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Sample records for acids soils ph

  1. Soil sorption of acidic pesticides: modeling pH effects.

    Spadotto, Claudio A; Hornsby, Arthur G

    2003-01-01

    A model of acidic pesticide sorption in soils was developed from theoretical modeling and experimental data, which initially considered a combination of a strongly acidic pesticide and a variable-charge soil with high clay content. Contribution of 2,4-D [(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid] anionic-form sorption was small when compared with molecular sorption. Dissociation of 2,4-D was not sufficient to explain the variation in Kd as a function of pH. Accessibility of soil organic functional groups able to interact with the pesticide (conformational changes) as a function of organic matter dissociation was proposed to explain the observed differences in sorption. Experimental 2,4-D sorption data and K(oc) values from literature for flumetsulam [N-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-5-methyl [1,2,4] triazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine-2-sulfonamide] and sulfentrazone [N-[2,4-dichloro-5-[4-(difluromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl] phenyl] methanesulfonamide] in several soils fit the model. PMID:12809295

  2. pH effects of the addition of three biochars to acidic Indonesian mineral soils

    Martinsen, V; Alling, V; Nurida, N L;

    2015-01-01

    Soil acidity may severely reduce crop production. Biochar (BC) may increase soil pH and cation exchange capacity (CEC) but reported effects differ substantially. In a systematic approach, using a standardized protocol on a uniquely large number set of 31 acidic soils, we quantified the effect of...... increasing amounts (0–30%; weight:weight) of three types of field-produced BCs (from cacao (Theobroma cacao. L.) shell, oil palm (Elaeis guineensis. Jacq.) shell and rice (Oryza sativa. L.) husk) on soil pH and CEC. Soils were sampled from croplands at Java, Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. All BCs caused...... a significant increase in mean soil pH with a stronger response and a greater maximum increase for the cacao shell BC addition, due to a greater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and larger amounts of extractable base cations. At 1% BC addition, corresponding to about 30 tons ha−1, the estimated...

  3. Effects of pH, organic acids, and inorganic ions on lead desorption from soils

    The desorption characteristics of lead in two variable charge soils (one developed from Arenaceous rock (RAR) and the other derived from Quaternary red earths (REQ)) were studied, and the effects of pH value, organic acid, and competitive ions were examined. Desorption of Pb2+ decreased from nearly 100.0 to 20.0% within pH 1.0-4.0 in both soils, and then the decrease diminished at pH > 4.0. Organic ligands at relatively low concentrations (≤10-3 mol L-1) slightly inhibited Pb2+ desorption, but enhanced Pb2+ desorption at higher concentrations. In this study, citric acid or acetic acid at higher concentrations (>10-3 mol L-1) had the greatest improvement of Pb2+ desorption, followed by malic acid; and the smallest was oxalic acid. Desorption of the adsorbed Pb2+ increased greatly with increasing concentrations of added Cu2+ or Zn2+. Applied Cu2+ increased Pb2+ desorption more than Zn2+ at the same loading. - The adsorption-desorption process is a basic and important reaction in soils controlling Pb2+ mobility and bioavailability

  4. Removal of Radium-226 from Radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid: Effect of pH

    Effect of washing solutions pH on removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid extracted from Malaysian peat soil was studied by a single batch washing method. The study encompassed the extraction of humic acid and the washing of radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid solutions of varying pH in the range between 3 to 11. Activity of radium-226 was determined by gamma spectrometer. In the pH range studied, the removal of radium-226 was greater when humic acid solutions were used compared to distilled water. Greater removal of radium-226 was obtained using highly basic pH washing solutions compared to neutral and acidic solutions. (author)

  5. Removal of Radium-226 from Radium-Contaminated Soil using Distilled Water and Humic Acid: Effect of pH

    Effect of washing solutions' pH removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid extracted from Malaysian peat soil was studied by batch washing method. The study encompassed the extraction of humic acid and the washing of radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid solutions of 100 ppm, both with varying pHs in the range of 3 to 11. The radioactivity concentration of radium-226 was determined by gamma spectrometer.The removal of radium-226 was greater when humic acid solutions were used compared to distilled water at the pH range studied and both washing solutions showed greater removal of radium-226 when basic solutions were used. Nevertheless, comparable removal efficiencies were observed when neutral and highly basic humic acid solutions were used. (author)

  6. Effects of Humic Acid and Solution pH on Dispersion of Na—and Ca—Soil Clays

    LANYEQING; HUQIONGYING; 等

    1996-01-01

    Dispersed soil clays have a negative impact on soil structure and contribute to soil erosion and contaminant movement.In this study,two typical soils from the south of China were chosen for investigating roles of pH and humic acid(HA) on dispersion of soil clays.Critical flocculation concentration (CFC) of the soil clay suspension was determined by using light transmission at a wavelength of 600 nm.The results indicated that effects of pH and HA on dispersion of the soil clays were closely related to the type of the major minerals makin up the soil and to the valence of the exchangeable cations as well.At four rates of pH(4,6,8and 10),the CFC for the Na-yellow-brown soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.32 to 0.56,6.0 to 14.0,10.0 to 24.6 and 26.0 to 52.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively when Na-HA was added at the rate of from 0 to 40mgL-1,With the same Na-HA addition and three pH(6,8and 10)treatments,the CFC for the Na-red soil was incresed from 0.5 to 20.0,1.0 to 40.0 and 6.0 to 141.0mmol L-1 NaCl,respectively.Obviously,pH and HA has greater effects on clay dispersion of the red soil(dominated by 1:1 minerals and oxides) than on that of the yellow-brown soil(dominated by 2:1minerals).However,at three rates of pH(6,8and 10) and with the addition of Ca-HA from 0 to 40mg L-1,the CFC of the Ca-yellow-brown soil and Ca-red soil treated with H2O2 was increased from 0.55 to 0.81,0.75 to 1.28,0.55 to 1.45and 0.038 to 0.266.0.25 to 0.62,0.7to 1.6mmol CaCl2 L-1,respectively.So,Na-soil claye are more sensitive to pH and HA than Ca-soil clays.

  7. PH BUFFERING IN FOREST SOIL ORGANIC HORIZONS: RELEVANCE TO ACID PRECIPITATION

    Samples of organic surface horizons (Oi, Oe, Oa) from New York State forest soils were equilibrated with 0 to 20 cmol HNO3 Kg(-1) soil in the laboratory by a batch technique designed to simulate reactions of acid precipitation with forest floors. Each organic horizon retained a c...

  8. ALUMINUM SOLUBILITY, CALCIUM-ALUMINUM EXCHANGE, AND PH IN ACID FOREST SOILS

    Important components in several models designed to describe the effects of acid deposition on soils and surface waters are the pH-A1 and Ca-A1 exchange relationships. f A1 solubility is controlled by A1 trihydroxide minerals, the theoretical pH-A1 relationship can be described by...

  9. Urea Fertilizer and pH Influence on Sorption Process of Flumetsulam and MCPA Acidic Herbicides in a Volcanic Soil.

    Palma, Graciela; Jorquera, Milko; Demanet, Rolando; Elgueta, Sebastian; Briceño, Gabriela; de la Luz Mora, María

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of urea fertilizer and pH on the sorption process of two acidic herbicides, flumetsulam (2',6'-difluoro-5-methyl[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-2-sulfonanilide) and MCPA (4-chloro--tolyloxyacetic acid), on an Andisol. Urea reduced the adsorption of MCPA but not that of flumetsulam. The Freundlich parameter of MCPA decreased from 8.5 to 5.1 mg L kg. This finding could be attributed to an increase in dissolved organic C due to an initial increase in soil pH for urea application. The higher acidic character of MCPA compared with that of flumetsulam produced a greater hydrolysis of urea, leading to a further pH increase. A marked effect of pH on the adsorption of both herbicides was observed. The organic C distribution coefficient () values for flumetsulam were in the range of 74 to 10 L kg, while those of MCPA were in the range of 208 to 45 L kg. In the kinetic studies, the pseudo-second-order model appeared to fit the data best ( > 0.994). The initial adsorption rates () ranged from 20.00 to 4.59 mg kg h for flumetsulam and from 125.00 to 25.60 mg kg hfor MCPA. Both herbicides were adsorbed rapidly during the first stage of the sorption process, and the rates of sorption were dependent on pH. The application of the Elovich and Weber-Morris models led us to conclude that mass transfer through the boundary layer and, to a lesser degree, intraparticle diffusion were influenced by the chemical character of the herbicide. These results suggest that urea application could increase leaching of acid herbicides in soils. PMID:26828188

  10. The geochemistry during management of lake acidification caused by the rewetting of sulfuric (pH < 4) acid sulfate soils

    Highlights: • The dynamic geochemistry of a lake acidification event and its management was assessed. • Sulfate complexes dominated the aqueous metal speciation at low pH. • Iron oxydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite) were identified. • Aerial additions of limestone to the acidic water slowly returned the pH to near neutral. • Coating of the limestone with gypsum and metal precipitates limited its neutralisation efficiency. - Abstract: Understanding the geochemistry and kinetics of acidification events arising from acid sulfate soils is important to enable effective management and risk assessment. Large-scale exposure and oxidation of acid sulfate soils occurred during a drought in the Lower Lakes (Murray–Darling Basin) of South Australia. We examined the geochemical changes that occurred in one region (Boggy Lake) that experienced surface water acidification and was subsequently neutralised via aerial limestone (CaCO3) dosing and dilution via natural lake refill. Very low pH (< 3) and high concentrations (≈10–1000 mg/L Fe, Al, Mn) of dissolved metals were initially found in surface water. The water chemistry exhibited pH-dependent enhancement of constituents typically associated with acid sulfate soils (SO4, Al and Fe). Geochemical speciation calculations indicated that most (60–80%) of the acidity was present as dissolved metal-sulfate complexes at low pH. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the orange-brown precipitates present after an initial limestone dosing were secondary oxyhydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite). Further limestone dosing resulted in neutralisation of the pH, reduction in dissolved metal concentrations, dissolution of jarosite and schwertmannite precipitates, and formation of other metal oxyhydroxide phases. The results were consistent with a pE-pH diagram constructed for metal-sulfur geochemistry. Assessment of the measured and simulated (using PHREEQC) pH and Ca/Cl ratio during limestone

  11. Effect of pH Value on Stress Corrosion Cracking of X70 Pipeline Steel in Acidic Soil Environment

    Zhiyong LIU; Cuiwei DU; Xin ZHANG; Fuming WANG; Xiaogang LI

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH value on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of API X70 pipeline steel in simulated acidic soil solutions was investigated by using slow strain rate test,electrochemical polarization curves,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,and scanning electron microscopy.pH plays an important role in the susceptibility and electrochemical mechanism of SCC.The pH higher than 5 has no significant effect on electrochemical processes.By contrast,the pH lower than 5 intensifies cathodic hydrogen evolution reactions,thus increasing the cathodic current and corrosion potential.Under different pH values,the SCC mechanism of X70 pipeline steel varies among anodic dissolution (AD),hydrogen embrittlement (HE),and the combination of AD and HE (AD + HE) with variations of applied potential.At-850 mVSCE,the SCC mechanism is HE if pH is less than 4 or AD + HE if pH value is more positive.

  12. Copper availability and bioavailability are controlled by rhizosphere pH in rape grown in an acidic Cu-contaminated soil

    Chaignon, Valerie; Quesnoit, Marie [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols Ecologie fonctionnelle and Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France); Hinsinger, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.hinsinger@supagro.inra.f [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols Ecologie fonctionnelle and Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France)

    2009-12-15

    We evaluated how root-induced changes in rhizosphere pH varied and interacted with Cu availability and bioavailability in an acidic soil. Rape was grown on a Cu-contaminated acidic soil, which had been limed at 10 rates. Soil Cu bioavailability was not influenced by liming. However, liming significantly decreased CaCl{sub 2}-extracted Cu for pH between 3.7 and 5.1. Little effect was found for pH above 5.1. For soil pH < 4.4, CaCl{sub 2}-Cu contents were smaller in rhizosphere than uncropped soil. Rhizosphere alkalisation occurred at pH < 4.8, while acidification occurred at greater pH. This explained the changes of CaCl{sub 2}-Cu in the rhizosphere at low pH and the absence of pH dependency of Cu bioavailability to rape. In addition, apoplastic Cu in roots increased with increasing soil pH, most probably as a result of increased dissociation and affinity of cell wall compounds for Cu. - Root-induced increase in pH reduces Cu availability in the rhizosphere and Cu bioavailability to rape.

  13. A review of metal (Pb and Zn) sensitive and pH tolerant bioassay organisms for risk screening of metal-contaminated acidic soils

    To improve risk estimates at the screening stage of Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA), short duration bioassays tailored to undisturbed soil cores from the contaminated site could be useful. However, existing standardized bioassays use disturbed soil samples and often pH sensitive organisms. This is a problem as naturally acidic soils are widespread. Changing soil properties to suit the test organism may change metal bioavailability, leading to erroneous risk estimates. For bioassays in undisturbed soil cores to be effective, species able to withstand natural soil properties must be identified. This review presents a critical examination of bioassay species' tolerance of acidic soils and sensitivity to metal contaminants such as Pb and Zn. Promising organisms include; Dendrobaena octaedra, Folsomia candida, Caenorhabditis elegans, Oppia nitens, Brassica rapa, Trifolium pratense, Allium cepa, Quercus rubra and Acer rubrum. The MetSTICK test and the Bait lamina test were also identified as suitable microorganism tests. -- Highlights: •Risk screening of metal contaminated soils should consider metal bioavailability. •Metal bioavailability is dependent on soil properties such as pH. •Many standardized bioassay organisms are sensitive to acidic soils. •This review identifies acid tolerant and metal sensitive bioassays and species. •The identified tests can improve risk screening of acidic metal contaminated soil. -- This review identifies bioassay species able to withstand naturally acidic soils while being sensitive to metal contaminants

  14. Copper availability and bioavailability are controlled by rhizosphere pH in rape grown in an acidic Cu-contaminated soil

    We evaluated how root-induced changes in rhizosphere pH varied and interacted with Cu availability and bioavailability in an acidic soil. Rape was grown on a Cu-contaminated acidic soil, which had been limed at 10 rates. Soil Cu bioavailability was not influenced by liming. However, liming significantly decreased CaCl2-extracted Cu for pH between 3.7 and 5.1. Little effect was found for pH above 5.1. For soil pH 2-Cu contents were smaller in rhizosphere than uncropped soil. Rhizosphere alkalisation occurred at pH 2-Cu in the rhizosphere at low pH and the absence of pH dependency of Cu bioavailability to rape. In addition, apoplastic Cu in roots increased with increasing soil pH, most probably as a result of increased dissociation and affinity of cell wall compounds for Cu. - Root-induced increase in pH reduces Cu availability in the rhizosphere and Cu bioavailability to rape.

  15. Effect of Soil pH Increase by Biochar on NO, N2O and N2 Production during Denitrification in Acid Soils

    Obia, Alfred; Cornelissen, Gerard; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biochar (BC) application to soil suppresses emission of nitrous- (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), but the mechanisms are unclear. One of the most prominent features of BC is its alkalizing effect in soils, which may affect denitrification and its product stoichiometry directly or indirectly. We conducted laboratory experiments with anoxic slurries of acid Acrisols from Indonesia and Zambia and two contrasting BCs produced locally from rice husk and cacao shell. Dose-dependent responses of denitrification and gaseous products (NO, N2O and N2) were assessed by high-resolution gas kinetics and related to the alkalizing effect of the BCs. To delineate the pH effect from other BC effects, we removed part of the alkalinity by leaching the BCs with water and acid prior to incubation. Uncharred cacao shell and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were also included in the study. The untreated BCs suppressed N2O and NO and increased N2 production during denitrification, irrespective of the effect on denitrification rate. The extent of N2O and NO suppression was dose-dependent and increased with the alkalizing effect of the two BC types, which was strongest for cacao shell BC. Acid leaching of BC, which decreased its alkalizing effect, reduced or eliminated the ability of BC to suppress N2O and NO net production. Just like untreated BCs, NaOH reduced net production of N2O and NO while increasing that of N2. This confirms the importance of altered soil pH for denitrification product stoichiometry. Addition of uncharred cacao shell stimulated denitrification strongly due to availability of labile carbon but only minor effects on the product stoichiometry of denitrification were found, in accordance with its modest effect on soil pH. Our study indicates that stimulation of denitrification was mainly due to increases in labile carbon whereas change in product stoichiometry was mainly due to a change in soil pH. PMID:26397367

  16. Effect of Soil pH Increase by Biochar on NO, N2O and N2 Production during Denitrification in Acid Soils.

    Obia, Alfred; Cornelissen, Gerard; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biochar (BC) application to soil suppresses emission of nitrous- (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), but the mechanisms are unclear. One of the most prominent features of BC is its alkalizing effect in soils, which may affect denitrification and its product stoichiometry directly or indirectly. We conducted laboratory experiments with anoxic slurries of acid Acrisols from Indonesia and Zambia and two contrasting BCs produced locally from rice husk and cacao shell. Dose-dependent responses of denitrification and gaseous products (NO, N2O and N2) were assessed by high-resolution gas kinetics and related to the alkalizing effect of the BCs. To delineate the pH effect from other BC effects, we removed part of the alkalinity by leaching the BCs with water and acid prior to incubation. Uncharred cacao shell and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were also included in the study. The untreated BCs suppressed N2O and NO and increased N2 production during denitrification, irrespective of the effect on denitrification rate. The extent of N2O and NO suppression was dose-dependent and increased with the alkalizing effect of the two BC types, which was strongest for cacao shell BC. Acid leaching of BC, which decreased its alkalizing effect, reduced or eliminated the ability of BC to suppress N2O and NO net production. Just like untreated BCs, NaOH reduced net production of N2O and NO while increasing that of N2. This confirms the importance of altered soil pH for denitrification product stoichiometry. Addition of uncharred cacao shell stimulated denitrification strongly due to availability of labile carbon but only minor effects on the product stoichiometry of denitrification were found, in accordance with its modest effect on soil pH. Our study indicates that stimulation of denitrification was mainly due to increases in labile carbon whereas change in product stoichiometry was mainly due to a change in soil pH. PMID:26397367

  17. Effect of Soil pH Increase by Biochar on NO, N2O and N2 Production during Denitrification in Acid Soils.

    Alfred Obia

    Full Text Available Biochar (BC application to soil suppresses emission of nitrous- (N2O and nitric oxide (NO, but the mechanisms are unclear. One of the most prominent features of BC is its alkalizing effect in soils, which may affect denitrification and its product stoichiometry directly or indirectly. We conducted laboratory experiments with anoxic slurries of acid Acrisols from Indonesia and Zambia and two contrasting BCs produced locally from rice husk and cacao shell. Dose-dependent responses of denitrification and gaseous products (NO, N2O and N2 were assessed by high-resolution gas kinetics and related to the alkalizing effect of the BCs. To delineate the pH effect from other BC effects, we removed part of the alkalinity by leaching the BCs with water and acid prior to incubation. Uncharred cacao shell and sodium hydroxide (NaOH were also included in the study. The untreated BCs suppressed N2O and NO and increased N2 production during denitrification, irrespective of the effect on denitrification rate. The extent of N2O and NO suppression was dose-dependent and increased with the alkalizing effect of the two BC types, which was strongest for cacao shell BC. Acid leaching of BC, which decreased its alkalizing effect, reduced or eliminated the ability of BC to suppress N2O and NO net production. Just like untreated BCs, NaOH reduced net production of N2O and NO while increasing that of N2. This confirms the importance of altered soil pH for denitrification product stoichiometry. Addition of uncharred cacao shell stimulated denitrification strongly due to availability of labile carbon but only minor effects on the product stoichiometry of denitrification were found, in accordance with its modest effect on soil pH. Our study indicates that stimulation of denitrification was mainly due to increases in labile carbon whereas change in product stoichiometry was mainly due to a change in soil pH.

  18. Effecf of pH and some cations on activity of acid phosphatase secreted from Ustilago sp. isolated from acid sulphate soil

    Chairatana Nilnond

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid phosphatase secreted from Ustilago sp. is able to hydrolyze organic phosphorus. These soil yeast microorganisms were isolated from rice roots grown in acid sulphate soil that generally contains highamount of aluminum (Al, iron (Fe and manganese (Mn ions. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to examine the effect of pH and some cations on acid phosphatase activity. Two isolates of Ustilago sp., AR101and AR102, were cultured in 100 mL of modified Pikovskaya's broth containing Na-phytate, pH 4, and acid phosphatase activity was determined at pH 2.0-7.0. Effect of Al, Fe, and Mn, including calcium (Ca ions,on growth of AR101 and AR102, secreted acid phosphatase activity, and the ability of acid phosphatase on the phosphorus release from Na-phytate by Ustilago sp. were investigated. It was found that the optimum pH for acid phosphatase activity was 3.5-4.5. The activity of acid phosphatase secreted from AR101 (3,690nmol min-1 mL-1 was remarkably higher than that from AR102 (956 nmol min-1 mL-1. Aluminum, iron, manganese and calcium ions in the medium did not affect the growth of either isolate. The activity of secretedacid phosphatase of AR101 was inhibited by Al and Ca ion, and synthesis of acid phosphatase of Ustilago sp. AR102 was possibly stimulated by Fe ion. Both AR101 and AR102 solubilized Na-phytate, resulting in therelease of P. However, some amount of released P was then precipitated with Al and Fe ions as the highly insoluble Fe- or Al- phosphate.

  19. Aluminium uptake and translocation in Al hyperaccumulator Rumex obtusifolius is affected by low-molecular-weight organic acids content and soil pH.

    Stanislava Vondráčková

    Full Text Available High Al resistance of Rumex obtusifolius together with its ability to accumulate Al has never been studied in weakly acidic conditions (pH > 5.8 and is not sufficiently described in real soil conditions. The potential elucidation of the role of organic acids in plant can explain the Al tolerance mechanism.We established a pot experiment with R. obtusifolius planted in slightly acidic and alkaline soils. For the manipulation of Al availability, both soils were untreated and treated by lime and superphosphate. We determined mobile Al concentrations in soils and concentrations of Al and organic acids in organs.Al availability correlated positively to the extraction of organic acids (citric acid < oxalic acid in soils. Monovalent Al cations were the most abundant mobile Al forms with positive charge in soils. Liming and superphosphate application were ambiguous measures for changing Al mobility in soils. Elevated transport of total Al from belowground organs into leaves was recorded in both lime-treated soils and in superphosphate-treated alkaline soil as a result of sufficient amount of Ca available from soil solution as well as from superphosphate that can probably modify distribution of total Al in R. obtusifolius as a representative of "oxalate plants." The highest concentrations of Al and organic acids were recorded in the leaves, followed by the stem and belowground organ infusions.In alkaline soil, R. obtusifolius is an Al-hyperaccumulator with the highest concentrations of oxalate in leaves, of malate in stems, and of citrate in belowground organs. These organic acids form strong complexes with Al that can play a key role in internal Al tolerance but the used methods did not allow us to distinguish the proportion of total Al-organic complexes to the free organic acids.

  20. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  1. Past and future seasonal variation in pH and metal concentrations in runoff from river basins on acid sulphate soils in Western Finland.

    Saarinen, Tuomas S; Kløve, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Drainage of acid sulphate soils (ASS) increases oxidation, leading to extensive leaching of acidity and metals to rivers (Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ni and Zn). This is often apparent during high runoff periods in spring and autumn after long dry periods with low groundwater levels and associated ASS oxidation. Regression models were used to study changes in these water quality variables according to various discharge scenarios. The knowledge of seasonal patterns of water quality variables in future is important for planning land use of the catchments in relation to WFD of European Union. The data showed that river water acidity (pH and metals) increased with discharge, with the correlation being strongest in low runoff periods in winter and summer and less clear in spring. With future climate change, river acidity can increase radically, especially during winters following extremely dry summers, and pH and metal peaks may occur even during winter. PMID:22702821

  2. Remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with heavy metals by means of their leaching at acidic pH followed by the soil reclamation by means of neutralization and bacterial manure addition

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Some grey forest soils in Western Bulgaria are heavily polluted with heavy metals (copper, lead, and zinc), arsenic, and uranium due to the infiltration of acid mine drainage generated at the abandoned uranium mine Curilo. This paper presents some results from a study about soil remediation based on the contaminants leaching from the topsoil by means of irrigation with solutions containing sulphuric acid or its in situ generation by means of sulphur-oxidizing chemolithotrophic bacteria in or without the presence of finely cut straw. These methods were tested in large scale zero suction lysimeters. The approaches based on S° and finely cut straw addition was the most efficient amongst the tested methods and for seven months of soil remediation the concentration of all soil contaminants were decreased below the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC). Neutralization of the soil acidity was applied as a next stage of soil reclamation by adding CaCO3 and cow manure. As a result, soil pH increased from strongly acidic (2.36) to slightly acidic (6.15) which allowed subsequent addition of humic acids and bacterial manure to the topsoil. The soil habitat changed in this way facilitated the growth of microorganisms which restored the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and carbon to the levels typical for non-polluted grey forest soil.

  3. Determining Critical Soil pH for Grain Sorghum Production

    Katy Butchee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. has become a popular rotation crop in the Great Plains. The transition from conventional tillage to no-tillage production systems has led to an increase in the need for crop rotations. Some of the soils of the Great Plains are acidic, and there is concern that grain sorghum production may be limited when grown on acidic soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of soil pH for grain sorghum production. Potassium chloride-exchangeable aluminum was also analyzed to determine grain sorghum’s sensitivity to soil aluminum (Al concentration. The relationship between relative yield and soil pH was investigated at Lahoma, Perkins, and Haskell, Oklahoma, USA with soil pH treatments ranging from 4.0–7.0. Soil pH was altered using aluminum sulfate or hydrated lime. Soil acidity reduced grain sorghum yield, resulting in a 10% reduction in yield at soil pH 5.42. Potassium chloride-exchangeable aluminum levels above 18 mg kg−1 resulted in yield reductions of 10% or greater. Liming should be considered to increase soil pH if it is below these critical levels where grain sorghum will be produced.

  4. Effect of Soil pH Increase by Biochar on NO, N2O and N2 Production during Denitrification in Acid Soils

    Obia, Alfred; Cornelissen, Gerard; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biochar (BC) application to soil suppresses emission of nitrous- (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), but the mechanisms are unclear. One of the most prominent features of BC is its alkalizing effect in soils, which may affect denitrification and its product stoichiometry directly or indirectly. We conducted laboratory experiments with anoxic slurries of acid Acrisols from Indonesia and Zambia and two contrasting BCs produced locally from rice husk and cacao shell. Dose-dependent responses of denitri...

  5. Determining Critical Soil pH for Sunflower Production

    Apurba Sutradhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil acidity has become a major yield-limiting factor in cropping systems of the Southern Great Plains, in which winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is the predominant crop. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. is a strong rotational crop with winter wheat due to its draught and heat tolerance. However, the effects of low soil pH on sunflower productivity have not been explored. The objective of this study was to determine the critical soil pH and aluminum concentration (AlKCl for sunflower. Sunflower was grown in a randomized complete block design with three replications of a pH gradient ranging from 4.0 to 7.0 at three locations with varying soil types. Soil pH was altered using aluminum sulfate (Al2(SO43 and hydrated lime (Ca(OH2. Plant height, vigor, and survivability were all negatively affected by soil acidity. Sunflower yield was reduced by 10% at or below soil pH 4.7 to 5.3 dependent upon location and soil type. Levels of AlKCl above 6.35 mg kg−1 reduced seed yield by 10% or greater. We concluded that sunflower may serve as a better rotational crop with winter wheat under acidic conditions when compared to other adaptable crops.

  6. Impact of pH on Microbial Biomass Carbon and Microbial Biomass Phosphorus in Red Soils

    CHEN Guo-Chao; HE Zhen-Li; WANG Yi-Jun

    2004-01-01

    The impact of pH changes on microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and microbial biomass phosphorus (Pmic)were examined for 3 red soils under citrus production with different lengths of cultivation. Soil pH significantly affected Cmic and Pmic. The Cmic and Pmic changes, as a function of soil pH, appeared to follow a normal distribution with the original soil pH value at the apex and as pH increased or decreased compared to the original soil pH, Cmic and Pmic declined. Moreover, there were critical pH values at both extremes (3.0 on the acidic side and 8.0 to 8.5 on the alkaline side), beyond which most of microorganisms could never survive.The effect of pH on Cmic and Pmic was also related to the original soil pH. The higher the original soil pH was, the less Cmic or Pmic were affected by pH change. It is suggested that soil microorganisms that grow in a soil environment with a more neutral soil pH range (I.e. pH 5.5-7.5) may have a greater tolerance to pH changes than those growing in more acidic or more alkaline soil pH conditions.

  7. Observation of pH Value in Electrokinetic Remediation using various electrolyte (MgSO4, KH2PO4 and Na(NO3)) for Barren Acidic Soil at Ayer Hitam, Johor, Malaysia

    Norashira, J.; Zaidi, E.; Aziman, M.; Saiful Azhar, A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Barren acidic soil collected at Ayer Hitam, Johor Malaysia was recorded at pH value of 2.36 with relative humidity of 86%. This pH value is not suitable for the growth of any plants especially for the soil stabilization purposes. Gradation weathering within the range of 4 to 6 indicates an incomplete/partial weathering process. The soil grade in this range is known as a black shale mudstone. Beside, this also influences to a factor of the high surface water runoff at this particular soil species. As the acidic pH become a major problem for soil fertilizing hence an appropriate technique was implemented known as using ‘Electrokinetic Remediation’, EKR. This technique has a great potential in changing the soil pH value from acidic to less acidic and also kept maintain the pH at the saturated rate of electrochemical process. This research study presents the monitoring data of pH value due to the effect of various electrolyte consist of 0.5M of MgSO4, KH2PO4, and Na(NO3). Here, the distilled water (DW) was used as reference solution. The electric field was provided by dipping two pieces of identical rectangular aluminum foil as anode and cathode. The EKR was conducted under a constant voltage gradient of 50 V/m across the sample bulk at 0.14 m length measured between both electrodes. The data collection was conducted during the total period of 7 days surveillance. The variation of pH values at the remediation area between anode and cathode for various type of electrolyte indicates that there are a significant saturated value as it reaches 7 days of treatment. During the analysis, it is found that the highest pH value at the remediation area after 7 days treatment using Na(NO3), KH2PO4 and MgSO4 was 3.93, 3.33 and 3.39 respectively. Hence from the last stage of pH value observation, it can be conclude that the best electrolyte for barren soil treatment is Na(NO3) whereby it contribute to highest pH value and turn the soil to be less acidic.

  8. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  9. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    Biochar as ecologically clean and stable form of carbon has complex of physical and chemical properties which make it a potentially powerful soil amendment (Mutezo, 2013). Therefore during the last decade the biochar application as soil amendment has been a matter for a great number of investigations. For the ecological viewpoint the trend of decreasing of soil organic matter in European agricultural land is a major problem. Society is faced with the task to find possibilities to stabilize or increase soil organic matter content in soil and quality. The availability of different functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic, acidic, alcoholic, amine, amide) allows soil organic matter to buffer over a wide range of soil pH values (Krull et al. 2004). Therefore the loss of soil organic matter also reduces cation exchange capacity resulting in lower nutrient retention (Kimetu et al. 2008). Biochar can retain elements in soil directly through the negative charge that develops on its surfaces, and this negative charge can buffer acidity in the soil. There are lack of investigations about the effect of biochar to soil pH buffering properties, The aim of our investigation was to investigate the changes in soil pH buffer capacity in a result of addition of carbonizated material to temperate region soils. In the experiment different kind of softwood biochars, activated carbon and different soil types with various organic matter and pH were used. The study soils were Albeluvisols, Leptosols, Cambisols, Regosols and Histosols . In the experiment the series of the soil: biochar mixtures with the biochar content 0 to 100% were used. The times of equiliberation between solid and liquid phase were from 1 to 168 hours. The suspension of soil: biochar mixtures was titrated with HCl solution. The titration curves were established and pH buffer capacities were calculated for the pH interval from 3.0 to 10.0. The results demonstrate the dependence of pH buffer capacity from soil type

  10. Silicate weathering in soils: A solution for soil pH management?

    Soldal, Jostein

    2015-01-01

    N2O released form agricultural soils is mainly a product of denitrification; a key microbial process in the N cycle. The relative rate of N2O released from this process depends of the soil pH, where the relative amount of N2O to denitrified N (N2O/N2+N2O) increase in more acidic soils. pH management in soils is mainly based on carbonate based liming, which will release CO2 to the atmosphere during dissolution or at later acidification. Use of non-carbonate rock p...

  11. Adaptation of Denitrifying Populations to Low Soil pH

    Parkin, Timothy B.; Sexstone, Alan J.; Tiedje, James M.

    1985-01-01

    Natural denitrification rates and activities of denitrifying enzymes were measured in an agricultural soil which had a 20-year past history of low pH (pH ca. 4) due to fertilization with acid-generating ammonium salts. The soil adjacent to this site had been limed and had a pH of ca. 6.0. Natural denitrification rates of these areas were of similar magnitude: 158 ng of N g−1 of soil day−1 for the acid soil and 390 ng of N g−1 of soil day−1 at the neutral site. Estimates of in situ denitrifyin...

  12. pH as a Driver for Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Forest Soils.

    Stempfhuber, Barbara; Engel, Marion; Fischer, Doreen; Neskovic-Prit, Ganna; Wubet, Tesfaye; Schöning, Ingo; Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Kublik, Susanne; Schloter-Hai, Brigitte; Rattei, Thomas; Welzl, Gerhard; Nicol, Graeme W; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, Francois; Prosser, James I; Schloter, Michael

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of soil pH on the diversity and abundance of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in 27 different forest soils across Germany. DNA was extracted from topsoil samples, the amoA gene, encoding ammonia monooxygenase, was amplified; and the amplicons were sequenced using a 454-based pyrosequencing approach. As expected, the ratio of archaeal (AOA) to bacterial (AOB) ammonia oxidizers' amoA genes increased sharply with decreasing soil pH. The diversity of AOA differed significantly between sites with ultra-acidic soil pH (4.5, regardless of geographic position and vegetation. These OTUs could be related to the Nitrosotalea group 1.1 and the Nitrososphaera subcluster 7.2, respectively, and showed significant similarities to OTUs described from other acidic environments. Conversely, none of the major OTUs typical of sites with a soil pH >4.6 could be found in the ultra- and extreme acidic soils. Based on a comparison with the amoA gene sequence data from a previous study performed on agricultural soils, we could clearly show that the development of AOA communities in soils with ultra-acidic pH (<3.5) is mainly triggered by soil pH and is not influenced significantly by the type of land use, the soil type, or the geographic position of the site, which was observed for sites with acido-neutral soil pH. PMID:25501889

  13. Some negative chemical properties of acid soils

    SVETLANA ANTIC-MLADENOVIC; SRDJAN BLAGOJEVIC; MIRJANA KRESOVIC; MIODRAG JAKOVLJEVIC

    2005-01-01

    Some important chemical properties of various samples of two types of acid soil fromWestern Serbia (pseudogley and brown forest) are presented in this paper.Mobile Al was found in elevated and toxic quantities (10–30 mg/100 g) in the more acid samples of pseudogley soil. All samples of brown forest soil were very acid and the quantities ofmobile Al were in the range from 12.8 to 90.0mg/100 g. In a selected number of pseudogley soils, the influence of pH and other soil properties on the minera...

  14. Teaching Plant-Soil Relationships with Color Images of Rhizosphere pH.

    Heckman, J. R.; Strick, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise that uses a simple imaging technique to illustrate the profound effects that living roots exert on the pH of the surrounding soil environment. Achieves visually stimulating results that can be used to reinforce lectures on rhizosphere pH, nutrient availability, plant tolerance of soil acidity, microbial activity, and…

  15. Effect of the Soil pH on the Alkaloid Content of Lupinus angustifolius

    Gisela Jansen; Hans-Ulrich Jürgens; Edgar Schliephake; Frank Ordon

    2012-01-01

    Field studies were conducted in growing seasons 2004, 2005, and 2010 to investigate the effect of different soil pH values on the alkaloid content in seeds of Lupinus angustifolius. Two-year experiments with eleven cultivars were carried out in acid soils with an average of pH=5.8 (Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania) and on calcareous soils with an average pH of 7.1 (Bavaria), respectively. In addition, in 2010, eight cultivars were grown in field experiments in soils with pH values varying betwee...

  16. Degradation of [14C]isofenphos in soil in the laboratory under different soil pH's, temperatures, and moistures

    The effects of three soil pH's, three soil temperatures, and three soil moistures on [14C]isofenphos degradation were investigated. All three factors interacted strongly and significantly affected the persistence of isofenphos as well as the formation of the degradation products (p less than 1%). Isofenphos degradation was greatest at the higher temperatures 350C greater than 250C greater than 150C (except under alkaline pH's), medium moisture 25% greater than 30% greater than 15%, and in both alkaline (pH = 8) and acidic soils (pH = 6) compared with neutral soil (pH = 7). Isofenphos oxon formation was greatest at higher temperatures 350C compared with 250C and 150C, in acidic soil greater than neutral soil greater than alkaline soil, and under high moisture (30%) compared with the 15% and 22.5% moistures. The formation of soil-bound residues was greatest at higher temperatures 350C greater than 250C greater than 150C, higher moisture 30% compared with 15% and 22.5%, and in alkaline soil compared with neutral and acidic soils

  17. Higher pH acid stimulation systems

    Abrams, A.; Richardson, E.A.; Scheuerman, R.F.; Templeton, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of high pH (4 to 6), mild acting acidizing systems developed for in-depth rock matrix stimulation for both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs are described. With these systems, in-depth stimulation capability is available from ambient to about 280 F (138 C). Buffer regulated (BR) systems also have application for near well-bore stimulation at temperatures of up to at least 365 F (185 C). The self-generating systems based on methyl formate (MF), the ammonium salt of monochloroacetic acid (CA), and methyl acetate (MA), have sandstone application ranges and are described. Three BR systems have been developed, based on formic, acetic, and citric acids. Included in the study is a brief review of the theory involved, experimental techniques for measuring acid reaction rates, and discussions of clay dissolution and carbonate acidization mechanisms. 16 references.

  18. Estimativa da acidez potencial pelo método do pH SMP em solos da formação Caiuá: noroeste do estado do Paraná Estimation of potential acidity by the pH SMP method in soils of the Caiuá formation: northwest of the State of Paraná

    J. A. Sambatti

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A utilização do pH SMP na estimativa da acidez potencial tem vantagens em relação ao método do acetato de cálcio 0,5 mol L-1, pH 7, mas requer regionalização edafológica prévia para estimar, com segurança, os valores de H + Al. Na região noroeste do Paraná, encontram-se solos originários de uma rocha sedimentar arenosa da Formação Caiuá, denominada Arenito Caiuá, do período Cretáceo. Esses solos são caracterizados pelos baixos teores de argila, matéria orgânica e baixo tamponamento, diferindo da maioria dos solos existentes no estado. Este estudo teve por objetivo comparar os métodos do pH SMP e o do acetato de cálcio 0,5 mol L-1, pH 7, visando estabelecer uma equação que estime a acidez potencial dos solos dessa área, por meio da obtenção do pH de equilíbrio da suspensão com a solução SMP. Cento e cinqüenta amostras de solos daquela área foram submetidas a análises de regressão, utilizando três modelos que foram avaliados, quanto à qualidade das estimativas, pelas estatísticas dos seus coeficientes e pelo comportamento dos seus resíduos (medido-estimado. A equação linear H + Al = 20,1925 - 2,6484 pH SMP (R² = 0,9051 foi a que melhor estimou a acidez potencial dos solos pertencentes à Formação Caiuá.The use of the pH SMP to estimate the potential acidity has advantages in relation to the 0.5 mol L-1, pH 7, calcium acetate method, but it requires previous edaphic regionalization to estimate the H + Al values with safety. In the northwestern region of the State of Paraná there are soils originally developed from sandy sedimentary rock of the Caiuá Formation, called Caiuá Sandstone, of the Cretaceous period. These soils are characterized by low contents of clay and organic matter, and a low buffer capacity, differing from most of the other soils in the state. The objective of this research was to compare the pH SMP and the 0.5 mol L-1, pH 7 calcium acetate methods, in order to establish an

  19. Long-term changes in soil pH across major forest ecosystems in China

    Yang, Yuanhe; Li, Pin; He, Honglin; Zhao, Xia; Datta, Arindam; Ma, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xuejun; Han, Wenxuan; Wilson, Maxwell C.; Fang, Jingyun

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric acidic deposition has been a major environmental problem since the industrial revolution. However, our understanding of the effect of acidic deposition on soil pH is inconclusive. Here we examined temporal variations in topsoil pH and their relationships with atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition across China's forests from the 1980s to the 2000s. To accomplish this goal, we conducted artificial neural network simulations using historical soil inventory data from the 1980s and a data set synthesized from literature published after 2000. Our results indicated that significant decreases in soil pH occurred in broadleaved forests, while minor changes were observed in coniferous and mixed coniferous and broadleaved forests. The magnitude of soil pH change was negatively correlated with atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition. This relationship highlights the need for stringent measures that reduce sulfur and nitrogen emissions so as to maintain ecosystem structure and function.

  20. Reversibility of soil solution acidity and of sulfate retention in acid forest soils

    Alewell, C.; Matzner, E. (Universitaet Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bodenoekologie)

    1993-11-01

    To quantify the effects of reduced sulfate input on the chemistry of soil solution and soil S storage in acid forest soils, an experiment with undisturbed soil columns from two different sites was implemented. The acid cambisol of the Solling is subjected to a high sulfate input and especially the B-horizon has a high sulfate content. On the contrary, the podzol of the Fuhrberg site is subjected to low input and has low sulfate content. Undisturbed soil columns were taken from both sites and were irrigated at 6[degree]C with a precipitation rate of 3 mmd[sup -1] over 10 mo. In treatment No. 1, an artificial throughfall with pH 5.2 and reduced sulfate load (45[mu]mol L[sup -1]) was applied. In treatment No. 2, an artificial throughfall representing a high sulfate deposition (427 [mu]mol L[sup -1], pH 3.2) was used. In the case of the Solling soil, the pH of soil solution was unaffected by treatments during the entire experiment. Alkalinity of the soil solution was slightly increased in treatment No. 1 at a depth of 20 cm. While treatment No. 1 resulted in a reduction of the sulfate concentrations of the soil solution in the top soil, sulfate concentrations were unaffected at a depth of 40 cm. The B-horizon of the Solling soil prevented deacidification of the soil solution by desorption of previously stored sulfate. In the case of the Fuhrberg soil, treatment No. 1 resulted in reduced sulfate concentrations of the soil solution even in deeper soil layers with concentrations approaching input levels. The pH of the solution was slightly elevated and the alkalinity of the solution increased. Organic S compounds in the soil seemed to have no influence on sulfate release in either soils. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Fixation Status of Acid Soils

    Six acid soil series from different benchmark sites; Rangsit soil (Sulfic Tropaquepts) (two acid sulfate soils), Pakchong soil (Oxic Paleustults) Korat soil (Oxic Paleustults), Warin soil (Oxic Paleustults), Mae Taeng soil (Typic paleustults) and Boundary grey soil and two Thai phosphate rocks (P R) (Lampun P R and Ratchabuie P R) had been characterized in the laboratory by isotope techniques (E, value Part 1). Triple superphosphate (TSP) was used as a standard fertilizer. R P and TSP with 50 mg P Kg-1 soil were incubated for 30 days to examine the fixing capacity of the acid soils. The results showed that Rangsit Soil which is acid sulfate had high fixing capacity. Pakchong soil retained higher P fixation ability than Korat and Warin soil series. The highest fixation capacity among 7 acid soils were Grey Soil and Mae Taeng soil series. The solubility of TSP was decreased when incorporated with soil after incubation for 30 days. P R from Ratchaburi showed higher effectiveness than Lamphun P R

  2. Brown coal derived products ameliorating soil acidity

    Issa, J.; Patti, A.F.; Jackson, W.R. [Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Centre for Green Chemistry

    2000-07-01

    Humic acid derived from brown coal, with added calcium, when applied to the soil surface, can increase pH deeper into the soil profile. The humates can move down with water percolating the soil. As they move down the added calcium bound to the humate's cation exchange sites (the acidic oxygen functional groups) can exchange with toxic aluminium ions and ions on exchange sites in the soil. Thus the soil pH is buffered, nutrient transport to plants assisted, and phytotoxic aluminium bound and rendered harmless to plants. K Humate is a commercially available source of humate (ex HRL Agriculture Pty Ltd Australia) derived from brown coal. It can be obtained by the treatment of brown coal with potassium hydroxide. Calsulmag is a commercial treated coal fly ash (also ex HRL Agriculture Pty Ltd) which can be used instead of lime due to its high inorganic calcium and magnesium content. When K humate and Calsulmag are combined in an aqueous mixture, and applied to the surface of an acidic soil, pH is increased (from 3.8 to 4.5) as is exchangeable calcium (30-50%), while exchangeable aluminium is decreased (30-50%), down to a 5 cm depth.

  3. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  4. Determination of Soil pH in Dominant Soil Types in the Republic of Croatia

    Darija Čapka; Ivica Kisić; Željka Zgorelec; Milan Mesić; Aleksandra Jurišić

    2009-01-01

    Soil pH is a basic soil parameter, since many processes in the soil depend on it, such as the growth and development of plants. Therefore, the monitoring of soil pH is very important. In this paper the values of soil pH are obtained by measurement of the samples in three media: H2O, KCl and CaCl2. The sampling was conducted at 18 locations on 11 soil types and 15 lower systematic units. The aim of this work was to establish functional connections between the pH values in all three media. R...

  5. Electrokinetic remediation of a Cu-Zn contaminated red soil by controlling the voltage and conditioning catholyte pH.

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Cang, Long; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2005-10-01

    Electrokinetics is an innovative technique for treating heavy metals contaminated soil, especially low pH soils such as the Chinese red soil (Udic Ferrisols). In this paper, a Cu-Zn contaminated red soil is treated by electrokinetics. When the Cu-Zn contaminated red soil was treated without control of catholyte pH during the electrokinetic treatment, the soil pH in the soil sections near cathode after the experiment was high above 6, which resulted in accumulation of large amounts of Cu and Zn in the soil sections with such high pH values. Compared to soil Cu, soil Zn was more efficiently removed from the soil by a controlled electrokinetic method. Application of lactic acid as catholyte pH conditioning solution caused an efficient removal of Cu and Zn from the soil. Increasing the electrolyte strength (salt concentration) of the conditioning solution further increased Cu removal, but did not cause a significant improvement for soil Zn. Soil Cu and Zn fractions after the electrokinetic treatments were analyzed using sequential extraction method, which indicated that Cu and Zn precipitation in the soil section closest to the cathode in the treatments without catholyte pH control limited their removal from the soil column. When the catholyte pH was controlled by lactic acid and CaCl(2), the soil Cu and Zn removal percentage after 554 h running reached 63% and 65%, respectively. Moreover, both the residual soil Cu and Zn concentrations were lower than 100 mg kg(-1), which is adequate and meets the requirement of the Chinese soil environmental quality standards. PMID:16202805

  6. Designer, acidic biochar influences calcareous soil characteristics.

    Ippolito, J A; Ducey, T F; Cantrell, K B; Novak, J M; Lentz, R D

    2016-01-01

    In a proof-of-concept study, an acidic (pH 5.8) biochar was created using a low pyrolysis temperature (350 °C) and steam activation (800 °C) to potentially improve the soil physicochemical status of an eroded calcareous soil. Biochar was added at 0%, 1%, 2%, and 10% (by wt.) and soils were destructively sampled at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 month intervals. Soil was analyzed for gravimetric water content, pH, NO3-N, plant-available Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, and P, organic C, CO2 respiration, and microbial enumeration via extractable DNA and 16S rRNA gene copies. Gravimetric soil water content increased with biochar application regardless of rate, as compared to the control. Soil pH decreased between 0.2 and 0.4 units, while plant-available Zn, Mn, and P increased with increasing biochar application rate. Micronutrient availability decreased over time likely due to insoluble mineral species precipitation. Increasing biochar application raised the soil organic C content and remained elevated over time. Increasing biochar application rate also increased respired CO2, yet the CO2 released decreased over time. Soil NO3-N concentrations significantly decreased with increasing biochar application rate likely due to microbial immobilization or denitrification. Depending on application rate, biochar produced a 1.4 to 2.1-fold increase in soil DNA extracted and 1.4- to 2.4-fold increase in 16S rRNA gene abundance over control soils, suggesting microbial stimulation and a subsequent burst of activity upon biochar addition. Our results showed that there is promise in designing a biochar to improve the quality and water relations of eroded calcareous soils. PMID:26077798

  7. 种植紫花苜蓿对云南酸性土壤酸碱性和土壤成分的影响%Effects on Soil pH and Soil Composition in Acid Soil in Yunnan by Planting Alfalfa

    孙仕仙; 杨思林; 李永梅; 陶瑞

    2012-01-01

    [目的]探讨利用石灰调节酸性土壤pH后,不同播种量、施磷量和行距对土壤成分的影响以及种植不同作物对土壤成分的影响.[方法]采用二次饱和D-最优设计和随机区组设计.[结果]紫花苜蓿不同播种量、施磷量和行距对土壤pH没有显著的影响,土壤有机质含量随播种量和施磷量的增加有不同程度的增加,而与行距的变化呈负相关关系,但均未达到显著水平;土壤速效氮含量与播种量和施磷量呈不显著正相关,与行距呈0.01水平显著的负相关;种植不同作物1年后土壤有机质含量增加,且差异达到0.05显著水平.种植苜蓿和三叶草能在0.05水平显著增加土壤全氮含量,但种植小麦和南瓜对全氮含量没有影响.种植豆科牧草(苜蓿和三叶草)均在0.01水平显著增加土壤碱解氮含量,而种植小麦和南瓜对碱解氮含量没有显著影响.[结论]该研究可为云南酸性土壤引进种植紫花苜蓿提供基础依据.%[ Objective ] The research aimed to study the influence of different seeding rate, amount of phosphate and row spacing of alfafa on soil nutrient after adjusting the soil pH using lime, and the influence of planting different crops on soil nutrient. [ Method]The two times satu-rated D-the optimal design and randomized design were adopted. [ Result ] Different seeding rate, amount of phosphate and row spacing of alfafa had no significant effects on soil pH. The content of soil organic matter increased in different level with the increase of seeding rate and amount of phosphate, while soil pH was inversely related with the change of the row spacing, but the influence wasn't significant. The content of soil nitrogen positively correlated with seeding rate and amount of phosphate, but negatively correlated with row spacing. The content of soil organic matter increased by planting different crops after a year and the difference was significant. The content of soil total nitrogen

  8. Mycorrhizal Response to Experimental pH and P Manipulation in Acidic Hardwood Forests

    Kluber, Laurel A.; Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R; Coyle, Kaitlin P.; DeForest, Jared L.; Charlotte R Hewins; Shaw, Alanna N.; Kurt A Smemo; David J. Burke

    2012-01-01

    Many temperate forests of the Northeastern United States and Europe have received significant anthropogenic acid and nitrogen (N) deposition over the last century. Although temperate hardwood forests are generally thought to be N-limited, anthropogenic deposition increases the possibility of phosphorus (P) limiting productivity in these forest ecosystems. Moreover, inorganic P availability is largely controlled by soil pH and biogeochemical theory suggests that forests with acidic soils (i.e.,

  9. Organic Ligand, Competing Cation, and pH Effects on Dissolution of Zinc in Soils

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine the interactive effects of an organic ligand,a competing cation,and pH on the dissolution of zinc(Zn)from three California soils,Maymen sandy loam,Merced clay,and Yolo clay loam.The concentrations of soluble Zn of the three soils were low in a background solution of Ca(NO3)2.Citric acid,a common organic ligand found in the rhizosphere,was effective in mobilizing Zn in these soils; its presence enhanced the concentration of Zn in soil solution by citrate forming a complex with Zn.The ability of Zn to form a complex with citric acid in the soil solution was dependent on the concentration of citric acid,pH,and the concentration of the competing cation Ca2+.The pH of the soil solution determined the extent of desorption of Zn in solid phase in the presence of citric acid.The amounts of Zn released from the solid phase were proportional to the concentration of citric acid and inversely proportional to the concentration of Ca(NO3)2 background solution,which supplied the competing cation Ca2+ for the formation of a complex with citrate.When the soil suspension was spiked with Zn,the adsorption of Zn by the soils was retarded by citric acid via the formation of the soluble Zn-citrate complex.The dissolution of Zn in the presence of citric acid was pH dependent in both adsorption and desorption processes.

