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Sample records for acinetobacter baumannii expanding

  1. The population structure of Acinetobacter baumannii: expanding multiresistant clones from an ancestral susceptible genetic pool.

    Laure Diancourt

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of hospital infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains are of increasing concern worldwide. Although it has been reported that particular outbreak strains are geographically widespread, little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of A. baumannii clonal groups. Sequencing of internal portions of seven housekeeping genes (total 2,976 nt was performed in 154 A. baumannii strains covering the breadth of known diversity and including representatives of previously recognized international clones, and in 19 representatives of other Acinetobacter species. Restricted amounts of diversity and a star-like phylogeny reveal that A. baumannii is a genetically compact species that suffered a severe bottleneck in the recent past, possibly linked to a restricted ecological niche. A. baumannii is neatly demarcated from its closest relative (genomic species 13TU and other Acinetobacter species. Multilocus sequence typing analysis demonstrated that the previously recognized international clones I to III correspond to three clonal complexes, each made of a central, predominant genotype and few single locus variants, a hallmark of recent clonal expansion. Whereas antimicrobial resistance was almost universal among isolates of these and a novel international clone (ST15, isolates of the other genotypes were mostly susceptible. This dichotomy indicates that antimicrobial resistance is a major selective advantage that drives the ongoing rapid clonal expansion of these highly problematic agents of nosocomial infections.

  2. The Population Structure of Acinetobacter baumannii: Expanding Multiresistant Clones from an Ancestral Susceptible Genetic Pool

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Nemec, Alexandr; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Brisse, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of hospital infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains are of increasing concern worldwide. Although it has been reported that particular outbreak strains are geographically widespread, little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of A. baumannii clonal groups. Sequencing of internal portions of seven housekeeping genes (total 2,976 nt) was performed in 154 A. baumannii strains covering the breadth of known diversity and including representatives of previously recognized international clones, and in 19 representatives of other Acinetobacter species. Restricted amounts of diversity and a star-like phylogeny reveal that A. baumannii is a genetically compact species that suffered a severe bottleneck in the recent past, possibly linked to a restricted ecological niche. A. baumannii is neatly demarcated from its closest relative (genomic species 13TU) and other Acinetobacter species. Multilocus sequence typing analysis demonstrated that the previously recognized international clones I to III correspond to three clonal complexes, each made of a central, predominant genotype and few single locus variants, a hallmark of recent clonal expansion. Whereas antimicrobial resistance was almost universal among isolates of these and a novel international clone (ST15), isolates of the other genotypes were mostly susceptible. This dichotomy indicates that antimicrobial resistance is a major selective advantage that drives the ongoing rapid clonal expansion of these highly problematic agents of nosocomial infections. PMID:20383326

  3. Reservoirs of Non-baumannii Acinetobacter Species.

    Al Atrouni, Ahmad; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Hamze, Monzer; Kempf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous gram negative and non-fermenting coccobacilli that have the ability to occupy several ecological niches including environment, animals and human. Among the different species, Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved as global pathogen causing wide range of infection. Since the implementation of molecular techniques, the habitat and the role of non-baumannii Acinetobacter in human infection have been elucidated. In addition, several new species have been described. In the present review, we summarize the recent data about the natural reservoir of non-baumannii Acinetobacter including the novel species that have been described for the first time from environmental sources and reported during the last years. PMID:26870013

  4. Reservoirs of Non-baumannii Acinetobacter Species

    Al Atrouni, Ahmad; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Hamze, Monzer; Kempf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous gram negative and non-fermenting coccobacilli that have the ability to occupy several ecological niches including environment, animals and human. Among the different species, Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved as global pathogen causing wide range of infection. Since the implementation of molecular techniques, the habitat and the role of non-baumannii Acinetobacter in human infection have been elucidated. In addition, several new species have been described....

  5. Acinetobacter baumannii em meio hospitalar

    Silveira, Maria José da Costa Pinho

    2011-01-01

    A espécie Acinetobacter baumannii é um microrganismo multirresistente, frequentemente associado a surtos e infecções nos cuidados de saúde. A presença de uma grande variedade de factores determinantes na resistência aos antibióticos, juntamente com a sua capacidade de regular esses mecanismos e se adaptar sob condições ambientais adversas, faz com que esta espécie seja centro de preocupação para a Saúde pública. A sua disseminação na maior parte das vezes clonal, dentro das ...

  6. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    Valentina Gentile; Emanuela Frangipani; Carlo Bonchi; Fabrizia Minandri; Federica Runci; Paolo Visca

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, w...

  7. Antimicrobial resistance and clonality in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Nemec, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to obtain insight into the epidemiology and molecular basis of multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii at the population level. To this aim a number of studies were performed on strains mainly from the Czech Republic (CR) which have shown in particular that (i) the vast majority of multidrug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates of A. baumannii from CR belong to clonal lineages termed EU clone I and II; (ii) these two clones have predominated among MDR hospital ...

  8. Antimicrobial resistance and clonality in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Nemec, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to obtain insight into the epidemiology and molecular basis of multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii at the population level. To this aim a number of studies were performed on strains mainly from the Czech Republic (CR) which have shown in particular that (i) the

  9. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    Valentina Gentile

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, indicating that iron starvation is not sensed as an overall biofilm-inducing stimulus by A. baumannii. The impressive iron withholding capacity of this bacterium should be taken into account for future development of chelation-based antimicrobial and anti-biofilm therapies.

  10. A Pathogenic Potential of Acinetobacter baumannii-Derived Membrane Vesicles

    Jong Suk Jin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs. A. baumannii OMVs deliver many virulence factors to host cells and then induce cytotoxicity and innate immune response. OMVs secreted from bacteria contribute directly to host pathology during A. baumannii infection.

  11. Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter Baumannii Strains Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Pinar Korkmaz

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and one of the most important multidrug-resistant microorganisms in hospitals worldwide. A.baumannii most commonly causes ventilator-associated pneumonia and blood stream infections and mortality rates in these infections can reach 35%. In this study, it was aimed to assess the frequency of Acinetobacter baumannii species which were considered to be causative agents of nosocomial infection and their resistance to antimicrobi...

  12. Heteroresistance to Colistin in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Jian LI; Rayner, Craig R; Nation, Roger L; Owen, Roxanne J.; Spelman, Denis; Tan, Kar Eng; Liolios, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant clinical problem worldwide and colistin is being used increasingly as “salvage” therapy. MICs of colistin against A. baumannii indicate its significant activity. However, resistance to colistin in A. baumannii has been reported recently. Clonotypes of 16 clinical A. baumannii isolates and ATCC 19606 were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and colistin MICs were measured. The time-kill kinetics of coli...

  13. Development of immunization trials against Acinetobacter baumannii

    Tarek A. Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has recently crossed all lines once considered harmless, pushing its way as a nosocomial pathogen. It had acquired resistance to almost all available chemotherapies and mainly targets intensive care residents; causing pneumonia and major outbreaks with high mortality rates. This urged the need for preventive methods, which include infection control, non-specific immune-therapy, passive, and active immunization in order to offer vulnerable immune-compromised patients a flare in the dark. Several attempts were done for constructing effective vaccines with promising results. These are precisely classified, documented, and discussed in this up-to-date review.

  14. Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm associated components

    Brossard, Kari A.

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative aerobic coccobaccillus that is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Infected individuals may develop pneumonia, urinary tract, wound, and other infections that are associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and mechanical ventilation. Treatment is difficult because many A. baumannii isolates have developed multi-drug resistance and the bacterium can persist on abiotic surfaces. Persistence and resistance may be due to formation of biofilms, which leads to long-term colonization, evasion of the host immune system and resistance to treatment with antibiotics and disinfectants. While biofilms are complex multifaceted structures, two bacterial components that have been shown to be important in formation and stability are exopolysaccharides (EPS) and the biofilm-associated protein (Bap). An EPS, poly-beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine, PNAG, has been described for E. coli and S. epidermidis. PNAG acts as an intercellular adhesin. Production of this adhesin is dependent on the pga/icaABCD locus. We have identified a homologous locus in A. baumannii 307-0294 that is involved in production of an exopolysaccharide, recognized by an anti-PNAG antibody. We hypothesized that the A. baumannii pgaABCD locus plays a role in biofilm formation, and protection against host innate defenses and disinfectants suggesting that PNAG is a possible virulence factor for the organism. The first aim of this thesis will define the pgaABCD locus. We have previously identified Bap, a protein with similarity to those described for S. aureus and we have demonstrated that this protein is involved in maintaining the stability of biofilms on glass. We hypothesized that A. baumannii Bap plays a role in persistence and pathogenesis and is regulated by quorum sensing. In our second aim we will examine the role of Bap in attachment and biofilm formation on medically relevant surfaces and also determine if Bap is involved in

  15. Biofilm formation and biocide resistance of acinetobacter baumannii

    Shoukat, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Multi drug resistant (MDR) strains of Acinetobacter baumannii have emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Over the last 20 years a worldwide expansion in Acinetobacter infections has been observed associated with intensive care units (ICUs), long term care facilities and wounded armed forces personnel. The developing resistance patterns seen in Acinetobacter sp suggest that the number of effective antibiotics may shortly be exhau...

  16. Assessment of Minocycline and Polymyxin B Combination against Acinetobacter baumannii

    Bowers, Dana R.; Cao, Henry; Zhou, Jian; Ledesma, Kimberly R.; Sun, Dongxu; Lomovskaya, Olga; Tam, Vincent H.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii is increasing worldwide, often necessitating combination therapy. The clinical utility of using minocycline with polymyxin B is not well established. In this study, we investigated the activity of minocycline and polymyxin B against 1 laboratory isolate and 3 clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Minocycline susceptibility testing was performed with and without an efflux pump inhibitor, phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN). The intr...

  17. Drug resistance patterns of acinetobacter baumannii in makkah, saudi arabia

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii causes infections of respiratory, urinary tract, blood stream and surgical sites. Its clinical significance has increased due to its rapidly developing resistance to major groups of antibiotics used for its treatment. There is limited data available on antimicrobial susceptibility of A. baumannii from Saudi Arabia. Objectives: To determine the patterns of drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii and predisposing factors for its acquisition.Subjects and Methods: In this descriptive study, 72 hospitalized patients infected with A baumannii were studied. The clinical and demographic data of the patients were collected using a predesigned questionnaire. Isolation and identification of A.baumannii from all clinical specimens were done using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susce ptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Majority of the isolates (61.1%) were from respiratory tract infections. A.baumannii isolates showed high drug resistance to piperacil lin (93.1%), aztreonam (80.5%), ticarcillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline (76.4%, each) and cefotaxime (75%). Only amikacin showed low rate of resistance compared to other antibiotics (40.3%). About 36% patients had some underlying diseases with diabetes mellitus (11%) being the predominant underlying disease. Conclusions: High antimicrobial resistance to commonly used antibiotics was seen against A.baumannii isolates. Only amikacin was most effective against it. (author)

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore.

    Kuah, B G; Kumarasinghe, G; Doran, J.; Chang, H R

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 17 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 70 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore were determined by broth microdilution. The MICs of amoxicillin, ampicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and piperacillin for 90% of the strains were > or = 128 micrograms/ml. Addition of sulbactam to ampicillin produced improved activity, whereas adding tazobactam to piperacillin did not. The MICs of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem ...

  19. In vitro activity of ceftobiprole against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates

    Marti, Sara; Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Espinal, Paula; Vila, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is a multiresistant opportunistic nosocomial pathogen responsible for outbreaks worldwide. The main infection caused by this microorganism is nosocomial pneumonia, in particular ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients in Intensive Care Units. Treatment of these nosocomial infections is becoming problematic because the level of resistance to antimicrobial agents is rising. Ceftobiprole is a new cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive an...

  20. Acinetobacter baumannii in Localised Cutaneous Mycobacteriosis in Falcons

    Margit Gabriele Muller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Between May 2007 and April 2009, 29 falcons with identically localized, yellowish discolored cutaneous lesions in the thigh and lateral body wall region were presented at Abu Dhabi Falcon Hospital. Out of 18 falcons integrated in this study, 16 tested positive to Mycobacterium. avium complex. The 2 negative falcons tested positive in the Mycobacterium genus PCR. Moreover, 1 falcon tested positive to M. avium. paratuberculosis in tissue samples by PCR. In all cases, blood and fecal samples tested negative. In the acid-fast stain, all samples showed the for mycobacteriosis typical rods. Moreover, in 13 samples Acinetobacter baumannii was detected by PCR and proven by DNA sequencing. Clinical features included highly elevated WBCs, heterophilia, lymphocytopenia, monocytosis, severe anemia and weight loss. A. baumannii, a gram-negative bacillus with the ability to integrate foreign DNA, has emerged as one of the major multidrug resistant bacteria. In veterinary medicine, it has so far been detected in dogs, cats, horses and wild birds. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an A. baumannii infection in falcons and of a veterinary Mycobacterium-Acinetobacter coinfection.

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter Baumannii Strains Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Pinar Korkmaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and one of the most important multidrug-resistant microorganisms in hospitals worldwide. A.baumannii most commonly causes ventilator-associated pneumonia and blood stream infections and mortality rates in these infections can reach 35%. In this study, it was aimed to assess the frequency of Acinetobacter baumannii species which were considered to be causative agents of nosocomial infection and their resistance to antimicrobial agents between January 2009 and November 2014 in our hospital. Material and Method: The diagnosis of nosocomial A.baumannii infection was made according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria. Identification of the microorganisms isolated from the specimens of the patients and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of them were performed by using VITEK 2 ID-AST automated system. Susceptibilities of amikacin, ampicillin-sulbactam, gentamicin, tobramycin, netilmycin, imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, tigecycline, colistin and co-trimoxazole were investigated in the species. SPSS 19,0 program was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 308 Acinetobacter species were isolated and these species were obtained more frequently from the clinical samples sent from the intensive care unit (92,9% and deep tracheal aspirate samples (64,6%. When all of the species were evaluated, the most efficient antibiotics were determined to be colistin, tigecycline and netilmycin. The susceptibility rates for colistin, tigecycline and netilmycin were determined to be 92,8%, 85,3% and 82%, respectively. These are followed by tobramycin with a susceptibility rate of 76,4%, gentamicin with a susceptibility rate of 47,8% and amikacin with a susceptibility rate of 46,3%. Discussion: In our study, colistin, tigecycline and netilmycin are the most

  2. Epidemiologic and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Colonization and Infection

    Villar, Macarena; Cano, María E.; Gato, Eva; Garnacho-Montero, José; Miguel Cisneros, José; Ruíz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Tomás, María; Bou, Germán; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria. We investigated changes in the clinical and molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii over a 10-year period. We compared the data from 2 prospective multicenter cohort studies in Spain, one performed in 2000 (183 patients) and one in 2010 (246 patients), which included consecutive patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. Molecular typing was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The incidence density of A. baumannii colonization or infection increased significantly from 0.14 in 2000 to 0.52 in 2010 in medical services (p < 0.001). The number of non-nosocomial health care-associated cases increased from 1.2% to 14.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). Previous exposure to carbapenems increased in 2010 (16.9% in 2000 vs 27.3% in 2010, p = 0.03). The drugs most frequently used for definitive treatment of patients with infections were carbapenems in 2000 (45%) and colistin in 2010 (50.3%). There was molecular-typing evidence of an increase in the frequency of A. baumannii acquisition in non-intensive care unit wards in 2010 (7.6% in 2000 vs 19.2% in 2010, p = 0.01). By MSLT, the ST2 clonal group predominated and increased in 2010. This epidemic clonal group was more frequently resistant to imipenem and was associated with an increased risk of sepsis, although not with severe sepsis or mortality. Some significant changes were noted in the epidemiology of A. baumannii, which is increasingly affecting patients admitted to conventional wards and is also the cause of non-nosocomial health care-associated infections. Epidemic clones seem to combine antimicrobial resistance and the ability to spread, while maintaining their clinical virulence. PMID:25181313

  3. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol. PMID:27486453

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Shi, Z Y; Liu, P Y; Lau, Y; Lin, Y; Hu, B S; Shir J-M

    1996-02-01

    The in-vitro activity of 18 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 248 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Taiwan were tested by agar dilution. The MIC90S of ampicillin, amoxicillin, piperacillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and amikacin were at least 128 mu g/ml. Ceftazidime, cefepime, sulbactam, clavulanic acid, and tazobactam presented moderate activity with MIC90S of 32, 16, 16, 32, and 32 mu g/ml, respectively. The increased activity of ampicillin/sulbactam, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and piperacillin/tazobactam was due to the intrinsic effect of sulbactam, clavulanic acid, and tazobactam, respectively. Imipenem, meropenem, and ciprofloxacin were the most active antimicrobial agents with MIC90S of 1, 1, and 0.5 mu g/ml, respectively. Nineteen isolates (7.7%) were resistant to all aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics, except carbapenems and ciprofloxacin. We are concerned about the multidrug resistance of A. baumannii in this study. PMID:9147913

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore.

    Kuah, B G; Kumarasinghe, G; Doran, J; Chang, H R

    1994-10-01

    The in vitro activities of 17 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 70 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore were determined by broth microdilution. The MICs of amoxicillin, ampicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and piperacillin for 90% of the strains were > or = 128 micrograms/ml. Addition of sulbactam to ampicillin produced improved activity, whereas adding tazobactam to piperacillin did not. The MICs of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem for 90% of the strains were 32, 32, and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. PMID:7840598

  6. Biofilm may not be Necessary for the Epidemic Spread of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Hu, Yuan; He, Lihua; Tao, Xiaoxia; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is recognized as a contributing factor to the capacity of Acinetobacter baumannii to persist and prosper in medical settings, but it is still unknown whether biofilms contribute to the spread of A. baumannii. In this study, the biofilm formation of 114 clinical A. baumannii isolates and 32 non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates was investigated using a microtiter plate assay. The clonal relationships among A. baumannii isolates were assessed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing, and one major outbreak clone and 5 other epidemic clones were identified. Compared with the epidemic or outbreak A. baumannii isolates, the sporadic isolates had significantly higher biofilm formation, but no significant difference was observed between the sporadic A. baumannii isolates and the non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates, suggesting that biofilm is not important for the epidemic spread of A. baumannii. Of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii isolates in this study, 95.7% were assigned to international clone 2 (IC2) and showed significantly lower biofilm formations than the other isolates, suggesting that biofilm did not contribute to the high success of IC2. These findings have increased our understanding of the potential relationship between biofilm formation and the epidemic capacity of A. baumannii. PMID:27558010

  7. Stereochemical insignificance discovered in Acinetobacter baumannii quorum sensing.

    Amanda L Garner

    Full Text Available Stereochemistry is a key aspect of molecular recognition for biological systems. As such, receptors and enzymes are often highly stereospecific, only recognizing one stereoisomer of a ligand. Recently, the quorum sensing signaling molecules used by the nosocomial opportunistic pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, were identified, and the primary signaling molecule isolated from this species was N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. A plethora of bacterial species have been demonstrated to utilize 3-hydroxy-acylhomoserine lactone autoinducers, and in virtually all cases, the (R-stereoisomer was identified as the natural ligand and exhibited greater autoinducer activity than the corresponding (S-stereoisomer. Using chemical synthesis and biochemical assays, we have uncovered a case of stereochemical insignificance in A. baumannii and provide a unique example where stereochemistry appears nonessential for acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing signaling. Based on previously reported phylogenetic studies, we suggest that A. baumannii has evolutionarily adopted this unique, yet promiscuous quorum sensing system to ensure its survival, particularly in the presence of other proteobacteria.

  8. Contribution of Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinase-30 to sulbactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Shu-Chen eKuo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The sulbactam resistance rate in Acinetobacter baumannii has increased worldwide. Previous reports have shown that the β-lactamase blaTEM-1 confers resistance to sulbactam in A. baumannii. The purpose of this study was to examine whether other β-lactamases including, the Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinase (ADC, OXA-23, OXA-24/72, and OXA-58 families, also contribute to sulbactam resistance in A. baumannii. The correlation between these β-lactamases and the sulbactam minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined using A. baumannii clinical isolates from diverse clonality, which were collected in a nationwide surveillance program from 2002 to 2010 in Taiwan. A possible association between the genetic structure of ISAba1-blaADC-30 and sulbactam resistance was observed because this genetic structure was detected in 97% of sulbactam-resistant strains compared with 10% of sulbactam-susceptible strains. Transformation of ISAba1-blaADC-30 into susceptible strains increased the sulbactam MIC from 2 to 32 μg/ml, which required blaADC-30 overexpression using an upstream promoter in ISAba1. Flow cytometry showed that ADC-30 production increased in response to sulbactam, ticarcillin, and ceftazidime treatment. This effect was regulated at the RNA level but not by an increase in the blaADC-30 gene copy number as indicated by quantitative PCR. Purified ADC-30 decreased the inhibitory zone created by sulbactam or ceftazidime, similarly to TEM-1. In conclusion, ADC-30 overexpression conferred resistance to sulbactam in diverse clinical A. baumannii isolates.

  9. Comparison of two methods for quantification of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation

    Saghar Hendiani; Ahya Abdi-Ali; Parisa Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: ‏ Medical devices are made from a variety of materials such as polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly styrene, glass and etc. by attaching to this surfaces, Acinetobacter baumannii can form biofilms and then cause several device associated infections. Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces. In this study, biofilm formation ability in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii was assessed by two methods on different surfaces. Materials and methods: ‏ Biof...

  10. Meta-analysis of colistin for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    Zhijin Chen; Yu Chen; Yaogao Fang; Xiaotian Wang; Yanqing Chen; Qingsong Qi; Fang Huang; Xungang Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistant among Acinetobacter baumannii infection is associated with a high mortality rate and limits the therapeutic options. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of colistin monotherapy vs. other single antibiotic therapy AND colistin-based combination therapy (with other antibiotics) vs. colistin alone for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Online electronic database were searched for studies evaluating colistin with or without other antibi...

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Compounds in Plant Extracts against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Yoko Miyasaki; John D Rabenstein; Joshua Rhea; Marie-Laure Crouch; Mocek, Ulla M.; Patricia Emmett Kittell; Morgan, Margie A.; Wesley Stephen Nichols; M M Van Benschoten; William David Hardy; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrob...

  12. Detection of colistin sensitivity in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in Iran

    Bahareh Vakili; Hossein Fazeli; Parisa Shoaei; Majid Yaran; Behrooz Ataei; Farzin Khorvash; Moj Khaleghi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nosocomial infection caused by Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a serious problem world-wide. Finding the suitable drug is an important priority. The aim of this study was to determine colistin (polymyxin E) resistance in clinical isolates of A. baumannii from intensive care units (ICUs) of Al Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: Sixty isolates of A. baumannii from patients hospitalized in ICU (Al Zahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences [IUMS]) were studied....

  13. Immunization against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Effectively Protects Mice in both Pneumonia and Sepsis Models

    Huang, Weiwei; Yao, Yufeng; Long, Qiong; Yang, Xu; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Jin, Xiaomei; LI Yang; Chu, Xiaojie; Chen, Bin; Ma, Yanbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acinetobacter baumannii is considered the prototypical example of a multi- or pan- drug-resistant bacterium. It has been increasingly implicated as a major cause of nosocomial and community-associated infections. This study proposed to evaluate the efficacy of immunological approaches to prevent and treat A. baumannii infections. Methods Mice were immunized with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) prepared from a clinically isolated multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. Pneumonia a...

  14. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25850806

  15. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies. PMID:25195891

  16. Genetic Environment and Transcription of ampC in an Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolate

    Segal, Heidi; Nelson, E C; Elisha, B. Gay

    2004-01-01

    An ampC gene was cloned from a clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii (strain RAN). DNA sequencing and primer extension studies showed that ampC is transcribed from a promoter contained within a putative insertion sequence element which has been found to abut several different genes in Acinetobacter spp.

  17. Place of Colistin-Rifampicin Association in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Meningitis: A Case Study

    Dahraoui Souhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is an important challenge due to the accumulation of resistance of this bacteria and low meningeal diffusion of several antimicrobial requiring use of an antimicrobial effective combination to eradicate these species. We report a case of Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant nosocomial meningitis which was successfully treated with intravenous and intrathecal colistin associated with rifampicin.

  18. In vitro efficacy of doripenem against pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacter baumannii by e-test

    To assess the in vitro efficacy of doripenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii using Epsilometer strips. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, from May 2014 to September 2014. Methodology: A total of 60 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from various clinical samples received from Military Hospital were included in the study. The specimens were inoculated onto blood, MacConkey and chocolate agars. The isolates were identified using Gram staining, motility, catalase test, oxidase test and API 20NE (Biomeriux, France). Organisms identified as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were included in the study. Bacterial suspensions equivalent to 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard of the isolates were prepared and applied on Mueller Hinton agar. Epsilometer strip was placed in the center of the plate and incubated for 18-24 hours. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was taken to be the point where the epsilon intersected the E-strip. MIC of all the isolates was noted. Results: For Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, MIC50 was 12 micro g/mL and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. For Acinetobacter baumannii MIC 50 and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. Conclusion: Doripenem is no more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in our setting. (author)

  19. Colistin and anti-Gram-positive bacterial agents against Acinetobacter baumannii

    Bin Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acinetobacter baumannii has attained an alarming level of resistance to antibacterial drugs. Clinicians are now considering the use of older agents or unorthodox combinations of licensed drugs against multidrug-resistant strains to bridge the current treatment gap. We investigated the in vitro activities of combination treatments that included colistin with vancomycin, norvancomycin or linezolid against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods The fractional inhibitory concentration index and time-kill assays were used to explore the combined effects of colistin with vancomycin, norvancomycin or linezolid against 40 clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to evaluate the interactions in response to the combination of colistin and vancomycin. Results The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of vancomycin and norvancomycin for half of the isolates decreased below the susceptibility break point, and the MIC of linezolid for one isolate was decreased to the blood and epithelial lining fluid concentration using the current dosing regimen. When vancomycin or norvancomycin was combined with subinhibitory doses of colistin, the multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii test samples were eradicated. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that subinhibitory doses of colistin were able to disrupt the outer membrane, facilitating a disruption of the cell wall and leading to cell lysis. Conclusions Subinhibitory doses of colistin significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity of vancomycin, norvancomycin, and linezolid against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

  20. Early dissemination of OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain in Colombia: a case report

    Sandra Yamile Saavedra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates have reached epidemic levels in past decades. Currently this microorganism is responsible for outbreaks of difficult eradication and with high mortality rates worldwide. We herein report a rare case of an OXA-72-producing A. baumannii isolate colonizing a 47-year-old male patient with peritonitis due to abdominal stab wound, four years earlier than the first report of this carbapenemase in Acinetobacter pittii in Colombia. Although OXA-72 presents a low prevalence compared with OXA-23, our study demonstrated that A. baumannii isolates carrying the blaOXA-72 gene were present in the hospital environment in Colombia and could act as a reservoir for further spread to other Acinetobacter species, like A. pittii, causing carbapenem-resistance.

  1. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-01-01

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of re...

  2. Facial ulcerations due to Acinetobacter baumannii: Vessel thrombosis with bacterial mycelia

    Dong Ming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl presented with a 2-week history of progressive facial ulcerations that did not respond to cephalexin and topical dexamethasone. Biopsy on the ulcer showed rod-shaped bacteria and actinomycetes-like mycelia in the vessel walls and within thrombi. Tissue culture yielded Acinetobacter baumannii, which was resistant to cephalexin. A favourite outcome was achieved with minocycline treatment. This is the first case report of A. baumannii-related vasculitis.

  3. Inhaled Colistin for Treatment of Pneumonia due to Colistin-Only-Susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii

    Choi, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Young Keun; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Colistin is used for the treatment of pneumonia associated with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the best route of administration and dosage is not known. We report our experience with aerosolized colistin in twelve patients with pneumonia caused by colistin-only-susceptible (COS) A. baumannii. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients' medical records who were treated with aerosolized colistin for the treatment of pneum...

  4. Clinical Use of Colistin Induces Cross-Resistance to Host Antimicrobials in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Napier, Brooke A.; Burd, Eileen M.; Satola, Sarah W.; Cagle, Stephanie M.; Ray, Susan M; McGann, Patrick; Pohl, Jan; Lesho, Emil P.; Weiss, David S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alarming rise in antibiotic resistance has led to an increase in patient mortality and health care costs. This problem is compounded by the absence of new antibiotics close to regulatory approval. Acinetobacter baumannii is a human pathogen that causes infections primarily in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and is highly antibiotic resistant. Colistin is one of the last-line antibiotics for treating A. baumannii infections; however, colistin-resistant strains are becoming...

