples. For the Galápagos study we used the AUV Sentry to obtain very high resolution (~1-m spatial scale) bathymetry, 26 Alvin dives, 17 camera-tows, and on-shore chemical and magnetic paeleointensity sample analyses to identify the areal extents, chemical variability and age constraints of at least 14 previously unknown discrete eruptive units in two areas with highly contrasting average magma supply defined by variations in crustal thickness and spreading rate. Preliminary general results of this study indicate that, at high magma supply, relatively low-volume eruptions are fed from shallow, moderately to highly differentiated, melt-dominated magma chambers to elongate fissures at relatively high average eruption rates. At low

  7. Coupled evolution of magma chambers and flow in conduits during large volcanic eruptions

    Karlstrom, L.; Manga, M.; Rudolph, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The largest silicic and mafic volcanic eruptions in the geologic record, Supervolcano and Large Igneous Province (LIP) eruptions, are distinguished by differences in surface emplacement mode, geologic context, magma volatile content, viscosity, and reservoir depth. However, these large eruptions also share several common features. Individual eruptions of both types emplace roughly the same total volume (10^3 - 10^4 km^3) of remarkably homogeneous magma that likely comes from a single reservoir. In addition, they both release large quantities of volatiles, and hence individual eruptions may significantly perturb global climate. We have developed a model that couples conduit flow and magma chamber deformation, allowing us to study both eruption types. Steady, one-dimensional multiphase flow of magma containing crystals, exsolved water, and CO_2 in a cylindrical conduit is coupled to pressure evolution within an ellipsoidal magma chamber beneath a free surface. LIP eruptions are characterized by gas-driven flow of mafic lava that may be sustained past the cessation of chamber overpressure, much like a siphon. Eruptions cease when the yield strength of the country rocks is reached and the (generally Moho-level) chamber or the conduit implodes, resulting in steady discharge and atmospheric volatile loading. In contrast, more shallow silicic lavas such as the Fish Canyon Tuff erupt through rapid mobilization of a long-lived crystal-rich mush. The crystal-rich mush is a yield strength fluid, which we model using the von Mises criterion for mobilization. If the trigger for mobilization of the mush leads directly to eruption, time-progressive yielding due to mass removal results in a fluid magma chamber that grows as the eruption proceeds, until free-surface stresses induce roof collapse and caldera formation. Chamber pressure evolution may be buffered by the mobilization of the mush, maintaining overpressure and high discharge throughout the eruption. This model suggests

  8. Fallout of uranium and plutonium from recent volcanic eruptions

    The concentrations of 234U, 235U, 238U in rain water were measured in a total of 102 individual samples which were collected at Fayetteville, Arkansas, from July 1980 through April 1983. A spectacular increase in the heavy isotope of uranium (238U) was observed in the months of July, August (1980); January through April, November and December 1981. This large increase in 238U in rain appeared to have had its origin in the May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. An increase in the concentration of 238U in rain, smaller than 1981, was observed, which seems to have originated from the El Chichon volcano eruption in March 1982, and the spring peak or so-called cycling effect. A striking increase in the average bimonthly concentration of /sup 239,240/Pu occurred during the months of September-October 1980 (15.6 fCi/l) and March-April 1981 (29.4 fCi/l). The excess deposition of /sup 239,240/Pu brought down by the rain at Fayetteville, Arkansas, from March 1980 through December 1982 was found to be 1.01 fCi/cm2. The total amount of /sub 239,240/Pu deposited at Fayetteville, Arkansas, from March through December 1982, was found to be about 30 times higher than the total amount calculated from reported literature values. The excess /sup 239,240/Pu has been attributed to stratospheric /sub 239,240/Pu from nuclear weapons testing prior to the 25th Chinese nuclear test

  9. Characterizing Volcanic Eruptions on Venus: Some Realistic (?) Scenarios

    Stofan, E. R.; Glaze, L. S.; Grinspoon, D. H.

    2011-01-01

    When Pioneer Venus arrived at Venus in 1978, it detected anomalously high concentrations of SO2 at the top of the troposphere, which subsequently declined over the next five years. This decline in SO2 was linked to some sort of dynamic process, possibly a volcanic eruption. Observations of SO2 variability have persisted since Pioneer Venus. More recently, scientists from the Venus Express mission announced that the SPICAV (Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Venus) instrument had measured varying amounts of SO2 in the upper atmosphere; VIRTIS (Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer) measured no similar variations in the lower atmosphere (ESA, 4 April, 2008). In addition, Fegley and Prinn stated that venusian volcanoes must replenish SO2 to the atmosphere, or it would react with calcite and disappear within 1.9 my. Fegley and Tremain suggested an eruption rate on the order of approx 1 cubic km/year to maintain atmospheric SO2; Bullock and Grinspoon posit that volcanism must have occurred within the last 20-50 my to maintain the sulfuric acid/water clouds on Venus. The abundance of volcanic deposits on Venus and the likely thermal history of the planet suggest that it is still geologically active, although at rates lower than Earth. Current estimates of resurfacing rates range from approx 0.01 cubic km/yr to approx 2 cubic km/yr. Demonstrating definitively that Venus is still volcanically active, and at what rate, would help to constrain models of evolution of the surface and interior, and help to focus future exploration of Venus.

  10. The Laki eruption and observed dendroclimatic effects of volcanism

    Jacoby, Gordon; D'Arrigo, Rosanne

    The year of the Laki eruption, 1783, is the most visibly obvious anomaly in the northwestern Alaska tree-ring record for over 400 years or more. Thicker-walled, latewood cells formed late in the growing season are virtually absent. Quantitatively the latewood density is over 4 standard deviations below the mean latewood density of white spruce (Picea glauca) trees from northwest Alaska; indication of extreme cold during the summer season in this region. The tree-ring response to the event weakens toward the east, indicating that extreme cold did not extend much beyond the Mackenzie River in western Canada or very far south of the Alaska Range in central Alaska. To understand the tree-ring effects due to the Laki eruption, it is helpful to also consider three other similar events in 1641, 1816-17, and 1836. In each case there is evidence of extreme cold causing very low density latewood in the rings of white spruce near the latitudinal treeline. The effects in the tree-ring record are spatially variable. Evidence of extreme cold typically extends for about 60°-70° of longitude; 1641 in north western-and-central Canada, 1783 in Alaska, 1816-17 in eastern Canada, and 1836 in north-central Canada. One interpretation of this spatial and temporal pattern is that in addition to general cooling, the thermal effects of volcanic events can lead to outbreaks of extremely cold polar air on a regional basis. This interpretation is compatible with air mass trajectories driven by Rossby wave circulation. Such extreme regional cooling can have great impact on human conditions.

  11. Mortality in England during the 1783 4 Laki Craters eruption

    Witham, C. S.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2004-12-01

    1783/4 has been recognised as a mortality “crisis year” in the population history of England. This demographic incident coincides with the Laki Craters eruption, Iceland, which began in June 1783 and fumigated many parts of Europe with volcanic gases and particles. Many reports and proxy climate records implicate the volcanic cloud in meteorological anomalies, including notably hot 1783 summer conditions in England and a severe subsequent winter. We present here a detailed analysis of the geographical and temporal trends in English mortality data, and interpret them in the light of the climatological records and observations of the pollutant cloud. We show that there were two distinct crisis periods: in August-September 1783, and January-February 1784, which together accounted for ~20,000 extra deaths. In both cases, the East of England was the worst affected region. Possible causes for the two crisis periods are considered and we conclude that the timing and magnitude of the winter mortality peak can be explained by the severe cold of January 1784. The late summer mortality followed 1 2 months after the very hot July of 1783 and may also have been related to the weather, with the time lag reflecting the relatively slow spread of enteric disease or the contraction of malaria. However, it is hard to explain the entire late summer anomaly by these high temperature causes. We therefore consider that fine acid aerosol and/or gases in the volcanic haze may also have contributed to the unusual August-September mortality. Given that complex radiative and dynamical effects of the volcanic cloud are implicated in the climatic anomalies in 1783 4, it is likely that the Laki Craters eruption did play a role in the English mortality crises of the same period.