  10. Amendment of Acid Soils with Crop Residues and Biochars

    YUAN Jin-Hua; XU Ren-Kou; WANG Ning; LI Jiu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The liming potential of some crop residues and their biochars on an acid Ultisol was investigated using incubation experiments. Rice hulls showed greater liming potential than rice hull biochar, while soybean and pea straws had less liming potential than their biochars. Due to their higher alkalinity, biochars from legume materials increased soil pH much compared to biochars from non-legume materials. The alkalinity of biochars was a key factor affecting their liming potential,and the greater alkalinity of biochars led to greater reductions in soil acidity. The incorporation of biochars decreased soil exchangeable acidity and increased soil exchangeable base cations and base saturation, thus improving soil fertility.

  11. Influence of soil pH on the sorption of ionizable chemicals

    Franco, Antonio; Fu, Wenjing; Trapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The soil-water distribution coefficient of ionizable chemicals (K-d) depends on the soil acidity, mainly because the pH governs speciation. Using pH-specific K-d values normalized to organic carbon (K-OC) from the literature, a method was developed to estimate the K-OC of monovalent organic acids...... and bases. The regression considers pH-dependent speciation and species-specific partition coefficients, calculated from the dissociation constant (pK(a)) and the octanol-water partition coefficient of the neutral molecule (log P-n). Probably because of the lower pH near the organic colloid-water...... impact of pH on the total sorption is contrasting. In fact, the shortcomings of the model assumptions affect the predictive power for acids and for bases differently. We evaluated accuracy and limitations of the regressions for their use in the environmental fate assessment of ionizable chemicals....

  12. Influence of soil pH on the sorption of ionizable chemicals

    Franco, Antonio; Fu, Wenjing; Trapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The soil-water distribution coefficient of ionizable chemicals (K-d) depends on the soil acidity, mainly because the pH governs speciation. Using pH-specific K-d values normalized to organic carbon (K-OC) from the literature, a method was developed to estimate the K-OC of monovalent organic acids...... and bases. The regression considers pH-dependent speciation and species-specific partition coefficients, calculated from the dissociation constant (pK(a)) and the octanol-water partition coefficient of the neutral molecule (log P-n). Probably because of the lower pH near the organic colloid......-water interface, the optimal pH to model dissociation was lower than the bulk soil pH. The knowledge of the soil pH allows calculation of the fractions of neutral and ionic molecules in the system, thus improving the existing regression for acids. The same approach was not successful with bases, for which the...

  13. Contrasting Soil pH Effects on Fungal and Bacterial Growth Suggest Functional Redundancy in Carbon Mineralization▿ †

    Rousk, Johannes; Brookes, Philip C.; Bååth, Erland

    2009-01-01

    The influence of pH on the relative importance of the two principal decomposer groups in soil, fungi and bacteria, was investigated along a continuous soil pH gradient at Hoosfield acid strip at Rothamsted Research in the United Kingdom. This experimental location provides a uniform pH gradient, ranging from pH 8.3 to 4.0, within 180 m in a silty loam soil on which barley has been continuously grown for more than 100 years. We estimated the importance of fungi and bacteria directly by measuri...

  14. Changes in ph, ec and concentration of phosphorus in soil solution during submergence and rice growth period in some paddy soils of north of Iran

    Nosratollah NAJAFI; Towfighi, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Changes in pH, EC and concentration of phosphorus in soil solution during submergence and rice growth period were studied in three paddy soils of North of Iran (one acid and two alkaline-calcareous soils). Also, changes in pH, EC and concentration of phosphorus in soil solution of an alkaline-calcareous soil after addition of 40 mg P/ kg of soil during submergence and rice growth period were studied. The experiment was performed in a set of specially fabricated pots equipped with ...

  15. Interaction of Cd and citric acid, EDTA in red soil

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption process of cadmium in redsoil(Ferrisols) as well as the influence by media's pH were investigated in detail with and without citric acid and EDTA. Experimental results clearly showed that Cd adsorption in red soil was affected significantly by the coexisted organic chemicals. In the presence of citric acid and EDTA, Cd adsorption in red soil increased with pH in acid media but decreased in high pH one. Further studies placed stress on the adsorbed Cd in red soil which was found to be existed mainly as exchangeable one at pH<5.5, and desorption rate by 0.10 mol/L NaNO3 gave a peak-shaped curve due to the difference of specifically and nonspecifically adsorbed Cd with pH's change.

  16. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells.

  17. 鼎湖山不同演替阶段森林土壤pH值和土壤微生物量碳氮对模拟酸雨的响应%Responses of Soil pH Value and Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Nitrogen to Simulated Acid Rain in Three Successional Subtropical Forests at Dinghushan Nature Reserve

    梁国华; 吴建平; 熊鑫; 吴小映; 褚国伟; 周国逸; 曾任森; 张德强

    2015-01-01

    开展酸雨增加对森林土壤酸化和土壤微生物活性的影响,可以为正确评估森林生态系统碳氮过程及其对全球气候变化的响应提供依据。以鼎湖山处于不同演替阶段的3种森林类型(马尾松Pinus massoniana)针叶林、针阔叶混交林和季风常绿阔叶林)为研究对象,从2009年6月开始,在自然林里喷施4个不同处理水平的模拟酸雨,即CK(pH=4.5左右的天然湖水)、T1(pH=4.0)、T2(pH=3.5)和T3(pH=3.0);2009年12月─2013年3月对模拟酸雨下土壤pH值和土壤微生物量碳、氮含量进行长期观测研究。重复测量方差分析表明,观测周期内,模拟酸雨没有显著影响松林的土壤pH值和土壤微生物量碳、氮含量,但却显著地降低了阔叶林的这3个指标(P0.05), but it significantly reduced soil pH value and soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in the BF (P<0.05), and the reduction was marginally significant in the MF. Compared with the CK treatment, mean rate of soil pH valuewere 0.01~0.04, 0.01~0.07, and 0.04~0.10 lower in the acid treatment plots in the PF, MF, and BF, respectively; similarly, mean rate of soil microbial biomass carbon were -1.0%~0.4%, 4.2%~13.6%, and 12.3%~18.4% lower, and mean rate of soil microbial biomass nitrogen were 0.8%~9.7%, 5.4%~17.4%, and 12.3%~25.1% lower in the acid treatment plots in the PF, MF, and BF, respectively. These results indicated the aggravation of soil acidification and the inhibition of soil microbial activity under the SAR in our forests, and more over, the sensitivity of the response of soil acidification and soil microbial activity to the SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive succession of three forests. In addition, by analyzing the responses of soil pH value and soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen of each year, we found that these negative effects had been strengthened over time with significant difference among treatments

  18. Characteristics of Phosphorus in Some Eastern Australian Acid Sulfate Soils

    2002-01-01

    Forty-five acid sulfate topsoil samples (depth < 0.5 m) from 15 soil cores were collected from 11 locations along the New South Wales coast, Australia. There was an overall trend for the concentration of the HC1extractable P to increase along with increasing amounts of organic C and the HCl-extractable trivalent metals in the topsoils of some less-disturbed acid sulfate soils (pH <4.5). This suggests that inorganic P in these soils probably accumulated via biological cycling and was retained by complexation with trivalent metals or their oxides and hydroxides. While there was no clear correlation between pH and the water-extractable P, the concentration of the water-extractable P tended to increase with increasing amounts of the HCl-extractable P. This disagrees with some established models which suggest that the concentration of solution P in acid soils is independent of total P and decreases with increasing acidity. The high concentration of sulfate present in acid sulfate soils appeared to affect the chemical behavior of P in these soil systems. Comparison was made between a less disturbed wetland acid sulfate soil and a more intensively disturbed sugarcane acid sulfate soil.The results show that reclamation of wetland acid sulfate soils for sugarcane production caused a significant decrease in the HCl-extractable P in the topsoil layer as a result of the reduced bio-cycling of phosphorus following sugarcane farming. Simulation experiment shows that addition of hydrated lime had no effects on the immobilization of retained P in an acid sulfate soil sample within a pH range 3.5~4.6. When the pH was raised to above 4.6, soluble P in the soil extracts had a tendency to increase with increasing pH until the 15th extraction (pH 5.13). This, in combination with the poor pH-soluble P relationship observed from the less-disturbed acid sulfate soils, suggests that soluble P was not clearly pH-dependent in acid sulfate soils with pH < 4.5.

  19. Alleviating aluminium toxicity on an acid sulphate soils in Peninsular Malaysia with application of calcium silicate

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to alleviate Al toxicity of an acid sulphate soils collected from paddy cultivation area in Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia. For this purpose, the collected acid sulphate soils were treated with calcium silicate. The treated soils were incubated for 120 days in submerged condition in a glasshouse. Subsamples were collected every 30 days throughout the incubation period. Soil pH and exchangeable Al showed positive effect; soil pH increased from ...

  20. Bioamendment of petroleum contaminated ultisol:effect on oil content, heavy metals and pH of tropical soil

    2001-01-01

    The effect of organic amendments on the oil content,heavy metals concentration and pH of petroleum contaminated sandy loam ultisol obtained from Rumuekpe oil field in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria was determined. Petroleum contaminated soils were treated with wood ash, compost and sawdust. The addition of organic amendments resulted in a significant(at 95% probability level) decrease in oil content by 92% for composting,81% for soil treated with sawdust and 58% for soil with ash supplementation, over 6 months. The effect of treatments on the iron(Fe), copper(Cu) and lead(Pb) concentration was significant at P<0.001. The remediation also affected the pH of soil. This initial pH of 5.6 was depressed by the application of compost and sawdust supplements respectively to a final pH of 5.2 and 5.3. On the other hand, amending the soil with wood ash raised the pH from 5.6 to 6.2. Increased acidity caused a decrease in the heavy metals concentration in the contaminated soil. Soil treatment with compost generally gave the best remediation results, followed by sawdust and then ash. Adjusting the pH of oil contaminated soil to high acidic levels may promote the availability and migration of heavy metals in remediated soils and not necessarily the rate of oil mineralization.

  1. Bacterial chitinolytic communities respond to chitin and pH alteration in soil

    Kielak, Anna; Cretoiu, Mariana; Semenov, Alexander; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; van Elsas, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Chitin amendment is a promising soil management strategy that may enhance the suppressiveness of soil toward plant pathogens. However, we understand very little of the effects of added chitin, including the putative successions that take place in the degradative process. We performed an experiment...... in moderately acid soil in which the level of chitin, next to the pH, was altered. Examination of chitinase activities revealed fast responses to the added crude chitin, with peaks of enzymatic activity occurring on day 7. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S r......RNA and chiA genes showed structural changes of the phylogenetically and functionally based bacterial communities following chitin addition and pH alteration. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated (i) that the diversity of chiA gene types in soil is enormous and (i) that different chiA gene types are selected...

  2. Simulated acid rain effects on soil chemistry and microbiology

    A research study was carried out regarding the effects of artificial rains at different pH's (3.1, 4.0, 5.6) on soil samples from Appiano Gentile pinewood. Chemical parameters, biological activities and microbiological groups, particularly sensitive to possible variations in the presence of pH changes, were monitored after 2, 4 and 6 months of treatment of the soil on eluate obtained from treatment with artificial acid rains. The paper reports the results research

  3. Effect of pH on boron adsorption in some soils of Paraná, Brazil

    Fábio Steiner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporary B deficiency can be triggered by liming of acid soils because of increased B adsorption at higher soil pH. Plants respond directly to the activity of B in soil solution and only indirectly to B adsorbed on soil constituents. Because the range between deficient and toxic B concentration is relatively narrow, this poses difficulty in maintaining appropriate B levels in soil solution. Thus, knowledge of the chemical behavior of B in the soil is particularly important. The present study investigated the effect of soil pH on B adsorption in four soils of Paraná State, and to correlate these values with the physical and chemical properties of the soils. Surface samples were taken from a Rhodic Hapludox, Arenic Hapludalf, Arenic Hapludult, and one Typic Usthorthent. To evaluate the effect of pH on B adsorption, subsamples soil received the application of increasing rates of calcium carbonate. Boron adsorption was accomplished by shaking 2.0 g soil, for 24 h, with 20 mL of 0.01 mol L¹ NaCl solution containing different concentrations (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, 2.0, and 4.0 mg B L-1. Sorption was fitted to non-linear form of the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Boron adsorption increased as concentration increased. Boron adsorption was dependent on soil pH, increasing as a function of pH in the range between 4.6 and 7.4, although the bonding energy has decreased. Maximum adsorption capacity (MAC of B was observed in the Arenic Hapludalf (49.8 mg B kg-1 soil followed by Arenic Hapludult (22.5 mg kg-1, Rhodic Hapludox (17.4 mg kg-1, and Typic Usthorthent (7.0 mg kg-1. The organic matter content, clay content, and aluminum oxide content (Al2O3 were the soils properties that affecting the B adsorption on Paraná soils.

  4. Mycorrhizal fungal communities respond to experimental elevation of soil pH and P availability in temperate hardwood forests.

    Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R; Kluber, Laurel A; Petersen, Sheryl M; Coyle, Kaitlin P; Hewins, Charlotte R; DeForest, Jared L; Smemo, Kurt A; Burke, David J

    2016-03-01

    Many forests are affected by chronic acid deposition, which can lower soil pH and limit the availability of nutrients such as phosphorus (P), but the response of mycorrhizal fungi to changes in soil pH and P availability and how this affects tree acquisition of nutrients is not well understood. Here, we describe an ecosystem-level manipulation in 72 plots, which increased pH and/or P availability across six forests in Ohio, USA. Two years after treatment initiation, mycorrhizal fungi on roots were examined with molecular techniques, including 454-pyrosequencing. Elevating pH significantly increased arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization and total fungal biomass, and affected community structure of AM and ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi, suggesting that raising soil pH altered both mycorrhizal fungal communities and fungal growth. AM fungal taxa were generally negatively correlated with recalcitrant P pools and soil enzyme activity, whereas EcM fungal taxa displayed variable responses, suggesting that these groups respond differently to P availability. Additionally, the production of extracellular phosphatase enzymes in soil decreased under elevated pH, suggesting a shift in functional activity of soil microbes with pH alteration. Thus, our findings suggest that elevating pH increased soil P availability, which may partly underlie the mycorrhizal fungal responses we observed. PMID:26850158

  5. Factors Affecting Sensitivity of Variable Charge Soils to Acid Rain

    WANGJING-HUA

    1995-01-01

    The sensitivity of a large number of variable charge soils to acid rain was evaluated through examining pH-H2SO4 input curves.Two derivative parameters,the consumption of hydrogen ions by the soil and the acidtolerant limit as defined as the quantity of sulfuric acid required to bring the soil to pH 3.5 in a 0.001mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 solution,were used.The sensitivity of variable charge soils was higher than that of constant charge soils,due to the predominance of kaolinite in clay mineralogical composition.Among these soils the sensitivity was generally of the order lateritic red soil>red soil> latosol.For a given type of soil within the same region the sensitivity was affected by parent material,due to differences in clay minerals and texture.The sensitivity of surface soil may be lower or higher than that of subsiol,depending on whether organic matter or texture plays the dominant role in determining the buffering capacity.Paddy soils consumed more acid within lower range of acid input when compared with upland soils,due to the presence of more exchangeable bases,but consumed less acid within higher acid input range,caused by the decrease in clay content.

  6. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Anderson R. Meda

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.Foram conduzidos experimentos de laboratórios para avaliar os efeitos de extratos de plantas solúveis em água na acidez do solo. Os materiais de plantas foram: aveia preta, nabo, tremoço branco e azul, mucuna cinza e anã, Crotalaria spectabilis e C. breviflora, milheto, guandu, grama estrela, grama mato grosso, folhas de café, folhas de cana-de-açúcar, palhada de arroz e palhada de trigo. Foi utilizado o seguinte procedimento para o extrato da planta solúvel em água: pesar 3g de material de planta, adicionar 150 ml de água, agitar por 8h e filtrar. Os extratos de plantas foram adicionados na superfície do solo em uma coluna de PVC (1 ml min-1. Após, adicionou-se água deionizada em quantidade equivalente a três volumes de poros. Os extratos de plantas aumentaram o pH, Ca e K trocável e diminuíram Al. Nabo, aveia preta e tremoço azul foram os melhores e milheto o pior material para amenizar a acidez do solo. Nabo aumentou Al na água de drenagem. As altera

  7. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    W. Luo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate containing soils across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate containing soils than in the non-carbonate containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC, carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate containing soils. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate and non-carbonate containing soils, leading to different rates, risks, and impacts of acidification. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  8. Interaction of NPK Fertilizers During Their Transformation in Soils:I.Dynamic Changes of Soil pH

    WANG HUOYAN; ZHOU JIANMIN; CHEN XIAOQIN; LI SHOUTIAN; DU CHANGWEN; DONG CAIXIA

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic changes of soil pH as influenced by ammonium sulfate (AS), monocalcium phosphate (MCP),potassium chloride (KCl) and their interaction in soils were evaluated in incubation experiments. Applyingthese fertilizers significantly reduced soil pH values in all cases and followed sequences of AS > MCP >KCl, MCP > KCl > AS and KCl > AS > MCP for the paddy, calcareous and red soils, respectively. TheAS-induced reduction of pH in the three soils followed the sequence of red soil > paddy soil > calcareous soil,while in MCP and KCl systems the reduction of pH followed the sequences of calcareous soil > paddy soil >red soil and red soil > calcareous soil > paddy soil, respectively. The interactions of the NPK fertilizers on pHwere significant. MCP plus KCl or MCP plus AS reduced pH values more than the fertilizers applied solelyin the paddy soil, but AS partly counteracted the effect of MCP on pH in the 1 d sample of the calcareoussoil. The effect of MCP on pH was trivial when MCP was applied in combination with KCl or AS in the redsoil. When applied in combination with AS, KCl did not affect soil pH initially, but suppressed the reductionof pH at the later incubation stage, which was related to inhibition of nitrification by KCl in the soils.

  9. Effect of organic matter and pH on the adsorption of metalaxyl and penconazole by soils

    Highlights: • The adsorption of non-ionic pesticides on soils is affected by pH. • At pH sOC/Ce ratio increased as the pH of the medium decreased. • The effect of pH on adsorption is related to the ionization of carboxylic groups. • SOM charge had similar effect on CsOC/Ce in the four soils under study. -- Abstract: Soil organic matter (SOM) is considered to be the primary adsorbent of non-ionic pesticides, and it is therefore thought to determine the concentration of such pesticides in the soil solution and how they are transported throughout the medium. It is generally assumed that the sorption capacity of different soils is the same per unit mass of SOM; however, the reactivity also depends on the SOM composition and the pH of the medium. We carried out experiments to study the effects of pH and ionic strength on the adsorption of the non-ionic fungicides metalaxyl and penconazole on four soils containing different amounts of organic carbon. The adsorption isotherms fitted a Freundlich equation. For pH > 5, partitioning of the fungicides between the solid phase and the soil solution did not vary with the pH, while at lower pH, the fraction adsorbed on the solid phase increased as the pH decreased. The response was related to the effect of pH on the ionization of the carboxylic groups of the SOM and therefore to the hydrophilic nature of the SOM. Analysis of the charge effect on the partitioning of both fungicides revealed a common response in all four soils. Adsorption appears to be related to the magnitude of the charge developed at the SOM due to ionization of the carboxylic acid groups

  10. Effect of organic matter and pH on the adsorption of metalaxyl and penconazole by soils

    Gondar, Dora; López, Rocío [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Antelo, Juan [Departamento de Edafología y Química Agrícola, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fiol, Sarah, E-mail: sarah.fiol@usc.es [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Arce, Florencio [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The adsorption of non-ionic pesticides on soils is affected by pH. • At pH < 5, the C{sub s}{sup OC}/C{sub e} ratio increased as the pH of the medium decreased. • The effect of pH on adsorption is related to the ionization of carboxylic groups. • SOM charge had similar effect on C{sub s}{sup OC}/C{sub e} in the four soils under study. -- Abstract: Soil organic matter (SOM) is considered to be the primary adsorbent of non-ionic pesticides, and it is therefore thought to determine the concentration of such pesticides in the soil solution and how they are transported throughout the medium. It is generally assumed that the sorption capacity of different soils is the same per unit mass of SOM; however, the reactivity also depends on the SOM composition and the pH of the medium. We carried out experiments to study the effects of pH and ionic strength on the adsorption of the non-ionic fungicides metalaxyl and penconazole on four soils containing different amounts of organic carbon. The adsorption isotherms fitted a Freundlich equation. For pH > 5, partitioning of the fungicides between the solid phase and the soil solution did not vary with the pH, while at lower pH, the fraction adsorbed on the solid phase increased as the pH decreased. The response was related to the effect of pH on the ionization of the carboxylic groups of the SOM and therefore to the hydrophilic nature of the SOM. Analysis of the charge effect on the partitioning of both fungicides revealed a common response in all four soils. Adsorption appears to be related to the magnitude of the charge developed at the SOM due to ionization of the carboxylic acid groups.

  11. Combined Use of Alkaline Slag and Rapeseed Cake to Ameliorate Soil Acidity in an Acid Tea Garden Soil

    WANG Lei; YANG Xing-Lun; K.RACHEL; WANG Yu; TONG De-Li; YE Mao; JIANG Xin

    2013-01-01

    Rapeseed cake (RC),the residue of rapeseed oil extraction,is effective for improving tea (Camellia sinensis) quality,especially taste and aroma,but it has limited ability to ameliorate strongly acidic soil.In order to improve the liming potential of RC,alkaline slag (AS),the by-product of recovery of sodium carbonate,was incorporated.Combined effects of different levels of RC and AS on ameliorating acidic soil from a tea garden were investigated.Laboratory incubations showed that combined use of AS and RC was an effective method to reduce soil exchangeable acidity and A1 saturation and increase base saturation,but not necessarily for soil pH adjustment.The release of alkalinity from the combined amendments and the mineralization of organic nitrogen increased soil pH initially,but then soil pH decreased due to nitrifications.Various degrees of nitrification were correlated with the interaction of different Ca levels,pH and N contents.When RC was applied at low levels,high Ca levels from AS repressed soil nitrification,resulting in smaller pH fluctuations.In contrast,high AS stimulated soil nitrification,when RC was applied at high levels,and resulted in a large pH decrease.Based on the optimum pH for tea production and quality,high ratios of AS to RC were indicated for soil acidity amelioration,and 8.0 g kg-1 and less than 2.5 g kg-1 were indicated for AS and RC,respectively.Further,field studies are needed to investigate the variables of combined amendments.

  12. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery

    Livia Maria Andaló TENUTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and < 0.005 mmols OH- to reach pH 5.5, respectively. Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH.

  13. Soil Quality Assessment of Acid Sulfate Paddy Soils with Different Productivities in Guangdong Province, China

    LIU Zhan-jun; ZHOU Wei; SHEN Jian-bo; LI Shu-tian; LIANG Guo-qing; WANG Xiu-bin; SUN Jing-wen; AI Chao

    2014-01-01

    Land conversion is considered an effective measure to ensure national food security in China, but little information is available on the quality of low productivity soils, in particular those in acid sulfate soil regions. In our study, acid sulfate paddy soils were divided into soils with high, medium and low levels based on local rice productivity, and 60 soil samples were collected for analysis. Twenty soil variables including physical, chemical and biochemical properties were determined. Those variables that were signiifcantly different between the high, medium and low productivity soils were selected for principal component analysis, and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), total nitrogen (TN), available silicon (ASi), pH and available zinc (AZn) were retained in the minimum data set (MDS). After scoring the MDS variables, they were integrated to calculate a soil quality index (SQI), and the high, medium and low productivity paddy soils received mean SQI scores of 0.95, 0.83 and 0.60, respectively. Low productivity paddy soils showed worse soil quality, and a large discrepancy was observed between the low and high productivity paddy soils. Lower MBC, TN, ASi, pH and available K (AK) were considered as the primary limiting factors. Additionally, all the soil samples collected were rich in available P and AZn, but deifcient in AK and ASi. The results suggest that soil AK and ASi deifciencies were the main limiting factors for all the studied acid sulfate paddy soil regions. The application of K and Si on a national basis and other sustainable management approaches are suggested to improve rice productivity, especially for low productivity paddy soils. Our results indicated that there is a large potential for increasing productivity and producing more cereals in acid sulfate paddy soil regions.

  14. TRPV1 senses both acidic and basic pH

    Dhaka, Ajay; Uzzell, Valerie; Dubin, Adrienne; Mathur, Jayanti; Petrus, Matt; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining physiological pH is required for survival, and exposure to alkaline chemicals such as ammonia (smelling salts) elicits severe pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, is an integrator of noxious stimuli including heat and extracellular acidic pH. Here we report that ammonia activates TRPV1, TRPA1 (another polymodal nocisensor), and other unknown receptor(s) expressed in sensory neurons. Ammonia and intracellular alkalization activate TRPV1 t...

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Soil Fulvic Acid

    Mir Munsif Ali Talpur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fulvic acid was isolated from the agriculture soil of District Naushahro Feroz, Sindh, Pakistan by International Humic Substances Society (IHSS method. The nutrient contents of the soil like N. P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn were determined by using the Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. The Spectroscopic analysis was carried out by studying the UV-Vis, FT-IR and NIR spectra of isolated compounds. The data has been compared with the literature and correlated. Moisture as well as texture shows good water holding capacity and silt- loam type of soil. pH and EC are indicators of the fertility of soil to be beneficial for plantation. The spectral data (UV-Visible, FTIR and NIR supports the characteristic functional groups (-COOH, C=O, -OH, -NH2, C=C, CH2 and Polysaccharides present in Fulvic acid. E4/E6 values depict its hydrophilic nature, having less aromatic and more aliphatic groups. The presence of metal ions indicates its chelating ability.

  16. Effect of organic matter and pH on the adsorption of metalaxyl and penconazole by soils.

    Gondar, Dora; López, Rocío; Antelo, Juan; Fiol, Sarah; Arce, Florencio

    2013-09-15

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is considered to be the primary adsorbent of non-ionic pesticides, and it is therefore thought to determine the concentration of such pesticides in the soil solution and how they are transported throughout the medium. It is generally assumed that the sorption capacity of different soils is the same per unit mass of SOM; however, the reactivity also depends on the SOM composition and the pH of the medium. We carried out experiments to study the effects of pH and ionic strength on the adsorption of the non-ionic fungicides metalaxyl and penconazole on four soils containing different amounts of organic carbon. The adsorption isotherms fitted a Freundlich equation. For pH>5, partitioning of the fungicides between the solid phase and the soil solution did not vary with the pH, while at lower pH, the fraction adsorbed on the solid phase increased as the pH decreased. The response was related to the effect of pH on the ionization of the carboxylic groups of the SOM and therefore to the hydrophilic nature of the SOM. Analysis of the charge effect on the partitioning of both fungicides revealed a common response in all four soils. Adsorption appears to be related to the magnitude of the charge developed at the SOM due to ionization of the carboxylic acid groups. PMID:23827731

  17. Mechanisms of soil pH regulation by biochar amendments and consequences for biochar long-term effects

    Rees, Frédéric; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Soil amendments of biochar, i.e. the solid product of biomass pyrolysis, have been increasingly investigated over the last few years as a way to store stable C in soils, to improve crop production and to remediate degraded and contaminated land. Many short-term effects of biochar on soil chemical and biological properties may be explained by the observed increase of soil pH, largely reported in the recent scientific literature for acid or neutral soils. However, both the mechanisms by which b...

  18. Succession of Soil Acidity Quality and its Influence on Soil Phosphorus Types

    DUANWenbiao; CHENLixin

    2004-01-01

    Succession rules of soil acidity quality of larch plantations in first rotation at different development stages, succession rules of soil acidity quality of young stand of larch plantations in second rotation and the relationship between soil acidity and various forms of organic phosphorus and inorganic phosphorus were studied in mountainous area of eastern part of Northeastern China. The results showed that active acidity (pH value) inrhizosphere soil decreased continually with stand age increasing from young stand, half-mature stand, near mature stand to mature stand, but active acidity (pH value) in non-rhizosphere soil, exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, total hydrolytic acidity, and the ratio of exchange acidity and total hydrolytic acidity in rhizosphere soil and in non-rhizosphere soil increased apparently; total organic P, moderately resistant organic P, and highly resistant organic P in soil decreased at all age stages in larch plantations when soil acidity added. For rhizosphere soil of all stands of larch plantations at different development stages,there was positive correlation between Ca-P (except in young stand), Al-P(except in half-mature stand), Fe-P (except in near mature stand and mature stand), O-P (except in young stand), and soil active acidity,respectively; For rhizosphere soil, there was negative correlation between Ca-P (except in half-mature stand), Al-P(except in young stand), O-P, and exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, there was also negative correlation between Ca-P, Al-P(except in young stand and half-mature stand), Fe-P, O-P, and total hydrolytic acidity respectively. For rhizosphere soil, the correlation coefficient between Ca-P, O-P and total hydrolytic aciditydecreased, respectively, as stand ages up and that between Fe-P and exchange acidity,exchangeable aluminium increased, respectively, as stand ages grew. For non-rhizosphere soil, there was not significant correlation between soil acidity and various forms of

  19. 不同母质和植被类型下红壤pH和交换性酸的剖面特征%Changes in pH and Exchangeable Acidity at Depths of Red Soils Derived from 4 Parent Materials Under 3 Vegetations

    赵凯丽; 蔡泽江; 王伯仁; 石林; 周晓阳; 孙楠

    2015-01-01

    性酸的变化较小。在3种植被类型下,0—40 cm土层以第四纪红土红壤酸化最为严重,其次为红砂岩红壤和花岗岩红壤,再次为板页岩红壤;湿地松林的酸化效果最强,其次为阔叶林,以马尾松林的酸化效果最弱。%[Objective]Soil parent materials and vegetation types are two main factors that affect soil acidification. To investigate changes in pH and soil exchangeable acidity at different depths of red soil derived from different soil parent materials and different vegetations will be significant for preventing soil acidification in regions with red soil.[Method]A series of soil samples at depths of 0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80 and 80-100 cm were collected from 11 sites with 4 parent materials (Quaternary red earth, Red sandstone, Plate shale, and Granite) under 3 vegetations (masson pine forest, slash pine forest, and broadleaf forest), in Qiyang County, Hunan province. Soil pH and soil exchangeable acidity were determined, and soil acidification was estimated by the difference in soil pH between 0-40 cm and 60-100 cm layers.[Result] The pH of red soils derived from the 4 parent materials was below 6.0. For the 4 parent materials, the average pH of red soils at 0-40 cm layers were following the orders: Granite red soil>Red sandstone red soil>Quaternary red earth red soil>Plate shale red soil; the average pH of red soils under the 3 vegetations were following the orders: masson pine forest>slash pine forest>broadleaf forest. But exchangeable acidity showed the opposite trend. For Quaternary red earth, soil pH significantly increased with soil depths increasing at 0-40 cm layers, but the pH of red soils derived from other parent materials decreased; soil exchangeable acidity had the opposite change trend as compared with soil pH. At layers of 40-100 cm, the average pH of red soils derived from the 4 parent materials werein the following order: Granite red soil>Quaternary red earth red soil>Red sandstone red soil>Plate shale red soil

  20. Effect of pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics in agricultural soils.

    Park, Jong Yol; Huwe, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effect of solution pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethazine) in combination with batch sorption tests and column experiments. Sorption isotherms properly conformed to Freundlich model, and sorption potential of the antibiotics is as follows; sulfadimethoxine > sulfamethoxazole > sulfamethazine. Decreasing pH values led to increased sorption potential of the antibiotics on soil material in pH range of 4.0-8.0. This likely resulted from abundance of neutral and positive-charged sulfonamides species at low pH, which electrostatically bind to sorption sites on soil surface. Due to destruction of macropore channels, lower hydraulic conductivities of mobile zone were estimated in the disturbed soil columns than in the undisturbed soil columns, and eventually led to lower mobility of the antibiotics in disturbed column. The results suggest that knowledge of soil structure and solution condition is required to predict fate and distribution of sulfonamide antibiotics in environmental matrix. PMID:26995452

  1. Soil water repellency and pH soil change under tropical pine plantations compared with native tropical forest

    Lebron, Inma; Robinson, David A.; Oatham, Mike; Wuddivira, Mark N.

    2012-01-01

    SummaryIn temperate climates, soil water repellency (SWR) has been documented to develop with land-use change from native forest to pine plantations. In the tropics a sparse evidence base has been documented for the observation of SWR, but no investigation has been conducted to determine the consequences of changing land-use from native forest to pine plantations with regard to SWR. In our research we broaden the evidence base for tropical SWR by comparing the SWR behavior of seven tropical pine plantations in Trinidad with co-located native forest. We found that SWR occurred under both pine and native forest, but was more persistent and less heterogeneous under pine. The SWR was water content dependent with a threshold ˜0.2 m 3 m -3, it showed a linear dependence with litter depth, and it was also found to be higher in more acidic soils. The forest floor pH, contrary to convention for temperate climates, was observed to increase under some pine plantations, as compared with native tropical forest. This only occurred in the very acidic tropical soils (pH soil and water quality.

  2. The solubility of aluminum in acidic forest soils: Long-term changes due to acid deposition

    Mulder, Jan; Stein, Alfred

    1994-01-01

    Despite the ecological and pedogenic importance of Al, its solubility control in acidic forest soils is poorly understood. Here we discuss the solubility of Al and its development with time in three acid brown forest soils in The Netherlands, which are under extreme acidification from atmospheric deposition. All soil solutions (to a 60 cm depth) were undersaturated with respect to synthetic gibbsite (Al(OH) 3; log K = 9.12 at 8°C), with the highest degree of undersaturation occurring in the surface soil. In about one third of the individual soil layers a significant positive correlation existed between the activity of Al 3+ and H +, but this relationship was far less than cubic. Kinetically constrained dissolution of Al is unlikely to explain the disequilibrium with respect to gibbsite, because undersaturation was highest through summer when water residence times were longest and temperatures greatest. Time series analysis of six year data sets for several soil layers revealed a significant annual decline in soil solution pH and Al solubility (defined as log Al + 3 pH) despite a constant concentration of strong acid anions. The annual decline of both pH and Al solubility was greatest in the surface soil and was positively correlated with the relative depletion of reactive organically bound soil Al. The results support our earlier hypothesis that in strongly acidified forest soils complexation by solid phase organics controls the solubility of Al even in mineral soil layers, relatively low in organic C. The data lend no support to the current widespread and often uncritical use of gibbsite as a model for the Al solubility in highly acidic forest soils (pH temperate zone.

  3. Mycorrhizal response to experimental pH and P manipulation in acidic hardwood forests.

    Laurel A Kluber

    Full Text Available Many temperate forests of the Northeastern United States and Europe have received significant anthropogenic acid and nitrogen (N deposition over the last century. Although temperate hardwood forests are generally thought to be N-limited, anthropogenic deposition increases the possibility of phosphorus (P limiting productivity in these forest ecosystems. Moreover, inorganic P availability is largely controlled by soil pH and biogeochemical theory suggests that forests with acidic soils (i.e., <pH 5 are particularly vulnerable to P limitation. Results from previous studies in these systems are mixed with evidence both for and against P limitation. We hypothesized that shifts in mycorrhizal colonization and community structure help temperate forest ecosystems overcome an underlying P limitation by accessing mineral and organic P sources that are otherwise unavailable for direct plant uptake. We examined arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM and ectomycorrhizal (EcM communities and soil microbial activity in an ecosystem-level experiment where soil pH and P availability were manipulated in mixed deciduous forests across eastern Ohio, USA. One year after treatment initiation, AM root biomass was positively correlated with the most available P pool, resin P, while AM colonization was negatively correlated. In total, 15,876 EcM root tips were identified and assigned to 26 genera and 219 operational taxonomic units (97% similarity. Ectomycorrhizal richness and root tip abundance were negatively correlated with the moderately available P pools, while the relative percent of tips colonized by Ascomycetes was positively correlated with soil pH. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed regional, but not treatment, differences in AM communities, while EcM communities had both treatment and regional differences. Our findings highlight the complex interactions between mycorrhizae and the soil environment and further underscore the fact that mycorrhizal communities do

  4. Characteristics of Soluble and Exchangeable Acidity in an Extremely Acidified Acid Sulfate Soil

    C.Lin; M.D.MELVILLE; 等

    1999-01-01

    An extremely acidified acid sulfate soil(ASS) was investigated to characterise its soluble and exchangeable acidity,The results showed that soluble acidity of a sample dtermined by titration with a KOH soulution was much significantly greater than that indicated by pH measured using a pH meter,paricularly for the extremely acidic soil samples,This is because the total soluble acidity of the extremely acidic soil samples was mainly composed of various soluble Al and Fe species,possibly in forms of Al sulfate complexes(e.g.,AlSO4+) and feerous Fe(Fe2+)_,It is therefore suggested not to use pH alone as an indicator of soluble acidity in ASS,particularly for extremely acidic ASS,It is also likely that AlSO4+ actively participated in cation exchange reactions.It appears that the possible involvement of this Al sulfate cation in the cation adsorption has significant effect on increasing the amount of acidity being adsorbed by the soils.

  5. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN pH VALUE AND MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF KUNMING RED LIMESTONE SOIL BY ACID- ALKALI DISPOSED%昆明红色石灰土经酸碱处理后的pH值与磁化率的关系研究

    钟望春; 苏怀; 张丹

    2012-01-01

    土壤磁性变化机制的研究中,越来越多的证据指示成壤作用的影响,而土壤理化性质是其分类的主要因素,却很少有关于土壤理化性质与磁化率关系的研究报道。通过对碳酸盐岩上覆红色石灰土的酸碱处理实验,探究土壤pH值与其磁化率的影响。研究结果表明:酸碱处理前,红色石灰土的磁化率集中在3000~4500×10m^3/kg,pH值在7~8,为碱性土壤;经HCI溶液处理后,pH值下降到1~4,磁化率下降到250—4000×10^-8m^3/kg,pH值与磁化率呈现正相关关系;经NaOH溶液处理后,pH值上升到8~13,磁化率反而下降到2500-4000×10^-8m^3/kg,pH值与磁化率呈现负相关关系。上述现象的产生,与酸和强碱所分别带来的还原和氧化环境有关,改变了弱磁性矿物和强磁性矿物之间的转化方向,抑制了趋磁细菌作用,最终引起土壤磁化率的变化。%About the research of soil magnetic change mechanism, more and more evidences indicate the impact of pedogenesis. The physical and chemical properties of soil decided soil classification, rarely reported on he relationship between soil properties and magnetic susceptibility. Based on studied the red limestone soil Acid - Alkali disposed, try to analysis the relationship between soil pH and the Magnetic susceptibility. Our result indicate that the magnetic susceptibility of the soils changes from 3 000 -4 500 × 10^ -8m^3/kg before disposing and the pH value of the soil stays from 7 -8, belongs to alkaline soil. After disposing the soil samples with HCl, the magnetic susceptibility changes from 250 -4 000 × 10^-8m^3/kg and the pH value drops tol -4, the pH value and the magmefic susceptibility are positive correlation. After disposing the soil samples with NaOH, the magnetic susceptibility changes form 2 500 - 4 000 × 10^-8m^3/kg and the pH value rises to 8 - 13, the pH value and the magnetic susceptibility are negative

  6. Soil Components Affecting Phosphate Sorption Parameters of Acid Paddy Soils in Guangdong Province

    2000-01-01

    Soil components affecting phosphate sorption parameters were studied using acid paddy soils derived from basalt, granite, sand-shale and the Pearl River Delta sediments, respectively, in Guangdong Province.For each soil, seven 2.50 g subsamples were equilibrated with 50 mL 0.02 mol L-1 (pH=7.0) of KCl containing 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50 and 100 ng P kg-1, respectively, in order to derive P sorption parameters (P sorption maximum, P sorption intensity factor and maximum buffer capacity) by Langmuir isotherm equation. It was shown that the main soil components influencing phosphate sorption maximum (Xm) included soil clay, pH,amorphous iron oxide (Feo) and amorphous aluminum oxide (Alo), with their effects in the order of Alo >Feo > pH > clay. Among these components, pH had a negative effect, and the others had a positive effect.Organic matter (OM) was the only soil component influencing P sorption intensity factor (K). The main components influencing maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC) consisted of soil clay, OM, pH, Feo and Alo, with their effects in the order of Alo > OM > pH > Feo > clay. Path analysis indicated that among the components with positive effects on maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC), the effect was in the order of Alo > Feo > Clay, while among the components with negative effects, OM > pH. OM played an important role in mobilizing phosphate in acid paddy soils mainly through decreasing the sorption intensity of phosphate by soil particles.

  7. Observation of Soil Water Repellency and pH soil change under Tropical Pine Plantations Compared with Native Tropical Forest

    Robinson, D. A.; Lebron, I.; Oatham, M. P.; Wuddivira, M. N.

    2011-12-01

    In temperate climates, soil water repellency (SWR) has been documented to develop with land-use change from native forest to pine plantations. In the tropics a sparse evidence base has been documented for the observation of SWR, but no investigation has been conducted to determine the consequences of changing land-use from native forest to pine plantations with regard to SWR. In our research we broaden the evidence base for tropical SWR by comparing the SWR behavior of seven tropical pine plantations in Trinidad with co-located native forest. We found that SWR occurred under both pine and native forest, but was more persistent and less heterogeneous under pine. The SWR was water content dependent with a threshold ~0.2 m3m-3, it showed a linear dependence with litter depth, and it was also found to be pH dependent, being higher in more acidic soils. The forest floor pH, contrary to convention for temperate climates, was observed to increase under some pine plantations, as compared with native tropical forest. This only occurred in the very acidic tropical soils (pHsoil and water quality.

  8. Tolerance of VA Mycorrhizal Fungi to Soil Acidity

    2001-01-01

    A 45-day greenhouse experiment was carried out to determine effect of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizai fungi on colonization rate,plant height, plant growth,hyphae length,total Al in the plants,exchangeable A1 in the soil and soil pH by comparison at soil pH 3.5,4.5 and 6.0.Plant mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus L.) and crotalaria (Crotalaria mucronata Desv.) were grown with and without VA mycorrhizal fungi in pots with red soil.Ten VA mycorrhizal fungi strains were tested,including Glomus epigaeum (No.90001),Glomus caledonium (No.90036),Glomus mosseae (No.90107), Acaulospora spp.(No.34),Scutellospora heterogama (No.36),Scutellospora calospora (No. 37),Glomus manihotis (No.38),Gigaspora spp.(No.47),Glomus manihotis (No.49),and Acaulospora spp.(No.53).Being the most tolerant to acidity,strain 34 and strain 38 showed quicker and higher-rated colonization without lagging,three to four times more in number of nodules,two to four times more in plant dry weight,30% to 60% more in hyphae length,lower soil exchangeable Al,and higher soil pH than without VA mycorrhizal fungi (CK).Other strains also could improve plant growth and enhance plant tolerance to acidity,but their effects were not marked.This indicated that VA mycorrhizal fungi differed in the tolerance to soil acidity and so did their inoculation effects.In the experiment,acidic soil could be remedied by inoculation of promising VA mycorrhizal fungi tolerant of acidity.

  9. Soil acidity and mobile aluminum status in pseudogley soils in Čačak-Kraljevo basin

    Đalović Ivica G.; Jocković Đorđe S.; Dugalić Goran J.; Bekavac Goran F.; Purar Božana; Šeremešić Srđan I.; Jocković Milan Đ.

    2012-01-01

    Soil acidity and aluminum toxicity are considered most damaging soil conditions affecting the growth of most crops. This paper reviews the results of tests of pH, exchangeable acidity and mobile aluminum (Al) concentration in profiles of pseudogley soils from Čačak-Kraljevo basin. For that purpose, 102 soil pits were dug in 2009 in several sites around Čačak- Kraljevo basin. The tests encompassed 54 field, 28 meadow, and 20 forest soil samples. Samples of soil in the disturbed state wer...

  10. Biochar impacts soil microbial community composition and nitrogen cycling in an acidic soil planted with rape.

    Xu, Hui-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Hu; Yao, Huai-Ying; Su, Jian-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-08-19

    Biochar has been suggested to improve acidic soils and to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. However, little has been done on the role of biochar in ameliorating acidified soils induced by overuse of nitrogen fertilizers. In this study, we designed a pot trial with an acidic soil (pH 4.48) in a greenhouse to study the interconnections between microbial community, soil chemical property changes, and N2O emissions after biochar application. The results showed that biochar increased plant growth, soil pH, total carbon, total nitrogen, C/N ratio, and soil cation exchange capacity. The results of high-throughput sequencing showed that biochar application increased α-diversity significantly and changed the relative abundances of some microbes that are related with carbon and nitrogen cycling at the family level. Biochar amendment stimulated both nitrification and denitrification processes, while reducing N2O emissions overall. Results of redundancy analysis indicated biochar could shift the soil microbial community by changing soil chemical properties, which modulate N-cycling processes and soil N2O emissions. The significantly increased nosZ transcription suggests that biochar decreased soil N2O emissions by enhancing its further reduction to N2. PMID:25054835

  11. Influence of Soil and Irrigation Water pH on the Availability of Phosphorus in Struvite Derived from Urine through a Greenhouse Pot Experiment.

    Liu, Xiaoning; Tao, Yi; Wen, Guoqi; Kong, Fanxin; Zhang, Xihui; Hu, Zhengyi

    2016-05-01

    One greenhouse pot experiment was used to investigate the availability of phosphorus in struvite derived from urine affected by soil pH (cinnamon soil, pH 7.3; paddy soil, pH 5.3) and irrigation water (pH 6.0 and 7.5) with bird rapeseed (Brassica campestris L.). The biomass of applied struvite in paddy soil was significantly greater than that of applied calcium superphosphate. However, statistically significant differences were not observed in cinnamon soil. Soil-applied struvite had a higher Olsen P compared to soil-applied calcium superphosphate irrespective of soil type. The biomass of applied struvite and irrigation with pH 6.0 water was greater compared to that with irrigation with pH 7.3 water irrespective of soil type, accompanied with significantly higher leaf chlorophyll concentration. Therefore, struvite has the potential to be an effective P fertilizer, and acidic irrigation water has greater influence on the availability of phosphorus in struvite than does acidic soil. PMID:27078189

  12. Effect of acid rain on soil microbial processes

    Acid rain is real; the pH of precipitation in many areas of the world is below its normal equilibrium value, and concentrations of inorganic N and S are elevated above background. The impact of acid rain on soil microbial processes is less clear. This is largely because of the chemical buffering of the soil ecosystem and the inherent resiliency and redundancy of soil microorganisms. Microorganisms have an amazing capacity to adapt to new situations, which is enhanced by their ability to evolve under selection pressure. Their resilience is a function of both the large number of microorganisms present in a given volume of soil and their high growth rate relative to macroorganisms. This suggests that microorganisms are likely to be able to adapt more quickly to acidification than plants or animals, which may be one reason why symbiotic associations, such as ectomycorrhizae, are more susceptible to acid inputs than their saprophytic counterparts

  13. Chemical Species of Aluminum Lons in Acid Soils

    XURENKOU; JIGUOLIANG

    1998-01-01

    Soil samples collected from several acid soils in Guangdong,Fujian,Zhejiang and Anhui provinces of the southern China were employded to characterize the chemical species of aluminum ions in the soils.The proportion or monoeric inorganic Al to total Al in soil solution was in the range of 19% to 70%,that of monomeric organlic Al (Al-OM) to total Al ranged from 7.7% to 69%,and that of the acid-soluble Al to total Al was generally smaller and was lower than 20% in most of the acid soils studied ,The Al-OM concentration in soil solution was postively correlated with the content of dissolved organic carbon(DOC) and aslo affected by the concentration of Al3+,The complexes of aluminum with fluoride(Al-F) were the predominant forms of inorganic Al,and the proportion of Al-F compexes to total inorganic Al increased with pH.Under strongly acid ondition,Al3+ was also a mjaor form of inorganic Al,and the proportio of Al3+ to total inorganic Al decreased with increasing pH.The,proportions of Al-OH and Al-SO4 complexes to total inorganic Al were small and were not larger than 10% in the most acid soils.The concentration of inorganic Al in solution depended largely on pH and the concentration of total F in soil solution,The concentrations of Al-OM,Al3+,Al-F and Al-OH complexes in topsoil were higher than those in subsoil and decreased with the increase in soil depth,The chemical species of aluminum ions were influenced by pH,The concentrations of Al-OM, Al3+,Al-F complexes and Al-OH complexes decreased with the increase in pH.

  14. Determination of amino acids in industrial effluents contaminated soil

    38 samples of soil for 19 locations partially irrigated on the effluents of sugar mill and oil andghee mill, bottom sediments of evaporation ponds of sugar and fertilizer industries were collected and analyzed for amino acids after acid digestion by gas chromatography using pre column derivatization with trifluroacetyleacetone and ethyl chloroformate. The results obtained were compared with the soil samples irrigated with fresh water. The soil samples were also analyzed for pH, total nitrogen contents and organic carbon. Nine essential (leucine (Leu), threonine (Thr), lysine (Lys), L-phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), histadine (His), L-valine (Val), methionine (Met) and isoleucine Ile) and ten non-essential ( alanine (Ala), cysteine (Cys), asparagine (Asn), glutamic acid (Glu), serine (Ser), glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), Glutamine (Gln), aspartic acid (Asp), tyrosine (Tyr)) amino acids were analyzed 13-15 amino acids were identified and determined quantitatively from soil samples. Amino acids Met, Asn, Gln and Trp were observed absent from all the samples. The variation in the amino acids contents in soil with the industrial effluents added and total nitrogen and organic carbon is discussed. (author)

  15. Acidification of Forest Soils: A Model for Analyzing Impacts of Acidic Deposition in Europe - Version II

    Kauppi, P.; Kaemaeri, J.; Posch, M; Kauppi, L.; Matzner, E.

    1985-01-01

    Acidification is an unfavorable process in forest soils. Timber logging, natural accumulation of biomass in the ecosystem, and acidic deposition are sources of acidification. Acidification causes a risk of damage to plant roots and a subsequent risk of a decline in ecosystem productivity. A dynamic model is introduced for describing the acidification of forest soils. In one-year time steps the model calculates the soil pH as function of acid stress and the buffer mechanisms of the soil. ...

  16. Effect of Oxalic Acid on Potassium Release from Typical Chinese Soils and Minerals

    TU Shu-Xin; GUO Zhi-Fen; SUN Jin-He

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid plays an important role in improving the bioavailability of soil nutrients. Batch experiments were employed to examine the influences of oxalic acid on extraction and release kinetics of potassium (K) from soils and minerals along with the adsorption and desorption of soil K+. The soils and minerals used were three typical Chinese soils, black soil (Mollisol), red soil (Ultisol), and calcareous alluvial soil (Entisol), and four K-bearing minerals, biotite, phlogopite, muscovite, and microcline. The results showed that soil K extracted using 0.2 mol L-1 oxalic acid was similar to that using 1 mol L-1 boiling HNO3. The relation between K release (y) and concentrations of oxalic acid (c) could be best described logarithmically as y=a+blogc, while the best-fit kinetic equation of K release was y=a +b√t, where a and b are the constants and t is the elapsed time. The K release for minerals was ranked as biotite> phlogopite>> muscovite> microcline and for soils it was in the order: black soil> calcareous alluvial soil> red soil. An oxalic acid solution with low pH was able to release more K from weathered minerals and alkaline soils. Oxalic acid decreased the soil K+ adsorption and increased the soil K+ desorption, the effect of which tended to be greater at lower solution pH, especially in the red soil.