  5. Colistin against colistin-only-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii-related infections: Monotherapy or combination therapy?

    F Simsek; Gedik, H; M T Yildirmak; N E Iris; A Türkmen; ERSOY, A.; Ersöz, M; A Gücüyener

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of the patients who were infected with colistin-only-susceptible (COS) Acinetobacter baumannii and treated with either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy. Materials and Methods: This retrospective case-control study was conducted in the training and research hospital with an 800 beds between August 2008 and December 2011. The patients, who were infected with COS A. baumannii and received either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy,...

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova Teaching Hospital.

    Raka, Lul; Kalenć, Smilja; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Katić, Stjepan; Sijak, Dubravko; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Zoutman, Dick; Jaka, Arbëresha

    2009-12-01

    Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU) of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%). First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days). Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU. PMID:20464330

  7. Molecular Typing of Acinetobacter Baumannii Clinical Strains in Tehran by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Neda Farahani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective : Currently, Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen insofar as its hospital outbreaks have been described from various geographical areas. Since the discrimination of strains within a species is important for delineating nosocomial outbreaks, this study was conducted with the aim of genotyping the A. baumannii clinical strains in Tehran via the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE method, which is the most accurate method used for the typing of bacterial species.   Materials & methods: This study was performed on 70 isolates of acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients from Baqiyatallah, Rasoole Akram, and Milad hospitals in Tehran. Cultural and biochemical methods were used for the identification of the isolates in species level, and then susceptibility tests were carried out on 50 isolates of A. baumannii using the disk diffusion method. The PFGE method was performed on the isolates by Apa I restriction enzyme. Finally, the results of the PFGE were analyzed. Result: Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from hospitals in Tehran showed seven different genetic patterns, two of which were sporadic . Also, genotypic profiles were different in each hospital, and different patterns of genetic resistance to common antibiotics were observed. Conclusion: A lthough diversity was observed among the strains of A. baumannii by the PFGE method in Tehran, no epidemic strains were found among them.  

  8. Association between acute motor axonal neuropathy and septic shock due to Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Toscani, Lucia; Guarducci, Diletta; Matà, Sabrina; Furlan, Tiziana; Ballo, Piercarlo

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we describe a case of acute motoral axonal neuropathy (AMAN) following septic shock due to Acinetobacter baumannii. The aetiology of AMAN is still not fully clarified. An association with a potential infection by Campylobacter jejuni, resulting in stimulation of autoimmune response against gangliosides mediated by a phenomenon of molecular mimicry, is believed to play a major role. Since the lipopolysaccharide of A. baumannii has a structure that is similar to that of C. jejuni, we hypothesise that the infection by A. baumannii in our patient may have had a pathogenic role in the development of the neurological picture via a mechanism of molecular mimicry. PMID:26700086

  9. Biochemical and Structural Analysis of Inhibitors Targeting the ADC-7 Cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Powers, Rachel A.; Swanson, Hollister C.; Taracila, Magdalena A.; Florek, Nicholas W.; Romagnoli, Chiara; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Bonomo, Robert A.; Wallar, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    β-Lactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii presents one of the greatest challenges to contemporary antimicrobial chemotherapy. Much of this resistance to cephalosporins derives from the expression of the class C β-lactamase enzymes, known as Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases (ADCs). Currently, β-lactamase inhibitors are structurally similar to β-lactam substrates and are not effective inactivators of this class C cephalosporinase. Herein, two boronic acid transition state inhibitors...

  10. Candida spp. airway colonization: A potential risk factor for Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Zhu, Song; Yan, Dongxing; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Ruilan; Zou, Jian; Yan, Jingdong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to identify potential risk factors for Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and evaluate the association between Candida spp. airway colonization and A. baumannii VAP. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were on mechanical ventilation (MV) for ≥48 hours were divided into the following groups: patients with and without Candida spp. airway colonization; colonized patients receiving antifungal treatment or not; patients with A. baumannii VAP and those without VAP. Logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to identify factors independently associated with A. baumannii VAP. Among 618 eligible patients, 264 (43%) had Candida spp. airway colonization and 114 (18%) developed A. baumannii VAP. Along with MV for ≥7 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 8.9, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 4.9-15.8) and presence of a central venous catheter (aOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9), Candida spp. airway colonization (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.3) was identified as an independent risk factor for A. baumannii VAP. Patients with Candida spp. airway colonization were more likely to develop A. baumannii VAP than non-colonized patients (23% vs 15%, P=.01 and 34% vs. 15%, Pmechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours. Candida spp. airway colonization was an independent risk factor for subsequent A. baumannii VAP. PMID:27001670

  11. Relationship between antimicrobial resistance and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions in Acinetobacter baumannii

    SHI Wei-feng; JIANG Jian-ping; MI Zu-huang

    2005-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the main gram-negative bacilli in clinical practice. Nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii is very difficult to treat. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance characteristics and four resistant gene expressions of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes including N-acetyltransferases and O-phosphotransferases in Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods Bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed by PhoenixTM system in 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of seven aminoglycosides including gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin, neomycin and streptomycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were detected by agar dilution. Four aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by DNA sequencer.Results The resistance rates of 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii against cefotaxime, levofloxacin, piperacillin, aztreonam, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol were more than 50%. Imipenem and meropenem showed high antibacterial activities with resistance rates of 3.2% and 4.1%. MIC50 and MIC90 of gentamicin, amikacin, streptomycin and kanamycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii were all more than 1024 mg/L, and the resistance rates were 100%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. But their resistance rates to tobramycin, netilmicin and neomycin were 86.7%, 93.3% and 46.7%, respectively. Three modifying enzyme genes, including aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes, were found in 15 strains, but aphA6 had not been detected. Their positive rates were 93.3%, 20.0% and 20.0%, respectively. These three genes existed simultaneously in No.19 strain. Nucleotide sequences of aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes shared 100%, 97.9% and 99.7% identities with GenBank genes (AY307113, S68058 and AY

  12. Colistin Methanesulfonate against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model▿

    Kroeger, Lisa A.; Hovde, Laurie B.; Mitropoulos, Isaac F.; Schafer, Jeremy; Rotschafer, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, a multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii was exposed to colistin methanesulfonate alone and in combination with ceftazidime. Pre- and postexposure colistin sulfate MICs were determined. A single daily dose of colistin methanesulfonate combined with continuous-infusion ceftazidime prevented regrowth and postexposure MIC increases.

  13. Whole-Genome Sequencing Elucidates Epidemiology of Nosocomial Clusters of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Willems, Stefanie; Kampmeier, Stefanie; Bletz, Stefan; Kossow, Annelene; Köck, Robin; Kipp, Frank; Mellmann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    We characterized two epidemiologically similar Acinetobacter baumannii clusters from two separate intensive care units (ICU) using core genome multilocus sequence typing. Clonal spread was confirmed in ICU-1 (12 of 14 isolates shared genotypes); in ICU-2, all genotypes (13 isolates) were diverse, thus excluding transmissions and enabling adequate infection control measures. PMID:27358465

  14. Code blue: Acinetobacter baumannii, a nosocomial pathogen with a role in the oral cavity.

    Richards, A M; Abu Kwaik, Y; Lamont, R J

    2015-02-01

    Actinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause a wide range of serious conditions including pneumonia, meningitis, necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. It is also a major cause of wound infections in military personnel injured during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, leading to its popular nickname of 'Iraqibacter'. Contributing to its success in clinical settings is resistance to environmental stresses such as desiccation and disinfectants. Moreover, in recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of A. baumannii strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes. Acinetobacter baumannii is an inhabitant of oral biofilms, which can act as a reservoir for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Subgingival colonization by A. baumannii increases the risk of refractory periodontitis. Pathogenesis of the organism involves adherence, biofilm formation and iron acquisition. In addition, A. baumannii can induce apoptotic cell death in epithelial cells and kill hyphal forms of Candida albicans. Virulence factors that have been identified include pili, the outer membrane protein OmpA, phospholipases and extracellular polysaccharide. Acinetobacter baumannii can sense blue light through a blue-light sensing using flavin (BLUF) domain protein, BlsA. The resulting conformational change in BlsA leads to changes in gene expression, including virulence genes. PMID:25052812

  15. Distribution and resistance of pathogens in liver transplant recipients with Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    Gao F

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fei Gao,1 Qifa Ye,2,3 Qiquan Wan,2 Shan Liu,4 Jiandang Zhou51Infectious Disease Department of Henan Province People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou, 2Department of Transplant Surgery, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 3Department of Transplant Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 4Adelphi University College of Nursing and Public Health, New York, NY, USA; 5Department of Clinical Laboratory of Microbiology, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become a major problem in liver transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical presentation, distribution, and drug susceptibility characteristics in liver recipients with A. baumannii infection.Methods: We retrospectively investigated 17 liver recipients who developed A. baumannii infection between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2014. The distribution of A. baumannii and drug susceptibility characteristics were reviewed.Results: Infectious complications due to A. baumannii appeared in 17 liver recipients, with a total of 24 episodes. Approximately 63% (15/24 of A. baumannii infections occurred within 2 weeks after transplantation. The most common source of infection was multiple culture-positive sites (35.3%, n=6, followed by the intra-abdominal/biliary tract (23.5%, n=4 and lung (23.5%, n=4. Eight patients (47.1% had a body temperature of 38°C or higher at the onset of A. baumannii infection. Nine, seven, and 12 recipients had a serum creatinine level of >1.5 mg/dL, a white blood cell count of >15,000/mm3, and a platelet count of <50,000/mm3, respectively. There were five (29.4% cases of septic shock and eight (47.1% deaths. The rate of antibiotic resistance of A. baumannii to ten of 12 antibiotics investigated was more than 60%. Among the 24 infections caused by A. baumannii, 75% were carbapenem

  16. Distribution of AdeABC efflux system genes in genotypically diverse strains of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Czaban, Sławomir; Hauschild, Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Milewski, Robert; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Nikliński, Jacek; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly problematic hospital-associated pathogen. Different mechanisms contribute to the formation of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii, including the AdeABC efflux system. Distribution of the structural and regulatory genes encoding the AdeABC efflux system among genetically diverse clinical A. baumannii strains was achieved by using PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. The distribution of adeABRS genes is extremely high among our A. baumannii strains, except the adeC gene. We have observed a large proportion of strains presenting multidrug-resistance phenotype for several years. The efflux pump could be an important mechanism in these strains in resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23886790

  17. Assessment of Biofilm Formation and Resistance to Imipenem and Ciprofloxacin among Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in Tehran

    Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Hendiani, Saghar; Mohammadi, Parisa; Gharavi, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces in an extracellular polymeric matrix which are associated with many chronic infections in humans. Acinetobacter spp. are emerging as a major cause of nosocomial infections and Acinetobacter baumannii is the predominant species associated with this kind of infections. Objectives: In the present study, the potential of biofilm formation of clinical isolates, A. baumannii, was assessed by using crystal violet method. Furth...

  18. Activities of colistin- and minocycline-based combinations against extensive drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from intensive care unit patients

    Li Jian; Zhu De-mei; Huang Jun; Liu Xiao-fang; Liang Wang; Zhang Jing

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Extensive drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii is a serious problem in the clinical setting. It is therefore important to find active antibiotic combinations that could be effective in the treatment of infections caused by this problematic 'superbug'. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro activities of three colistin-based combinations and a minocycline-based combination against clinically isolated extensive drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDR-AB) strains. ...

  19. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M M; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  20. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Yoko Miyasaki

    Full Text Available The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova teaching hospital

    Lul Raka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacterbaumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%. First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days. Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU.

  2. Molecular Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated From Nosocomial Infections of a Teaching Hospital in Isfahan, Iran

    Fazeli; Taraghian; Kamali; Poursina; Nasr Esfahani; Moghim

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii are among important causes of nosocomial infections and cause therapeutic problems worldwide. The emergence of extensively drug-resistant A. baumannii (XDRAB) cause serious threats to hospital acquired infections (HAI) worldwide and further limit the treatment options. Objectives The current study aimed to identify and isolate the MDR...

  3. Use of a stainless steel washer platform to study Acinetobacter baumannii adhesion and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    Orsinger-Jacobsen, Samantha J.; Patel, Shenan S.; Vellozzi, Ernestine M.; Gialanella, Phillip; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Miranda, Kildare; Martinez, Luis R.

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequent cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia, and has recently increased in incidence as the causative agent of severe disease in troops wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq. Clinical approaches are limited since A. baumannii strains isolated from patients are extremely resistant to current antimicrobials. A. baumannii can survive desiccation and during outbreaks has been recovered from various sites in the patients’ environment. To better understand its prevalence in...

  4. Safety and effectiveness of colistin compared with tobramycin for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    Cohen Karen; van Zyl-Smit Richard; Bamford Colleen; Gounden Ronald; Maartens Gary

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Nosocomial infections due to multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are often treated with colistin, but there are few data comparing its safety and efficacy with other antimicrobials. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients treated with colistin or tobramycin for A. baumannii infections in intensive care units (ICUs) at Groote Schuur hospital. Colistin was used for A. baumannii isolates which were resistant to all other available antimicrobials. In the tobr...

  5. Evaluate the frequency distribution of nonadhesive virulence factors in carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from clinical samples in Kermanshah

    Mohajeri, Parviz; Sharbati, Saba; Farahani, Abbas; Rezaei, Zhaleh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii which is a Gram-negative bacterium can cause several different infections. The appearance of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii in recent years has made the treatment process more difficult. The identification of virulence factors (VFs), such as nonadhesives in A. baumannii, helps to fight against related infections. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 samples from teaching hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran, were collected during a 24 months period (2011-20...

  6. Oxacillinase (OXA-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Brazil: clinical and environmental impact and therapeutic options

    Micheli Medeiros

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a worldwide trend, infections caused by MDR OXA-type (Ambler class D carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii are currently regarded as a clinical and epidemiological emergency in Brazil. OXA-producing A. baumannii strains have been identified in the states of Alagoas, Amazonas, Bahia, Distrito Federal, Espírito Santo, Goiás, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Paraná, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina and São Paulo. In some settings, the presence of OXA-23- and/or OXA-143 -producing A. baumannii (so far restricted to Brazil has been endemic and A. baumannii strains carrying blaOXA-23 genes have been detected in hospital wastewater effluents, hence a potential risk to the community and the environment. Although molecular typing by multilocus sequence typing (MLST - Bartual scheme, University of Oxford, http://pubmlst.org/abaumannii/ has revealed the international spread of a clonal complex (CC denominated CC92, in Brazil most OXA-23-producing A. baumannii belong to CC113, CC109 or CC104 clonal complexes. Finally, from a clinical point of view, the main problem of A. baumannii infections is the limited use of antibacterial agents with in vitro activity, often restricted to ampicillin/sulbactam, polymyxin B and/or colistin (polymyxin E.

  7. Aptamer-nanobody based ELASA for specific detection of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    Rasoulinejad, Samaneh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi

    2016-08-10

    Acinetobacter baumannii has turned into an important threat in nosocomial outbreak infections and multidrug resistance leading to high mortality rates in the 21st century. In recent years its mortality has increased by 15% which in part could be due to lack of a rapid and sensitive diagnostic test. In this work we introduced a new detection test for A. baumannii with two highly specific aptamer and nanobody molecules. High binding affinity DNA oligonucleotide aptamers toward A. baumannii were selected through 12 rounds of whole cell System Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment process (SELEX). The SELEX procedures was monitored by flow cytometry. The dissociation constant and binding efficiency of the selected aptamer Aci49 was 7.547±1:353pM and 47.50%, respectively. A sandwich enzyme linked aptamer sorbent assay (ELASA) was designed with the biotinylated Aci49 aptamer and our previously developed nanobody against biofilm associated protein (Bap). The assay system was optimized with A. baumannii (ATCC 19606) and 47 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were tested. The threshold of detection in sandwich ELASA process was10(3) CFU/ml. The sensitivity of test toward the clinical isolates was 95.47%. Our results reveal that the sandwich ELASA is sensitive and specific enough for the rapid detection of A. baumannii from clinical isolates. PMID:27234880

  8. Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis and Transport of Acinetobactin in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Hasan, Tarik; Choi, Chul Hee; Oh, Man Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria survive in iron-limited host environments by using several iron acquisition mechanisms. Acinetobacter baumannii, causing serious infections in compromised patients, produces an iron-chelating molecule, called acinetobactin, which is composed of equimolar quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), L-threonine, and N-hydroxyhistamine, to compete with host cells for iron. Genes that are involved in the production and transport of acinetobactin are clustered within the ge...

  9. Wide Distribution of Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Burns Patients in Iran

    zahra eFarshadzadeh; Farhad Bonakdar Hashemi; Sara eRahimi; Babak ePourakbari; Davoud eEsmaeili; Mohammad Ali Haghighi; Ali eMajidpour; Saeed eShojaa; Maryam eRahmani; Samira eGharesi; Masoud eAziemzadeh; Abbas eBahador

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CNSAb) is a major public health concern globally. This study determined the antibiotic resistance and molecular epidemiology of CNSAb isolates from a referral burn center in Tehran, Iran.Sixty-nine CNSAb isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the E-test methodology. Multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), Multilocus sequence typing and multiplex PCR were perform...

  10. Wide distribution of carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in burns patients in Iran

    Farshadzadeh, Zahra; Farhad B. Hashemi; Rahimi, Sara; Pourakbari, Babak; Esmaeili, Davoud; Haghighi, Mohammad A.; Majidpour, Ali; Shojaa, Saeed; Rahmani, Maryam; Gharesi, Samira; Aziemzadeh, Masoud; BAHADOR, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CNSAb) is a major public health concern globally. This study determined the antibiotic resistance and molecular epidemiology of CNSAb isolates from a referral burn center in Tehran, Iran. Sixty-nine CNSAb isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the E test methodology. Multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and multiplex PCR were...

  11. Predictors of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    Aynur Camkıran; Aycan Kundakcı; Coşkun Araz; Arash Pirat; Pınar Zeyneloğlu; Hande Arslan; Gülnaz Arslan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) is an important cause of hospital acquired infection and leads to an increasing morbidity and mortality in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of MRAB infection in surgical ICU patients. Material and Method: The charts of the patients who were admitted to the ICU between January 2008 and August 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with MRAB infection. Recorded data were as fo...

  12. Is inhaled colistin beneficial in ventilator associated pneumonia or nosocomial pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii?

    Demirdal, Tuna; Sari, Ummu Sena; Nemli, Salih Atakan

    2016-01-01

    Background In the present study, our objective was to evaluate and compare the clinical and microbiological results in patients receiving systemic and systemic plus inhaled colistin therapy due to nosocomial pneumonia (NP) or ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods A retrospective matched case–control study was performed at the ICUs at Izmir Katip Celebi University Ataturk Training and Research Hospital from January 2013 to December 2014. Eighty patien...

  13. Impaired Virulence and In Vivo Fitness of Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    López-Rojas, Rafael; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; McConnell, Michael J.; Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; Smani, Younes; Fernández-Reyes, María; Rivas, Luis; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (American Type Culture Collection strain 19606) acquires mutations in the pmrB gene during the in vitro development of resistance to colistin. The colistin-resistant strain has lower affinity for colistin, reduced in vivo fitness (competition index, .016), and decreased virulence, both in terms of mortality (0% lethal dose, 6.9 vs 4.9 log colony-forming units) and survival in a mouse model of peritoneal sepsis. These results may explain the low incidence and disseminat...

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    Goel, Vikas Kumar; Kapil, Arti

    2001-01-01

    Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses ...

  15. Emerging broad-spectrum resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: Mechanisms and epidemiology

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel , Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is quite common among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, in particular among clinically relevant species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacterial species, which are mainly nosocomial pathogens, possess a diversity of resistance mechanisms that may lead to multidrug or even pandrug resistance. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenemases conferring resistance to carbapenem...

  16. Epidemiology of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii in Mediterranean Countries

    Nassima Djahmi; Catherine Dunyach-Remy; Alix Pantel; Mazouz Dekhil; Albert Sotto; Jean-Philippe Lavigne

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and global spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii are of great concern to health services worldwide. These β -lactamases hydrolyse almost all β -lactams, are plasmid-encoded, and are easily transferable among bacterial species. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 types. Their current extensive spread worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae is an important source of concern. Infections caused by these bacteria have limited treat...

  17. Postcraniofacial trauma multidrug resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii infection treated with intravenous colistin: A rare complication

    Sanjay Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial meningitis is a rare complication of combined craniofacial and neurosurgical procedures. The increase in meningitis caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii has resulted in a significant reduction in available treatment options. We report a case of 52-year-old man who sustained a complex craniofacial trauma, who developed nosocomial MDR infection caused by A. baumannii in the wound. Patient was at significant risk of developing meningitis but, he was successfully treated with intravenous colistin. To conclude, patients with complex maxillofacial trauma are at high risk of MDR A. baumannii meningitis, especially in craniofacial intensive care units, and adequate infection control measures with proper institution of antibiotics, should be used to reduce the risk of this infection

  18. Prevalence of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in high complexity hospital

    Ana Milda Karsten Baumgart

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii are Gram-negative bacilli that in the last decades have become prevalent agents of hospital infection due to high antimicrobial resistance developed by these microorganisms. The present study is a retrospective analysis of all positive cultures for these microorganisms in the period of January 2004 to December 2008. Resistance levels of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa to carbapenems was high and showed a trend to increase during the period of study. In recent years the increasing incidence and resistance levels of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa to the antimicrobials used for their treatment in the hospital setting underscores the relevance of infections caused by these bacteria. The selective pressure caused by indiscriminated use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in empirical hospital infections is probably the main reason for such an increase with the consequent impact upon patient morbidity and mortality

  19. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a descriptive study in a city hospital

    Pratap Siddharth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (MRAB is an important cause of hospital acquired infection. The purpose of this study is to determine the risk factors for MRAB in a city hospital patient population. Methods This study is a retrospective review of a city hospital epidemiology data base and includes 247 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (AB from 164 patients. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii was defined as resistance to more than three classes of antibiotics. Using the non-MRAB isolates as the control group, the risk factors for the acquisition of MRAB were determined. Results Of the 247 AB isolates 72% (177 were multidrug resistant. Fifty-eight percent (143/247 of isolates were highly resistant (resistant to imipenem, amikacin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. Of the 37 patients who died with Acinetobacter colonization/infection, 32 (86% patients had the organism recovered from the respiratory tract. The factors which were found to be significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05 with multidrug resistance include the recovery of AB from multiple sites, mechanical ventilation, previous antibiotic exposure, and the presence of neurologic impairment. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter was associated with significant mortality when compared with sensitive strains (p ≤ 0.01. When surgical patients (N = 75 were considered separately, mechanical ventilation and multiple isolates remained the factors significantly associated with the development of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. Among surgical patients 46/75 (61% grew a multidrug resistant strain of AB and 37/75 (40% were resistant to all commonly used antibiotics including aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, carbepenems, extended spectrum penicillins, and quinolones. Thirty-five percent of the surgical patients had AB cultured from multiple sites and 57% of the Acinetobacter isolates were associated with a co-infecting organism, usually a Staphylococcus or Pseudomonas. As

  20. Comparison of two methods for quantification of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation

    Saghar Hendiani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ‏ Medical devices are made from a variety of materials such as polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly styrene, glass and etc. by attaching to this surfaces, Acinetobacter baumannii can form biofilms and then cause several device associated infections. Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces. In this study, biofilm formation ability in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii was assessed by two methods on different surfaces. Materials and methods: ‏ Biofilm formation by 75 clinical isolates of A. baumannii was evaluated on polycarbonate surface (microtiter plate and polypropylene surface (falcon by crystal violet and 2,3-Bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide salt (XTT tetrazolium sodium salt assay methods. Falcon or tube method was carried out under static and agitation conditions. Results: ‏ Results showed the most isolates can form biofilm but higher numbers of isolates form biofilm on polypropylene surface under agitation. XTT method confirmed strong biofilm formation ability of 10 isolates. Discussion and conclusion: Each of the two assays showed an excellent applicability for the quantification of biofilms. The Crystal violet assay is cheap, easy and is usually used for the quantification of biofilms formed by microorganisms but XTT is more reliable and repeatable. Most of A. baumannii isolates have potential to form biofilm on the medical devices which may result in device-associated infections.

  1. Screening of Herbal-Based Bioactive Extract Against Carbapenem-Resistant Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Tiwari, Monalisa; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Vishvanath

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is grouped in the ESKAPE pathogens by Infectious Disease Society of America, which is linked to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and increased costs. The high level of acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms of these bacteria makes it an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In this study, methanolic extracts of six medicinal plants were subjected to phytochemical screening and their antimicrobial activity was tested against two strains of A. baumannii (ATCC 19606, carbapenem-sensitive strain, and RS 307, carbapenem-resistant strain). Synergistic effect of the plant extracts and antibiotics was also tested. Bael or Aegle marmelos contains tannin, phenol, terpenoids, glycoside, alkaloids, coumarine, steroid, and quinones. Flowers of madar or Calotropis procera possess tannin, phenol, terpenoids, glycoside, quinone, anthraquinone, anthocyanin, coumarin, and steroid. An inhibitory growth curve was seen for both the bacterial strains when treated with A. marmelos, Curcuma longa, and leaves and flowers of C. procera. Antibiotics alone showed a small zone of inhibition, but when used with herbal extracts they exhibited larger zone of inhibition. Synergistic effect of A. marmelos and imipenem was the best against both the strains of A. baumannii. From this study, it can be concluded that extracts from A. marmelos and leaves and flowers of C. procera exhibited the most effective antibacterial activity. These herbal extracts may be used to screen the bioactive compound against the carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii. PMID:26910023

  2. Biofilm formation in clinical isolates of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii and its relationship with multidrug resistance

    Ebrahim Babapour; Azam Haddadi; Reza Mirnejad; Seyed-Abdolhamid Angaji; Nour Amirmozafari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To check biofilm formation by Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) clinical isolates and show their susceptibility to different antibiotics and investigate a possible link between establishment of biofilm and multidrug resistance. Methods: This study was performed on clinical samples collected from patients with nosocomial infections in three hospitals of Tehran. Samples were initially screened by culture and biochemical tests for the presence of different species of Acinetobacter. Iden-tifications were further confirmed by PCR assays. Their susceptibilities to 11 antibiotics of different classes were determined by disc diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The ability to produce biofilm was investigated using methods:culture on Congo red agar, microtiter plate, and test tube method. Results: From the overall clinical samples, 156 specimens were confirmed to contain A. baumannii. The bacteria were highly resistant to most antibiotics except polymyxin B. Of these isolates, 10.26% were able to produce biofilms as shown on Congo red agar. However, the percentage of bacteria with positive biofilm in test tube, standard microtiter plate, and modified microtiter plate assays were 48.72%, 66.66%, and 73.72%, respec-tively. At least 92%of the biofilm forming isolates were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: Since most of the multidrug resistant strains produce biofilm, it seems necessary to provide continuous monitoring and determination of antibiotic susceptibility of clinical A. baumannii. This would help to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treatment.

  3. Effects of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics on the resistant bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii

    Wan G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Guoqing Wan,1,2 Lingao Ruan,2,3 Yu Yin,2,3 Tian Yang,2,3 Mei Ge,2 Xiaodong Cheng1,4 1School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 2Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceutical R&D, 3School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Integrative Biology & Pharmacology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Acinetobacter baumannii resistance to carbapenem antibiotics is a serious clinical challenge. As a newly developed technology, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs show some excellent characteristics compared to older treatments, and are a candidate for combating A. baumannii infection. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, we combined AgNPs with antibiotics to treat carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (aba1604. Our results showed that single AgNPs completely inhibited A. baumannii growth at 2.5 µg/mL. AgNP treatment also showed synergistic effects with the antibiotics polymixin B and rifampicin, and an additive effect with tigecyline. In vivo, we found that AgNPs–antibiotic combinations led to better survival ratios in A. baumannii-infected mouse peritonitis models than that by single drug treatment. Finally, we employed different antisense RNA-targeted Escherichia coli strains to elucidate the synergistic mechanism involved in bacterial responses to AgNPs and antibiotics. Keywords: Acinetobacter baumannii, AgNPs, synergistic, antibiotic combination, anti­sense RNA 

  4. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M., E-mail: gulick@hwi.buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  5. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins

  6. Mutant Prevention Concentrations of Imipenem and Meropenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii

    E. Dahdouh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of the MPC of carbapenems against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. and to assess its possible relationship with mechanisms of resistance. Detection of the mechanisms of resistance was performed using Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing, Double Disk Synergy, disk antagonism, addition of NaCl to the medium, addition of PBA or EDTA to Carbapenem disks, addition of PBA to Cefoxitin disks, and CCCP test for 10 Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. The MIC and MPC were determined using the broth macrodilution and plate dilution methods, respectively. Four Acinetobacter baumannii strains produced MBL. Two of them produced Oxacillinase and one produced ESBL. Two Pseudomonas spp. isolates produced both KPC and MBL. The resistant Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. strains had higher MPC values than susceptible ones. However, the Mutant Selection Window was found to be dependent on the degree of resistance but not on a particular mechanism of resistance. The usefulness of the MPC was found to be dependent on its value. Based on our data, we recommend determining the MPC for each isolate before using it during treatment. Furthermore, the use of T>MSW instead of T>MIC is suggested.