  12. Water Content of Basalt Erupted on the ocean floor

    Moore, J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Deep sea pillow basalts dredged from the ocean floor show that vesicularity changes with composition as well as with depth. Alkalic basalts are more vesicular than tholeiitic basalts erupted at the same depth. The vesicularity data, when related to experimentally determined solubility of water in basalt, indicate that K-poor oceanic tholeiites originally contained about 0.25 percent water, Hawaiian tholeiites of intermediate K-content, about 0.5 percent water, and alkali-rich basalts, about 0.9 percent water. Analyses of fresh basalt pillows show a systematic increase of H2O+ as the rocks become more alkalic. K-poor oceanic tholeiites contain 0.06-0.42 percent H2O+, Hawaiian tholeiites, 0.31-0.60 percent H2O+, and alkali rich basalts 0.49-0.98 percent H2O+. The contents of K2O, P2O5, F, and Cl increase directly with an increase in H2O+ content such that at 1.0 weight percent H2O+, K2O is 1.58 percent, P2O5 is 0.55 percent, F is 0.07 percent, and Cl is 0.1 percent. The measured weight percent of deuterium on the rim of one Hawaiian pillow is -6.0 (relative to SMOW); this value, which is similar to other indications of magmatic water, suggests that no appreciable sea water was absorbed by the pillow during or subsequent to eruption on the ocean floor. Concentrations of volatile constituents in the alkali basalt melts relative to tholeiitic melts can be explained by varying degrees of partial melting of mantle material or by fractional crystallization of a magma batch. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Reconstruction of eruption column model based on the 3D numerical simulation of volcanic plume for 2011 Shinmoe-dake eruption

    Hashimoto, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Shimbori, T.; Ishii, K.; Takagi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The result of volcanic ash transport simulation strongly depends on an eruption column model, that gives a profile of discharging rate of ash particles, for a predictability of dispersion of ash particles. Simple eruption column models, such as proposed by Suzuki (1983), have been adopted in volcanic ash transport simulations for its simplicity and convenience. However, such a model sometimes brings erroneous results especially when an environmental wind field considerably affects the behavior of eruption column. The distortion of eruption column and enhancement of turbulent mixing due to wind shear should be taken into account in an eruption column model for the improvement of its applicability. The authors have conducted the three-dimensional simulation of volcanic plume for the 2011 Shinmoe-dake eruption, assuming the vertically-sheared wind field actually observed in the event, and have taken statistics of the locations and mobile vectors of the ash particles getting out of the simulated volcanic plume to establish the profile of discharging rate. The resulted profile is distinctly different from that based on a usual eruption column model. The new profile is characterized by the relatively large discharge of micron-sized ash particles from the middle level of the plume, comparing to the usual one. The authors plan to validate the new model in the simulation of long-range transport of volcanic ash, based on satellite observation data. This work will be a basis for a future improvement of the volcanic ash fall forecast by Japan Meteorological Agency, which is established with the Suzuki's model. The characteristics and validity of new model will be discussed in the presentation. Acknowledgement This study was supported by the Earthquake Research Institute cooperative research program. References Suzuki, T., 1983: A theoretical model for dispersion of tephra. Arc Volcanism: Physics and Tectonics. TERRAPUB, 95-113.

  14. Ground Deformation during Papandayan Volcano 2002 Eruption as Detected by GPS Surveys

    Hasanuddin Z. Abidin

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Papandayan is an A-type active volcano located in the southern part of Garut Regency, about 70 km southeast of Bandung, Indonesia. Its earliest recorded eruption, and most violent and devastating outburst occurred in 1772 and the latest eruptions occurred in the period of 11 November to 8 December 2002, and consisted of freatic, freatomagmatic and magmatic types of eruption.During the latest eruption period, GPS surveys were conducted at several points inside and around the crater in a radial mode using the reference point located at Papandayan observatory around 10 km from the crater. At the points closest to the erupting craters, GPS displacements up to a few dm were detected, whereas at the points outside the crater, the displacements were in the cm level. The magnitude of displacements observed at each point also show a temporal variation according to the eruption characteristics. The results show that deformation during eruption tends to be local, e.g. just around the crater. Pressure source is difficult to be properly modeled from GPS results, due to limited GPS data available and differences in topography, geological structure and/or rheology related to each GPS station.

  15. Multiple dendrochronological responses to the eruption of Cinder Cone, Lassen Volcanic National Park, California

    Sheppard, P.R.; Ort, M.H.; Anderson, K.C.; Clynne, M.A.; May, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Two dendrochronological properties – ring width and ring chemistry – were investigated in trees near Cinder Cone in Lassen Volcanic National Park, northeastern California, for the purpose of re-evaluating the date of its eruption. Cinder Cone is thought to have erupted in AD 1666 based on ring-width evidence, but interpreting ring-width changes alone is not straightforward because many forest disturbances can cause changes in ring width. Old Jeffrey pines growing in Cinder Cone tephra and elsewhere for control comparison were sampled. Trees growing in tephra show synchronous ring-width changes at AD 1666, but this ring-width signal could be considered ambiguous for dating the eruption because changes in ring width can be caused by other events. Trees growing in tephra also show changes in ring phosphorus, sulfur, and sodium during the late 1660s, but inter-tree variability in dendrochemical signals makes dating the eruption from ring chemistry alone difficult. The combination of dendrochemistry and ring-width signals improves confidence in dating the eruption of Cinder Cone over the analysis of just one ring-growth property. These results are similar to another case study using dendrochronology of ring width and ring chemistry at Parícutin, Michoacán, Mexico, a cinder cone that erupted beginning in 1943. In both cases, combining analysis with ring width and ring chemistry improved confidence in the dendro-dating of the eruptions.

  16. Steady subsidence of a repeatedly erupting caldera through InSAR observations: Aso, Japan

    Nobile, Adriano; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel; Aoki, Yosuke; Borgstrom, Sven; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Geshi, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    The relation between unrest and eruption at calderas is still poorly understood. Aso caldera, Japan, shows minor episodic eruptions, mainly phreatic, associated with steady subsidence. We analyse the recent deformation of Aso using SAR images from 1993 to 2011 and compare this with the eruptive activity. Although the dataset suffers from limitations (e.g., atmospheric effects, coherence loss, low signal to noise ratio), we observe a steady subsidence signal from 1996 to 1998, that suggests an overall contraction of a magmatic source below the caldera centre, from 4.5 to 7 km depth. Because of the similar volumes of the contracting source and erupted material, we propose that the contraction may have been induced by the release of the magmatic fluids feeding the eruptions. If confirmed by further data, this hypothesis suggests that degassing processes play a crucial role in triggering minor eruptions within open conduit calderas, as at Aso. These features underline the importance of defining any eruptive potential also from deflating magmatic systems with open conduit.

  17. Double eruption cyst in a newborn boy. Case report and review of the literature

    Marissa ZARAKAS, Kyriaki TSINIDOU, Corina TRIANTAFYLLOU, Eleftheria MEGALOGIANNI, Konstantinos I. TOSIOS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Eruption cyst is a dentigerous cyst of the soft tissue of the jaws that forms around the crown of an erupting primary or permanent tooth, due to separation of the dental follicle from the crown. Eruption cysts usually present as solitary swellings on the alveolar ridge mucosa, whereas multiple eruption cysts presenting simultaneously or in short intervals are uncommon.The case of a 2 month old Caucasian boy with two adjacent eruption cysts, manifesting as a congenital bilobular tumor of smooth surface and blue color, on the mandibular central incisors area is presented. The lesion was diagnosed as a “hemangioma”, but it progressively grew in size and changed in color. The patient’s and family medical history were non contributory.Radiographic examination revealed the superficial location of the primary mandibular central incisors within the soft tissues, and showed no abnormal bone resorption. With the diagnosis of double eruption cyst,a monthly follow-up of the patient was suggested and a month after the clinical examination the cyst disappeared spontaneously without noticeable hemorrhage.A year later the primary mandibular central incisors had erupted normally and there was no residual lesion.