  17. Impact of tree species on soil carbon stocks and soil acidity in southern Sweden

    The impact of tree species on soil carbon stocks and acidity in southern Sweden was studied in a non-replicated plantation with monocultures of 67-year-old ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), beech (Fagus silvatica L.), elm (Ulmus glabra Huds.), hornbeam (Carpinusbetulus L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.). The site was characterized by a cambisol on glacial till. Volume-determined soil samples were taken from the O-horizon and mineral soil layers to 20 cm. Soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), pH (H2O), cation-exchange capacity and base saturation at pH 7 and exchangeable calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium ions were analysed in the soil fraction hornbeam > oak > beech > ash > elm. The pH in the O-horizon ranged in the order elm > ash > hornbeam > beech > oak > spruce. In the mineral soil, SOC and TN ranged in the order elm > oak > ash = hornbeam > spruce > beech, i.e. partly reversed, and pH ranged in the same order as for the O-horizon. It is suggested that spruce is the best option for fertile sites in southern Sweden if the aim is a high carbon sequestration rate, whereas elm, ash and hornbeam are the best solutions if the aim is a low soil acidification rate

  18. Acid soils of western Serbia and their further acidification

    Mrvic, Vesna

    2010-05-01

    Acid soils cause many unfavorable soil characteristics from the plant nutrition point of view. Because of increased soil acidity the violation of buffering soil properties due to leaching of Ca and Mg ions is taking place that also can cause soil physical degradation via peptization of colloids. Together with increasing of soil acidity the content of mobile Al increases that can be toxic for plants. Easily available nutritive elements transforms into hardly avaialble froms. The process of deactivation is especially expressed for phosphorous that under such conditions forms non-soluble compounds with sesqui-oxides. From the other hand the higher solubility of some microelements (Zn and B) can cause their accelerated leaching from root zone and therefore, result in their deficiency for plant nutrition. Dangerous and toxic matters transforms into easly-available forms for plants, especially, Cd and Ni under the lower soil pH. The studied soil occupies 36675 hectare in the municipality of Krupan in Serbia, and are characterized with very unfavorable chemical properties: 26% of the territory belongs to the cathegory of very acidic, and 44 % belongs to the cathegory of acidic. The results showed that the soil of the territory of Krupan is limited for agricultural land use due to their high acidity. Beside the statement of negative soil properties determined by acidity, there is a necessity for determination of soil sensitivity for acidification processes toward soil protection from ecological aspect and its prevention from further acidification. Based on such data and categorization of soils it is possible to undertake proper measures for soil protection and melioration of the most endangered soil cover, where the economic aspect of these measures is very important. One of the methods of soil classification based on sensitivity for acidification classification the determination of soil categories is based on the values of soil CEC and pH in water. By combination of these

  19. The relationship between N mineralization or microbial biomass N with micromorphological properties in beech forest soils with different texture and pH

    Kooijman, A.M.; Mourik, van, J.A.; Schilder, M.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    To test relationships between net N-mineralization, organic matter and soil organisms, we combined micromorphology with laboratory incubation experiments over a soil gradient. Microbial biomass N generally increased with pH, and from sandy to loamy soil, but net N-mineralization showed the opposite, and was highest in acid, sandy soil. Twenty-two micromorphological characteristics were analyzed with principal component analysis. PC1 had high eigenvalue (0.70), and clearly separated fungi from...

  20. EFFECT OF SIMULATED ACID RAIN ON NITRIFICATION AND NITROGEN MINERALIZATION IN FOREST SOILS

    To determine the possible microbiological changes in soil resulting from acid rain, columns containing samples of forest soils were leached with either a continuous application of 100cm of simulated acid rain (pH3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour or an intermittent 1.5-hour application of 1.2...

  1. Leachability and desorption of PCBs from soil and their dependency on pH and dissolved organic matter

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu, E-mail: badeasilviu@gmail.com; Mustafa, Majid; Lundstedt, Staffan; Tysklind, Mats

    2014-11-15

    pH affects both soil–water partitioning coefficient (K{sub d}) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), thereby influencing PCBs' leachability from contaminated soils. To explore these incompletely understood interactions, the leachability of 11 selected PCBs in a naturally aged soil was investigated in pH static leaching tests spanning a wide pH range (2 to 9). The K{sub d} was calculated for each of the PCBs, based on their observed concentrations in the soil and leachates obtained from each test. The concentration and composition of DOM in each leachate were also determined, the latter using FTIR spectroscopy. Correlations between the DOM's FTIR spectra and K{sub d} values were investigated by orthogonal projections to latent structures. The log K{sub d}-values varied among the PCB congeners and were most variable at low pH, but the values for all studied congeners decreased with increasing pH, by up to 3 log units (for PCB 187). In the pH 5–7 interval, an abrupt decrease in log K{sub d} values with increases in pH was observed, although the total organic carbon content remained relatively stable. The FTIR data indicate that fulvic and humic acids in DOM partially deprotonate as the pH rises from 5 to 7. - Highlights: • The log K{sub d}-values of 11 selected PCBs were investigated in pH static leaching tests • The log K{sub d}-values of all PCBs decreased with increasing pH, by up to 3 log units • The de-protonation of humics may explain why K{sub d}-values fell as pH rose from 5 to 7.

  2. Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study

    Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R. [Rutgers Centre, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  3. Short-term effects of human urine fertiliser and wood ash on soil pH and electrical conductivity

    Dora Neina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fertiliser value of human urine has been examined on several crops, yet little is known about its effects on key soil properties of agronomic significance. This study investigated temporal soil salinization potential of human urine fertiliser (HUF. It further looked at combined effects of human urine and wood ash (WA on soil pH, urine-NH_3 volatilisation, soil electrical conductivity (EC, and basic cation contents of two Acrisols (Adenta and Toje series from the coastal savannah zone of Ghana. The experiment was a factorial design conducted in the laboratory for 12 weeks. The results indicated an increase in soil pH by 1.2 units for Adenta series and 1 unit for Toje series after one week of HUF application followed by a decline by about 2 pH units for both soil types after twelve weeks. This was attributed to nitrification of ammonium to nitrate leading to acidification. The EC otherwise increased with HUF application creating slightly saline conditions in Toje series and non-saline conditions in Adenta series. When WA was applied with HUF, both soil pH and EC increased. In contrast, the HUF alone slightly salinized Toje series, but both soils remained non-saline whenWA and HUF were applied together. The application ofWA resulted in two-fold increase in Ca, Mg, K, and Na content compared to HUF alone. Hence, WA is a promising amendment of acid soils and could reduce the effect of soluble salts in human urine fertilizer, which is likely to cause soil salinity.

  4. Impacts of soil organic matter, pH and exogenous copper on sorption behavior of norfloxacin in three soils

    ZHANG Jie; LI Zhaojun; GE Gaofei; SUN Wanchun; LIANG Yongchao; WU Laosheng

    2009-01-01

    Norfloxacin (Nor) sorption and the factors (soil organic matter (SOM), pH, and exogenous copper (Cu) influencing the sorption were investigated in a black soil (soil B), a fluvo-aquic soil (soil F), and a red soil (soil R). With increasing of Nor concentrations, sorption amount of norfloxacin increased in both the bulk soils and their SOM-removed soils, but the sorption capacity in SOM-removed soils was higher than that of their corresponding bulk soils, indicating that the process of norfloxacin sorption in soil was influenced by the soil properties including SOM. The sorption data in all bulk soils and SOM-removed soils were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir models. The correlation coefficients suggested that the experimental data fitted better to Freundlich equation than to Langmuir equation. Furthermore, the data from soil F and SOM-removed F could not be described by Langmuir equation. The norfloxacin sorption amount decreased in soil B and soil F, whereas it increased in soil R as solution pH increased. The maximum KD and KOC were achieved in soil R when the equilibrium solution pH was 6. And the norfloxacin sorption was also influenced by the exogenous Cu2+ ions, which depended on the soil types and Cu2+ concentrations. With increasing of Cu2+ concentrations in solution, generally, sorption amount, KD and KOC for norfloxacin in soils increased and were up to a peak at 100 mg/L Cu2+, and then the sorption amount decreased regardless of norfloxacin levels.

  5. The effect of acidity on the distribution and symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia in Lithuanian soils

    Lapinskas, E. B.

    2007-04-01

    The distribution and symbiotic efficiency of nodule bacteria Rhizobium leguminosarum_bv. trifolii F., Sinorhizobium meliloti D., Rhizobium galegae L., and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae F. in Lithuanian soils as dependent on the soil acidity were studied in the long-term field, pot, and laboratory experiments. The critical and optimal pH values controlling the distribution of rhizobia and the symbiotic nitrogen fixation were determined for every bacterial species. The relationship was found between the soil pH and the nitrogen-fixing capacity of rhizobia. A positive effect of liming of acid soils in combination with inoculation of legumes on the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation was demonstrated.

  6. Responses of soil buffering capacity to acid treatment in three typical subtropical forests.

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yu, Mengxiao; Li, Kun; Shao, Yijing; Yan, Junhua

    2016-09-01

    Elevated anthropogenic acid deposition can significantly affect forest ecosystem functioning by changing soil pH, nutrient balance, and chemical leaching and so on. These effects generally differ among different forests, and the dominant mechanisms for those observed responses often vary, depending on climate, soil conditions and vegetation types. Using soil monoliths (0-40cm) from pine forest (pioneer), coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (transitional) and broadleaved forest (mature) in southern China, we conducted a leaching experiment with acid treatments at different pH levels (control: pH≈4.5; pH=3.5; pH=2.5). We found that pH3.5 treatment significantly reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in leachate from the pioneer forest soil. pH2.5 treatment significantly increased concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the pioneer forest soil, and also concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the transitional forest soil. All acid treatments had no significant effects on concentrations of these chemicals in leachate from the mature forest soil. The responses can be explained by the changes in soil pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and concentrations of Al and Fe. Our results showed that acid buffering capacity of the pioneer or transitional forest soil was lower than that of the mature forest soil. Therefore preserving mature forests in southern China is important for reducing the adverse impacts of high acid deposition on stream water quality at present and into the future. PMID:27185346

  7. Effects of Electrolyte Anions and pH on Adsortpion of Sulfate by Variable Charge Soils

    ZHANGGANGYA; G.M.BRUEMMER; 等

    1996-01-01

    The effects of three electrolyte anions,ionic strength and pH on the adsorption of sulfate by two variable charge soils,with different surface charge properties were studied.Under the conditions of the same pH and ionic strength the effect of electrolyte anions on the adsorption of sulfate was in the order of Cl->NO3->ClO4-,indicating the difference of the nature among these three anions.For ferralsol in the same concentration of chloride and perchloride solutions,the two sulfate adsorption-pH curves could intersect at certain pH value.When pH was higher than the intersecting point.more sulfate was adsorbed in the perchloride solution,while when it was lower than the intersecting point,more sulfate was adsorbed in the chloride solution.In different concentratioins of electrolyte solution,the curves of the amount of oxy-acid anion adsorbed,which changed with pH,could intersect at a certain pH,which is termed point of zero salt effect(PZSE) on adsortpion.The nature of electrolyte anions influenced obviously the appearace of PZSE for sulfate adsorption.For ferralsol the curves of adsorption converged to about pH 7 in NaCl solution seemed to intersect in NaNO3 solution and to have a typical PZSE for sulfate adsorption in NaClO4 solution,For Acrisol the three curves of adsorption were nearly parallel in NaCl and NaNO3 solutions and converged to pH 6.5 in NaClO4 solution.

  8. Variation in pH Optima of Hydrolytic Enzyme Activities in Tropical Rain Forest Soils

    Turner, Benjamin L.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes synthesized by soil microbes play a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in the environment. The pH optima of eight hydrolytic enzymes involved in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, were assessed in a series of tropical forest soils of contrasting pH values from the Republic of Panama. Assays were conducted using 4-methylumbelliferone-linked fluorogenic substrates in modified universal buffer. Optimum pH values differed markedly am...

  9. The effect of soil pH on N2O/(N2O+N2) product ratio of denitrification depends on soil NO3- concentration

    Senbayram, Mehmet; Dittert, Klaus; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lammel, Joachim; Bakken, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Globally, agricultural soils account for about 60% of the atmospheric N2O emissions and denitrification in soil is the major source of atmospheric N2O, which contributes to global warming and destruction of stratospheric ozone. Denitrification is the microbially mediated process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction that may produce not only N2O but also nitric oxide (NO), and molecular nitrogen (N2). The major controls on denitrification rates are soil NO3, O2, and labile C levels. Typically, when soils become more anoxic, larger proportions of N2O produced in denitrification are further reduced to N2 before leaving the soil. Microbial ecology may possibly find solutions to this major environmental problem of agricultural systems once mechanisms controlling the product ratio of denitrification (N2O/N2O+N2) are better understood. Recent investigations of these gaseous microbial products provided the evidence for a negative effect of soil acidity on the N2O/N2O+N2 product ratio. However, in an earlier study, we showed that, regardless of soil type, higher NO3- concentrations in soil may also retard the reduction of N2O to N2. In this context, the positive effect of higher soil pH on the N2O/(N2O+N2) product ratio in soils with high NO3- content is still poorly understood. Therefore, we set up a number of incubation experiments in order to test short-term and long-term effects of soil pH and NO3- concentration on denitrification rates and the product stoichiometry of denitrification. We measured N2O, NO as well as elemental N2 in soils with pH levels ranging 4.1 to pH 6.9 collected from a long-term liming experiment. In a continuous flow incubation system we evacuated and flushed all vessels with He. Then, fresh He was directed through an inlet in the lid at a flow rate of 15-30 ml min-1. Gas samples were analyzed twice a day for N2O by ECD and for N2 by TCD detectors. Denitrification rates increased significantly with increasing soil pH, however, during the initial

  10. Insights into the Effect of Soil pH on N2O and N2 Emissions and Denitrifier Community Size and Activity ▿

    Čuhel, Jiří; Šimek, Miloslav; Laughlin, Ronnie J.; Bru, David; Chèneby, Dominique; Watson, Catherine J.; Philippot, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how changes in soil pH affect the N2O and N2 emissions, denitrification activity, and size of a denitrifier community. We established a field experiment, situated in a grassland area, which consisted of three treatments which were repeatedly amended with a KOH solution (alkaline soil), an H2SO4 solution (acidic soil), or water (natural pH soil) over 10 months. At the site, we determined field N2O and N2 emissions using the 15N gas flux method and...

  11. Effects of simulated acid rain on microbial characteristics in a lateritic red soil.

    Xu, Hua-qin; Zhang, Jia-en; Ouyang, Ying; Lin, Ling; Quan, Guo-ming; Zhao, Ben-liang; Yu, Jia-yu

    2015-11-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed to examine the impact of simulated acid rain (SAR) on nutrient leaching, microbial biomass, and microbial activities in a lateritic red soil in South China. The soil column leaching experiment was conducted over a 60-day period with the following six SAR pH treatments (levels): 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0 and one control treatment (pH = 7). Compared with the control treatment, the concentrations of soil organic matter, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), and average well color density (AWCD) in the Ecoplates were all significantly decreased by leaching with SAR at different pH levels. The decrease in MBC and MBN indicated that acid rain reduced the soil microbial population, while the decrease in AWCD revealed that acid rain had a negative effect on soil bacterial metabolic function. Soil basal respiration increased gradually from pH 4.0 to 7.0 but decreased dramatically from pH 2.5 to 3.0. The decrease in soil nutrient was the major reason for the change of soil microbial functions. A principal component analysis showed that the major carbon sources used by the bacteria were carbohydrates and carboxylic acids. PMID:26201661

  12. Soil organic matter, soil pH and soil nutrient dynamics in forest stands after fire

    Altun, Lokman; Bilgili, Ertuğrul; SAĞLAM, Bülent; KÜÇÜK, Ömer; Yılmaz, Murat; Tüfekçioğlu, Aydın

    2004-01-01

    Fires burn, spread and release energy. The process of burning not only helps increase the decomposition of organic matters but also causes the plant nutrients bound to vegetation and organic dead material to get into soil and inflicts changes on the physical and chemical properties of soil. Changes taken place in soils and their status over time are extremely important for the success of the vegetation that will establish on the site after fire. This study presents the results of a study cond...

  13. pH Effect on kinetics of Heavy Metal Sorption in Soils

    LINYU-SUO; XUEJIA-HUA

    1994-01-01

    The pH effect on the sorption kinetics of heavy metals in soils was studied using a constant flow leaching method.The soil samples were red soil collected from Yingtan,Jiangxi,and yellow-brown soil from Nanjing,Jiansu,The heavy metals tested were zinc and cadmium.Assuming that the experimental data diffed to the following kinetic rate equation:1/c.dx/dt=kx∞-kx,the rate constant k of sorption could be determined from the slope of the straight line by plotting of 1/c,dx/dt vs.x.The results showed that the pH effect on the rate constants of heavy mental sorption in soils was very significant.The values of k decreased with increasing pH.The sorptions were more sensitive to pH in red soil than in yellow-brown soil.

  14. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China. PMID:26657252

  15. Effects of Multiple Soil Conditioners on a Mine Site Acid Sulfate Soil for Vetiver Growth

    LIN Chu-Xia; LONG Xin-Xian; XU Song-Jun; CHU Cheng-Xing; MAI Shao-Zhi; JIANG Dian

    2004-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of various soil treatments on the growth of vetiver grass ( Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) with the objective of formulating appropriate soil media for use in sulfide-bearing mined areas. An acidic mine site acid sulfate soil (pH 2.8) was treated with different soil conditioner formula including hydrated lime, red mud (bauxite residues), zeolitic rock powder, biosolids and a compound fertilizer. Soils treated with red mud and hydrated lime corrected soil acidity and reduced or eliminated metal toxicity enabling the establishment of vetiver grass.Although over-liming affected growth, some seedlings of vetiver survived the initial strong alkaline conditions. Addition of appropriate amounts of zeolitic rock powder also enhanced growth, but over-application caused detrimental effects. In this experiment, soil medium with the best growth performance of vetiver was 50 g of red mud, 10 g of lime, 30 g of zeolitic rock powder and 30 g of biosolids with 2000 g of mine soils (100% survival rate with the greatest biomass and number of new shoots), but adding a chemical fertilizer to this media adversely impacted plant growth. In addition, a high application rate of biosolids resulted in poorer growth of vetiver, compared to a moderate application rate.

  16. Application of Ground Phosphate Rock to Diminish the Effects of Simulated Acid Rain of Soil Properties

    DONGYUAN-YAN; LIXUE-YUAN

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain retained in soil on the properties of acid soil and its diminishing by application of ground phosphate rock were investigated by using the sorption method.Results show as follows:(1)For yellow brown soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil with a pH value of 5.9 was relatively small,except a great quantity of acid rain deposited on it.(2) for red soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil was significant.With the increase of the amount of acid deposition,the pH value of soil was declined,but the contents of exchangeable H+,Al3+ and Mn2+ and the amount of SO41- retention were increased.(3) Many properties of acid soils could be improved by applying ground phosphate rock.For example,pH value of soils and the amounts of available P and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ were increased,and the amounts of exchangeable H+ and Al3+ and SO42- retained was reduced.The application of ground posphate rock could effctively diminish the pollution of acid rain to soil.

  17. Forest-soil response to acid and salt additions of sulfate. 2. Aluminum and base cations

    Reconstructed spodosol and intact alfisol soil columns were used to examine the effects of 52 weeks of additions of various simulated throughfall solutions on base cation, Al, acid neutralizing capacity, and pH levels in soil leachates. The work illustrates the importance of soil cation exchange (especially in the forest floor), anion concentrations, and pCO2 levels in controlling the leachate chemistry in response to acidic and 'seasalt' deposition events

  18. Acidification of Forest Soils: Model Development and Application for Analyzing Impacts of Acidic Deposition in Europe

    P. E. Kauppi; KÀmÀri, J.; Posch, M; Kauppi, L.; Matzner, E.

    1984-01-01

    Acidification is considered as an unfavorable process in forest soils. Timber logging, natural accumulation of biomass in the ecosystem, and acidic deposition are known as sources of acidification. Acidification causes the risk of damage to plant roots and subsequent risk of a decline in ecosystem productivity. A dynamic model is introduced for describing the acidification of forest soils. In one-year time steps the model calculates the soil pH as function of the acid stress and the buff...

  19. Studies on distribution and residue of sulfur in simulated acid rain in vegetable and soil by using 35S

    Distribution and residue of sulfur in simulated acid rain in two kinds of vegetables (lettuce and Chinese cabbage) and three types of soils (acid yellow earth, acid and neutral purple soils) were studied by using 35S tracer method. The results showed that the higher concentration of acid rain was sprayed, the more residue of sulfur in vegetable there would be. The residue of sulfur in vegetable varied with the different physical and chemical properties of soils, the order of sulfur residue in vegetable was: acid purple soil>acid yellow earth>neutral purple soil. In the same soil, the residue of sulfur in lettuce was higher than that in Chinese cabbage, for the same vegetable, the residue of sulfur in leaves were higher than that in stems. The order of sulfur residue in different soils was acid purple soil>acid yellow earth>neutral purple soil. The higher concentration of acid rain was sprayed, the more residue of sulfur in soil surface there would be. The sulfur residue varied with the depth of soil and the pH value of acid rain. With the increase of soil depth, a slight increase of sulfur residue with rain of ph 6 and a slight decrease with rain of pH 4.0 and 2.5 were found

  20. Effects of Soil Oxygen Conditions and Soil pH on Remediation of DDT-contaminated Soil by Laccase from White Rot Fungi

    Yuechun Zhao; Xiaoyun Yi

    2010-01-01

    High residues of DDT in agricultural soils are of concern because they present serious threats to food security and human health. This article focuses on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil using laccase under different soil oxygen and soil pH conditions. The laboratory experiment results showed significant effects of soil oxygen conditions and soil pH on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase at the end of a 25-d incubation period. This study found the positive correlation between ...

  1. Optimizing Available Phosphorus in Calcareous Soils Fertilized with Diammonium Phosphate and Phosphoric Acid Using Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm

    Asif Naeem; Muhammad Akhtar; Waqar Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P) retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA) required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were sp...

  2. Self-assembly of humic acid: influence of pH and chemical composition

    Chilom, G.; Nagy, Z.; Delp, S.; Huff, G.; Rice, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Interest in enhancing the residence time of soil organic matter (SOM) through natural or engineered mechanisms as a possible means of sequestering organic carbon to mitigate the impacts of carbon-dioxide induced global warming effects has steadily increased over the last decade. Humic substances are major organic constituents of SOM and were recently shown that can self-organize or self-assemble into a composite material with different characteristics than those of the starting materials, and the organized state controls its mineralization by microorganisms. This study examines the role of pH and the relative concentration of humic-like amphiphilic (HA2) and lipid-like (L1) components in the self-assembly of the lipid-humic composite (L0). The L0, L1 and HA2 fractions were isolated using a combination of organic solvent and aqueous alkaline extractions from two humic acid samples at various pH values. HA2 and L1 isolated at low pH were mixed in various mass ratios in organic solvent in order to “reassemble” L0. The data show that the amount of L0 decreased with increasing the pH and reached a constant value from pH 6 to pH 11, and the proportion of L1 increased with the pH. Comparative measurements of the specific heat capacity as a function of temperature of the recombined L0 reveal differences when compared to the physical mixture of the HA2 and L1 depending on the ratio of the components. These differences are an indication that the recombined L0’s solid-state structure is more than just a mixture of components and is determined by specific interactions between its components.

  3. Soil pH management by calcareous and siliceous minerals: effect on N2O yield in nitrification and denitrification

    Nadeem, Shahid; Bakken, Lars; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Amelioration of soil pH by liming is necessary and common practice in vast areas of crop production. It is well known that pH is one of the most pervasive factors controlling rates and product stoichiometries in microbially mediated N transformations, including N2O emissions. While liming of acid soils appears to increase N2O reductase activity in denitrification (resulting in less N2O relative to N2), sudden pH raise may boost nitrification and hence N2O emission from ammonia oxidation. Thus, the net effect of liming on N2O emissions is not straightforward, which probably explains why soil pH management has not been embraced as a strategy for mitigating N2O emissions so far. Here we report laboratory incubations in which we determined potential rates and N2O yields in soils from an ongoing field experiment, comparing traditional calcareous limes (calcite, dolomite) with mafic minerals (olivine, different types of plagioclase). The experiment is in its second year, and shows strong pH increase (0.7-1.5, units) in plots with calcareous limes, a weak pH increase (~ 0.2 unit) in the olivine treatment and no measurable pH increase with the plagioclases. Potential nitrification rates correlated positively with effective soil pH as did the N2O yield, measured as N2O accumulation rate over NO2- + NO3- accumulation rate. The N2O yield increased in the order, control soils. Overall, the N2O yield from nitrification was quite low (0.09 - 0.17%). Potential denitrifications rates showed little response to pH increase (no C source added) but significantly lower N2O product ratios (N2O/(N2O + N2) with increasing pH in the order, calcite < dolomite < olivine < plagioclase < control. Given the overall low N2O yield of nitrification as compared to that of denitrification (10 - 100%), the observed increases in N2O yields of nitrification are unlikely to override a significant reduction in N2O production by denitrification under fluctuating oxic-anoxic conditions. The results will be

  4. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2016-01-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the ma...

  5. Soil acidity as affecting micronutrients concentration, nitrato reductase enzyme activity and yield in upland rice plants

    Edemar Moro; Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol; Heitor Cantarella; Adriano Stephan Nascente; Adriana Lima Moro; Fernando Broetto

    2013-01-01

    The lowest grain yield of rice under no-tillage system (NTS) in relation to the conventional system may be due to the predominance nitrate in the soil and the low nitrate reductase activity. Another reason may be caused by micronutrient deficiency because of superficially soil acidity corrections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by soil pH in the N forms in the soil, micronutrients concentration in rice plants, nitrate reductase activity, yield of ric...

  6. Reduction of exchangeable calcium and magnesium in soil with increasing pH

    Miyazawa Mário

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory study was conducted with soil samples and synthetic solutions to investigate possible mechanisms related with reduction in KCl exchangeable Ca and Mg with increasing pH. Increasing soil pH over 5.3 with CaCO3 added to the soil and with NaOH solution added to soil/KCl suspension increased adsorptions of Ca and Mg. The reduction of Mg was greater than Ca and was related to the concentration of soil exchangeable Al. The decreases of soluble Ca and Mg following addition of Al in synthetic solution were at pH > 7.5. The isomorphic coprecipitation reaction with Al compounds may be the most possible mechanism responsible for the decrease of exchangeable Ca and Mg with increasing pH. Possible chemical reactions are presented.

  7. Specific transformations of mineral forms of nitrogen in acid soils

    MIRJANA KRESOVIC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were performed on soils of different acidity, ranging in the pH interval 4.65–5.80 (in water. Changes of the mineral nitrogen forms in the examined soils were studied by applying short-term incubation experiments performed under aerobic conditions, with a humidity of 30 % and a temperature of 20 °C, both with and without the addition of 100 and 300 ppm NH4–N. The results of the incubation experiments showed that retarded nitrification was present in all the examined soils. Increased and toxic quantities of nitrites (35.7 ppm were formed during the incubation, which remained in the soil solution for several days, and even weeks, in spite of favorable conditions of moisture, aeration and temperature for the development of the process of chemo-autotrophic nitrification. Decelerated chemoautotrophic nitrification was the source of the occurrence of nitrite in the examined less acid soil (soil 1, while in soils of higher acidity (soils 2 and 3 after addition of 100 and 300 ppm NH4–N, nitrite occurred due to chemical denitrification (chemodenitrification. Nitrites formed in the process of chemodenitrification underwent spontaneous chemical oxidation resulting in nitrate formation (chemical nitrification. The content of mineral nitrogen (NH4 + NO3 + NO2–N decreased during the incubation period, proving gaseous losses from the examined soils. Application of lower doses of nitrogen fertilizers could decrease nitrogen losses by denitrification as well as the occurrence of nitrite in toxic quantities in the investigated pseudogley soil.

  8. Influence of acid rain and organic matter on the adsorption of trace elements on soil

    Acid rain has become one of the most serious environmental problems. Soil loses its buffering capacity by long exposure to acid rain, and the soil pH value decreases significantly. The acidification of the soil disturbs the adsorption equilibrium of many elements in the soil-water system. Soil is a very complex heterogeneous system, primarily consisting of clay minerals, hydrous oxides and polymeric organic substances, which possess their own characteristic element-adsorbing properties. On the other hand, the intrinsic properties of elements are reflected in their adsorption process as a matter of course. Therefore, both the effects of the pH of acid rain and that of the components of the soil on the adsorption of different elements should be studied when the adsorption process in acid soils is to be clarified. Although leaching of major cations in soil, such as Ca2+, Mg2+ and Al3+, by acid rain, has been extensively studied, relatively little attention has been focused on trace elements which can also seriously affect the ecological system. We studied the acid rain effects on element adsorption by kaolin, forest soil, black soil, and also these soils with Fe- and Mn-oxides or organic matter selectively removed by using the radioactive multitracer technique. (author)

  9. Seasonal Belowground Ecosystem and Eco-enzymatic Responses to Soil pH and Phosphorus Availability in Temperate Hardwood Forests

    Smemo, K. A.; Deforest, J. L.; Petersen, S. L.; Burke, D.; Hewins, C.; Kluber, L. A.; Kyker, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric acid deposition can increase phosphorus (P) limitation in temperate hardwood forests by increasing N availability, and therefore P demand, and/or by decreasing pH and occluding inorganic P. However, only recently have studies demonstrated that P limitation can occur in temperate forests and very little is known about the temporal aspects of P dynamics in acidic forest soils and how seasonal shifts in nutrient availability and demand influence microbial investment in extracellular enzymes. The objectives of this study were to investigate how P availability and soil pH influence seasonal patterns of nutrient cycling and soil microbial activity in hardwood forests that experience chronic acid deposition. We experimentally manipulated soil pH, P, or both for three years and examined soil treatment responses in fall, winter, spring, early summer, and late summer. We found that site (glaciated versus unglaciated) and treatment had the most significant influence on nutrient pools and cycling. In general, nutrient pools were higher in glaciated soils than unglaciated for measured nutrients, including total C and N (2-3 times higher), extractable inorganic nitrogen, and readily available P. Treatment had no impact on total C and N pools in either region, but did affect other measured nutrients such as ammonium, which was greatest in the elevated pH treatment for both sites. As expected, readily available P pools were highest in the elevated P treatments (3 fold increase in both sites), but raising pH decreased available P pools in the glaciated site. Raising soil pH increased both net N mineralization rates and net P mineralization rates, regardless of site. Nitrification responses were complex, but we observed an overall significant nitrification increase under elevated pH, particularly in the growing season. Extracellular enzyme activity showed more seasonal patterns than site and treatment effects, exhibiting significant growing season activity reductions for

  10. Model study of acid rain effect on adsorption of trace elements on soils using a multitracer

    Using a radioactive multitracer and model acid rain (HCl or H2SO4 solution), batch experiments were performed to examine the pH effect on the adsorption-desorption equilibrium of 16 elements on soils as a model study of an acid rain effect. Kaolin, black soil (original and with organic matter almost removed) and Kureha soil (original and with organic matter almost removed) were used as adsorbents. Characteristic dependence on the pH value of the suspension was observed for the adsorption of the elements on kaolin and the soils. The results of this model study indicate that acid rain decreases the retention of cations, while it increases or does not change the adsorption of anions on soils. Organic matter in soils has a positive effect on the extent of adsorption of most elements investigated. (author)

  11. Spontaneous aggregation of humic acid observed with AFM at different pH.

    Colombo, Claudio; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Angelico, Ruggero; Cho, Hyen Goo; Francioso, Ornella; Ertani, Andrea; Nardi, Serenella

    2015-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy in contact (AFM-C) mode was used to investigate the molecular dynamics of leonardite humic acid (HA) aggregate formed at different pH values. HA nanoparticles dispersed at pH values ranging from 2 to 12 were observed on a mica surface under dry conditions. The most clearly resolved and well-resulted AFM images of single particle were obtained at pH 5, where HA appeared as supramolecular particles with a conic shape and a hole in the centre. Those observations suggested that HA formed under these conditions exhibited a pseudo-amphiphilic nature, with secluded hydrophobic domains and polar subunits in direct contact with hydrophilic mica surface. Based on molecular simulation methods, a lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) model was proposed to explain the HA ring-like morphology. The LCC model optimized the parameters of β-O-4 linkages between 14 units of 1-4 phenyl propanoid, and resulted in an optimized structure comprising 45-50 linear helical molecules looped spirally around a central cavity. Those results added new insights on the adsorption mechanism of HA on polar surfaces as a function of pH, which was relevant from the point of view of natural aggregation in soil environment. PMID:26295541

  12. Transcription of denitrification genes and kinetics of NO, N2O and N2 by soil bacteria as affected by pH

    Liu, B.; Bakken, L. R.; Frostegard, A.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), which is to a large part derived from denitrification in soil, is a major greenhouse gas and was also recently shown to be the single most important ozone-depleting substance. Previous studies demonstrate that the N2O/N2 product ratio of denitrification is strongly dependent on pH, increasing with decreasing soil pH. The mechanisms involved are, however, poorly understood. We here present an investigation of soils from a long-term liming experiment. Since it is difficult to control which pH is actually experienced by bacterial cells in intact soils, we extracted cells on a Nycodenz gradient and exposed them to different pH levels. Bacteria extracted from soils of 3 different pHs (4.0, 6.1 and 8.0) were incubated in minimal medium supplemented with nitrate (2mM) and glutamic acid (5 mM), buffered at three pH levels (5.7, 6.1 and 7.6). Both the pH of the medium and original soil pH showed profound effect on the denitrification activity in terms of gas emission kinetics. N2O reductase (N2OR) activity was only present when cells from the high pH soils (pH 6.1 and 8.0) were exposed to high pH medium (pH 7.6). Functional genes (nirS, nirK and nosZ) and their transcripts were quantified in the extracts from pH6.1-soil. A 10-25 fold higher expression of nosZ vs nirS was found when incubated at pH 7.6 compared to pH 6.1 and 5.7. The low but significant transcription of nosZ at pH 6.1 and 5.7 did not result in detectable N2O reduction however. Cells that had been allowed to assemble their proteome while growing in pH7 medium showed N2OR activity which was practically unaffected by pH within the range 5-7. On the contrary, no N2OR activity was detected if the proteome had been formed at pH 6. The cells extracted from acid soils (pH 5.8 and 6.1) showed very low nosZ transcritption and no N2OR activity if exposed to pH 7 during the transition from oxic to anoxic conditions, suggesting an adaptation to low pH in the sense that they do not transcribe the gene

  13. Effects of acid rain on competitive releases of Cd, Cu, and Zn from two natural soils and two contaminated soils in hunan, China

    Liao, Bo-han; Guo, Zhao-hui; Zeng, Qingru; Probst, Anne; Probst, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Leaching experiments of rebuilt soil columns with two simulated acid rain solutions (pH 4.6– 3.8) were conducted for two natural soils and two artificial contaminated soils from Hunan, southcentralChina, to study effects of acid rain on competitive releases of soil Cd, Cu, and Zn. Distilled water was used in comparison. The results showed that the total releases were Zn>Cu>Cd for the natural soils and Cd>Zn≫Cu for the contaminated soils, which reflected sensitivity of these metals to acid rai...

  14. Transformation of diphenylarsinic acid in agricultural soils.

    Maejima, Yuji; Arao, Tomohito; Baba, Koji

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the transformation and fate of diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) during incubation in two types of soils (Entisol and Andisol) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions only, DPAA was transformed into methyldiphenylarsine oxide by methylation. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, DPAA was degraded to phenylarsonic acid by dephenylation, and phenylarsonic acid was subsequently methylated to form methylphenylarsinic acid and dimethylphenylarsine oxide. The degradation of DPAA in the Andisol was less extensive than in the Entisol. In autoclaved soil under anaerobic conditions, DPAA underwent little degradation during the 24-wk incubation. In unautoclaved soils, the concentration of DPAA in soil clearly decreased after 24 wk of incubation, indicating that DPAA degradation was driven by microbial activity. PMID:21488495

  15. Proton interactions with soil organic matter: the importance of aggregation and the weak acids of humin

    Cooke, J. D.; Tipping, E.; Hamilton-Taylor, J.

    2008-01-01

    Samples of three organic-rich soils (ombrotrophic peat, podzol H-horizon, humic ranker) were extensively washed with dilute nitric acid, dialysed against deionised water, and then subjected to acid-base titrations over the pH range 3 – 10, in 0.3 – 300 mM NaNO3, and with soil concentrations in the range 2 to 150 g l-1. The results for the three soils were quantitatively similar. Comparison of the titration data with previously published results for humic acids isolated from the same soils s...

  16. Utilization of maize cob biochar and rice husk charcoal as soil amendments for improving acid soil fertility and productivity

    Nurhidayati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decline in soil fertility in agricultural land is a major problem that causes a decrease in the production of food crops. One of the causes of the decline in soil fertility is declining soil pH that caused the decline in the availability of nutrients in the soil. This study aimed to assess the influence of alternative liming materials derived from maize cob biochar and rice husk charcoal compared to conventional lime to improve soil pH, soil nutrient availability and maize production. The experiment used a factorial complete randomized design which consisting of two factors. The first factor is the type of soil amendment which consists of three levels (calcite lime, rice husk charcoal and cob maize biochar. The second factor is the application rates of the soil amendment consisted of three levels (3, 6 and 9 t/ha and one control treatment (without soil amendment. The results of this study showed that the application of various soil amendment increased soil pH, which the pH increase of the lime application was relatively more stable over time compared to biochar and husk charcoal. The average of the soil pH increased for each soil amendment by 23% (lime, 20% (rice husk charcoal and 23% (biochar as compared with control. The increase in soil pH can increase the availability of soil N, P and K. The greatest influence of soil pH on nutrient availability was shown by the relationship between soil pH and K nutrient availability with R2 = 0.712, while for the N by R2 = 0.462 and for the P by R2 = 0.245. The relationship between the availability of N and maize yield showed a linear equation. While the relationship between the availability of P and K with the maize yield showed a quadratic equation. The highest maize yield was found in the application of biochar and rice husk charcoal with a dose of 6-9 t/ha. The results of this study suggested that biochar and husk charcoal could be used as an alternative liming material in improving acid soil

  17. TOLERANCE OF PEANUT GENOTYPES TO ACIDIC SOIL CONDITION

    Astanto Kasno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The acidic soil is generally less productive due to soil pH ranging from 3.1 to 5.0. However, it could be solved through soil amelioration, planting tolerant varieties to acidic soil condition, and a combination of both. Twenty peanut genotypes including two check varieties (Jerapah and Talam 1 were evaluated on dolomite-ameliorated and non ameliorated soil. In the greenhouse, the treatments were laid out in factorial design with four replications, while in the field using strip plot design with three replications. Assessment of tolerance was using Stressed Tolerance Index (STI according to Fernandez (1992. Results showed that dolomite application at dose equivalent to 0.5 x exchangeable Al was optimal in improving peanut growth, and peanut yield on acidic soil. Lines of GH3 (G/92088/92088-02-B-2-8-1 and GH 4 (G/92088/ 92088-02-B-2-8-2 genotypes had high STI with average yield of 2.47 tha-1 and 2.62 t ha-1 of dry pods and potential yield of 4.05 t ha-1 and 3.73 t ha-1 of dry pods, respectively as well as check varieties (Jerapah and Talam-1. It is concluded that peanut genotype of G/92088//92088-02-B-2-8-1 and G/92088//920 88- 02-B-2-8-2 were adaptable and tolerance to acidic, and tolerance of peanuts on acidic soil condition were probably controlled by the buffering mechanisms.

  18. Exchangeable aluminum evaluation in acid soils

    Abreu Jr. Cassio Hamilton; Muraoka Takashi; Lavorante André Fernando

    2003-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting agricultural production in tropical climate regions is mainly related to the presence of exchangeable aluminum (Al3+) in highly weathered acid soils. Four methods of Al3+ determination extracted with neutral 1 mol L¹ KCl solution were evaluated: three colorimetric methods (aluminon plus ascorbic acid, and eriochrome cyanine R by FIA) and the usual titrimetric method with back-titration. Surface samples from 20 soils of different Brazilian regions, with active ...

  19. Regulation of antigen presentation by acidic pH

    1990-01-01

    The effect of pH on functional association of peptide antigens with APC membranes was investigated by using aldehyde-fixed B cells and class II- restricted T cell hybridomas to assess antigen/MHC complex formation. The results indicated that the rate and extent of functional peptide binding was markedly increased at pH 5.0 as compared with pH 7.3. The pH dependence of binding was preserved after pretreatment of fixed APC with pH 5.0 buffer, suggesting that pH had a direct effect on the intera...

  20. Effect of crushed mussel shell addition on bacterial growth in acid polluted soils

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Garrido-Rodríguez, B.; Arias-Estévez, M.;

    2015-01-01

    We applied three different doses of crushed mussel shell (CMS) on two Cu-polluted acid soils to study the effect of these amendments on the growth of the bacterial community during 730 days. Soil pH increased in the short and medium term due to CMS addition. In a first stage, bacterial growth was...

  1. Controls of Soluble Al in Experimental Acid Sulfate Conditions and Acid Sulfate Soils

    LINCHUXIA; M.D.MELVILLE

    1997-01-01

    The controls of soluble Al concentration were examined in three situations of acid sulfate conditions:1) experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of varying amounts of Al(OH)3(gibbsite) into a sequence of H2SO4 solutions;2)experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of the same sequence of H2SO4 solutions into two non-cid sulfacte soil samples with known amounts of acid oxalate extractable Al; and 3) actual acid sulfate soil conditions.The experiment using gibbsite as an Al-bearing mineral showed that increase in the concentration of H2SO4 solution increased the soluble Al concentration,accompanied by a decrease i the solution pH, Increasing amount of gibbsite added to the H2SO4 solutions also increased soluble Al concentration,but resulted in an increase in solution pH.Within the H2SO4 concentration range of 0.0005-0.5mol L-1 and the Al(OH)3 range of 0.01-0.5g(in 25 mL of H2SO4 solutions),the input of H2SO4 had the major control on soluble Al Concentration and pH .The availability of Al(OH)3,however,was responsible for the spread fo the various sample points,with a tendency that the samples containing more gibbsite had a higher soluble Al concentration than those containing less gibbsite at equivalent pH levels.The experimental results from treatment of soil samples with H2SO4 solutions and the analytical results of acid sulfate soils also showed the similar trend.

  2. The effect of soil pH and the fungicide 'Captan' on 134Cs transfer factors for cucumber and radish plants

    The effect of soil pH and the fungicide 'Captan' on 134Cs transfer factors (TFs) was studied in a greenhouse pot experiment with cucumber and radish plants. A soil with a low pH (4.2) was selected and its pH value has increased to 5.7, 6.5 and 7.6 by the addition of different amounts of Ca(OH)2. Liming of the soil and the subsequent increase in pH values resulted in a reduction of 134Cs TFs which was not always significant. TFs were the highest in the very acid soil (pH 4.2) and were practically the same above the pH 5.7 although they were the lowest in the calcareous soil. The ratio highest / lowest TF of each crop or plant part ranged between ∼ 2.0 for radish and 4.5 for cucumber plants and it was much lower than that previously reported and attributed to pH differences. Edible to other plant material TF ratio indicates that cucumber plant accumulates considerably more of the totally absorbed 134CS in the edible part than radish crops. When biomass production was used for excluding dilution effects, 134CS total activity (Bq/pot) was higher for both plants when grown in the intermediate soil pH (5.7 - 6.5), due to the higher yield at these pH values. The application of the fungicide 'Captan' gave no significant differences in 134Cs TFs for both plant species and in all studied soil pH. Refs. 4 (author)

  3. Influence of pH on wetting kinetics of a pine forest soil

    Amer, Ahmad; Schaumann, Gabriele; Diehl, Dörte

    2014-05-01

    Water repellent properties of organic matter significantly alter soil water dynamics. Various environmental factors control appearance and breakup of repellency in soil. Beside water content and temperature also pH exerts an influence on soil water repellency although investigations achieved partly ambiguous results; some found increasing repellency with increasing pH (Terashima et al. 2004; Duval et al. 2005), other with decreasing pH (Karnok et al. 1993; Roper 2005) and some found repellency maxima at intermediate pH and an increase with decreasing and with increasing pH (Bayer and Schaumann 2007; Diehl et al. 2010). The breakup of repellency may be observed via the time dependent sessile drop contact angle (TISED). With water contact time, soil-water contact angle decreases until complete wetting is reached. Diehl and Schaumann (2007) calculated the activation energy of the wetting process from the rate of sessile drop wetting obtained at different temperatures and draw conclusions on chemical or physical nature of repellency. The present study aims at the influence of pH on the wetting kinetics of soil. Therefore, TISED of soil was determined as a function of pH and temperature. We used upper soil samples (0 - 10 cm) from a pine forest in the southwest of Germany (Rheinland-Pfalz). Samples were air-dried, sieved soil sample. Apparent work of adhesion was calculated, plotted vs. time and mathematically fitted using double exponential function. Rate constants of wetting were used to determine the activation energy by Arrhenius equation. First results indicated that despite comparable initial contact angles, pH alteration strongly changed the wetting rate suggesting maximum wetting resistance at the natural pH of 4.3 and decreasing wetting resistance at lower and at higher pH. The poster will present further current results of the ongoing study and discuss the activation energy of the wetting process in dependence of artificially altered soil pH. References: Bayer

  4. Effect of organic matter and pH on mercury release from soils

    2007-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on the effect of organic matter (OM) and pH on mercury (Hg) release from soils. Hg release flux was measured using the dynamic flux chamber (DFC) combined with the Lumex(r) multifunctional mercury analyzer in both laboratory experiment and field monitoring. The results showed that Hg emission from the OM-added soils was apparently low because of the high affinity of OM to Hg, resulting in the reverse order as the amount of OM addition. Meanwhile, Hg release flux from different pH value soils exhibited the same trend for both Hg2+ and Hg22+ treatment, increasing the Hg flux with pH value of soils increasing. The trend of Hg release in the pH dependence experiment has been well in agreement with that from the field test. In addition, Hg release seemed to be related to its species in the soil, the flux from Hg2+-added soil was obviously higher than that of Hg22+-added soil in both the OM and pH laboratory experiment.

  5. Effect of Simulated Acid Rain on Potential Carbon and Nitrogen Mineralization in Forest Soils

    OUYANG Xue-Jun; ZHOU Guo-Yi; HUANG Zhong-Liang; LIU Ju-Xiu; ZHANG De-Qiang; LI Jiong

    2008-01-01

    Acid rain is a serious environmental problem worldwide. In this study, a pot experiment using forest soils planted with the seedlings of four woody species was performed with weekly treatments of pH 4.40, 4.00, 3.52, and 3.05 simulated acid rain (SAR) for 42 months compared to a control of pH 5.00 lake water. The cumulative amounts of C and N mineralization in the five treated soils were determined after incubation at 25 ℃ for 65 d to examine the effects of SAR treatments.For all five treatments, cumulative CO2-C production ranged from 20.24 to 27.81 mg kg-1 dry soil, net production of available N from 17.37 to 48.95 mg kg-1 dry soil, and net production of NO-3-N from 9.09 to 46.23 mg kg-1 dry soil. SAR treatments generally enhanced the emission of CO2-C from the soils; however, SAR with pH 3.05 inhibited the emission.SAR treatments decreased the net production of available N and NO3-N. The cumulative CH4 and N2O productions from the soils increased with increasing amount of simulated acid rain. The cumulative CO2-C production and the net production of available N of the soil under Acmena acuminatissima were significantly higher (P≤0.05) than those under Schima superba and Cryptocarya concinna. The mineralization of soil organic C was related to the contents of soil organic C and N, but was not related to soil pH. However, the overall effect of acid rain on the storage of soil organic matter and the cycling of important nutrients depended on the amount of acid deposition and the types of forests.

  6. Crossing the pedogenetic threshold: Apparent phosphorus limitation by soil microorganisms in unglaciated acidic eastern hardwood forests

    Deforest, J. L.; Smemo, K. A.; Burke, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The availability of soil phosphorus (P) can significantly influence microbial community composition and the ecosystem-level processes they mediate. However, the threshold at which soil microorganisms become functionally P-limited is unclear because of soil acidity effect on P availability. We reason that acidic temperate hardwood forest ecosystems are, in fact, functionally P-limited, but compensation occur via soil microbial production of phosphatase enzymes. We tested this hypothesis in glaciated and unglaciated mature mixed-mesophytic forests in eastern Ohio where both soil pH and P availability had been experientially manipulated. We measured the activity of two P acquiring soil enzymes, phosphomonoesterase (PMono) and phosphodiesterase (PDi), to understand how soil acidity and available P influence microbial function. Our experimental treatments elevated ambient soil pH from below 4.5 to around 5.5 and increased readily available phosphate from 3 to ~25 mg P/kg on glaciated soils and from 0.5 to ~5 mg P/kg on unglaciated soils. The P treatment decreased the activity of PDi by 82% relative to the control on unglaciated soils, but we observed no P treatment effect on glaciated soils. A similar result was observed for PMono. Soil pH, alone, did not significantly influence enzyme activities. Results suggest that soil microorganisms are more likely to be P-limited in older unglaciated soils. However, dramatically higher phosphatase activity in response to very low P availability suggests that an underlying ecosystem P limitation can be ameliorated by soil microbial community dynamics. This mechanism may be more important for older, unglaciated soils that have already crossed a pedogenic threshold where P availability influences ecosystem and microbial function.

  7. Effects of Soil Oxygen Conditions and Soil pH on Remediation of DDT-contaminated Soil by Laccase from White Rot Fungi

    Yuechun Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available High residues of DDT in agricultural soils are of concern because they present serious threats to food security and human health. This article focuses on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil using laccase under different soil oxygen and soil pH conditions. The laboratory experiment results showed significant effects of soil oxygen conditions and soil pH on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase at the end of a 25-d incubation period. This study found the positive correlation between the concentration of oxygen in soil and the degradation of DDT by laccase. The residue of DDTs in soil under the atmosphere of oxygen decreased by 28.1% compared with the atmosphere of nitrogen at the end of the incubation with laccase. A similar pattern was observed in the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase under different flooding conditions, the higher the concentrations of oxygen in soil, the lower the residues of four DDT components and DDTs in soils. The residue of DDTs in the nonflooding soil declined by 16.7% compared to the flooded soil at the end of the incubation. The residues of DDTs in soils treated with laccase were lower in the pH range 2.5–4.5.

  8. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2016-03-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to ameliorate soil acidity in rice-cropped soil. The secondary objective was to study the effects of calcium silicate amendment on soil acidity, exchangeable Al, exchangeable Ca, and Si content. The soil was treated with 0, 1, 2, and 3 Mg ha-1 of calcium silicate under submerged conditions and the soil treatments were sampled every 30 days throughout an incubation period of 120 days. Application of calcium silicate induced a positive effect on soil pH and exchangeable Al; soil pH increased from 2.9 (initial) to 3.5, while exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 (initial) to 0.82 cmolc kg-1. Furthermore, the exchangeable Ca and Si contents increased from 1.68 (initial) to 4.94 cmolc kg-1 and from 21.21 (initial) to 81.71 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it was noted that calcium silicate was effective at alleviating Al toxicity in acid sulfate, rice-cropped soil, yielding values below the critical level of 2 cmolc kg-1. In addition, application of calcium silicate showed an ameliorative effect as it increased soil pH and supplied substantial amounts of Ca and Si.

  9. The combined effects of urea application and simulated acid rain on soil acidification and microbial community structure.

    Liu, Xingmei; Zhou, Jian; Li, Wanlu; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to test the effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) at different pHs, when applied to fertilized and unfertilized soils, on the leaching of soil cations (K, Ca, Mg, Na) and Al. Their effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+) and microbial community structure were also determined. A Paleudalfs soil was incubated for 30 days, with and without an initial application of urea (200 mg N kg(-1)soil) as nitrogen (N) fertilizer. The soil was held in columns and leached with SAR at three pH levels. Six treatments were tested: SAR of pH 2.5, 4.0 and 5.6 leaching on unfertilized soil (T1, T2 and T3), and on soils fertilized with urea (T4, T5 and T6). Increasing acid inputs proportionally increased cation leaching in both unfertilized and fertilized soils. Urea application increased the initial Ca and Mg leaching, but had no effect on the total concentrations of Ca, Mg and K leached. There was no significant difference for the amount of Na leached between the different treatments. The SAR pH and urea application had significant effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+). Urea application, SAR treated with various pH, and the interactions between them all had significant impacts on total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). The highest concentration of total PLFAs occurred in fertilized soils with SAR pH5.6 and the lowest in soils leached with the lowest SAR pH. Soils pretreated with urea then leached with SARs of pH 4.0 and 5.6 had larger total PLFA concentrations than soil without urea. Bacterial, fungal, actinomycete, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs had generally similar trends to total PLFAs. PMID:24488523

  10. Effects of organic acids on Cd adsorption and desorption by two anthropic soils

    Jingui WANG; Jialong LV; Yaolong FU

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to study the effects of malic, tartaric, oxalic, and citric acid on the adsorption and desorption characteristics of Cd by two typical anthropic soils (lou soil and irrigation-silted soil) in North-west China. Cadmium adsorption and desorption were studied under a range of temperatures (25℃, 30℃, 35℃, 40℃), organic acid concentrations (0.5-5.0 mmol·L-1), and pH values (2-8). The results showed that the Cd adsorption capacity of the lou soil was significantly greater than that of the irrigation-silted soil. Generally, Cd adsorption increased as the temperature increased. In the presence of NaNO3, the adsorption of Cd was endothermic with △H values of 31.365 kJ·mo1-1 for lou soil and 28.278 kJ·mol-1 for irrigation-silted soil. The endothermic reaction indicated that H bonds were the main driving force for Cd adsorption in both soils. However, different concentrations of organic acids showed various influences on the two soils. In the presence of citric acid, chemical adsorption and van der Waals interactions were the main driving forces for Cd adsorption rather than H bonds. Although the types of organic acids and soil properties were different, the effects of the organic acids on the adsorption and desorption of Cd were similar in the two soils. The adsorption percentage of Cd generally decreased as organic acid concentrations increased. In contrast, the adsorption percentage increased as the pH of the initial solution increased. The exception was that adsorption percentage of Cd increased slightly as oxalic acid concentrations increased. In contrast, the desorption percentage of Cd increased with increasing concentrations of organic acids but decreased as the initial solution pH increased.