  7. The induction and identification of novel Colistin resistance mutations in Acinetobacter baumannii and their implications.

    Thi Khanh Nhu, Nguyen; Riordan, David W; Do Hoang Nhu, Tran; Thanh, Duy Pham; Thwaites, Guy; Huong Lan, Nguyen Phu; Wren, Brendan W; Baker, Stephen; Stabler, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of opportunistic hospital acquired infection and has been identified as an important emerging infection due to its high levels of antimicrobial resistance. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii has risen rapidly in Vietnam, where colistin is becoming the drug of last resort for many infections. In this study we generated spontaneous colistin resistant progeny (up to >256 μg/μl) from four colistin susceptible Vietnamese isolates and one susceptible reference strain (MIC <1.5 μg/μl). Whole genome sequencing was used to identify single nucleotide mutations that could be attributed to the reduced colistin susceptibility. We identified six lpxACD and three pmrB mutations, the majority of which were novel. In addition, we identified further mutations in six A. baumannii genes (vacJ, pldA, ttg2C, pheS and conserved hypothetical protein) that we hypothesise have a role in reduced colistin susceptibility. This study has identified additional mutations that may be associated with colistin resistance through novel resistance mechanisms. Our work further demonstrates how rapidly A. baumannii can generate resistance to a last resort antimicrobial and highlights the need for improved surveillance to identified A. baumannii with an extensive drug resistance profile. PMID:27329501

  8. Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 Carbapenemase in Qatar.

    Rolain, J-M; Loucif, L; Al-Maslamani, M; Elmagboul, E; Al-Ansari, N; Taj-Aldeen, S; Shaukat, A; Ahmedullah, H; Hamed, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the molecular support of carbapenem resistance from randomly selected clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii as a pilot study from the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Qatar. Results of our report will be used to study carbapenemases using molecular techniques in all isolated MDR A. baumannii. Forty-eight MDR A. baumannii were randomly selected from isolates preserved at HMC. Identification of all isolates was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antibiotic resistance was tested phenotypically by Phoenix and confirmed by Etest. The molecular support of carbapenemases (bla OXA-23, bla OXA-24, bla OXA-58, bla NDM) was investigated by real-time PCR. The epidemiologic relatedness of the isolates was verified by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of CsuE and bla OXA-51 genes. All 48 isolates were identified as A. baumannii and were confirmed to be resistant to most antibiotics, especially meropenem, imipenems, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin and most of the β-lactams; they were sensitive to colistin. All the isolates were positive for bla OXA-23 and negative for the other tested carbapenemase genes. Clonality analysis demonstrated that different lineages were actually circulating in Qatar; and we suggest that an outbreak occurred in the medical intensive care unit of HMC between 2011 and 2012. Here we report the emergence of MDR A. baumannii producing the carbapenemase OXA-23 in Qatar. PMID:27054039

  9. Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Concomitant Contamination of Air and Environmental Surfaces.

    Shimose, Luis A; Masuda, Eriko; Sfeir, Maroun; Berbel Caban, Ana; Bueno, Maria X; dePascale, Dennise; Spychala, Caressa N; Cleary, Timothy; Namias, Nicholas; Kett, Daniel H; Doi, Yohei; Munoz-Price, L Silvia

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To concomitantly determine the differential degrees of air and environmental contamination by Acinetobacter baumannii based on anatomic source of colonization and type of ICU layout (single-occupancy vs open layout). DESIGN Longitudinal prospective surveillance study of air and environmental surfaces in patient rooms. SETTING A 1,500-bed public teaching hospital in Miami, Florida. PATIENTS Consecutive A. baumannii-colonized patients admitted to our ICUs between October 2013 and February 2014. METHODS Air and environmental surfaces of the rooms of A. baumannii-colonized patients were sampled daily for up to 10 days. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to type and match the matching air, environmental, and clinical A. baumannii isolates. RESULTS A total of 25 A. baumannii-colonized patients were identified during the study period; 17 were colonized in the respiratory tract and 8 were colonized in the rectum. In rooms with rectally colonized patients, 38.3% of air samples were positive for A. baumannii; in rooms of patients with respiratory colonization, 13.1% of air samples were positive (P=.0001). In rooms with rectally colonized patients, 15.5% of environmental samples were positive for A. baumannii; in rooms of patients with respiratory colonization, 9.5% of environmental samples were positive (P=.02). The rates of air contamination in the open-layout and single-occupancy ICUs were 17.9% and 21.8%, respectively (P=.5). Environmental surfaces were positive in 9.5% of instances in open-layout ICUs versus 13.4% in single-occupancy ICUs (P=.09). CONCLUSIONS Air and environmental surface contaminations were significantly greater among rectally colonized patients; however, ICU layout did not influence the rate of contamination. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:777-781. PMID:27045768

  10. Comparative proteomics of inner membrane fraction from carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with a reference strain.

    Vishvanath Tiwari

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has been identified by the Infectious Diseases Society of America as one of the six pathogens that cause majority of hospital infections. Increased resistance of A.baumannii even to the latest generation of β-lactams like carbapenem is an immediate threat to mankind. As inner-membrane fraction plays a significant role in survival of A.baumannii, we investigated the inner-membrane fraction proteome of carbapenem-resistant strain of A.baumannii using Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE followed by DeCyder, Progenesis and LC-MS/MS analysis. We identified 19 over-expressed and 4 down-regulated proteins (fold change>2, p<0.05 in resistant strain as compared to reference strain. Some of the upregulated proteins in resistant strain and their association with carbapenem resistance in A.baumannii are: i β-lactamases, AmpC and OXA-51: cleave and inactivate carbapenem ii metabolic enzymes, ATP synthase, malate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase: help in increased energy production for the survival and iii elongation factor Tu and ribosomal proteins: help in the overall protein production. Further, entry of carbapenem perhaps is limited by controlled production of OmpW and low levels of surface antigen help to evade host defence mechanism in developing resistance in A.baumannii. Present results support a model for the importance of proteins of inner-membrane fraction and their synergistic effect in the mediation of resistance of A.baumannii to carbapenem.

  11. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Veterinary Clinics, Germany

    Zordan, Sabrina; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Weiss, Reinhard; van der Reijden, Tanny; van den Broek, Peterhans; Baljer, Georg; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. in hospitalized animals was observed at the Justus-Liebig-University (Germany). Genotypic analysis of 56 isolates during 2000–2008 showed 3 clusters that corresponded to European clones I–III. Results indicate spread of genotypically related strains within and among veterinary clinics in Germany.

  12. The influence of carbapenem resistance on mortality in solid organ transplant recipients with Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    de Gouvêa Erika

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has been associated with high morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. The main objective of this study was to assess the influence of carbapenem resistance and other potential risk factors on the outcome of A. baumannii infection after kidney and liver transplantation. Methods Retrospective study of a case series of A. baumannii infection among liver and renal transplant recipients. The primary outcome was death associated with A. baumannii infection. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the influence of carbapenem resistance and other covariates on the outcome. Results Forty-nine cases of A. baumannii infection affecting 24 kidney and 25 liver transplant recipients were studied. Eighteen cases (37% were caused by carbapenem-resistant isolates. There were 17 (35% deaths associated with A. baumannii infection. In unadjusted analysis, liver transplantation (p = 0.003, acquisition in intensive care unit (p = 0.001, extra-urinary site of infection (p A. baumannii infection. The number of deaths associated with A. baumannii infection was higher among patients infected with carbapenem-resistant isolates, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.28. In multivariate analysis, the risk of A. baumannii-associated mortality was higher in patients with infection acquired in the intensive care unit (odds ratio [OR] = 34.8, p = 0.01 and on mechanical ventilation (OR = 15.2, p = 0.04. Appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy was associated with significantly lower mortality (OR = 0.04, p = 0.03, but carbapenem resistance had no impact on it (OR = 0.73, p = 0.70. Conclusion These findings suggest that A. baumannii-associated mortality among liver and kidney transplant recipients is influenced by baseline clinical severity and by the early start of appropriate therapy, but not by carbapenem

  13. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a 1000-bed tertiary care hospital in Tehran, Iran

    Rahbar Mohammad

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a ubiquitous pathogen that has emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated infections. Acinetobacter baumannii usually causes respiratory tract, urinary tract, blood stream and surgical site infections. They are of increasing importance because of its ability to rapidly develop resistance to the major groups of antibiotics. There are few data available on the antimicrobial susceptibility of A. baumannii in Iran. During the period of study from July 2005 to November 2006, a total of 88 strains of A. baumannii were isolated from clinical specimens obtained from patients hospitalized in an Iranian 1000-bed tertiary care hospital. Conventional bacteriological methods were used for identification of A. baumannii. Susceptibility testing was performed by the method recommended by Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute (CLSI. The majority of isolates were from respiratory tract specimens. The organism showed high rate of resistance to ceftriaxone (90.9%, piperacillin (90.9%, ceftazidime (84.1%, amikacin (85.2% and ciprofloxacin (90.9%. Imipenem was the most effective antibiotic against A. baumannii and the rate of resistance for imipenem was 4.5%. The second most effective antibiotic was tobramycin, and 44.3% of A. baumannii isolates were resistant to this antibiotic. In conclusion, our study showed that the rate of resistance in A. baumannii to imipenem was low. There was a significant relationship between demographic features of patients such as age, undergoing mechanical ventilation, length of hospital stay and drug resistance.

  14. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    Yassine Nait Chabane

    Full Text Available The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I egg-shaped (27%; II ball-shaped (50%; and III irregular pellicles (23%. One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen.

  15. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  16. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-05-15

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of recombinant bacteria harboring the desired chimeric plasmid are limited, making the construction of a chimeric plasmid more difficult. We describe a rapid and easy cloning method for markerless gene deletion in A. baumannii, which has no limitation in the availability of restriction sites and allows for easy selection of the clones carrying the desired chimeric plasmid. Notably, it is not necessary to construct new vectors in our method. This method utilizes direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments, in which upstream and downstream regions of the target gene are fused with an antibiotic resistance cassette via overlap extension PCR and are inserted into a blunt-end suicide vector developed for blunt-end cloning. Importantly, the antibiotic resistance cassette is placed outside the downstream region in order to enable easy selection of the recombinants carrying the desired plasmid, to eliminate the antibiotic resistance cassette via homologous recombination, and to avoid the necessity of constructing new vectors. This strategy was successfully applied to functional analysis of the genes associated with iron acquisition by A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and to ompA gene deletion in other A. baumannii strains. Consequently, the proposed method is invaluable for markerless gene deletion in multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:25746991

  17. Predictors of mortality in patients with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy.

    Choi, Ik Sung; Lee, Yu Ji; Wi, Yu Mi; Kwan, Byung Soo; Jung, Kae Hwa; Hong, Woong Pyo; Kim, June Myong

    2016-08-01

    The ratio of the area under the free (unbound) concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC/MIC) was proposed to be the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index most strongly linked to the antibacterial effect of colistin against Acinetobacter baumannii. A retrospective study of patients who received colistin to treat pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii over a 4-year period was performed to assess the impact of the colistin MIC on mortality. A total of 227 patients were included in the analysis. The 7-day and 14-day mortality rates of patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy were 15.0% and 23.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, days from index culture to first dose of colistin, underlying tumour and septic shock at presentation were independent predictors of mortality in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. In the univariate analysis, the colistin dose based on ideal body weight (IBW) correlated with patient outcome. Therefore, the use of IBW appeared to be more appropriate to calculate the colistin dosage. In addition, these results highlight the clinical significance of colistin MIC in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. Although MICs were in the 'susceptible' range, patients infected with isolates with high colistin MICs showed a poorer clinical response rate than patients infected with isolates with low colistin MICs. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the roles of colistin MIC for predicting mortality in XDR A. baumannii pneumonia with a high colistin MIC. PMID:27423416

  18. Epidemiologic and clinical impact of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection: a reappraisal.

    Villar, Macarena; Cano, María E; Gato, Eva; Garnacho-Montero, José; Miguel Cisneros, José; Ruíz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Tomás, María; Bou, Germán; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria. We investigated changes in the clinical and molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii over a 10-year period. We compared the data from 2 prospective multicenter cohort studies in Spain, one performed in 2000 (183 patients) and one in 2010 (246 patients), which included consecutive patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. Molecular typing was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The incidence density of A. baumannii colonization or infection increased significantly from 0.14 in 2000 to 0.52 in 2010 in medical services (p < 0.001). The number of non-nosocomial health care-associated cases increased from 1.2% to 14.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). Previous exposure to carbapenems increased in 2010 (16.9% in 2000 vs 27.3% in 2010, p = 0.03). The drugs most frequently used for definitive treatment of patients with infections were carbapenems in 2000 (45%) and colistin in 2010 (50.3%). There was molecular-typing evidence of an increase in the frequency of A. baumannii acquisition in non-intensive care unit wards in 2010 (7.6% in 2000 vs 19.2% in 2010, p = 0.01). By MSLT, the ST2 clonal group predominated and increased in 2010. This epidemic clonal group was more frequently resistant to imipenem and was associated with an increased risk of sepsis, although not with severe sepsis or mortality. Some significant changes were noted in the epidemiology of A. baumannii, which is increasingly affecting patients admitted to conventional wards and is also the cause of non-nosocomial health care-associated infections. Epidemic clones seem to combine antimicrobial resistance and the ability to spread, while maintaining their clinical virulence. PMID:25181313

  19. Outbreak of resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: measures and proposal for prevention and control

    Roberta Maia de Castro Romanelli

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection, frequent in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients, is commonly associated with high morbimortality. Several outbreaks due to multidrug-resistant (MDR A. baumanii have been reported but few of them in Brazil. This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with colonization and infection by MDR and carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated from patients admitted to the adult ICU at HC/UFMG. A case-control study was performed from January 2007 to June 2008. Cases were defined as patients colonized or infected by MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii, and controls were patients without MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolation, in a 1:2 proportion. For statistical analysis, due to changes in infection control guidelines, infection criteria and the notification process, this study was divided into two periods. During the first period analyzed, from January to December 2007, colonization or infection by MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii was associated with prior infection, invasive device utilization, prior carbapenem use and clinical severity. In the multivariate analysis, prior infection and mechanical ventilation proved to be statistically significant risk factors. Carbapenem use showed a tendency towards a statistical association. During the second study period, from January to June 2008, variables with a significant association with MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii colonization/infection were catheter utilization, carbapenem and third-generation cephalosporin use, hepatic transplantation, and clinical severity. In the multivariate analysis, only CVC use showed a statistical difference. Carbapenem and third-generation cephalosporin use displayed a tendency to be risk factors. Risk factors must be focused on infection control and prevention measures considering A. baumanni dissemination.

  20. Antibacterial Effects of Origanum vulgare Essence Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated From Selected Hospitals of Tehran, Iran

    Saghi; Bahador; Khaledi; Ataee Kachoei; Amiri Dastjerdi; Esmaeili

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection due to Acinetobacter baumannii has become a significant challenge to modern healthcare systems. The rapid emergence and global dissemination of A. baumannii as a major nosocomial pathogen is remarkable and it demonstrates its successful adaptation to the 21st century hospital environment. Recent studies have discussed about essential oil of Origanum vulgare against a range of bacteria, including various species of Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Esc...

  1. Prevalence and Characterization of Integrons in Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Eastern China: A Multiple-Hospital Study

    Jing Chen; Hong Li; Jinsong Yang; Rong Zhan; Aiping Chen; Yansheng Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this multiple-hospital study was to investigate the prevalence of integrons in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) in Eastern China, and characterize the integron-integrase genes, so as to provide evidence for the management and appropriate antibiotic use of MDRAB infections. Methods: A total of 425 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were collected from 16 tertiary hospitals in 11 cities of four provinces (Fujian, Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Shandong) from Janua...

  2. Dissemination of multiple carbapenem-resistant clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Eastern District of Saudi Arabia

    Al-Sultan, Abdulrahman A.; Evans, Benjamin A.; Aboulmagd, Elsayed; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Bohol, Marie Fe F.; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.; Opazo, Andres F.; Amyes, Sebastian G. B.

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been shown that carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are frequently detected in Saudi Arabia. The present study aimed to identify the epidemiology and distribution of antibiotic resistance determinants in these bacteria. A total of 83 A. baumannii isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and screened by PCR for carbapenemase genes and insertion sequences. Antibiotic sensitivity to imipenem, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin were determined. ...

  3. First report of an OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate related to Tn2006 in Spain.

    Espinal, P; Macià, M D; Roca, I; Gato, E; Ruíz, E; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Oliver, A; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Bou, G; Tomás, M; Vila, J

    2013-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate belonging to European clone II and sequence type 2 was recovered from a patient in the Son Espases hospital in Mallorca, Spain. Genetic analysis showed the presence of the bla(OXA-23) gene in association with the widely disseminated transposon Tn2006. This is the first reported identification of A. baumannii carrying bla(OXA-23) in Spain. PMID:23070166

  4. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    Phee, Lynette M.; Betts, Jonathan W.; Bharathan, Binutha; Wareham, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffu...

  5. Contribution of Efflux Pumps, Porins, and B-Lactamases to Multidrug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Rumbo, C.; Gato, E.; López, M.; Ruiz de Alegría, C.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Vila, J.; Pachón, J.; J. M. Cisneros; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; A. Pascual; Bou,G.; Tomás, M.

    2013-01-01

    Weinvestigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGEROC- 1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58B-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24B-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems).Weused real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobi...

  6. Intravesical colistin irrigation to treat multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii urinary tract infection: a case report

    Volkow-Fernández Patricia; Rodríguez Cecilia Franco; Cornejo-Juárez Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacteria and a significant nosocomial pathogen in hospitals. Multidrug-resistant A. baumannii have emerged as a cause of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients. This microorganism has the ability to produce biofilms on different surfaces, which could explain their ability to persist in clinical environments and their role in device-related infections. Case presentation We present the case of a 33-year-old Hispanic man ...

  7. Análisis comparativo de islas de resistencia en los genomas de las cepas multirresistentes de acinetobacter baumannii, acinetobacter nosocomialis y acinetobacter pittii aisladas en Colombia

    Uribe Rico, Laura Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Las islas genómicas de resistencia (IGR) constituyen uno de los principales mecanismos genéticos de transferencia horizontal, por los cuales las bacterias causantes de infecciones intrahospitalarias adquieren perfiles de multirresistencia, entre las que se encuentran las especies del género Acinetobacter. En el presente trabajo se realizó la búsqueda de estos elementos genéticos en tres genomas secuenciado de cepas multirresistentes A. baumannii 107m (AB107m), A. nosocomialis 28F (AN28F) y A....

  8. In vitro effects of sulbactam combinations with different antibiotic groups against clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    Deveci, Aydin; Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Acicbe, Ozlem; Tanyel, Esra; Yaman, Gorkem; Durupinar, Belma

    2012-10-01

    Treatment of multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections causes some problems as a result of possessing various antibacterial resistance mechanisms against available antibiotics. Combination of antibiotics, acting by different mechanisms, is used for the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. It is an important factor to determine synergy or antagonism between agents in the combination for the constitution of effective therapy. The study aimed to determine In vitro interactions interpreted according to calculated fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index between sulbactam and ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin. Ten clinical isolates of A. baumannii were tested for determination of synergistic effects of sulbactam with different antimicrobial combinations. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of both sulbactam and combined antibiotics decreased 2- to 128-fold. Synergy and partial synergy were determined in combination of sulbactam with ceftazidime and gentamicin (FIC index: ≤ 0.5 or >0.5 to sulbactam. Although synergistic and partial synergistic effects were observed in the combination of sulbactam and ceftriaxone, all isolates remained resistant to ceftriaxone. The effect of cefepime-sulbactam combination was synergy in five, partial synergy in one and indifferent in four isolates. Meropenem and sulbactam showed a partial synergistic effect (FIC index: >0.5 to 1-2) in six isolates. Antagonism was not determined in any combination for clinical A. baumannii isolates in the study. In conclusion, sulbactam is a good candidate for combination treatment regimes for MDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:23182043

  9. Acinetobacter baumannii phenylacetic acid metabolism influences infection outcome through a direct effect on neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Ellett, Felix; Murray, Gerald L; Kostoulias, Xenia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Schulze, Keith E; Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Li, Jian; Creek, Darren J; Lieschke, Graham J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2016-08-23

    Innate cellular immune responses are a critical first-line defense against invading bacterial pathogens. Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream to a site of infection is mediated by chemotactic factors that are often host-derived. More recently, there has been a greater appreciation of the importance of bacterial factors driving neutrophil movement during infection. Here, we describe the development of a zebrafish infection model to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. By using isogenic A. baumannii mutants lacking expression of virulence effector proteins, we demonstrated that bacterial drivers of disease severity are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. By using transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent phagocytes, we showed that a mutation of an established A. baumannii global virulence regulator led to marked changes in neutrophil behavior involving rapid neutrophil influx to a localized site of infection, followed by prolonged neutrophil dwelling. This neutrophilic response augmented bacterial clearance and was secondary to an impaired A. baumannii phenylacetic acid catabolism pathway, which led to accumulation of phenylacetate. Purified phenylacetate was confirmed to be a neutrophil chemoattractant. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism of bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis in vivo, providing insight into the role of bacterial metabolism in host innate immune evasion. Furthermore, the work provides a potentially new therapeutic paradigm of targeting a bacterial metabolic pathway to augment host innate immune responses and attenuate disease. PMID:27506797

  10. Enhanced Efficacy of Combinations of Pexiganan with Colistin Versus Acinetobacter Baumannii in Experimental Sepsis.

    Cirioni, Oscar; Simonetti, Oriana; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Barucca, Alessandra; Ghiselli, Roberto; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pelloni, Maria; Minardi, Daniele; Trombettoni, Maria Michela Cappelletti; Guerrieri, Mario; Offidani, Annamaria; Giacometti, Andrea; Provinciali, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the efficacy of colistin combined with pexiganan in experimental mouse models of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.Adult male BALB/c mice received intraperitoneally 1 mL saline containing 2 × 10 CFU of susceptible and multiresistant A. baumannii. Two hours after bacterial challenge, animals received 1 mg/kg of colistin, 1 mg/kg of pexiganan, or 1 mg/kg of colistin plus 1 mg/kg of pexiganan.Blood culture positivity, the quantities of bacteria in the intra-abdominal fluid, the rate of lethality and immunological studies, such as immunophenotyping and NK cytotoxicity, were evaluated.In the in vitro study, A. baumannii showed susceptibility to colistin and pexiganan and a strong synergy was observed by testing colistin combined with pexiganan with fractionary inhibitory concentration index of 0.312 for both strains.In the in vivo study colistin or pexiganan alone showed a good antimicrobial efficacy. When colistin was combined with pexiganan, the positive interaction produced low bacterial counts that were statistically significant versus singly treated groups. For both strains the highest rate of survival was observed in combined-treated groups (90%).Pexiganan increased NK cytotoxic activity over the levels of infected and colistin-treated animals.In conclusion, pexiganan combined with colistin was found to be efficacious against A. baumannii infection. PMID:26849630

  11. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Guang-Huey Lin

    Full Text Available Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR.

  12. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Lin, Guang-Huey; Chen, Hao-Ping; Shu, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR. PMID:26390211

  13. Thai ethnomedicinal plants as resistant modifying agents for combating Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    Phatthalung Pinanong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. Methods Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay. Results At 250 μg/ml, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Punica granatum, Quisqualis indica, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia sp. that possessed low intrinsic antibacterial activity significantly enhanced the activity of novobiocin at 1 μg/ml (1/8xminimum inhibitory concentration against this pathogen. Holarrhena antidysenterica at 7.8 μg/ml demonstrated remarkable resistant modifying ability against A. baumannii in combination with novobiocin. The phytochemical study revealed that constituents of this medicinal plant contain alkaloids, condensed tannins, and triterpenoids. Conclusion The use of Holarrhena antidysenterica in combination with novobiocin provides an effective alternative treatment for multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  14. Functional Exposed Amino Acids of BauA as Potential Immunogen Against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Sefid, Fatemeh; Rasooli, Iraj; Jahangiri, Abolfazl; Bazmara, Hadise

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is recognized to be among the most difficult antimicrobial-resistant gram negative bacilli to control and treat. One of the major challenges that the pathogenic bacteria face in their host is the scarcity of freely available iron. To survive under such conditions, bacteria express new proteins on their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Antibodies directed against these proteins associated with iron uptake exert a bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect against A. baumanii in vitro, by blocking siderophore mediated iron uptake pathways. Attempts should be made to discover peptides that could mimic protein epitopes and possess the same immunogenicity as the whole protein. Subsequently, theoretical methods for epitope prediction have been developed leading to synthesis of such peptides that are important for development of immunodiagnostic tests and vaccines. The present study was designed to in silico resolving the major obstacles in the control or in prevention of the diseases caused by A. baumannii. We exploited bioinformatic tools to better understand and characterize the Baumannii acinetobactin utilization structure of A. baumannii and select appropriate regions as effective B cell epitopes. In conclusion, amino acids 26-191 of cork domain and 321-635 of part of the barrel domain including L4-L9, were selected as vaccine candidates. These two regions contain functional exposed amino acids with higher score of B cell epitopes properties. Majority of amino acids are hydrophilic, flexible, accessible, and favorable for B cells from secondary structure point of view. PMID:25840681

  15. The First Outbreak Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii ST208 and ST195 in China

    Junyan Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of patients and molecular mechanisms of the first outbreak mainly caused by sequence types (STs 208 multidrug resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii in China. A total of 10 clinical samples were collected from 5 patients who were involved in the outbreak. Bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by the VITEK-2 COMPACT automated system. MICs of tigecycline for clinical isolates were determined using broth microdilution. The clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings was determinated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. A total of 7 A. baumannii strains were isolated and all were MDR strains; two of them were carbapenem-nonsusceptible strains. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene in the isolates. The isolates belonged to a single clonal pulsotype determined by PFGE and two sequences types (STs determined by MLST. The isolates belonged to the globally disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST195 and ST208 were the most common sequence types (71.43% and 28.57%. The outbreak was successfully controlled by stringent infection control measures, especially improving the hand hygiene compliance and enhancing antimicrobial stewardship. In conclusion, this is the first description of an outbreak caused mainly by A. baumannii of ST208 in China. Infection control measures should be strengthened when infection outbreaks in hospital.

  16. The First Outbreak Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii ST208 and ST195 in China

    Qu, Junyan; Du, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of patients and molecular mechanisms of the first outbreak mainly caused by sequence types (STs) 208 multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii in China. A total of 10 clinical samples were collected from 5 patients who were involved in the outbreak. Bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by the VITEK-2 COMPACT automated system. MICs of tigecycline for clinical isolates were determined using broth microdilution. The clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings was determinated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 7 A. baumannii strains were isolated and all were MDR strains; two of them were carbapenem-nonsusceptible strains. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene in the isolates. The isolates belonged to a single clonal pulsotype determined by PFGE and two sequences types (STs) determined by MLST. The isolates belonged to the globally disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST195 and ST208 were the most common sequence types (71.43% and 28.57%). The outbreak was successfully controlled by stringent infection control measures, especially improving the hand hygiene compliance and enhancing antimicrobial stewardship. In conclusion, this is the first description of an outbreak caused mainly by A. baumannii of ST208 in China. Infection control measures should be strengthened when infection outbreaks in hospital. PMID:27144176

  17. Detection of AmpC β-lactamases in Acinetobacter baumannii in the Xuzhou region and analysis of drug resistance

    LIU, YONGRUI; LIU, XIANGQUN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and related drug resistance of AmpC β-lactamases in Acinetobacter baumannii in tertiary-level hospitals in the Xuzhou region in China. A total of 134 clinical isolates of non-repetitive Acinetobacter baumannii were collected from different hospitals in the Xuzhou region, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to determine the genotype of AmpC. The PCR products were purified and sequenced. The susceptibility to an...