  18. Dike model for the 2012-2013 Tolbachik eruption constrained by satellite radar interferometry observations

    Lundgren, Paul; Kiryukhin, Alexey; Milillo, Pietro; Samsonov, Sergey

    2015-12-01

    A large dike intrusion and fissure eruption lasting 9 months began on November 27, 2013, beneath the south flank of Tolbachik Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. The eruption was the most recent at Tolbachik since the Great Tolbachik Eruption from 1975 to 1976. The 2012 eruption was preceded by more than 6 months of seismicity that clustered beneath the east flank of the volcano along a NW-SE trend. Seismicity increased dramatically before the eruption, with propagation of the seismicity from the central volcano conduit in the final hours. We use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to compute relative displacement images (interferograms) for SAR data pairs spanning the eruption. We use satellite SAR data from the Canadian Space Agency's RADARSAT-2 and from the Italian Space Agency's COSMO-SkyMed missions. Data are modeled first through a Markov Chain Monte Carlo solution for a single tensile dislocation (dike). We then use a boundary element method that includes topography to model a distributed dike-opening model. We find the best-fitting dike dips 80° to the WNW with maximum opening of 6-8 m, localized in the near surface and more broadly distributed in distinct regions up to 3 km beneath the surface, which varies from 1 to 2 km elevation for the eruptive fissures. The distribution of dike opening and its correspondence with co-diking seismicity suggests that the dike propagated radially from Tolbachik's central conduit.

  19. Eruptive modes and hiatus of volcanism at West Mata seamount, NE Lau basin: 1996-2012

    Embley, Robert W.; Merle, Susan G.; Baker, Edward T.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Lupton, John E.; Resing, Joseph A.; Dziak, Robert P.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Chadwick, William W.; Shank, T.; Greene, Ron; Walker, Sharon L.; Haxel, Joseph; Olson, Eric; Baumberger, Tamara

    2014-10-01

    present multiple lines of evidence for years to decade-long changes in the location and character of volcanic activity at West Mata seamount in the NE Lau basin over a 16 year period, and a hiatus in summit eruptions from early 2011 to at least September 2012. Boninite lava and pyroclasts were observed erupting from its summit in 2009, and hydroacoustic data from a succession of hydrophones moored nearby show near-continuous eruptive activity from January 2009 to early 2011. Successive differencing of seven multibeam bathymetric surveys of the volcano made in the 1996-2012 period reveals a pattern of extended constructional volcanism on the summit and northwest flank punctuated by eruptions along the volcano's WSW rift zone (WSWRZ). Away from the summit, the volumetrically largest eruption during the observational period occurred between May 2010 and November 2011 at ˜2920 m depth near the base of the WSWRZ. The (nearly) equally long ENE rift zone did not experience any volcanic activity during the 1996-2012 period. The cessation of summit volcanism recorded on the moored hydrophone was accompanied or followed by the formation of a small summit crater and a landslide on the eastern flank. Water column sensors, analysis of gas samples in the overlying hydrothermal plume and dives with a remotely operated vehicle in September 2012 confirmed that the summit eruption had ceased. Based on the historical eruption rates calculated using the bathymetric differencing technique, the volcano could be as young as several thousand years.

  20. MASS AND ENERGY OF ERUPTING SOLAR PLASMA OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ∼3 × 1013-5 × 1014 g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ∼1 × 1015 g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events

  1. Volcanic Eruptions in the Southern Red Sea During 2007–2013

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2015-04-03

    The first volcanic eruption known to occur in the southern Red Sea in over a century started on Jebel at Tair Island in September 2007. The early phase of the eruption was energetic, with lava reaching the shore of the small island within hours, destroying a Yemeni military outpost and causing a few casualties. The eruption lasted several months, producing a new summit cone and lava covering an area of 5.9 km2, which is about half the area of the island. The Jebel at Tair activity was followed by two more eruptions within the Zubair archipelago, about 50 km to the southeast, in 2011–2012 and 2013, both of which started on the seafloor and resulted in the formation of new islands. The first of these eruptions started in December 2011 in the northern part of the archipelago and lasted for about one month, generating a small (0.25 km2) oval-shaped island. Coastal erosion during the first two years following the end of the eruption has reduced the size of the island to 0.19 km2. The second event occurred in the central part of the Zubair Islands and lasted roughly two months (September–November, 2013), forming a larger (0.68 km2) island. The recent volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea are a part of increased activity seen in the entire southern Red Sea region following the onset of a rifting episode in Afar (Ethiopia) in 2005.

  2. A reappraisal of the 1835 eruption of Cosigüina and its atmospheric impact

    Self, S.; Rampino, M. R.; Carr, M. J.

    1989-10-01

    In the “great” January 1835 eruption of Cosigüina volcano, Nicaragua, andesitic magma and lithic material were erupted over a period of at least three days. Proximal facies consist of clastogenic lava, scoria-fall, and lithic ash-fall produced by phreatomagmatic to vulcanian or plinian activity, together with surge deposits and lithic block-falls. Pyroclastic flow deposits covered some flanks of the volcano and entered the sea in the Gulf of Fonseca. Little record exists of the distal ash-fall, thus the total bulk volume erupted can only be roughly constrained to 2.9 5.6 km3. Furthermore, the amount of juvenile material is thought to be small. A recent study of volatiles in 1835 scoria suggests sulfur release from the magma was negligible. This reappraisal indicates that the Cosigüina eruption probably had little global climatic impact. Despite its violent nature, the magnitude of the eruption was modest. The eruption occurred too late to initiate the Northern Hemisphere cooling trend form 1828 1836. Dry fogs and other atmospheric optical phenomena usually observed after eruptions that contribute significantly to the stratospheric aerosol burden were not recorded after 1835.

  3. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions.

    Myers, Clayton E; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E

    2015-12-24

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events. PMID:26701052

  4. On numerical simulation of the global distribution of sulfate aerosol produced by a large volcanic eruption

    Pudykiewicz, J.A.; Dastoor, A.P. [Atmospheric Environment Service, Quebec (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the Earth`s atmosphere and can significantly perturb the global atmospheric chemistry. The large amount of sulfate aerosol produced by the oxidation of SO{sub 2} injected into the atmosphere during volcanic eruptions also has a relatively big influence on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s climatic system. The submicron particles of the sulfate aerosol reflect solar radiation more effectively than they trap radiation in the infrared range. The effect of this is observed as cooling of the Earth`s surface. The modification of the global radiation budget following volcanic eruption can subsequently cause significant fluctuations of atmospheric variables on a subclimatic scale. The resulting perturbation of weather patterns has been observed and well documented since the eruptions of Mt. Krakatau and Mt. Tambora. The impact of the sulfate aerosol from volcanic eruptions on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s atmosphere was also confirmed by the studies done with Global Circulation Models designed to simulate climate. The objective of the present paper is to present a simple and effective method to estimate the global distribution of the sulfate aerosol produced as a consequence of volcanic eruptions. In this study we will present results of the simulation of global distribution of sulfate aerosol from the eruption of Mt Pinatubo.

  5. Observational Features of Large-Scale Structures as Revealed by the Catastrophe Model of Solar Eruptions

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale magnetic structures are the main carrier of major eruptions in the solar atmosphere. These structures are rooted in the photosphere and are driven by the unceasing motion of the photospheric material through a series of equilibrium configurations. The motion brings energy into the coronal magnetic field until the system ceases to be in equilibrium. The catastrophe theory for solar eruptions indicates that loss of mechanical equilibrium constitutes the main trigger mechanism of major eruptions, usually shown up as solar flares,eruptive prominences, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Magnetic reconnection which takes place at the very beginning of the eruption as a result of plasma instabilities/turbulence inside the current sheet, converts magnetic energy into heating and kinetic energy that are responsible for solar flares, and for accelerating both plasma ejecta (flows and CMEs) and energetic particles. Various manifestations are thus related to one another, and the physics behind these relationships is catastrophe and magnetic reconnection. This work reports on recent progress in both theoretical research and observations on eruptive phenomena showing the above manifestations. We start by displaying the properties of large-scale structures in the corona and the related magnetic fields prior to an eruption, and show various morphological features of the disrupting magnetic fields. Then, in the framework of the catastrophe theory,we look into the physics behind those features investigated in a succession of previous works,and discuss the approaches they used.

  6. Ice-melt rates in liquid-filled cavities during explosive subglacial eruptions

    Woodcock, D. C.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.