  11. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil and soil solution chemistry in a monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China.

    Qiu, Qingyan; Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-05-01

    Acid rain is an environmental problem of increasing concern in China. In this study, a laboratory leaching column experiment with acid forest soil was set up to investigate the responses of soil and soil solution chemistry to simulated acid rain (SAR). Five pH levels of SAR were set: 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5 (as a control, CK). The results showed that soil acidification would occur when the pH of SAR was ≤3.5. The concentrations of NO₃(-)and Ca(2+) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR fell 3.5. The concentration of SO₄(2-) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR was acidity of SAR. The releases of soluble Al and Fe were SAR pH dependent, and their net exports under pH 2.5 treatment were 19.6 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than that under CK. The net export of DOC was reduced by 12-29% under SAR treatments as compared to CK. Our results indicate the chemical constituents in the soil are more sensitive to SAR than those in the soil solution, and the effects of SAR on soil solution chemistry depend not only on the intensity of SAR but also on the duration of SAR addition. The soil and soil solution chemistry in this region may not be affected by current precipitation (pH≈4.5) in short term, but the soil and soil leachate chemistry may change dramatically if the pH of precipitation were below 3.5 and 3.0, respectively. PMID:25893761

  12. Soil pH management without lime, a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cultivated soils

    Nadeem, Shahid; Bakken, Lars; Reent Köster, Jan; Tore Mørkved, Pål; Simon, Nina; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    For decades, agricultural scientists have searched for methods to reduce the climate forcing of food production by increasing carbon sequestration in the soil and reducing the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). The outcome of this research is depressingly meagre and the two targets appear incompatible: efforts to increase carbon sequestration appear to enhance the emissions of N2O. Currently there is a need to find alternative management strategies which may effectively reduce both the CO2 and N2O footprints of food production. Soil pH is a master variable in soil productivity and plays an important role in controlling the chemical and biological activity in soil. Recent investigations of the physiology of denitrification have provided compelling evidence that the emission of N2O declines with increasing pH within the range 5-7. Thus, by managing the soil pH at a near neutral level appears to be a feasible way to reduce N2O emissions. Such pH management has been a target in conventional agriculture for a long time, since a near-neutral pH is optimal for a majority of cultivated plants. The traditional way to counteract acidification of agricultural soils is to apply lime, which inevitably leads to emission of CO2. An alternative way to increase the soil pH is the use of mafic rock powders, which have been shown to counteract soil acidification, albeit with a slower reaction than lime. Here we report a newly established field trail in Norway, in which we compare the effects of lime and different mafic mineral and rock powders (olivine, different types of plagioclase) on CO2 and N2O emissions under natural agricultural conditions. Soil pH is measured on a monthly basis from all treatment plots. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission measurements are carried out on a weekly basis using static chambers and an autonomous robot using fast box technique. Field results from the first winter (fallow) show immediate effect of lime on soil pH, and slower effects of the mafic rocks. The

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Extending its application to soil pH measurements

    Acid–base equilibria are involved in almost all the processes that occur in soil. The bioavailability of nutrients for plants, for instance, depends on the solubilization of mineral nutrients in the soil solution, which is a pH-dependent process. The determination of pH in soil solutions is usually carried out by potentiometry using a glass membrane electrode, after extracting some of the soil components with water or CaCl2 solution. The present work describes a simple method for determining the pH of soil, using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Sixty samples presenting different textural composition and pH (previously determined by potentiometry) were employed. The samples were divided into a calibration set with fifty samples and a validation set with ten samples. LIBS spectra were recorded for each pelleted sample using laser pulse energy of 115 mJ. The intensities of thirty-two emission lines for Al, Ca, H, and O were used to fit a partial least squares (PLS) model. The model was validated by prediction of the pH of the validation set samples, which showed good agreement with the reference values. The prediction mean absolute error was 0.3 pH units and the root mean square error of the prediction was 0.4. These results highlight the potential of LIBS for use in other applications beyond elemental composition determinations. For soil analysis, the proposed method offers the possibility of determining pH, in addition to nutrients and contaminants, using a single LIBS measurement. - Highlights: • Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil are influenced by pH. • The pH of mineral soils is normally determined in slurries of water and soil sample by potentiometric measurements. • The association of LIBS elemental emissions with multivariate strategies of analysis has become LIBS a powerful technique. • LIBS was unprecedentedly applied for direct pH determination in different kinds of soil sample. • The clean and fast proposed

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Extending its application to soil pH measurements

    Ferreira, Edilene Cristina, E-mail: edilene@iq.unesp.br [São Paulo State University – UNESP, Analytical Chemistry Department, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni 55, CEP 14800-060, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Gomes Neto, José A. [São Paulo State University – UNESP, Analytical Chemistry Department, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni 55, CEP 14800-060, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Milori, Débora M.B.P.; Ferreira, Ednaldo José [Embrapa Agricultural Instrumentation, Rua XV de Novembro 1452, CEP 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Anzano, Jesús Manuel [Laser Laboratory & Environment, Faculty of Sciences, University of Zaragoza, C/. Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-08-01

    Acid–base equilibria are involved in almost all the processes that occur in soil. The bioavailability of nutrients for plants, for instance, depends on the solubilization of mineral nutrients in the soil solution, which is a pH-dependent process. The determination of pH in soil solutions is usually carried out by potentiometry using a glass membrane electrode, after extracting some of the soil components with water or CaCl{sub 2} solution. The present work describes a simple method for determining the pH of soil, using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Sixty samples presenting different textural composition and pH (previously determined by potentiometry) were employed. The samples were divided into a calibration set with fifty samples and a validation set with ten samples. LIBS spectra were recorded for each pelleted sample using laser pulse energy of 115 mJ. The intensities of thirty-two emission lines for Al, Ca, H, and O were used to fit a partial least squares (PLS) model. The model was validated by prediction of the pH of the validation set samples, which showed good agreement with the reference values. The prediction mean absolute error was 0.3 pH units and the root mean square error of the prediction was 0.4. These results highlight the potential of LIBS for use in other applications beyond elemental composition determinations. For soil analysis, the proposed method offers the possibility of determining pH, in addition to nutrients and contaminants, using a single LIBS measurement. - Highlights: • Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil are influenced by pH. • The pH of mineral soils is normally determined in slurries of water and soil sample by potentiometric measurements. • The association of LIBS elemental emissions with multivariate strategies of analysis has become LIBS a powerful technique. • LIBS was unprecedentedly applied for direct pH determination in different kinds of soil sample. • The clean and fast proposed

  15. Exploring links between pH and bacterial community composition in soils from the Craibstone Experimental Farm.

    Bartram, Andrea K; Jiang, Xingpeng; Lynch, Michael D J; Masella, Andre P; Nicol, Graeme W; Dushoff, Jonathan; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-02-01

    Soil pH is an important determinant of microbial community composition and diversity, yet few studies have characterized the specific effects of pH on individual bacterial taxa within bacterial communities, both abundant and rare. We collected composite soil samples over 2 years from an experimentally maintained pH gradient ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 from the Craibstone Experimental Farm (Craibstone, Scotland). Extracted nucleic acids were characterized by bacterial and group-specific denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and next-generation sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Both methods demonstrated comparable and reproducible shifts within higher taxonomic bacterial groups (e.g. Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Gammaproteobacteria) across the pH gradient. In addition, we used non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the first time on 16S rRNA gene data to identify positively interacting (i.e. co-occurring) operational taxonomic unit (OTU) clusters (i.e. 'components'), with abundances that correlated strongly with pH, and sample year to a lesser extent. All OTUs identified by NMF were visualized within principle coordinate analyses of UNIFRAC distances and subjected to taxonomic network analysis (SSUnique), which plotted OTU abundance and similarity against established taxonomies. Most pH-dependent OTUs identified here would not have been identified by previous methodologies for microbial community profiling and were unrelated to known lineages. PMID:24117982

  16. Acidez potencial pelo método do pH SMP no Estado do Amazonas Potential acidity by pH SMP method in Amazonas State, Brazil

    Adônis Moreira

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi definir um modelo matemático que estime o H+Al a partir do pH SMP medido em água e em solução de CaCl2 0,01 mol L-1 nas condições edafoclimáticas locais. Foram utilizadas 246 amostras de solo provenientes de diversas localidades. Mesmo apresentando menor coeficiente da correlação (r = 0,89*, a equação H+Al = 30,646 - 3,848pH SMP obtida em H2O foi mais eficiente que a obtida em solução CaCl2 (H+Al = 30,155 - 3,834pH SMP, r = 0,91*, a qual subestima os valores da acidez potencial.The objective of this work was to determine a mathematic model that estimates the potential acidity with pH SMP measured in water and in solution of CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1. Two hundred and forty six soil samples from several localities were utilized. Despite presenting a lower correlation coefficient (r = 0.89*, the equation H+Al = 30.646 - 3.848pH SMP, obtained in H2O, was more efficient than in the CaCl2 solution (H+Al = 30.155 -3.834pH SMP, r = 0.91*, since this last one underestimates the values of the potential acidity.

  17. Effect of pH on the adsorption of carbendazim in Polish mineral soils

    The study aimed to determine the influence of pH on the adsorption of carbendazim in soil profiles of three mineral agricultural soils: Hyperdystric Arenosol, Haplic Luvisol and Hypereutric Cambisol. In the examined pH range between 3 and 7 the adsorption of carbendazim was inversely correlated to the pH of the soil. The adsorption coefficients were in the range between 0.3 and 151.8 mL g−1. Decreasing the pH in the soil suspensions from 7 to 3 increased the value of this coefficient by 3 to 70 times. A decrease in the amounts of organic matter down the soil profiles was not associated with weaker carbendazim adsorption. In the samples from all soil horizons, at pH values between 3 and 6, the predominant sorption process was carbendazim adsorption on clay minerals. The adsorption of carbendazim on organic matter prevailed over that on clays only at pH > 6 and only in the Ap horizon of the examined soils. The developed mathematical models yielded very good results when the adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim was assumed to be the predominant adsorption process on clays together with the adsorption of neutral molecules on organic matter and clays. The results from both the model fitting and the experiments revealed the negative effect of Al oxides and hydroxides and Al cations on the adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim on clay minerals. The developed models successfully described the pH-dependent adsorption processes of carbendazim for both data from particular soil horizons and those from all three examined soil profiles. -- Highlights: ► Adsorption of carbendazim in soils was inversely correlated to soil pH. ► At low pH carbendazim was adsorbed predominantly by clay minerals. ► Al3+ influenced adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim on clays. ► Created models predict pH-dependent sorption processes in the whole soil profiles.

  18. Influence of soil pH in vegetative filter strips for reducing soluble nutrient transport.

    Rahmana, Atikur; Rahmana, Shafiqur; Cihacek, Larry

    2014-08-01

    Low efficacy of vegetative filter strips (VFS) in reducing soluble nutrients has been reported in research articles. Solubility of phosphorus and nitrogen compounds is largely affected by pH of soil. Changing soil pH may result in a decrease in soluble nutrient transportation through VFS. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of pH levels of VFS soil on soluble nutrient transport reduction from manure-borne runoff. Soil (loamy sand texture; bulk density 1.3 g cm-3) was treated with calcium carbonate to change pH at different pH treatment levels (5.5-6.5, 6.5-7.5, and 7.5-8.5), soil was packed into galvanized metal boxes, and tall fescue grasses were established in the boxes to simulate VFS. Boxes were placed in an open environment, tilted to a 3.0% slope, and 44.0 L manure-amended water was applied through the VFS by a pump at a rate of 1.45 L min-1. Water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet as well as from the leachate. Samples were analysed for ortho-phosphorus, ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and potassium. Highest transport reductions in ortho-phosphorus (42.4%) and potassium (20.5%) were observed at pH range 7.5-8.5. Ammonium nitrogen transport reduction was the highest at pH level of 6.5-7.5 and was 26.1%. Surface transport reduction in nitrate nitrogen was 100%, but leachate had the highest concentration of nitrate nitrogen. Mass transport reduction also suggested that higher pH in the VFS soil are effective in reducing some soluble nutrients transport. PMID:24956766

  19. Adsorption-Desorption of Hexaconazole in Soils with Respect to Soil Properties, Temperature, and pH

    Maznah Zainol

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature and pH on adsorption-desorption of fungicide hexaconazole was studied in two Malaysian soil types; namely clay loam and sandy loam. The adsorption-desorption experiment was conducted using the batch equilibration technique and the residues of hexaconazole were analysed using the GC-ECD. The results showed that the adsorption-desorption isotherms of hexaconazole can be described with Freundlich equation. The Freundlich sorption coefficient (Kd values were positively correlated to the clay and organic matter content in the soils. Hexaconazole attained the equilibrium phase within 24 h in both soil types studied. The adsorption coefficient (Kd values obtained for clay loam soil and sandy loam soil were 2.54 mL/g and 2.27 mL/g, respectively, indicating that hexaconazole was weakly sorbed onto the soils due to the low organic content of the soils. Regarding thermodynamic parameters, the Gibb’s free energy change (ΔG analysis showed that hexaconazole adsorption onto soil was spontaneous and exothermic, plus it exhibited positive hysteresis. A strong correlation was observed between the adsorption of hexaconazole and pH of the soil solution. However, temperature was found to have no effect on the adsorption of hexaconazole onto the soils; for the range tested.

  20. A simple model for assessing ammonia emission from ammoniacal fertilisers as affected by pH and injection into soil

    Nyord, T.; Schelde, K. M.; Søgaard, H. T.; Jensen, L. S.; Sommer, S. G.

    Ammonia (NH 3) volatilisation following the application of ammoniacal fertilisers and liquid manure to agricultural land is a significant source of atmospheric NH 3, which not only poses a risk to the environment, but may also result in a loss of plant available nitrogen (N). This study examined the potential for reducing NH 3 emission through acidifying an ammoniacal solution and by injecting the solution. The combination of the two technologies was studied and a model for predicting the most optimal treatment was developed. In the laboratory, ammonium (NH 4+) hydroxide (aqueous NH 3) was dissolved in water (pH 11) and injected into a loamy sand soil. The NH 3 emission was measured with a dynamic chamber technology. Injecting the solution to 10 mm below the soil surface reduced NH 3 emission by 10% compared to surface application, and injection to 30 mm reduced emission by 20% compared to surface application. Acidifying the ammoniacal solution by adding sulphuric acid and reducing pH to 10 reduced the emission by 60% at a 10 mm injection depth and 90% at 30 mm compared with non-acidified and surface-spread ammoniacal solution. The results show that there is an important interaction of pH and injection depth and that there is a need for models predicting a combined effect. This type of model could contribute to reduce cost and energy (traction force) by providing the optimal combination of acidifying and injection depth that gives a specific reduction in NH 3 emission, which in this study was reducing pH to 10 and inject the fertiliser to 30 mm below surface. This study showed that relatively simple models can predict the NH 3 emission from injected ammoniacal fertilisers, but that there is still a need for developing algorithms that predict the effect of pH, including the pH buffering capacity of the fertiliser and the soil.

  1. Influence of Microsprinkler Irrigation Amount on Water, Soil, and pH Profiles in a Coastal Saline Soil

    Linlin Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China.

  2. Effects of soil acidity on the uptake of trace elements in soybean and tomato plants

    The effects of soil acidity on the uptake of trace elements (Co, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Tc, Ru, Rh and Re) in soybean and tomato were studied by a multitracer technique. The soybean and tomato plants were cultivated on soils at pH 6.4 (normal soil) and 4.2 (acid soil) and administered with a multitracer for 15-60 days. In general, the uptake of cationic elements in the leaves and stems of soybean plants cultivated on acid soil became higher than those of plants cultivated on normal soil during the late period of growth. However, the effect of soil acidification on the uptake of the anionic element, Se, was quite different from that on the cationic elements. The uptake of Se by the plants cultivated on normal soil was higher than that of the plants cultivated on acid soil at all four harvest points. The uptake behavior of these elements in soybean was discussed in relation to their adsorption behavior on the same soil as was used for soybean cultivation. The growth of tomato plants was seriously affected by the soil acidity and lowering of uptake of elements was observed for the plants cultivated on acidified soil

  3. Total Nucleic Acid Extraction from Soil

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Roey Angel ### Abstract The following protocol is intended for the simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from various soil samples along with suggestions on how to tweak the protocol for soil with higher humic content. The protocol has been used by many and results in very high yields of nucleic acids, typically much more than commercial kits. For buffers and solutions used in this protocol, please see accompanying document Buffers and Solutions for TNA Extractions.pdf. ...

  4. Influence of humified organic matter on copper behavior in acid polluted soils

    Fernandez-Calvino, D., E-mail: davidfc@uvigo.e [Plant Biology and Soil Science Department, University of Vigo, Ourense Campus, 32004 Ourense (Spain); Soler-Rovira, P.; Polo, A. [Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Arias-Estevez, M. [Plant Biology and Soil Science Department, University of Vigo, Ourense Campus, 32004 Ourense (Spain); Plaza, C. [Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The main purpose of this work was to identify the role of soil humic acids (HAs) in controlling the behavior of Cu(II) in vineyard soils by exploring the relationship between the chemical and binding properties of HA fractions and those of soil as a whole. The study was conducted on soils with a sandy loam texture, pH 4.3-5.0, a carbon content of 12.4-41.0 g kg{sup -1} and Cu concentrations from 11 to 666 mg kg{sup -1}. The metal complexing capacity of HA extracts obtained from the soils ranged from 0.69 to 1.02 mol kg{sup -1}, and the stability constants for the metal ion-HA complexes formed, log K, from 5.07 to 5.36. Organic matter-quality related characteristics had little influence on Cu adsorption in acid soils, especially if compared with pH, the degree of Cu saturation and the amount of soil organic matter. - The effect of organic matter quality on Cu adsorption in acid soils was low compared with other soil characteristics such as pH or degree of Cu saturation.

  5. N2O production pathways in the subtropical acid forest soils in China

    To date, N2O production pathways are poorly understood in the humid subtropical and tropical forest soils. A 15N-tracing experiment was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions to investigate the processes responsible for N2O production in four subtropical acid forest soils (pH2O emission in the subtropical acid forest soils, being responsible for 56.1%, 53.5%, 54.4%, and 55.2% of N2O production, in the GC, GS, GB, and TC soils, respectively, under aerobic conditions (40%-52%WFPS). The heterotrophic nitrification (recalcitrant organic N oxidation) accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N2O production, while the contribution of autotrophic nitrification was little in the studied subtropical acid forest soils. The ratios of N2O-N emission from total nitrification (heterotrophic+autotrophic nitrification) were higher than those in most previous references. The soil with the lowest pH and highest organic-C content (GB) had the highest ratio (1.63%), suggesting that soil pH-organic matter interactions may exist and affect N2O product ratios from nitrification. The ratio of N2O-N emission from heterotrophic nitrification varied from 0.02% to 25.4% due to soil pH and organic matter. Results are valuable in the accurate modeling of N2O production in the subtropical acid forest soils and global budget. - Highlights: → We studied N2O production pathways in subtropical acid forest soil under aerobic conditions. → Denitrification was the main source of N2O production in subtropical acid forest soils. → Heterotrophic nitrification accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N2O production. → While, contribution of autotrophic nitrification to N2O production was little. → Ratios of N2O-N emission from nitrification were higher than those in most previous references.

  6. Behavior of Engineered Nanomaterials in Unsaturated Soil: Transport, Effects on pH, and Interactions with Phosphorous

    Conway, J.; Keller, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent life cycle assessments have predicted that soils will be the primary non-landfill sink for many engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), and as their production and use increases annually it becomes increasingly relevant to understand their behavior in the unsaturated surface layers of soil. In this series of experiments, the transport and interactions of three common ENMs, TiO2, CeO2, and CuOH, were measured in an unsaturated potting soil with and without humic acid as a stabilizing agent. Transport was measured in loosely packed soil columns at two concentrations (10 and 100 ppm) with three exposure methods: through the application of contaminated biosolids to the top of the column with subsequent irrigation, by watering with an ENM suspension, and by mixing ENMs homogeneously into the soil and irrigating. Transport was also measured in soil containing intact root structures for the latter two exposure methods at 10 ppm ENM concentration. Soil columns were dried and 3 cm segments were acid digested and measured with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICS-AES). The effect of these ENMs on soil pH was tested after mixing ENM suspensions into soil at four concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 mg kg-1). The bioavailability of PO4 in the presence of ENMs was measured by quantifying the soluble, bioavailable (i.e., extractable by Bray No. 1 solution), and tightly bound fractions of P in 0, 1, 10, and 100 mg kg-1 spiked soils via ICP-AES. We found that these three ENMs exhibit limited transport in all exposure scenarios and so will likely remain near the source zone in an environmental exposure. Additionally, these ENMs were seen to decrease soil pH by up to 0.5 in the highest concentrations, which has consequences for plant growth and nutrient mobility. TiO2 and CeO2 also decreased the soluble and bioavailable fractions of P, and so could inhibit the uptake of this limiting nutrient by organisms.

  7. Fluctuations in ammonia oxidizing communities across agricultural soils are driven by soil structure and pH

    Michele C ePereira e Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The milieu in soil in which microorganisms dwell is never constant. Conditions such as temperature, water availability, pH and nutrients frequently change, impacting the overall functioning of the soil system. To understand the effects of such factors on soil functioning, proxies (indicators of soil function are needed that, in a sensitive manner, reveal normal amplitude of variation. Thus, the so-called normal operating range (NOR of soil can be defined. In this study we determined different components of nitrification by analyzing, in eight agricultural soils, how the community structures and sizes of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively, and their activity, fluctuate over spatial and temporal scales. The results indicated that soil pH and soil type are the main factors that influence the size and structure of the AOA and AOB, as well as their function. The nitrification rates varied between 0.11 ± 0.03 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and 1.68 ± 0.11 µgN.h-1.gdw-1, being higher in soils with higher clay content (1.09 ± 0.12 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and lower in soils with lower clay percentages (0.27 ± 0.04 µgN.h-1.gdw-1. Nitrifying activity was driven by soil pH, mostly related to its effect on AOA but not on AOB abundance. Regarding the influence of soil parameters, clay content was the main soil factor shaping the structure of both the AOA and AOB communities. Overall, the potential nitrifying activities were higher and more variable over time in the clayey than in the sandy soils. Whereas the structure of AOB fluctuated more (62.7 ± 2.10% the structure of AOA communities showed lower amplitude of variation (53.65 ± 3.37%. Similar trends were observed for the sizes of these communities. The present work represents a first step towards defining a NOR for soil nitrification. Moreover, the clear effect of soil texture established here suggests that the NOR should be defined in a soil-type-specific manner.

  8. Influences of pH, Temperature, and Moisture on Gaseous Tritium Uptake in Surface Soils

    Fallon, Robert D.

    1982-01-01

    In South Carolina surface soils, the uptake of gaseous tritium (T2, HT, or both) showed a broad optimal temperature response from about 20 to 50°C, with the highest rates at 35 to 45°C. The optimal pH was in the range of 4 to 7. Uptake rates declined at the wet and dry extremes in soil moisture content. Inhibition seen upon the addition of hydrogen or carbon monoxide to the soil atmosphere suggested that hydrogenase may be responsible for T2-HT uptake in soil. During the period of most rapid ...

  9. Acidity Regimes of Soils Under Different Vegetations in the Changbai Mountains Region

    YUTIANREN; GAOZIQIN; 等

    1997-01-01

    The acidity regimes of representative soils on the north slope of the Changbai Mountains were examined through determinations of pH and pCa of the soil paste as well as in-situ determinations,For soils under broad-leaf forest or broad-leaf-Korean pine forest,the pH decreased from the litte to lower layers gradually until it did not change or decreased further slightly .For soils under coniferous of Erans birch forest,ther was a minimum in pH at a depth of 3-6 cm where the content of humus was high,The pCa increased gradually from the soil surface downward to a constant value.The lime potential(pH-0.5pCa) showed a similar trend as the pH in its distribution.For a given soil,the measured pH value of the thick paste,ranging from 4.5 to 5.5,was lower by about 0.5 units than the value determined by the conventional method with a water to soil ratio of 5:1 ,The pH determined in situ was even lower.It was found that there was a firly close relationship between soil acidity and the type of vegetation.The pH showed a trend of decreasing from soils under broda-leaf forest through broad-leaf-conifer mixed rorest and coniferos forest to Ermans birch forest,and the pCa showed an opposite trend in variation.

  10. VARIAÇÃO DE PERDA DE NITROGÊNIO COM pH DO SOLO NITROGEN VARIATION LOSS WITH SOIL pH

    Ataídes Terra Lamis

    2007-09-01

    édica, Itaguai and Piranema. Nitrogen fertilization was of 200mg of N/Kg of soil. The statistical analysis with the soils of the series Itaguai, Seropédica and Ecologia showed a significant difference at the 5% level between the treatments. It was observed in these soils that when the pH became less acid there was an increase in the losses of ammonium by volatilization. In the experiment with the soil of the series Piranema there was no significant difference in the losses of ammonium in any of the three pH levels.

  11. Chicken manure biochar as liming and nutrient source for acid Appalachian soil.

    Hass, Amir; Gonzalez, Javier M; Lima, Isabel M; Godwin, Harry W; Halvorson, Jonathan J; Boyer, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Acid weathered soils often require lime and fertilizer application to overcome nutrient deficiencies and metal toxicity to increase soil productivity. Slow-pyrolysis chicken manure biochars, produced at 350 and 700°C with and without subsequent steam activation, were evaluated in an incubation study as soil amendments for a representative acid and highly weathered soil from Appalachia. Biochars were mixed at 5, 10, 20, and 40 g kg into a Gilpin soil (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludult) and incubated in a climate-controlled chamber for 8 wk, along with a nonamended control and soil amended with agronomic dolomitic lime (AgLime). At the end of the incubation, soil pH, nutrient availability (by Mehlich-3 and ammonium bicarbonate diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid [AB-DTPA] extractions), and soil leachate composition were evaluated. Biochar effect on soil pH was process- and rate-dependent. Biochar increased soil pH from 4.8 to 6.6 at the high application rate (40 g kg), but was less effective than AgLime. Biochar produced at 350°C without activation had the least effect on soil pH. Biochar increased soil Mehlich-3 extractable micro- and macronutrients. On the basis of unit element applied, increase in pyrolysis temperature and biochar activation decreased availability of K, P, and S compared to nonactivated biochar produced at 350°C. Activated biochars reduced AB-DTPA extractable Al and Cd more than AgLime. Biochar did not increase NO in leachate, but increased dissolved organic carbon, total N and P, PO, SO, and K at high application rate (40 g kg). Risks of elevated levels of dissolved P may limit chicken manure biochar application rate. Applied at low rates, these biochars provide added nutritional value with low adverse impact on leachate composition. PMID:22751051

  12. Mobility and speciation of Cd,Cu,and Zn in two acidic soils affected by simulated acid rain

    GUO Zhao-hui; LIAO Bo-han; HUANG Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    Through a batch experiment, the mobility and speciation of heavy metals(Cd, Cu, Zn) in two acidic forest soils from Hunan Province were studied. The results showed that the release and potential active speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the tested contaminated red soil(CRS) and yellow red soil(CYRS) increased significantly with pH decreasing and ion concentrations increasing of simulated acid rain, and these effects were mainly decided by the pH value of simulated acid rain. Cd had the highest potential risk on the environment compared with Cu and Zn. Cd existed mainly in exchangeable form in residual CRS and CYRS, Cu in organically bound and Mn-oxide occluded forms, and Zn in mineral forms due to the high background values.

  13. Soil degradation by sulfuric acid disposition on uranium producing sites in south Bulgaria

    This study assesses the damage of soils caused by spills of sulfuric acid solutions used for in situ leaching of uranium at eight uranium producing (by open-cast method) sites (total area of approximately 220 ha) in the region of Momino-Rakovski (South Bulgaria). The upper soil layer is cinnamonic pseudopodzolic ( or Eutric Planosols by FAO Legend, 1974). The results of the investigation show that the sulfuric acid spills caused strong acidification of upper (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-60 cm) soil horizons which is expressed as decreasing of pH (H2O) to 2.9-3.5 and increasing of exchangeable H+ and Al3+ to 18 and 32% from CEC. Acid degradation of soils is combined with reducing of organic matter content. The average concentration of the total heavy metal content in the upper soil horizon (in ppm) is: Cd=1.5; Cu=30; Pb=25; Zn=40 and U=8. No significant differences were detected between the upper and subsurface soil layers . The heavy metal concentration did not exceed the Bulgarian standards for heavy metals and uranium content of soils. But the coarse texture of the top soil layers, the lack of carbonates, The low CEC and strong acidity determine a low buffering capacity of the investigated soils and this can be considered as hazardous for plants. This indicates that a future soil monitoring should be carried out in the region together with measures for neutralizing of soil acidity

  14. Complexation of Ni(II) by α-isosaccharinic acid and gluconic acid from pH 7 to pH 13

    Nickel reactions with gluconic acid (Gl) and a-isosaccharinic acid (ISA) have been investigated from pH 7 to pH 13.3. Measurement of the stoichiometries of the products of these reactions showed that NiGl and NiISA were formed at pH2Gl(OH)3 and Ni2ISA(OH)3 were formed at pH values between 7 and 10 and Ni2Gl(OH)4 and Ni2ISA(OH)4 were formed at pH>10. The stability constants for the formation of the soluble complexes were measured using an ion exchange resin method (Schubert method) at pH 7 and 13.3, and differential pulse polarography at pH 7. The polarographic measurements were performed in order to check the validity of the Schubert method at pH 7. This was due to the possibility of any cationic complexes that may have been formed sorbing to the resin. The importance of determining the stoichiometry of the reactions before calculating the stability constants from measurements taken using the Schubert method is emphasised

  15. Ammonia-oxidizing activity and microbial community structure in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil

    Okamura, K.; Takanashi, A.; Yamada, T.; Hiraishi, A.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ammonia-oxidizing activity and the phylogentic composition of microorganisms involved in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil. All soil samples were collected from three sites located in Tahara and Toyohashi, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The potential nitrification rate (PNR) was measured by the chlorate inhibition method. The soil pH of tea orchards studied ranged from 2.78 to 4.84, differing significantly from sample to sample, whereas that of meadow and unplanted fields ranged from 5.78 to 6.35. The PNR ranged from 0.050 to 0.193 μg NO2--Ng-1 h-1 and were positively correlated with the soil pH (r2 = 0.382, pamoA genes. The detected archaeal clones separated from the cluster of the 'Soil clones' and tightly clustered with the clones originating from other acidic soil environments including the Chinese tea orchard soil. These results suggest that the specific archaeal populations dominate as the ammonia oxidizers in acid tea-orchard soils and possibly other acid soils, independent of geographic locations, which results from the adaptation to specific ecological niches.

  16. Soil acidity as affecting micronutrients concentration, nitrato reductase enzyme activity and yield in upland rice plants

    Edemar Moro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lowest grain yield of rice under no-tillage system (NTS in relation to the conventional system may be due to the predominance nitrate in the soil and the low nitrate reductase activity. Another reason may be caused by micronutrient deficiency because of superficially soil acidity corrections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by soil pH in the N forms in the soil, micronutrients concentration in rice plants, nitrate reductase activity, yield of rice and its components. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse conditions. The experimental design was a completely randomized in a factorial three (levels of soil acidity x five (micronutrients sources with four replications. The addition of micronutrients does not affect levels of nitrate and ammonium in the soil; soil acidity significantly affects levels of nitrate and ammonium in the soil, concentration of micronutrients in rice plants and crop yield and its components; medium soil acidity (pH 5.5 result in medium to high levels of Cu and Fe, medium level of Zn and Mn, high nitrate reductase activity, resulting in higher dry matter, tillers, panicles, spikelets, weight of 100 grains and hence grain yield.

  17. Soil amendments modify phosphate sorption in an acid soil: the importance of P source (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, TSP, DAP)

    Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Center, Rutherford, Vic. (Australia)

    2007-07-01

    Soil acidity is a widespread problem in Victoria, Australia, affecting at least 4 million ha of agricultural land. Soil amendments such as lime and organic materials may ameliorate acid soils, resulting in raised soil pH and increased availability of plant nutrients such as phosphorus (P). The addition of lime, lignite, and compost significantly modified P sorption in an acid soil, with the degree of change highly dependent upon the source of P applied. The application of 2.5 t/ha of lime increased P sorption for all P sources, while P sorption was decreased in the lignite and compost treatments when di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) was applied. Lime and compost addition increased the solution pH, with no change in pH in the lignite treatment. Addition of TSP decreased the pH in all treatments, while DAP addition only increased solution pH in the untreated soil and the lignite treatment. The addition of soil amendments had a significant effect on solution cation concentrations, due to both the influx of cations, and the resultant changes in solution pH. The source of P applied (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, TSP (triple superphosphate), DAP) also had a significant effect due to both the counter-ions present and the pH of each P source (e. g. TSP pH 2.7; DAP pH 7.4). The lignite treatment decreased total P sorption relative to the other amendments. The combination of lignite and DAP resulted in both the greatest decrease in P sorption, and the formation of soluble Al-organic complexes. Therefore, a combination of lignite and DAP may be of use in decreasing P sorption in acid soils.

  18. Sorption of dissolved lead from shooting range soils using hydroxyapatite amendments synthesized from industrial byproducts as affected by varying pH conditions.

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Taki, Tomohiro; Sato, Takeshi

    2009-04-01

    For immobilization technologies to be successful, the use of readily available and cost advantageous amendment is important when the remediation targets vast amounts of contaminated soils. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the byproduct-synthesized hydroxyapatite can be used as an immobilizing amendment for dissolved Pb from a shooting range soil, and to model the kinetic data collected from dissolution experiments. A soil-solution kinetic experiment was conducted under fixed pH conditions as a function of time. A Pb-contaminated soil was reacted with various hydroxyapatite amendments to determine the dissolution rate and mineral products of soil Pb. Three types of amendments used were pure hydroxyapatite (HA), and poorly crystalline hydroxyapatites synthesized from gypsum waste (CHA), and synthesized from incinerated poultry litter (PHA). The dissolved Pb concentration decreased with the addition of amendments at pH 3-7. Both CHA and PHA were more effective than HA for attenuating Pb dissolution at pH 6 and above. According to the thermodynamic calculation at pH 6, the dissolved Pb concentration for CHA and PHA treatments was predicted to be 66% and 50% lower than that of HA treatment, respectively. A better Pb immobilization effect demonstrated by CHA and PHA resulted in their greater solubility at higher pH, which may promote the formation of chloropyromorphite precipitates. Dissolution kinetics of soil Pb was adequately explained by pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations in acid pH ranges. According to the ion exchange model, an adequate agreement between the experimental data and regression curves was shown in the initial 40 min of the reaction process, but the accuracy of model predictability decreased thereafter. According to kinetic models and dissolution phenomena, CHA and PHA amendments had better Pb sorption capacity with rapid kinetics than pure hydroxyapatite at weak acid to neutral pH. PMID:19111967

  19. Effects of pH and manure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics in soil.

    Strauss, Claudia; Harter, Thomas; Radke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are a commonly used group of compounds in animal husbandry. They are excreted with manure, which is collected in a storage lagoon in certain types of confined animal feeding operations. Flood irrigation of forage fields with this liquid manure creates the potential risk of groundwater contamination in areas with shallow groundwater levels. We tested the hypothesis that-in addition to the soil characteristics-manure as cosolute and manure pH are two major parameters influencing sulfonamide transport in soils. Solute displacement experiments in repacked, saturated soil columns were performed with soil (loamy sand) and manure from a dairy farm in California. Breakthrough of nonreactive tracer and sulfadimethoxine, sulfamethazine, and sulfamethoxazole at different solution pH (5, 6.5, 8.5) with and without manure was modeled using Hydrus-1D to infer transport and reaction parameters. Tracer and sulfonamide breakthrough curves were well explained by a model concept based on physical nonequilibrium transport, equilibrium sorption, and first-order dissipation kinetics. Sorption of the antibiotics was low ( K₄ ≤ 0.7 L kg) and only weakly influenced by pH and manure. However, sulfonamide attenuation was significantly affected by both pH and manure. The mass recovery of sulfonamides decreased with decreasing pH, e.g., for sulfamethoxazole from 77 (pH 8.5) to 56% (pH 5). The sulfonamides were highly mobile under the studied conditions, but manure application increased their attenuation substantially. The observed attenuation was most likely caused by a combination of microbial transformation and irreversible sorption to the soil matrix. PMID:21869527

  20. Revegetation of extremely acid mine soils based on aided phytostabilization: A case study from southern China.

    Yang, Sheng-Xiang; Liao, Bin; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Chai, Li-Yuan; Li, Jin-Tian

    2016-08-15

    Acidification is a major constraint for revegetation of sulphidic metal-contaminated soils, as exemplified by the limited literature reporting the successful phytostabilization of mine soils associated with pHacidification potential. In this study, a combination of ameliorants (lime and chicken manure) and five acid-tolerant plant species has been employed in order to establish a self-sustaining vegetation cover on an extremely acid (pHacidification potential. The results from the first two-year data showed that the addition of the amendments and the establishment of a plant cover were effective in preventing soil acidification. Net acid-generating potential of the mine soil decreased steadily, whilst pH and acid neutralization capacity increased over time. All the five acid-tolerant plants colonized successfully in the acidic metal-contaminated soil and developed a good vegetation cover within six months, and subsequent vegetation development enhanced organic matter accumulation and nutrient element status in the mine soil. The two-year remediation program performed on this extremely acid metalliferous soil indicated that aided phytostabilization can be a practical and effective restoration strategy for such extremely acid mine soils. PMID:27100018

  1. Metsulfuron-methyl sorption/desorption behavior on volcanic ash-derived soils. effect of phosphate and pH.

    Cáceres, Lizethly; Fuentes, Roxana; Escudey, Mauricio; Fuentes, Edwar; Báez, María E

    2010-06-01

    Metsulfuron-methyl sorption/desorption behavior was studied through batch sorption experiments in three typical volcanic ash-derived soils belonging to Andisol and Ultisol orders. Their distinctive physical and chemical properties are acidic pH and variable surface charge. Organic matter content and mineral composition affected in different ways sorption of metsulfuron-methyl (K(OC) ranging from 113 to 646 mL g(-1)): organic matter and iron and aluminum oxides mainly through hydrophilic rather than hydrophobic interactions in Andisols, and Kaolinite group minerals, as major constituents of Ultisols, and iron and aluminum oxides only through hydrophilic interactions. The Freundlich model described metsulfuron-methyl behavior in all cases (R(2) > 0.992). K(f) values (3.1-14.4 microg(1-1/n) mL(1/n) g(-1)) were higher than those reported for different class of soils including some with variable charge. Hysteresis was more significant in Ultisols. A strong influence of pH and phosphate was established for both kinds of soil, intensive soil fertilization and liming being the most probable scenario for leaching of metsulfuron-methyl, particularly in Ultisols. PMID:20455566

  2. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    Guohua Liang

    Full Text Available The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF, a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0. Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types.

  3. Acid sulfate soils are an environmental hazard in Finland

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) create significant threats to the environment on coastal regions of the Baltic Sea in Finland. The sediments were deposited during the ancient Litorina Sea phase of the Baltic Sea about 7500-4500 years ago. Finland has larger spatial extent of the ASS than any other European country. Mostly based on anthropogenic reasons (cultivation, trenching etc.) ASS deposits are currently being exposed to oxygen which leads to chemical reaction creating sulfuric acid. The acidic waters then dissolve metals form the soil. Acidic surface run off including the metals are then leached into the water bodies weakening the water quality and killing fish or vegetation. In constructed areas acidic waters may corrode building materials. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is mapping ASS deposits in Finland. The goal is to map a total of 5 million hectares of the potentially ASS affected region. It has been estimated that the problematic Litorina Sea deposits, which are situated 0-100 m above the recent Baltic Sea shoreline, cover 500 000 hectares area. There are several phases in mapping. The work begins at the office with gathering the existing data, interpreting airborne geophysical data and compiling a field working plan. In the field, quality of the soil is studied and in uncertain cases samples are taken to laboratory analyses. Also electrical conductivity and pH of soil and water are measured in the field. Laboratory methods include multielemental determinations with ICP-OES, analyses of grain size and humus content (LOI), and incubation. So far, approximately 60 % of the potential ASS affected regions in Finland are mapped. Over 15 000 sites have been studied in the field and 4000 laboratory analyses are done. The spatial database presented in the scale of 1: 250 000 can be viewed at the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/hasu/index.html).

  4. Liming of acid soils in Osijek-Baranja county

    Dolijanović Željko; Andrijačić Martina; Đurđević Boris; Vukadinović Vladimir; Vukadinović Vesna; Jurišić Mladen; Bertić Blaženka; Jug Irena

    2011-01-01

    The negative trend of soil degradation process increases with intensive agricultural production. Therefore, there is a need for soil conditioning like liming, humification, fertilization, etc. to improve soil quality. One of the major problems that occur on agricultural soils of Croatia is acidification. A downward trend of soil pH is mainly present in soils of poor structure with intensive agricultural production. In agricultural practice liming often need...

  5. Correction of Excessive Soil Acidity with Different Liming Materials

    Milan Mesić

    2001-06-01

    According to the changes of soil pH, hydrolytic acidity, base saturation level and mobile aluminium content in soil for all investigation years, the differences in rapidity and duration of activity of particular liming material were recorded. Hydrated lime, sugar factory waste lime, ground soft lithothamnium limestone, hard limestone and dolomite influenced the soil chemical properties on the similar way, but not equally. When higher doses of these materials were applied the excessive soil acidity was almost completely neutralised. Compared to the other liming materials the efficacy of not ground lithothamnium limestone was somewhat lower, and that of phosphogypsum and special natural substrata was considerably lower. Winter wheat and corn were used as test crops and they were grown in the crop sequence winter wheat – corn – corn – winter wheat. According to the winter wheat and corn grain yield recorded at different trial treatments, the trial was statistically significant in all 4 years of investigation. At the first investigation year the highest yield of winter wheat was recorded at the treatment with higher dose of sugar factory waste lime. At the second, third and fourth year highest yields of test crops were obtained at trial treatment with higher dose of ground soft lithothamnium limestone.

  6. P Limitation and Microbial Biogeochemistry in Acidic Forest Soils of the Northeastern United States

    Smemo, K. A.; Deforest, J. L.; Burke, D. J.; Elliot, H. L.; Kluber, L. A.; Carrino-Kyker, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    In forest ecosystems with acidic soils, such as many hardwood forests of the Northeastern United States, net primary productivity should be limited by phosphorus (P) because P is biologically less available at pH temperate forests that have naturally acidic soil or are exposed to chronic acid deposition; such findings are contrary to biogeochemical expectations. We hypothesize that many eastern forests possess an underlying P limitation not realized at the ecosystem level. Instead, shifts in the composition, structure and function of soil microbial communities compensate by acquiring more P from organic sources and P limitation is therefore not manifested at the aboveground (plant) level. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated soil pH and P availability in 72 20 x 40 m mature hardwood forest plots across northeastern (glaciated) and southeastern (unglaciated) Ohio beginning in late summer 2009. Ten months after treatment initiation, soil pH has increased from 4.5 to 5.5 and soil P has increased from 3 to ~25 mg P/kg soil on glaciated soils and from 0.5 to ~5 mg P/kg soil on unglaciated soils. To quantify treatment responses, we measured the activity of soil extracellular enzymes associated with liberation of P, N, and C from organic matter, as well as pools of N and N cycling processes. We saw no significant effects of our treatments on pools of available ammonium or nitrate, nor did we see effects on net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. However, glaciated soils had significantly greater nitrate pools and higher N cycling rates than older unglaciated soils. Nitrogen and C cycling enzymes in treatment plots were not significantly different than control plots, but N-acetylglucosaminidase activity (N acquisition) was significantly greater in the unglaciated soils and β-glucosidase and cellobiosidase activities (C cycling) were greatest in the glaciated soils. In only the unglaciated soils was the activity of P acquisition enzymes (phosphomonoesterase

  7. pH regulates ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in paddy soils in Southern China.

    Li, Hu; Weng, Bo-Sen; Huang, Fu-Yi; Su, Jian-Qiang; Yang, Xiao-Ru

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) play important roles in nitrogen cycling. However, the effects of environmental factors on the activity, abundance, and diversity of AOA and AOB and the relative contributions of these two groups to nitrification in paddy soils are not well explained. In this study, potential nitrification activity (PNA), abundance, and diversity of amoA genes from 12 paddy soils in Southern China were determined by potential nitrification assay, quantitative PCR, and cloning. The results showed that PNA was highly variable between paddy soils, ranging from 4.05 ± 0.21 to 9.81 ± 1.09 mg NOx-N kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), and no significant correlation with soil parameters was found. The abundance of AOA was predominant over AOB, indicating that AOA may be the major members in aerobic ammonia oxidation in these paddy soils. Community compositions of AOA and AOB were highly variable among samples, but the variations were best explained by pH. AOA sequences were affiliated to the Nitrosopumilus cluster and Nitrososphaera cluster, and AOB were classified into the lineages of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas, with Nitrosospira being predominant over Nitrosomonas, accounting for 83.6 % of the AOB community. Moreover, the majority of Nitrosomonas was determined in neutral soils. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis further demonstrated that AOA and AOB community structures were significantly affected by pH, soil total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and C/N ratio, suggesting that these factors exert strong effects on the distribution of AOB and AOA in paddy soils in Southern China. In conclusion, our results imply that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure and nitrification activity. PMID:25744648

  8. Effect of lemon waste on soil ph and availability of micronutrient in calcareous soils of fars province, Southern Iran

    Gharaie, Hossienali

    2008-01-01

    Most of soils of Iran are calcareous in nature. The orchard trees are widespread in south of Iran. Sour lemon is one product of the area and is processed for lemon juice. To evaluate the effect of lemon waste on soil pH and availability of micronutrients, composite soil samples were collected from 0-40 Cm of the area and analyzed for physico- chemical properties. Lemon waste was gathered from processing factory, dried at 70 c and crushed to 1-2 mm size. A statistical complete r...

  9. Negative pH and extremely acidic mine waters from Iron Mountain, California

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Alpers, C.N.; Ptacek, C.J.; Blowes, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Extremely acidic mine waters with pH values as low as -3.6, total dissolved metal concentrations as high as 200 g/L, and sulfate concentrations as high as 760 g/L, have been encountered underground in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA. These are the most acidic waters known. The pH measurements were obtained by using the Pitzer method to define pH for calibration of glass membrane electrodes. The calibration of pH below 0.5 with glass membrane electrodes becomes strongly nonlinear but is reproducible to a pH as low as -4. Numerous efflorescent minerals were found forming from these acid waters. These extreme acid waters were formed primarily by pyrite oxidation and concentration by evaporation with minor effects from aqueous ferrous iron oxidation and efflorescent mineral formation.

  10. Analysis Of Soil NPK Ph And Electrical Conductivity At Adham Area- Renk Upper Nile State

    Abubaker Haroun Mohamed Adam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objectives of this study were to investigate soil type potentiality and reaction in relation to the scattered remaining vegetation species and to quantify soil suitability for growing field crops. Adham area witnessed serious land degradation due to the rapid expansion of Rain-fed Mechanized Farming and overgrazing. Consequently the low crop yield enforced the local communities to shift to the alternative sources of income generating activities particularly those related to forest products like charcoal making firewood production logging and tree lobbing. By using Randomized Complete Block Design RCBD with emphasizes on Macro nutrients particularly the Nitrogen Phosphorous and potassium NPK in addition to soil pH and Electrical Conductivity EC. random soil samples each with three levels of depths 0 - 15 15 - 30 30 - 45 cm. were collected. All collected data were analyzed in the laboratory. The result of revealed several types of soils including the cracking and non -cracking clay sandy and red soils. The result of statistical analysis depicted variability in NPK pH and EC between the different locations and soil depths. Furthermore the result showed an association between some studied soil attributes and the spatial distribution of the vegetation species. Rational use through participatory approach is recommended for natural resources management conservation and sustainability. Moreover further study using space technology also recommended.

  11. Niveles de carbono orgánico y ph en suelos agrícolas de las regiones pampeana y extrapampeana argentina Organic carbon and ph levels in agricultural soils of the pampa and extra-pampean regions of argentina

    Hernán René Sainz Rozas

    2011-07-01

    second objective was to compare the prediction efficiency (EP of two interpolation methods: 1 inverse distance weighting (IDW and 2 ordinary Kriging method (KO. Both methods produced similar maps of SOM and pH, but the EP was slightly greater for the KO (65 to 80% compared to IDP (63 to 79%. Soil organic matter values ranged from 5.5 to 38.0 g kg-1, with values declining westward and northward and increasing to the southeast of the region. Soils of most of the area presented pH values that ranged from 6 to 7.5, except for some cases in northern Buenos Aires, center-southern Santa Fe and eastern Cordoba, where soil pH values ranged from 5.5 to 6. Soil organic matter showed a declining tendency which indicated the need to apply management practices to revert this degradation process. The soil pH should not be limiting for crop production, but potential problems of acidity could appear in some areas.

  12. Effect of Temperature, pH and Salt on Fluorescent Quality of Water Extractable Organic Matter in Black Soil

    LI Ming-tang; ZHAO Lan-po; ZHANG Jin-jing

    2013-01-01

    Water erosion is the major reason for the loss of soil organic carbon in the Northeast China, which leads to the soil quality deterioration and adjacent water pollution. In this study, the effect of extraction temperature, pH value, and salt on the water extractable organic matter (WEOM) was determined by means of the UV absorbance, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix, and derived fluorescence indexes. In general, the carbon content and aromaticity of WEOM increased with the increasing of extraction temperature, with the exception that there was no significant difference in the amount at 0 and 20°C. More fluorophores, especially microbially-derived organic matter were extracted at high temperature. The pH values of extractant, including 5, 7, and 10, showed no effect on the carbon amount of WEOM, whereas the aromaticity and microbially-derived component gradually increased with the increasing of pH values. The fluorescence intensity of humic acid-like fluorophore was stronger in neutral and alkali condition than that in acidic condition. The addition of 10 mmol L-1 CaCl2 significantly decreased the carbon amount of recovered WEOM. Moreover, it significantly decreased the aromaticity of WEOM and the quantity of fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like fluorophores, whereas increased the percentage of tyrosine-like and tryptophan-like fluorophores in the total fluorophores and the amount of microbially-derived organic matter. Generally, 10 mmol L-1 KCl showed the same influence trend, but with low influence degree.

  13. Impact of Seasalt Deposition on Acid Soils in Maritime Regions

    ZHANG Zhen-Hua

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of seasalt deposition and its impact on acid soils in maritime regions are reviewed. It is pointed out that studies involving the impact of seasalt deposition on acid soils have been concentrated on short-term effects on soil and water acidification. A deep consideration of long-term effects on soil acidification in maritime regions is still needed.