  18. Molecular typing of Acinetobacter baumannii by automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR

    Giuseppe Russello

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has been increasingly reported as a significant causative organism of various nosocomial infections. Here we describe three different outbreaks of multidrug resistant A. baumannii started in the Intensitive Care Unit and then involving other wards of San Carlo Borromeo hospital in Milan, Italy. In order to characterize the clinical strains isolates, molecular typing using semi-automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR was performed.Among the sixty-one strains analyzed, three main cluster (C1, C2, C3 were detected: C1 included six indistinguishable strains, C2 five and C3 thirty. No correlation was observed between chemosensitivity and ribotyping pattern and an high rate of carbapenems resistance was founded.

  19. Colistin against colistin-only-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii-related infections: Monotherapy or combination therapy?

    F Simsek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of the patients who were infected with colistin-only-susceptible (COS Acinetobacter baumannii and treated with either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy. Materials and Methods: This retrospective case-control study was conducted in the training and research hospital with an 800 beds between August 2008 and December 2011. The patients, who were infected with COS A. baumannii and received either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy, were included into the study. Results: In total, 51 patients fulfilling study criteria were evaluated. Colistin monotherapy was found effective as much as colistin combined therapy in terms of clinical and microbiological responses in patients with ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP and also in patients with blood stream infections. Conclusion: Although there is no randomised controlled study yet, colistin monotherapy and colistin combined therapy are likely to achieve similar treatment responses rates. Heteroresistant strains can emerge in patients who receive colistin monotherapy

  20. Emerging broad-spectrum resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: Mechanisms and epidemiology.

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug resistance is quite common among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, in particular among clinically relevant species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacterial species, which are mainly nosocomial pathogens, possess a diversity of resistance mechanisms that may lead to multidrug or even pandrug resistance. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenemases conferring resistance to carbapenems, and 16S rRNA methylases conferring resistance to all clinically relevant aminoglycosides are the most important causes of concern. Concomitant resistance to fluoroquinolones, polymyxins (colistin) and tigecycline may lead to pandrug resistance. The most important mechanisms of resistance in P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii and their most recent dissemination worldwide are detailed here. PMID:25857949

  1. Biofilm Formation and Motility Depend on the Nature of the Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    Vijayakumar, Saranya; Rajenderan, Sangeetha; Laishram, Shakti; Anandan, Shalini; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen involved in various infections ranging from minor soft-tissue infections to more severe infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteremia. The severity and the type of infections depend on the genetic and phenotypic variations of the strains. In this study, we compared the extent of biofilm formation and motility displayed by 60 multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clinical strains isolated from blood and sputum samples from patients from Southern India. Our results showed that isolates from the sputum samples formed significantly more robust biofilm compared to the blood isolates. On the other hand, we observed that the blood isolates were more motile than the sputum isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that systematically evaluated the correlation between these two phenotypic traits and the nature of the isolates. PMID:27252939

  2. Fulminating septicemia due to persistent pan-resistant community-acquired metallo-β-lactamase (IMP-1-positive Acinetobacter baumannii

    Nilima V Telang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is considered as an emerging nosocomial pathogen and is renowned for its multi-drug resistance. We report a case of community-acquired pan-resistant A. baumannii caused fulminating septicemia. The treatment failure led to death. The A. baumannii strain isolated from blood, pus, urine and tracheal aspirate was confirmed by 16S r-RNA sequence homology and found positive for metallo-β-lactamase IMP-1, and was found to be a strong biofilm producer. The isolate was only susceptible (moderately to colistin.

  3. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    Hassan, Karl A.; Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide ch...

  4. Colistin and tigecycline for management of external ventricular device-related ventriculitis due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Tamang, Sushil; Paneru, Hem Raj; Shrestha, Pramesh Sunder; Keyal, Niraj; Acharya, Subhash Prasad; Marhatta, Moda Nath; Shilpakar, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important cause of nosocomial ventriculitis associated with external ventricular device (EVD). It is frequently multidrug resistant (MDR), carries a poor outcome, and is difficult to treat. We report a case of MDR Acinetobacter ventriculitis treated with intravenous and intraventricular colistin together with intravenous tigecycline. The patient developed nephrotoxicity and poor neurological outcome despite microbiological cure. Careful implementation of bundle of measures to minimize EVD-associated ventriculitis is valuable. PMID:27365967

  5. Control of an Outbreak of Acinetobacter baumannii in Burn Unit in a Tertiary Care Hospital of North India

    Shweta Sharma; Nirmaljit Kaur; Shalini Malhotra; Preeti Madan; Charoo Hans

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter infection is increasing in hospitals and now it is considered as a global threat, as it can be easily transmitted and remain viable in the hospital environment for a long time due to its multidrug-resistant status, resistance to desiccation, and tendency to adhere to inanimate surfaces. Outbreaks caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) are difficult to control and have substantial morbidity and mortality, especially in vulnerable host. Here we are describin...

  6. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    AMK AL Jarousha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To perform a prospective case control study of blood stream infection to determine the infection rate of Acine­tobac­ter baumannii and the risk factors associated with mortality."nMethods:   From February 2004 to January 2005, 579 consecutive episodes of blood stream infection were obtained at two neo­na­tal intensive care units Al Nasser and Al Shifa hospitals in Gaza City. Forty (6.9% isolates of A. baumannii were ob­tained from the neonates under 28 d. Most of the isolates (92% were from hospitalized patients in the intensive care units."nResults: Community acquired infection was 8%.  Sixty three percent of the patients were males. The isolates of A. bauman­nii were resistant to commonly used antibiotics while being sensitive to meropenem (92.5%, imipenem (90%, chloram­pheni­col (80%, ciprofloxacin (75%, gentamicin (57.5%, ceftriaxone (50%, amikacin (37.5%, cefuroxime and ce­fo­taxime (35%. Over all crude mortality rate was 20% with much higher crude mortality among patients with noso­co­mial infec­tion.  Based on logistic regression, the following factors were statistically significant: weight < 1500g, age < 7 d, mean of hospitalization equal 20 days, antibiotic use, and mechanical ventilation, when compared to the control group (P< 0.05."nConclusion:  Infection rate of nosocomial blood stream infection was considerable and alarming in neonatal intensive care unit infants and associated with a significant excess length of NICU stay and a significant economic burden.  

  7. Caracterización de integrones de clase I en aislamientos hospitalarios de acinetobacter baumannii

    Gáfaro Montejo, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Se analizaron 129 aislamientos de Acinetobacter baumannii obtenidos de hospitales colombianos de tercer nivel con el objetivo de detectar y caracterizar integrones de tipo I (elementos genéticos importantes por la capacidad de adquirir determinantes genéticos de resistencia a los antibióticos) y su relación con el fenotipo de resistencia antibiótica. De los aislamientos estudiados el 24% fueron positivos para la presencia del integrón de tipo I. La caracterización de estos últimos demostró...

  8. Rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii and molecular epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant A.baumannii in two comprehensive hospitals of Beijing, China

    Puyuan eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with a variety of nosocomial infections. A rapid and sensitive molecular detection in clinical isolates is quite needed for the appropriate therapy and outbreak control of A. baumannii. Group 2 carbapenems have been considered the agents of choice for the treatment of multiple drug resistant A. baumannii. But the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB has been steadily increasing in recent years. Here, we developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for the rapid detection of A. baumannii in clinical samples by using high-specificity primers of the blaOXA-51 gene. Then we investigated the OXA-carbapenemases molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates in 2 comprehensive hospitals in Beijing. The results showed that the LAMP assay could detect target DNA within 60 min at 65°C. The detection limit was 50 pg/μl, which was about 10-fold greater than that of PCR. Furthermore, this method could distinguish A. baumannii from the homologous A. nosocomialis and A. pittii. A total of 228 positive isolates were identified by this LAMP-based method for A. baumannii from 335 ICU patients with clinically suspected multi-resistant infections in 2 hospitals in Beijing. The rates of CRAB are on the rise and are slowly becoming a routine phenotype for A. baumannii. Among the CRABs, 92.3% harbored both the blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 genes. Thirty-three pulsotypes were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and the majority belonged to clone C. In conclusion, the LAMP method developed for detecting A. baumannii was faster and simpler than conventional PCR and has great potential for both point-of-care testing and basic research. We further demonstrated a high distribution of class D carbapenemase-encoding genes, mainly OXA-23, which presents an emerging threat in hospitals in China.

  9. Acinetobacter baumannii in intensive care unit: A novel system to study clonal relationship among the isolates

    Leonardis Francesca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nosocomial infections surveillance system must be strongly effective especially in highly critic areas, such as Intensive Care Units (ICU. These areas are frequently an epidemiological epicentre for transmission of multi-resistant pathogens, like Acinetobacter baumannii. As an epidemic outbreak occurs it is very important to confirm or exclude the genetic relationship among the isolates in a short time. There are several molecular typing systems used with this aim. The Repetitive sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR has been recognized as an effective method and it was recently adapted to an automated format known as the DiversiLab system. Methods In the present study we have evaluated the combination of a newly introduced software package for the control of hospital infection (VIGI@ct with the DiversiLab system. In order to evaluate the reliability of the DiversiLab its results were also compared with those obtained using f-AFLP. Results The combination of VIGI@ct and DiversiLab enabled an earlier identification of an A. baumannii epidemic cluster, through the confirmation of the genetic relationship among the isolates. This cluster regards 56 multi-drug-resistant A. baumannii isolates from several specimens collected from 13 different patients admitted to the ICU in a ten month period. The A. baumannii isolates were clonally related being their similarity included between 97 and 100%. The results of the DiversiLab were confirmed by f-AFLP analysis. Conclusion The early identification of the outbreak has led to the prompt application of operative procedures and precautions to avoid the spread of pathogen. To date, 6 months after the last A. baumannii isolate, no other related case has been identified.

  10. Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 Carbapenemase in Qatar

    J.-M. Rolain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to describe the molecular support of carbapenem resistance from randomly selected clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii as a pilot study from the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC, Qatar. Results of our report will be used to study carbapenemases using molecular techniques in all isolated MDR A. baumannii. Forty-eight MDR A. baumannii were randomly selected from isolates preserved at HMC. Identification of all isolates was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antibiotic resistance was tested phenotypically by Phoenix and confirmed by Etest. The molecular support of carbapenemases (blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM was investigated by real-time PCR. The epidemiologic relatedness of the isolates was verified by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of CsuE and blaOXA-51 genes. All 48 isolates were identified as A. baumannii and were confirmed to be resistant to most antibiotics, especially meropenem, imipenems, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin and most of the β-lactams; they were sensitive to colistin. All the isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and negative for the other tested carbapenemase genes. Clonality analysis demonstrated that different lineages were actually circulating in Qatar; and we suggest that an outbreak occurred in the medical intensive care unit of HMC between 2011 and 2012. Here we report the emergence of MDR A. baumannii producing the carbapenemase OXA-23 in Qatar.

  11. Synergistic effects of sulbactam in multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Fatih Temocin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequently isolated etiologic agent of nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units. With the increase in multi-drug resistance of A. baumannii isolates, finding appropriate treatment alternatives for infections caused by these bacteria has become more difficult, and available alternate treatments include the use of older antibiotics such as colistin or a combination of antibiotics. The current study aimed to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of various antibiotic combinations against multi-drug resistant A. baumannii strains. Thirty multi-drug and carbapenem resistant A. baumannii strains isolated at the Ankara Training and Research Hospital between June 2011 and June 2012 were used in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility tests and species-level identification were performed using conventional methods and the VITEK 2 system. The effects of meropenem, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, tigecycline, and colistin alone and in combination with sulbactam against the isolates were studied using Etest (bioMérieux in Mueller-Hinton agar medium. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC was used to determine the efficacy of the various combinations. While all combinations showed a predominant indifferent effect, a synergistic effect was also observed in 4 of the 5 combinations. Synergy was demonstrated in 43% of the isolates with the meropenem-sulbactam combination, in 27% of the isolates with tigecycline-sulbactam, and in 17% of the isolates with colistin-sulbactam and amikacin-sulbactam. No synergy was detected with the sulbactam-ciprofloxacin combination and antagonism was detected only in the sulbactam-colistin combination (6.66% of the isolates. Antibiotic combinations can be used as an alternative treatment approach in multi-drug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  12. Immunization against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii effectively protects mice in both pneumonia and sepsis models.

    Weiwei Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Acinetobacter baumannii is considered the prototypical example of a multi- or pan- drug-resistant bacterium. It has been increasingly implicated as a major cause of nosocomial and community-associated infections. This study proposed to evaluate the efficacy of immunological approaches to prevent and treat A. baumannii infections. METHODS: Mice were immunized with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs prepared from a clinically isolated multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. Pneumonia and sepsis models were used to evaluate the efficacy of active and passive immunization with OMVs. The probable effective mechanisms and the protective potential of clonally distinct clinical isolates were investigated in vitro using an opsonophagocytic assay. RESULTS: Intramuscular immunization with OMVs rapidly produced high levels of OMV-specific IgG antibodies, and subsequent intranasal challenge with A. baumannii elicited mucosal IgA and IgG responses. Both active and passive immunization protected the mice from challenges with homologue bacteria in a sepsis model. Bacterial burden in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF, lung, and spleen, inflammatory cell infiltration in BALF and lung, and inflammatory cytokine accumulation in BALF was significantly suppressed in the pneumonia model by both active and passive immunization strategies. The antisera from immunized mice presented with significant opsonophagocytic activities in a dose-dependent manner against not only homologous strains but also five of the other six clonally distinct clinical isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Utilizing immunological characteristics of outer membrane proteins to elevate protective immunity and circumvent complex multidrug-resistance mechanisms might be a viable approach to effectively control A. baumannii infections.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of a Virulent Bacteriophage AB1 of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Jia Shiru

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen worldwide with increasing prevalence of multi-drug and pan-drug resistance. A. baumannii exists widely in natural environment, especially in health care settings, and has been shown difficult to be eradicated. Bacteriophages are often considered alternative agent for controlling bacterial infection and contamination. In this study, we described the isolation and characterization of one virulent bacteriophage AB1 capable of specifically infecting A. baumannii. Results A virulent bacteriophage AB1, specific for infecting a clinical strain A. baumannii KD311, was first isolated from marine sediment sample. Restriction analysis indicated that phage AB1 was a dsDNA virus with an approximate genome size of 45.2 kb to 46.9 kb. Transmission electron microscopy showed that phage AB1 had an icosahedral head with a non-contractile tail and collar or whisker structures, and might be tentatively classified as a member of the Siphoviridae family. Proteomic pattern of phage AB1, generated by SDS-PAGE using purified phage particles, revealed five major bands and six minor bands with molecular weight ranging from 14 to 80 kilo-dalton. Also determined was the adsorption rate of phage AB1 to the host bacterium, which was significantly enhanced by addition of 10 mM CaCl2. In a single step growth test, phage AB1 was shown having a latent period of 18 minutes and a burst size of 409. Moreover, pH and thermal stability of phage AB1 were also investigated. At the optimal pH 6.0, 73.2% of phages survived after 60 min incubation at 50°C. When phage AB1 was used to infect four additional clinical isolates of A. baumannii, one clinical isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lab strains PAK and PAO1, none of the tested strains was found susceptible, indicating a relatively narrow host range for phage AB1. Conclusion Phage AB1 was capable of eliciting efficient lysis

  14. A health care-associated pneumonia case due to colistin resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Siran Keske

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 78 year old male was hospitalized in neurology clinic with a diagnosis of encephalopathy. On 13th day of imipenem treatment for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP, a new VAP episode was diagnosed based on physical examination, laboratory and radiological findings. Cefoperazone-sulbactam 2x2 gr/day IV was started empirically. In the 3rd day of treatment Acinetobacter baumannii was identified from endotracheal aspirate culture that was resistant to all other antibiotics including colistin except cefoperazone-sulbactam (intermediate and tigecycline (MIC: 4 mg/L, intermediate by VITEK and E-test. Tigecycline 2 x 50 mg (after loading dose of 100 mg IV, colistin IV 2 x 150 mg and colistin inhaler 2 x 75 mg were added to the cefoperazone-sulbactam 2 x 2 gr IV. Clinical findings were improved under this combination and completed to 14 days. The patient was discharged from hospital with neurological sequel after three months. This case has been presented to emphasize that colistin resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is becoming a problem for our country. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(3: 111-113

  15. Activity of Gallium Meso- and Protoporphyrin IX against Biofilms of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates.

    Chang, David; Garcia, Rebecca A; Akers, Kevin S; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C; Sanchez, Carlos J

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a challenging pathogen due to antimicrobial resistance and biofilm development. The role of iron in bacterial physiology has prompted the evaluation of iron-modulation as an antimicrobial strategy. The non-reducible iron analog gallium(III) nitrate, Ga(NO₃)₃, has been shown to inhibit A. baumannii planktonic growth; however, utilization of heme-iron by clinical isolates has been associated with development of tolerance. These observations prompted the evaluation of iron-heme sources on planktonic and biofilm growth, as well as antimicrobial activities of gallium meso- and protoporphyrin IX (Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX), metal heme derivatives against planktonic and biofilm bacteria of multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolates of A. baumannii in vitro. Ga(NO₃)₃ was moderately effective at reducing planktonic bacteria (64 to 128 µM) with little activity against biofilms (≥512 µM). In contrast, Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX were highly active against planktonic bacteria (0.25 to 8 µM). Cytotoxic effects in human fibroblasts were observed following exposure to concentrations exceeding 128 µM of Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX. We observed that the gallium metal heme conjugates were more active against planktonic and biofilm bacteria, possibly due to utilization of heme-iron as demonstrated by the enhanced effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation. PMID:26999163

  16. Crystal structure of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the ESKAPE pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Sutton, Kristin A; Breen, Jennifer; Russo, Thomas A; Schultz, L Wayne; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-03-01

    The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase catalyzes the sixth step of the seven-step shikimate pathway. Chorismate, the product of the pathway, is a precursor for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, siderophores and metabolites such as folate, ubiquinone and vitamin K. The shikimate pathway is present in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and apicomplexan parasites, but is absent in humans. The EPSP synthase enzyme produces 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate and phosphate from phosphoenolpyruvate and shikimate 3-phosphate via a transferase reaction, and is the target of the herbicide glyphosate. The Acinetobacter baumannii gene encoding EPSP synthase, aroA, has previously been demonstrated to be essential during host infection for the growth and survival of this clinically important drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogen. Prephenate dehydrogenase is also encoded by the bifunctional A. baumannii aroA gene, but its activity is dependent upon EPSP synthase since it operates downstream of the shikimate pathway. As part of an effort to evaluate new antimicrobial targets, recombinant A. baumannii EPSP (AbEPSP) synthase, comprising residues Ala301-Gln756 of the aroA gene product, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure, determined to 2.37 Å resolution, is described in the context of a potential antimicrobial target and in comparison to EPSP synthases that are resistant or sensitive to the herbicide glyphosate. PMID:26919521

  17. Antibacterial activity of a newly developed peptide-modified lysin against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Hang eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The global emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria is a growing threat to public health worldwide. Natural bacteriophage lysins are promising alternatives in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens, but not Gram-negative ones, like Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to the barriers posed by their outer membranes. Recently, modifying a natural lysin with an antimicrobial peptide was found able to break the barriers, and to kill Gram-negative pathogens. Herein, a new peptide-modified lysin (PlyA was constructed by fusing the cecropin A peptide residues 1–8 (KWKLFKKI with the OBPgp279 lysin and its antibacterial activity was studied. PlyA showed good and broad antibacterial activities against logarithmic phase A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, but much reduced activities against the cells in stationary phase. Addition of outer membrane permeabilizers (EDTA and citric acid could enhance the antibacterial activity of PlyA against stationary phase cells. Finally, no antibacterial activity of PlyA could be observed in some bio-matrices, such as culture media, milk, and sera. In conclusion, we reported here a novel peptide-modified lysin with significant antibacterial activity against both logarithmic (without OMPs and stationary phase (with OMPs A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa cells in buffer, but further optimization is needed to achieve broad activity in diverse bio-matrices.

  18. Emergence and clonal dissemination of carbapenem-hydrolysing OXA-58-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Bolivia.

    Sevillano, Elena; Fernández, Elena; Bustamante, Zulema; Zabalaga, Silvia; Rosales, Ikerne; Umaran, Adelaida; Gallego, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen and very little information is available regarding its imipenem resistance in Latin American countries such as Bolivia. This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance profile of 46 clinical strains from different hospitals in Cochabamba, Bolivia, from March 2008 to July 2009, and the presence of carbapenemases as a mechanism of resistance to imipenem. Isolates were obtained from 46 patients (one isolate per patient; 30 males,16 females) with an age range of 1 day to 84 years, and were collected from different sample types, the majority from respiratory tract infections (17) and wounds (13). Resistance to imipenem was detected in 15 isolates collected from different hospitals of the city. These isolates grouped into the same genotype, named A, and were resistant to all antibiotics tested including imipenem, with susceptibility only to colistin. Experiments to detect carbapenemases revealed the presence of the OXA-58 carbapenemase. Further analysis revealed the location of the bla(OXA-58) gene on a 40 kb plasmid. To our knowledge, this is the first report of carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii isolates from Bolivia that is conferred by the OXA-58 carbapenemase. The presence of this gene in a multidrug-resistant clone and its location within a plasmid is of great concern with regard to the spread of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii in the hospital environment in Bolivia. PMID:21873380

  19. Epidemiology of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii in Mediterranean Countries

    Nassima Djahmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and global spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii are of great concern to health services worldwide. These β-lactamases hydrolyse almost all β-lactams, are plasmid-encoded, and are easily transferable among bacterial species. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 types. Their current extensive spread worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae is an important source of concern. Infections caused by these bacteria have limited treatment options and have been associated with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase producers are mainly identified among Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and A. baumannii and still mostly in hospital settings and rarely in the community. The Mediterranean region is of interest due to a great diversity and population mixing. The prevalence of carbapenemases is particularly high, with this area constituting one of the most important reservoirs. The types of carbapenemase vary among countries, partially depending on the population exchange relationship between the regions and the possible reservoirs of each carbapenemase. This review described the epidemiology of carbapenemases produced by enterobacteria and A. baumannii in this part of the world highlighting the worrisome situation and the need to screen and detect these enzymes to prevent and control their dissemination.

  20. Safety and effectiveness of colistin compared with tobramycin for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    Cohen Karen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nosocomial infections due to multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are often treated with colistin, but there are few data comparing its safety and efficacy with other antimicrobials. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients treated with colistin or tobramycin for A. baumannii infections in intensive care units (ICUs at Groote Schuur hospital. Colistin was used for A. baumannii isolates which were resistant to all other available antimicrobials. In the tobramycin group, 53% of the isolates were only susceptible to tobramycin and colistin. We assessed ICU mortality, nephrotoxicity and time to the first negative culture. Results 32 patients, with similar admission APACHE scores and serum creatinine, were treated with each antimicrobial. There were no significant differences between the colistin and tobramycin groups in ICU mortality (p = 0.54, nephrotoxicity (p = 0.67, change in creatinine from baseline to highest subsequent value (p = 0.11 and time to microbiological clearance (p = 0.75. The hazard ratio for total in-hospital survival in patients treated with colistin compared to tobramycin was 0.43 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.99. Conclusion Our study suggests that colistin and tobramycin have similar risks of nephrotoxicity and are equally efficacious. Colistin is an acceptable antibiotic for the treatment of A. baumanii infections when the organism is resistant to other available antimicrobials.

  1. Activity of Gallium Meso- and Protoporphyrin IX against Biofilms of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    David Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a challenging pathogen due to antimicrobial resistance and biofilm development. The role of iron in bacterial physiology has prompted the evaluation of iron-modulation as an antimicrobial strategy. The non-reducible iron analog gallium(III nitrate, Ga(NO33, has been shown to inhibit A. baumannii planktonic growth; however, utilization of heme-iron by clinical isolates has been associated with development of tolerance. These observations prompted the evaluation of iron-heme sources on planktonic and biofilm growth, as well as antimicrobial activities of gallium meso- and protoporphyrin IX (Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX, metal heme derivatives against planktonic and biofilm bacteria of multidrug-resistant (MDR clinical isolates of A. baumannii in vitro. Ga(NO33 was moderately effective at reducing planktonic bacteria (64 to 128 µM with little activity against biofilms (≥512 µM. In contrast, Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX were highly active against planktonic bacteria (0.25 to 8 µM. Cytotoxic effects in human fibroblasts were observed following exposure to concentrations exceeding 128 µM of Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX. We observed that the gallium metal heme conjugates were more active against planktonic and biofilm bacteria, possibly due to utilization of heme-iron as demonstrated by the enhanced effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation.

  2. Infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Khalid Ahmed Al-Anazi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, non-fermentative coccobacillus which is widely distributed in nature. Recently, it has emerged as a major cause of health care-associated infections in addition to its capacity to cause community acquired infections. Risk factors for A. baumannii infections and bacteremia in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation include: severe underlying illness such as hematological malignancy, prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, invasive instrumentation such as central venous catheters or endotracheal intubation, colonization of respiratory, gastrointestinal or urinary tracts in addition to severe immunosuppression caused by using corticosteroids for treating graft versus host disease. The organism causes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, but serious complications such as bacteremia, septic shock, ventilator-associated pneumonia, extensive soft tissue necrosis and rapidly progressive systemic infections that ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death are prone to occur in severely immunocompromised hosts. The organism is usually resistant to many antimicrobials including penicillins, cephalosporins, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, almost all flouroquinolones and most of the aminoglycosides. The recently increasing resistance to carbapenems, colistin and polymyxins is alarming. Additionally, there are geographic variations in the resistance patterns and several globally and regionally resistant strains have already been described. Successful management of A.baumannii infections depends upon appropriate utilization of antibiotics and strict application of preventive and infection control measures. In uncomplicated infections, the use of a single active beta-lactam may be justified, while definitive treatment of complicated infections in critically ill individuals may require drug combinations such as colistin and rifampicin or colistin and

  3. Characterising the Transmission Dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in Intensive Care Units Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Doan, Tan N; Kong, David C M; Marshall, Caroline; Kirkpatrick, Carl M J; McBryde, Emma S

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in hospitals, despite such information being critical for designing effective infection control measures. In the absence of comprehensive epidemiological data, mathematical modelling is an attractive approach to understanding transmission process. The statistical challenge in estimating transmission parameters from infection data arises from the fact that most patients are colonised asymptomatically and therefore the transmission process is not fully observed. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) can overcome this problem. We developed a continuous-time structured HMM to characterise the transmission dynamics, and to quantify the relative importance of different acquisition sources of A. baumannii in intensive care units (ICUs) in three hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The hidden states were the total number of patients colonised with A. baumannii (both detected and undetected). The model input was monthly incidence data of the number of detected colonised patients (observations). A Bayesian framework with Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm was used for parameter estimations. We estimated that 96-98% of acquisition in Hospital 1 and 3 was due to cross-transmission between patients; whereas most colonisation in Hospital 2 was due to other sources (sporadic acquisition). On average, it takes 20 and 31 days for each susceptible individual in Hospital 1 and Hospital 3 to become colonised as a result of cross-transmission, respectively; whereas it takes 17 days to observe one new colonisation from sporadic acquisition in Hospital 2. The basic reproduction ratio (R0) for Hospital 1, 2 and 3 was 1.5, 0.02 and 1.6, respectively. Our study is the first to characterise the transmission dynamics of A. baumannii using mathematical modelling. We showed that HMMs can be applied to sparse hospital infection data to estimate transmission parameters despite unobserved events and imperfect detection of the organism

  4. Characterising the Transmission Dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in Intensive Care Units Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Tan N Doan

    Full Text Available Little is known about the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in hospitals, despite such information being critical for designing effective infection control measures. In the absence of comprehensive epidemiological data, mathematical modelling is an attractive approach to understanding transmission process. The statistical challenge in estimating transmission parameters from infection data arises from the fact that most patients are colonised asymptomatically and therefore the transmission process is not fully observed. Hidden Markov models (HMMs can overcome this problem. We developed a continuous-time structured HMM to characterise the transmission dynamics, and to quantify the relative importance of different acquisition sources of A. baumannii in intensive care units (ICUs in three hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The hidden states were the total number of patients colonised with A. baumannii (both detected and undetected. The model input was monthly incidence data of the number of detected colonised patients (observations. A Bayesian framework with Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm was used for parameter estimations. We estimated that 96-98% of acquisition in Hospital 1 and 3 was due to cross-transmission between patients; whereas most colonisation in Hospital 2 was due to other sources (sporadic acquisition. On average, it takes 20 and 31 days for each susceptible individual in Hospital 1 and Hospital 3 to become colonised as a result of cross-transmission, respectively; whereas it takes 17 days to observe one new colonisation from sporadic acquisition in Hospital 2. The basic reproduction ratio (R0 for Hospital 1, 2 and 3 was 1.5, 0.02 and 1.6, respectively. Our study is the first to characterise the transmission dynamics of A. baumannii using mathematical modelling. We showed that HMMs can be applied to sparse hospital infection data to estimate transmission parameters despite unobserved events and imperfect detection of

  5. The Prevalence of ESBL Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Parviz Mohajeri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones are used for treating infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumannii strains some time have extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL, but ESBL production is rather rare. Resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics is mediated by lactamases and other mechanisms of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate of the prevalence of ESBL production and clonal relatedness of A. baumannii in Iran. Materials and Methods: A. baumannii isolates identified from patients at hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran, were studied. The double disk method was used for detection of ESBL production. The susceptibility to different antibiotics was determined by the disk diffusion method (CLSI. Clonal relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and processed by Bionumerics 7.0 software. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS-16.0. Results: This study showed high prevalence of resistance to ampicillin and cefpodoxim (98.1 and 92.3%. Fifty-two of the 84 isolates were identified as ESBL producers. Only colistin and tigecycline remained active against all isolates tested. The PFGE identified eight distinct pulsotypes: A (N=9, B (N=10, C (N=2, D (N=5, E (N=9, F (N=15, G (N=1 and H (N=1. The PFGE profiles A, B and F were believed to be endemic (specially clone F that was dominant across different wards of the hospitals and appeared to be endemic in the ICU, emergency, pediatric and infection area throughout the years. Conclusion: Early and timely detection of ESBL-producing A. baumannii clones is useful for preventing their spread within the hospital. PFGE analysis is helpful for detection of common strains in different wards and prevention of further spread of these pulsotypes to other hospital environment.