    2014-03-01

    Subglacial eruptions are often associated with rapid penetration of overlying ice and release of large flow rates of water as jökulhlaups. Observations of recent subglacial eruptions indicate rapid syn-eruptive ice melting within liquid-filled subglacial cavities, but quantitative descriptions of possible heat transfer processes need to be developed. Calculations of heat flux from the ice cavity fluid to the melting ice surface indicate that up to 0.6 MW m-2 may be obtained for fluids undergoing single-phase free convection, similar to minimum estimates of heat flux inferred from observations of recent eruptions. Our model of boiling two-phase free convection in subglacial cavities indicates that much greater heat fluxes, in the range 3-5 MW m-2, can be obtained in the vent region of the cavity and may be increased further by momentum transfer from the eruption jet. Rapid magma-water heat transfer from fragmented magma is needed to sustain these heat fluxes. Similar heat fluxes are anticipated for forced convection of subcooled cavity water induced by momentum transfer from an eruption jet. These heat fluxes approach those required to explain jökulhlaup flow rates and rapid ice penetration rates by melting in some, but not all recent eruptions.

  7. Erupting filaments with large enclosing flux tubes as sources of high-mass 3-part CMEs, and erupting filaments in the absence of enclosing flux tubes as sources of low-mass unstructured CMEs

    Hutton, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The 3-part appearance of many CMEs arising from erupting filaments emerges from a large magnetic flux tube structure, consistent with the form of the erupting filament system. Other CMEs arising from erupting filaments lack a clear 3-part structure and reasons for this have not been researched in detail. This paper aims to further establish the link between CME structure and the structure of the erupting filament system and to investigate whether CMEs which lack a 3-part structure have different eruption characteristics. A survey is made of 221 near-limb filament eruptions observed from 2013/05/03-2014/06/30 by EUV imagers and coronagraphs. 92 filament eruptions are associated with 3-part structured CMEs, 41 eruptions are associated with unstructured CMEs. The remaining 88 are categorized as failed eruptions. For 34% of the 3-part CMEs, processing applied to EUV images reveals the erupting front edge is a pre-existing loop structure surrounding the filament, which subsequently erupts with the filament to form...

  8. Two-way coupling between Vesuvius eruptions and southern Apennine earthquakes, Italy, by elastic stress transfer

    Nostro, C.; Stein, R.S.; Cocco, M.; Belardinelli, M.E.; Marzocchi, W.

    1998-01-01

    During the past 1000 years, eruptions of Vesuvius have often been accompanied by large earthquakes in the Apennines 50-60 km to the northeast. Statistical investigations had shown that earthquakes often preceded eruptions, typically by less than a decade, but did not provide a physical explanation for the correlation. Here, we explore elastic stress interaction between earthquakes and eruptions under the hypothesis that small stress changes can promote events when the Apennine normal faults and the Vesuvius magma body are close to failure. We show that earthquakes can promote eruptions by compressing the magma body at depth and opening suitably oriented near-surface conduits. Voiding the magma body in turns brings these same normal faults closer to Coulomb failure, promoting earthquakes. Such a coupling is strongest if the magma reservoir is a dike oriented normal to the regional extension axis, parallel to the Apennines, and the near-surface conduits and fissures are oriented normal to the Apennines. This preferred orientation suggests that the eruptions issuing from such fissures should be most closely linked in time to Apennine earthquakes. Large Apennine earthquakes since 1400 are calculated to have transferred more stress to Vesuvius than all but the largest eruptions have transferred to Apennine faults, which may explain why earthquakes more commonly lead than follow eruptions. A two-way coupling may thus link earthquakes and Vesuvius eruptions along a 100-km-long set of faults. We test the statistical significance of the earthquake-eruption correlation in the two-way coupling zone, and find a correlation significant at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Impacts of high-latitude volcanic eruptions on ENSO and AMOC.

    Pausata, Francesco S R; Chafik, Leon; Caballero, Rodrigo; Battisti, David S

    2015-11-10

    Large volcanic eruptions can have major impacts on global climate, affecting both atmospheric and ocean circulation through changes in atmospheric chemical composition and optical properties. The residence time of volcanic aerosol from strong eruptions is roughly 2-3 y. Attention has consequently focused on their short-term impacts, whereas the long-term, ocean-mediated response has not been well studied. Most studies have focused on tropical eruptions; high-latitude eruptions have drawn less attention because their impacts are thought to be merely hemispheric rather than global. No study to date has investigated the long-term effects of high-latitude eruptions. Here, we use a climate model to show that large summer high-latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere cause strong hemispheric cooling, which could induce an El Niño-like anomaly, in the equatorial Pacific during the first 8-9 mo after the start of the eruption. The hemispherically asymmetric cooling shifts the Intertropical Convergence Zone southward, triggering a weakening of the trade winds over the western and central equatorial Pacific that favors the development of an El Niño-like anomaly. In the model used here, the specified high-latitude eruption also leads to a strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the first 25 y after the eruption, followed by a weakening lasting at least 35 y. The long-lived changes in the AMOC strength also alter the variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). PMID:26504201

  10. Historical evidence for a connection between volcanic eruptions and climate change

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    The times of historical volcanic aerosol clouds were compared with changes in atmospheric temperatures on regional, hemispheric, and global scales. These involve either a direct comparison of individual significant eruption years with temperature records, or a comparison of eruption years with composited temperature records for several years before and after chosen sets of eruptions. Some studies have challenged the connection between individual eruptions and climate change. Mass and Portman (1989) recently suggested that the volcanic signal was present, but smaller than previously thought. In a study designed to test the idea that eruptions could cause small changes in climate, Hansen and other (1978) chose one of the best monitored eruptions at the time, the 1963 eruption of Agung volcano on the island of Bali. Using a simple radiation-balance model, in which an aerosol cloud in the tropics was simulated, this basic pattern of temperature change in the tropics and subtropics was reproduced. There may be natural limits to the atmospheric effects of any volcanic eruption. Self-limiting physical and chemical effects in eruption clouds were proposed. Model results suggest that aerosol microphysical processes of condensation and coagulation produce larger aerosols as the SO2 injection rate is increased. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on regional temperatures where the effects of volcanic aerosol clouds can be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns, especially changes in mid-latitudes where meridional circulation patterns may develop. Such climatic perturbations can be detected in proxy evidence such as decreases in tree-ring widths and frost damage rings in climatically sensitive parts of the world, changes in treelines, weather anomalies such as unusually cold summers, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures.

  11. Classification of Volcanic Eruptions on Io and Earth Using Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Data

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2005-01-01

    Two bodies in the Solar System exhibit high-temperature active volcanism: Earth and Io. While there are important differences in the eruptions on Earth and Io, in low-spatial-resolution data (corresponding to the bulk of available and foreseeable data of Io), similar styles of effusive and explosive volcanism yield similar thermal flux densities. For example, a square metre of an active pahoehoe flow on Io looks very similar to a square metre of an active pahoehoe flow on Earth. If, from observed thermal emission as a function of wavelength and change in thermal emission with time, the eruption style of an ionian volcano can be constrained, estimates of volumetric fluxes can be made and compared with terrestrial volcanoes using techniques derived for analysing terrestrial remotely-sensed data. In this way we find that ionian volcanoes fundamentally differ from their terrestrial counterparts only in areal extent, with Io volcanoes covering larger areas, with higher volumetric flux. Io outbursts eruptions have enormous implied volumetric fluxes, and may scale with terrestrial flood basalt eruptions. Even with the low-spatial resolution data available it is possible to sometimes constrain and classify eruption style both on Io and Earth from the integrated thermal emission spectrum. Plotting 2 and 5 m fluxes reveals the evolution of individual eruptions of different styles, as well as the relative intensity of eruptions, allowing comparison to be made from individual eruptions on both planets. Analyses like this can be used for interpretation of low-resolution data until the next mission to the jovian system. For a number of Io volcanoes (including Pele, Prometheus, Amirani, Zamama, Culann, Tohil and Tvashtar) we do have high/moderate resolution imagery to aid determination of eruption mode from analyses based only on low spatial-resolution data.