  14. Dissolution of Aluminum in Variably Charged Soils as Affected by Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids

    LI Jiu-Yu; XU Ren-Kou; JI Guo-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids exist widely in soils and play an important role in soil processes such as mineral weathering, nutrient mobilization and Al detoxification. In this research, a batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of aluminum in two variably charged soils, an Ultisol and an Oxisol. The results showed that the LMW organic acids enhanced the dissolution of Al in the two investigated soils in the following order: citric > oxalic > malonic > malic > tartaric > salicylic > lactic > maleic. This was generally in agreement with the magnitude of the stability constants for the Al-organic complexes. The effects of LMW organic acids on Al dissolution were greater in the Ultisol than in the Oxisol as compared to their controls. Also, the accelerating effects of citric and oxalic acids on dissolution of Al increased with an increase in pH, while the effects of lactic and salicylic acids decreased. Additionally, when the organic acid concentration was less than 0.2 mmol L-1, the dissolution of Al changed little with increase in acid concentration. However, when the organic acid concentration was greater than 0.2 mmol L-1,the dissolution of Al increased with increase in acid concentration. In addition to the acid first dissociation constant and stability constant of Al-organic complexes, the promoting effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of Al were also related to their sorption-desorption equilibrium in the soils.

  15. Aluminum tolerance of two wheat cultivars (Brevor and Atlas66) in relation to their rhizosphere pH and organic acids exuded from roots.

    Wang, Ping; Bi, Shuping; Ma, Liping; Han, Weiying

    2006-12-27

    Phytotoxicity of aluminum (Al) has become a serious problem in inhibiting plant growth on acid soils. Under Al stress, the changes of rhizosphere pH, root elongation, absorption of Al by wheat roots, organic acids exuded from roots, and some main factors related to Al-tolerant mechanisms have been studied using hydroponics, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two wheat cultivars, Brevor and Atlas66, differing in Al tolerance are chosen in the study. Accordingly, the rhizosphere pH has a positive effect on Al tolerance. Atlas66 (Al-tolerant) has higher capability to maintain high rhizosphere pH than Brevor (Al-sensitive) does. High pH can reduce Al3+ activity and toxicity, and increase the efficiency of exuding organic acids from the roots. More inhibition of root elongation has been found in Brevor because of the exposure of roots to Al3+ solution at low pH. Brevor accumulate more Al in roots than Atlas66 even at higher pH. Al-induced exudation of malic and citric acids has been found in Atlas66 roots, while no Al-induced organic acids have been found in Brevor. These results indicate that the Al-induced secretion of organic acids from Atlas66 roots has a positive correlation with Al tolerance. Comprehensive treatment of Al3+ and H+ indicates that wheat is adversely influenced by excess Al3+, rather than low pH. PMID:17177538

  16. Contribution of ants in modifying of soil acidity and particle size distribution

    Morgun, Alexandra; Golichenkov, Maxim

    2015-04-01

    Being a natural body, formed by the influence of biota on the upper layers of the Earth's crust, the soil is the most striking example of biogenic-abiogenic interactions in the biosphere. Invertebrates (especially ants that build soil nests) are important agents that change soil properties in well developed terrestrial ecosystems. Impact of soil microorganisms on soil properties is particularly described in numerous literature and concerns mainly chemical properties and general indicators of soil biological activity. Influence of ants (as representatives of the soil mesofauna) mostly appears as mechanical movement of soil particles and aggregates, and chemical effects caused by concentration of organic matter within the ant's nest. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of ants on physical and chemical soil attributes such as particle size distribution and soil acidity. The samples were taken from aerial parts of Lasius niger nests, selected on different elements of the relief (summit position, slope, terrace and floodplain) in the Arkhangelsk region (north of the European part of Russia) and compared with the specimens of the upper horizons of the reference soils. Particle size distribution was determined by laser diffraction method using laser diffraction particle size analyzer «Analysette 22 comfort» (FRITSCH, Germany). The acidity (pH) was determined by potentiometry in water suspension. Particle size distribution of the samples from the nests is more variable as compared to the control samples. For example, the content of 5-10 μm fraction ranges from 9% to 12% in reference soils, while in the anthill samples the variation is from 8% to 15%. Similarly, for 50-250 μm fraction - it ranges from 15% to 18% in reference soils, whereas in anthills - from 6% to 29%. The results of particle size analysis showed that the reference sample on the terrace has silty loam texture and nests soil L. niger are medium loam. The reference soil on the slope is

  17. Atmospheric Methane Consumption by Forest Soils and Extracted Bacteria at Different pH Values

    Amaral, John A.; Ren, Tie; Knowles, Roger

    1998-01-01

    The effect of pH on atmospheric methane (CH4) consumption was studied with slurries of forest soils and with bacteria extracted from the same soils. Soil samples were collected from a mixed hardwood stand in New Hampshire, from jackpine and aspen stands at the BOREAS (Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study) site near Thompson, northern Manitoba, from sites in southern Québec, including a beech stand and a meadow, and from a site in Ontario (cultivated humisol). Consumption of atmospheric CH4 (conc...

  18. Standard test method for measuring pH of soil for use in corrosion testing

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the pH of a soil in corrosion testing. The principle use of the test is to supplement soil resistivity measurements and thereby identify conditions under which the corrosion of metals in soil may be accentuated (see G 57 - 78 (1984)). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Effects of dicyandiamide and dolomite application on N2O emission from an acidic soil.

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Yupeng; Peng, Qi-An; Lin, Shan; Mo, Yongliang; Wu, Lei; Hu, Ronggui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Soil acidification is a major problem for sustainable agriculture since it limits productivity of several crops. Liming is usually adopted to ameliorate soil acidity that can trigger soil processes such as nitrification, denitrification, and loss of nitrogen (N) as nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The loss of N following liming of acidic soils can be controlled by nitrification inhibitors (such as dicyandiamide). However, effects of nitrification inhibitors following liming of acidic soils are not well understood so far. Here, we conducted a laboratory study using an acidic soil to examine the effects of dolomite and dicyandiamide (DCD) application on N2O emissions. Three levels of DCD (0, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1); DCD0, DCD10, and DCD20, respectively) were applied to the acidic soil under two levels of dolomite (0 and 1 g kg(-1)) which were further treated with two levels of N fertilizer (0 and 200 mg N kg(-1)). Results showed that N2O emissions were highest at low soil pH levels in fertilizer-treated soil without application of DCD and dolomite. Application of DCD and dolomite significantly (P ≤ 0.001) reduced N2O emissions through decreasing rates of NH4 (+)-N oxidation and increasing soil pH, respectively. Total N2O emissions were reduced by 44 and 13 % in DCD20 and dolomite alone treatments, respectively, while DCD20 + dolomite reduced N2O emissions by 54 % when compared with DCD0 treatment. The present study suggests that application of DCD and dolomite to acidic soils can mitigate N2O emissions. PMID:26620858

  20. Copper binding to soil fulvic and humic acids

    Xu, Jinling; Tan, Wenfeng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Mingxia; Fang, Linchuan; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of Cu(II) to soil fulvic acid (JGFA), soil humic acids (JGHA, JLHA), and lignite-based humic acid (PAHA) was investigated through NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectrum (CAS). It is to extend the knowledge of copper binding by soil humic substances (HS) both in respect of

  1. Productivity of Calliandra calothyrsus, Indigofera zollingeriana and Gliricidia sepium on acid soil in the greenhouse

    Iwan Herdiawan; Endang Sutedi

    2015-01-01

    Acid soil which contains Al3+ and Mn2 is generally unfavorable for crop including the tree legumes. The minerals are toxic to the plants resulted minimalization of growth and crop production. Caliandra calothyrsus, Indigofera zollingeriana, and Gliricidia sepium were tree legumes those are generally used for forage.  The aim of this study was to compare their tolerancy to Al3+ and growth production on acid soil. The plants were grown in ultisol soil with 4.57 of pH collected from Palm Oil pla...

  2. Effects of Composted and Thermally Dried Sewage Sludges on Soil and Soil Humic Acid Properties

    J.M.FERN(A)NDEZ; N.SENESI; C.PLAZA; G.BRUNETTI; A.POLO

    2009-01-01

    The effect of annual additions of composted sewage sludge (CS) and thermally dried sewage sludge (TS) at 80 t ha-1 on soil chemical properties was investigated for three years in a field experiment under semiarid conditions.Humie acids (HAs) isolated by conventional procedures from CS,TS,and unamended (SO) and sludge amended soils were analysed for elemental (C,H,N,S and O) and acidic functional groups (carboxylic and phenolic) and by ultraviolet-visible,Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies.With respect to CS,TS had similar pH and total P and K contents,larger dry matter,total organic C,total N.and C/N ratio and smaller ash content and electrical conductivity.Amendment with both CS and TS induced a number of modifications in soil properties,including an increase of pH,electrical conductivity,total organic C,total N,and available P.The CS-HA had greater O,total acidity,carboxyl,and phenolic OH group contents and smaller C and H contents than TS-HA.The CS-HA and TS-HA had larger N and S contents,smaller C,O and acidic functional group contents,and lower aromatic polycondensation and humification degrees than SO-HA.Amended soil-HAs showed C,H,N and S contents larger than SO-HA,suggesting that sludge HAs were partially incorporated into soil HAs.These effects were more evident with increasing number of sludge applications.

  3. Effects of organic acids on cadmium and copper sorption and desorption by two calcareous soils.

    Najafi, Sarvenaz; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-09-01

    Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) present in soil alter equilibrium pH of soil, and consequently, affect heavy metal sorption and desorption on soil constitutes. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different concentrations (0.1, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 30, 40, 50, 70, and 100 mM) of citric, malic, and oxalic acids on sorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) in two calcareous soils. Increasing the concentrations of three LMWOAs decreased the equilibrium pH of soil solutions. The results indicated that increase in organic acids concentrations generally reduced Cd and Cu sorption in soils. Increase concentrations of LMWOAs generally promoted Cd and Cu desorption from soils. A valley-like curve was observed for desorption of Cu after the citric acid concentration increment in soil 2. Increasing the concentrations of three LMWOAs caused a marked decrease in Kd(sorp) values of Cd and Cu in soils. In general, citric acid was the most effective organic acid in reducing sorption and increasing desorption of both metals, and oxalic acid had the minimal impact. The results indicated that LMWOAs had a greater impact on Cu sorption and desorption than Cd, which can be attributed to higher stability constants of organic acids complexes with Cu compared to Cd. It can be concluded that by selecting suitable type and concentration of LMWOAs, mobility, and hence, bioavailability of heavy metals can be changed. So, environmental implications concerning heavy metals mobility might be derived from these findings. PMID:26298186

  4. Changes of organic acid exudation and rhizosphere pH in rice plants under chromium stress

    The effect of chromium (Cr) stress on the changes of rhizosphere pH, organic acid exudation, and Cr accumulation in plants was studied using two rice genotypes differing in grain Cr accumulation. The results showed that rhizosphere pH increased with increasing level of Cr in the culture solution and with an extended time of Cr exposure. Among the six organic acids examined in this experiment, oxalic and malic acid contents were relatively higher, and had a significant positive correlation with the rhizosphere pH, indicating that they play an important role in changing rhizosphere pH. The Cr content in roots was significantly higher than that in stems and leaves. Cr accumulation in plants was significantly and positively correlated with rhizosphere pH, and the exudation of oxalic, malic and citric acids, suggesting that an increase in rhizosphere pH, and exudation of oxalic, malic and citric acid enhances Cr accumulation in rice plants. - Rhizosphere pH and organic acid exudation of rice roots are markedly affected by chromium level in culture solution

  5. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    Christopher Ash

    Full Text Available Shredded card (SC was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water. We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4. Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49 were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC. In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC. In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC. In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil, and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC. A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption. SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing.

  6. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  7. Primordial soup or vinaigrette: did the RNA world evolve at acidic pH?

    Bernhardt Harold S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA world concept has wide, though certainly not unanimous, support within the origin-of-life scientific community. One view is that life may have emerged as early as the Hadean Eon 4.3-3.8 billion years ago with an atmosphere of high CO2 producing an acidic ocean of the order of pH 3.5-6. Compatible with this scenario is the intriguing proposal that life arose within alkaline (pH 9-11 deep-sea hydrothermal vents like those of the 'Lost City', with the interface with the acidic ocean creating a proton gradient sufficient to drive the first metabolism. However, RNA is most stable at pH 4-5 and is unstable at alkaline pH, raising the possibility that RNA may have first arisen in the acidic ocean itself (possibly near an acidic hydrothermal vent, acidic volcanic lake or comet pond. As the Hadean Eon progressed, the ocean pH is inferred to have gradually risen to near neutral as atmospheric CO2 levels decreased. Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that RNA is well suited for a world evolving at acidic pH. This is supported by the enhanced stability at acidic pH of not only the RNA phosphodiester bond but also of the aminoacyl-(tRNA and peptide bonds. Examples of in vitro-selected ribozymes with activities at acid pH have recently been documented. The subsequent transition to a DNA genome could have been partly driven by the gradual rise in ocean pH, since DNA has greater stability than RNA at alkaline pH, but not at acidic pH. Testing the hypothesis We have proposed mechanisms for two key RNA world activities that are compatible with an acidic milieu: (i non-enzymatic RNA replication of a hemi-protonated cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, and (ii specific aminoacylation of tRNA/hairpins through triple helix interactions between the helical aminoacyl stem and a single-stranded aminoacylating ribozyme. Implications of the hypothesis Our hypothesis casts doubt on the hypothesis that RNA evolved in the vicinity of alkaline

  8. Effects of Converter Slag on some Chemical Characteristics of Acid Soils

    H. Shariatmadari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Lintz-Donawitz (LD converter slag, a by-product of the iron and steel-making industry is produced in large quantities in Isfahan, Iran. The slag contains 52.8 and 2.2% (w/w CaO and MgO, respectively. To determine the influence of LD slag on the chemical characteristics of three acid soils from Gilan, an incubation study was conducted. The soil samples were collected from 0-30 cm of rice and tobacco fields and a tea garden. Treatments were 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 % (w/w of converter slag/kg soil. The slag was thoroughly mixed with 500g soil in plastic pots. Soil moisture content was adjusted to near field capacity and changes in pH, EC and AB-DTPA-extractable Fe, Mn, Zn, P and K were determined at 1, 10, 30 and 60 days. Results showed that soil pH increased with increasing slag rates. Slag increased AB-DTPA-extractable P and Mn, the magnitude increase depend on the amount of slag applied. However, the effect of slag on AB-DTPA-extractable Fe depended on initial pH, initially decreasing at the pH range of 7.4 - 8.5 and then increasing at higher pH levels. Slag decreased AB-DTPA-extractable K especially in highly acid soil. In the present study, soil pH and AB-DTPA-extractable Fe decreased with time, though the effect of incubation time on pH was not significant. The effect of incubation time on AB-DTPA extractable Mn and P was different. Time effect on EC and AB-DTPA-extractable K was not significant. In general, soil chemical characteristics were more affected by slag rates than by incubation time. In conclusion, it seems that converter slag is a suitable amendment for acid soils. It is suggested that the effect of LD converter slag on plant growth and chemical characteristics of acid soils be studied under field conditions.

  9. Declines in Soil pH due to Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs Alter Buffering and Exchange Reactions in Tropical Forest Soils

    Lohse, K. A.

    2003-12-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs may alter tropical soil buffering and exchange reactions that have important implications for nutrient cycling, forest productivity, and downstream ecosystems. In contrast to relatively young temperate soils that are typically buffered from N inputs by base cation reactions, aluminum reactions may serve to buffer highly weathered tropical soils and result in immediate increases in aluminum mobility and toxicity. Increased nitrate losses due to chronic N inputs may also deplete residual base cations in already weathered base cation-poor soils, further acidify soils, and thereby reduce nitrate mobility through pH-dependent anion exchange reactions. To test these hypotheses, I determined soil pH and cation and anion exchange capacity (CEC and AEC) and measured base cation and aluminum soil solution losses following first-time and long-term experimental N additions from two Hawaiian tropical forest soils, a 300 year old Andisol and a 4.1 million year old Oxisol. I found that elevated base cation losses accompanied increased nitrate losses after first time N additions to the young Andisol whereas immediate and large aluminum losses were associated with increased nitrate losses from the Oxisol. In the long-term, base cation and aluminum losses increased in proportion to nitrate losses. Long-term N additions at both sites resulted in significant declines in soil pH, decreased CEC and increased AEC. These results suggest that even chronic N inputs resulting in small but elevated nitrate losses may deplete residual base cations, increase mobility and toxicity of aluminum, and potentially lead to declines in forest productivity and acidification of downstream ecosystems. These findings also suggest that AEC may provide a long-term mechanism to delay nitrate losses in tropical forests with significant variable charge that are experiencing chronic anthropogenic N inputs.

  10. Transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabilites during decomposition in soil

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Paul, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Carbon-14-labelled acetate was added to a heavy clay soil of pH 7.6 to study the transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabolites during decomposition. The acetate was totally metabolized after 6 days of incubation at 25°C when 70% of the labelled carbon had been...... evolved as CO2. Maximum incorporation of trace-C into the various organic fractions was observed after 4 days when 19% of residual, labelled carbon in the soil was located in carbohydrates, 29 % in amino acids and 21 % in the insoluble residue of the soil. The curves showing the amounts of labelled carbon...... days of incubation, 2.2% of the labelled carbon originally added to the soil was located in carbohydrate metabolites, 7% in amino acid metabolites and 5% in the insoluble residue. The carbon in these fractions accounted for 77% of the total, residual, labelled carbon in the soil; 12% in carbohydrates...

  11. Sorption of a triazol derivative by soils: importance of surface acidity

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of a triazol derivative, 1-(4-chlorophenyl)- 4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)penten-3-ol with a common name of S3307D, on fifteen soils and three H2O2-treated soils was investigated. The sorption isotherm for each untreated and treated soil was non-linear, and was best fitted to Freundlich sorption equation. Soils containing high amount of clay content or organic matter or both sorbed much higher amounts of the chemical than soils that had low contents of these soil constituents. H2O2-treated soils showed considerable sorptive affinity for S3307D. It was concluded that both organic matter and mineral fraction in natural soils contributed to the sorption of the basic compound. Sorption by the H2O2 treated soils increased as suspension pH decreased, but all suspension pHs exceeded the pKa of the compound by more than two units. This implies that organic base protonation can occur on surfaces of soil components, and surface acidity (exchangeable acidity ) is important in sorption process of the organic base rather than suspension pH.

  12. REACTION OF APPLE-TREE VARIETIES AND STOCKS ON CHANGE OF pH OF SOIL

    Doroshenko T. N.; Buzoverov A. V.; Ryazanova L. G.; Zakharchuk N. V.

    2015-01-01

    The researches are devoted to the determination of physiological parameters of grafted apple-trees joining with the level of their resistance to the change of soil рН. The experiments were carried out in the conditions of lysimetric experience with the soils use characterizing by different value of рН. The scheme of experience included the following variants of soil medium reaction: neutral (рН 7,3), typical for black soils of plain part of the region (control); weak-acid (рН 6,2) existing in...

  13. Swelling characteristics of hydroxyethylmethacrylate/ methacrylic acid pH -sensitive hydrogel as a drug delivery system

    M. Falamarzian- J. Varshosaz

    1996-01-01

    Hydroxyethyl methacrylate /methacrylic acid (HEMA/MAA) copolymer cross-linked with ethylenglycol dimethacrylate was prepared by a bulk.free radical polymerization method. The results indicate that this polymer is a pH -sensitive hydrogel which is collapsed in the acidic medium but completely swollen in the alkaline and neutral pH . it was determined that a proportion of 40% of MAA, the ionizing monomer of this hydrogel, was the best concentration among the different percentages used which sho...

  14. Organic acid excretion in Penicillium ochrochloron increases with ambient pH

    PamelaVrabl

    2012-04-01

    Confirming our hypothesis, the main result demonstrated that organic acid excretion in P. ochrochloron was enhanced at high external pH levels compared to low pH levels independent of the tested strain, nutrient limitation and cultivation method. We discuss these findings against the background of three hypotheses explaining organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi, i.e. overflow metabolism, charge balance and aggressive acidification hypothesis.

  15. Sorption of Phenols: Influence of Groundwater pH and of Soil Organic Carbon Content

    Silvia Fiore

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Physical and chemical properties of soil, groundwater and pollutants deeply influenced the type and the strength of sorption phenomena involving hydrophobic organic contaminants: Soil fraction of organic carbon (foc and cation exchange capacity, groundwater pH and pollutants hydrophobicity were with undoubtedly the predominant issues. Approach: In this study an experimental study of the sorption of phenol and 2-nitrophenol on three soils was performed considering three initial pH values, with the aim to evaluate the soil/pollutant interactions as a function of the relative abundance of the neutral contaminants and phenolate species and of the solid phase properties. Results: The considered soil samples (a silty clay, a silt and a sand coming from northern Italy underwent to a physical and chemical characterization: Particle-size, mineralogical and chemical analyses were performed. The experimental data coming from some batch tests, carried employing aqueous phases containing different concentrations of phenol and 2-nitrophenol at initial pH values equal to 4, 7 and 10, were fitted by means of several isotherm models. Three Dual Mode Models (DMM, employing different isotherm models to represent the sorption of the neutral and the anionic species of the pollutants, were evaluated by the researchers to simulate the sorption of phenol and 2-nitrophenol in the examined conditions. Conclusion: The soil/contaminant interaction mechanisms determining the isotherm shapes were discussed: foc appeared to be the main issue, although the nitro-group was able to promote sorption. In all considered soil samples and at all initial pH values, the highest foc (found in the silty soil and the presence of the nitro-group determined the highest amounts of pollutant transferred on the solid phase. The two DMMs proposed by the researchers, implying nonlinearity, showed a higher reliability in simulating experimental data compared to a DMM based on

  16. Immobilization of Cd, Zn, and Pb from Soil Treated by Limestone with Variation of pH Using a Column Test

    Sung-Wook Yun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decades of mining in South Korea have resulted in the contamination of large amounts of soil by metals. The most feasible approach to site restoration requires the use of a stabilization agent to reduce metal mobility. This study examined the leaching characteristics of limestone used as a stabilization agent when subjected to solutions of differing pH. In a laboratory-scale column test, solutions with pH values of 3.5, 4.6, and 5.6, representing acidic to nonacidic rainfall, were applied to soil mixed with limestone. Test results indicate that metal components can be released with the addition of acidic solutions, even if the soil is highly alkaline. Cd and Zn, in particular, exhibited abrupt or continuous leaching when exposed to acid solutions, indicating the potential for contamination of water systems as metal-laden soils are exposed to the slightly acidic rainfall typical of South Korea. Treatment using stabilization agents such as limestone may reduce leaching of metals from the contaminated soil. Stabilizing metal-contaminated farmland is an economical and feasible way to reduce pollutants around abandoned metal mines.

  17. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    Highlights: ► Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. ► Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). ► Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. ► Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10−10, 2.08 × 10−9 and 6.8 × 10−10 m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m3). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m3) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  18. The effect of soil pH on photo-catalytic oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    Rakesh M. Pawar; Avice M. Hall; David C. Naseby

    2013-01-01

    The environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a significant issue, raising interest in its clean up using remediation. However, the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils can drastically influence degradation of pollutants. The effect of soil pH on degradation of PAHs with a view to modify soil pH to enhance the degradation of PAH's was studied. The degradation rate of key model PAHs was monitored in topsoil modified to a range of pH 4 to 9 at half pH int...

  19. Nature of Soil Acidity in Relation to Properties and Lime Requirement of Some Inceptisols

    A. K. DOLUI; S. BHATTACHARJEE

    2003-01-01

    Some Inceptisols representing the Singla catchment area in Karimgaunge district of Assam, India, were studied for lime requirement as influenced by the nature of soil acidity. The electrostatically bonded (EB)-H+ and EB-Al3+ acidities constituted 33 and 67 percent of exchangeable acidity while EB-H+, EB-Al3+,exchangeable and pH-dependent acidities comprised 6, 14, 20 and 80 percent of total potential acidity. The pH-dependent acidity made a major contribution towards the total potential acidity (67%~84%). Grand mean of lime requirement determined by the laboratory incubation method and estimated by the methods of New Woodruff, Woodruff and Peech as expressed in MgCaCO3 ha-1 was in the order: Woodruff (15.6) > New Woodruff (14.9) > Peech (5.1) > incubation (5.0). Correlations analysis among different forms of acidity and lime requirement methods with selected soil properties showed that pH in three media, namely water, 1 mol L-1 KCl and 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2, had a significant negative correlation with different forms of acidity and lime requirement methods. Exchangeable Fe and Al showed significant positive correlations with EB-Al3+ acidity, exchangeable acidity, pH-dependent acidity and total potential acidity, and also lime requirement methods. Extractable Al showed positive correlations with different forms of acidity except EB-H+ and EB-Al3+ acidities. The lime requirement by different methods depended upon the extractable aluminium.Significant positive correlations existed between lime requirements and different forms of acidity of the soils except EB-H+ acidity and incubation method. The nature of soil acidity was mostly pH-dependent. Statistically, the Woodruff method did slightly better than the New Woodruff, incubation and Peech methods at estimating lime requirement and hence the Woodruff procedure may be recommended for routine soil testing because of its speed and simplicity.

  20. Impact of mitigation strategies on acid sulfate soil chemistry and microbial community.

    Wu, Xiaofen; Sten, Pekka; Engblom, Sten; Nowak, Pawel; Österholm, Peter; Dopson, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Potential acid sulfate soils contain reduced iron sulfides that if oxidized, can cause significant environmental damage by releasing large amounts of acid and metals. This study examines metal and acid release as well as the microbial community capable of catalyzing metal sulfide oxidation after treating acid sulfate soil with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2). Leaching tests of acid sulfate soil samples were carried out in the laboratory. The pH of the leachate during the initial flushing with water lay between 3.8 and 4.4 suggesting that the jarosite/schwertmannite equilibrium controls the solution chemistry. However, the pH increased to circa 6 after treatment with CaCO3 suspension and circa 12 after introducing Ca(OH)2 solution. 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from community DNA extracted from the untreated and both CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 treated acid sulfate soils were most similar to bacteria (69.1% to 85.7%) and archaea (95.4% to 100%) previously identified from acid and metal contaminated environments. These species included a Thiomonas cuprina-like and an Acidocella-like bacteria as well as a Ferroplasma acidiphilum-like archeon. Although the CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 treatments did not decrease the proportion of microorganisms capable of accelerating acid and metal release, the chemical effects of the treatments suggested their reduced activity. PMID:25933291

  1. Zn Adsorption by Variable Charge Soils in Relation to pH

    SUNHAN-YUAN

    1993-01-01

    Zn adsorption by pure oxides or in the presence of a high concentration of inner electrolyte has been extensively studied.But,in studies on Zn adsorption in the complicated soil system,especially in variable charge soils,profound knowledge about the absorption mechanism still lacks.In this paper,taking Zn ion adsorption by two typical variable charge soils as the object of the study,author discusses the relation between Zn adsorption and pH and possible adsorption mechanisms.The results showed that in the low pH range where the amount of Zn adsorbed did not exceed 50% of Zn added,the specific adsorption was the diminant mechanism.The species of Zn specifically adsorbed was free Zn2+ ion.In the middle and high pH ranges,the mechanisms of specific and electrostatic adsorptions co-existed,accounting for about 70% and 30%,respectively.Noteworthily,in the high pH range,the hydroxyl Zn ion (ZnOH+) from Zn2+ hydrolysis probably was a preferable species for specific absorption.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations capture the misfolding of the bovine prion protein at acidic pH.

    Cheng, Chin Jung; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is transmissible to humans and that is currently incurable. BSE is caused by the prion protein (PrP), which adopts two conformers; PrPC is the native innocuous form, which is α-helix rich; and PrPSc is the β-sheet rich misfolded form, which is infectious and forms neurotoxic species. Acidic pH induces the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of bovine PrP at various pH regimes. An acidic pH environment induced conformational changes that were not observed in neutral pH simulations. Putative misfolded structures, with nonnative β-strands formed in the flexible N-terminal domain, were found in acidic pH simulations. Two distinct pathways were observed for the formation of nonnative β-strands: at low pH, hydrophobic contacts with M129 nucleated the nonnative β-strand; at mid-pH, polar contacts involving Q168 and D178 facilitated the formation of a hairpin at the flexible N-terminus. These mid- and low pH simulations capture the process of nonnative β-strand formation, thereby improving our understanding of how PrPC misfolds into the β-sheet rich PrPSc and how pH factors into the process. PMID:24970211

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Capture the Misfolding of the Bovine Prion Protein at Acidic pH

    Chin Jung Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or mad cow disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is transmissible to humans and that is currently incurable. BSE is caused by the prion protein (PrP, which adopts two conformers; PrPC is the native innocuous form, which is α-helix rich; and PrPSc is the β-sheet rich misfolded form, which is infectious and forms neurotoxic species. Acidic pH induces the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of bovine PrP at various pH regimes. An acidic pH environment induced conformational changes that were not observed in neutral pH simulations. Putative misfolded structures, with nonnative β-strands formed in the flexible N-terminal domain, were found in acidic pH simulations. Two distinct pathways were observed for the formation of nonnative β-strands: at low pH, hydrophobic contacts with M129 nucleated the nonnative β-strand; at mid-pH, polar contacts involving Q168 and D178 facilitated the formation of a hairpin at the flexible N-terminus. These mid- and low pH simulations capture the process of nonnative β-strand formation, thereby improving our understanding of how PrPC misfolds into the β-sheet rich PrPSc and how pH factors into the process.

  4. Identifying sources of acidity and spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils in the Anglesea River catchment, southern Australia

    Wong, Vanessa; Yau, Chin; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    Globally, coastal and estuarine floodplains are frequently underlain by sulfidic sediments. When exposed to oxygen, sulfidic sediments oxidise to form acid sulfate soils, adversely impacting on floodplain health and adjacent aquatic ecoystems. In eastern Australia, our understanding of the formation of these coastal and estuarine floodplains, and hence, spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils, is relatively well established. These soils have largely formed as a result of sedimentation of coastal river valleys approximately 6000 years BP when sea levels were one to two metres higher. However, our understanding of the evolution of estuarine systems and acid sulfate soil formation, and hence, distribution, in southern Australia remains limited. The Anglesea River, in southern Australia, is subjected to frequent episodes of poor water quality and low pH resulting in closure of the river and, in extreme cases, large fish kill events. This region is heavily reliant on tourism and host to a number of iconic features, including the Great Ocean Road and Twelve Apostles. Poor water quality has been linked to acid leakage from mining activities and Tertiary-aged coal seams, peat swamps and acid sulfate soils in the region. However, our understanding of the sources of acidity and distribution of acid sulfate soils in this region remains poor. In this study, four sites on the Anglesea River floodplain were sampled, representative of the main vegetation communities. Peat swamps and intertidal marshes were both significant sources of acidity on the floodplain in the lower catchment. However, acid neutralising capacity provided by carbonate sands suggests that there are additional sources of acidity higher in the catchment. This pilot study has highlighted the complexity in the links between the floodplain, upper catchment and waterways with further research required to understand these links for targeted acid management strategies.

  5. Soil quality under forest compared to other landuses in acid soil of North Western Himalaya, India

    Sharmistha Pal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to examine the impact of land?use on soil fertility in an Alfisol, at Dharamshala district of north western Himalayan region, India. Soil samples were collected from 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm soil depths of five land-uses viz. natural forest of Pinus roxburghii, grassland, horticulture, agriculture and wasteland. Soil was examined for pH, organic carbon (OC, electrical conductivity (EC, cation exchange capacity (CEC, available nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, exchangeable calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, potassium (K, aluminium (Al, microbial biomass carbon (MBC, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN, microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP, acid phosphatase activity (APHA and dehydrogenase activity (DHA. Soil pH varied from 5.22 in forest and 5.72 in grassland. OC content was higher in forest (3.01%, followed by grassland (2.16% and was least (0.36% in deeper layers of agriculture. Highest N content was found under forest (699, 654, 623 and 597 kg/ha, at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm depth, respectively, followed by grassland, horticulture and agriculture and least in wasteland. Exchangeable Ca and Mg were higher in grassland (0.801 c mol kg-1 and 0.402 c mol kg-1, respectively. Exchangeable K and Al were higher under forest (0.231 c mol kg-1 and 1.89 c mol kg-1, respectively least in wasteland. Soil biological properties were highest under surface soil of forest (576 mg kg-1, 31.24 mg kg-1, 6.55 mg kg-1, 29.6 mg PNP g-1h-1 and 35.65 ľg TPF 24 h-1 g-1 dry soil, respectively for MBC, MBN, MBP, APHA and DHA and least in 45-60 cm layer, under wasteland. The forest had a higher fertility index and soil evaluation factor followed by grassland, horticulture, agriculture as compared to wasteland. 

  6. Remediation of metal/organic contaminated soils by combined acid extraction and surfactant washing

    Van Benschoten, J.E.; Ryan, M.E.; Huang, C.; Healy, T.C.; Brandl, P.J. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The specific objectives of this research are to: (1) determine the solubilization of two polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) (naphthalene and pyrene) using several surfactants at low pH conditions; (2) determine the losses of candidate surfactants due to precipitation or adsorption to a test soil as a function of pH; and (3) evaluate the performance of surfactants under acidic conditions for removal of lead and PAH compounds from a contaminated soil. In this paper, experimental results related to the first two objectives are presented.

  7. Using a toxicokinetics approach to explain the effect of soil pH on cadmium bioavailability to Folsomia candida

    The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of metal bioavailability in soil by linking the biotic ligand approach with toxicokinetics modelling. We determined cadmium bioaccumulation kinetics in Folsomia candida (Collembola) as a function of soil pH. Animals were exposed for 21 days to LUFA 2.2 soil at 5 or 20 μg Cd g−1 dry soil followed by 21 days elimination in clean soil. Internal cadmium concentrations were modelled using a first-order one-compartment model, relating uptake rate constants (k1) to total soil, water or 0.01 M CaCl2 extractable and porewater concentrations. Based on total soil concentrations, k1 was independent of soil pH while it strongly increased with increasing pH based on porewater concentrations explaining the reduced competition of H+ ions making cadmium more bioavailable in pore water at high pH. This shows that the principles of biotic ligand modelling are applicable to predict cadmium accumulation kinetics in soil-living invertebrates. -- Highlights: •Cadmium uptake and elimination in Folsomia candida were investigated. •Animals were exposed to LUFA 2.2 soil at different pH levels. •Langmuir isotherms were used to describe interaction of Ca and protons with Cd. •pH was the main factor affecting Cd toxicokinetics when pore water was considered. -- Integrating bioaccumulation kinetics with a BLM approach provides novel insights into the bioavailability of cadmium to springtails in soil

  8. Multitracer studies on the effects of model acid rain on the adsorption of trace elements on soils

    Using a multitracer technique, the effects of acid rain pH on the adsorption of 15 trace elements on soil were studied. Kaolin, forest soil (original and with partially removed oxides), black soil (original and without organic matter) and Kureha soil (original, with partially removed oxides, and without organic matter) were employed as the adsorbents. Instead of H2SO4 solution, HCl solution was selected as the model acid rain based on the results of adsorption experiments on kaolin. In general, the percentage adsorption of cationic elements on three original soils and kaolin increased with increasing pH. The adsorption of oxyanionic elements, As and Se, on three soils was high over the entire pH range studied, while that on kaolin was low and decreased with an increase in pH. The differences in the physical and chemical properties of soils were reflected on the adsorption. The organic matter in soil had positive effects on the extent of adsorption of most elements studied, while the oxides apparently showed positive effects only for Fe and Se adsorption. The results indicate that acid rain decreases the retention of cations in soil and that it increases or does not change the adsorption of anions. (orig.)

  9. Fitting maize into sustainable cropping systems on acid soils of the tropics

    techniques for acid soil tolerance. There is a need to better characterise these properties on a molecular basis and to systematically select for them. Incorporation of soil acidity tolerant plant species and cultivars into cropping systems contribute to improved nutrient efficiency of the overall system and thus reduce fertilizer needs. The application of nuclear techniques could contribute to facilitate and enhance scientific progress especially in the following areas: - Quantification of morphological root characteristics and rooting patterns. - Studying water-use efficiency as affected by soil acidity and plant adaptation. - Establishment of carbon and nitrogen budgets of cropping systems as affected by soil pH and crop management. - Quantification of the soil/fertilizer P mobilisation capacity of crops and cropping systems. - Molecular characterisation of plant adaptation-mechanisms. (author)

  10. Improving the efficiency of rock phosphate on high pH soils: Results from participatory research in India

    Andres, Christian; Mandloi, Lokendra S.; Verma, Rajeev; Gomez, Sara; Nyffenegger, Mirjam R.; Locher, Michael; Patel, Dharmendra; Forster, Dionys; Bhullar, Gurbir S; Studer, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    High soil pH levels may limit the availability of phosphorous (P) to crops. In organic farming, the use of synthetic P fertilizers is not allowed. Application of rock phosphate (RP) to crops is one of the alternatives for organic production. However, RP application shows little effect on high pH soils, because the P is not transformed into plant-available forms under alkaline soil conditions. Aiming at the development of locally adapted solutions, we followed a Participatory Technology Dev...

  11. Soil acidity and mobile aluminum status in pseudogley soils in Čačak-Kraljevo basin

    Đalović Ivica G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil acidity and aluminum toxicity are considered most damaging soil conditions affecting the growth of most crops. This paper reviews the results of tests of pH, exchangeable acidity and mobile aluminum (Al concentration in profiles of pseudogley soils from Čačak-Kraljevo basin. For that purpose, 102 soil pits were dug in 2009 in several sites around Čačak- Kraljevo basin. The tests encompassed 54 field, 28 meadow, and 20 forest soil samples. Samples of soil in the disturbed state were taken from the Ah and Eg horizons (102 samples, from the B1tg horizon in 39 field, 24 meadow and 15 forest pits (a total of 78 samples and from the B2tg horizon in 14 field, 11 meadow, and 4 forest pits (a total of 29 samples. Mean pH values (1M KCl of the tested soil profiles were 4.28, 3.90 and 3.80 for the Ah, Eg and B1tg horizons, respectively. Soil pH of forest samples was lower than those in meadow and arable land samples (mean values of 4.06, 3.97 and 3.85 for arable land, meadow and forest samples, respectively. Soil acidification was especially intensive in deep horizons, as 27% (Ah, 77% (Eg and 87% (B1tg soil samples had the pH value below 4.0. Mean values of total exchangeable acidity (TEA were 1.55, 2.33 and 3.40 meq 100 g-1 for the Ah, Eg and B1tg horizons, respectively. The TEA values in forest soils were considerably higher (3.39 meq 100 g-1 than those in arable soils and meadow soils (1.96 and 1.93, respectively. Mean mobile Al contents of tested soil samples were 11.02, 19.58 and 28.33 mg Al 100 g-1 for the Ah, Eg and B1tg horizons, respectively. According to the pH and TEA values, mobile Al was considerably higher in the forest soils (the mean value of 26.08 mg Al 100 g-1 than in the arable soils and meadow soils (the mean values of 16.85 and 16.00 mg Al 100 g-1, respectively. The Eg and B1tg horizons of the forest soil had especially high mobile Al contents (the mean values of 28.50 and 32.95 mg Al 100 g-1, respectively. High levels of

  12. Crop uptake and extractability of cadmium in soils naturally high in metals at different pH levels

    Singh, B.R.; Almas, A.; Narwal, R.P. [Haryana Agric. Univ., Hisar (India); Jeng, A.S.

    1995-12-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted for three years to study the effect of different pH levels on metal concentrations in plants and the cadmium (Cd) extractability by DTPA and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}. The soils used were an alum shale (clay loam) and a moraine (loam), which were adjusted to pH levels of 5.5, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.5. Wheat (Triticum aestivum), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were grown as test crops. Crop yields were not consistently affected at increasing soil pH levels. The concentration of Cd in plant species decreased with increasing soil pH in both soils and in all three years. Significant concentration differences between soil pH levels were only seen in wheat and carrot crops. Increasing soil pH also decreased the nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) concentrations in plants in the first year crop but the copper (Cu) concentration was not consistently affected by soil pH. The effect of pH was more pronounced in the moraine then the alum shale soil. The DTPA-and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-extractable Cd was decreased with the increasing soil pH and the pH effect was more pronounced with NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} extractable Cd. Both extractants were found equally effective in relation to the Cd concentration in plants in this study. 33 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Photoproduction of glyoxylic acid in model wine: Impact of sulfur dioxide, caffeic acid, pH and temperature.

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Barril, Celia; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-01-15

    Glyoxylic acid is a tartaric acid degradation product formed in model wine solutions containing iron and its production is greatly increased by exposure to UV-visible light. In this study, the combined effect of sulfur dioxide, caffeic acid, pH and temperature on the light-induced (⩾300nm) production of glyoxylic acid in model wine containing tartaric acid and iron was investigated using a Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM). Glyoxylic acid produced in the irradiated model wine was present in free and hydrogen sulfite adduct forms and the measured total, free and percentage free glyoxylic acid values were modeled using RSM. Sulfur dioxide significantly decreased the total amount of glyoxylic acid produced, but could not prevent its production, while caffeic acid showed no significant impact. The interaction between pH and temperature was significant, with low pH values and low temperatures giving rise to higher levels of total glyoxylic acid. PMID:27542478

  14. Distribution and elevated soil pools of mercury in an acidic subtropical forest of southwestern China

    Tieshanping catchment in southwest China was supposed to a large pool of atmospheric mercury. This work was aimed to examine THg (total mercury) concentrations, pools and influence factors in the acidic forest. THg concentrations were highly elevated in the study area, which was significantly depended on TOM (total organic matter) concentrations and altitudinal elevation, whereas negatively correlated with soil pH. The pools of mercury accumulated in soils were correlated strongly with the stocks of TOM and altitude, ranged from 5.9 to 32 mg m−2 and averaged 14.5 mg m−2, indicating that the acidic forest was a great sink of atmospheric mercury in southwest China. THg concentrations in stream waters decreased with altitude increasing and regression analyses showed that soil/air exchange flux would be increased with the decrease of altitude. Present results suggest that elevation increasing decreases THg losses as low THg concentrations in runoffs and volatilization from soils. - Highlights: • Soil THg pools and influence factors were studied at an acidic catchment in southwestern China. • THg concentrations was increased significantly with TOM concentrations and altitude increasing, decreased with pH. • THg pools in soils were highly elevated and deepened on TOM pools and altitude. • Difference in THg output by volatilization and runoff was a major reason for THg distribution at different altitudes. - Mercury pools increased with altitude increasing as mercury lost more at low elevation area in acidic subtropical forest

  15. Bromine accumulation in acidic black colluvial soils

    Cortizas, Antonio Martínez; Vázquez, Cruz Ferro; Kaal, Joeri; Biester, Harald; Casais, Manuela Costa; Rodríguez, Teresa Taboada; Lado, Luis Rodríguez

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations showed that bromine is incorporated to soil organic matter (SOM), its content increasing with humification. But few research was done on its long-term accumulation and the role played by pedogenetic processes, as those involved in organic matter stabilization. We investigated bromine content and distribution in four deep, acidic, organic-rich, Holocene soils from an oceanic area of Western Europe. Bromine concentrations (93-778 μg g-1) in the silt + clay (area, and total estimated retention was low (6-16%). The degree of SOM bromination, expressed as the Br/C molar ratio, varied between 0.03 and 1.20 mmol Br/mol C. The ratio was highly correlated (n = 23, r2 0.88, p pool of metal-clay-stabilized organic matter.

  16. Removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid by column leaching method

    In this study, evaluation of radium-226 removal from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid extracted from peat soil by column leaching method was carried out. Humic acid of concentration 100 ppm and pH 7 was leached through a column packed with radium-contaminated soil and leachates collected were analysed with gamma spectrometer to determine the leached radium-226. Results obtained indicated low removal of radium-226 between 1 - 4 %. Meanwhile, leaching profile revealed that radium-226 was bound to soil components with three different strength, thus resulting in three phases of radium-226 removal. It was estimated that the total removal of radium-226 from 10 g radium-contaminated soil sample studied could be achieved using approximately 31500 - 31850 ml HA solutions with leaching rate of 1 ml/ min. (author)

  17. H-binding groups in lignite vs. soil humic acids: NICA-Donnan and spectroscopic parameters.

    Drosos, Marios; Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2009-04-01

    A comparative study has been carried out for two sets of humic acids isolated from lignites and soils. H-binding data were analyzed using the NICA-Donnan model, for three Greek lignite humic acids (HA) plus IHSS Leonardite reference HA, and five Greek soil HAs plus a commercial peat HA. (13)C-CP-MAS NMR and H-binding data provide quantitative estimates for functional groups, showing that lignite HAs of diverse origin have strikingly homogeneous properties, while the H-binding structural units of soil HAs are characterized by a large degree of variability. Consistent differences between soil HA vs. lignite HA are revealed at the level of functional groups' concentrations. In the pH range 4 to 10, soil HA showed a charge variation 3.5 [equiv kg(-1)]. PMID:19144349

  18. Humic Acid Complexation of Th, Hf and Zr in Ligand Competition Experiments: Metal Loading and Ph Effects

    Stern, Jennifer C.; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The mobility of metals in soils and subsurface aquifers is strongly affected by sorption and complexation with dissolved organic matter, oxyhydroxides, clay minerals, and inorganic ligands. Humic substances (HS) are organic macromolecules with functional groups that have a strong affinity for binding metals, such as actinides. Thorium, often studied as an analog for tetravalent actinides, has also been shown to strongly associate with dissolved and colloidal HS in natural waters. The effects of HS on the mobilization dynamics of actinides are of particular interest in risk assessment of nuclear waste repositories. Here, we present conditional equilibrium binding constants (Kc, MHA) of thorium, hafnium, and zirconium-humic acid complexes from ligand competition experiments using capillary electrophoresis coupled with ICP-MS (CE- ICP-MS). Equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange (EDLE) experiments using size exclusion via a 1000 Damembrane were also performed to validate the CE-ICP-MS analysis. Experiments were performed at pH 3.5-7 with solutions containing one tetravalent metal (Th, Hf, or Zr), Elliot soil humic acid (EHA) or Pahokee peat humic acid (PHA), and EDTA. CE-ICP-MS and EDLE experiments yielded nearly identical binding constants for the metal- humic acid complexes, indicating that both methods are appropriate for examining metal speciation at conditions lower than neutral pH. We find that tetravalent metals form strong complexes with humic acids, with Kc, MHA several orders of magnitude above REE-humic complexes. Experiments were conducted at a range of dissolved HA concentrations to examine the effect of [HA]/[Th] molar ratio on Kc, MHA. At low metal loading conditions (i.e. elevated [HA]/[Th] ratios) the ThHA binding constant reached values that were not affected by the relative abundance of humic acid and thorium. The importance of [HA]/[Th] molar ratios on constraining the equilibrium of MHA complexation is apparent when our estimated Kc, MHA values

  19. pH : a key control of the nature and distribution of dissolved organic matter and associated trace metals in soil

    Pédrot, M.; Dia, A.; Davranche, M.

    2009-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter is ubiquitous at the Earth's surface and plays a prominent role in controlling metal speciation and mobility from soils to hydrosystems. Humic substances (HS) are usually considered to be the most reactive fraction of organic matter. Humic substances are relatively small and formed by chemically diverse organic molecules, bearing different functional groups that act as binding sites for cations and mineral surfaces. Among the different environmental physicochemical parameters controlling the metal speciation, pH is likely to be the most important one. Indeed, pH affect the dissociation of functional groups, and thus can influence the HS structure, their ability to complex metals, their solubility degree allowing the formation of aggregates at the mineral surface. In this context, soil/water interactions conducted through batch system experiments, were carried out with a wetland organic-rich soil to investigate the effect of pH on the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and associated trace elements. The pH was regulated between 4 and 7.5 using an automatic pH stat titrator. Ultrafiltration experiments were performed to separate the dissolved organic pool following decreasing pore sizes (30 kDa, 5 kDa and 2 kDa with 1 Da = 1 g.mol-1). The pH increase induced a significant DOC release, especially in heavy organic molecules (size >5 kDa) with a high aromaticity (>30 %). These were probably humic acids (HA). This HA release influenced (i) directly the trace element concentrations in soil solution since HA were enriched in several trace elements such as Th, REE, Y, U, Cr and Cu; and (ii) indirectly by the breaking of clay-humic complexes releasing Fe- and Al-rich nanoparticles associated with V, Pb and Ti. By contrast, at acid pH, most HS were complexed onto mineral surfaces. They also sequestered iron nanoparticles. Therefore, at low pH, most part of DOC molecules had a size heavy organic molecules considered to be flexible linear

  20. The time course of the transcriptomic response of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 following a shift to acidic pH

    Pühler Alfred

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The symbiotic soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti often has to face low pH in its natural habitats. To identify genes responding to pH stress a global transcriptional analysis of S. meliloti strain 1021 following a pH shift from pH 7.0 to pH 5.75 was carried out. In detail, oligo-based whole genome microarrays were used in a time course experiment. The monitoring period covered a time span of about one hour after the pH shift. The obtained microarray data was filtered and grouped by K-means clustering in order to obtain groups of genes behaving similarly concerning their expression levels throughout the time course. Results The results display a versatile response of S. meliloti 1021 represented by distinct expression profiles of subsets of genes with functional relation. The eight generated clusters could be subdivided into a group of four clusters containing genes that were up-regulated and another group of four clusters containing genes that were down-regulated in response to the acidic pH shift. The respective mean expression progression of the four up-regulated clusters could be described as (i permanently and strong, (ii permanently and intermediate, (iii permanently and progressive, and (iv transiently up-regulated. The expression profile of the four down-regulated clusters could be characterized as (i permanently, (ii permanently and progressive, (iii transiently, and (iv ultra short down-regulated. Genes coding for proteins with functional relation were mostly cumulated in the same cluster, pointing to a characteristic expression profile for distinct cellular functions. Among the strongest up-regulated genes lpiA, degP1, cah, exoV and exoH were found. The most striking functional groups responding to the shift to acidic pH were genes of the exopolysaccharide I biosynthesis as well as flagellar and chemotaxis genes. While the genes of the exopolysaccharide I biosynthesis (exoY, exoQ, exoW, exoV, exoT, exoH, exoK exo

  1. Cadmium and Zn availability as affected by pH manipulation and its assessment by soil extraction, DGT and indicator plants

    Manipulation of soil pH by soil additives and / or rhizosphere processes may enhance the efficiency of metal phytoextraction. Here we report on the effect of nitric acid additions to four polluted soils on Cd and Zn concentrations in soil solution (Csoln) and 0.005 M Ca(NO3)2 extracts, and related changes in the diffusive fluxes and resupply of the metals as assessed by diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT). The responses of these chemical indicators of bioavailability were compared to metal uptake in two indicator plant species, common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg) and narrow leaf plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) grown for 75 days in a pot experiment. Lowering soil pH increased Csoln, the 0.005 M Ca(NO3)2-soluble fractions and the DGT-measured Cd and Zn concentrations (CDGT) in the experimental soils. This was associated with enhanced uptake of Cd and Zn on soils acidified to pH 4.5 whereas plants did not survive at pH 3.5. Toxicity along with decreased kinetics of metal resupply (calculated by the 2D DIFS model) in the strong acidification treatment suggests that moderate acidification is more appropriate to enhance the phytoextraction process. Each of the chemical indicators of bioavailability predicted well (R2 > 0.70) the Cd and Zn concentrations in plantain shoots but due to metal toxicity not for dandelion. Concentration factors, i.e. the ratio between metal concentrations in shoots and in soil solution (CF) indicate that Cd and Zn uptake in plantain was not limited by diffusion which may explain that DGT did not perform better than Csoln. However, DGT is expected to predict plant uptake better in diffusion-limited conditions such as in the rhizosphere of metal-accumulating phytoextraction crops. - Highlights: ► The effect of soil acidification was assessed for four Zn and Cd polluted soils. ► For some soils moderate acidification could enhance the metal uptake efficiency. ► Chemical assessment of bioavailability using soil solution and

  2. Cadmium and Zn availability as affected by pH manipulation and its assessment by soil extraction, DGT and indicator plants

    Muhammad, Iqbal; Puschenreiter, Markus, E-mail: markus.puschenreiter@boku.ac.at; Wenzel, Walter W.