  6. Carbapenem resistance and phenotypic detection of carbapenemases in clinical isolates of acinetobacter baumannii

    Gomty Mahajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-Ab reported worldwide has become one of the most difficult nosocomially acquired Gram-negative pathogens to control and treat. The clinical utility of carbapenems is under threat with the emergence of acquired carbapenemases, particularly Ambler class B metallo-lactamases (MBL. Because of the global increase in the occurrence and dissemination of MBLs, early detection is critical. This study was undertaken to detect resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of A. baumannii from hospitalized patients by both disk-diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC methods and to assess the rate of carbapenemase and MBL production among the isolates. Materials and Methods : A. baumannii were identified from various clinical samples and antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined by the standard disk-diffusion method. Meropenem-resistant strains were tested further by agar dilution MIC for meropenem. Resistant isolates were screened for carbapenemase production by the modified Hodge test and positive isolates were further checked for metallo-β-lacatmase production by the EDTA disk synergy test. Results : 42 isolates (31.81% showed resistance to meropenem by the disk diffusion method. 47.6% were carbapenemase positive by the modified Hodge test and 19% were MBL producers phenotypically by the EDTA disc synergy test (EDS. These meropenem-resistant isolates were resistant to most of the other antibiotics tested. These 42 isolates were recovered mostly from patients admitted to intensive care units. Four isolates of the A. baumannii complex were pan drug resistant and showed resistance to even tigecycline and polymyxin B. Conclusion : Carbapenem resistance has been increasingly reported, necessitating their detection. This study reports simple, carbapenemase, and MBL detection method that can be easily incorporated into the daily routine of a clinical laboratory.

  7. CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping.

    Karah, Nabil; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Sahl, Jason W; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST). CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii. PMID:25706932

  8. CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping.

    Nabil Karah

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST. CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii.

  9. Antibiogram of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from clinical specimens at King Hussein Medical Centre, Jordan: a retrospective analysis.

    Batarseh, A; Al-Sarhan, A; Maayteh, M; Al-Khatirei, S; Alarmouti, M

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and the local antibiogram of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Al-Hussein Hospital at King Hussein Medical Centre in Amman, Jordan. In a retrospective study from January to December 2013, data on 116 non-repetitive positive clinical samples were retrieved from patients' laboratory records. The resistance rates of A. baumannii isolates were high for ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and ticarcillin (100%), ceftazidime, cefepime and piperacillin (98.3%), imipenem (97.4%), piperacillin/tazobactam (96.6%), quinolones (94.8%), ampicillin/sulbactam (89.7%), gentamicin, (87.9%), tobramycin and tetracycline (76.7%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (75.9%), but lower for minocycline (26.7%) and colistin (1.7%). A. baumannii in our hospital were highly resistant to all antibiotics, including tigecycline, except for minocycline and colistin which are considered the last resort treatment for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:26857720

  10. Abrp, a new gene, confers reduced susceptibility to tetracycline, glycylcine, chloramphenicol and fosfomycin classes in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Li, X; Quan, J; Yang, Y; Ji, J; Liu, L; Fu, Y; Hua, X; Chen, Y; Pi, B; Jiang, Y; Yu, Y

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a non-fermenting gram-negative coccobacillus, is a major pathogen responsible for a variety of healthcare-associated infections, including pneumonia, urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Moreover, A. baumannii is associated with alarming increases in drug resistance rates to almost all available antibiotics leaving limited treatment options. Here, we characterize the biological functions of a novel gene, abrp, which encodes a peptidase C13 family. We demonstrate that the abrp is associated with decreased susceptibility to tetracycline, minocycline, doxycycline, tigecycline, chloramphenicol and fosfomycin. Deletion of abrp was able to increase cell membrane permeability and display slower cell growth rate. Results from the present study show that abrp plays an important role in conferring reduced susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics and cell growth in A. baumannii. The change of antibiotic sensitivities may result from modifications to the cell membrane permeability of A. baumannii. PMID:27220329

  11. Multiple drug resistant carbapenemases producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harbours multiple R-plasmids

    Rajagopalan Saranathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The nosocomial human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has high propensity to develop resistance to antimicrobials and to become multidrug resistant (MDR, consequently complicating the treatment. This study was carried out to investigate the presence of resistant plasmids (R-plasmids among the clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, the study was performed to check the presence of common β-lactamases encoding genes on these plasmids. Methods: A total of 55 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were included in the study and all were subjected to plasmid DNA isolation, followed by PCR to check the presence of resistance gene determinants such as blaOXA-23 , blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58 and blaIMP-1 on these plasmids that encode for oxacillinase (OXA and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL type of carbapenemases. Plasmid curing experiments were carried out on selected isolates using ethidium bromide and acridine orange as curing agents and the antibiotic resistance profiles were evaluated before and after curing. Results: All the isolates were identified as A. baumannii by 16SrDNA amplification and sequencing. Plasmid DNA isolated from these isolates showed the occurrence of multiple plasmids with size ranging from 500bp to ≥ 25 kb. The percentage of blaOXA-51 and blaOXA-23 on plasmids were found to be 78 and 42 per cent, respectively and 20 isolates (36% carried blaIMP-1 gene on plasmids. Significant difference was observed in the antibiograms of plasmid cured isolates when compared to their parental ones. The clinical isolates became susceptible to more than two antibiotic classes after curing of plasmids indicating plasmid borne resistance. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study determined the plasmid mediated resistance mechanisms and occurrence of different resistance genes on various plasmids isolated from MDR A. baumannii. The present findings showed the evidence for antibiotic resistance mediated through multiple plasmids in

  12. Molecular Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated From Nosocomial Infections of a Teaching Hospital in Isfahan, Iran

    Fazeli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Multidrug resistant (MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR Acinetobacter baumannii are among important causes of nosocomial infections and cause therapeutic problems worldwide. The emergence of extensively drug-resistant A. baumannii (XDRAB cause serious threats to hospital acquired infections (HAI worldwide and further limit the treatment options. Objectives The current study aimed to identify and isolate the MDR and XDR Acinetobacter baumannii from different wards of a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran, and determine the susceptibility pattern of these bacteria. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty one (121 isolates of A. baumannii collected from a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran, within eight months (between September 2013 and April 2014 were included in the current study. The samples were isolated from different wards and different specimens. To confirm the species of A. baumannii, Polymerase chain reaction (PCRwas conducted to identify blaoxa-51 gene. Disk diffusion method was employed to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility against cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ampicillin-sulbactam, cefepime, meropenem, tobramycin, amikacin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole, and aztreonam. Results Among the 121 isolated A. baumannii, 44% and 56% were isolated from female and male, respectively. Samples cultured from the trachea (36%, urine (15%, blood (10%, wound (10%, cerebrospinal fluid (7%, bronchial (4% and the others (18%. Most of the isolates (50% were obtained from intensive care unit (ICU. Isolated A. baumannii showed high resistance to the evaluated antibiotics except ampicillin-sulbactam, which showed only 33.9% resistance. Also, 62.8% and 100% of the isolates were identified as XDR and MDR. Conclusions The result of the current study showed the growing number of nosocomial infections associated with XDR A. baumannii causing difficulties in antibiotic therapy. Resistant strains increasingly cause

  13. Identification of an Acinetobacter baumannii zinc acquisition system that facilitates resistance to calprotectin-mediated zinc sequestration.

    M Indriati Hood

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that accounts for up to 20 percent of infections in intensive care units worldwide. Furthermore, A. baumannii strains have emerged that are resistant to all available antimicrobials. These facts highlight the dire need for new therapeutic strategies to combat this growing public health threat. Given the critical role for transition metals at the pathogen-host interface, interrogating the role for these metals in A. baumannii physiology and pathogenesis could elucidate novel therapeutic strategies. Toward this end, the role for calprotectin- (CP-mediated chelation of manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn in defense against A. baumannii was investigated. These experiments revealed that CP inhibits A. baumannii growth in vitro through chelation of Mn and Zn. Consistent with these in vitro data, Imaging Mass Spectrometry revealed that CP accompanies neutrophil recruitment to the lung and accumulates at foci of infection in a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia. CP contributes to host survival and control of bacterial replication in the lung and limits dissemination to secondary sites. Using CP as a probe identified an A. baumannii Zn acquisition system that contributes to Zn uptake, enabling this organism to resist CP-mediated metal chelation, which enhances pathogenesis. Moreover, evidence is provided that Zn uptake across the outer membrane is an energy-dependent process in A. baumannii. Finally, it is shown that Zn limitation reverses carbapenem resistance in multidrug resistant A. baumannii underscoring the clinical relevance of these findings. Taken together, these data establish Zn acquisition systems as viable therapeutic targets to combat multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  14. Klinik örneklerden izole edilen Acinetobacter baumannii suşlarının in-vitro duyarlılık durumları

    Savcı, Ünsal; Özveren, Gülşen; Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Yunus BULUT; Özdaş, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Management of Acinetobacter baumannii infection is usually difficult due to increase in multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii srains and rapid development of resistance to new antimicrobial drugs. It may cause nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infections, blood stream infections, meningitis especially in intensive care units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 170 A. baumanii strains iso...

  15. [Antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from clinical specimens in the "Marius Nasta" Pneumology Institute, Bucharest].

    Moisoiu, Adriana; Ionită, Monica; Sârbu, Lăcrămioara; Stoica, Corina; Grigoriu, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients who are in critical condition in hospitals and especially in intensive care units (ICU). Long time considered a bacterium with low virulence, A. baumannii has more recently become a cause for major concern in clinical practice due to its high level of antimicrobial resistance. The extend of infections with Acinetobacter baumannii in ICU is caused by multiple factors, such as mechanical ventilation, invasive procedures, the use of a large number of broad spectrum antibiotics and transmission through the hands of medical staff In this study we evaluated the resistance to antibiotics of 213 non-duplicated strains of A. baumannii isolated in the bacteriology laboratory of the "Marius Nasta" lnstitute of Pneumophtisiology (IPMN) from January 2012 to December 2013. These strains originated from patients in medical wards (56), ICU (143) and surgery (14). Strains identification was performed by classical methods on multitest media and with API kits (Bio Merieux). The antibiotic sensitivity was performed on Mueller-Hinton media in accordance with CLSI2013. Analysis of the resistance to antibiotics was the following: carbenicilin (87.3%), ceftriaxone (87.3%), cefoperazone with sulbactam (84.9%), ceftazidime (79.3%), carbapenems (imipenem and/or meropenem--75.1%), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and/orlevofloxacin--73.7%), cefepime (66.6%), piperacilin with tazobactam (62.4%), amikacin (50.2%), netilmicin (45%), gentamicin (42.7%) and tobramycin (35.6%). In our study, we only found two strains of Acinetobacter baumannii with resistance to colistin and 70 (32.8%) strains sensitive only to colistin, but resistant to all other antibiotics tested. A. baumannii is a pathogen with rapid spread and extended resistance to even newer antimicrobial agents. Due to its ability to survive in the hospital environment, A. baumannii has the immense potential to cause nosocomial

  16. Tn7::In2-8 dispersion in multidrug resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Chile Dispersión de Tn7::In2-8 en aislamientos multirresistentes de Acinetobacter baumannii de Chile

    M. S. Ramírez; Bello, H.; G. González Rocha; C. Márquez; Centrón, D.

    2010-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is considered an important pathogen in our hospital environment having a well-known capacity to acquire different mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. Previous studies in our laboratory had exposed the high dispersion of class 2 integrons in this species. In the present study, we analyzed 7 multiresistant intI2 positive A. baumannii isolates, 6 of which were found to harbour the Tn7::In2-8 element. Our results demonstrate the unusually high distribution of Tn7::In2-8 a...

  17. Breath analysis for noninvasively differentiating Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia from its respiratory tract colonization of ventilated patients.

    Gao, Jianping; Zou, Yingchang; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Feng; Lang, Lang; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Ying, Kejing

    2016-01-01

    A number of multiresistant pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) place a heavy burden on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) patients in intensive care units (ICU). It is critically important to differentiate between bacterial infection and colonization to avoid prescribing unnecessary antibiotics. Quantitative culture of lower respiratory tract (LRT) specimens, however, requires invasive procedures. Nowadays, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been studied in vitro and in vivo to identify pathogen-derived biomarkers. Therefore, an exploratory pilot study was conceived for a proof of concept that the appearance and level of A. baumannii-derived metabolites might be correlated with the presence of the pathogen and its ecological niche (i.e. the infection and colonization states) in ICU ventilated patients. Twenty patients with A. baumannii VAP (infection group), 20 ventilated patients with LRT A. baumannii colonization (colonization group) and 20 ventilated patients with neurological disorders, but without pneumonia or A. baumannii colonization (control group) were enrolled in the in vivo pilot study. A clinical isolate of A. baumannii strains was used for the in vitro culture experiment. The adsorptive preconcentration (solid-phase microextraction fiber and Tenax(®) TA) and analysis technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were applied in the studies. Breath profiles could be visually differentiated between A. baumannii cultivation in vitro and culture medium, and among in vivo groups. In the in vitro experiment, nine compounds of interest (2,5-dimethyl-pyrazine, 1-undecene, isopentyl 3-methylbutanoate, decanal, 1,3-naphthalenediol, longifolene, tetradecane, iminodibenzyl and 3-methyl-indene) in the headspace were found to be possible A. baumannii derivations. While there were eight target VOCs (1-undecene, nonanal, decanal, 2,6,10-trimethyl-dodecane, 5-methyl-5-propyl-nonane, longifolene, tetradecane and 2-butyl-1-octanol

  18. Triclosan Can Select for an AdeIJK-Overexpressing Mutant of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 That Displays Reduced Susceptibility to Multiple Antibiotics

    Fernando, Dinesh M.; Xu, Wayne; Loewen, Peter C.; Zhanel, George G; Kumar, Ayush

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine if triclosan can select for mutants of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 that display reduced susceptibilities to antibiotics, we isolated a triclosan-resistant mutant, A. baumannii AB042, by serial passaging of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 in growth medium supplemented with triclosan. The antimicrobial susceptibility of AB042 was analyzed by the 2-fold serial dilution method. Expression of five different resistance-nodulation-division (RND) pump-encoding genes (adeB, adeG, ...

  19. Effect of colistin exposure and growth phase on the surface properties of live Acinetobacter baumannii cells examined by atomic force microscopy

    Soon, Rachel L; Nation, Roger L; Harper, Marina; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D.; Tan, Chun-Hong; Jian LI; Larson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The diminishing antimicrobial development pipeline has forced the revival of colistin as a last line of defence against infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ such as Acinetobacter baumannii. The complete loss of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediates colistin resistance in some A. baumannii strains. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the surface properties of colistin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains at mid-logarithmic and stationary growth phas...

  20. Synergistic Activity of Colistin and Rifampin Combination against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model

    Lee, Hee Ji; Bergen, Phillip J.; Bulitta, Jurgen B.; Tsuji, Brian; Forrest, Alan; Nation, Roger L; Jian LI

    2013-01-01

    Combination therapy may be required for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. This study systematically investigated bacterial killing and emergence of colistin resistance with colistin and rifampin combinations against MDR A. baumannii. Studies were conducted over 72 h in an in vitro pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model at inocula of ∼106 and ∼108 CFU/ml using two MDR clinical isolates of A. baumannii, FADDI-AB030 (colistin susceptible) and FADDI-AB156 (colistin resis...

  1. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.; Bordoni, R.; Imperi, F.; Bonnal, R.J.P.; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; De Bellis, G.; Visca, P.; Cassone, A.; Carattoli, A.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...... of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, with the aim of identifying novel genes related to virulence and drug resistance. A. baumannii ACICU has a single chromosome of 3,904,116 bp (which is predicted to contain 3,758 genes) and two plasmids, pACICUI and pACICU2, of 28,279 and 64...... than in ATCC 17978 and ADP1 (76.2, 57.2, and 62.5 transporters per Mb of genome, respectively). An antibiotic resistance island, AbaR2, was identified in ACICU and had plausibly evolved by reductive evolution from the AbaR1 island previously described in multiresistant strain A. baumannii AYE. Moreover...

  2. Potent in vitro antibacterial activity of DS-8587, a novel broad-spectrum quinolone, against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Higuchi, Saito; Onodera, Yoshikuni; Chiba, Megumi; Hoshino, Kazuki; Gotoh, Naomasa

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the in vitro activity of DS-8587, a novel fluoroquinolone, against Acinetobacter baumannii. The MICs of DS-8587 against clinical isolates and its inhibitory activity against target enzymes were superior to those of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity of DS-8587 was less affected by adeA/adeB/adeC or abeM efflux pumps than was that of ciprofloxacin and the frequency of single-step mutations with DS-8587 was lower than that with ciprofloxacin. DS-8587 might be an effective agent against A. baumannii infection. PMID:23380726

  3. Propolis as an antibacterial agent against clinical isolates of mdr-acinetobacter baumannii

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important health care problem. The organism is now identified as an important nosocomial pathogen particularly in the intensive care settings. The therapeutic options to treat this pathogen are limited; thus it needs testing for alternatives, like those of plant origin or natural products. Propolis is one of such products which have been tested against this organism. Methods: A. baumannii (n=32) were collected from Fatima Memorial Hospital, Lahore. The isolates were identified on the basis of their morphology, cultural characteristics and biochemical profile. The susceptibility of the isolates to various antimicrobials was evaluated as per Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method according to (CLSI 2010). An ethanolic extract of propolis was prepared by the ultrasonic extraction method and its antibacterial activity was evaluated by the agar well diffusion technique. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was also determined by the agar dilution technique. Results: The isolates were found to be resistant to most of the commonly used anti-acinetobacter antimicrobials; doxycycline however was the exception. Propolis from Sargodha (EPS) and Lahore (EPL) showed zones of inhibition of 21.8 ± .29 mm and 15.66 ± 2.18 mm respectively. MIC ranges of EPS and EPL similarly was from 1.5-2.0 mg/ml and 4.0-4.5 mg/ml respectively. Conclusion: It is clear that EPS has potential edge of activity as compared to EPL. Nevertheless the potential efficacy of propolis must be subjected to pharmaceutical kinetics and dynamics to precisely determine its potential antimicrobial usefulness. (author)

  4. Association of plasmid typing to biotyping and antibiotyping in the characterization of outbreaks by Acinetobacter baumannii

    Maria Cristina Bronharo Tognim

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available During an outbreak at an University Hospital, from April to September, in 1994, sixteen strains of Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated from patients and one strain from an enteral solution. We afterwards analyzed the outbreak by means of plasmid typing, antibiotic resistance typing and biotyping. Two main plasmid profiles were identified. Twelve strains belonged to biotype 2, and five to biotype 19. Susceptibility to amikacin and to carbenicillin allowed classification of the strains into two groups. The results show that association of those three typing methods allowed the differentiation of what was at first considered as a single outbreak into two apparently unrelated outbreaks.Durante um surto ocorrido de abril a setembro de 1994 em um Hospital Universitário, dezesseis cepas de Acinetobacter baumannii foram isoladas de pacientes e uma de solução enteral. Nós posteriormente analizamos as cepas isoladas durante o surto pelos seguintes métodos de tipagem : perfil de DNA plasmidial, perfil de antibiograma e biotipagem. Dois padrões de tipagem foram identificados pela análise do perfil plasmidial. Doze cepas foram caracterizadas como sendo do biotipo 2, e cinco do biotipo 19. O padrão de sensibilidade a amicacina e a carbenicilina possibilitou a classificação das cepas em dois grupos. Os resultados demonstraram que estes três métodos de tipagem associados possibilitaram a diferenciação do que primeiramente foi considerado como um único surto, em dois surtos aparentemente não relacionados.

  5. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents.

    Jennifer M Colquhoun

    Full Text Available Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s. Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in

  6. Wide Distribution of Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Burns Patients in Iran

    zahra eFarshadzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance in carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CNSAb is a major public health concern globally. This study determined the antibiotic resistance and molecular epidemiology of CNSAb isolates from a referral burn center in Tehran, Iran.Sixty-nine CNSAb isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the E-test methodology. Multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA, Multilocus sequence typing and multiplex PCR were performed. PCR assays tested for ambler classes A, B, and D β-lactamases. Detection of ISAba1, characterization of integrons, and biofilm formation were investigated.Fifty-three (77% isolates revealed XDR phenotypes. High prevalence of blaOXA-23-like (88% and blaPER-1 (54% were detected. ISAba1 was detected upstream of blaADC, blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA51-like genes in, 97, 42 and 26% of isolates, respectively. Thirty-one (45% isolates were assigned to International Clone (IC variants. MLVA identified 56 distinct types with 6 clusters and 53 singleton genotypes. Forty previously known MLST sequence types forming 5 clonal complexes were identified. The Class 1 integron (class 1 integrons gene was identified in 84% of the isolates. The most prevalent (33% cassette combination was aacA4-catB8-aadA1. The IC variants were predominant in the A. baumannii lineage with the ability to form strong biofilms.The XDR-CNSAb from burned patients

  7. Synergistic Effect of Oleanolic Acid on Aminoglycoside Antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Bora Shin

    Full Text Available Difficulties involved in treating drug-resistant pathogens have created a need for new therapies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using oleanolic acid (OA, a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, as a natural adjuvant for antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii. High concentrations of OA can kill cells, partly because it generates reactive oxygen species. Measurement of the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC for OA and time-kill experiments demonstrated that it only synergizes with aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin, kanamycin. Other classes of antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin, rifampicin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline have no interactions with OA. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that genes involved in ATP synthesis and cell membrane permeability, the gene encoding glycosyltransferase, peptidoglycan-related genes, phage-related genes, and DNA repair genes were upregulated under OA. OA highly induces the expression of adk, which encodes an adenylate kinase, and des6, which encodes a linoleoyl-CoA desaturase, and deletion of these genes increased FICs; these observations indicate that adk and des6 are involved in the synergism of OA with aminoglycosides. Data obtained using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, fluorescence-conjugated gentamicin, and membrane fatty acid analysis indicates that adk and des6 are involved in changes in membrane permeability. Proton-motive force and ATP synthesis tests show that those genes are also involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our data show that OA boosts aminoglycoside uptake by changing membrane permeability and energy metabolism in A. baumannii.

  8. Investigation of the molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients and environmental contamination.

    Ying, Chunmei; Li, Yongli; Wang, Yaping; Zheng, Bing; Yang, Chengde

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate correlations between Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from neurosurgical intensive care unit patients and its environment. This is a prospective, observational study. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents against 27 clinical and 28 environmental isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. Molecular genotyping was performed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The presence of carbapenemase and metallo-β-lactamase genes were analyzed by specific PCRs and DNA sequencing. From the clinical A. baumannii isolates, 25.9% were found resistant to minocycline, 51.9% to cefoperazone-sulbactam, 59.3% to imipenem and 70% resistant to other antimicrobial agents. Environmental isolates were more sensitive compared with clinical isolates (P<0.05). Twenty-seven clinical isolates comprised three ERIC-PCR genotypes, four major PFGE pulsotypes and five distinct MLST sequence types (STs) (ST208, ST368, ST191, ST195, ST540), all belonging to CC92 with only one locus (gpi) difference among them. Twenty-eight environmental isolates showed more diverse genetic types than clinical isolates and comprised six ERIC-PCR groups, nine PFGE groups and two main STs (ST208, ST229). Four clinical and 15 environmental isolates could not be identified by MLST and were assigned to non-clonal STs. We identified the presence of the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase encoding gene in most of the clinical (21/27) but fewer in the environmental isolates (3/28). The A. baumannii strains isolated from patients were genetically similar to the environmental strains, with CC92 members as the major fraction but with different antibiotic susceptibilities. PMID:25873322

  9. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in a mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii burn infection

    Dai, Tianhong; Tegos, George P.; Lu, Zongshun; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Huang, Liyi; Franklin, Michael J.; Baer, David G.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii infections represent a growing problem, especially in traumatic wounds and burns suffered by military personnel injured in Middle Eastern conflicts. Effective treatment using traditional antibiotics can be extremely difficult and new antimicrobial approaches are being investigated. One of these antimicrobial alternatives could be the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) and visible light known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). We report on the establishment of a new mouse model of full thickness thermal burns infected with a bioluminescent derivative of a clinical Iraqi isolate of A. baumannii and its PDT treatment by topical application of a PS produced by covalent conjugation chlorin(e6) to polyethylenimine followed by illumination of the burn surface with red light. Application of 108 A. baumannii cells to the surface of 10-second burns made on the dorsal surface of shaved female BALB/c mice led to chronic infections that lasted on average 22 days characterized by a remarkably stable bacterial bioluminescence. PDT carried out on day 0 soon after applying bacteria gave over three logs of loss of bacterial luminescence in a light exposure dependent manner, while PDT carried out on day 1 and day 2 gave approximately a 1.7-log reduction. Application of PS dissolved in 10% or 20% DMSO without light gave only modest reduction in bacterial luminescence from mouse burns. Some bacterial regrowth in the treated burn was observed but was generally modest. It was also found that PDT did not lead to inhibition of wound healing. The data suggest that PDT may be an effective new treatment for multi-drug resistant localized A. baumannii infections.

  10. Early detection of metallo-β-lactamase NDM-1- and OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Libyan hospitals.

    Mathlouthi, Najla; El Salabi, Allaaeddin Ali; Ben Jomàa-Jemili, Mariem; Bakour, Sofiane; Al-Bayssari, Charbel; Zorgani, Abdulaziz A; Kraiema, Abdulmajeed; Elahmer, Omar; Okdah, Liliane; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Chouchani, Chedly

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing various nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to characterise the molecular support of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates recovered from two Libyan hospitals. Bacterial isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion and Etest methods, and carbapenem resistance determinants were studied by PCR amplification and sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for typing of the isolates. All 36 imipenem-resistant isolates tested were identified as A. baumannii. The blaOXA-23 gene was detected in 29 strains (80.6%). The metallo-β-lactamase blaNDM-1 gene was detected in eight isolates (22.2%), showing dissemination of multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii in Tripoli Medical Center and Burn and Plastic Surgery Hospital in Libya, including one isolate that co-expressed the blaOXA-23 gene. MLST revealed several sequence types (STs). Imipenem-resistant A. baumannii ST2 was the predominant clone (16/36; 44.4%). This study shows that NDM-1 and OXA-23 contribute to antibiotic resistance in Libyan hospitals and represents the first incidence of the association of these two carbapenemases in an autochthonous MDR A. baumannii isolated from patients in Libya, indicating that there is a longstanding infection control problem in these hospitals. PMID:27216382

  11. Diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii in four French military hospitals, as assessed by multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis.