  12. Chronology and impact of the 2011 Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption, Chile

    M. Elissondo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed chronological reconstruction of the 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano (Chile based on information derived from newspapers, scientific reports and satellite images. Chronology of associated volcanic processes and their local and regional effects (i.e. precursory activity, tephra fallout, lahars, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows are also presented. The eruption had a severe impact on the ecosystem and on various economic sectors, including aviation, tourism, agriculture, and fishing industry. Urban areas and critical infrastructures, such as airports, hospitals and roads, were also impacted. The concentration of PM10 (Particulate Matter ≤ 10 μm was measured during and after the eruption, showing that maximum safety threshold levels of daily and annual exposures were surpassed in several occasions. Probabilistic analysis of atmospheric and eruptive conditions have shown that the main direction of dispersal is directly towards east of the volcano and that the climactic phase of the eruption, dispersed toward south-east, has a probability of occurrence within 1 %. The management of the crisis, including evacuation of people, is discussed, as well as the comparison with the impact associated with other recent eruptions located in similar areas and having similar characteristics (i.e. Quizapu, Hudson, and Chaitén volcanoes. This comparison shows that the regions downwind and very close to the erupting volcanoes suffered very similar problems, without a clear relation with the intensity of the eruption (e.g. health problems, damage to vegetation, death of animals, roof collapse, air traffic disruptions, road closure, lahars and flooding. This suggests that a detailed collection of impact data can be largely beneficial for the development of plans for the management of an eruptive crisis and the mitigation of associated risk of the Andean region.

  13. Chronology and impact of the 2011 Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption, Chile

    Elissondo, M.; Baumann, V.; Bonadonna, C.; Pistolesi, M.; Cioni, R.; Bertagnini, A.; Biass, S.; Herrero, J. C.; Gonzalez, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed chronological reconstruction of the 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano (Chile) based on information derived from newspapers, scientific reports and satellite images. Chronology of associated volcanic processes and their local and regional effects (i.e. precursory activity, tephra fallout, lahars, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows) are also presented. The eruption had a severe impact on the ecosystem and on various economic sectors, including aviation, tourism, agriculture, and fishing industry. Urban areas and critical infrastructures, such as airports, hospitals and roads, were also impacted. The concentration of PM10 (Particulate Matter ≤ 10 μm) was measured during and after the eruption, showing that maximum safety threshold levels of daily and annual exposures were surpassed in several occasions. Probabilistic analysis of atmospheric and eruptive conditions have shown that the main direction of dispersal is directly towards east of the volcano and that the climactic phase of the eruption, dispersed toward south-east, has a probability of occurrence within 1 %. The management of the crisis, including evacuation of people, is discussed, as well as the comparison with the impact associated with other recent eruptions located in similar areas and having similar characteristics (i.e. Quizapu, Hudson, and Chaitén volcanoes). This comparison shows that the regions downwind and very close to the erupting volcanoes suffered very similar problems, without a clear relation with the intensity of the eruption (e.g. health problems, damage to vegetation, death of animals, roof collapse, air traffic disruptions, road closure, lahars and flooding). This suggests that a detailed collection of impact data can be largely beneficial for the development of plans for the management of an eruptive crisis and the mitigation of associated risk of the Andean region.

  14. Animal Health and Productivity Status of Cattle After The Eruption of Mount Merapi

    Yulvian Sani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The eruption of Merapi from October 26th to November 6th, 2010 has affected social life and environment around the Merapi. The eruption has caused destruction of land and water resources, plants, death of animals and human casualities. The lava, dust and stones released from the eruption of Merapi had caused residential destruction, casualities, agricultural land and plants destruction, and contamination of water. The eruption has directly affected 4 districts including Sleman (Yogyakarta, Magelang, Boyolali and Klaten (Central Java categorized as Disaster Risk Area (DRA. The purpose of this assessment is to analyse the impacts of Merapi eruption in animal health and productivity in particular for dairy and beef cattle. A total of 2.828 heads of cattle was reported died during the eruption of Merapi, and 1.962 heads died at the time of eruption and 36 heads at the arrival on evacuation areas. Animal that found died including 423 heads of beef cattle (0.13% and 2.405 heads of dairy cattle (3.2%. Clinical sains noted after the eruption were reduction of milk production, loss of appetite, diarrhoea, respiratory disturbances, mastitis and collapse. The main problems for livestock were reduction of milk production, collapse of dairy milk corporation activities and contamination of water resources. Other than dairy cattle mortality, the reduction of milk production may be caused by subclinical mastitis and environmental distress due to temperature and noise of eruption for few days. The subclinical mastitis should be further investigated to establish rehabilitation programme for dairy milk agribussiness activity in particular around the DRA of Merapi.

  15. Volcanic plume measurements using a UAV for the 2014 Mt. Ontake eruption

    Mori, Toshiya; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Terada, Akihiko; Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke; Shinohara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    A phreatic eruption of Mt. Ontake, Japan, started abruptly on September 27, 2014, and caused the worst volcanic calamity in recent 70 years in Japan. We conducted volcanic plume surveys using an electric multirotor unmanned aerial vehicle to elucidate the conditions of Mt. Ontake's plume, which is flowing over 3000 m altitude. A plume gas composition, sulfur dioxide flux and thermal image measurements and a particle sampling were carried out using the unmanned aerial vehicle for three field campaigns on November 20 and 21, 2014, and June 2, 2015. Together with the results of manned helicopter and aircraft observations, we revealed that the plume of Mt. Ontake was not directly emitted from the magma but was influenced by hydrothermal system, and observed SO2/H2S molar ratios were decreasing after the eruption. High SO2 flux of >2000 t/d observed at least until 20 h after the onset of the eruption implies significant input of magmatic gas and the flux quickly decreased to about 130 t/d in 2 months. In contrast, H2S fluxes retrieved using SO2/H2S ratio and SO2 flux showed significantly high level of 700-800 t/d, which continued at least between 2 weeks and 2 months after the eruption. This is a peculiar feature of the 2014 Mt. Ontake eruption. Considering the trends of the flux changes of SO2 and H2S, we presume that majority of SO2 and H2S are supplied, respectively, from high-temperature magmatic fluid of a deep origin and from hydrothermal system. From the point of view of SO2/H2S ratios and fumarolic temperatures, the plume degassing trend after the 2014 eruption is following the similar course as that after the 1979 eruptions, and we speculate the 2014 eruptive activity will cease slowly similar to the 1979 eruption.

  16. Catastrophic eruptions of the directed-blast type at Mount St. Helens, bezymianny and Shiveluch volcanoes

    Bogoyavlenskaya, G.E.; Braitseva, O.A.; Melekestsev, I.V.; Kiriyanov, V. Yu; Dan, Miller C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes catastrophic eruptions of Mount St. Helens (1980), Bezymianny (1955-1956), and Shiveluch (1964) volcanoes. A detailed description of eruption stages and their products, as well as the quantitative characteristics of the eruptive process are given. The eruptions under study belong to the directed-blast type. This type is characterized by the catastrophic character of the climatic stage during which a directed blast, accompanied by edifice destruction, the profound ejection of juvenile pyroclastics and the formation of pyroclastic flows, occur. The climatic stage of all three eruptions has similar characteristics, such as duration, kinetic energy of blast (1017-1018 J), the initial velocity of debris ejection, morphology and size of newly-formed craters. But there are also certain differences. At Mount St. Helens the directed blast was preceeded by failure of the edifice and these events produced separable deposits, namely debris avalanche and directed blast deposits which are composed of different materials and have different volumes, thickness and distribution. At Bezymianny, failure did not precede the blast and the whole mass of debris of the old edifice was outburst only by blast. The resulting deposits, represented by the directed blast agglomerate and sand facies, have characteristics of both the debris avalanche and the blast deposit at Mount St. Helens. At Shiveluch directed-blast deposits are represented only by the directed-blast agglomerate; the directed-blast sand facies, or blast proper, seen at Mount St. Helens is absent. During the period of Plinian activity, the total volumes of juvenile material erupted at Mount St. Helens and at Besymianny were roughly comparable and exceeded the volume of juvenile material erupted at Shiveluch, However, the volume of pyroclastic-flow deposits erupted at Mount St. Helens was much less. The heat energy of all three eruptions is comparable: 1.3 ?? 1018, 3.8-4.8 ?? 1018 and 1 ?? 1017 J for