    2012-02-01

    Manipulation of soil pH by soil additives and / or rhizosphere processes may enhance the efficiency of metal phytoextraction. Here we report on the effect of nitric acid additions to four polluted soils on Cd and Zn concentrations in soil solution (C{sub soln}) and 0.005 M Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} extracts, and related changes in the diffusive fluxes and resupply of the metals as assessed by diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT). The responses of these chemical indicators of bioavailability were compared to metal uptake in two indicator plant species, common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg) and narrow leaf plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) grown for 75 days in a pot experiment. Lowering soil pH increased C{sub soln}, the 0.005 M Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-soluble fractions and the DGT-measured Cd and Zn concentrations (C{sub DGT}) in the experimental soils. This was associated with enhanced uptake of Cd and Zn on soils acidified to pH 4.5 whereas plants did not survive at pH 3.5. Toxicity along with decreased kinetics of metal resupply (calculated by the 2D DIFS model) in the strong acidification treatment suggests that moderate acidification is more appropriate to enhance the phytoextraction process. Each of the chemical indicators of bioavailability predicted well (R{sup 2} > 0.70) the Cd and Zn concentrations in plantain shoots but due to metal toxicity not for dandelion. Concentration factors, i.e. the ratio between metal concentrations in shoots and in soil solution (CF) indicate that Cd and Zn uptake in plantain was not limited by diffusion which may explain that DGT did not perform better than C{sub soln}. However, DGT is expected to predict plant uptake better in diffusion-limited conditions such as in the rhizosphere of metal-accumulating phytoextraction crops. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of soil acidification was assessed for four Zn and Cd polluted soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For some soils moderate acidification could

  3. Short-column anion-exchange chromatography for soil and peat humic substances profiling by step-wise gradient of high pH aqueous sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

    Hutta, Milan; Ráczová, Janka; Góra, Róbert; Pessl, Juraj

    2015-08-21

    Novel anion-exchange liquid chromatographic method with step gradient of aqueous EDTA(4-) based mobile phase elution has been developed to profile available Slovak soil humic substances and alkaline extracts of various soils. The method utilize short glass column (30mm×3mm) filled in with hydrolytically stable particles (60μm diameter) Separon HEMA-BIO 1000 having (diethylamino)ethyl functional groups. Step gradient was programmed by mixing mobile phase composed of aqueous solution of sodium EDTA (pH 12.0; 5mmolL(-1)) and mobile phase constituted of aqueous solution of sodium EDTA (pH 12.0, 500mmolL(-1)). The FLD of HSs was set to excitation wavelength 480nm and emission wavelength 530nm (λem). Separation mechanism was studied by use of selected aromatic acids related to humic acids with the aid of UV spectrophotometric detection at 280nm. The proposed method benefits from high ionic strength (I=5molL(-1)) of the end mobile phase buffer and provides high recovery of humic acids (98%). Accurate and reproducible profiling of studied humic substances, alkaline extracts of various types of soils enables straightforward characterization and differentiation of HSs in arable and forest soils. Selected model aromatic acids were used for separation mechanism elucidation. PMID:26143606

  4. Effect of reactive substrates used for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater on the fertility of acid soils.

    Cucarella, Victor; Zaleski, Tomasz; Mazurek, Ryszard; Renman, Gunno

    2008-07-01

    Reactive substrates used in filter systems can reduce phosphorus (P) pollution and, once saturated with P, may be recycled in agriculture. These substrates are usually calcium carbonate derivates with high pH values, which may be particularly beneficial for acid soils. Three reactive substrates (Filtra P, Polonite and wollastonite) saturated with P were used as amendments to an acid soil in a pot experiment. Substrate amendments tended to improve ryegrass yield and P uptake compared with control and potassium phosphate treatments. Polonite produced the highest yield/amendment ratio, while Polonite and Filtra P significantly increased the concentrations of P and Ca in the ryegrass. Addition of all three substrates increased the pH, AL-extractable P and cation exchange capacity of soils during the experiment. These substrates can therefore be applied to acid soils in order to recycle P and improve soil properties. PMID:17920265

  5. Composition of exchangeable bases and acidity in soils of the Crimean Mountains

    Kostenko, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    Acid forest and mountainous meadow soils of the Crimean Mountains were studied. The amount of hydrogen and aluminum ions extracted from these soils depended on the pH of extracting agents. The maximum values of the soil acidity were obtained upon the extraction with a strongly alkaline solution of sodium acetate in 0.05 N NaOH. The application of this extractant made it possible to determine the total exchange acidity, the total amount of extractable aluminum, and the total cation exchange capacity of the soils after the extraction of all the acidic components from them. The values of these characteristics were significantly higher than the values of the potential acidity and cation exchange capacity obtained by the routine analytical methods. Hydrogen predominated among the acidic components of the exchange acidity in the humus horizons, whereas aluminum predominated among them in the underlying mineral horizons. Hydrothermic conditions and the character of vegetation and parent materials were the major factors affecting the relationships between bases and acidic components in the soil adsorption complex.

  6. The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and Acid leaching

    The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and acid leaching has been carried out to increase high uranium concentrates of materials, separating associated economical minerals and to reduce the gangue minerals which bothering at chemical processing. The physical treatment has been done by ore preparation and floatation using oleic acid and pine oil, 20 % of pulp at pH 9, condition time at 5 minutes and collections of float fraction was 10 minutes. The chemical processing has been done by dynamic leaching using H2SO4 100 kg/ton, MnO2 20 kg/ton, 50 % of solid with ore size - 65 mesh, temperature at 80 oC and time of leaching was 8 hours. The result of experiments is as follows : Physical treatment by floatation shown that the concentrates of U increased at sink fraction by (1.5 - 2) times against feed sample for all the samples, and in the float fraction the recovery of molybdenite separation is 58 - 81 % and rare earths is 57 - 80 %. The result of dynamic leaching is 76 - 91 %, and recovery uranium increasing from 81.02 % (mixture samples soil before floatation) to 91.16 % ( mixture samples of float fraction)

  7. Dolomite application to acidic soils: a promising option for mitigating N2O emissions.

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Peng, Qi-An; Hu, Ronggui; Wu, Yupeng; Lin, Shan; Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-12-01

    Soil acidification is one of the main problems to crop productivity as well as a potent source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O). Liming practice is usually performed for the amelioration of acidic soils, but the effects of dolomite application on N2O emissions from acidic soils are still not well understood. Therefore, a laboratory study was conducted to examine N2O emissions from an acidic soil following application of dolomite. Dolomite was applied to acidic soil in a factorial design under different levels of moisture and nitrogen (N) fertilizer. Treatments were as follows: dolomite was applied as 0, 1, and 2 g kg(-1) soil (named as CK, L, and H, respectively) under two levels of moisture [i.e., 55 and 90 % water-filled pore space (WFPS)]. All treatments of dolomite and moisture were further amended with 0 and 200 mg N kg(-1) soil as (NH4)2SO4. Soil properties such as soil pH, mineral N (NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil N2O emissions were analyzed throughout the study period. Application of N fertilizer rapidly increased soil N2O emissions and peaked at 0.59 μg N2O-N kg(-1) h(-1) under 90 % WFPS without dolomite application. The highest cumulative N2O flux was 246.32 μg N2O-N kg(-1) under 90 % WFPS without dolomite addition in fertilized soil. Addition of dolomite significantly (p ≤ 0.01) mitigated N2O emissions as soil pH increased, and H treatment was more effective for mitigating N2O emissions as compared to L treatment. The H treatment decreased the cumulative N2O emissions by up to 73 and 67 % under 55 and 90 % WFPS, respectively, in fertilized soil, and 60 and 68 % under 55 and 90 % WFPS, respectively, in unfertilized soil when compared to those without dolomite addition. Results demonstrated that application of dolomite to acidic soils is a promising option for mitigating N2O emissions. PMID:26289338

  8. Fractionation of Moderately and Highly Stable Organic Phosphorus in Acid Soil

    FANYEKUAN; LISHIJUN

    1998-01-01

    The fractionation of moderately and highly organic phosphorus(Po) in acid soil was studied by two methods .By the first method,after incubation for 40 d; the mineralization rates of eight constituents of stable Po in the soil were determined.By the second method ,five constituents of peecipitates of stable Po in the soil were separated,then the five precipiates were put back into the original soils and incubated for 40 d and 60 d .Then,mineralization rates of the five precipitates were determined.The same results were obtained by the two methods.When the pH of the alkali solution containing stable Po was adjusted from 3.00 to 3.10,the mineralization rate of moderately stable Po Was rapidly raised.Therefore,the pH 3.00 is the critical point between moderately and highly stable Po.

  9. Soil organic matter and soil acidity in Mangrove areas in the river Paraiba Estuary, Cabedelo, Paraiba, Brazil

    Renata Wilma Vasconcelos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove ecosystems are of great environmental significance, because of their fragility and role in feeding and breeding various animal species. In northeastern Brazil, the disorderly occupation of estuarine areas and the urban sprawl have led to a considerable loss of the original area occupied by mangroves. In the municipality of Cabedelo, State of Paraíba, there are about 4,900 ha of remnant mangrove areas in the estuarine complex of the Paraíba River. However, information about the attributes of mangrove soils at this location is quite scarce. The aim of this study was to quantify the soil organic matter and soil acidity in mangroves located in the estuary of the Paraíba River, State of Paraíba, Brazil, in order to increase the database of soil attributes in this region. The study area is in local influence of the Restinga de Cabedelo National Forest (Flona, an environmental conservation unit of the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation. For the choice of sampling points, we considered an area that receives direct influence of the eviction of domestic and industrial effluents. The soil of the study area is an “Organossolo Háplico” in Brazilian Soil Classification (Histosol, and was sampled at four point sites: one upstream of the effluent discharge (P1, one in the watercourse receiving effluent water (P2, one downstream of the effluent discharge (P3 and another near Flona (P4, at 0-20 and 20-40 cm, in four replications in time (28/08/2012 in the morning and afternoon, and 21/01/2013 in the morning and afternoon. Potential acidity, pH and soil organic matter (SOM were determined. No significant differences were detected in the potential acidity of the four collection sites, which ranged from 0.38 to 0.45 cmolc dm-3. Soil pH was greatest at point P4 (7.0 and lowest at point P1 (5.8. The SOM was highest at point P1 (86.4 % and lowest at P2 (77.9 %. The attributes related to soil acidity were not sensitive to indicate

  10. Early indications of soil recovery from acidic deposition in U.S. red spruce forests

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Shortle, Walter C.; David, Mark B.; Smith, Kevin T.; Warby, Richard A.F.; Lapenis, Andrei G.

    2012-01-01

    Forty to fifty percent decreases in acidic deposition through the 1980s and 1990s led to partial recovery of acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States; however, the limited number of studies that have assessed soil change found increased soil acidification during this period. From existing data, it's not clear whether soils continued to worsen in the 1990s or if recovery had begun. To evaluate possible changes in soils through the 1990s, soils in six red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, first sampled in 1992 to 1993, were resampled in 2003 to 2004. The Oa-horizon pH increased (P 42−, which decreased the mobility of Al throughout the upper soil profile. Results indicate a nascent recovery driven largely by vegetation processes.

  11. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  12. Biological nitrogen fixation by lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) in acid soils.

    Pijnenborg, J.W.M.

    1990-01-01

    Growth of lucerne( Medicago sativa L.) is poor in soils with values of pH-H2O below 6. This is often due to nitrogen deficiency, resulting from a hampered performance of the symbiosis withRhizobium meliloti. This thesis deals with the factors affecting biological nitrogen fixation by lucerne in acid soils.In a field experiment, lucerne seeds were either inoculated withR.meliloti only,or inoculated and pelleted with lime, before sowing in a sandy soil of pH 5.2. Lime-pelleting significantly im...

  13. Effect of application of coal powder and lime on alfalfa growth on copper polluted acidic soil

    Józefaciuk G.; Popandova S.; Arsova A.; Raichev T.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a combined treatment of copper contaminated acid soil with lime and a coal powder decreases copper toxicity due to a synergetic effect of pH increase and association of Cu2+ ions in organo-mineral complexes. A two-year-long pot experiment with alfalfa was carried out on a pseudopodzolic soil contaminated with four Cu levels in the range 0-900 mg kg-1 soil. The amendments applied were lime, coal powder and a precomposted mixture of lime and...

  14. Photoionization of aromatic amino acid at different pH values

    2000-01-01

    The photoioization of aromatic amino acid in solutions of different pH values were investigated by 248 nm laser flash photolysis. The results showed that the photoionizations of tyrosine and tryptophan were affected by pH value of solution, but phenylalanine was not. The ionization was in favor of monophotonic process at high pH value and of biphotonic process at low pH value. The mechanisms of pH effect on photoionization of tyrosine and tryptophan were the deprotonation of phenolic hydroxyl group and the deprotonation of>NH on the indole ring respectively. Our results explain the discrepancy of values for the yield of hydrated electron obtained by other investigators.

  15. Short-term effects of human urine fertiliser and wood ash on soil pH and electrical conductivity

    Dora Neina; Gabriel Nii Noi Dowuona

    2013-01-01

    The fertiliser value of human urine has been examined on several crops, yet little is known about its effects on key soil properties of agronomic significance. This study investigated temporal soil salinization potential of human urine fertiliser (HUF). It further looked at combined effects of human urine and wood ash (WA) on soil pH, urine-NH_3 volatilisation, soil electrical conductivity (EC), and basic cation contents of two Acrisols (Adenta and Toje series) from the coastal savannah zone ...

  16. Stability and mobility of cerium oxide nanoparticles in soils: effects of humic substances, pH and ionic strength

    Chen, Yirui; Mu, Linlin; Li, Chunyan; Bai, Lingyun; Jacobson, Astrid; Darnault, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of types of nanomaterials used in the field of nanotechnology, cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are among the top five most commonly utilized by industry, agriculture and nanomedicine for their unique physico-chemical properties. They are used, for example, in the production of catalysts, as fuel additives, and as polishing agents. Therefore, the release and encounter of CeO2 NPs in the environment following their application, waste disposal, life-cycle and accidents is inevitable. It is critical to examine the behavior of CeO2 NPs released in the environment to assess the risk they pose to the environmental and public health. In particular, little is known about the fate and transport of CeO2 NPs in soils and groundwater. To assess the behavior of CeO2 NPs, it is important to investigate the factors that affect their stability and mobility. Humic substances are a major component of soils and have been shown to have the potential to impact the transport and retention of nanoparticles in soils. Consequently, our study characterizes the impacts of humic and fulvic acids on the stability and mobility of cerium oxides in model porous media under various pH and ionic strength conditions. Batch experiments conducted at various concentrations of humic and fulvic acids coupled with a wide range of pHs and ionic strengths were investigated. Selected parameters from these batch studies were then used as experimental conditions representative of environmental systems to perform column transport experiments to assess of the mobility of CeO2 NPs in saturated porous media, which is the first step in simulating their behavior in soil and groundwater systems.

  17. Effect of some soil amendments on soil properties and plant growth in Southern Thailand acid upland soil

    Onthong, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major factors limiting plant growth is acid soil. In general lime is used for soil amendment in acid soil. However, It has been reported that gypsum or phosphogypsum can be used for ameliorating soilacidity. Pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of lime, phosphogypsum and kieserite on soil properties and plant growth in Kho Hong soil series (coarse loamy, kaolinitic,isohyperthermic, TypicKandiudults which was considered as acid upland soil (pH 5.07. Sweet corn variety INSEE 2 was used as the test crop. The experiment was a completely randomized design with 4 replications and 19 treatments asfollow : unamended, application of hydrated lime and dolomite to raise soil pH at 5.5, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with phosphogypsum at the rate that can supply calcium 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 time of both limes, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with kieserite at the rate 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 times of sulfur requirement for corn (40 kg S ha-1. The result showed that shoot and root dry weights of corn were increased when lime materials, phosphogypsum and kieserite were applied and the drymatter weights were increased according to the increasing of phosphogypsum and kieserite. The maximum shoot dry weight (18.98 g pot-1 was obtained when 1 times of kieserite was supplied with dolomite and wassignificantly (P<0.01 higher than those of the unamended treatment, only hydrated lime and dolomite treatments, which had dry weights of 12.64, 15.18 and 15.67 g pot-1 respectively. Phosphorus and K uptakewere not significantly different in all treatments and the lowest uptake of N, Ca, Mg and S was obtained in the unamended treatment. The maximum uptake of N (512.10 mg pot-1 was found when 0.5 times ofphosphogypsum was applied together with dolomite. Calcium and Mg uptake was likely to increase according to the increasing rate of soil amendment application. Highest uptake of Ca (42.51 mg pot-1 was obtainedwhen

  18. Oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Ascorbic acid and low pH increase oxidative deterioration

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Timm Heinrich, Maike; Meyer, Anne S.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid (0-4000 ppm) and pH (3.8-6.2) on oxidation and levels of iron and copper in various fractions of mayonnaise enriched with 16% fish oil was investigated. Ascorbic acid induced release of iron from the assumed oil- water interface into the aqueous phase at all pH levels......H promoted oxidation. It is proposed that iron bridges between the egg yolk proteins low-density lipoproteins, lipovitellin, and phosvitin at the oil-water interface are broken at low pH values, whereby iron ions become accessible as oxidation initiators. In the presence of ascorbic acid, oxidation is...... further enhanced due to the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ that rapidly catalyzes lipid oxidation via lipid hydroperoxide decomposition at the oil-water interface in mayonnaise...

  19. Understanding the mechanism behind the nitrous acid (HONO) emissions from the northern soils

    Bhattarai, Hem Raj; Siljanen, Henri MP; Biasi, Christina; Maljanen, Marja

    2016-04-01

    The interest of the flux of nitrous acid (HONO) from soils has recently increased. HONO is an important source of the oxidant OH- radical in the troposphere and thus results a reduction of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. Soils have been recently found to be potential sources of HONO as these emissions are linked to other nitrogen cycle processes, especially presence of nitrite in soils. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been suggested as possible yet substantial sources of HONO. Along with soil pH, other physical properties such as C:N, nitrogen availability, soil moisture and temperature may effect HONO emissions. Our preliminary results demonstrate that drained acidic peatlands with a low C:N produces higher NO, N2O and HONO emissions compared to those in pristine peatlands and upland forest soils. This study will identify the hotspots and the process involved in HONO emissions in northern ecosystems. Along with HONO, we will examine the emissions of NO and N2O to quantify the related N-gases emitted. These results will add a new piece of information in our knowledge of the nitrogen cycle. Soil samples will be collected from several boreal and arctic sites in Finland, Sweden and Russia. In the laboratory, soil samples will be manipulated based on previously described soil physical properties. This will be followed by labelling experiment coupled with selective nitrification inhibitor experiment in the soils. Our first hypothesis is that northern ecosystems are sources of HONO. Second, is that the soil properties (C:N ratio, moisture, N-availability, pH) regulate the magnitude of HONO emissions from northern soils. Third is that the first step of nitrification (ammonium oxidation) is the main pathway to produce HONO. This study will show that the northern ecosystems could be sources of HONO and therefore increasing the oxidizing capacity of the lower atmosphere.

  20. Soil pH and nutrient uptake in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) and Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) in Northern Sweden. Multielement studies by means of plant and soil analyses

    Magnusson, Margareta [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Agricultural Research for Northern Sweden

    2000-07-01

    To reveal nutrient element deficiencies or imbalances limiting vegetable production in northern Sweden, multielement soil and plant analyses were performed in cauliflower and broccoli during the period 1989 to 1996. The pH range of the soils was 4.4-8. 1. The results were evaluated with the multivariate statistical methods PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and PLS (Partial Least Squares Projection to Latent Structures). The major yield-limiting elements were Mg, B, Mn, Zn, Fe and Cu. This was a result of high soil pH and large content of Ca in the soil. The reason for B deficiency was also low B content in the soil. Applications of green mulch increased yield on soils with a pH below 6.0. It also increased the uptake and concentration in the plants of B, Ba, Cl, Cu, K, Mg, Mn, N, P, Se and Zn, and decreased the uptake and concentration of Al, Cs and Tl. The mineral fertilizer applied, NPK 11-5-18 micro, decreased soil pH. This has resulted in larger uptake and higher concentrations in the plants of Co and Mn, in comparison to where cattle manure was applied. This fertilizer strongly decreased uptake of Mo, as a result of both the acidifying effect and the large S content. Repeated applications of nitrate of lime in combination with the NPK 11-5-18 strongly increased the uptake of Cs by the plants. The results in this investigation, together with the literature reviews, strongly indicate that a relatively low soil pH (5.0-5.5) is favourable when organic fertilizers are used and that harmful effects of very low soil pH (<5.0), are ameliorated by organic materials but aggravated by mineral fertilizers. The main purpose of lime is to counteract the acidity and increased leaching created by mineral fertilizers. Because of the historical context in which the lime requirements were established, the dangers of acid soils appear to have been strongly overestimated.

  1. Phenolic Acids in Plant-Soil-Microbe System: A Review

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic acids are very common compounds in pedosphere. The objective of this review was to summarize the current knowledge of the behaviors of phenolic acids in plant-soil-microbe system. When phenolic acids originated from leaching, decomposition and exudation of living and dead plant tissues enter soils, they can react physicochemically with soil particle surfaces and/or incorporate into humic matter. Phenolic acids desorbed from soil particle surfaces and remained in solution phase can be utilized by microbe as carbon sources and absorbed by plants. The degradation products of phenolic acids by microbe include some organic and/or inorganic compounds such as new phenolic acids. In addition, phenolic acids in soils can stimulate population and activity of microbe. Phenolic acids can inhibit plants growth by affecting ion leakage, phytohormone activity, membrane permeability, hydraulic conductivity, net nutrient uptake, and enzyme activity. Behaviors of phenolic acids in soils are influenced by other organic compounds (phenolic acids, methionine, glucose, etc.) and/or inorganic ions. The role of phenolic acids as allelopathic agents should not be neglected only based on their low specific concentrations in natural soils, because numbers and interactions of phenolic acids will increase their allelopathic activities.

  2. Phosphorus Status, Inorganic Phosphorus Forms, and Other Physicochemical Properties of Acid Soils of Farta District, Northwestern Highlands of Ethiopia

    Asmare Melese; Heluf Gebrekidan; Markku Yli-Halla; Birru Yitaferu

    2015-01-01

    Soil acidity and low availability of P limit crop production in the highlands of Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to determine the P status, distribution and forms of inorganic P and relate them to selected chemical properties of eight representative acidic surface soil samples from Farta District. Soil pH (H2O) varied between 4.74 and 5.50. The moderate to high CEC suggests that besides kaolinite, the soils also contain expandable 2 : 1 clay minerals. Though the total P content was ...

  3. Quantifying the role of forest soil and bedrock in the acid neutralization of surface water in steep hillslopes

    The role of soil and bedrock in acid neutralizing processes has been difficult to quantify because of hydrological and biogeochemical uncertainties. To quantify those roles, hydrochemical observations were conducted at two hydrologically well-defined, steep granitic hillslopes in the Tanakami Mountains of Japan. These paired hillslopes are similar except for their soils; Fudoji is leached of base cations (base saturation 30%), because the erosion rate is 100-1000 times greater. The results showed that (1) soil solution pH at the soil-bedrock interface at Fudoji (4.3) was significantly lower than that of Rachidani (5.5), (2) the hillslope discharge pH in both hillslopes was similar (6.7-6.8), and (3) at Fudoji, 60% of the base cations leaching from the hillslope were derived from bedrock, whereas only 20% were derived from bedrock in Rachidani. Further, previously published results showed that the stream pH could not be predicted from the acid deposition rate and soil base saturation status. These results demonstrate that bedrock plays an especially important role when the overlying soil has been leached of base cations. These results indicate that while the status of soil acidification is a first-order control on vulnerability to surface water acidification, in some cases such as at Fudoji, subsurface interaction with the bedrock determines the sensitivity of surface water to acidic deposition. - Bedrock plays a major role in neutralizing acid when overlying soils have been leached of base cations

  4. Rhizosheaths on wheat grown in acid soils: phosphorus acquisition efficiency and genetic control.

    James, Richard A; Weligama, Chandrakumara; Verbyla, Klara; Ryan, Peter R; Rebetzke, Gregory J; Rattey, Allan; Richardson, Alan E; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Rhizosheaths comprise soil bound to roots, and in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rhizosheath size correlates with root hair length. The aims of this study were to determine the effect that a large rhizosheath has on the phosphorus (P) acquisition by wheat and to investigate the genetic control of rhizosheath size in wheat grown on acid soil.Near-isogenic wheat lines differing in rhizosheath size were evaluated on two acid soils. The soils were fertilized with mineral nutrients and included treatments with either low or high P. The same soils were treated with CaCO3 to raise the pH and detoxify Al(3+) Genotypic differences in rhizosheath size were apparent only when soil pH was low and Al(3+) was present. On acid soils, a large rhizosheath increased shoot biomass compared with a small rhizosheath regardless of P supply. At low P supply, increased shoot biomass could be attributed to a greater uptake of soil P, but at high P supply the increased biomass was due to some other factor. Generation means analysis indicated that rhizosheath size on acid soil was controlled by multiple, additive loci. Subsequently, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of an F6 population of recombinant inbred lines identified five major loci contributing to the phenotype together accounting for over 60% of the total genetic variance. One locus on chromosome 1D accounted for 34% of the genotypic variation. Genetic control of rhizosheath size appears to be relatively simple and markers based on the QTL provide valuable tools for marker assisted breeding. PMID:26873980

  5. N{sub 2}O production pathways in the subtropical acid forest soils in China

    Zhang Jinbo [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Cai Zucong, E-mail: zccai@mail.issas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhu Tongbin [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2011-07-15

    To date, N{sub 2}O production pathways are poorly understood in the humid subtropical and tropical forest soils. A {sup 15}N-tracing experiment was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions to investigate the processes responsible for N{sub 2}O production in four subtropical acid forest soils (pH<4.5) in China. The results showed that denitrification was the main source of N{sub 2}O emission in the subtropical acid forest soils, being responsible for 56.1%, 53.5%, 54.4%, and 55.2% of N{sub 2}O production, in the GC, GS, GB, and TC soils, respectively, under aerobic conditions (40%-52%WFPS). The heterotrophic nitrification (recalcitrant organic N oxidation) accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N{sub 2}O production, while the contribution of autotrophic nitrification was little in the studied subtropical acid forest soils. The ratios of N{sub 2}O-N emission from total nitrification (heterotrophic+autotrophic nitrification) were higher than those in most previous references. The soil with the lowest pH and highest organic-C content (GB) had the highest ratio (1.63%), suggesting that soil pH-organic matter interactions may exist and affect N{sub 2}O product ratios from nitrification. The ratio of N{sub 2}O-N emission from heterotrophic nitrification varied from 0.02% to 25.4% due to soil pH and organic matter. Results are valuable in the accurate modeling of N2O production in the subtropical acid forest soils and global budget. - Highlights: {yields} We studied N{sub 2}O production pathways in subtropical acid forest soil under aerobic conditions. {yields} Denitrification was the main source of N{sub 2}O production in subtropical acid forest soils. {yields} Heterotrophic nitrification accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N{sub 2}O production. {yields} While, contribution of autotrophic nitrification to N{sub 2}O production was little. {yields} Ratios of N{sub 2}O-N emission from nitrification were higher than those in most previous references.

  6. Efficiency of hexane extraction of napropamide from Aldrich humic acid and soil solutions

    Williams, C.F.; Letey, J.; Farmer, W.J.; Nelson, S.D.; Anderson, M.; Ben-Hur, M.

    1999-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been shown to form a stable complex with napropamide [2({alpha}-naphthoxy)-N,N-diethyl propionamide] and to facilitate its transport through soil columns. Liquid-liquid extraction of organics is a common method to transfer napropamide from water into an organic phase for gas chromatography analysis. A study was conducted to determine the effect of Aldrich humic acid, soil-derived dissolved organic matter, electrical conductivity, and hydrogen ion activity on the ability of hexane to extract napropamide from solutions and from soil extracts. The electrical conductivity from solutions and from soil extracts. The electrical conductivity of Aldrich humic acid solutions were adjusted to 0.01, 0.97, and 1.69 dS m{sup {minus}1} by adding NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}, and pH was adjusted using HCl and NaOH. Electrical conductivity had no effect on extraction efficiency. In the absence of DOM pH had no effect on extraction efficiency. In the absence of DOM pH had no effect on extraction efficiency. Extraction efficiency decreased with increasing DOM concentration. Maximum reduction in extraction efficiency occurred in the presence of DOM when solution pH was near neutrality. A maximum extraction efficiency of 100% was observed in the absence of DOM and a minimum of 68% when napropamide was added to DOM solutions at pH 8.2 and then lowered to pH 5.6. Management practices such as liming and allowing napropamide to dry on the soil may increase environmental transport. Also quantification of napropamide in environmental samples can be affected by DOM.

  7. Interaction between uranium and humic acid (Ⅰ): Adsorption behaviors of U(Ⅵ) in soil humic acids

    WEI Min; LIAO Jiali; LIU Ning; ZHANG Dong; KANG Houjun; YANG Yuanyou; YANG Yong; JIN Jiannan

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of uranium on three soil humic acids (HAs), which were extracted from soils of different depths at the same site, were investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorption results showed that U(Ⅵ) in solutions can be adsorbed by the three soil HAs, with the order of FHA (HA from 5 m depth of soil) >SHA (HA from the surface) >THA (HA from 10 m depth of soil) for adsorption efficiency in each desirable condition, and the adsorption reached equilibrium in about 240 min. Although the maximum adsorption efficiency was adsorption could be described with Langmiur isotherm or Freundlich isotherm equation. The L/S (liquid/solid, mL/g)ratio and pH were important factors influencing the adsorption in our adsorption system besides uranium concentration. The adsorption efficiency decreased with the increase of the L/S ratio and pH at the pH range of 2.0-3.0 for SHA and THA or 2.5 - 6.0 for FHA. However, no significant difference in adsorption of U(Ⅵ) was observed at the experimental temperature. All the results implied that humic substances have different characteristics in samples even collected at the same site.

  8. Interaction between uranium and humic acid. Pt.1: Adsorption behaviors of U(VI) in soil humic acids

    The adsorption behaviors of uranium on three soil humic acids (HAs), which were extracted from soils of different depths at the same site, were investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorption results showed that U(VI) in solutions can be adsorbed by the three soil HAs, with the order of FHA (HA from 5 m depth of soil) >SHA (HA from the surface) >THA (HA from 10 m depth of soil) for adsorption efficiency in each desirable condition, and the adsorption reached equilibrium in about 240 min. Although the maximum adsorption efficiency was achieved at a suitable uranium concentration (10 mg·L-1 U(VI) for SHA and THA, 20 mg·L-l U(VI) for FHA), the adsorption could be described with Langmiur isotherm or Freundlich isotherm equation. The L/S (liquid/solid, mL/g) ratio and pH were important factors influencing the adsorption in our adsorption system besides uranium concentration. The adsorption efficiency decreased with the increase of the L/S ratio and pH at the pH range of 2.0-3.0 for SHA and THA or 2.5-6.0 for FHA. However, no significant difference in adsorption of U(VI) was observed at the experimental temperature. All the results implied that humic substances have different characteristics in samples even collected at the same site. (authors)

  9. Evidence for shift from acidobacteria to proteobacteria dominance in soil profile of boreal acid sulphate soils

    Chroňáková, Alica; Bryndová, Michala; Otáhalová, Šárka; Yli-Halla, M.; Šimek, Miloslav

    Dijon : INRA, 2014. s. 276. [Global Soil Biodiversity Conference. Assessing soil biodiversity and its role for ecosystem services /1./. 02.12.2014-05.12.2014, Dijon] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : boreal acid sulphate soils * soil profile * bacteria community structure * subsoil horizons Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  10. Effects of saliva on starch-thickened drinks with acidic and neutral pH.

    Hanson, Ben; Cox, Ben; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Smith, Christina H

    2012-09-01

    Powdered maize starch thickeners are used to modify drink consistency in the clinical management of dysphagia. Amylase is a digestive enzyme found in saliva which breaks down starch. This action is dependent on pH, which varies in practice depending on the particular drink. This study measured the effects of human saliva on the viscosity of drinks thickened with a widely used starch-based thickener. Experiments simulated a possible clinical scenario whereby saliva enters a cup and contaminates a drink. Citric acid (E330) was added to water to produce a controlled range of pH from 3.0 to 7.0, and several commercially available drinks with naturally low pH were investigated. When saliva was added to thickened water, viscosity was reduced to less than 1% of its original value after 10-15 min. However, lowering pH systematically slowed the reduction in viscosity attributable to saliva. At pH 3.5 and below, saliva was found to have no significant effect on viscosity. The pH of drinks in this study ranged from 2.6 for Coca Cola to 6.2 for black coffee. Again, low pH slowed the effect of saliva. For many popular drinks, having pH of 3.6 or less, viscosity was not significantly affected by the addition of saliva. PMID:22210234

  11. An evaluation of remote sensing derived soil pH and average spring groundwater table for ecological assessments

    Roelofsen, Hans D.; van Bodegom, Peter M.; Kooistra, Lammert; van Amerongen, Jorg J.; Witte, Jan-Philip M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological assessments such as species distribution modelling and benchmarking site quality towards regulations often rely on full spatial coverage information of site factors such as soil acidity, moisture regime or nutrient availability. To determine if remote sensing (RS) is a viable alternative to traditional data sources of site factor estimates, we analysed the accuracy (using ground truth validation measurements) of traditional and RS sources of pH and mean spring groundwater level (MSL, in m) estimates. Traditional sources were a soil map and hydrological model. RS estimates were obtained using vegetation indicator values (IVs) from a Dutch national system as an intermediate between site factors and spectral response. IVs relate to those site factors that dictate vegetation occurrence, whilst also providing a robust link to canopy spectra. For pH, the soil map and the RS estimate were nearly as accurate. For MSL, the RS estimates were much closer to the observed groundwater levels than the hydrological model, but the error margin of the estimates still exceeded the tolerance range of moisture sensitive vegetation. The relatively high accuracy of the RS estimates was made possible by the availability of local calibration points and large environmental gradients in the study site. In addition, the error composition of the RS estimates could be analysed step-by-step, whereas the traditional sources had to be accepted 'as-is'. Also considering that RS offers high spatial and temporal resolution at low costs, RS offered advantages over traditional sources. This will likely hold true for any other situation where prerequisites of accurate RS estimates have been met.

  12. Nitrogen saturation, soil acidification, and ecological effects in a subtropical pine forest on acid soil in southwest China

    Huang, Yongmei; Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Zhang, Ting; Duan, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Elevated anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition has caused nitrate (NO3-) leaching, an indication of N saturation, in several temperate and boreal forests across the Northern Hemisphere. So far, the occurrence of N saturation in subtropical forests and its effects on the chemistry of the typically highly weathered soils, forest growth, and biodiversity have received little attention. Here we investigated N saturation and the effects of chronically high N inputs on soil and vegetation in a typical, subtropical Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest at Tieshanping, southwest China. Seven years of N flux data obtained in ambient conditions and in response to field manipulation, including a doubling of N input either as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) or as sodium nitrate (NaNO3) solution, resulted in a unique set of N balance data. Our data showed extreme N saturation with near-quantitative leaching of NO3-, by far the dominant form of dissolved inorganic N in soil water. Even after 7 years, NH4+, added as NH4NO3, was nearly fully converted to NO3-, thus giving rise to a major acid input into the soil. Despite the large acid input, the decrease in soil pH was insignificant, due to pH buffering caused by Al3+ mobilization and enhanced SO42- adsorption. In response to the NH4NO3-induced increase in soil acidification and N availability, ground vegetation showed significant reduction of abundance and diversity, while Masson pine growth further declined. By contrast, addition of NaNO3 did not cause soil acidification. The comparison of NH4NO3 treatment and NaNO3 treatment indicated that pine growth decline was mainly attributed to acidification-induced nutrient imbalance, while the loss in abundance of major ground species was the combining effect of N saturation and acidification. Therefore, N emission control is of primary importance to curb further acidification and eutrophication of forest soils in much of subtropical south China.

  13. Acid and Alkali Buffer Capacity of Typical Fluvor-Aquic Soil in Huang-HuaiHai Plain

    HUANG Ping; ZHANG Jia-bao; ZHU An-ning; ZHANG Cong-zhi

    2009-01-01

    Soil acid and alkali buffer capacity, as a major indicator for evaluating its vulnerability and resistibility to acidification and alkalization, is an important factor affecting the sustainable agriculture, through knowledge on which soil acidification process can be predicted and modified. In this study, titration curve method was adopted to investigate the pH buffer capacity (pHBC) of fluvor-aquic soil, and separate titration curves were established by adding incremental amounts of either standardized hydrochloric acid (HCl) (0.12 mol L-1) or sodium hydroxide (NaOH) (0.10 mol L-1) to soil suspended in deionized water (soil:solution=1:5). Soil pH was measured after 7 d resuspension and isothermal equilibrium (T= 25℃). Linear regressions were fitted to the linear portion of each titration curve and the slopes of these lines were derived as the soil pHBC. The results showed that significant correlations between the amounts of adding acid or alkali and each pH change were presented, and titration curve method was feasible for measurement of pHBC on typical fluvor-aquic soil in Huang-Huai-Hai Plain, and the coefficients of determination were higher than the similar researches on acid soil (R2= 0.96). The slope-derived pHBC of acid and alkali were 158.71 and 25.02 mmol kg-1, respectively. According to the classification of soil buffer systems, the soil tested belongs to the calcium carbonate buffer system, carbonates contribute the most to pHBC, and the contribution of soil organic matter relatively less than it.

  14. THE IMPACT OF CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID ADDITION ON PH VALUE OF LONGISSIMUS DORSI MUSCLE

    Przemysław WASILEWSKI

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The subject of research was 60 crossbred gilts, divided into 6 groups, fed the fodder with addition of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA or sunflower oil (SFO in amount: 0.5; 1.0; and 2.0 %, respectively. Animals were slaughtered with the body weight ca. 95 kg. The aim of research was to determine pH value of loin meat tissue (Longissimus dorsi of right half-carcass in 45 minutes, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 hours and 24 hours after slaughter. Results were statistically elaborated using one-way variance analysis. Longissimus dorsi muscle pH values measured 45 minutes after slaughter in case of all groups of pigs were in range from 6.34 up to 6.47, what shows good meat quality. The lowest pH1 (measured 45 minutes after slaughter had meat of fatteners where addition of 2 % sunflower oil was given into fodder and the highest value of this trait was in group of individuals where also was given sunflower oil in 1 % amount. Statistical significant differences in pH value measured in different time after slaughter i.e. after 45 minutes, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 hours between tested groups of pigs were not stated. The exception is the result of pH measurement 5 hours after slaughter. Statistical significant differences were between group of pigs getting 0.5 % addition of conjugated linoleic acid characterized by the highest pH value of meat and group of animals fed the fodder with 1 % addition of conjugated linoleic acid (P≤0.01. On the basis of the results obtained in presented paper may be stated that feeding pigs with addition of conjugated linoleic acid in amounts 0.5; 1.0 and 2.0 % did not impact negatively on meat quality defined by pH value.

  15. Effects of humic acid-based buffer + cation on chemical characteristics of saline soils and maize growth

    W. Mindari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Humic acid is believed to maintain the stability of the soil reaction, adsorption / fixation / chelate of cation, thereby increasing the availability of water and plant nutrients. On the other hand, the dynamics of saline soil cation is strongly influenced by the change of seasons that disrupt water and plant nutrients uptake. This experiment was aimed to examine the characteristics of the humic acid from compost, coal, and peat and its function in the adsorption of K+ and NH4+ cations, thus increasing the availability of nutrients and of maize growth. Eighteen treatments consisted of three humic acid sources (compost, peat and coal, two cation additives (K+ and NH4+, and three doses of humic acid-based buffer (10, 20, and 30 g / 3kg, were arranged in a factorial completely randomized with three replicates. The treatments were evaluated against changes in pH, electric conductivity (EC, cation exchange capacity (CEC, chlorophyll content, plant dry weight and plant height. The results showed that the addition of K+ and NH4+ affected pH, CEC, K+, NH4+, and water content of the buffer. Application of humic acid-based buffer significantly decreased soil pH from > 7 to about 6.3, decreased soil EC to 0.9 mS / cm, and increased exchangeable Na from 0.40 to 0.56 me / 100g soil, Ca from 15.57 to 20.21 me/100 g soil, Mg from 1.76 to 6.52 me/100 g soil, and K from 0.05-0.51 me / 100g soil. Plant growth (plant height, chlorophyll content, leaf area, and stem weight at 35 days after planting increased with increasing dose of humic acid. The dose of 2.0g peat humic acid + NH4+ / 3 kg of soil or 30g peat humic acid + K+ / 3 kg of oil gave the best results of maize growth.

  16. A new fluorescent pH probe for extremely acidic conditions

    Xu, Yu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jiang, Zheng [School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Xiao, Yu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Bi, Fu-Zhen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Miao, Jun-Ying, E-mail: miaojy@sdu.edu.cn [School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Bao-Xiang, E-mail: bxzhao@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2014-04-01

    A new coumarin-based fluorescent probe can detect highly acidic conditions in both solution and bacteria with high selectivity and sensitivity. Highlights: • A new fluorescence probe for very low pH was synthesized and characterized. • The probe can monitor pH in solution and bacteria. • The two-step protonation of N atoms of the probe leads to fluorescence quenching. Abstract: A novel turn-off fluorescent probe based on coumarin and imidazole moiety for extremely acidic conditions was designed and developed. The probe with pKa = 2.1 is able to respond to very low pH value (below 3.5) with high sensitivity relying on fluorescence quenching at 460 nm in fluorescence spectra or the ratios of absorbance maximum at 380 nm to that at 450 nm in UV–vis spectra. It can quantitatively detect pH value based on equilibrium equation, pH = pKa -log[(Ix - Ib)/(Ia - Ix)]. It had very short response time that was less than 1 min, good reversibility and nearly no interference from common metal ions. Moreover, using ¹H NMR analysis and theoretical calculation of molecular orbital, we verified that a two-step protonation process of two N atoms of the probe leaded to photoinduced electron transfer (PET), which was actually the mechanism of the fluorescence quenching phenomenon under strongly acidic conditions. Furthermore, the probe was also applied to imaging strong acidity in bacteria, E.coli and had good effect. This work illustrates that the new probe could be a practical and ideal pH indicator for strongly acidic conditions with good biological significance.

  17. Influence of soil pH on available fluoride content of the soil in tea garden%土壤pH对茶园土壤有效氟含量的影响

    张永利; 廖万有; 王烨军; 苏有健; 孙力

    2013-01-01

    以茶园土壤为对象,通过室内模拟培养和田间改良试验,研究了茶园土壤pH对土壤中水溶态氟和交换态氟含量的影响.结果表明,在模拟培养下,当土壤pH由4.0降至3.5时,土壤水溶态氟含量迅速升高,当pH值在4.0~5.0之间时,水溶态氟含量较为稳定,之后随着土壤pH升高水溶态氟含量增加;交换态氟含量的变化趋势与之大致相反,且pH对20~40 cm土层土壤有效氟的影响比0~20 cm土层显著,对水溶态氟的影响比交换态显著,在强酸性土壤条件下对有效氟含量的影响比酸性条件下显著.田间试验结果与之基本一致,以pH 5.0为基点,随土壤pH值的上升或下降,两层土壤水溶态氟含量均增加,其中pH值降低对土壤水溶态氟的影响更大.%Laboratory incubation tests and a field experiment were conducted to study the influence of soil pH on water soluble fluoride and exchangeable fluoride contents in tea garden soil. The results showed that the soil water soluble fluorine content increased obviously as soil pH value decreased from 4.0 to 3.5; it changed slightly at the ranging from pH 4.0 to pH 4.5, and then it increased with the raise of pH value. The change trend of soil exchangeable fluoride content was opposite. Soil pH had more influence on water soluble fluoride than on exchangeable fluoride, and the influence on available fluoride was more in 20-40 cm soil layer than in 0-20 cm soil layer, greater in strong acidic soil than in acidic soil. The field experiment also showed that pH 5.0 was the lowest point of soil water soluble fluoride content in the range of pH 4.5-6.0, and water soluble fluoride contents in two soil layers increased as soil pH value rose or fell from 5.0. Soil acidification could lead to water soluble fluoride content dramatic increasing.

  18. Acidic Microclimate pH Distribution in PLGA Microspheres Monitored by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Ding, Amy G.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The microclimate pH (μpH) distribution inside poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres was monitored quantitatively over an acidic range as a function of several formulation variables. A ratiometric method by confocal laser scanning microscopy with Lysosensor yellow/blue® dextran was adapted from those previously reported, and μpH distribution kinetics inside PLGA microspheres was examined during incubation under physiologic conditions for 4 weeks. The effects of polymer molecular we...

  19. Dissolved Divalent Metal and pH Effects on Amino Acid Polymerization: A Thermodynamic Evaluation

    Kitadai, Norio

    2016-06-01

    Polymerization of amino acids is a fundamentally important step for the chemical evolution of life. Nevertheless, its response to changing environmental conditions has not yet been well understood because of the lack of reliable quantitative information. For thermodynamics, detailed prediction over diverse combinations of temperature and pH has been made only for a few amino acid-peptide systems. This study used recently reported thermodynamic dataset for the polymerization of the simplest amino acid "glycine (Gly)" to its short peptides (di-glycine and tri-glycine) to examine chemical and structural characteristics of amino acids and peptides that control the temperature and pH dependence of polymerization. Results showed that the dependency is strongly controlled by the intramolecular distance between the amino and carboxyl groups in an amino acid structure, although the side-chain group role is minor. The polymerization behavior of Gly reported earlier in the literature is therefore expected to be a typical feature for those of α-amino acids. Equilibrium calculations were conducted to examine effects of dissolved metals as a function of pH on the monomer-polymer equilibria of Gly. Results showed that metals shift the equilibria toward the monomer side, particularly at neutral and alkaline pH. Metals that form weak interaction with Gly (e.g., Mg2+) have no noticeable influence on the polymerization, although strong interaction engenders significant decrease of the equilibrium concentrations of Gly peptides. Considering chemical and structural characteristics of Gly and Gly peptides that control their interactions with metals, it can be expected that similar responses to the addition of metals are applicable in the polymerization of neutral α-amino acids. Neutral and alkaline aqueous environments with dissolved metals having high affinity with neutral α-amino acids (e.g., Cu2+) are therefore not beneficial places for peptide bond formation on the primitive

  20. Polyamine/salt-assembled microspheres coated with hyaluronic acid for targeting and pH sensing.

    Zhang, Pan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Guojun; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-06-01

    The poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/trisodium citrate aggregates were fabricated and further covalently crosslinked via the coupling reaction of carboxylic sites on trisodium citrate with the amine groups on polyamine, onto which poly-L-lysine and hyaluronic acid were sequentially assembled, forming stable microspheres. The pH sensitive dye and pH insensitive dye were further labeled to enable the microspheres with pH sensing property. Moreover, these microspheres could be specifically targeted to HeLa tumor cells, since hyaluronic acid can specifically recognize and bind to CD44, a receptor overexpressed on many tumor cells. Quantitative pH measurement by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the microspheres were internalized into HeLa cells, and accumulated in acidic compartments. By contrast, only a few microspheres were adhered on the NIH 3T3 cells surface. The microspheres with combined pH sensing property and targeting ability can enhance the insight understanding of the targeted drug vehicles trafficking after cellular internalization. PMID:26954089

  1. The pH at the First Equivalence Point in the Titration of a Diprotic Acid

    Ault, Addison

    2003-12-01

    Some readers will note a similarity between this approach and the one I took in a paper entitled “Do pH in Your Head” (2). In an example in that article the isoelectric pH of glycine (the pH at which the average charge of a glycine molecule is zero), has the value of 6.0, which is exactly half-way between 2.4, the pKa of the carboxyl group of glycine, and 9.6, the pKa of the ammonium group of glycine. This is what one would expect when realizing that a solution of neutral glycine right out of the bottle is equivalent to glycine obtained by titration of the conjugate acid of glycine to the first equivalence point. Those who are interested might want to consider why the isoelectric pH of an “acidic” amino acid, such as alanine, is exactly half-way between the pKa values of the two carboxyl groups, and why the isoelectric pH of a “basic” amino acid such as lysine is exactly half-way between the pKa values of the two ammonium groups.

  2. Soil Acidification due to Acid Deposition in Southern China

    Liao, Bohan

    1998-12-31

    Anthropogenic emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to the atmosphere has made acid deposition one of the most serious environmental problems. In China, acid deposition research started in the late 1970s. The present thesis is part of a joint Chinese-Norwegian research project. The main goal of the thesis was to investigate the mechanism of soil acidification, to estimate soil responses to acid deposition, and to compare relative soil sensitivity to acidification in southern China. Laboratory experiments and modelling simulations were included. Specifically, the thesis (1) studies the characteristics of anion adsorption and cation release of the soils from southern China, (2) examines the effects of increased ionic strength in the precipitation and the effects of anion adsorption on cation release from the soils, (3) compares the relative sensitivity of these soils to acidification and the potentially harmful effects of acid deposition, (4) estimates likely soil responses to different deposition scenarios, including changes in soil waters and soil properties, and (5) investigates long-term changes in soils and soil waters in the Guiyang catchment due to acid deposition. 218 refs., 31 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. Influence of sodium chloride, pH, and lactic acid bacteria on anaerobic lactic acid utilization during fermented cucumber spoilage

    Cucumbers are preserved commercially by natural fermentations in 5% to 8% sodium chloride (NaCl) brines. Occasionally, fermented cucumbers spoil after the primary fermentation is complete. This spoilage has been characterized by decreases in lactic acid and a rise in brine pH caused by microbial ins...

  4. Adsorción de cadmio, cromo y mercurio en suelos del Valle del Cauca a varios valores de pH Cadmium, chromium and mercury adsorption on Cauca Valley soils as a function of pH

    García O. Álvaro

    1991-12-01

    were collected and prepared for sorption experiments adjusting the pH to 5.7,6.5 and 7.8 values using, 1,4 and 12% acetic acid or 0.01 N NaOH. Six saturating solution of each metal (0.0, 0.28, 0.56, 1.12 and 2.25 mg L-1 were added to 0.25 g air dried and ground to pass a 2-mm sieve soil samples. The soil solution suspensions were shaken for 25 minutes and then extracted with 0.01N HC1. Cadmium; Cr and Hg concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. The difference between the initial and final metal solution concentration was considered to be soil adsorbed and the amount 0.01 N HC1 extracted as the metal retained by the soil. Cadmium adsorption in all the soils was higher at neutral or alkaline pH values due to the predominance of divalent solubles or insoluble metalanion complexes formed in the soil at pH values higter than 7.0. The Cr and Hg adsorption is higher at acid values of pH due to the formation of complexes with the organic matter (chelation or with Fe, Al or Mn hydrous oxids wich are favoreced at this pH values. The lower 0.01N HC1 extraction (higher retention was observed at pH values 6.4-6.6 in all the soils suggesting that in this range of pH this heavy metals are strongly adsorbed by the exchange complex and are not available to plants.

  5. Changes in soil chemical properties and lettuce yield response following incorporation of biochar and cow dung to highly weathered acidic soils

    Agyei Frimpong, Kwame; Amoakwah, Emmanuel; Osei, Benjamin;

    2016-01-01

    imposed on two highly weathered, acidic soils from the coastal savanna and tropical rainforest agroecological zones of Ghana, respectively, to elucidate their effect on yield of lettuce. The study showed that application of biochar solely or in combination with cow dung increased soil pH, total organic...... carbon, and cation exchange capacity, and temporarily increased soil respiration and microbial biomass carbon. Further, incorporation of combined application of cow dung and biochar increased lettuce yield more than sole incorporation of either amendment. The study demonstrated that corn cob biochar can...... improve soil chemical properties and lettuce yield if applied solely or in combination with cow dung....

  6. Structure of Acidic pH Dengue Virus Showing the Fusogenic Glycoprotein Trimers

    Zhang, Xinzheng; Sheng, Ju; Austin, S. Kyle; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Diamond, Michael S.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Flaviviruses undergo large conformational changes during their life cycle. Under acidic pH conditions, the mature virus forms transient fusogenic trimers of E glycoproteins that engage the lipid membrane in host cells to initiate viral fusion and nucleocapsid penetration into the cytoplasm. However,

  7. Dynamics of fatty acid vesicles in response to pH stimuli

    Ikari, Keita; Sakuma, Yuka; Jimbo, Takehiro; Kodama, Atsuji; Imai, Masayuki; Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Rasmussen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of decanoic acid/decanoate (DA) vesicles in response to pH stimuli. Two types of dynamic processes induced by the micro injection of NaOH solutions are sequentially observed: deformations and topological transitions. In the deformation stage, DA vesicles show a series ...