    Yolande Hauck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections by A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (ACB complex isolates represent a serious threat for wounded and burn patients. Three international multidrug-resistant (MDR clones (EU clone I-III are responsible for a large proportion of nosocomial infections with A. baumannii but other emerging strains with high epidemic potential also occur. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We automatized a Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR analysis (MLVA protocol and used it to investigate the genetic diversity of 136 ACB isolates from four military hospitals and one childrens hospital. Acinetobacter sp other than baumannii isolates represented 22.6% (31/137 with a majority being A. pittii. The genotyping protocol designed for A.baumannii was also efficient to cluster A. pittii isolates. Fifty-five percent of A. baumannii isolates belonged to the two international clones I and II, and we identified new clones which members were found in the different hospitals. Analysis of two CRISPR-cas systems helped define two clonal complexes and provided phylogenetic information to help trace back their emergence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The increasing occurrence of A. baumannii infections in the hospital calls for measures to rapidly characterize the isolates and identify emerging clones. The automatized MLVA protocol can be the instrument for such surveys. In addition, the investigation of CRISPR/cas systems may give important keys to understand the evolution of some highly successful clonal complexes.

  12. Nickel biosorption by Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from industrial wastewater Bioadsorção de niquel por Acinetobacter baumannii e Pseudomonas aeruginosa isoladas de águas residuais industriais

    Carlos E. Rodríguez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nickel biosorption ability was evaluated in two bacterial strains: Acinetobacter baumannii UCR-2971 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCR-2957, resulting in greatest adsorption at pH 4.5 and a residence time of 100 minutes. Biosorption isotherms showed that the process follows the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption rates (Nmax were 8.8 and 5.7 mg·g-1 for A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, respectively; however, affinity constants suggest that P. aeruginosa (K=1.28 has higher affinity for nickel than A. baumannii (K=0.68. It is suggested that both strains could be used for wastewater treatment, as long as the concentration of Ni2+ is within the range of mg·L-1.Foi avaliada a capacidade de adsorção do Ni2+ por duas bactérias, Acinetobacter baumannii e Pseudomonas aeruginosa, em pH 4.5 com tempo de contato de 100 minutos. Isotermas de adsorção foram calculadas com as duas linhagens. Observou-se que, para ambas, o processo de adsorção está de acordo com o modelo fisicoquímico de Langmuir. A captação máxima do Ni2+ (Nmax foi 5.7 e 8.8 mg Ni2+ g-1 para P. aeruginosa e A. baumannii, respectivamente. Não obstante, P. aeruginosa apresenta uma constante de afinidade (K=1.28 maior que A. baumannii (K=0.68. Estes resultados indicam que ambas as linhagens são adequadas para o tratamento de águas contaminadas, desde que a concentração de níquel seja da ordem de mg·L-1.

  13. Phenotypic and Molecular Epidemiology of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii Complex Strains Spread at Nemazee Hospital of Shiraz, Iran

    2015-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii (ACB) complex are Gram-negative opportunistic bacteria with low virulence properties. Their resistance to antibiotics has become a matter of concern in hospital infections. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of ACB isolates collected from the Nemazee hospital of Shiraz. In addition, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to determine the genetic patterns of these strains. Pa...

  14. Innate Immune Responses to Systemic Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in Mice: Neutrophils, but Not Interleukin-17, Mediate Host Resistance▿

    Breslow, Jessica M.; Meissler, Joseph J.; Hartzell, Rebecca R.; Spence, Phillip B.; Truant, Allan; Gaughan, John; Eisenstein, Toby K.

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen with a high prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant strains, causing pneumonia and sepsis. The current studies further develop a systemic mouse model of this infection and characterize selected innate immune responses to the organism. Five clinical isolates, with various degrees of antibiotic resistance, were assessed for virulence in two mouse strains, and between male and female mice, using intraperitoneal infection. A nearly 1,000-fold differe...

  15. Emergence of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Nursing Homes With High Background Rates of MRSA Colonization.

    Cheng, Vincent C C; Chen, Jonathan H K; Ng, W C; Wong, Janet Y H; Chow, Denise M K; Law, T C; So, Simon Y C; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, T C; Chan, Felix H W; Ho, P L; Yuen, K Y

    2016-08-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) with diverse multilocus sequence typing emerged among our nursing home residents (6.5%) with a high background rate of MRSA (32.2%). Rectal swabs yielded a higher rate of CRAB detection than axillary or nasal swabs. Bed-bound status, use of adult diapers, and nasogastric tube were risk factors for CRAB colonization. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:983-986. PMID:27108526

  16. Colistin Therapy in a 23-Week Gestational-Age Neonate with Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Pneumonia

    Mirjana Lulic-Botica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant pathogens are becoming more difficult to treat with significantly increasing infection rates. The lack of new antibiotics to combat these strains has led to the resurgence of older antibiotics. This case highlights the first reported use of colistimethate sodium treatment in a 23-week gestational-age neonate with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia who developed acute renal failure and seizures shortly after initiation of treatment.

  17. Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Aminoglycoside Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Strain BM4454

    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs in...

  18. Intra-pleural colistin methanesulfonate therapy for pleural infection caused by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a successful case report

    Muhammad Asim Rana; Basheer Abd El Rahaman; Ahmed Fouad Mady; Mohammed Al Odat; Abdurehman Al Harthy; Omar El Sayed Ramadan; Shehzad Ahmad Mumtaz; Omrani, Ali S

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria are an increasing clinical challenge, since the antimicrobial treatment options are often limited to colistin methanesulfonate. No data are available regarding the pharmacokinetics of colistin in pleural fluid. We report the case of a 92-year old man with ventilator-associated pneumonia and pleurisy caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli, which were both multidrug-resistant. After an unsuccessful treatment with ...

  19. Preliminary Study of Colistin versus Colistin plus Fosfomycin for Treatment of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    Sirijatuphat, Rujipas; Thamlikitkul, Visanu

    2014-01-01

    Ninety-four patients infected with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were randomized to receive colistin alone or colistin plus fosfomycin for 7 to 14 days. The patients who received combination therapy had a significantly more favorable microbiological response and a trend toward more favorable clinical outcomes and lower mortality than those who received colistin alone. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01297894.)

  20. In Vitro Responses of Acinetobacter baumannii to Two- and Three-Drug Combinations following Exposure to Colistin and Doripenem

    Oleksiuk, Louise M.; Nguyen, M. Hong; Press, Ellen G.; Updike, Cassaundra L.; O'Hara, Jessica A.; Doi, Yohei; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Shields, Ryan K.

    2014-01-01

    We compared in vitro killing of colistin, doripenem, and sulbactam by time-kill methods against Acinetobacter baumannii isolates collected from patients before and after colistin-doripenem treatment (initial and recurrent isolates, respectively). Colistin-doripenem bactericidal activity against recurrent isolates was attenuated (mean log10 kill, −5.74 versus −2.88; P = 0.01) but was restored by adding sulbactam. Doripenem MICs rather than colistin MICs correlated with the activity of colistin...

  1. Activity of Colistin against Heteroresistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Emergence of Resistance in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model▿

    Tan, Chun-Hong; Jian LI; Nation, Roger L

    2007-01-01

    Three clinically relevant intermittent regimens, and a continuous infusion, of colistin were simulated in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model against two colistin-heteroresistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Extensive initial killing was followed by regrowth as early as 6 h later; bacterial density in the 24- to 72-h period was within 1 log10 CFU/ml of growth control. Population analysis profiles revealed extensive emergence of resistant subpopulations regardless of the c...

  2. In Vitro Synergy of Colistin Combinations against Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates

    Vidaillac, Céline; Benichou, Lothaire; Duval, Raphaël E.

    2012-01-01

    Colistin resistance, although uncommon, is increasingly being reported among Gram-negative clinical pathogens, and an understanding of its impact on the activity of antimicrobials is now evolving. We evaluated the potential for synergy of colistin plus trimethoprim, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (1/19 ratio), or vancomycin against 12 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 4), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 4), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 4). The strains included six multidrug-resistant clin...

  3. The Study of Inhibition Effects Satureja khuzestaniea Essence against Gene Expression bap Acinetobacter baumannii with Real time PCR Technique

    Abbas Bahador; Hossein Saghii; Ramezal Ataee; Davoud Esmaeili

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Acinetobacter baumannii a major hospital pathogens and causes outbreaks of infections and associated to nosocomial infections, including bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis, urinary tract infection, and wound infections. Satureja khuzestaniea province the group Nnayyan and Carvacrol and thymol are antimicrobial activity of this plant. Biofilm-related genes (bap)-specific proteins on the cell surface generate a direct role in biofilm formation and infection of the bacteria is...

  4. Prevalence of multi drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the clinical samples from Tertiary Care Hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan

    Begum, Shahzeera; Hasan, Fariha; Hussain, Shagufta; Ali Shah, Aamer

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Acinetobacter baumannii can cause a wide range of infections, including bacteremia, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, peritonitis, etc. This organism is becoming resistant to a large group of antibiotics, especially β-lactam antibiotics. The reason for multi-drug resistance may be the production of extended- spectrum β-lactamses (ESBLs), carbapenemases/metallo β-lactamases or AmpC β-lactamases. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of multi-dr...

  5. The Response Regulator BfmR Is a Potential Drug Target for Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Russo, Thomas A; Manohar, Akshay; Beanan, Janet M; Olson, Ruth; MacDonald, Ulrike; Graham, Jessica; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Identification and validation is the first phase of target-based antimicrobial development. BfmR (RstA), a response regulator in a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) in Acinetobacter baumannii, is an intriguing potential antimicrobial target. A unique characteristic of BfmR is that its inhibition would have the dual benefit of significantly decreasing in vivo survival and increasing sensitivity to selected antimicrobials. Studies on the clinically relevant strain AB307-0294 have shown BfmR to be essential in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype in strains AB307-0294 and AB908 is mediated, in part, by enabling growth in human ascites fluid and serum. Further, BfmR conferred resistance to complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was independent of capsular polysaccharide. Importantly, BfmR also increased resistance to the clinically important antimicrobials meropenem and colistin. BfmR was highly conserved among A. baumannii strains. The crystal structure of the receiver domain of BfmR was determined, lending insight into putative ligand binding sites. This enabled an in silico ligand binding analysis and a blind docking strategy to assess use as a potential druggable target. Predicted binding hot spots exist at the homodimer interface and the phosphorylation site. These data support pursuing the next step in the development process, which includes determining the degree of inhibition needed to impact growth/survival and the development a BfmR activity assay amenable to high-throughput screening for the identification of inhibitors. Such agents would represent a new class of antimicrobials active against A. baumannii which could be active against other Gram-negative bacilli that possess a TCS with shared homology. IMPORTANCE Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacilli, has significantly affected the ability of physicians to treat infections, with resultant increased morbidity, mortality, and health

  6. Draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant blaOXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii ST208 isolate from China.

    Chen, Yan; Wu, Liyan; Chen, Yu; Xu, Zhijun; Xu, Liqun

    2016-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged worldwide as an important opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and has become a major public health concern. In this study, the draft genome sequence of A. baumannii TCM331 (ST208/CC92), a multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolate harbouring the blaOXA-23 gene isolated in China, was determined. The genome of TCM331 was sequenced via Illumina HiSeq™ 2000, and bioinformatics analysis was performed. Important antimicrobial resistance determinants were observed in an estimated genome size of 4,058,691bp with 3838 predicted coding regions. In conclusion, these data might facilitate further understanding of the specific genomic features of MDR A. baumannii in China. PMID:27436391

  7. Clinical validation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization.

    Blanco-Lobo, P; González-Galán, V; García-Quintanilla, M; Valencia, R; Cazalla, A; Martín, C; Alonso, I; Pérez-Romero, P; Cisneros, J M; Aznar, J; McConnell, M J

    2016-09-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approaches have not been assessed in terms of their ability to detect patients colonized by Acinetobacter baumannii during active surveillance. This prospective, double-blind study demonstrated that a real-time PCR assay had high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (91.2%) compared with conventional culture for detecting A. baumannii in 397 active surveillance samples, and provided results within 3h. Receiver-operator curve analyses demonstrated that the technique has diagnostic accuracy of 97.7% (95% confidence interval 96.0-99.3%). This method could facilitate the rapid implementation of infection control measures for preventing the transmission of A. baumannii. PMID:27206968

  8. INHIBITION OF Acinetobacter baumannii ADHESION BY ANTI-FIMBRIAL ANTIBODY: THE FIMBRIAL ANTIGEN EFFECTIVENESS

    Hadeel K. Musafer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collecting samples of Acinetobacter baumannii taken from different clinical cases of wounds, septicemia, and urinary tract infections. That was accomplished by taking (296 samples from Baghdad educational hospital and Ibn-al-Baladi hospital. Samples were cultured on solid media (McConkey and blood agars, and according to microscopical, cultural, and biochemical identification, in addition to using API 20-E system, (21 isolates of A. baumannii were identified and in percentage of 47.619, 9.523, 14.285, and 28.571 for wound, blood, sputum, and urine samples, respectively. Methods: detection of fimbriated bacterial isolates among 21 isolates, and all those isolated were fimbriae forming isolates; isolate number (9 was selected as an effective isolate in formation of fimbriae. Non-forming fimbriae isolate of Shigella flexneri is used as negative control. Results and Conclusion: the average of adherence of fimbriated bacterial cell with human epithelial cells was reached (50 adherent bacterial cell per epithelial cell compared with the average of adherence of control isolate (12 adherent bacterial cell per epithelial cell, the inhibition processes are performed: Inhibition of bacterial adherence by specific antibodies of fimbriae antigen showed inhibition effect of adherence in respect to fimbriated isolate A. baumannii 9 also the subminimum inhibitory concentration for four antibiotics (Gentamicin, Tobramycin, Cefepime, and Amikacin inhibit the adherence of fimbriated isolate. The isolates (used in the study have the ability to agglutinate Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human red blood corpuscles (RBCs. The study of effect of different fimbriae extract concentrations (25, 50, 100 μg/ml on immune cells; consequently, reached to the following results: Concentrations of (25, 50, 100 μg/ml showed a negative effect on lymphocyte and PMNs viability which increased significantly (P≤0.05 with increasing of fimbriae extract concentration. On the other hand

  9. Surveillance of multidrug resistance-associated genes in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients

    Zhe DONG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the status of multidrug resistance-associated genes carried by Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients in our hospital in order to provide a basis for surveillance of drug-resistance and inflection control. Methods One hundred and twenty A. baumannii isolates were collected from elderly patients between 2008 and 2010. The mean age of the patients was 85 (65 to 95 years. Whonet 5.6 software was used to analyze the resistance rate of 16 antimicrobial agents. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and the sequencing method were adopted to detect 10 kinds of resistance genes (blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA- 23-like, blaOXA-24-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1, intI 1, and intI 2. The corresponding resistance gene profiling(RGP was analyzed and designated according to the status of resistance genes. Results The resistance rates to the remaining 15 kinds of antibiotics varied between 70.8% and 97.5%, with the exception of the sensitivity rate to polymyxin B by up to more than 90%. The positivity rates of blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1 and intI 1 were 100%, 81.7%, 0.8%, 10.8%, 91.7%, 81.7%, 86.7%, and 83.3% respectively. A total of 18 kinds of drug-resistant gene maps were found, but blaOXA-24-like and intI 2 were not detected. Among these gene maps, the rate of RGP1 (blaOXA-23-like+blaampC+armA+ISAba1+ intI 1 was as high as 60.8%. Conclusions A. baumannii isolates from elderly patients have a higher carrying rate of drug-resistant genes, resulting in severe multidrugresistant conditions. Therefore, full-time infection control personnel and clinical physicians should actively participate in the surveillance, prevention, and control of infections caused by A. baumannii in the elderly.

  10. Pyocyanin stimulates quorum sensing-mediated tolerance to oxidative stress and increases persister cell populations in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Bhargava, Nidhi; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena

    2014-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are nosocomial pathogens with overlapping sites of infection. This work reports that the two can coexist stably in mixed-culture biofilms. In a study intended to improve our understanding of the mechanism of their coexistence, it was found that pyocyanin, produced by P. aeruginosa that generally eliminates competition from other pathogens, led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. baumannii cells, which in response showed a significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in production of enzymes, specifically, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). This work shows for the first time that the expression of catalase and SOD is under the control of a quorum-sensing system in A. baumannii. In support of this observation, a quorum-sensing mutant of A. baumannii (abaI::Km) was found to be sensitive to pyocyanin compared to its wild type and showed significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower levels of the antioxidant enzymes, which increased on addition of 5 μM N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. Likewise, in wild-type A. baumannii, there was a significant (P quencher of quorum sensing. In the presence of amikacin and carbenicillin, A. baumannii formed 0.07 and 0.02% persister cells, which increased 4- and 3-fold, respectively, in the presence of pyocyanin. These findings show that pyocyanin induces a protective mechanism in A. baumannii against oxidative stress and also increases its persistence against antibiotics which could be of clinical significance in the case of coinfections with A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. PMID:24891106

  11. [Candida peritonitis and sepsis due to Acinetobacter baumannii in peritoneal dialysis: an association with prognosis not always unfavourable].

    Rapisarda, Francesco; Aliotta, Roberta; Pocorobba, Barbara; Portale, Grazia; Ferrario, Silvia; Zanoli, Luca; Fatuzzo, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections have a high incidence in patients receiving peritoneal dialysis. (1)
Peritoneal dialysis is often complicated by peritonitis which has only minimally mycotic etiology, but nonetheless it is associated with 15-45% mortality (8).
 The opportunistic pathogens such as Candida can cause infection in immunocompromised conditions. Even the Acinetobacter tends to infect immunocompromised individuals and it has the same risk factors for infection as Candida: immunosuppression, malignancy, HIV positivity and all the other conditions of immunosuppression, central venous catheterization, mechanical ventilation and prolonged antibiotic therapy. The sepsis by Acinetobacter predicts a negative prognosis with the mortality rate between 20 to 60% (12), especially in cases of isolation of multi-resistant germs.
 We present a case report of a CKD patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis therapy who was hospitalized for acute pancreatitis, later complicated by the development of pancreatic pseudocysts, C. albicans peritonitis with hematologic spread of the fungus, superimposed Acinetobacter baumannii sepsis and pneumonia. She has been subjected to percutaneous drainage of pseudocysts, to switch from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis, to various evacuative thoracentesis, and to polymicrobial therapy (meropenem, teicoplanina, tigeciclina, linezolid, colimicina, fluconazolo, etc.) that allowed the resolution of sepsis. The peculiarity of this case is represented by the numerous morbidity that the patient developed simultaneously, with the genesis of a complex clinical picture, by the combination of infections due to Candida albicans and Acinetobacter baumannii. Successful treatment strategies allowed to fight and cure a medical condition associated with a high mortality rate. PMID:26845211

  12. Antibacterial Effects of Origanum vulgare Essence Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated From Selected Hospitals of Tehran, Iran

    Saghi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Infection due to Acinetobacter baumannii has become a significant challenge to modern healthcare systems. The rapid emergence and global dissemination of A. baumannii as a major nosocomial pathogen is remarkable and it demonstrates its successful adaptation to the 21st century hospital environment. Recent studies have discussed about essential oil of Origanum vulgare against a range of bacteria, including various species of Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Escherichia coli. Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects O. vulgare essence against multidrug-resistant (MDR strains of A. baumannii from selected hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods This oil was obtained using the hydrodistillation method and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrography (GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity against MDR isolates was achieved using disc diffusion method and macro-broth dilution assay. Results Analysis of the essential oil revealed the presence of pulegone (68.59% piperitone (7.8%, piperitenone (7.8%, 1, 8-cineole (1.3%, and carvacrol (1.6% as the major components. The results showed a significant activity against MDR A. baumannii with inhibition zones and minimal inhibitory concentration values in the ranges of 7-15 mm and 20-35 µL/mL respectively. Conclusions This investigation showed that the essence oil of O. vulgare had a potent antimicrobial activity against MDR A. baumannii. Further research is required to evaluate the practical values of therapeutic applications.

  13. Antibiotic resistance and OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn wards.

    Gao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaonan; Bao, Ying; Ma, Ruihua; Zhou, Yufa; Li, Xinxian; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2014-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate drug resistance, OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and genetic diversity in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) in burn wards. Airborne A. baumannii were collected in burn wards and their corridors using Andersen 6-stage air sampler from January to June 2011. The isolates susceptibility to 13 commonly used antibiotics was examined according to the CLSI guidelines; OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and molecular diversity of isolates were analyzed, respectively. A total of 16 non-repetitive A. baumannii were isolated, with 10 strains having a resistance rate of greater than 50% against the 13 antibiotics. The resistance rate against ceftriaxone, cyclophosvnamide, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem was 93.75% (15/16), but no isolate observed to be resistant to cefoperazone/sulbactam. Resistance gene analyses showed that all 16 isolates carried OXA-51, and 15 isolates carried OXA-23 except No.15; but OXA-24 and OXA-58 resistance genes not detected. The isolates were classified into 13 genotypes (A-M) according to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (REP-PCR) results and only six isolates had a homology ≥90%. In conclusion, airborne A. baumannii in the burn wards had multidrug resistance and complex molecular diversity, and OXA-23 and OXA-51 were dominant mechanisms for resisting carbapenems. PMID:23886986

  14. Multidrug Resistance Related to Biofilm Formation in Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains from Different Pulsotypes.

    de Campos, Paola Amaral; Royer, Sabrina; da Fonseca Batistão, Deivid William; Araújo, Bruna Fuga; Queiroz, Lícia Ludendorff; de Brito, Cristiane Silveira; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo P; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in the hospital environment has been associated with the presence of multiple genetic elements, virulence factors and the ability to form biofilms. This study evaluated the biofilm formation ability of clinical and environmental A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from various sources and presenting different molecular characteristics, resistance profiles and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. Fifty-three isolates were recovered from 2009 to 2014 in a Brazilian university hospital. Investigation of biofilm formation was performed for 10 strains of each species assessed by an initial adhesion assay, biofilm cell concentration and biofilm biomass, evaluated by quantitative assays in replicates, in three independent experiments. All strains of A. baumannii were able to attach to polystyrene plates, although two strains adhered to a lesser degree than the control. K. pneumoniae strains showed opposite behaviour, where only three strains adhered significantly when compared to the control. Quantitative evaluation revealed that in five A. baumannii and four K. pneumoniae isolates the biomass production could be characterised as moderate. None of the isolates were strong biofilm producers. Our results demonstrate: (1) biofilm formation is a heterogeneous property amongst A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae clinical strains and it was not associated with certain clonal types; (2) no relationship between multidrug resistance and biofilm production was observed; (3) more virulent K. pneumoniae strains tended to present higher production of biofilm. PMID:26846651

  15. Evaluation of adherence, hemagglutination, and presence of genes codifying for virulence factors of Acinetobacter baumannii causing urinary tract infection

    Graziela Braun

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a strictly aerobic bacterium which causes severe infections, however its pathogenic characteristics are not well defined. Thirteen A. baumannii strains isolated from urine of hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients with different ages were investigated for the presence of virulence factors. The isolates belonged to biotypes 2, 6, and 9 and were sensitive to imipenem. The majority of them showed resistance to amikacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, norfloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. None of A. baumannii strains presented genes codifying for 17 different virulence factors previously described in uropathogenic Escherichia coli, when tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Nine isolates agglutinated human group AB erythrocytes, in presence of mannose, but none of them agglutinated group O erythrocytes. Adherence to polystyrene was observed in 7 isolates, and this result did not correlate with that obtained in hemagglutination assay. All the isolates were able to grow in iron-limiting conditions, showing that A. baumannii produces some type of siderophore. However, the genes iutA and fyuA, from iron uptake system of E. coli and Yersinia sp., respectively, were not present in the isolates, suggesting the presence of a different type of siderophore. The fimbriae of A. baumannii strains that mediates the adherence are possibly mannose-resistant, eventhough the mechanism of adherence to human epithelial cells still remains to be elucidated.

  16. Relationship between Antibiotic Resistance, Biofilm Formation, and Biofilm-Specific Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Qi, Lihua; Li, Hao; Zhang, Chuanfu; Liang, Beibei; Li, Jie; Wang, Ligui; Du, Xinying; Liu, Xuelin; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to examine the relationships between antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and biofilm-specific resistance in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii. The tested 272 isolates were collected from several hospitals in China during 2010-2013. Biofilm-forming capacities were evaluated using the crystal violet staining method. Antibiotic resistance/susceptibility profiles to 21 antibiotics were assessed using VITEK 2 system, broth microdilution method or the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) to cefotaxime, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin were evaluated using micro dilution assays. Genetic relatedness of the isolates was also analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and plasmid profile. Among all the 272 isolates, 31 were multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 166 were extensively drug-resistant (XDR). PFGE typing revealed 167 pattern types and 103 clusters with a similarity of 80%. MDR and XDR isolates built up the main prevalent genotypes. Most of the non-MDR isolates were distributed in a scattered pattern. Additionally, 249 isolates exhibited biofilm formation, among which 63 were stronger biofilm formers than type strain ATCC19606. Population that exhibited more robust biofilm formation likely contained larger proportion of non-MDR isolates. Isolates with higher level of resistance tended to form weaker biofilms. The MBECs for cefotaxime, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin showed a positive correlation with corresponding MICs, while the enhancement in resistance occurred independent of the quantity of biofilm biomass produced. Results from this study imply that biofilm acts as a mechanism for bacteria to get a better survival, especially in isolates with resistance level not high enough. Moreover, even though biofilms formed by isolates with high level of resistance are always weak, they could still provide similar level of protection for the

  17. Strategies for the treatment of polymyxin B-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    Menegucci, Thatiany Cevallos; Albiero, James; Migliorini, Letícia Busato; Alves, Janio Leal Borges; Viana, Giselle Fukita; Mazucheli, Josmar; Carrara-Marroni, Floristher Elaine; Cardoso, Celso Luiz; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the activity of meropenem (MEM), fosfomycin (FOF) and polymyxin B (PMB), alone and in combination, was analysed. In addition, optimisation of the pharmacodynamic index of MEM and FOF against six isolates of OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii (including three resistant to PMB) that were not clonally related was assessed. Antimicrobial combinations were evaluated by chequerboard analysis and were considered synergistic when the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was ≤0.5. Pharmacodynamic analyses of the MEM and FOF dosing schemes were performed by Monte Carlo simulation. The target pharmacodynamic index (%ƒT>MIC) for MEM and FOF was ≥40% and ≥70%, respectively, and a probability of target attainment (PTA) ≥0.9 was considered adequate. Among the PMB-resistant isolates, combinations of PMB+MEM and PMB+FOF+MEM showed the highest synergistic activity (FICI ≤0.125); isolates that were previously PMB-resistant were included in the susceptible category using CLSI interpretive criteria. Pharmacodynamic evaluation found that for a FOF minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≤16μg/mL, treatment both by bolus dosing and prolonged infusion achieved adequate PTA, whilst for MIC=32μg/mL only infusion achieved adequate PTA. For a MEM MIC of 4μg/mL, only the bolus treatment scheme with 1.5g q6h and the infusion schemes with 1.0g q8h, 1.5g q6h and 2.0g q8h achieved PTA ≥0.9. Results of antimicrobial and pharmacodynamic analyses can assist in treating infections caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. However, in vivo clinical studies are essential to evaluate the true role of these compounds, including intravenous antimicrobial FOF therapy. PMID:27068675

  18. Resistance Markers and Genetic Diversity in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Recovered from Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections

    Hanoch S. I. Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to detect metallo-β-lactamases, cephalosporinases and oxacillinases and to assess genetic diversity among 64 multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains recovered from blood cultures in five different hospitals in Brazil from December 2008 to June 2009. High rates of resistance to imipenem (93.75% and polymyxin B (39.06% were observed using the disk diffusion (DD method and by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Using the disk approximation method, thirty-nine strains (60.9% were phenotypically positive for class D enzymes, and 51 strains (79.6% were positive for cephalosporinase (AmpC. Using the E-test, 60 strains (93.75% were positive for metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs. All strains were positive for at least one of the 10 studied genes; 59 (92.1% contained blaVIM-1, 79.6% contained blaAmpC, 93.7% contained blaOXA23 and 84.3% contained blaOXA51. Enterobacteria Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR analysis revealed a predominance of certain clones that differed from each other. However, the same band pattern was observed in samples from the different hospitals studied, demonstrating correlation between the genotypic and phenotypic results. Thus, ERIC-PCR is an appropriate method for rapidly clustering genetically related isolates. These results suggest that defined clonal clusters are circulating within the studied hospitals. These results also show that the prevalence of MDR A. baumannii may vary among clones disseminated in specific hospitals, and they emphasize the importance of adhering to appropriate infection control measures.

  19. High prevalence of extensively drug-resistant and metallo beta-lactamase-producing clinical Acinetobacter baumannii in Iran.