  17. Masculinization of the eruption pattern of permanent mandibular canines in opposite sex twin girls.

    Heikkinen, Tuomo; Harila, Virpi; Tapanainen, Juha S; Alvesalo, Lassi

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of prenatal androgenization on the clinical eruption of permanent teeth expressing dimorphism and bimaturism. The eruption curves of permanent teeth (except third molars), including those that make up the canine complex (permanent canines, lower first premolars), are compared among opposite sex twins (OS twins) relative to single-born boys and girls. The comparisons are made with regard to three phases of eruption (pierced mucosa, half- erupted, and completely erupted) from a cross-sectional sample of dental casts, using Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyzes. The casts were collected from 2159 school children from the US Collaborative Perinatal Project, including 39 pairs of OS-twins, of which 12 pairs (30.8%) were Euro-Americans and 27 pairs (69.2%) were of African-American ancestry. The eruption patterns of the incisors, upper first molars, and lower canines were found to be significantly masculinized (delayed) among OS twin girls. The differences in most other teeth were either not significant, or the number of observations of active eruption phases were too few, such as in the upper first molars and incisors, to yield strong evidence and meaningful results. The masculinization of the tooth eruption pattern in OS twin girls is intriguing because of the lower canine responses during puberty, as well as canine primordial formation during early fetal androgenization of their co-twin during the 8th to 14th gestational weeks. The present results offer a challenge for future research exploring tooth eruption mechanisms, and may also highlight some cases of delayed or ectopic canines, which are biased toward females. PMID:23754587

  18. The ash-fall hazard from a Plinian eruption at Colima Volcano, Mexico

    Rita Fonseca

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The historical eruptive activity at Colima Volcano has been characterized by Strombolian and Merapi type eruptions and Vulcanian explosions associated with dome growth, which have ended in a Plinian eruption about every 100 years. The situation now prevailing at Colima Volcano is similar to that which preceded these explosive eruptions, when a dome fills the crater. This study proposes seven scenarios for the ash-fall from a Plinian eruption, based on historical eruptive activity, isopach thickness from the 1913 Plinian eruption, land use, socioeconomic data, and a 15-year statistical wind study realized with daily radiosonde data grouped according to four altitudinal levels: 4,000-9,000 (I; 9,000-14,000 (II; 14,000-17,000 (III and 17,000-28,000 (IV m a.s.l., based on common wind speeds and directions. We have integrated the wind distribution at level IV and estimated the ash dispersion for a Plinian eruption. From January to March, the main impact would be towards the northeast, in April and in October, towards the east, in May, towards the north-northeast or north-northwest, from June to August, towards the northwest, in September, towards the west, and in November and December, towards the west-southwest. The fallout would damage the coniferous forests of the Colima National Park, two lagoons and three lakes. More than 30 million people living in Guadalajara, Mexico City, Leon and Colima would suffer eye, respiratory and skin problems. The proximal areas, such as Ciudad Guzman, would be subject to roof collapsing and communication problems. The agricultural and livestock sectors would suffer severe financial losses. The Queseria sugar mill, the Atenquique paper mill, and the cement plants in Zapotiltic would halt work due to chimney obstruction and machinery abrasion. Four thermoelectric plants, twenty airports and four commercial ports would be affected if the eruption occurs in summer.

  19. Volcanic eruptions with little warning: the case of Volcán Reventador's Surprise November 3, 2002 Eruption, Ecuador

    Minard Hall

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Successful mitigation of a possible volcanic disaster depends upon the early detection of renewed volcanic activity. With considerable optimism, volcano observatories instrument dangerous volcanoes, with the hope of an early recognition of the reactivation of a volcano. Reventador volcano's November 3, 2002 eruption came with little warning and had a tremendous socio-economic impact. Reventador volcano, a young andesitic cone in the Eastern Cordillera of Ecuador, has had, at least, 16 eruptions between 1541 and 2002. These eruptions were characterized by small pyroclastic flows, blocky lava flows, debris flows, and limited ash falls. With the exception of a M=4 earthquake near the volcano one month earlier, only seismic activity related to the eruption onset was registered. Following only 7 hours of seismic tremor, the paroxysmal eruption began at 0912 h on November 3, 2002 with a sustained column that ascended to 17 km and five pyroclastic flows, that traveled as much as 9 km to the east. By mid-afternoon ash falls of 1-10 mm thickness began blanketing the Interandean Valley near Quito. The economic impact was significant, including severe damage to the principal petroleum pipelines, closure of schools, businesses, and Quito's airport for 10 days. It is important to conclude that for those volcanoes that are characterized by low silica, volatile-rich, fluid magmas, magma ascent can be aseismic, rapid, and without much warning. This event should serve as a clear reminder to scientists, civil defense, and authorities of the rapid onset of the eruptions of some volcanoesErupciones volcánicas con poco aviso: el caso de la erupción sorpresiva del 3 de Noviembre del 2002 del Volcán Reventador. La mitigación exitosa de un posible desastre volcánico depende de la detección oportuna de la reactivación de un volcán. Con mucho optimismo, los observatorios volcánicos efectúan un monitoreo de volcanes peligrosos, en espera de reconocer

  20. A comparison of volcanic eruption processes on Earth, Moon, Mars, Io and Venus

    The silicate planets and satellites display a wide range of physical, chemical and atmospheric characteristics which may influence the nature of volcanism, a major geological process common to the evolution of the surfaces of these bodies. Consideration of the process of magma ascent and eruption from first principles allows predictions to be made concerning volcanic eruption styles and expected landforms and deposits on each planetary body. Examination of actual landforms and deposits in light of these predictions leads to a better understanding of the nature of volcanic eruption processes and outlines outstanding problems. (author)

  1. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analyzed. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    Cruz R, S. de la; Armienta, M.A.; Segovia A, N

    1992-05-15

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  3. Bromine release during Plinian eruptions along the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Appel, K.; Freundt, A.; Perez-Fernandez, W.; Wehrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) have produced at least 72 highly explosive eruptions within the last 200 ka. The eruption columns of all these “Plinian” eruptions reached well into the stratosphere such that their released volatiles may have influenced atmospheric chemistry and climate. While previous research has focussed on the sulfur and chlorine emissions during such large eruptions, we here present measurements of the heavy halogen bromine by means of synchrotron radiation induced micro-XRF microanalysis (SR-XRF) with typical detection limits at 0.3 ppm (in Fe rich standard basalt ML3B glass). Spot analyses of pre-eruptive glass inclusions trapped in minerals formed in magma reservoirs were compared with those in matrix glasses of the tephras, which represent the post-eruptive, degassed concentrations. The concentration difference between inclusions and matrix glasses, multiplied by erupted magma mass determined by extensive field mapping, yields estimates of the degassed mass of bromine. Br is probably hundreds of times more effective in destroying ozone than Cl, and can accumulate in the stratosphere over significant time scales. Melt inclusions representing deposits of 22 large eruptions along the CAVA have Br contents between 0.5 and 13 ppm. Br concentrations in matrix glasses are nearly constant at 0.4 to 1.5 ppm. However, Br concentrations and Cl/Br ratios vary along the CAVA. The highest values of Br contents (>8 ppm) and lowest Cl/Br ratios (170 to 600) in melt inclusions occur across central Nicaragua and southern El Salvador, and correlate with bulk-rock compositions of high Ba/La > 85 as well as low La/Yb discharged 700 kilotons of Br. On average, each of the remaining 21 CAVA eruptions studied have discharged c.100 kilotons of bromine. During the past 200 ka, CAVA volcanoes have emitted a cumulative mass of 3.2 Mt of Br through highly explosive eruptions. There are six periods in the past (c. 2ka, 6ka, 25ka, 40ka, 60ka, 75

  4. Excess mortality in Europe following a future Laki-style Icelandic eruption

    Schmidt, A.; Ostro, B; Carslaw, K. S.; Wilson, M; T. Thordarson; G. W. Mann; Simmons, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Historical records show that the A.D. 1783–1784 Laki eruption in Iceland caused severe environmental stress and posed a health hazard far beyond the borders of Iceland. Given the reasonable likelihood of such an event recurring, it is important to assess the scale on which a future eruption could impact society. We quantify the potential health effects caused by an increase in air pollution during a future Laki-style eruption using a global aerosol model together with concentration-response f...