  8. Fixation of radiocaesium in an acid brown forest soil

    The influence of clay minerals and organic matter on the sorption and desorption of radiocaesium in an acid brown forest soil is investigated. A highly selective adsorption of radiocaesium is often reported in the surface horizons of acid forest soils. For this reason, soil humus is often considered as a key parameter in modelling the behaviour of Cs in these soils. The Ca2+-clay fractions, extracted from the surface hemi-organic horizon and the deeper mineral horizons of an acid brown soil, exhibit similarly high Cs+ sorption properties. Desorption yields are much lower in the surface layers, resulting in higher net retention of radiocaesium. Organic matter dynamics in the soil containing Hydroxy Interlayered Vermiculite minerals has an indirect effect on radiocaesium retention properties through Al complexation by organic acids. Acidocomplexolysis of Hydroxy Interlayered Vermiculitic clays results in the formation of degraded vermiculite in the topsoil layers, inducing a larger amount of high charged interlayer sites for Cs+ specific adsorption

  9. Removal of heavy metals from a contaminated soil using tartaric acid

    KE Xin; LI Pei-jun; ZHOU Qi-xing; ZHANG Yun; SUN Tie-heng

    2006-01-01

    This study reports the feasibility of remediation of a heavy metal (HM) contaminated soil using tartaric acid, an environmentally-friendly extractant. Batch experiments were performed to test the factors influencing remediation of the HM contaminated soil. An empirical model was employed to describe the kinetics of HM dissolution/desorption and to predict equilibrium concentrations of HMs in soil leachate. The changes of HMs in different fractions before and after tartaric acid treatment were also investigated. Tartaric acid solution containing HMs was regenerated by chestnut shells. Results show that utilization of tartaric acid was effective for removal of HMs from the contaminated soil, attaining 50%-60% of Cd, 40%-50% of Pb, 40%-50% of Cu and 20%-30% of Zn in the pH range of 3.5-4.0 within 24 h. Mass transfer coefficients for cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were much higher than those for copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). Sequential fractionations of treated and untreated soil samples showed that tartaric acid was effective in removing the exchangeable, carbonate fractions of Cd, Zn and Cu from the contaminated soil. The contents of Pb and Cu in Fe-Mn oxide fraciton were also significantly decreased by tartaric acid treatment. One hundred milliliters of tartaric acid solution containing HMs could be regenerated by 10 g chestnut shells in a batch reactor. Such a remediation procedure indicated that tartaric acid is a promising agent for remediation of HM contaminated soils. However, further research is needed before the method can be practically used for in situ remediation of contaminated sites.

  10. Autoinducer-2 detection among commensal oral streptococci is dependent on pH and boric acid.

    Cuadra, Giancarlo A; Frantellizzi, Ashley J; Gaesser, Kimberly M; Tammariello, Steven P; Ahmed, Anika

    2016-07-01

    Autoinducer-2, considered a universal signaling molecule, is produced by many species of bacteria; including oral strains. Structurally, autoinducer-2 can exist bound to boron (borated autoinducer-2). Functionally, autoinducer-2 has been linked to important bacterial processes such as virulence and biofilm formation. In order to test production of autoinducer-2 by a given bacterial strain, a bioassay using marine bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio harveyi as a reporter for autoinducer-2 has been designed. We hypothesize that pH adjustment and addition of boron are required for optimal bioluminescence and accurate autoinducer-2 detection. Using this reporter strain we tested autoinducer-2 activity from two oral commensal species, Streptococcus gordonii DL1 and Streptococcus oralis 34. Spent broth was collected and adjusted to pH 7.5 and supplemented with boric acid prior to measuring autoinducer- 2 activity. Results show that low pH inhibits bioluminescence of the reporter strain, but pH 7.5 allows for bioluminescence induction and proper readings of autoinducer-2 activity. Addition of boric acid also has a positive effect on bioluminescence allowing for a more sensitive detection of autoinducer-2 activity. Our data suggests that although autoinducer-2 is present in spent broth, low pH and/or low levels of boric acid become an obstacle for proper autoinducer-2 detection. For proper autoinducer-2 detection, we propose a protocol using this bioassay to include pH adjustment and boric acid addition to spent broth. Studies on autoinducer-2 activity in several bacteria species represent an important area of study as this universal signaling molecule is involved in critical bacterial phenotypes such as virulence and biofilm formation. PMID:27350615

  11. Declining acidic deposition begins reversal of forest-soil acidification in the northeastern U.S. and eastern Canada

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Hazlett, Paul W.; Fernandez, Ivan J.; Ouimet, Rock; Bailey, Scott W.; Shortle, Walter C.; Smith, Kevin T.; Antidormi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Decreasing trends in acidic deposition levels over the past several decades have led to partial chemical recovery of surface waters. However, depletion of soil Ca from acidic deposition has slowed surface water recovery and led to the impairment of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Nevertheless, documentation of acidic deposition effects on soils has been limited, and little is known regarding soil responses to ongoing acidic deposition decreases. In this study, resampling of soils in eastern Canada and the northeastern U.S. was done at 27 sites exposed to reductions in wet SO42– deposition of 5.7–76%, over intervals of 8–24 y. Decreases of exchangeable Al in the O horizon and increases in pH in the O and B horizons were seen at most sites. Among all sites, reductions in SO42– deposition were positively correlated with ratios (final sampling/initial sampling) of base saturation (P soils have begun to reverse.

  12. Enhanced-electrokinetic remediation of copper-pyrene co-contaminated soil with different oxidants and pH control.

    Cang, Long; Fan, Guang-Ping; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Wang, Quan-Ying

    2013-02-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation has potential to simultaneously remove heavy metals and organic compounds from soil, but the removal percent of these pollutants is very low in general if no enhancing treatment is applied. This study developed a new enhanced-EK remediation technology to decontaminate a heavy metal-organic compound co-contaminated soil by applying different oxidants and pH control. A red soil was used as a model clayed soil, and was spiked with pyrene and Cu at about 500 mg kg(-1) for both to simulate real situation. Bench-scale EK experiments were performed using four oxidants (H(2)O(2), NaClO, KMnO(4), and Na(2)S(2)O(8)) and controlling electrolyte pH at 3.5 or 10. After the treatments with 1.0 V cm(-1) of voltage gradient for 335 h, soil pH, electrical conductivity, and the concentrations and chemical fractionations of soil pyrene and Cu were analyzed. The results showed that there was significant migration of pyrene and Cu from the soil, and the removal percent of soil pyrene and Cu varied in the range of 30-52% and 8-94%, respectively. Low pH favoured the migration of soil Cu, while KMnO(4) was the best one for the degradation of pyrene among the tested oxidants, although it unfortunately prevented the migration of soil Cu by forming Cu oxide. Application of Na(2)S(2)O(8) and to control the catholyte pH at 3.5 were found to be the best operation conditions for decontaminating the Cu-pyrene co-contaminated soil. PMID:23177009

  13. Soil acidity status in polluted and non-polluted areas in southern Finland

    From 359 study plots on coniferous forest soil in southern Finland, 232 humus and 359 mineral soil (top 5 cm) samples were taken in 1991 and analyzed for their cation exchange capacity, base saturation, pH, total S content (humus samples only), and extractable Al, Fe and Mn concentrations in order to assess the impact of acidic air pollution on soil acidity. The main sources of local air pollutants (SO2 and NOx) were from the capital region and an oil refinery. Although concentrations of S in the humus layer were 8% higher near the emission sources, it was concluded that air pollution has not resulted in a detectable increase in soil acidity. Mean values for humus layer pH (BaCl2), cation exchange capacity (CEC), base saturation, and extractable Al concentration for the overall study area were 2.9 (0.2), 310 (50) meq kg-1, 48 (12)% of CEC, and 530 (340) mg kg-1. The respective values for the mineral soil layer were 3.3 (0.3), 56 (19) meq kg-1, 13 (8)% of CEC, and 320 (130) mg kg-1. Standard deviations are given in parentheses. 24 refs, 2 figs, 5 tabs

  14. Titratable Acidity and Alkalinity of Red Soil Surfaces

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The surfaces of red soils have an apparent amphoteric character,carrying titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity simultaneously.The titratable acidity arises from deprotonation of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces and dissociation of weak-acid functional groups of soil organic matter,while the titratable alkalinity is derived from release of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity mainly depended on the composition and content of iron and aluminum oxides in the soils.The results showed that the titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity were in significantly positive correlation not only with the content of amorphous aluminum oxide(Alo) and iron oxide(Feo) extracted with acid ammonium oxalate solution,free iron oxide(Fed) extracted with sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate(DCB) and clays,but also with the zero point of charge (ZPC) of the samples.Organic matter made an important contribution to the titratable acidity.the titratable alkalinity was closely correlated with the amount of fluoride ions adsorbed.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity of red soils were influenced by parent materials,being in the order of red soil derived from basalt> that from tuff> that from granite.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity ware closely related with origination of the variable charges of red soils,and to a certain extent were responsible for variable negative and positive charges of the soils.

  15. 磷酸对 pH 振荡的影响%Effect of phosphoric acid on pH oscillation

    杨珊

    2015-01-01

    研究酸性外源物的加入对 pH 振荡行为的影响。以 BrO3--SO32--Fe(CN)64-(简称 BSF)体系为 pH 振荡模型,在连续流动搅拌条件下研究三元无机酸-磷酸的浓度改变对 BSF 体系 pH 振荡的周期和振幅的影响规律。结果表明,随着磷酸浓度的增加,BSF 体系 pH 振荡的振幅线性减小,而周期则先减小后增大。磷酸对 pH 振荡的上述影响与其酸性、对 pH 的缓冲作用及原盐效应有关。%The effect of the introduction of inorganic triacid-phosphoric acid on the oscillating behaviors of pH oscillation of BrO3 - -SO3 2 - -Fe(CN)6 4 -(BSF)system was studied in a continuous flow stirred setup. The regularity of pH amplitude and period as changing the concentration of phosphoric acid was studied. The results showed that the amplitude of pH oscillation decreased linearly with the increase of the concen-tration of phosphoric acid,while the period decreased and then increased. The above phenomena were as-sociated with the acidity,pH buffering effect,and primary salt effect of phosphoric acid.

  16. Cadmium availability in rice paddy fields from a mining area: The effects of soil properties highlighting iron fractions and pH value.

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Liu, Chuanping; Zhu, Jishu; Li, Fangbai; Deng, Dong-Mei; Wang, Qi; Liu, Chengshuai

    2016-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) availability can be significantly affected by soil properties. The effect of pH value on Cd availability has been confirmed. Paddy soils in South China generally contain high contents of iron (Fe). Thus, it is hypothesized that Fe fractions, in addition to pH value, may play an important role in the Cd bioavailability in paddy soil and this requires further investigation. In this study, 73 paired soil and rice plant samples were collected from paddy fields those were contaminated by acid mine drainage containing Cd. The contents of Fe in the amorphous and DCB-extractable Fe oxides were significantly and negatively correlated with the Cd content in rice grain or straw (excluding DCB-extractable Fe vs Cd in straw). In addition, the concentration of HCl-extractable Fe(II) derived from Fe(III) reduction was positively correlated with the Cd content in rice grain or straw. These results suggest that soil Fe redox could affect the availability of Cd in rice plant. Contribution assessment of soil properties to Cd accumulation in rice grain based on random forest (RF) and stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) showed that pH value should be the most important factor and the content of Fe in the amorphous Fe oxides should be the second most important factor in affecting Cd content in rice grain. Overall, compared with the studies from temperate regions, such as Europe and northern China, Fe oxide exhibited its unique role in the bioavailability of Cd in the reddish paddy soil from our study area. The exploration of practical remediation strategies for Cd from the perspective of Fe oxide may be promising. PMID:26629644

  17. Growth of silver catfish ( Rhamdia quelen exposed to acidic pH at different humic acid levels

    Silvio Teixeira da Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Humic substances are organic compounds that possess high molecular weight and are formed by the decomposition of plant materials. Humic substances comprise humic acids, fulvic acids and humin. Humic acids (HA have shown to be able to provide some protection to biological membranes of fish in water with low pH, replacing the protective action of Ca2+. Thus, this studyaimed to observe growth of silver catfish ( Rhamdia quelen juveniles exposed to pHs 5.5 and 6.5 and to different levels of HA: 0, 10, 25 and 50mg L-1. Results showed that, irrespective of pH, HA was highly detrimental to silver catfish growth, since the higher the concentration of HA, the lower the weight gain and feed intake, resulting in lower biomass and lower specific growth rate of juveniles. Hence, HA is extremely damaging to the performance of silver catfish juveniles in the tested concentrations.

  18. Recovery of carboxylic acids at pH greater than pK{sub a}

    Tung, L.A.

    1993-08-01

    Economics of producing carboxylic acids by fermentation is often dominated, not by the fermentation cost, but by the cost of recovering and purifying the acids from dilute aqueous solutions. Experiments were performed to measure uptakes of lactic and succinic acids as functions of pH by basic polymeric sorbents; sorbent regeneration was also tested. Performance at pH > pK{sub a} and regenerability depend on sorbent basicity; apparent pK{sub a} and monomer pK{sub a} can be used to predict sorbent performance. Two basic amine extractants, Alamine 336 and Amberlite LA-2, in were also studied; they are able to sustain capacity to higher pH in diluents that stabilize the acid-amine complex through H bonding. Secondary amines perform better than tert-amines in diluents that solvate the additional proton. Competitive sulfate and phosphate, an interference in fermentation, are taken up by sorbents more strongly than by extractants. The third step in the proposed fermentation process, the cracking of the trimethylammonium (TMA) carboxylate, was also examined. Because lactic acid is more soluble and tends to self-esterify, simple thermal cracking does not remove all TMA; a more promising approach is to esterify the TMA lactate by reaction with an alcohol.

  19. ACIDS SOILS’ PH AND NUTRIENT IMPROVEMENT WHEN AMENDED WITH INORGANIC SOLID WASTES FROM KRAFT MILL

    M ZAMBRANO; Parodi, V.; Baeza, J; Vidal, G.

    2007-01-01

    Kraft mill generates a large amount of dregs (D) and grits (G) as solid wastes due to the causticizing process. The disposal of these wastes is expensive in terms of land requirement and maintenance. On the other hand, solid wastes have alkalinity and buffer properties, which make them appropriate for use as amendments to acidic soils. The goal of this work was to determine the physical, chemical, toxicity and hazardousness characteristics of D & G. Additionally, the effect on acidic soils’ p...

  20. Spatial variability of soil pH based on GIS combined with geostatistics in Panzhihua tobacco area

    GIS and geostatistics were utilized to study the spatial variability of soil pH in Panzhihua tobacco area. Results showed that pH values in this area ranged from 4.5 to 8.3, especially 5.5 to 6.5, and in few areas were lower than 5.0 or higher than 7.0 which can meet the need of high-quality tobacco production. The best fitting model of variogram was exponential model with the nugget/sill of soil pH in 13.61% indicating strong spatial correlation. The change process was 5.40 km and the coefficient of determination was 0.491. The spatial variability of soil pH was mainly caused by structural factors such as cane, topography and soil type. The soil pH in Panzhihua tobacco area also showed a increasing trend of northwest to southeast trend. The pH of some areas in Caochang, Gonghe and Yumen were lower, and in Dalongtan were slightly higher. (authors)

  1. Spatial Trends in the Texture, Moisture Content, and pH of a Virginia Coastal Plain Soil

    Zacharais, S.; Heatwole, C.D.; Campbell, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    Soil texture, moisture content, and pH data from an agricultural field area of 48 _ 32 m in a Suffolk sandy loam soil in the Virginia Coastal Plain was examined for spatial trends. Trend surface analysis of sand, silt, and clay content data (n = 35) found that 68%, 74%, and 31% of the total variability in sand, silt, and clay content, respectively, was explained by second-order trend surfaces. Soil moisture content and pH also exhibited spatial trends, which resulted in statistically signific...

  2. Suppression of Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli on Bean by Aluminum in Acid Soils.

    Furuya, H; Takahashi, T; Matsumoto, T

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT The severity of bean root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli in vitro was studied with regard to exchangeable soil aluminum for 25 soil samples collected from northeastern Honshyu island, Japan. Of these, 24 were Andosols, typically acidic and of volcanic ash origin. Disease severity was assessed based on the number of lesions produced by the pathogen on a 6-cm section of bean stem buried and incubated for 8 days at 25 degrees C in artificially infested soil samples. The number of lesions differed considerably among soil samples. In all soils in which disease incidence was very low, macroconidial germination was strongly inhibited. The inhibition was observed in all soil samples with exchangeable aluminum contents of at least 0.4 meq/100 g of soil, although it is unclear if this concentration is the lowest limit for inhibition. When soil pH was 5.6 or lower, higher amounts of exchangeable aluminum were detected from soils in which the major clay mineralogy was chloritized 2:1 minerals, while no or limited amounts of aluminum were detected from soils in which the major clay mineralogy was allophane/imogolite. Macroconidial germination and disease incidence are thus closely related to clay mineralogy, which regulates the behavior of exchangeable aluminum. PMID:18944802

  3. Algal and bacterial activities in acidic (pH 3) strip mine lakes

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H2S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H2S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by [14C]glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake

  4. Day-to-night variations of cytoplasmic pH in a crassulacean acid metabolism plant.

    Hafke, J B; Neff, R; Hütt, M T; Lüttge, U; Thiel, G

    2001-01-01

    In crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) large amounts of malic acid are redistributed between vacuole and cytoplasm in the course of night-to-day transitions. The corresponding changes of the cytoplasmic pH (pHcyt) were monitored in mesophyll protoplasts from the CAM plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier by ratiometric fluorimetry with the fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6-)carboxyfluorescein as a pHcyt indicator. At the beginning of the light phase, pHcyt was slightly alkaline (about 7.5). It dropped during midday by about 0.3 pH units before recovering again in the late-day-to-early-dark phase. In the physiological context the variation in pHcyt may be a component of CAM regulation. Due to its pH sensitivity, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase appears as a likely target enzyme. From monitoring delta pHcyt in response to loading the cytoplasm with the weak acid salt K-acetate a cytoplasmic H(+)-buffer capacity in the order of 65 mM H+ per pH unit was estimated at a pHcyt of about 7.5. With this value, an acid load of the cytoplasm by about 10 mM malic acid can be estimated as the cause of the observed drop in pHcyt. A diurnal oscillation in pHcyt and a quantitatively similar cytoplasmic malic acid is predicted from an established mathematical model which allows simulation of the CAM dynamics. The similarity of model predictions and experimental data supports the view put forward in this model that a phase transition of the tonoplast is an essential functional element in CAM dynamics. PMID:11732184

  5. Effect of acidic pH on the stability of α-synuclein dimers.

    Lv, Zhengjian; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V; Zhang, Yuliang; Ysselstein, Daniel; Rochet, Jean Christophe; Blanchard, Scott C; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-10-01

    Environmental factors, such as acidic pH, facilitate the assembly of α-synuclein (α-Syn) in aggregates, but the impact of pH on the very first step of α-Syn aggregation remains elusive. Recently, we developed a single-molecule approach that enabled us to measure directly the stability of α-Syn dimers. Unlabeled α-Syn monomers were immobilized on a substrate, and fluorophore-labeled monomers were added to the solution to allow them to form dimers with immobilized α-Syn monomers. The dimer lifetimes were measured directly from the fluorescence bursts on the time trajectories. Herein, we applied the single-molecule tethered approach for probing of intermolecular interaction to characterize the effect of acidic pH on the lifetimes of α-Syn dimers. The experiments were performed at pH 5 and 7 for wild-type α-Syn and for two mutants containing familial type mutations E46K and A53T. We demonstrate that a decrease of pH resulted in more than threefold increase in the α-Syn dimers lifetimes with some variability between the α-Syn species. We hypothesize that the stabilization effect is explained by neutralization of residues 96-140 of α-Syn and this electrostatic effect facilitates the association of the two monomers. Given that dimerization is the first step of α-Syn aggregation, we posit that the electrostatic effect thereby contributes to accelerating α-Syn aggregation at acidic pH. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 715-724, 2016. PMID:27177831

  6. Influence of aeration intensity and medium acidity on phosphate mobilization affected by soil bacteria

    K. V. Lavrentyeva; P. I. Kharchenko; N. V. Cherevach; A. I. Vinnikov

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of phosphate solubilisation conducted by two bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Enterobacter dissolvens under conditions of different rates of aeration and рН. Bacterial development was characterized by different media acidity and aeration levels. It was established optimal aeration rates and potential of hydrogen for soil bacteria growth and phosphate solubilisation – 0.5721 mole О2/l per hour and pH ≈ 6.0.

  7. Soil pH effects on the interactions between dissolved zinc, non-nano- and nano-ZnO with soil bacterial communities

    Read, Daniel S.; Matzke, Marianne; Gweon, Hyun S.;

    2016-01-01

    elicited a similar response in the soil bacterial community, and this differed significantly to the ionic zinc salt treatment. The results highlight the importance of considering soil pH in nanotoxicology studies, although further work is needed to determine the exact mechanisms controlling the toxicity...

  8. Chemical stabilization of cadmium in acidic soil using alkaline agronomic and industrial by-products.

    Chang, Yao-Tsung; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Jheng, Shao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals using reactive or stabilizing materials is a promising solution for soil remediation. Therefore, four agronomic and industrial by-products [wood biochar (WB), crushed oyster shell (OS), blast furnace slag (BFS), and fluidized-bed crystallized calcium (FBCC)] and CaCO3 were added to acidic soil (Cd = 8.71 mg kg(-1)) at the rates of 1%, 2%, and 4% and incubated for 90 d. Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis L.) was then planted in the soil to test the Cd uptake. The elevation in soil pH caused by adding the by-products produced a negative charge on the soil surface, which enhanced Cd adsorption. Consequently, the diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cd content decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in the incubated soil. These results from the sequential extraction procedure indicated that Cd converted from the exchangeable fraction to the carbonate or Fe-Mn oxide fraction. The long-term effectiveness of Cd immobilization caused by applying the 4 by-products was much greater than that caused by applying CaCO3. Plant shoot biomass clearly increased because of the by-product soil amendment. Cd concentration in the shoots was < 10.0 mg kg(-1) following by-product application, as compared to 24 mg kg(-1) for plants growing in unamended soil. PMID:23947715

  9. Irreversibility of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Sorption onto a Volcanic Ash Soil

    Mon, E.; Kawamoto, K.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2008-12-01

    Pesticide sorption and desorption in soils are key processes governing fate and transport of pesticides in the soil environment. The irreversibility (or hysteresis) in the processes of pesticide sorption and desorption needs to be known to accurately predict behavior of pesticides in soil systems. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is a widely used pesticide in agriculture fields. However, only few studies of 2,4-D adsorption onto Andosols (volcanic ash soils) have been published, and the knowledge of 2,4-D desorption onto Andosols is very limited. In this study, a volcanic ash soil sampled from a pasture site in Nishi-Tokyo, Japan was used as a sorbent in order to investigate the irreversibility of 2,4-D sorption. For comparison, a pure clay mineral (kaolinite) obtained from Clay Science Society of Japan (CSSJ) was also used. 2,4-D solutions with three concentrations (0.011, 0.022 and 0.045 mmol/L) were prepared in artificial rain water (ARW= 0.085mM NaCl + 0.015mM CaCl2) to simulate field conditions. To prepare the sample solutions, the solid mass/liquid volume ratio of 1:10 was used for both sorbents (volcanic ash soil and kaolinite). The experiments were conducted in triplicate using a batch method under different pH conditions to examine the effect of pH. Desorption was measured during a equilibration procedure: After removal of 7 mL of supernatant in the sorption step, 7 mL of ARW excluding 2,4-D was added to the sample solution after which, it was equilibrated and centrifuged. The procedure was performed sequentially three or four times to obtain a desorption isotherm. Sorption and desorption generally followed Freundlich isotherms. The results showed markedly effects of pH on 2,4-D sorption and desorption in both the soil and kaolinite, with the percentage of sorption increasing with decreasing pH whereas the percentage of desorption decreased. There was a larger adsorption-desorption hysteresis in the volcanic ash soil as compared to kaolinite

  10. Relation Between pH and Desorption of Cu, Cr, Zn, and Pb from Industrially Polluted Soils

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik K.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2009-01-01

    . It was evident that Cu, Pb, and Zn started to desorb at a higher pH from calcareous soils than from soils with low carbonate content. The mechanism responsible for this is co-precipitation of heavy metals in the carbonates. When the carbonates are dissolved at a relatively high pH of about 5, the co......Desorption of Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn from industrially polluted soils as a result of acidification is in focus. The eight soils of the investigation vary greatly in composition and heavy metal concentration/combination. Three soils had elevated concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn; regardless of pollution...... level, pollution origin, and soil type, the order for desorption as pH decreased was Zn > Cu > Pb. Turning to a single heavy metal in different soils, there was a huge difference in the pH at which the major desorption started. The variation was most significant for Pb where, e.g., less than 10% was...

  11. Adsorption of tetracycline on soil and sediment: Effects of pH and the presence of Cu(II)

    Tetracycline (TC) is frequently detected in the environment, however, knowledge on the environmental fate and transport of TC is still limited. Batch adsorption experiments of TC by soil and sediment samples were conducted. The distribution of charge and electrostatic potential of individual atoms of various TC species in the aqueous solution were determined using MOPAC version 0.034 W program in ChemBio3D Ultra software. Most of the adsorption isotherms on the soil, river and marine sediments were well fitted with the Freundlich and Polanyi-Manes (PMM) models. The single point organic carbon (OC)-normalized adsorption distribution coefficients (KOC) and PMM saturated adsorption capacity (QOC0) values of TC were associated with the mesopore volume and clay content to a greater extent, indicating the mesopore volume of the soil and sediments and their clay content possibly influenced the fate and transport of TC in the natural environment. The adsorption of TC on soil and sediments strongly depended on the pH and presence of Cu(II). The presence of Cu(II) facilitated TC adsorption on soil and sediments at low pH (pH < 5), possibly due to the metallic complexation and surface-bridging mechanism by Cu(II) adsorption on soil and sediments. The cation exchange interaction, metallic complexation and Coulombic interaction of mechanisms for adsorption of TC to soils and sediments were further supported by quantum chemical calculation of various TC species in different pH.

  12. Understory vegetation leads to changes in soil acidity and in microbial communities 27 years after reforestation.

    Fu, Xiaoli; Yang, Fengting; Wang, Jianlei; Di, Yuebao; Dai, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with potted plants and removed understories have indicated that understory vegetation often affects the chemical and microbial properties of soil. In this study, we examined the mechanism and extent of the influence of understory vegetation on the chemical and microbial properties of soil in plantation forests. The relationships between the vegetational structure (diversity for different functional layers, aboveground biomass of understory vegetation, and species number) and soil properties (pH, microbial community structure, and levels of soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen) were analyzed across six reforestation types (three pure needleleaf forests, a needle-broadleaf mixed forest, a broadleaf forest, and a shrubland). Twenty-seven years after reforestation, soil pH significantly decreased by an average of 0.95 across reforestation types. Soil pH was positively correlated with the aboveground biomass of the understory. The levels of total, bacterial, and fungal phospholipid fatty acids, and the fungal:bacterial ratios were similar in the shrubland and the broadleaf forest. Both the aboveground biomass of the understory and the diversity of the tree layer positively influenced the fungal:bacterial ratio. Improving the aboveground biomass of the understory could alleviate soil acidification. An increase in the aboveground biomass of the understory, rather than in understory diversity, enhanced the functional traits of the soil microbial communities. The replacement of pure plantations with mixed-species stands, as well as the enhancement of understory recruitment, can improve the ecological functions of a plantation, as measured by the alleviation of soil acidification and increased fungal dominance. PMID:25261818

  13. The influence of pH adjusted with different acids on the dyeability of polyester fabric

    Miljkovic Milena N.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of using formic, oxalic, citric, tartaric, hydrochloric, nitric, sulphuric and phosphoric acid for dyebath pH adjustment was investigated upon the dyeing of polyester fabric with CI Disperse Yellow 60. The positions of colour in CIELab coordinates of the samples dyed with the addition of tested acids were assessed and compared to those dyed with the addition of acetic acid. It was found that the differences in dyeabilities obtained with the addition of citric, oxalic, hydrochloric, nitric and sulphuric acid are entirely acceptable according to both M&S 83A and CMC (2:1 standards in comparison to the dyeability obtained with the addition of acetic acid.

  14. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and tension lysimetry indicated that expelled solution concentrations were higher than those obtained with either type of lysimeter, although there was less difference with tension

  15. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2. PMID:24727041

  16. Synthesis and characterization of a pH responsive folic acid functionalized polymeric drug delivery system.

    Li, Xia; McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    We report the computational analysis, synthesis and characterization of folate functionalized poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride), PSMA for drug delivery purpose. The selection of the proper linker between the polymer and the folic acid group was performed before conducting the synthesis using Density Functional Theory (DFT). The computational results showed the bio-degradable linker 2, 4-diaminobutyric acid, DABA as a good candidate allowing flexibility of the folic acid group while maintaining the pH sensitivity of PSMA, used as a trigger for drug release. The synthesis was subsequently carried out in multi-step experimental procedures. The functionalized polymer was characterized using InfraRed spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Dynamic Light Scattering confirming both the chemical structure and the pH responsiveness of PSMA-DABA-Folate polymers. This study provides an excellent example of how computational chemistry can be used in selection process for the functional materials and product characterization. The pH sensitive polymers are expected to be used in delivering anti-cancer drugs to solid tumors with overly expressed folic acid receptors. PMID:27183249

  17. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  18. Archaeal Abundance across a pH Gradient in an Arable Soil and Its Relationship to Bacterial and Fungal Growth Rates

    Bengtson, Per; Sterngren, Anna E.; Rousk, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Soil pH is one of the most influential factors for the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, but the influence of soil pH on the distribution and composition of soil archaeal communities has yet to be systematically addressed. The primary aim of this study was to determine how total archaeal abundance (quantitative PCR [qPCR]-based estimates of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers) is related to soil pH across a pH gradient (pH 4.0 to 8.3). Secondarily, we wanted to assess how archaeal abund...

  19. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in acid soils is supported by hydrolysis of urea

    Lu, Lu; Han, Wenyan; Zhang, Jinbo; Wu, Yucheng; Wang, Baozhan; Lin, Xiangui; Zhu, Jianguo; Cai, Zucong; Jia, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of urea as a source of ammonia has been proposed as a mechanism for the nitrification of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in acidic soil. The growth of Nitrososphaera viennensis on urea suggests that the ureolysis of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) might occur in natural environments. In this study, 15N isotope tracing indicates that ammonia oxidation occurred upon the addition of urea at a concentration similar to the in situ ammonium content of tea orchard soil (pH 3.75) and ...

  20. Determination of Minimal Duration Essential for Isolation of Humic Acids From Soils in Forest Restoration Programmes

    Mohd R. N. Hanisah; Osumanu H. Ahmed; Kasim Susilawati; Nik Muhamad A. Majid; Mohamadu B. Jalloh

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether a simple and rapid method could be developed for extracting, fractionating and purifying soil HA in forest rehabilitation programmes. Humic acids from 10 g of soil were extracted with 100 mL of 0.10 M NaOH. Different extraction periods (4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h) were tested. Samples were centrifuged (16,211 G for 15 min) at the end of each extraction period. The dark-coloured supernatant liquor containing HA was decanted and the pH of the...

  1. Dynamics of fatty acid vesicles in response to pH stimuli.

    Ikari, Keita; Sakuma, Yuka; Jimbo, Takehiro; Kodama, Atsuji; Imai, Masayuki; Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Rasmussen, Steen

    2015-08-21

    We investigate the dynamics of decanoic acid/decanoate (DA) vesicles in response to pH stimuli. Two types of dynamic processes induced by the micro-injection of NaOH solutions are sequentially observed: deformations and topological transitions. In the deformation stage, DA vesicles show a series of shape deformations, i.e., prolate-oblate-stomatocyte-sphere. In the topological transition stage, spherical DA vesicles follow either of the two pathways, pore formation and vesicle fusion. The pH stimuli modify a critical aggregation concentration of DA molecules, which causes the solubilization of DA molecules in the outer leaflet of the vesicle bilayers. This solubilization decreases the outer surface area of the vesicle, thereby increasing surface tension. A kinetic model based on area difference elasticity theory can accurately describe the dynamics of DA vesicles triggered by pH stimuli. PMID:26166464

  2. Iron biofortification of wheat grains through integrated use of organic and chemical fertilizers in pH affected calcareous soil.

    Ramzani, Pia Muhammad Adnan; Khalid, Muhammad; Naveed, Muhammad; Ahmad, Rashid; Shahid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Incidence of iron (Fe) deficiency in human populations is an emerging global challenge. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of iron sulphate combined with biochar and poultry manure for Fe biofortification of wheat grains in pH affected calcareous soil. In first two incubation studies, rates of sulfur (S) and Fe combined with various organic amendments for lowering pH and Fe availability in calcareous soil were optimized. In pot experiment, best rate of Fe along with biochar (BC) and poultry manure (PM) was evaluated for Fe biofortification of wheat in normal and S treated low pH calcareous soil. Fe applied with BC provided fair increase in root-shoot biomass and photosynthesis up to 79, 53 and 67%, respectively in S treated low pH soil than control. Grain Fe and ferritin concentration was increased up to 1.4 and 1.2 fold, respectively while phytate and polyphenol was decreased 35 and 44%, respectively than control in treatment where Fe was applied with BC and S. In conclusion, combined use of Fe and BC could be an effective approach to improve growth and grain Fe biofortification of wheat in pH affected calcareous soil. PMID:27179316

  3. Monomeric banana lectin at acidic pH overrules conformational stability of its native dimeric form.

    Javed M Khan

    Full Text Available Banana lectin (BL is a homodimeric protein categorized among jacalin-related family of lectins. The effect of acidic pH was examined on conformational stability of BL by using circular dichroism, intrinsic fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-napthalene sulfonate (ANS binding, size exclusion chromatography (SEC and dynamic light scattering (DLS. During acid denaturation of BL, the monomerization of native dimeric protein was found at pH 2.0. The elution profile from SEC showed two different peaks (59.65 ml & 87.98 ml at pH 2.0 while single peak (61.45 ml at pH 7.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R h of native BL was 2.9 nm while at pH 2.0 two species were found with R h of 1.7 and 3.7 nm. Furthermore at, pH 2.0 the secondary structures of BL remained unaltered while tertiary structure was significantly disrupted with the exposure of hydrophobic clusters confirming the existence of molten globule like state. The unfolding of BL with different subunit status was further evaluated by urea and temperature mediated denaturation to check their stability. As inferred from high Cm and ΔG values, the monomeric form of BL offers more resistance towards chemical denaturation than the native dimeric form. Besides, dimeric BL exhibited a Tm of 77°C while no loss in secondary structures was observed in monomers even up to 95°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on monomeric subunit of lectins showing more stability against denaturants than its native dimeric state.

  4. Production of Retrovirus-Based Vectors in Mildly Acidic pH Conditions.

    Holic, Nathalie; Fenard, David

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on retroviridae are increasingly becoming a tool of choice for biomedical research and for the development of biotherapies in rare diseases or cancers. To meet the challenges of preclinical and clinical production, different steps of the production process of self-inactivating γ-retroviral (RVs) and lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been improved (e.g., transfection, media optimization, cell culture conditions). However, the increasing need for mass production of such vectors is still a challenge and could hamper their availability for therapeutic use. Recently, we observed that the use of a neutral pH during vector production is not optimal. The use of mildly acidic pH conditions (pH 6) can increase by two- to threefold the production of RVs and LVs pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) or gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) glycoproteins. Here, we describe the production protocol in mildly acidic pH conditions of GALVTR- and VSV-G-pseudotyped LVs using the transient transfection of HEK293T cells and the production protocol of GALV-pseudotyped RVs produced from a murine producer cell line. These protocols should help to achieve higher titers of vectors, thereby facilitating experimental research and therapeutic applications. PMID:27317171

  5. Chlorogenic acid increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural formation when heating fructose alone or with aspartic acid at two pH levels.

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zou, Yueyu; Wu, Taigang; Huang, Caihuan; Pei, Kehan; Zhang, Guangwen; Lin, Xiaohua; Bai, Weibin; Ou, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic acid that ubiquitously exists in fruits. This work aims to investigate whether and how CGA influences HMF formation during heating fructose alone, or with an amino acid. The results showed that that CGA increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation. At pH 5.5 and 7.0, the addition of 5.0 μmol/ml CGA increased HMF formation by 49.4% and 25.2%, respectively when heating fructose alone, and by 9.0% and 16.7%, respectively when heating fructose with aspartic acid. CGA significantly increased HMF formation by promoting 3-deoxosone formation, and its conversion to HMF by inhibiting HMF elimination, especially in the Maillard reaction system. A comparison of the catalytic capacity of CGA with its six analogous compounds showed that both its di-hydroxyphenyl and carboxyl groups function in increasing HMF formation. PMID:26213045

  6. Dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization strongly affect co2 emissions following lime application to acidic soil

    Emission of greenhouse gases from agricultural soils has main contribution to the climatic change and global warming. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen mineralization can affect CO/sub 2/ emission from soils. Influence of DOC and nitrogen mineralization on CO/sub 2/ emissions following lime application to acidic soil was investigated in current study. Laboratory experiment was conducted under aerobic conditions with 25% moisture contents (66% water-filled pore space) at 25 degree C in the dark conditions. Different treatments of lime were applied to acidic soil as follows: CK (control), L (low rate of lime: 0.2g lime / 100 g soil) and H (high rate of lime: 0.5g lime /100g soil). CO/sub 2/ emissions were measured by gas chromatography and dissolved organic carbon, NH4 +-N, NO/sub 3/ --N and soil pH were measured during incubation study. Addition of lime to acidic soil significantly increased the concentration of DOC and N mineralization rate. Higher concentrations of DOC and N mineralization, consequently, increased the CO/sub 2/ emissions from lime treated soils. Cumulative CO/sub 2/ emission was 75% and 71% higher from L and H treatments as compared to CK. The results of current study suggest that DOC and N mineralization are critical in controlling gaseous emissions of CO/sub 2/ from acidic soils following lime application. (author)

  7. Colored pI standards and gel isoelectric focusing in strongly acidic pH

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Šlais, Karel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 382, č. 1 (2005), s. 65-72. ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4031302; GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS4031201; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/1447 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : colored pI markers * gel isoelectric focusing * acidic pH Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.695, year: 2005

  8. Acidic sandy soil improvement with biochar - A microcosm study.

    Molnár, Mónika; Vaszita, Emese; Farkas, Éva; Ujaczki, Éva; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Tolner, Mária; Klebercz, Orsolya; Kirchkeszner, Csaba; Gruiz, Katalin; Uzinger, Nikolett; Feigl, Viktória

    2016-09-01

    Biochar produced from a wide range of organic materials by pyrolysis has been reported as a means to improve soil physical properties, fertility and crop productivity. However, there is a lack of studies on the complex effects of biochar both on the degraded sandy soil physico-chemical properties and the soil biota as well as on toxicity, particularly in combined application with fertilizer and compost. A 7-week microcosm experiment was conducted to improve the quality of an acidic sandy soil combining variations in biochar types and amounts, compost and fertilizer application rates. The applied biochars were produced from different feedstocks such as grain husks, paper fibre sludge and wood screenings. The main purpose of the microcosm experiment was to assess the efficiency and applicability of different biochars as soil amendment prior to field trials and to choose the most efficient biochar to improve the fertility, biological activity and physical properties of acidic sandy soils. We complemented the methodology with ecotoxicity assessment to evaluate the possible risks to the soil as habitat for microbes, plants and animals. There was clear evidence of biochar-soil interactions positively affecting both the physico-chemical properties of the tested acidic sandy soil and the soil biota. Our results suggest that the grain husk and the paper fibre sludge biochars applied to the tested soil at 1% and 0.5 w/w% rate mixed with compost, respectively can supply a more liveable habitat for plants and soil living animals than the acidic sandy soil without treatment. PMID:26850860

  9. Anoxic Biodegradation of Isosaccharinic Acids at Alkaline pH by Natural Microbial Communities.

    Simon P Rout

    Full Text Available One design concept for the long-term management of the UK's intermediate level radioactive wastes (ILW is disposal to a cementitious geological disposal facility (GDF. Under the alkaline (10.013.0 anoxic conditions expected within a GDF, cellulosic wastes will undergo chemical hydrolysis. The resulting cellulose degradation products (CDP are dominated by α- and β-isosaccharinic acids (ISA, which present an organic carbon source that may enable subsequent microbial colonisation of a GDF. Microcosms established from neutral, near-surface sediments demonstrated complete ISA degradation under methanogenic conditions up to pH 10.0. Degradation decreased as pH increased, with β-ISA fermentation more heavily influenced than α-ISA. This reduction in degradation rate was accompanied by a shift in microbial population away from organisms related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides to a more diverse Clostridial community. The increase in pH to 10.0 saw an increase in detection of Alcaligenes aquatilis and a dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the Archaeal population. Methane was generated up to pH 10.0 with acetate accumulation at higher pH values reflecting a reduced detection of acetoclastic methanogens. An increase in pH to 11.0 resulted in the accumulation of ISA, the absence of methanogenesis and the loss of biomass from the system. This study is the first to demonstrate methanogenesis from ISA by near surface microbial communities not previously exposed to these compounds up to and including pH 10.0.

  10. Indomethacin inhibits tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channels at acidic pH in rat nociceptive neurons.

    Nakamura, Michiko; Jang, Il-Sung

    2016-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are well-known inhibitors of cyclooxygenases (COXs) and are widely used for the treatment of inflammatory pain; however several NSAIDs display COX-independent analgesic action including the inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) channels expressed in primary afferent neurons. In the present study, we examined whether NSAIDs modulate tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels and if this modulation depends on the extracellular pH. The TTX-R Na(+) currents were recorded from small-sized trigeminal ganglion neurons by using a whole-cell patch clamp technique. Among eight NSAIDs tested in this study, several drugs, including aspirin and ibuprofen, did not affect TTX-R Na(+) channels either at pH 7.4 or at pH 6.0. However, we found that indomethacin, and, to a lesser extent, ibuprofen and naproxen potently inhibited the peak amplitude of TTX-R Na(+) currents at pH 6.0. The indomethacin-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) channels was more potent at depolarized membrane potentials. Indomethacin significantly shifted both the voltage-activation and voltage-inactivation relationships to depolarizing potentials at pH 6.0. Indomethacin accelerated the development of inactivation and retarded the recovery from inactivation of TTX-R Na(+) channels at pH 6.0. Given that indomethacin and several other NSAIDs could further suppress local nociceptive signals by inhibiting TTX-R Na(+) channels at an acidic pH in addition to the classical COX inhibition, these drugs could be particularly useful for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:26898291

  11. Modelling the growth rate of Escherichia coli as a function of pH and lactic acid concentration.

    Presser, K A; Ratkowsky, D A; Ross, T.

    1997-01-01

    The growth rate responses of Escherichia coli M23 (a nonpathogenic strain) to suboptimal pH and lactic acid concentration were determined. Growth rates were measured turbidimetrically at 20 degrees C in the range of pH 2.71 to 8.45. The total concentration of lactic acid was fixed at specific values, and the pH was varied by the addition of a strong acid (hydrochloric) or base (sodium hydroxide) to enable the determination of undissociated and dissociated lactic acid concentrations under each...

  12. Formation and Crystal Structures of Lewis Acid Adducts of Ph3PCHP(O)Ph2; New Neutral and Cationic Species

    Petz, Wolfgang; Neumüller, Bernhard; Aicher, Kathrin; Öxler, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The carbodiphosphorane C(PPh3)2 (1) is easily hydrolyzed from wet air to give the ylide Ph3PCHP(O)Ph2 (2), which forms addition compounds with various Lewis acids to give neutral or cationic compounds. According to pairs of electrons at the central carbon atom and the oxygen atom, respectively, addition compounds with coordination modes A (via oxygen), B (via carbon), and C (via carbon and oxygen) were isolated either as by-products from reactions of Lewis acids with 1 (co...

  13. Interaction of uranium(VI) and humic acid under neutral pH conditions

    Full text of publication follows: Due to their strong ability for complex and colloid formation, humic acids influence the speciation and consequently the migration behavior of actinide ions in the environment. In order to perform a trustworthy risk assessment for the conception of future nuclear waste repositories as well as for the remediation of former uranium mining and milling areas, reliable thermodynamic data on the interaction of uranium with humic acids under geo-genic conditions are necessary. The U(VI) complexation by humic acids was already the subject of a number of previous investigations. However, these studies were predominately performed in the acidic pH range, where the hydrolysis of the uranyl ion can be neglected. Only few studies exist on the interaction of U(VI) with humic acids under neutral pH conditions where ternary U(VI) humate complexes are formed. In the present study we investigate the complexation of U(VI) by purified Aldrich humic acid at pH 7 under exclusion of CO2 ([HA]: 2 mg/L; [U]: 1 x 10-6-1 x 10-5 M, I: 0.1 M NaClO4). Under the studied experimental conditions and in absence of humic acid, U(VI) occurs in form of the following species: UO2OH+, UO2(OH)2(aq), (UO2)3(OH)5+, (UO2)4(OH)7+. The speciation is dominated by 62- 73 % of (UO2)3(OH)5+. Based on this speciation, the formation of ternary uranyl hydroxy humate complexes is assumed. For determination of the U(VI) and humic acid speciation in solution we apply the conventional time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and TRLFS with ultrafast pulses, respectively. For identification and quantification of the U(VI) species in solution, fluorescence spectra were measured for the relevant U(VI) hydrolysis species. The experimental data are evaluated applying the metal ion charge neutralization model [1], which describes the metal ion complexation by humic acids. [1] Kim, J.I., Czerwinski, K.R.: Complexation of Metal Ions with Humic Acids: Metal Ion Charge

  14. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox

  15. Application of alkaline waste from pulp industry to acid soil with pine

    Patricia Pértile

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil extensive areas are covered with pine forests, planted for pulp and paper production. This industry generates solid alkaline waste, such as dregs. The application of this dregs to forest soils is an alternative for soil acidity correction and plant nutrient supply, as well as a solution for its proper disposal. The purpose of this study was to compare the residual effect of surface application of dregs and dolomitic lime on (a changes in the physical and chemical properties of an acidic soil and (b pine tree development. The experiment was carried out in 2004 in Bocaina do Sul, Santa Catarina, consisting of the application of increasing dreg and lime rates to a Pinus taeda L. production area, on a Humic Cambisol, in a randomized block design with four replications and 10 x 10 m plots. The treatments consisted of levels of soil acidity amendments corresponding to the recommendations by the SMP method to reach pH 5.5 in the 0-20 cm layer, as follows: no soil amendment; dregs at 5.08 (1/4 SMP, 10.15 (1/2 SMP and 20.3 Mg ha-1 (1 SMP; and lime at 8.35 (1/2 SMP and 16.7 Mg ha-1 (1 SMP. Soil layers were sampled in 2010 for analyses of soil chemical and physical properties. The diameter at breast height of the 6.5 year old pine trees was also evaluated. Surface application of dregs improved soil chemical fertility by reducing acidity and increasing base saturation, similar to liming, especially in surface layers. Dregs, comparable to lime, reduced the degree of clay flocculation, but did not affect the soil physical quality. There was no effect of the amendments on increase in pine tree diameter. Thus, the alternative to raise the pH in forest soils to 5.5 with dregs is promising for the forestry sector with a view to dispose of the waste and increase soil fertility.

  16. Significance of Ligand Exchange Relating to Sulfate in Retarding Acidification of Variable Charge Soils Caused by Acid Rain

    WANGJINGHUA; YUTIANREN

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of evaluating the role of ligand exchange of sulfate ions in retarding the rate of acidification of variable charge soils,the changes in pH after the addition of different amounts of HNO3 or H2SO4 to representative soils of China were measured .A difference between pH changes caused by the two kinds of acids was observed only for variable charge soils and kaolinite,but not for constant charge soils and bentonite,The larger the proportion of H2SO4 in the HNO3-H2SO4 mixture,the lower the calculated H+ ion activities remained in the suspension.The difference in H+ ion activities between H2SO4 systems and HNO3 systems was larger for soils with a low base-saturation(BS) percentage than those with a high BS percentage.The removal of free iron oxides from the soil led to a decrease in the difference,while the coating of Fe2O3 on a bentonite resulted in a remarkable appearance of the difference.The effect of ligand exchange on the acidity status of the soil varied with the soil type.Surface soils with a high organic matter content showed a less pronounced effect of ligand exchange than subsoils did.It was estimated that when acid rain chiefly containing H2SO4 was deposited on variable charge soils the acidification rate might be slower by 20%-40% than that when the acid rain chiefly contained HNO3 for soils with a high organic matter content,and that the rate might be half of that caused by HNO3 for soils with a low organic matter content,especially for latosols.

  17. Gravity-driven transport of three engineered nanomaterials in unsaturated soils and their effects on soil pH and nutrient release.

    Conway, Jon R; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-07-01

    The gravity-driven transport of TiO2, CeO2, and Cu(OH)2 engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and their effects on soil pH and nutrient release were measured in three unsaturated soils. ENM transport was found to be highly limited in natural soils collected from farmland and grasslands, with the majority of particles being retained in the upper 0-3 cm of the soil profile, while greater transport depth was seen in a commercial potting soil. Physical straining appeared to be the primary mechanism of retention in natural soils as ENMs immediately formed micron-scale aggregates, which was exacerbated by coating particles with Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) which promote steric hindrance. Small changes in soil pH were observed in natural soils contaminated with ENMs that were largely independent of ENM type and concentration, but differed from controls. These changes may have been due to enhanced release of naturally present pH-altering ions (Mg(2+), H(+)) in the soil via substitution processes. These results suggest ENMs introduced into soil will likely be highly retained near the source zone. PMID:27108211

  18. Nodulation of cowpeas and survival of cowpeas Rhizobia in acid, aluminum-rich soils. [Vigna unguiculata; Rhizobium

    Hartel, P.G.; Whelan, A.M.; Alexander, M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether the reduced nodulation of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) grown in certain acid, Alrich soils resulted from the poor survival of the potentially infective rhizobia. Two strains of Rhizobium capable of nodulating cowpeas were used. The lowest pH for growth in defined liquid medium was 4.2 for one strain and 3.9 for the other. Only the latter was Al tolerant and could grow in a defined liquid medium containing 50 ..mu..M KAl(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/. The survival of the bacteria and their ability to nodulate cowpeas in three soils were measured after the soils were amended with Ca or Al salts to give pH values ranging from 5.7 to 4.1 and extractable-Al concentrations from < 0.1 to 3.7 cmol(p/sup +/)/kg of soil. Only small differences in survival in 7 or 8 weeks were noted between the two strains. Plants inoculated with the Al-sensitive strain bore significantly fewer nodules in the more acid, Al-rich soils than in the same soils with higher pH values and less extractable Al. No significant reduction in nodule number was evident for plants inoculated with the Al-tolerant strain and grown in the more acid, Al-rich soils compared to cowpeas grown in the same soils with higher pH values and less extractable Al. It is suggested that the Al content of soil is not a major factor in the survival of cowpea rhizobia but that it does have a significant effect on nodulation. 24 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Removal of pollutants by enhanced coagulation combined PAC with variable charge soils: flocs' properties and effect of pH.

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Wu, Chun-De; Duan, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the properties of flocs and effects of the solution pH on removal of representative pollutants by enhanced coagulation with variable charge soils of South China and polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The results demonstrated that the removal efficiency of turbidity was larger and the aggregated flocs had a faster growth rate, bigger size, denser structure and faster settling rate than those generated by PAC alone, when variable charge soil was used in conjunction with PAC. Additionally, initial solutions pH had meaningful effects on removal of pollutants. With the increase in the pH of the solution, the removal efficiencies of turbidity, algae and heavy metal ions significantly increased. Besides, charge neutralization together with physical entrapment of colloids was the dominant mechanism in enhanced coagulation, and variable charge soil displayed a great adsorption effect. PMID:26829123

  20. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain (V): Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash.

    Dong, Xu-Hui; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Wang, Wei; Gao, Shi-Dong; Isobe, Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements (Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements (Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil. PMID:15559796

  1. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain(V):Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash

    DONG Xu-hui; SAKAMOTO Kazuhiko; WANG Wei; GAO Shi-dong; ISOBE Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity(ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements(Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements(Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0%-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil.