    Maspi, Hossein; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Amin, Mohsen; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2016-09-01

    Acinetobacter species particularly Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) have been widely reported as broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant pathogens. Expression of various types of metallo beta-lactamases (MBL), classified as Ambler class B, has been associated with carbapenem resistance. Here, we attempted to assess the frequency of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and MBL-producing A. baumannii among clinical isolates. 86 clinical A. baumannii strains were collected from 2014 to 2015 and their susceptibility to meropenem (10 μg), imipenem (10 μg), azteronem (30 μg), pipracillin (100 μg) tazobactam (110 μg), tobramycin (10 μg), fosfomycin (200 μg), rifampicin (5 μg), colistin (10 μg), tigecycline (15 μg), sulbactam/ampicillin (10 μg + 10 μg) and polymixin B (300 U) was evaluated using disk diffusion method. The MBL-producing isolates were screened using combined disc diffusion method. Furthermore, the presence of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaSPM, blaGIM, blaSIM and blaNDM was detected by PCR. 34.9% of isolates were recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). 81 (94.2%) and 62 (71.2%) isolates were multidrug resistance (MDR) and XDR, respectively. 44 (51.2%) and 65 (75.6%) isolates were MBL-producing strains with resistance to imipenem and meropenem, respectively. 2 (2.3%), 13 (15.1%), 2 (2.3%), 4 (4.7%) and 2 (2.3%) isolates carried blaVIM, blaIMP, blaSPM, blaGIM and blaSIM genes, respectively. Our data showed that the rate of XDR and MBL A. baumannii is on the rise. PMID:27448835

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    Goel Vikas

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses four new outer membrane proteins,with molecular weight ranging from 77 kDa to 88 kDa, that are called Iron Regulated Outer Membrane Proteins (IROMPs. We studied the functional and immunological properties of IROMPs expressed by A.baumanii ATCC 19606.The bands corresponding to IROMPs were eluted from SDS-PAGE and were used to immunize BALB/c mice for the production of monoclonal antibodies. Hybridomas secreting specific antibodies against these IROMPs were selected after screening by ELISA and their reactivity was confirmed by Western Blot. The antibodies then generated belonged to IgM isotype and showed bactericidical and opsonising activities against A.baumanii in vitro.These antibodies also blocked siderophore mediated iron uptake via IROMPs in bacteria. Conclusion This proves that iron uptake via IROMPs,which is mediated through siderophores,may have an important role in the survival of A.baumanii inside the host,and helps establishing the infection.

  1. The effect of silver or gallium doped titanium against the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Cochis, A; Azzimonti, B; Della Valle, C; De Giglio, E; Bloise, N; Visai, L; Cometa, S; Rimondini, L; Chiesa, R

    2016-02-01

    Implant-related infection of biomaterials is one of the main causes of arthroplasty and osteosynthesis failure. Bacteria, such as the rapidly-emerging Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) pathogen Acinetobacter Baumannii, initiate the infection by adhering to biomaterials and forming a biofilm. Since the implant surface plays a crucial role in early bacterial adhesion phases, titanium was electrochemically modified by an Anodic Spark Deposition (ASD) treatment, developed previously and thought to provide osseo-integrative properties. In this study, the treatment was modified to insert gallium or silver onto the titanium surface, to provide antibacterial properties. The material was characterized morphologically, chemically, and mechanically; biological properties were investigated by direct cytocompatibility assay, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) activity, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Immunofluorescent (IF) analysis; antibacterial activity was determined by counting Colony Forming Units, and viability assay. The various ASD-treated surfaces showed similar morphology, micrometric pore size, and uniform pore distribution. Of the treatments studied, gallium-doped specimens showed the best ALP synthesis and antibacterial properties. This study demonstrates the possibility of successfully doping the surface of titanium with gallium or silver, using the ASD technique; this approach can provide antibacterial properties and maintain high osseo-integrative potential. PMID:26708086

  2. Higher isolation of NDM-1 producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the sewage of the hospitals in Beijing.

    Chuanfu Zhang

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistant microbes present in the environment are a potential public health risk. In this study, we investigate the presence of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1 producing bacteria in the 99 water samples in Beijing City, including river water, treated drinking water, raw water samples from the pools and sewage from 4 comprehensive hospitals. For the bla NDM-1 positive isolate, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was further analyzed, and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE was performed to determine the genetic relationship among the NDM-1 producing isolates from sewage and human, as well as the clinical strains without NDM-1. The results indicate that there was a higher isolation of NDM-1 producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the sewage of the hospitals, while no NDM-1 producing isolates were recovered from samples obtained from the river, drinking, or fishpond water. Surprisingly, these isolates were markedly different from the clinical isolates in drug resistance and pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting different evolutionary relationships. Our results showed that the hospital sewage may be one of the diffusion reservoirs of NDM-1 producing bacteria.

  3. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii acquired before liver transplantation: Impact on recipient outcomes.

    Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Pierrotti, Ligia Câmera; Oshiro, Isabel Cristina Villela Soares; Bonazzi, Patrícia Rodrigues; Oliveira, Larissa Marques de; Machado, Anna Silva; Van Der Heijden, Inneke Marie; Rossi, Flavia; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2016-05-01

    Infection with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) after liver transplantation (LT) is associated with high mortality. This study aimed to identify risk factors for post-LT CRAB infection, as well as to evaluate the impact of pre-LT CRAB acquisition on the incidence of post-LT CRAB infection. This was a prospective cohort study of all patients undergoing LT at our facility between October 2009 and October 2011. Surveillance cultures (SCs) were collected immediately before LT and weekly thereafter, until discharge. We analyzed 196 patients who were submitted to 222 LTs. CRAB was identified in 105 (53.6%); 24 (22.9%) of these patients were found to have acquired CRAB before LT, and 85 (81.0%) tested positive on SCs. Post-LT CRAB infection occurred in 56 (28.6%), the most common site being the surgical wound. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors for developing CRAB infection were prolonged cold ischemia, post-LT dialysis, LT due to fulminant hepatitis, and pre-LT CRAB acquisition with pre-LT CRAB acquisition showing a considerable trend toward significance (P = 0.06). Among the recipients with CRAB infection, 60-day mortality was 46.4%, significantly higher than among those without (P recipient survival. Liver Transplantation 22 615-626 2016 AASLD. PMID:26684547

  4. Combination therapy with polymyxin B and netropsin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Chung, Joon-Hui; Bhat, Abhayprasad; Kim, Chang-Jin; Yong, Dongeun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are last-resort antibiotics for treating infections of Gram-negative bacteria. The recent emergence of polymyxin-resistant bacteria, however, urgently demands clinical optimisation of polymyxin use to minimise further evolution of resistance. In this study we developed a novel combination therapy using minimal concentrations of polymyxin B. After large-scale screening of Streptomyces secondary metabolites, we identified a reliable polymixin synergist and confirmed as netropsin using high-pressure liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry followed by in vitro assays using various Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of combining polymixin B and netropsin in vivo, we performed survival analysis on greater wax moth Galleria mellonella infected with colistin-resistant clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates as well as Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Salmonella typhimuruim, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The survival of infected G. mellonella was significantly higher when treated with polymyxin B and netropsin in combination than when treated with polymyxin B or netropsin alone. We propose a netropsin combination therapy that minimises the use of polymyxin B when treating infections with multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27306928

  5. [Extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) production in Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from Chilean hospitals belonging to VIII Region].

    Pino I, Carolina; Domínguez Y, Mariana; González R, Gerardo; Bello T, Helia; Sepúlveda A, Marcela; Mella M, Sergio; Zemelman M, Claudia; Zemelman Z, Raúl

    2007-04-01

    The resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to ss-lactam antibiotics is mainly due to the synthesis of ss-lactamases. From a clinical point of view, this bacteria and others, grouped under the acronym SPACE (S: Serratia, P: Pseudomonas, A: Acinetobacter, C: Citrobacter, E: Enterobacter) are essentially Amp-C ss-lactamases producers. There is no local information about ESBL presence in Acinetobacter. We studied ESBL production using the Ho and col. technique modified by adding cloxacillin as chromosomal ss-lactamases inhibitor. From 69 isolates, with resistance to at least one third generation cephalosporin, only 7 showed positive synergy test. Four of these amplified for TEM family gene, and one of these amplified also for the OXA family. Our study found a low ESBL production percentage, which agrees with the premise of Amp-C as the main mechanism of resistance to ss-lactam antibiotics in A. baumannii. However, the ESBL description in these bacteria emphasizes the capacity of expressing multiple resistance mechanisms. PMID:17453072

  6. Association of biofilm production with multidrug resistance among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from intensive care unit

    Jeetendra Gurung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Given choice, bacteria prefer a community-based, surface-bound colony to an individual existence. The inclination for bacteria to become surface bound is so ubiquitous in diverse ecosystems that it suggests a strong survival strategy and selective advantage for surface dwellers over their free-ranging counterparts. Virtually any surface, biotic or abiotic (animal, mineral, or vegetable is suitable for bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Thus, a biofilm is "a functional consortium of microorganisms organized within an extensive exopolymeric matrix." Materials and Methods: The present study was undertaken to detect biofilm production from the repertoire stocks of Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa obtained from clinical specimens. The tube method was performed to qualitatively detect biofilm production. Results: A total of 109 isolates of both organisms were included in the study, out of which 42% (46/109 isolates showed biofilm detection. Among the biofilm producers, 57% of P. aeruginosa and 73% of A. baumannii showed multidrug resistance (MDR pattern which was statistically significant in comparison to nonbiofilm producers (P < 0.001. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the only study to have tested the biofilm production in both P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii in a single study. Biofilm production and MDR pattern were found to be significantly higher in A. baumannii than P. aeruginosa. Antibiotic resistance was significantly higher among biofilm producing P. aeruginosa than non producers. Similarly, antibiotic resistance was significantly higher among biofilm producing A. baumannii than non producers.

  7. Antibiotic Resistance and the Frequency of Extended-Spectrum B-Lactamase in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Clinical Samples through Phenotypic Methods

    Somayeh Vafaei; Reza Mirnejad; Nour Amirmozafari; Abbasali Imani Fooladi; Faramarz Masjedian

    2013-01-01

    AbstractBackground and objectives: Nowadays Acinetobacter baumannii is as one of the problematic opportunistic pathogens, especially in intensive care because of the incidence of drug-resistant strains in the world. The purpose of current study was to define the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and detect the prevalence of producing strains of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) in A. baumannii isolates which had been isolated from clinical samples with combined disk test.Materials and met...

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of the Morphology and Topography of Colistin-Heteroresistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains as a Function of Growth Phase and in Response to Colistin Treatment▿

    Soon, Rachel L; Nation, Roger L; Hartley, Patrick G.; Larson, Ian; Jian LI

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative Acinetobacter baumannii strains and the lack of novel antibiotics under development are posing a global dilemma, forcing a resurgence of the last-line antibiotic colistin. Our aim was to use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the morphology and topography of paired colistin-susceptible and -resistant cells from colistin-heteroresistant A. baumannii strains as a function of bacterial growth phase and colistin ex...

  9. Activity of Cecropin A-Melittin Hybrid Peptides against Colistin-Resistant Clinical Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii: Molecular Basis for the Differential Mechanisms of Action

    Saugar, José María; Rodríguez-Hernández, María Jesús; de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Pachón-Ibañez, María Eugenia; Fernández-Reyes, María; Andreu, David; Pachón, Jerónimo; Rivas, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has successfully developed resistance against all common antibiotics, including colistin (polymyxin E), the last universally active drug against this pathogen. The possible widespread distribution of colistin-resistant A. baumannii strains may create an alarming clinical situation. In a previous work, we reported differences in lethal mechanisms between polymyxin B (PXB) and the cecropin A-melittin (CA-M) hybrid peptide CA(1-8)M(1-18) (KWKLFKKIGIGAVLKVLTTGLPALIS-NH2) o...

  10. Genomic comparison of multi-drug resistant invasive and colonizing Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from diverse human body sites reveals genomic plasticity

    Hsiao William W; Phillippy Adam M; Harris Anthony D; Johnson J Kristie; Sahl Jason W; Thom Kerri A; Rasko David A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as a significant global pathogen, with a surprisingly rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance and spread within hospitals and health care institutions. This study examines the genomic content of three A. baumannii strains isolated from distinct body sites. Isolates from blood, peri-anal, and wound sources were examined in an attempt to identify genetic features that could be correlated to each isolation source. Results Pulsed...

  11. An outbreak of Acinetobacter baumannii septicemia in a neonatal intensive care unit of a university hospital in Brazil

    Denise von Dolinger de Brito

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied an outbreak of two multi-drug resistant clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Uberlândia Federal University Hospital in Minas Gerais state, Brazil, and we analyzed the contribution of cross-transmission in the rise in infection rates. Eleven neonates who developed multi-drug resistant A. baumannii nosocomial infection were matched to 22 neonates who were admitted to the same unit and did not develop an infection during the outbreak period, in order to identify risk factors for infection. Three out of the 11 neonates died. Epidemiological investigation included molecular typing, using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Prior to the outbreak, from December 2001 to March 2002, no case of infection by this microorganism was diagnosed. Environmental and healthcare worker hand cultures were negative. Nine isolates had similar pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns and two had another clone. The first clone was brought into the unit by an infected patient who was transferred from another hospital without a history of antibiotic use. The second clone did have its origin clearly defined. Both infected groups led us to conclude that several factors contributed to infection with A. baumannii. These factors were: exposure to antibiotics and invasive devices, birth weight 7 days. Based on logistic regression, infected neonates were more exposed to carbapenem and mechanical ventilation than the control group. Cross transmission between infants contributed to the rise in the rates of multi-drug resistant A. baumannii infection.

  12. Low-Frequency Ultrasound Enhances Antimicrobial Activity of Colistin-Vancomycin Combination against Pan-Resistant Biofilm of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Liu, Xu; Yin, Hong; Weng, Chun-Xiao; Cai, Yun

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms in catheters are very difficult to treat. Low-frequency ultrasound (LFU) may improve bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity. However, no previous studies have been reported on its efficacy against pan-resistant biofilms of A. baumannii. This study was designed to investigate whether LFU can enhance the activity of colistin, vancomycin and colistin-vancomycin combinations against pan-resistant biofilms of A. baumannii. The efficacy of colistin combinations was determined using the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). The antibacterial effect was determined from bacteria counts in biofilms and the establishment of 24-h time-kill curves. A significantly synergistic effect was detected between colistin and vancomycin (FICI colistin in the combination treatments resulted in a better ultrasound-enhanced antibacterial effect. In 24-h time-kill curves, the combination of colistin (8 μg/mL) plus vancomycin (4 μg/mL) with LFU caused a significant reduction in bacteria counts in biofilms after 8 h and a continuing decline until 24 h. Bacterial counts were reduced by 3.77 log(CFU/mL) by LFU plus combinations, compared with combinations without LFU at 24 h. Our results indicate that LFU in combination with colistin plus vancomycin may be useful in treating pan-resistant A. baumannii infections. PMID:27131840

  13. Novel cassette array in a class 1 integron in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from central Iran.

    Japoni-Nejad, Alireza; Farshad, Shohreh; van Belkum, Alex; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii is a major problem in the hospital and outbreaks caused by this organism have been reported frequently. The present study aimed at determining the antibiotic susceptibility patterns, the prevalence of different classes of integrons and the characterization of integron class 1 gene cassettes in Iranian A. baumannii isolates. A total of 63 non-duplicate A. baumannii isolates were collected from clinical and environmental specimens in the Vali-Asr hospital in the central province of Iran (March to September, 2011). The antimicrobial susceptibility for 15 antibiotics which are used conventionally was determined by disk diffusion. The presence of different integron classes was investigated by PCR and the size of gene cassettes in class 1 integrons was then determined by PCR as well. Moreover, integron cassette arrays of isolates were delineated by RFLP and sequencing amplicons with different lengths. Of 63 isolates 62 (98.4%) carried a class 1 integron. The prevalence of IntI2 was 15.9% and the length of the amplicons ranged from 500 bp to 3 kb. Sequencing of integrons of class 1 revealed the presence of many resistance genes (aadA, aacA, aacC, dfrA, bla(GES) and bla(IMP)). We identified a completely new gene cassette which contained aacA7-qacF-aadA5-bla(IMP), this cassette has not been reported previously in A. baumannii. PMID:24161711

  14. Infecção cutânea rara por Acinetobacter baumannii em imunocompetente: relato de um caso Rare cutaneous infection by Acinetobacter baumannii in an immunocompetent patient: a case report

    Pablo Vitoriano Cirino

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O Acinetobacter baumanni é patógeno oportunista antigamente considerado de baixa virulência. Atualmente está envolvido em processos infecciosos que acometem pacientes imunocomprometidos,grandes queimados e pacientes em unidades de terapia intensiva que fazem uso de ventilação mecânica. Esse relato de caso chama atenção para infecção cutânea rara por essa bactéria em paciente imunocompetente.Acinetobacter baumannii is an oportunistic pathogen that used to be considered as having low virulence; however, it is currently known to be involved in infectious processes in patients with immunosuppression, large burns and those under mechanical ventilation in intensive care units. This case report emphasizes the possibility of cutaneous infection by A. baumanni in immunocompetent patients.

  15. Complete genome of the multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain KBN10P02143 isolated from Korea

    Lee, Yong-Woon; Choe, Hanna; Lee, Sang-Heon; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kam, Sin; Kim, Byung Kwon; Lee, Won-Kil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a strictly aerobic, non-fermentative, Gram-negative coccobacillary rod-shaped bacterium, is an opportunistic pathogen in humans. We recently isolated a multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain KBN10P02143 from the pus sample drawn from a surgical patient in South Korea. We report the complete genome of this strain, which consists of 4,139,396 bp (G + C content, 39.08%) with 3,868 protein-coding genes, 73 tRNAs and six rRNA operons. Identification of the genes related to multidrug resistance from this genome and the discovery of a novel conjugative plasmid will increase our understanding of the pathogenicity associated with this species. PMID:27143492

  16. Activities of Polymyxin B and Cecropin A-Melittin Peptide CA(1-8)M(1-18) against a Multiresistant Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Saugar, José María; Alarcón, Teresa; López-Hernández, Susana; López-Brea, Manuel; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Polymyxin B (PXB) and the cecropin A-melittin hybrid CA(1-8)M(1-18) (KWKLFKKIGIGAVLKVLTTGLPALIS-NH2) were compared for antibiotic activity on reference and multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Significant differences for both peptides were observed on their inner membrane interaction and inhibition by environmental factors, supporting the use of CA(1-8)M(1-18) as a potential alternative to PXB against Acinetobacter.

  17. Colistin Resistance in a Clinical Acinetobacter baumannii Strain Appearing after Colistin Treatment: Effect on Virulence and Bacterial Fitness

    López-Rojas, Rafael; McConnell, Michael J.; Jiménez-Mejías, Manuel Enrique; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    The fitness and virulence costs associated with the clinical acquisition of colistin resistance by Acinetobacter baumannii were evaluated. The growth of strain CR17 (colistin resistant) was less than that of strain CS01 (colistin susceptible) when the strains were grown in competition (72-h competition index, 0.008). In a murine sepsis model, CS01 and CR17 reached spleen concentrations when coinfecting of 9.31 and 6.97 log10 CFU/g, respectively, with an in vivo competition index of 0.016. Mor...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    Goel Vikas; Kapil Arti

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, e...

  19. Outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the intensive care unit: a multi-level strategic management approach.

    Molter, G; Seifert, H; Mandraka, F; Kasper, G; Weidmann, B; Hornei, B; Öhler, M; Schwimmbeck, P; Kröschel, P; Higgins, P G; Reuter, S

    2016-02-01

    An outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) occurred in an interdisciplinary intensive care unit, affecting 10 patients. Within hours of recognition of the spread of CRAb an intervention team was instituted for collection of available data, decision-making, communication and monitoring of all interventions performed, including cohorting, temporary stop of admissions, staff education, and enforcement of infection control measures. An area was defined for cohortation of patients colonized with CRAb, with a separate nursing team and a second set of mobile equipment. New transmissions were no longer observed after only four days into the institution of enhanced infection control measures. PMID:26778130

  20. Complete genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii XH386 (ST208, a multi-drug resistant bacteria isolated from pediatric hospital in China

    Youhong Fang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important bacterium that emerged as a significant nosocomial pathogen worldwide. The rise of A. baumannii was due to its multi-drug resistance (MDR, while it was difficult to treat multi-drug resistant A. baumannii with antibiotics, especially in pediatric patients for the therapeutic options with antibiotics were quite limited in pediatric patients. A. baumannii ST208 was identified as predominant sequence type of carbapenem resistant A. baumannii in the United States and China. As we knew, there was no complete genome sequence reproted for A. baumannii ST208, although several whole genome shotgun sequences had been reported. Here, we sequenced the 4087-kilobase (kb chromosome and 112-kb plasmid of A. baumannii XH386 (ST208, which was isolated from a pediatric hospital in China. The genome of A. baumannii XH386 contained 3968 protein-coding genes and 94 RNA-only encoding genes. Genomic analysis and Minimum inhibitory concentration assay showed that A. baumannii XH386 was multi-drug resistant strain, which showed resistance to most of antibiotics, except for tigecycline. The data may be accessed via the GenBank accession number CP010779 and CP010780.

  1. Identifying more epidemic clones during a hospital outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Matthieu Domenech de Cellès

    Full Text Available Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are a major concern in hospitals. Current infection-control practices legitimately focus on hygiene and appropriate use of antibiotics. However, little is known about the intrinsic abilities of some bacterial strains to cause outbreaks. They can be measured at a population level by the pathogen's transmission rate, i.e. the rate at which the pathogen is transmitted from colonized hosts to susceptible hosts, or its reproduction number, counting the number of secondary cases per infected/colonized host. We collected data covering a 20-month surveillance period for carriage of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB in a surgery ward. All isolates were subjected to molecular fingerprinting, and a cluster analysis of profiles was performed to identify clonal groups. We then applied stochastic transmission models to infer transmission rates of MDRAB and each MDRAB clone. Molecular fingerprinting indicated that 3 clonal complexes spread in the ward. A first model, not accounting for different clones, quantified the level of in-ward cross-transmission, with an estimated transmission rate of 0.03/day (95% credible interval [0.012-0.049] and a single-admission reproduction number of 0.61 [0.30-1.02]. The second model, accounting for different clones, suggested an enhanced transmissibility of clone 3 (transmission rate 0.047/day [0.018-0.091], with a single-admission reproduction number of 0.81 [0.30-1.56]. Clones 1 and 2 had comparable transmission rates (respectively, 0.016 [0.001-0.045], 0.014 [0.001-0.045]. The method used is broadly applicable to other nosocomial pathogens, as long as surveillance data and genotyping information are available. Building on these results, more epidemic clones could be identified, and could lead to follow-up studies dissecting the functional basis for variation in transmissibility of MDRAB lineages.

  2. Structures of the Class D Carbapenemase OXA-24 from Acinetobacter baumannii in Complex with Doripenem

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Ortega, Caleb J.; Renck, Nicholas A.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Powers, Rachel A.; Leonard, David A. (Case Western); (Grand Valley)

    2012-02-08

    The emergence of class D {beta}-lactamases with carbapenemase activity presents an enormous challenge to health practitioners, particularly with regard to the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii. Unfortunately, class D {beta}-lactamases with carbapenemase activity are resistant to {beta}-lactamase inhibitors. To better understand the details of the how these enzymes bind and hydrolyze carbapenems, we have determined the structures of two deacylation-deficient variants (K84D and V130D) of the class D carbapenemase OXA-24 with doripenem bound as a covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. Doripenem adopts essentially the same configuration in both OXA-24 variant structures, but varies significantly when compared to the non-carbapenemase class D member OXA-1/doripenem complex. The alcohol of the 6a hydroxyethyl moiety is directed away from the general base carboxy-K84, with implications for activation of the deacylating water. The tunnel formed by the Y112/M223 bridge in the apo form of OXA-24 is largely unchanged by the binding of doripenem. The presence of this bridge, however, causes the distal pyrrolidine/sulfonamide group to bind in a drastically different conformation compared to doripenem bound to OXA-1. The resulting difference in the position of the side-chain bridge sulfur of doripenem is consistent with the hypothesis that the tautomeric state of the pyrroline ring contributes to the different carbapenem hydrolysis rates of OXA-1 and OXA-24. These findings represent a snapshot of a key step in the catalytic mechanism of an important class D enzyme, and might be useful for the design of novel inhibitors.

  3. Protective Effect of a Synbiotic against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a Murine Infection Model.

    Asahara, Takashi; Takahashi, Akira; Yuki, Norikatsu; Kaji, Rumi; Takahashi, Takuya; Nomoto, Koji

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the ability of the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult (BbY) to protect against infection, as well as the potentiation of BbY activity by the synbiotic combination of BbY and prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS). The study employed a mouse model of lethal intestinal multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAb) infection. The endogenous intestinal microbiota was disrupted by the administration of multiple antibiotics, causing the loss of endogenous Bifidobacterium Oral infection of these mice with MDRAb resulted in marked growth of this organism. Additional treatment of the infected mice with a sublethal dose of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) induced systemic invasion by MDRAb and subsequent animal death. The continuous oral administration of BbY increased the survival rate and inhibited the intestinal growth and invasion by MDRAb in the infection model. Disruptions of the intestinal environment and barrier function in the infected mice were attenuated by BbY. Protection against the MDRAb infection was markedly potentiated by a synbiotic combination of BbY and GOS, although GOS by itself did not provide protection. Negative correlations were observed between intestinal MDRAb and BbY counts or acetic acid levels; positive correlations were observed between acetic acid levels and intestinal epithelium expression of tight-junction-related genes. These results demonstrated that the probiotic and synbiotic markedly potentiated protection against fatal intestinal infection caused by a multidrug-resistant bacterium. Probiotics and synbiotics are presumed to provide protection by compensation for the disrupted indigenous populations, thereby maintaining the intestinal environments and barrier functions otherwise targeted during opportunistic infection by MDRAb. PMID:26953197

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–baumannii complex strains isolated from a referral hospital in northern Vietnam

    Van, Trang Dinh; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Vu, Phu Dinh; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Pham, Ca Van; Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Phung, Cam Dac; Hoang, Ha Thu Thi; Tang, Nga Thi; Do, Nga Thuy; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Wertheim, Heiman

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–baumannii complex is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) globally, remarkable for its high rate of antibiotic resistance, including to carbapenems. There are few data on the resistance of A. baumannii in Vietnam, which are essential for developing evidence-based treatment guidelines for HAIs. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was conducted by VITEK®2, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on 66 clinical A. baumannii complex isolates recovered during 2009 at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), a referral hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. Basic demographic and clinical data were collected and analysed using descriptive statistics. Most isolates came from lower respiratory tract specimens (59; 89.4%) from intensive care unit (ICU) patients [64/65 (98.5%) with available data] who had been admitted to NHTD for ≥2 days [42/46 (91.3%) with available data]. More than 90% of the isolates were resistant to the tested β-lactamase/β-lactamase inhibitors, cephalosporins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Moreover, 25.4% (16/63) were resistant to all tested β-lactams, quinolones and aminoglycosides. All isolates remained sensitive to colistin and 58.7% were susceptible to tigecycline. Of the 66 isolates, 49 could be classified into eight PFGE types (A–H). Every PFGE type, except D, had cluster(s) of three or more isolates with a temporal relationship. In conclusion, these data suggest a significant rise in A. baumannii antibiotic resistance in Vietnam. Clustering within PFGE types supports cross-transmission of A. baumannii within the ICU at NHTD. Increased research and resources in optimising treatment, infection control and antibiotic stewardship are needed. PMID:25540720

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Acinetobacter baumannii Sequence Type 2 Isolate from Puerto Rico.

    Martínez, Teresa; Ropelewski, Alexander J; González-Mendez, Ricardo; Vázquez, Guillermo J; Robledo, Iraida E

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain M3AC14-8, sequence type 2 (ST2), carrying a chromosomally carried blaKPC-2 gene. The draft genome consists of a total length of 4.11 Mbp and a G+C content of 39.25%. PMID:27540056

  6. Presence of high-risk clones of OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii (ST79) and SPM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST277) in environmental water samples in Brazil.