  5. An approach to source characterization of tremor signals associated with eruptions and lahars

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Mothes, Patricia; Ruiz, Mario; Maeda, Yuta

    2015-11-01

    Tremor signals are observed in association with eruption activity and lahar descents. Reduced displacement ( D R) derived from tremor signals has been used to quantify tremor sources. However, tremor duration is not considered in D R, which makes it difficult to compare D R values estimated for different tremor episodes. We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize the sources of tremor signals. We used this method to estimate the tremor source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We considered the source amplitude to be the maximum value during tremor. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude ( I s) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram of tremor corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10-Hz band. For eruption tremor signals, we also estimated the cumulative source pressure ( I p) from an infrasonic envelope waveform corrected for geometrical spreading. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and lahars and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua: noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that I s increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for lahar tremor signals and explosion events, but I s increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. We found a linear relation between I s and I p for both explosion events and eruption tremor. Because I p may be proportional to the total mass involved during an eruption episode, this linear relation suggests that I s may be useful to quantify eruption size. The I s values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were

  6. A Pediatric Case of Acute Generalized Pustular Eruption without Streptococcal Infection

    Tabata, Nobuko; Yoshizawa, Hideka

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular lesions characterized by acute onset with fever occur in pustulosis acuta generalisata, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and generalized pustular psoriasis. In the present report, we describe a pediatric case of generalized pustular eruption that was not completely consistent with clinical features. Our patient had no evidence of a post-streptococcal infection. We observed scattered symmetric eruption of discrete pustules with an inflammatory halo on normal skin. The eruption was absent on her palms and soles of the feet. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports in the English literature of cases with clinical features similar to those of our patient. PMID:27462226

  7. Neotectonic earth movements related to the 1999 eruption of Cameroon Mountain, West Africa

    C. E. Suh; S. N. Ayonghe; E. S. Njumbe

    2001-01-01

    @@ The 1999 eruption of Cameroon Mountain was restricted to two sites and controlled by fissures subparallel to one another. Brittle failure, vertical displacement, horizontal displacement and ground deflation are the main types of ground deformation around these sites. The eruptive vents at both sites have a NE-SW trend parallel to the principal eruptive fissures and brittle discontinuities in rock bodies in this vicinity. SH (greatest horizontal stress) is inferred to have a SW-NE trend parallel to the direction of vent migration and fracture propagation.

  8. Tambora 1815 as a test case for high impact volcanic eruptions: Earth system effects

    Raible, Christoph C.; Brönnimann, Stefan; Auchmann, Renate; Brohan, Philip; Frölicher, Thomas L.; Graf, Hans-F.; Jones, Phil; Luterbacher, Jürg; Muthers, Stefan; Neukom, Raphael; Robock, Alan; Self, Stephen; Sudrajat, Adjat; Timmreck, Claudia; Wegmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The eruption of Tambora (Indonesia) in April 1815 had substantial effects on global climate and led to the ‘Year Without a Summer’ of 1816 in Europe and North America. Although a tragic event—tens of thousands of people lost their lives—the eruption also was an ‘experiment of nature’ from which science has learned until today. The aim of this study is to summarize our current understanding of the Tambora eruption and its effects on climate as expressed in early instrumental observations, clim...

  9. Ice-melt rates in liquid-filled cavities during explosive subglacial eruptions

    Woodcock, Duncan; Lane, Stephen; Gilbert, Jennie

    2014-01-01

    Subglacial eruptions are often associated with rapid penetration of overlying ice and release of large flow rates of water as jökulhlaups. Observations of recent subglacial eruptions indicate rapid syn-eruptive ice melting within liquid-filled subglacial cavities, but quantitative descriptions of possible heat transfer processes need to be developed. Calculations of heat flux from the ice cavity fluid to the melting ice surface indicate that up to 0.6 MW m−2 may be obtained for fluids undergo...

  10. Geochronology of the largest explosive eruptions in Kamchatka and their reflection in the Greenland Ice sheet

    Results of multi-year detailed studied on dating of the largest explosive eruptions on the Kamchatka and their reflections in the Greenland Ice Sheet are summarized. The eruptions age determination was conducted by the 14C -dating of buried organic residues. The analysis showed that out of two acid peaks probable for caldera-forming eruptions the peak of 6476 year before our era is considered the most preferable one. Its maximum value (710 ppb) for the whole profile of the Greenland Ice Sheet corresponds to the largest volume of pyroclastics of the caldera-forming (above 120 km3)

  11. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  12. Tephra dispersal during the Campanian Ignimbrite (Italy) eruption: implications for ultra-distal ash transport during the large caldera-forming eruption

    Smith, Victoria C.; Isaia, Roberto; Engwell, Sam L.; Albert, Paul. G.

    2016-06-01

    The Campanian Ignimbrite eruption dispersed ash over much of the central eastern Mediterranean Sea and eastern Europe. The eruption started with a Plinian phase that was followed by a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) associated with the collapse of the Plinian column and the caldera. The glass compositions of the deposits span a wide geochemical range, but the Plinian fallout and PDCs associated with column collapse, the Lower Pumice Flow, only erupted the most evolved compositions. The later PDCs, the Breccia Museo and Upper Pumice Flow, erupted during and after caldera collapse, tap a less evolved component, and intermediate compositions that represent mixing between the end-members. The range of glass compositions in the Campanian Ignimbrite deposits from sites across the central and eastern Mediterranean Sea allow us to trace the dispersal of the different phases of this caldera-forming eruption. We map the fallout from the Plinian column and the plumes of fine material associated with the PDCs (co-PDCs) across the entire dispersal area. This cannot be done using the usual grain-size methods as deposits in these distal regions do not retain characteristics that allow attribution to either the Plinian or co-PDC phases. The glass compositions of the tephra at ultra-distal sites (>1500 km from the vent) match those of the uppermost PDC units, suggesting that most of the ultra-distal dispersal was associated with the late co-PDC plume that was generated during caldera collapse.

  13. Influences on the variability of eruption sequences and style transitions in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Procter, Jonathan; Agustín-Flores, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanism is characterised by a complex array of eruptive behaviours, reflecting spatial and temporal variability of the magmatic properties (e.g. composition, eruptive volume, magma flux) as well as environmental factors at the vent site (e.g. availability of water, country rock geology, faulting). These combine to produce changes in eruption style over brief periods (minutes to days) in many eruption episodes. Monogenetic eruptions in some volcanic fields often start with a phreatomagmatic vent-opening phase that later transforms into "dry" magmatic explosive or effusive activity, with a strong variation in the duration and importance of this first phase. Such an eruption sequence pattern occurred in 83% of the known eruption in the 0.25 My-old Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand. In this investigation, the eruptive volumes were compared with the sequences of eruption styles preserved in the pyroclastic record at each volcano of the AVF, as well as environmental influencing factors, such as distribution and thickness of water-saturated semi- to unconsolidated sediments, topographic position, distances from known fault lines. The AVF showed that there is no correlation between ejecta ring volumes and environmental influencing factors that is valid for the entire AVF. In contrary, using a set of comparisons of single volcanoes with well-known and documented sequences, resultant eruption sequences could be explained by predominant patterns of the environment in which these volcanoes were erupted. Based on the spatial variability of these environmental factors, a first-order susceptibility hazard map was constructed for the AVF that forecasts areas of largest likelihood for phreatomagmatic eruptions by overlaying topographical and shallow geological information. Combining detailed phase-by-phase breakdowns of eruptive volumes and the event sequences of the AVF, along with the new susceptibility map, more realistic eruption scenarios can be