    Turano, Helena; Gomes, Fernando; Medeiros, Micheli; Oliveira, Silvane; Fontes, Lívia C; Sato, Maria I Z; Lincopan, Nilton

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the presence of hospital-associated high-risk lineages of OXA-23-producing ST79 Acinetobacter baumannii and SPM-1-producing ST277 Pseudomonas aeruginosa in urban rivers in Brazil. These findings indicate that urban rivers can act as reservoirs of clinically important multidrug-resistant bacteria, which constitute a potential risk to human and animal health. PMID:27342783

  7. The molecular epidemiological study of colistin-only-sensitive strains in multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    YANG Li; HAN Lizhong; SUN Jingyong; YU Yunsong; NI Yuxing

    2007-01-01

    This paper reported the epidemiology of the colistin-only-sensitive Acinetobacter baumannii(COS-AB)in a tertiary teaching hospital in China.We analyzed the clinical data of 136 COS-AB isolates from June 2004 to May 2005 and collected 66 A.baumannii isolates in which 33 strains were COS-AB,and the rest were non-COS-AB.Random amplified polymorphic DNA(RAPD)analysis (primer ERIC2 and 272)showed that all COS-AB were identical,while pulsed-field gel electrophotesis(PFGE)analysis showed two separate genotypes of these COS-ABwhich were distinctly different from that of non-COS-AB.The COS-AB from burn wards showed the identical PFGE pattern which was distinguished from the genotype of COS-AB in other departments,mainly surgical systems.The cross-infection was severe and strict methods of disinfection and sterilization should be implemented.Meanwhile,the epidemiology of COS-AB in environment and patients should be closely monitored.The PFGE analysis is a reliable method of A.baumannii typing.

  8. Inhibitory effects of reserpine and carbonyl cyanide m-chloro-phenylhydrazone on fluoroquinolone resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii

    SHI Wei-feng; JIANG Jian-ping; XU Ning; HUANG Zhi-mi; WANG Yu-yue

    2005-01-01

    @@ Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to fluoro-quinolones may be grouped into three principal categories: gene mutations of DNA topoisomerase Ⅱ (GyrA or GyrB), DNA topoisomerase Ⅳ (ParC or ParE), decrease of outer membrane permeation and upregulation of multi-drug efflux pump (active efflux system).1 Efflux pumps are transport proteins removing toxic substrates (including virtually all classes of clinically relevant antibiotics) from cells to the external environment. These proteins exist in both Gram positive bacteria and Gram negative bacteria as well as in fungi and mammalian (tumour) cells.2-4 It has been reported that alkaloid reserpine and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) can inhibit NorA multi-drug efflux.5,6 In order to explore the universality of drug efflux in microorganisms, 85 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii (A. Baumannii) were tested using reserpine and CCCP. The quinolone-resistant-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC genes in 35 isolates of A. Baumannii were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced by DNA sequencer. The correlation between resistant mutation regularity and bacterial drug efflux were analysed.

  9. Diversity in the major polysaccharide antigen of Acinetobacter baumannii assessed by DNA sequencing, and development of a molecular serotyping scheme.

    Dalong Hu

    Full Text Available We have sequenced the gene clusters for type strains of the Acinetobacter baumannii serotyping scheme developed in the 1990s, and used the sequences to better understand diversity in surface polysaccharides of the genus. We obtained genome sequences for 27 available serovar type strains, and identified 25 polysaccharide gene cluster sequences. There are structures for 12 of these polysaccharides, and in general the genes present are appropriate to the structure where known. This greatly facilitates interpretation. We also find 53 different glycosyltransferase genes, and for 7 strains can provisionally allocate specific genes to all linkages. We identified primers that will distinguish the 25 sequence forms by PCR or microarray, or alternatively the genes can be used to determine serotype by "molecular serology". We applied the latter to 190 Acinetobacter genome-derived gene-clusters, and found 76 that have one of the 25 gene-cluster forms. We also found novel gene clusters and added 52 new gene-cluster sequence forms with different wzy genes and different gene contents. Altogether, the strains that have one of the original 25 sequence forms include 98 A. baumannii (24 from our strains and 5 A. nosocomialis (3 from our strains, whereas 32 genomes from 12 species other than A. baumannii or A. nosocomialis, all have new sequence forms. One of the 25 serovar type sequences is found to be in European clone I (EC I, 2 are in EC II but none in EC III. The public genome strains add an additional 52 new sequence forms, and also bring the number found in EC I to 5, in EC II to 9 and in EC III to 2.

  10. Spread of carbapenem-resistant international clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in Turkey and Azerbaijan: a collaborative study.

    Ahmed, S S; Alp, E; Ulu-Kilic, A; Dinc, G; Aktas, Z; Ada, B; Bagirova, F; Baran, I; Ersoy, Y; Esen, S; Guven, T G; Hopman, J; Hosoglu, S; Koksal, F; Parlak, E; Yalcin, A N; Yilmaz, G; Voss, A; Melchers, W

    2016-09-01

    Epidemic clones of Acinetobacter baumannii, described as European clones I, II, and III, are associated with hospital epidemics throughout the world. We aimed to determine the molecular characteristics and genetic diversity between European clones I, II, and III from Turkey and Azerbaijan. In this study, a total of 112 bloodstream isolates of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. were collected from 11 hospitals across Turkey and Azerbaijan. The identification of Acinetobacter spp. using conventional and sensitivity tests was performed by standard criteria. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect OXA carbapenemase-encoding genes (bla OXA-23-like, bla OXA-24-like, bla OXA-51-like, and bla OXA-58-like). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was used to investigate genetic diversity. The bla OXA-51-like gene was present in all 112 isolates, 75 (67 %) carried bla OXA-23-like, 7 (6.2 %) carried bla OXA-58-like genes, and 5 (4.5 %) carried bla OXA-24-like genes. With a 90 % similarity cut-off value, 15 clones and eight unique isolates were identified. The largest clone was cluster D, with six subtypes. Isolates from clusters D and I were widely spread in seven different geographical regions throughout Turkey. However, F cluster was found in the northern and eastern regions of Turkey. EU clone I was grouped within J cluster with three isolates found in Antalya, Istanbul, and Erzurum. EU clone II was grouped in the U cluster with 15 isolates and found in Kayseri and Diyarbakır. The bla OXA-24-like gene in carbapenemases was identified rarely in Turkey and has been reported for the first time from Azerbaijan. Furthermore, this is the first multicenter study in Turkey and Azerbaijan to identify several major clusters belonging to European clones I and II of A. baumannii. PMID:27259712

  11. Contribution of efflux pumps, porins, and β-lactamases to multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Rumbo, C; Gato, E; López, M; Ruiz de Alegría, C; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Martínez-Martínez, L; Vila, J; Pachón, J; Cisneros, J M; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system. PMID:23939894

  12. In vitro activity of tigecycline and comparators against carbapenem-susceptible and resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in Italy

    Carattoli Alessandra

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent multi-centre Italian survey (2003–2004, conducted in 45 laboratories throughout Italy with the aim of monitoring microorganisms responsible for severe infections and their antibiotic resistance, Acinetobacter baumannii was isolated from various wards of 9 hospitals as one of the most frequent pathogens. One hundred and seven clinically significant strains of A. baumannii isolates were included in this study to determine the in vitro activity of tigecycline and comparator agents. Methods Tests for the susceptibility to antibiotics were performed by the broth microdilution method as recommended by CLSI guidelines. The following antibiotics were tested: aztreonam, piperacillin/tazobactam, ampicillin/sulbactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem tetracycline, doxycycline, tigecycline, gentamicin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, colistin, and trimethoprim/sulphametoxazole. The PCR assay was used to determine the presence of OXA, VIM, or IMP genes in the carbapenem resistant strains. Results A. baumannii showed widespread resistance to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam in more than 90% of the strains; resistance to imipenem and meropenem was 50 and 59% respectively, amikacin and gentamicin were both active against about 30% of the strains and colistin about 99%, with only one strain resistant. By comparison with tetracyclines, tigecycline and doxycycline showed a higher activity. In particular, tigecycline showed a MIC90 value of 2 mg/L and our strains displayed a unimodal distribution of susceptibility being indistinctly active against carbapenem-susceptible and resistant strains, these latter possessed OXA-type variant enzymes. Conclusion In conclusion, tigecycline had a good activity against the MDR A. baumannii strains while maintaining the same MIC90 of 2 mg/L against the carbapenem-resistant strains.

  13. In Vivo and In Vitro Efficacy of Minocycline-Based Combination Therapy for Minocycline-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Yang, Ya-Sung; Lee, Yi; Tseng, Kuo-Chuan; Huang, Wei-Cheng; Chuang, Ming-Fen; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling Yang; Chen, Te-Li

    2016-07-01

    Minocycline-based combination therapy has been suggested to be a possible choice for the treatment of infections caused by minocycline-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii, but its use for the treatment of infections caused by minocycline-resistant A. baumannii is not well established. In this study, we compared the efficacy of minocycline-based combination therapy (with colistin, cefoperazone-sulbactam, or meropenem) to that of colistin in combination with meropenem for the treatment of minocycline-resistant A. baumannii infection. From 2006 to 2010, 191 (17.6%) of 1,083 A. baumannii complex isolates not susceptible to minocycline from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance program were collected. Four representative A. baumannii isolates resistant to minocycline, amikacin, ampicillin-sulbactam, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, gentamicin, imipenem, levofloxacin, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam were selected on the basis of the diversity of their pulsotypes, collection years, health care setting origins, and geographic areas of origination. All four isolates had tetB and overexpressed adeABC, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Among all minocycline-based regimens, only the combination with colistin produced a fractional inhibitory concentration index comparable to that achieved with meropenem combined with colistin. Minocycline (4 or 16 μg/ml) in combination with colistin (0.5 μg/ml) also synergistically killed minocycline-resistant isolates in time-kill studies. Minocycline (50 mg/kg of body weight) in combination with colistin (10 mg/kg) significantly improved the survival of mice and reduced the number of bacteria present in the lungs of mice compared to the results of monotherapy. However, minocycline (16 μg/ml)-based therapy was not effective at reducing biofilm-associated bacteria at 24 or 48 h when its effectiveness was compared to that of colistin (0.5 μg/ml) and meropenem (8 μg/ml). The clinical use of

  14. Predictors of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    Aynur Camkıran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB is an important cause of hospital acquired infection and leads to an increasing morbidity and mortality in intensive care units (ICU. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of MRAB infection in surgical ICU patients. Material and Method: The charts of the patients who were admitted to the ICU between January 2008 and August 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with MRAB infection. Recorded data were as follows: age, sex, medical history, underlying surgical pathology, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (APACHE II and Glasgow Coma Score on ICU admission,presence of invasive procedures (intubation, arterial, central venous lines, urinary catheters, and renal replacement therapy, days in ICU and white blood cells (WBC and lactate count on infection day, infection site, complications (such as organ/system failure, length of stay (LOS in the ICU and hospital, and final outcome. Results: During the study period 25 patients with MRAB infection were identified. When compared with their matched control group (n=25, patients with MRAB infection had a significantly higher mean APACHE II score (p=0.001 and more frequently had an open wound (p=0.002 or required mechanical ventilation (p=0.005, with respiratory system disease (p=0.03, arterial catheterization (p=0.006, and central venous catheterization (p=0.004. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that APACHE II score (OR,1.155; CI, 1.008-1.324; p= 0.038 and open wound (OR, 27.77; CI, 2.020-333.333; p=0.018 were predictors of MRAB infection in these patients. Compared to their controls, patients with MRAB infection hand a longer LOS in ICU (36.44±30.44 days vs 7.80±8.13 days, p<0.000 and hospital (55.12±40.81 days vs 19.04±13.44 days, p<0.000. In hospital mortality rates for patients with MRAB infection and their controls were 56% and 32%, respectively (p=0.154. Conclusion: Our results indicate

  15. Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii Belonging to the ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 Clone Lacking the AdeABC (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type) Efflux Pump.

    López, M; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Gato, E; Blasco, L; Poza, M; Fernández-García, L; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Little is known about the genetic characteristics of clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii lacking the AdeABC pump. In this study, we sequenced the genome of clinical strain Ab421 GEIH-2010 (belonging to clone ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 from the GEIH-REIPI Ab. 2010 project) which lacks this efflux pump. PMID:27609928

  16. Prevalence and Characterization of Integrons in Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Eastern China: A Multiple-Hospital Study

    Jing Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this multiple-hospital study was to investigate the prevalence of integrons in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB in Eastern China, and characterize the integron-integrase genes, so as to provide evidence for the management and appropriate antibiotic use of MDRAB infections. Methods: A total of 425 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were collected from 16 tertiary hospitals in 11 cities of four provinces (Fujian, Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Shandong from January 2009 to June 2012. The susceptibility of A. baumannii isolates to ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, aztreonam, meropenem, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole/trimenthoprim, minocycline and imipenem was tested, and integrons and their gene cassettes were characterized in these isolates using PCR assay. In addition, integron-positive A. baumannii isolates were genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE assay, and intI1 gene cassette was sequenced. Results: intI1 gene was carried in 69.6% of total A. baumannii isolates, while intI2 and intI3 genes were not detected. The prevalence of resistance to ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, aztreonam, imipenem, meropenem, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole/trimenthoprim was significantly higher in integron-positive A. baumannii isolates than in negative isolates (all p values <0.05, while no significant difference was observed in the prevalence of minocycline resistance (p > 0.05. PFGE assay revealed 27 PFGE genotypes and 4 predominant genotypes, P1, P4, P7 and P19. The PFGE genotype P1 contained 13 extensive-drug resistant and 89 non-extensive-drug resistant A. baumannii isolates, while the genotype P4 contained 34 extensive-drug resistant and 67 non-extensive-drug resistant isolates, appearing a significant

  17. Detecting imipenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii by automated systems (BD Phoenix, Microscan WalkAway, Vitek 2); high error rates with Microscan WalkAway

    Ozlu Nagihan; Comert Fusun; Aktas Elif; Kulah Canan; Akyar Isin; Ankarali Handan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Increasing reports of carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections are of serious concern. Reliable susceptibility testing results remains a critical issue for the clinical outcome. Automated systems are increasingly used for species identification and susceptibility testing. This study was organized to evaluate the accuracies of three widely used automated susceptibility testing methods for testing the imipenem susceptibilities of A. baumannii isolates, by comp...

  18. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine Β-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitt...

  19. Eradication of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a female patient with total hip arthroplasty, with debridement and retention: a case report

    Beieler Alison M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become a significant cause of healthcare-associated infections, but few reports have addressed Acinetobacter baumannii infections associated with orthopedic devices. The current recommended treatment for complicated infections due to orthopedic devices, including resistant gram-negative rods, consists of antimicrobial therapy with debridement and removal of implants. Case presentation The patient, a 47-year-old woman, had previously had a prior total hip arthroplasty at 16 years of age for a complex femoral neck fracture, and multiple subsequent revisions. This time, she underwent a fifth revision secondary to pain. Surgery was complicated by hypotension resulting in transfer to the intensive care unit and prolonged respiratory failure. She received peri-operative cefazolin but postoperatively developed surgical wound drainage requiring debridement of a hematoma. Cultures of this grew ampicillin-sensitive Enterococcus and Acinetobacter baumannii (sensitive only to amikacin and imipenem. The patient was started on imipenem. Removal of the total hip arthroplasty was not recommended because of the recent surgical complications, and the patient was eventually discharged home. She was seen weekly for laboratory tests and examinations and, after 4 months of therapy, the imipenem was discontinued. She did well clinically for 7 months before recurrent pain led to removal of the total hip arthroplasty. Intra-operative cultures grew ampicillin-sensitive Enterococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus but no multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. The patient received ampicillin for 8 weeks and had not had recurrent infection at the time of writing, 37 months after discontinuing imipenem. Conclusion We describe the successful treatment of an acute infection from multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with debridement and retention of the total hip arthroplasty, using

  20. MULTI DRUG RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW FOR MICROBIAL AND CLINICAL STUDY

    Buddha Bahadur Basnet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Infections due to Mutli Drug Resistant A. baumannii (MDRAB is now recognized as a major public health problem worldwide. The nosocomial infection due to MDRAB has leaded to increased in morbidity and mortality which has added noticeably to significant challenge to modern antibiotic therapy system. This is due to rapid phenomenon of A. baumannii to acquire antibiotic resistance. Thus, in this review the overview of current knowledge on epidemiology, infections, mechanism of resistance and effective treatment options are briefly highlighted.

  1. In vitro synergy of colistin combinations against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 carbapenemase.

    Wei, Wenjuan; Yang, Haifei; Liu, Yanyan; Ye, Ying; Li, Jiabin

    2016-06-01

    Fifty extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) were isolated from patients. The chequerboard microdilution method was used to determine the in vitro activities of five colistin (COL)-based combinations including COL+fosfomycin (FOS), COL+rifampicin (RIF), COL+imipenem (IMP), COL+sulbactam (SUP) and COL+levofloxacin (LVX). The synergistic activity was evaluated by the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). According to our results, the combination of COL was synergistic with FOS, RIF, IMP, SUP and LVX with the ratios of 50, 72, 88, 92 and 64%, respectively. When combined with COL, the other five agents showed increased antimicrobial activities. In addition, two of the combinations, COL+RIF and COL+IMP, were more active than the combinations of COL+FOS, COL+SUP and COL+LVX. More importantly, these combination regimens could exert synergistic effects at the sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels against XDRAB strains. PMID:25978105

  2. Clinical outcomes of tigecycline alone or in combination with other antimicrobial agents for the treatment of patients with healthcare-associated multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    Lee, Y-T; Tsao, S-M; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-09-01

    Tigecycline (TG) has been shown to be active in vitro against Acinetobacter baumannii, although data on the clinical efficacy of TG alone or in combination for the treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (MDRAB) remain limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) caused by MDRAB who were treated with imipenem/cilastatin and sulbactam, and TG alone or in combination with other antibiotics. A total of 386 patients with HAIs caused by MDRAB were retrospectively analyzed and grouped into TG and non-TG groups, depending on whether they received TG treatment. Of the 266 patients in the TG group, 108 were treated with TG alone and 158 were treated with TG in combination with ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, piperacillin/tazobactam, or a carbapenem. All 120 patients in the non-TG group were treated with imipenem/cilastatin and sulbactam. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality after TG treatment and the secondary outcome was clinical outcome. There were no significant differences in survival rates between the two groups. However, the rate of unfavorable outcome was significantly lower (p < 0.05) among patients in the TG group than among patients in the non-TG group. The most significant predictor of unfavorable outcome was sepsis, whereas TG treatment and microbial eradication were the most significant predictors of favorable outcomes. Our study represents the largest study of patients with MDRAB infection treated with TG and expands our understanding of the role of TG therapy alone or in combination with other agents for the treatment of HAI caused by MDRAB. PMID:23553594

  3. Antimicrobial action of zinc oxide nanoparticles in combination with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Ghasemi, F; Jalal, R

    2016-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a serious concern amongst hospitalised patients worldwide and its resistance to antibiotics has emerged as a threat to public health in recent years. Metal oxide nanoparticles were found to be effective for overcoming bacterial resistance owing to their antibacterial activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and the conventional antibiotics ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime as well as their mechanisms of action against resistant A. baumannii. ZnO-NPs were prepared by the solvothermal method and were characterised by various methods. Broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods were used to determine the antibacterial activities of ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime antibiotics in the absence and presence of a subinhibitory concentration of ZnO-NPs. The mechanism of action of ZnO-NPs alone and in combination with these antibiotics was assessed by flow cytometry, DNA extraction, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the antibacterial activities of both antibiotics increased in the presence of a subinhibitory concentration of ZnO-NPs. Combination of ZnO-NPs with antibiotics increased the uptake of antibiotics and changed the bacterial cells from rod to cocci forms. Bacterial filamentation was also observed and exhibited no DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that ZnO-NPs potentiate the antimicrobial action of ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime. A mechanism is proposed to explain this phenomenon. PMID:27530853

  4. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections.

    Phee, Lynette M; Betts, Jonathan W; Bharathan, Binutha; Wareham, David W

    2015-08-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffusion, checkerboard methodology (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] of ≤ 0.5, susceptibility breakpoint index [SBPI] of >2), and time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). The ability of FD to limit the emergence of COL resistance was assessed in the presence and absence of each drug alone and in combination. Synergy was demonstrated against all strains, with an average FICI and SBPI of 0.064 and 78.85, respectively. In time-kill assays, COL-FD was synergistic and rapidly bactericidal, including against COL-resistant strains. Fusidic acid prevented the emergence of COL resistance, which was readily selected with COL alone. This is the first description of a novel COL-FD regimen for the treatment of MDRAB. The combination was effective at low concentrations, which should be therapeutically achievable while limiting toxicity. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism underlying the interaction and the suitability of COL-FD as an unorthodox therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:25987639

  5. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    Betts, Jonathan W.; Bharathan, Binutha

    2015-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffusion, checkerboard methodology (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] of ≤ 0.5, susceptibility breakpoint index [SBPI] of >2), and time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). The ability of FD to limit the emergence of COL resistance was assessed in the presence and absence of each drug alone and in combination. Synergy was demonstrated against all strains, with an average FICI and SBPI of 0.064 and 78.85, respectively. In time-kill assays, COL-FD was synergistic and rapidly bactericidal, including against COL-resistant strains. Fusidic acid prevented the emergence of COL resistance, which was readily selected with COL alone. This is the first description of a novel COL-FD regimen for the treatment of MDRAB. The combination was effective at low concentrations, which should be therapeutically achievable while limiting toxicity. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism underlying the interaction and the suitability of COL-FD as an unorthodox therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:25987639

  6. Epidemiology and clonality of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from an intensive care unit in Palermo, Italy

    Mammina Caterina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, initially considered as having a poor clinical relevance, is frequently isolated from infection cases in intensive care units. We describe the epidemiology of carbapenem resistant A. baumannii (CRAB in a general ICU in Palermo, Italy, from October 2010 to March 2011. Findings 58 of 61 isolates exhibited MICs for meropenem or imipenem ≥16 mg/L. Forty-nine carried blaOXA-23 and two blaOXA-58 genes. Five subtype clusters were detected by rep-PCR. Clusters D and E included 10 isolates that tested negative for the carbapenem resistance genes. MLST attributed all isolates, but two, with sequence type (ST2, whereas the two remaining isolates with ST78. The respiratory tract was the most common site of infection (26 out of 36 cases. 72.2%. A high infection related mortality rate was observed (18 out of 35 patients, 51.4%. Nineteen patients tested positive for other multidrug resistant organisms in addition to CRAB. In eight cases isolates belonging to distinct subtype clusters and/or with distinct carbapenemase profiles were identified. Conclusions Carbapenem resistance was prominently driven by the dissemination of CRAB isolates belonging to ST2, carrying the carbapenemase gene blaOXA-23. The colonization/infection of some patients by multiple strains is suggestive of an endemic circulation of CRAB.

  7. 101株鲍曼不动杆菌的耐药性分析%Analysis of drug resistance of acinetobacter baumannii

    王仲书; 李玉梅; 王灿灿

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解鲍曼不动杆菌的临床分布及其对常用抗生素的耐药状况,为有效的临床治疗和医院感染控制提供实验室依据.方法 对2008年4月~2009年6月间某院分离出的101株鲍曼不动杆菌通过微量稀释法进行MIC测定.结果101株鲍曼不动杆菌大多分离自痰液,主要来自于ICU病房.鲍曼不动杆菌对复方新诺明耐药率最高,为91%,依次是环丙沙星89%,庆大霉素86%、头孢噻肟86%等.结论:我院鲍曼不动杆菌耐药情况严重,治疗首选碳青霉烯类抗生素,其次可选用替卡西林/克拉维酸、头孢哌酮/舒巴坦.%Objective To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumanii. Methods The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 101 acinetobacter baumannii isolated were measured by microdilution method. Results 101 Acinetobacter baummanii were mainly isolated from ICU, and most of them were from sputum. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed the resistant rate of Acinetobacter baumannii to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole was the highest (91%), folio wed by gentamicin (86%), cefotaxime (86%). Conclusion The drug resistance of Acinetobacter baummanii is serious. Carbapenem is the preferred antibacterial therapy for Acinetobacter baumannii.

  8. Longitudinal analysis of the temporal evolution of Acinetobacter baumannii strains in Ohio, USA, by using rapid automated typing methods.

    Brooke K Decker

    Full Text Available Genotyping methods are essential to understand the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii. We examined the representative genotypes of A. baumannii at different time periods in select locations in Ohio, using two rapid automated typing methods: PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS, a form of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, and repetitive-sequence-based-PCR (rep-PCR. Our analysis included 122 isolates from 4 referral hospital systems, in 2 urban areas of Ohio. These isolates were associated with outbreaks at 3 different time periods (1996, 2000 and 2005-2007. Type assignments of PCR/ESI-MS and rep-PCR were compared to each other and to worldwide (WW clone types. The discriminatory power of each method was determined using the Simpson's index of diversity (DI. We observed that PCR/ESI-MS sequence type (ST 14, corresponding to WW clone 3, predominated in 1996, whereas ST 12 and 14 co-existed in the intermediate period (2000 and ST 10 and 12, belonging to WW clone 2, predominated more recently in 2007. The shift from WW clone 3 to WW clone 2 was accompanied by an increase in carbapenem resistance. The DI was approximately 0.74 for PCR/ESI-MS, 0.88 for rep-PCR and 0.90 for the combination of both typing methods. We conclude that combining rapid automated typing methods such as PCR/ESI-MS and rep-PCR serves to optimally characterize the regional molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii. Our data also sheds light on the changing sequence types in an 11 year period in Northeast Ohio.

  9. Individual or Combined Effects of Meropenem, Imipenem, Sulbactam, Colistin, and Tigecycline on Biofilm-Embedded Acinetobacter baumannii and Biofilm Architecture.

    Wang, Yung-Chih; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Yang, Ya-Sung; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Chuang, Ming-Fen; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee; Chen, Te-Li

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms are difficult to eradicate. We investigated the effects of meropenem (2 mg/liter), imipenem (2 mg/liter), sulbactam (4 mg/liter), colistin (2 mg/liter), and tigecycline (2 mg/liter), alone or in combination, on biofilm-embedded carbapenem-resistant and carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii (CRAb and CSAb, respectively) cells, as well as on the architecture of the biofilms. A. baumannii ATCC 15151 (Ab15151) and its OXA-82-overproducing transformant, along with two clinical CSAb and two clinical CRAb isolates of differing clonalities, were used. The minimal bactericidal concentrations for biofilm-embedded cells of the six tested isolates were >50-fold those of their planktonic cells. When used individually, meropenem exhibited a higher killing effect than the other four antimicrobials on biofilm-embedded CSAb cells in the colony biofilm assay. For two clinical CRAb isolates, meropenem plus sulbactam or sulbactam plus tigecycline showed >100-fold the bactericidal effect exhibited by these agents used alone after 48 h of treatment. The effect of antimicrobials on the architecture of Ab15151 biofilm emitting green fluorescence was determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy using COMSTAT software. Significant decreases in the maximum biofilm thickness were observed after exposure to meropenem and imipenem. Meropenem plus sulbactam significantly decreased the biomass and mean thickness and increased the roughness coefficient of biofilms, but sulbactam plus tigecycline only decreased the maximum and mean biofilm thickness compared to any of these agents used alone. Meropenem was active against biofilm-embedded CSAb, whereas meropenem plus sulbactam exhibited synergism against biofilm-embedded CRAb and caused significantly more damage to the biofilm architecture than did any of the agents used alone. PMID:27216052

  10. A prospective evaluation of synergistic effect of sulbactam and tazobactam combination with meropenem or colistin against multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Mohammed Ali M.Marie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the synergistic effect of sulbactam/tazobactam in combination with meropenem or colistin against multidrug resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from hospitalized patients from a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia. During the study period, 54 multidrug and carbapenem-resistant isolates of A. baumannii isolates were collected from blood and respiratory samples of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia or bacteremia. Microbroth checkerboard assay (CBA and E-test were performed to look for synergistic interface of sulbactam and tazobactam with meropenem or colistin. All 54 MDR isolates of A. baumannii were resistant to carbapenem. Minimum inhibitory concentration [50/90] value against sulbactam, tazobactam, meropenem, colistin was found to be 64/128, 64/128, 64/256, and 0.5/1.0 respectively. Synergy was detected in more isolates with CBA compared to E-test. All four combinations showed significant synergistic bactericidal activity. However, the combination with colistin showed greater synergistic effect than combination with meropenem. Antagonism was not detected with any of the combinations and any method, but indifference was seen in tazobactam and colistin combination alone. A significant bactericidal effect was seen with sulbactam combination with meropenem or colistin in both methods. A combination therapy can be a choice of treatment. As colistin is known to exhibit nephrotoxicity, the combination of sulbactam and meropenem might be considered as an alternative antibiotic treatment for such multi- and extremely resistant bacteria. Yet, sample size is small in our study, so further well-designed in vitro and clinical studies on large scale should confirm our findings.