  14. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    Mastin, L.G.; Guffanti, M.; Servranckx, R.; Webley, P.; Barsotti, S.; Dean, K.; Durant, A.; Ewert, J.W.; Neri, A.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Schneider, D.; Siebert, L.; Stunder, B.; Swanson, G.; Tupper, A.; Volentik, A.; Waythomas, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days in order to define hazards to aircraft and to communities downwind. Those models use input parameters, called "eruption source parameters", such as plume height H, mass eruption rate ???, duration D, and the mass fraction m63 of erupted debris finer than about 4??{symbol} or 63????m, which can remain in the cloud for many hours or days. Observational constraints on the value of such parameters are frequently unavailable in the first minutes or hours after an eruption is detected. Moreover, observed plume height may change during an eruption, requiring rapid assignment of new parameters. This paper reports on a group effort to improve the accuracy of source parameters used by VATDs in the early hours of an eruption. We do so by first compiling a list of eruptions for which these parameters are well constrained, and then using these data to review and update previously studied parameter relationships. We find that the existing scatter in plots of H versus ??? yields an uncertainty within the 50% confidence interval of plus or minus a factor of four in eruption rate for a given plume height. This scatter is not clearly attributable to biases in measurement techniques or to well-recognized processes such as elutriation from pyroclastic flows. Sparse data on total grain-size distribution suggest that the mass fraction of fine debris m63 could vary by nearly two orders of magnitude between small basaltic eruptions (??? 0.01) and large silicic ones (> 0.5). We classify eleven eruption types; four types each for different sizes of silicic and mafic eruptions; submarine eruptions; "brief" or Vulcanian eruptions; and eruptions that generate co-ignimbrite or co-pyroclastic flow plumes. For each eruption type we assign source parameters. We then assign a characteristic eruption type to each of the world's ??? 1500

  15. Volcanic Eruptions, Landscape Disturbance, and Potential Impacts to Marine and Terrestrial Ecosystems in Alaska: An Example from the August 2008 Eruption of Kasatochi Volcano

    Waythomas, C. F.; Drew, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    The magnitude, style, and sometimes-prolonged nature of volcanic activity in Alaska has had significant impact on ecological habitat. The accumulation of volcaniclastic deposits during eruptions have destroyed or altered areas important to the success of various species and it may take years to decades for landforms and surfaces to recover and become habitable again. Kasatochi volcano, in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, erupted explosively on August 7-8, 2008 and the rich nesting habitat for several species of seabirds on the island was completely destroyed. The eruption produced thick pyroclastic fall and flow deposits and several SO2 rich ash-gas plumes that reached 14 to 18 km above sea level. Pyroclastic deposits are several tens of meters thick, blanket the entire island, and initially extended seaward to increase the diameter of the island by about 800 m. Wave and gully erosion have modified these deposits and have exhumed some pre-eruption surfaces. Analysis of surface erosional features observed in satellite and time-lapse camera images and field studies have shown that by September 2009, gully erosion removed 300,000-600,000 m3 of mostly fine-grained volcanic sediment from the volcano flanks and much of this has reached the ocean. Sediment yield estimates from two representative drainage basins are about 104 m3km-2yr-1 and are comparable to sediment yields at other active volcanoes outside of Alaska. Coastal erosion rates at Kasatochi are as high as 80-140 myr-1 and parts of the northern coastline have already been eroded back to pre-eruption positions. As of March, 2011 about 72% of the material emplaced beyond the pre-eruption coastline on the northern sector of the island has been removed by wave erosion. Parts of the southern coastline have prograded beyond the post-eruption shoreline as a result of long-shore transport of sediment from north to south. As of March 2011, the total volume of material eroded by wave action was about 107 m3. The preferred

  16. Communicating likelihoods and probabilities in forecasts of volcanic eruptions

    Doyle, Emma E. H.; McClure, John; Johnston, David M.; Paton, Douglas

    2014-02-01

    The issuing of forecasts and warnings of natural hazard events, such as volcanic eruptions, earthquake aftershock sequences and extreme weather often involves the use of probabilistic terms, particularly when communicated by scientific advisory groups to key decision-makers, who can differ greatly in relative expertise and function in the decision making process. Recipients may also differ in their perception of relative importance of political and economic influences on interpretation. Consequently, the interpretation of these probabilistic terms can vary greatly due to the framing of the statements, and whether verbal or numerical terms are used. We present a review from the psychology literature on how the framing of information influences communication of these probability terms. It is also unclear as to how people rate their perception of an event's likelihood throughout a time frame when a forecast time window is stated. Previous research has identified that, when presented with a 10-year time window forecast, participants viewed the likelihood of an event occurring ‘today’ as being of less than that in year 10. Here we show that this skew in perception also occurs for short-term time windows (under one week) that are of most relevance for emergency warnings. In addition, unlike the long-time window statements, the use of the phrasing “within the next…” instead of “in the next…” does not mitigate this skew, nor do we observe significant differences between the perceived likelihoods of scientists and non-scientists. This finding suggests that effects occurring due to the shorter time window may be ‘masking’ any differences in perception due to wording or career background observed for long-time window forecasts. These results have implications for scientific advice, warning forecasts, emergency management decision-making, and public information as any skew in perceived event likelihood towards the end of a forecast time window may result in

  17. Ash Redistribution Following a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain

    Pelletier, J. D.; Delong, S. B.; Cline, M. L.; Harrington, C. D.; Keating, G.

    2005-12-01

    The redistribution of contaminated tephra by hillslope, fluvial, and pedologic processes is a poorly-constrained but important aspect of evaluating the radiological dose from an unlikely volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain (YM). To better evaluate this hazard, we developed a spatially-distributed numerical model of tephra redistribution that integrates contaminated tephra from hill slopes and active channels, mixes it with clean sediment in the channel system, distributes it on the fan, and migrates it into the soil column. The model is coupled with an atmospheric dispersion model that predicts the deposition of radioactive waste-contaminated tephra at specified grid points. The redistribution model begins in the upper Fortymile Wash drainage basin where it integrates the tephra deposited on steep slopes and active channel beds within a spatially-distributed framework. The Fortymile Wash drainage basin is the focus of this model because tephra from only this basin reaches the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes, and it is on this fan where the radiological dose to a hypothetical individual is compared to the regulatory standard (via additional biosphere models). The dilution effect of flood scour, mixing, and re-deposition within the upper basin is modeled using a dilution-mixing model widely used in the contaminant-transport literature. The accuracy of this model is established by comparing the model prediction with tephra concentrations measured in channels draining the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. The model combines the contaminated tephra transported from the upper basin with the tephra deposited directly on the fan as primary fallout. On the Fortymile Wash fan, channels and interchannel-divide areas are divided on the basis of soil-geomorphic mapping according to whether they are Holocene or Pleistocene in age. This approach allows the model to incorporate the effects of channel migration on the fan within the past 10,000 yr. The model treats

  18. Case report: Management of severe posterior open bite due to primary failure of eruption.

    Mc Cafferty, J

    2010-06-01

    Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is a rare condition affecting any or all posterior quadrants. Unilateral involvement of maxillary and mandibular quadrants causes a dramatic posterior open bite that requires complex management strategies.

  19. Decade of stratospheric sulfate measurements compared with observations of volcanic eruptions

    Sulfate aerosol concentrations in the stratosphere have been measured for 11 years (1971--1981) using portions of filters collected by the Department of Energy's High Altitude Sampling Program. Data collected seasonally at altitudes between 13 km and 20 km spanning latitudes from 75 0N to 51 0S are reported. These data are compared with the reported altitudes of volcanic eruption plumes during the same decade. From this comparison it is concluded that (1) several unreported volcanic eruptions or eruptions to altitudes higher than reported did occur during the decade, (2) the e-fold removal time for sulfate aerosol from the stratosphere following the eruption of Volcan Fuego in 1974 was 11.2 +- 1.2 months, (3) the volcanic contribution to the average stratospheric sulfate concentration over the decade was greater than 50%, and (4) there may be evidence for an anthropogenic contribution to stratospheric sulfate that increases at the rate of 6 to 8% per year

  20. The global precipitation response to volcanic eruptions in the CMIP5 models

    We examine the precipitation response to volcanic eruptions in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) historical simulations compared to three observational datasets, including one with ocean coverage. Global precipitation decreases significantly following eruptions in CMIP5 models, with the largest decrease in wet tropical regions. This also occurs in observational land data, and ocean data in the boreal cold season. Monsoon rainfall decreases following eruptions in both models and observations. In response to individual eruptions, the ITCZ shifts away from the hemisphere with the greater concentration of aerosols in CMIP5. Models undergo a longer-lasting ocean precipitation response than over land, but the response in the short satellite record is too noisy to confirm this. We detect the influence of volcanism on precipitation in all three datasets in the cold season, although the models underestimate the size of the response. In the warm season the volcanic influence is only marginally detectable. (letter)