  2. Arsenic removal from contaminated soil using phosphoric acid and phosphate

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to study Arsenic (As) removal from a naturally contaminated soil using phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4). Both H3PO4 and KH2PO4 proved to clearly reduce toxicity of the soil in terms of soil As content, attaining more than 20% As removal at a concentration of 200 mmol/L, although soil As tolerance limit of 30 mg/kg, according to Chinese Environmental quality standard for soil (EQSS), was not satisfied by using these two extractants. At the same time, acidification of soil and dissolution of soil components (Ca, Mg, and Si) resulted from using these two extractants, especially H3PO4. The effectiveness of these two extractants could be attributed to the replacement of As by phosphate ions (PO43-). The function of H3PO4 as an acid to dissolve soil components had little effects on As removal. KH2PO4 almost removed as much As as H3PO4, but it did not result in serious damage to soils, indicating that it was a more promising extractant. The results of a kinetic study showed that As removal reached equilibrium after incubation for 360 min, but dissolution of soil components, especially Mg and Ca, was very rapid. Therefore dissolution of soil components would be inevitable if As was further removed. Elovich's model best described the kinetic data of As removal among the four models used in the kinetic study.

  3. Rice straw incorporated just before soil flooding increases acetic acid formation and decreases available nitrogen

    Ronaldir Knoblauch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into the soil just before flooding for water-seeded rice can immobilize mineral nitrogen (N and lead to the production of acetic acid harmful to the rice seedlings, which negatively affects grain yield. This study aimed to evaluate the formation of organic acids and variation in pH and to quantify the mineral N concentration in the soil as a function of different times of incorporation of rice straw or of ashes from burning the straw before flooding. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse using an Inceptisol (Typic Haplaquept soil. The treatments were as follows: control (no straw or ash; incorporation of ashes from previous straw burning; rice straw incorporated to drained soil 60 days before flooding; straw incorporated 30 days before flooding; straw incorporated 15 days before flooding and straw incorporated on the day of flooding. Experimental units were plastic buckets with 6.0 kg of soil. The buckets remained flooded throughout the trial period without rice plants. Soil samples were collected every seven days, beginning one day before flooding until the 13th week of flooding for determination of mineral N- ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-. Soil solution pH and concentration of organic acids (acetic, propionic and butyric were determined. All NO3- there was before flooding was lost in approximately two weeks of flooding, in all treatments. There was sigmoidal behavior for NH4+ formation in all treatments, i.e., ammonium ion concentration began to rise shortly after soil flooding, slightly decreased and then went up again. On the 91st day of flooding, the NH4+ concentrations in soil was 56 mg kg-1 in the control treatment, 72 mg kg-1 for the 60-day treatment, 73 mg kg-1 for the 30-day treatment and 53 mg kg-1 for the ash incorporation treatment. These ammonium concentrations correspond to 84, 108, 110 and 80 kg ha-1 of N-NH4+, respectively. When the straw was incorporated on the day of flooding or 15 days

  4. Impaired Reduction of N2O to N2 in Acid Soils Is Due to a Posttranscriptional Interference with the Expression of nosZ

    Liu, Binbin; Frostegård, Åsa; Bakken, Lars R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating empirical evidence over the last 60 years has shown that the reduction of N2O to N2 is impaired by low soil pH, suggesting that liming of acid soils may reduce N2O emissions. This option has not gained much momentum in global change research, however, possibly due to limited understanding of why low pH interferes with N2O reductase. We hypothesized that the reason is that denitrifying organisms in soils are unable to assemble functional N2O reductase (N2OR) at low pH, as...

  5. Studies on separation of heavy metals from acidic solutions by foam fractionation with respect to an application on acidic soil extracs

    Wömmel, Simone; Calmano, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation is presented on the batch foam fractionation of the heavy metal cations Pb2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Sb3+ and As5+ from diluted aqueous solutions with hexamethylenedithiocarbamate (HMDC) as complexing agent and sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Among the considered pH-values of 2, 4 and 7 the pH 2 experiments allow a direct application of foam fractionation on acidic extracts from heavy metal contaminated soil. The experiments at pH 2 and pH 4 show better results th...

  6. Bioleaching of heavy metals from soil using fungal-organic acids : bench scale testing

    Cathum, S.J.; Ousmanova, D.; Somers, A.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Brown, C.E. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Engineering Division]|[Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environmental Technology Centre

    2006-07-01

    The ability of fungi to solubilize metals from solid materials may present new opportunities in environmental remediation. This paper presented details of a bench scale experiment that evaluated the leaching of heavy metals from contaminated soil using in situ fungal-generated organic acids. Rice was used as the growing media for organic acid production by A. foetidus. The cultivated fungus was placed on large pieces of potato-dextrose agar (PDA) plates and suspended in 5 L of sterilized water. The cooked rice was inoculated by pouring the 5 L spore suspension over the rice layer. Soil was obtained from a soil pile impacted with heavy metals at a private industrial site and augmented with Pb-contaminated soil. A polyethylene tub was used with a drain pipe leading to a leachate vessel. Crushed stone was spread over the bottom of the tub to assist leachate drainage. Approximately 45 kg of the contaminated soil was spread evenly over the stone layer to a depth of 10 cm. The concentrated spore suspension was sprinkled over the rice. Each week the leachate collection vessel was removed from the bioleaching system and the fine soil particles were allowed to settle. A control was run using the contaminated soil and solid substrate without fungus. Growth of A. foetidus was observed in both control experiment and test experiment after a period of 35 days. The pH of the leachate was measured as the fungal growth progressed. The process was assessed using ICP Mass Spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy, which showed that approximately 65 g of heavy metals were mobilized from 45 kg of soil, and that the biological leaching process resulted in greater mobilization of heavy metals relative to the control experiment. It was concluded that organic acids generated by A. foetidus were capable of leaching heavy metals from the soil. 30 refs., 4 tabs., 15 figs.

  7. Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils

    Evans, Ch. D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Ostle, N.; Zielinski, P.; Cooper, M.; Peacock, M.; Clark, J.; Oulehle, Filip; Cooper, D.; Freeman, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2012), s. 3317-3331. ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : acidity * dissolved organic carbon * organic soil * peat * podzol * soil carbon * sulphur Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.910, year: 2012

  8. Microbiological transformations of phosphorus and sulphur compounds in acid soils

    Stamenov Dragana; Jarak Mirjana; Đurić Simonida; Jafari Hajnal Timea; Bjelić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of phosphorus and sulphur in soil is closely related to the dynamics of the biological cycle in which microorganisms play a central role. There is not much microbiological activity in acid soils because aerobes are scarce, rhizosphere is restricted to the shallow surface layer, and the biomass of microorganisms decreases with higher acidity. The aim of the research was to investigate the number of microorganisms, which decompose organic and inorganic phosphorus compounds an...

  9. Influence of vegetation on phenolic acid contents in soil

    Malá, J.; Cvikrová, M.; Hrubcová, M. (Marie); Máchová, P.

    2013-01-01

    The study described in this paper was undertaken in order to assess the impact of different woody plants on the dynamics of phenolic acids in soil. The influence of plant litter on the amount of phenolic compounds occurring in soils beneath several deciduous and coniferous tree species was examined in pot experiments. The contents of endogenous methanol soluble free and conjugated phenolic acids in Norway spruce, larch, rowan and two species of willow were determined. We focused on the dynami...

  10. Composts with and without wood ash admixture for the management of tropical acid soils: chemical, physical and microbiological effects

    Bougnom, B. P.; Insam, H.; Etoa, F. X.

    2009-04-01

    Acid soils generally found in the tropics have a low pH, are poor in organic matter, deficient in Ca2+, Mg+, P, or Mo ; limited in mineralization, nitrification, nodulation, and mycorrhizal infection , suffer from Al or Mn toxicity. Within the framework aiming at using organic wastes and wood ash to overcome soil infertility in tropical acidic soils, a green house experiment was conducted with two acid soils collected from Cameroon (Ferralsol and Acrisol) and amended with three types of compost 3:1(W/W) containing 0 (K0), 8(K8) and 16% (K16) wood ash admixture respectively for two consecutive cycles of 100 days, during which soybean (Glycine max) was grown on the first, the second cycle was left as fallow. Generally the same trends of variation of the physico-chemical parameters were observed in both soils. Addition of organic wastes increased the pH electrical conductivity, soil organic matter, water holding capacity, total Carbone and total nitrogen as compared to the controls. The rate of nitrification highly increased posing the problem of possible leaching of nitrates in the ground water. The cations and micronutrients content followed the same trends. These changes leaded to an increase of the P availability and a decrease of Al toxicity. At the end of the second cycle, generally most of the different parameters slightly decreased except for the electrical conductivity. All composts passed a toxicity test, and the amended soils had significant better fresh and dried plant biomass, the Total nitrogen also significantly increased. Amended soils with K0 generally performed better than those amended with K8 and K16, thinking that their pH (closer to the neutrality) was responsible of these performances, all the parameters were significantly correlated to the pH. K8 and K16 performances could be performed by reducing the added quantities. The study of PCR-DGGE have shown a shift in the fungal and bacterial communities, Ammonia oxidizing bacteria community were

  11. Availability of Cu and Zn in an acidic sludge-amended soil as affected by zeolite application and liming

    Antoniadis, Vasileios; Dimirkou, Anthoula [Thessaly Univ., Volos (Greece). Dept. of Agriculture, Crop Production and Rural Environment; Damalidis, Konstantinos [Democritus Univ. of Thrace, Orestiada (Greece). Dept. of Agricultural Development

    2012-03-15

    Acidic soils exhibit high trace element availability compared to neutral pH soils, and thus, when trace metals are added (e.g. due to sewage sludge application), measures should be taken to reduce their mobility. In this experiment, we tested two such methods, liming and zeolite addition. The aim was to measure the availability, in ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), of heavy metals (Cu and Zn) added to soil with sewage sludge in both acidic and limed soil. Thus, in this pot experiment, we used a soil at two pH values (original soil at pH 3.56 and limed to 6.5), two rates of sewage sludge (0 and 50 Mg ha{sup -1}) and three rates of zeolite (0, 2 and 5 Mg ha{sup -1}, referred to as Z-0, Z-1 and Z-2, respectively). We found that metal concentrations in plant decreased significantly with liming but zeolite did not further reduce metal levels. In metal extractions with DTPA, zeolite additions reduced metal concentrations. In the second sampling time (on day 100), metal levels were significantly reduced at Z-0 and Z-1 compared to day 50, but at Z-2, metals were either only slightly reduced or even unchanged. We concluded that zeolite hindered metals from being strongly and irreversibly bound onto soil colloids. Zeolite at Z-2 kept metal availability relatively high over time, while metal availability at Z-0 and Z-1 was being reduced due to liming. (orig.)

  12. Short-range variability of soil pH in a regional geochemical survey, communicating uncertainty to the data user

    Ander, Louise; Knights, Kate; Lark, Murray

    2015-04-01

    The north of Ireland is well-furnished with geochemical data after completion of the Tellus survey of Northern Ireland and the Tellus Border survey of six northern counties of the Republic of Ireland. These data are of considerable interest to the agricultural sector, in particular the data on soil pH. However, a geochemical survey at regional scale cannot resolve significant variation of soil pH, in particular effects of soil management and fine-scale variation of superficial material. This leads to uncertainties in the mapped soil pH which must be accounted for when making decisions about management interventions, including more detailed local sampling. In this poster we show how uncertainty of predicted soil pH, relative to established threshold values, can be quantified by disjunctive kriging. The uncertainty is expressed in terms of probabilities. We show how this can be communicated to the data user by means of the calibrated phrases of the IPCC, using results from recent research on its efficacy to modify its presentation.

  13. The role of soil pH in linking groundwater flow and plant species density in boreal forest landscapes

    Zinko, Ursula; Dynesius, Mats; Nilsson, Christer; Seibert, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In hilly boreal landscapes topography governs groundwater flow which strongly influences soil development, and thus vegetation composition. Soil pH is known to correlate well with plant species density and composition, but in boreal forests this relationship has been little studied. Previously, we successfully used a topography-based hydrological index, the topographical wetness index (TWI), as an approximation of the variation in groundwater flow to predict local plant species density in a b...

  14. Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: effect of pH and redox conditions.

    Lockwood, CL; Mortimer, RJG; Stewart, DI; Mayes, WM; Peacock, CL; Polya, DA; Lythgoe, PR; Lehoux, AP; Gruiz, K; Burke, IT

    2014-01-01

    The tailings dam breach at the Ajka alumina plant, western Hungary in 2010 introduced ∼1 million m3 of red mud suspension into the surrounding area. Red mud (fine fraction bauxite residue) has a characteristically alkaline pH and contains several potentially toxic elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaerobic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near Ajka in order to investigate the effects of red mud addition on soil biogeochemistry and arsenic mobility in soil–water experim...

  15. The molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in forest soils as a function of pH and temperature

    V. Roth; Dittmar, T.; R. Gaupp; G. Gleixner

    2015-01-01

    We examined the molecular composition of forest soil water during three different seasons at three different sites, using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS). We examined oxic soils and tested the hypothesis that pH and season correlate with the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM). We used molecular formulae and their relative intensity from ESI-FT-ICR-MS for statistical analysis. Applying unconstrained and co...

  16. The gamma dose assessment and pH correlation for various soil types at Batu Pahat and Kluang districts, Johor, Malaysia

    Johar, Saffuwan Mohamed; Embong, Zaidi; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    An assessment of absorbed dose and radiation hazard index as well as its relationship with soil pH was performed in this study. The area was chosen due to its variety of soil types from the Alluvial and the Sedentary group. The radioactivity concentration levels and the soil acidity were measured using the Canberra GC3518 high pure germanium with a relative efficiency of 35% at 1.3 MeV and the Takemura Soil pH and Moisture Tester (DM15), respectively. Overall results show the Holyrood-Lunas soil of Alluvial group recorded the highest external terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of 286.4±37.9 nGy h-1 and radioactivity concentrations of 78.1±8.9 Bq kg-1 (226Ra), 410.5±55.4 Bq kg-1 (232Th) and 56.4±8.8 Bq kg-1 (40K), respectively, while the Peat soil of Alluvial group recorded the lowest TGRD of 4.4±2.7 nGy h-1 and radioactivity concentrations of 4.8±1.7 Bq kg-1 (226Ra), 3.1±1.1 Bq kg-1 (232Th) and 6.1±2.0 Bq kg-1 (40K), respectively. The estimated mean outdoor annual effective dose, the mean radium equivalent activity (Req) and the mean external (Hext) and internal hazard index (Hint) associated with the alluvial and sedentary soil group were evaluated at 0.15 and 0.20 mSv, 280 and 364 Bq kg-1, Hext = 0.78 and 1.01, and Hint = 0.93 and 1.26, respectively. Correlation analysis between 238U, 232Th and 40K with soil pH level for alluvial group was r = +0.68, +0.48 and 0, respectively, while for sedentary soil, the Pearson's, r = -0.30, -0.90 and +0.14, respectively.

  17. The gamma dose assessment and pH correlation for various soil types at Batu Pahat and Kluang districts, Johor, Malaysia

    An assessment of absorbed dose and radiation hazard index as well as its relationship with soil pH was performed in this study. The area was chosen due to its variety of soil types from the Alluvial and the Sedentary group. The radioactivity concentration levels and the soil acidity were measured using the Canberra GC3518 high pure germanium with a relative efficiency of 35% at 1.3 MeV and the Takemura Soil pH and Moisture Tester (DM15), respectively. Overall results show the Holyrood-Lunas soil of Alluvial group recorded the highest external terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of 286.4±37.9 nGy h−1 and radioactivity concentrations of 78.1±8.9 Bq kg−1 (226Ra), 410.5±55.4 Bq kg−1 (232Th) and 56.4±8.8 Bq kg−1 (40K), respectively, while the Peat soil of Alluvial group recorded the lowest TGRD of 4.4±2.7 nGy h−1 and radioactivity concentrations of 4.8±1.7 Bq kg−1 (226Ra), 3.1±1.1 Bq kg−1 (232Th) and 6.1±2.0 Bq kg−1 (40K), respectively. The estimated mean outdoor annual effective dose, the mean radium equivalent activity (Req) and the mean external (Hext) and internal hazard index (Hint) associated with the alluvial and sedentary soil group were evaluated at 0.15 and 0.20 mSv, 280 and 364 Bq kg−1, Hext = 0.78 and 1.01, and Hint = 0.93 and 1.26, respectively. Correlation analysis between 238U, 232Th and 40K with soil pH level for alluvial group was r = +0.68, +0.48 and 0, respectively, while for sedentary soil, the Pearson’s, r = −0.30, −0.90 and +0.14, respectively

  18. The gamma dose assessment and pH correlation for various soil types at Batu Pahat and Kluang districts, Johor, Malaysia

    Johar, Saffuwan Mohamed, E-mail: saffuwan@uthm.edu.my [Department of Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia); Embong, Zaidi [Department of Science, Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia); Research Center for Soft Soil (RECESS), Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia); Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad [Research Center for Soft Soil (RECESS), Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    An assessment of absorbed dose and radiation hazard index as well as its relationship with soil pH was performed in this study. The area was chosen due to its variety of soil types from the Alluvial and the Sedentary group. The radioactivity concentration levels and the soil acidity were measured using the Canberra GC3518 high pure germanium with a relative efficiency of 35% at 1.3 MeV and the Takemura Soil pH and Moisture Tester (DM15), respectively. Overall results show the Holyrood-Lunas soil of Alluvial group recorded the highest external terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of 286.4±37.9 nGy h{sup −1} and radioactivity concentrations of 78.1±8.9 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 226}Ra), 410.5±55.4 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 232}Th) and 56.4±8.8 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 40}K), respectively, while the Peat soil of Alluvial group recorded the lowest TGRD of 4.4±2.7 nGy h{sup −1} and radioactivity concentrations of 4.8±1.7 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 226}Ra), 3.1±1.1 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 232}Th) and 6.1±2.0 Bq kg{sup −1} ({sup 40}K), respectively. The estimated mean outdoor annual effective dose, the mean radium equivalent activity (R{sub eq}) and the mean external (H{sub ext}) and internal hazard index (H{sub int}) associated with the alluvial and sedentary soil group were evaluated at 0.15 and 0.20 mSv, 280 and 364 Bq kg{sup −1}, H{sub ext} = 0.78 and 1.01, and H{sub int} = 0.93 and 1.26, respectively. Correlation analysis between 238U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K with soil pH level for alluvial group was r = +0.68, +0.48 and 0, respectively, while for sedentary soil, the Pearson’s, r = −0.30, −0.90 and +0.14, respectively.

  19. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process. PMID:26652215

  20. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  1. The influence of soil pH and humus content on received by Mehlich 3 method nutrients analysis results

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Rodima, Ako; Kõlli, Raimo; Künnapas, Allan; Rebane, Jaanus; Penu, Priit; Vennik, Kersti; Soobik, Liina

    2015-04-01

    Soils provide vital ecosystem functions, playing an important role in our economy and in healthy living environment. However, soils are increasingly degrading in Europe and at the global level. Knowledge about the content of major plant available nutrients, i.e. calcium, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus, plays an important role in the sustainable soil management. Mobility of nutrients depends directly on the environmental conditions, two of the most important factors are the pH and organic matter content. Therefore it is essential to have correct information about the content and behaviour of the above named elements in soil, both from the environmental and agronomical viewpoint. During the last decades several extracting solutions which are suitable for the evaluation of nutrient status of soils have been developed for this purpose. One of them is called Mehlich 3 which is widely used in USA, Canada and some European countries (e.g. Estonia, Czech Republic) because of its suitability to extract several major plant nutrients from the soil simultaneously. There are several different instrumental methods used for the analysis of nutrient elements in the soil extract. Potassium, magnesium and calcium are widely analysed by the AAS (atomic absorption spectroscopic) method or by the ICP (inductively coupled plasma) spectroscopic methods. Molecular spectroscopy and ICP spectroscopy were used for the phosphorus determination. In 2011 a new multielemental instrumental method MP-AES (microwave plasma atomic emission spectroscopy) was added to them. Due to its lower detection limits and multielemental character, compared with AAS, and lower exploitation costs, compared with ICP, the MP-AES has a good potential to achieve a leading position in soil nutrient analysis in the future. The objective of this study was to investigate: (i) the impact of soil pH and humus content and (ii) applicability of MP-AES instrumental method for the determination of soil nutrients extracted

  2. Improving phosphorus availability in an acid soil using organic amendments produced from agroindustrial wastes.

    Ch'ng, Huck Ywih; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad Ab

    2014-01-01

    In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp.) to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixture of biochar and compost increased total phosphorus, available phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus fractions (soluble inorganic phosphorus, aluminium bound inorganic phosphorus, iron bound inorganic phosphorus, redundant soluble inorganic phosphorus, and calcium bound phosphorus), and organic phosphorus. This was possible because the organic amendments increased soil pH and reduced exchangeable acidity, exchangeable aluminium, and exchangeable iron. The findings suggest that the organic amendments altered soil chemical properties in a way that enhanced the availability of phosphorus in this study. The amendments effectively fixed aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus, thus rendering phosphorus available by keeping the inorganic phosphorus in a bioavailable labile phosphorus pool for a longer period compared with application of Triple Superphosphate without organic amendments. PMID:25032229

  3. Studies of Different pH Levels of Simulated Acid Rain on Lens culinaris CVS. Malika and L-830.

    RP Malik; De Manisha; Lokendra Singh; VK Deshwal

    2013-01-01

    Simulated acid rain affected seed vigour, relative seed vigour percentage, seeding survival percentage and other related attributes in two cultivars of Lens culinaris. Treatment consist of four acidic levels in simulated acid rain pH 2.5,3.5,4.5 and 5.5.Effect of different pH of acid rain on germination, seed germination, seed germination action index, mean germination frequency etc. on cvs. malika and L-830 of Lens culinaris was studied. High acidic levels were found to be inhibitory for sur...

  4. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). YATP (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [14C]acetate and [14C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation

  5. Soil pH Dynamics and Nitrogen Transformations Under Long-Term Chemical Fertilization in Four Typical Chinese Croplands

    MENG Hong-qi; XU Ming-gang; L Jia-long; HE Xin-hua; LI Jian-wei; SHI Xiao-jun; PENG Chang; WANG Bo-ren; ZHANG Hui-min

    2013-01-01

    Long-term fertilization experiment provides the platform for understanding the proton budgets in nitrogen transformations of agricultural ecosystems. We analyzed the historical (1990-2005) observations on four agricultural long-term experiments in China (Changping, Chongqing, Gongzhuling and Qiyang) under four different fertilizations, i.e., no-fertilizer (control), sole chemical nitrogen fertilizer (FN), sole chemical phosphorous and potassium fertilizers (FPK) and chemical nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium fertilizers (FNPK). The significant decline in topsoil pH was caused not only by chemical N fertilization (0.29 and 0.89∆pH at Gongzhuling and Qiyang, respectively) but also by chemical PK fertilization (0.59∆pH at Gongzhuling). The enhancement of available nutrients in the topsoil due to long-term direct nutrients supply with chemical fertilizers was in the descending order of available P (168-599%)>available K (16-189%)>available N (9-33%). The relative rate of soil pH decline was lower under long-term judicious chemical fertilization (-0.036-0.034 ∆pH yr-1) than that under long-term sole N or PK fertilization (0.016-0.086 ∆pH yr-1). Long-term judicious chemical fertilization with N, P and K elements decreases the nutritional limitation to normal crop growth, under which more N output was distributed in biomass removal rather than the loss via nitrate leaching. We concluded that the N distribution percentage of nitrate leaching to biomass removal might be a suitable indicator to the sensitivity of agricultural ecosystems to acid inputs.

  6. Electrokinetic removal of chromium and copper from contaminated soils by lactic acid enhancement in the catholyte

    ZHOU Dong-mei; Alshawabkeh Akram N; DENG Chang-fen; CANG Long; SI You-bin

    2004-01-01

    The electrokinetic removal of chromium and copper from contaminated soils by adding lactic acid in cathode chamber as an enhancing reagent was evaluated. Two sets of duplicate experiments with chromium contaminated kaolinite and with a silty soil sampled from a superfund site in California of USA and polluted by Cr and Cu, were carried out in a constant current mode. Changes of soil water content and soil pH before and after the electrokinetic experiments, and variations of voltage drop and electroosmosis flow during the treatments were examined. The results indicated that Cr, spiked as Cr(Ⅵ) in the kaolinite, was accumulated mainly in the anode chamber, and some of Cr and metal hydroxides precipitated in the soil sections in contact with the cathode, which significantly increased electrical energy consumption. Treatment of the soil collected from the site showed accumulation of large amounts of Cr and Cu in the anode chamber while none was detected in the cathode one. The results suggested that the two metals either complexed with the injected lactic acid at the cathode or existed as negatively charged complex, and electromigrated toward the anode under a voltage gradient.

  7. Microenvironmental pH measurement during sodium naproxenate dissolution in acidic medium by UV/vis imaging

    Ostergaard, Jesper; Jensen, Henrik; Larsen, Susan W;

    2014-01-01

    Variable dissolution from sodium salts of drugs containing a carboxylic acid group after passing the acidic environment of the stomach may affect oral bioavailability. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to investigate pH effects in relation to the dissolution of sodium naproxenate in....... Sodium naproxenate, can significantly alter the local pH of the dissolution medium, is eventually neutralized and precipitates as the acidic species naproxen. The developed approach is considered useful for detailed studies of pH dependent dissolution phenomena in dissolution testing....

  8. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE SMP AND CALCIUM ACETATE METHODS FOR CERRADO SOILS POTENTIAL ACIDITY DETERMINATION COMPARAÇÃO ENTRE O MÉTODO SMP E O DO ACETATO DE CÁLCIO PARA DETRMINAÇÃO DA ACIDEZ POTENCIAL DE SOLOS DE CERRADO

    Juarez Patrício de Oliveira Júnior; José Xavier de Almeida Neto; Huberto José Kliemann; Orlando Cavalcante de Castro

    2007-01-01

    In order to establish the correlation between soil potential acidity and SMP solution pH, 472 soil samples from the Goiás State cerrado area were studied. Soils were analyzed for H + Al by the calcium acetate at pH 7.0, SMP solution pH, and water pH methods. Data showed a correlation between SMP solution pH and soil H + Al content (r²=0.82), allowing the potential acidity det...

  9. Analytical Methods for Environmental Risk Assessment of Acid Sulfate Soils: A Review

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of acid sulfate soil risk is an important step for acid sulfate soil management and its reliability depends very much on the suitability and accuracy of various analytical methods for estimating sulfide-derived potential acidity, actual acidity and acid-neutralizing capacity in acid sulfate soils. This paper critically reviews various analytical methods that are currently used for determination of the above parameters, as well as their implications for environmental risk assessment of acid sulfate soils.

  10. [Responses of rhizosphere nitrogen and phosphorus transformations to different acid rain intensities in a hilly red soil tea plantation].

    Chen, Xi; Chen, Fu-sheng; Ye, Su-qiong; Yu, Su-qin; Fang, Xiang-min; Hu, Xiao-fei

    2015-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) plantation in hilly red soil region has been long impacted by acid deposition, however its effects on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transformations in rhizosphere soils remain unclear. A 25-year old tea plantation in a typical hilly red soil region was selected for an in situ simulation experiment treated by pH 4.5, pH 3.5, pH 2.5 and control. Rhizosihere and bulk soils were collected in the third year from the simulated acid deposition experiment. Soil mineral N, available P contents and major enzyme activities were analyzed using the chemical extraction and biochemical methods, and N and P mineralization rates were estimated using the indoor aerobic incubation methods. Our results showed that compared to the control, the treatments of pH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5, respectively decreased 7.1%, 42.1% and 49.9% NO3(-)-N, 6.4%, 35.9% and 40.3% mineral N, 10.5%, 41.1% and 46.9% available P, 18.7%, 30.1% and 44.7% ammonification rate, 3.6%, 12.7% and 38.8% net N-mineralization rate, and 31.5%, 41.8% and 63.0% P mineralization rate in rhizosphere soils; however, among the 4 treatments, rhizosphere soil nitrification rate was not significantly different, the rhizosphere soil urease and acid phosphatase activities generally increased with the increasing intensity of acid rain (Pacid intensity, the rhizosphere effects of NH4+-N, NO3(-)-N, mineral N, ammonification and net N-mineralization rates were altered from positive to negative effects, those of urease and acid phosphatease showed the opposite trends, those of available P and P mineralization were negative and that of nitrification was positive. In sum, prolonged elevated acid rain could reduce N and P transformation rates, decrease their availability, alter their rhizosphere effects, and have impact on nutrient cycling in tea plantation. PMID:25985647

  11. Sorption, desorption, and speciation of Cd, Ni, and Fe by four calcareous soils as affected by pH.

    Tahervand, Samaneh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    The sorption, desorption, and speciation of cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), and iron (Fe) in four calcareous soils were investigated at the pH range of 2-9. The results indicated that sorption of Fe by four soils was higher than 80 % at pH 2, while in the case of Cd and Ni was less than 30 %. The most common sequence of metal sorption at pH 2-9 for four soils was in the order of Fe ≫ Ni > Cd. Cadmium and Ni sorption as a function of pH showed the predictable trend of increasing metal sorption with increase in equilibrium pH, while the Fe sorption trend was different and characterized by three phases. With regard to the order of Cd, Ni, and Fe sorption on soils, Cd and Ni showed high affinity for organic matter (OM), whereas Fe had high tendency for calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Results of metal desorption using 0.01 M NaCl demonstrated that metal sorption on soils containing high amounts of CaCO3 was less reversible in comparison to soils containing high OM. In general, Cd and Ni desorption curves were characterized by three phases; (1) the greatest desorption at pH 2, (2) the low desorption at pH 3-7, and (3) the least desorption at pH > 7. The MINTEQ speciation solubility program showed that the percentage of free metals declined markedly with increase of pH, while the percentage of carbonate and hydroxyl species increased. Furthermore, MINTEQ predicted that saturation index (SI) of metals increased with increasing pH. PMID:27147235

  12. Adsorption-desorption of humic-like acid on bulk soils and montmorillonite:Effects of pH, ionic strength, adsorbate concentration and contact time%土壤及土壤矿物对类胡敏酸的吸附解吸及其影响因素研究

    康露; 吴景贵; 张晋京; 赵欣宇; 史振鑫; 燕存岳; 张志莹; 杨天悦

    2013-01-01

    应用平衡吸附法,研究了不同pH值、离子强度、类胡敏酸浓度和接触时间条件下,黑土、白浆土及蒙脱石对类胡敏酸(HLA)的吸附作用.结果表明:随着HLA浓度的增加,土壤及蒙脱石对HLA的吸附量增加.黑土、白浆土及蒙脱石对HLA的吸附等温线均为L型,其吸附不可逆性表现为白浆土>蒙脱石>黑土.通过Langmiur方程计算,蒙脱石、白浆土对HLA达到吸附平衡时的最大吸附量分别为764.7、790.3 mg·g-1,而黑土为35.27 mg·g-1.Freundlich方程可以很好地描述白浆土、蒙脱石对HLA的吸附和解吸等温线,而Temkin方程可以很好地描述黑土对HLA的吸附和解吸等温线.同时,3种材料的吸附自由能△G°<0,吸附热Qm >0,表明其对HLA的吸附是自发的、放热的过程.随着pH的升高,黑土、白浆土及蒙脱石对HLA的吸附量减少;随离子强度的增加,黑土、白浆土及蒙脱石对HLA的吸附量增大.黑土、白浆土及蒙脱石对HLA的吸附动力学过程划分为快反应和慢反应阶段,其中,蒙脱石、白浆土对HLA的吸附动力学过程用一级动力学方程拟合的效果最好,而对黑土而言,用Elovich方程描述更合适.%Adsorption-desorption of organic fertilizer-isolated HLA on bulk soils and montmorillonite were studied as a function of pH, ionic strength, HLA concentrations and contact time by the batch equilibrium method. The results showed that adsorption of HLA on bulk soils and montmorillonite increased with the increase of initial HLA concentrations. The adsorption isotherms were all L type. The adsorption irreversibility of HLA decreased in the order of albic luvisol > montmorillonite > black soil. Based on the Langmuir equation, the maximum HLA adsorption capacity of montmorillonite, albic luvisol and black soil were 764.7, 790.3 and 35.27 mg·g-1, respectively. Freundlich equation fitted the equilibrium data better for albic luvisol and montmorillonite, while Temkin equation

  13. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Ana Flávia Soares

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10, each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL or diode laser/violet LED (VHL (experimental: Control (C; 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL; 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL; 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL; 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL; and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental (EXP10VHL. pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm. ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05. Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups.

  14. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  15. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel.

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-02-01

    Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  16. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene, E-mail: irene.sanchezandrea@wur.nl [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sanz, Jose Luis [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bijmans, Martijn F.M. [Wetsus, Centre of Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Stams, Alfons J.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); IBB – Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed.

  17. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed

  18. Adsorption of tetracycline on soil and sediment: Effects of pH and the presence of Cu(II)

    Zhang Zheyun [State Key Laboratory of Water Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun Ke, E-mail: sunke@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Gao Bo [Department of Water Environment, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing 100038 (China); Zhang Guixiang; Liu Xitao; Zhao Ye [State Key Laboratory of Water Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Tetracycline (TC) is frequently detected in the environment, however, knowledge on the environmental fate and transport of TC is still limited. Batch adsorption experiments of TC by soil and sediment samples were conducted. The distribution of charge and electrostatic potential of individual atoms of various TC species in the aqueous solution were determined using MOPAC version 0.034 W program in ChemBio3D Ultra software. Most of the adsorption isotherms on the soil, river and marine sediments were well fitted with the Freundlich and Polanyi-Manes (PMM) models. The single point organic carbon (OC)-normalized adsorption distribution coefficients (K{sub OC}) and PMM saturated adsorption capacity (Q{sub OC}{sup 0}) values of TC were associated with the mesopore volume and clay content to a greater extent, indicating the mesopore volume of the soil and sediments and their clay content possibly influenced the fate and transport of TC in the natural environment. The adsorption of TC on soil and sediments strongly depended on the pH and presence of Cu(II). The presence of Cu(II) facilitated TC adsorption on soil and sediments at low pH (pH < 5), possibly due to the metallic complexation and surface-bridging mechanism by Cu(II) adsorption on soil and sediments. The cation exchange interaction, metallic complexation and Coulombic interaction of mechanisms for adsorption of TC to soils and sediments were further supported by quantum chemical calculation of various TC species in different pH.

  19. Benthic fauna of extremely acidic lakes (pH 2-3)

    Rodrigues, G.G.

    2001-07-01

    The structure of the benthic invertebrate communities were investigated in terms of composition, abundance, and biomass from extremely acidic lakes with pH values from 2 to 3 in areas where coal was intensively mined in the Lusatian region in the eastern region of Germany. Benthic invertebrates colonisation on leaves and the breakdown rate processing of the three deciduous leaf: Betula pendula (birch), Fraxinus excelsior (ash), and Juglans regia (walnut) were investigated. Also, the main key-species of these acidic environments were investigated, in terms of description of pupal exuviae of Chironomus crassimanus and the feeding habit of this acid-resistant species through analysis of their gut content. The benthic food web in extremely acidic mining Lusatian lakes is very short in terms of species richness, trophic relationship, guilds and functional feeding groups. Collector-filters and scraper-grazers were absent in extremely acidic mining lakes (AML 107, AML 111 and AML 117). Shredders as Limnophyes minimus (Diptera, Chironomidae, Orthocladiinae) and Hydrozetes lacustris (Acari, Hydrozetidae) occurred in low abundance in AML 107 and AML 111, and it may be in response to slow leaf breakdown process in these ecosystems, except in AML 117 where the H. lacustris contributed most to ecosystems functioning via the processing of litter. Aquatic insects as Sialis lutaria (Megaloptera, Sialidae), Orectochilus villosus (Coleoptera, Gyrinidae), Coenagrion mercuriale (Odonata, Coenagrionidae), and Phryganeidae (Trichoptera) are the top-predators of these ecosystems. They did not depend on the level of pH in the lakes, but on the availability of food resources. (orig.)

  20. A new allele of acid soil tolerance gene from a malting barley variety

    Bian, Miao; Jin, Xiaoli; Broughton, Sue; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Zhou, Gaofeng; Zhou, Meixue; Zhang, Guoping; Sun, Dongfa; Li, Chengdao

    2015-01-01

    Background Acid soil is a serious limitation to crop production all over the world. Toxic aluminium (Al) cations in acid soil inhibit root growth and reduce yield. Although a gene tolerant to acid soil has been identified, it has not been used in malting barley breeding, which is partly due to the acid soil tolerance gene being linked to unfavorable malting quality traits. Results A Brazilian malting barley variety Br2 was identified as tolerant to acid soil. A doubled haploid (DH) population...

  1. Long term field evaluation of phosphate rock and superphosphate in acid soils of Hungary; Incubation and pot experiments

    A series of experiments was conducted to compare the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rock (from Algeria) and of single superphosphate (from Russia, Kola) on a moderately acidic pseudogley brown forest soil (Szentgyoergyvoelgy) and on a slightly acidic chernozem brown forest soil (Kompolt). Dynamics of water-soluble and ammonium lactate-soluble P-contents (AL-P) and soil pH-H2O changes were studied in a half-year long incubation experiment. A follow-up pot experiment with the same soils was carried out with winter rape as test plants. Both experiments were set up with similar P fertilizer sources and P rates (100, 200, and 400 mg mineral acid soluble P2O5 per kg soil). At the beginning of incubation experiment, the water-soluble P content of the pseudogley brown forest soil was influenced by both the sources of P and the experimental conditions. The water-soluble P content decreased with time. After the 15th to 20th day of incubation, when the fast binding process of the water-soluble P ended, the effects of the P forms decreased. In this stage, the effects of environmental conditions depended on the form of the P fertilizer. The water-soluble P content of the phosphate rock-treated samples was affected to a great extent by soil water content, while the incubation temperature had a greater effect in soils treated with superphosphate. The AL-P content of soils was increased similarly by addition of equal rates of phosphate rock and super-phosphate at the beginning of incubation. The AL-P content of phosphate rock-treated soils was higher throughout the incubation period than of the superphosphate-treated soils -treated. Temperature had a greater effect on the AL-P content of soils than soil water content. As the AL-extraction may dissolve a substantial amount of the undecomposed phosphate rock, this method is not applicable to soil testing of available P forms from phosphate rock-treated soils. Initial soil pH decreased on average by 0.5 units in the

  2. Long term field evaluation of phosphate rock and superphosphate in acid soils of Hungary; Incubation and pot experiments

    A series of experiments was conducted to compare the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rock (from Algeria) and of single superphosphate (from Russia, Kola) on a moderately acidic pseudogley brown forest soil (Szentgyoergyvoelgy) and on a slightly acidic chernozem brown forest soil (Kompolt). Dynamics of water-soluble and ammonium lactate-soluble P-contents (AL-P) and soil pH-H2O changes were studied in a half-year long incubation experiment. A follow-up pot experiment with the same soils was carried out with winter rape as test plants. Both experiments were set up with similar P fertilizer sources and P rates (100, 200, and 400 mg mineral acid soluble P2O5 per kg soil). At the beginning of incubation experiment, the water-soluble P content of the pseudogley brown forest soil was influenced by both the sources of P and the experimental conditions. The water-soluble P content decreased with time. After the 15th to 20th day of incubation, when the fast binding process of the water-soluble P ended, the effects of the P forms decreased. In this stage, the effects of environmental conditions depended on the form of the P fertilizer. The water-soluble P content of the phosphate rock-treated samples was affected to a great extent by soil water content, while the incubation temperature had a greater effect in soils treated with superphosphate. The AL-P content of soils was increased similarly by addition of equal rates of phosphate rock and super-phosphate at the beginning of incubation. The AL-P content of phosphate rock-treated soils was higher throughout the incubation period than of the superphosphate-treated soils -treated. Temperature had a greater effect on the AL-P content of soils than soil water content. As the AL-extraction may dissolve a substantial amount of the undecomposed phosphate rock, this method is not applicable to soil testing of available P forms from phosphate rock-treated soils. Initial soil pH decreased on average by 0.5 units in the

  3. A critical assessment of soil amendments (slaked lime/acidic fertilizer) for the phytomanagement of moderately contaminated shooting range soils

    Conesa, Hector M.; Gonzalez-Alcaraz, Maria N. [Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnologia Agraria; Wieser, Mirjam; Studer, Bjoern; Schulin, Rainer [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The effects of the addition of an acidic fertilizer solution and/or slaked lime (5.5 g Ca(OH){sub 2}kg{sup -1}) on a slightly acidic shooting range soil (pH 6.1, % organic carbon 5.4) with moderate metal (e.g., 620 mg kg{sup -1} Pb) and metalloid (17 mg kg{sup -1} Sb) concentrations on metal and Sb solubility and plant accumulation were investigated. Materials and methods: In a pot experiment, we grew Plantago lanceolata, Lolium perenne and Triticum aestivum. The pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and metal and Sb concentrations in the leachate were monitored. Results and discussion: The addition of slaked lime increased the soil pH from 6.1 to 7.2 and the DOC from 100 to 300 mg l{sup -1}. In contrast to Sb, we found a correlation between DOC and soluble Cu concentrations. The addition of the acidic fertilizer significantly increased Mn- and Pb-NaNO{sub 3} extractable concentrations. Slaked lime decreased at first, Pb-, Mn- Ni- and Zn-NaNO{sub 3} extractable concentrations, but with time, these concentrations increased. Metal accumulation in shoots was in general low. The highest concentrations were obtained in shoots of L. perenne for Mn (135 mg kg{sup -1} DW). Spikes of T. aestivum accumulated more Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn than shoots. Grains of T. aestivum had higher Zn concentrations (up to 37 mg kg{sup -1}) than spikes and shoots (up to 22 and 19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively). Antimony concentrations were always below 2 mg kg{sup -1} for the three species studied. Conclusions: Under these growing conditions, these three plant species showed to be suitable for the phytomanagement of moderately contaminated shooting range areas. (orig.)

  4. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    Alpers Charles N; Wilkin Richard T; Church Clinton D; Rye Robert O; McCleskey R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated ...

  5. Sorption and leaching potential of acidic herbicides in Brazilian soils.

    Spadotto, Claudio A; Hornsby, Arthur G; Gomes, Marco A F

    2005-01-01

    Leaching of acidic herbicides (2,4-D, flumetsulam, and sulfentrazone) in soils was estimated by comparing the original and modified AF (Attenuation Factor) models for multi-layered soils (AFi). The original AFi model was modified to include the concept of pH-dependence for Kd (sorption coefficient) based on pesticide dissociation and changes in the accessibility of soil organic functional groups able to interact with the pesticide. The original and modified models, considering soil and herbicide properties, were applied to assess the leaching potential of selected herbicides in three Brazilian soils. The pH-dependent Kd values estimated for all three herbicides were observed to be always higher than pH-independent Kd values calculated using average Koc data, and therefore the original AFi model overestimated the overall leaching potential for the soils studied. PMID:15656159

  6. Acid Sulfate Soils in Australia:Characteristics,Problems and Management

    C.LIN

    1999-01-01

    Acid sulfate soils(ASS) are widely distributod in Australia.This has only been recognised recently when intensive research on ASS has been done in this county.This paper reviews aspects concerning a )the distribution and acid potential,b) controls on acidic status,and c) problems and management of ASS problems from ASS exist but insufficient attention was paid to them.

  7. Soil bacterial and fungal communities along a soil chronosequence assessed by fatty acid profiling

    Welc, M.; Bünemann, E. K.; Flieβbach, A.; Frossard, E.; Jansa, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 49, JUN 2012 (2012), s. 184-192. ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fatty acid methyl esters * Glacier forefield * Soil chronosequence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.654, year: 2012

  8. Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on untreated and mussel-shell-treated soil materials: fractionation and effects of pH and chromium concentration

    Otero, M.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2015-04-01

    We used batch-type experiments to study Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on granitic material, forest soil, pyritic material, mussel shell, and on forest soil and granitic material amended with 12 t ha-1 (1.2 kg m -2) shell, considering the effects of varying Cr(VI) concentration and pH. Sequential extractions were carried out to fractionate adsorbed Cr(VI) and to determine the stability of Cr(VI) retention. The pyritic material had the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, whereas the granitic material showed the lowest retention potential. When high Cr concentrations were added, some saturation of the adsorbent surfaces became apparent, but Cr release remained low. The highest Cr retention was achieved at a very acid pH value, with release progressively increasing as a function of increasing pH. The amendment with 12 t ha-1 mussel shell did not cause marked changes in Cr(VI) retention. Sorption data were satisfactory adjusted to the Freundlich model. Regarding Cr(VI) fractionation, the soluble fraction (weakly bound) was dominant in mussel shell and in the unamended and amended granitic material, whereas more stable fractions dominated in the pyritic material (residual fraction) and in the forest soil (oxidizable fraction). In conclusion, the pyritic material presented the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, while the retention was low and weak on the granitic material; mussel shell was not characterized by a marked Cr(VI) retention potential, and it did not cause remarkable increase in Cr(VI) retention when used to amend the granitic material or the forest soil.

  9. Chemical dynamics of acidity and heavy metals in a mine water-polluted soil during decontamination using clean water.

    Chen, A; Lin, C; Lu, W; Ma, Y; Bai, Y; Chen, H; Li, J

    2010-03-15

    A column leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the chemical dynamics of the percolating water and washed soil during decontamination of an acidic mine water-polluted soil. The results show that leaching of the contaminated soil with clean water rapidly reduced soluble acidity and ion concentrations in the soils. However, only <20% of the total actual acidity in the soil column was eliminated after 30 leaching cycles. It is likely that the stored acidity continues to be released to the percolating water over a long period of time. During the column leaching, dissolved Cu and Pb were rapidly leached out, followed by mobilization of colloidal Cu and Pb from the exchangeable and the oxide-bound fractions as a result of reduced ionic strength in the soil solution. The soluble Fe contained in the soil was rare, probably because the soil pH was not sufficiently low; marked mobility of colloidal Fe took place after the ionic strength of the percolating water was weakened and the mobilized Fe was mainly derived from iron oxides. In contrast with Cu, Pb and Fe, the concentration of leachate Zn and Mn showed a continuously decreasing trend during the entire period of the experiment. PMID:19913356

  10. Effect of redox potential and pH on arsenic speciation and solubility in a contaminated soil

    Masscheleyn, P.H.; Delaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The influence of redox potential and pH on arsenic speciation and solubility was studied in a contaminated soil. Alterations in the oxidation state of arsenic, and influenced by redox potential and pH, greatly affected its solubility in soil. At higher soil redox levels (500-200 mV), arsenic solubility was low and the major part (65-98%) of the arsenic in solution was present as As(V). An alkaline pH, or the reduction of As(V) to As(III), released substantial proportions of arsenic into solution. Under moderately reduced soil conditions (0-100 mV), arsenic solubility was controlled by the dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides. Arsenic was coprecipitated (as As(V)) with iron oxyhydroxides and released upon their solubilization. Upon reduction to {minus}200 mV, the soluble arsenic content increased 13-fold as compared to 500 mV. The observed slow kinetics of the As(V)-As(III) transformation and the high concentrations of Mn present indicate that, under reduced soil conditions, arsenic solubility could be controlled by a Mn{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} phase.

  11. The capacity of biochar made from common reeds to neutralise pH and remove dissolved metals in acid drainage.

    Mosley, Luke M; Willson, Philip; Hamilton, Benjamin; Butler, Greg; Seaman, Russell

    2015-10-01

    We tested the capacity of biochar (made at 450 °C from a common reed species) to neutralise pH and remove metals in two acid drainage waters (pH 2.6 and 4.6) using column leaching and batch mixing experiments. In the column experiments, the acid drainage water was neutralised upon passage through the biochar with substantial increases (4-5 pH units) in the leachate pH. In the batch experiments, the leachate pH remained above 6.5 when the drainage:biochar ratio was less than approximately 700:1 (L acid drainage:kg biochar) and 20:1 for the pH 4.6 and pH 2.6 drainage waters, respectively. Dissolved metal concentrations were reduced by 89-98 % (Fe ≈ Al > Ni ≈ Zn > Mn) in the leachate from the biochar. A key mechanism of pH neutralisation appears to be solid carbonate dissolution as calcite (CaCO3) was identified (via X-ray diffraction) in the biochar prior to contact with acid drainage, and dissolved alkalinity and Ca was observed in the leachate. Proton and metal removal by cation exchange, direct binding to oxygen-containing functional groups, and metal oxide precipitation also appears important. Further evaluation of the treatment capacity of other biochars and field trials are warranted. PMID:26004563

  12. Modeling the neutralizing processes of acid precipitation in soils and glacial sediments of northern Ohio

    Eckstein, Yoram; Hau, Joseph A.

    1992-02-01

    Most studies of the acidic deposition phenomena have been focused on processes occurring in the northeastern USA and Scandinavia. In these regions the soil cover is thin, the bedrock is acidic, and the terrain has very poor acid buffering capacity. Most of the US Midwest, including northern Ohio, has been ignored because the terrain is covered by glacial sediments with an abundance of carbonate minerals. Yet, for the last three decades the area has been experiencing acidic precipitation with a pH range of 3.5-4.5. the lowest in the USA. Samples of precipitation, soil water, and shallow ground water from Leroy Township in Lake County, Ohio, and from Wooster Township in Wayne County, Ohio, were analyzed and processed using WATEQ3 and PHREEQE computer models to quantify the effects of the acidic deposition. The two regions are characterized by very similar topographic, geological and hydrogeological conditions. Although the cation content of the precipitation in both regions is similar, the anion concentrations are much higher (sulfate by 70%, nitrate by 14% and chloride by 167%) in Leroy, located 50 km east-northeast and downwind of the Cleveland-Akron industrial complex, than in Wooster, located 80 km south-southwest and off-wind from the industrial complex. Computer modeling results indicate that buffering of acidic deposition in the surficial sediments and glacial tills of the two regions is dominated apparently by calcite dissolution, and dissolution and exchange of hydrogen for magnesium ions are the dominant neutralizing processes. However, reaction simulations also suggest that the buffering capacity of the Leroy soils and tills has been depleted to a much greater degree than in Wooster Township. In Leroy more acidic input is reacting with less buffering material to produce lower soil and groundwater pH. The depletion of carbonate and alumino-silicate minerals in the soils of Leroy Township is occurring at a rate that is 3-5 times faster than in the same type

  13. The production and degradation of trichloroacetic acid in soil: Results from in situ soil column experiments

    Heal, M. R.; Dickey, C. A.; Heal, K.V.; Stidson, R.T.; Matucha, Miroslav; Cape, J. N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 4 (2010), s. 401-407. ISSN 0045-6535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Trichloroacetic acid * TCA * Soil lysimeter Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 3.155, year: 2010

  14. Forest soil response to acid and salt additions of sulfate. 3. Solubilization and composition of dissolved organic carbon

    A year-long experiment, using reconstructed spodosol and intact alfisol soil columns, was conducted to examine the effects of various simulated throughfall solutions on soil C dynamics. Soil organic C solubilization, dissolved organic C fractions, and decomposition rates were studied using simulated acidic and salt throughfall solutions. Based on the results of the study the authors propose that throughfall solutions of pH above 3.7 will have little or no influences on dissolved organic C cycling in the types of spodosol and alfisol forest soils used here. However, at pH 3.0 some alterations in organic C solubilization, dissolved organic C fractions, and mobility could be expected

  15. Soil quality under forest compared to other land-uses in acid soil of north western Himalaya, India

    Sharmistha Pal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Present research was undertaken to examine the impact of land useon soil fertility in an Alfisol, at Dharamshala district of north western Himalayan region, India. Soil samples were collected from 0-15, 15–30, 30–45 and 45-60 cm soil depths of five landuses viz. natural forest of Pinus roxburghii,grassland, horticulture, agriculture and wasteland. Soil was examined for pH, organic carbon (OC, electrical conductivity (EC, cation exchange capacity(CEC, available nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, exchangeable calcium(Ca, magnesium (Mg, potassium (K, aluminium (Al, microbial biomasscarbon (MBC, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN, microbial biomassphosphorus (MBP, acid phosphatase activity (APHA and dehydrogenaseactivity (DHA. Soil pH varied from 5.22 in forest and 5.72 in grassland. OC content was higher in forest (3.01%, followed by grassland (2.16% and was least (0.36% in deeper layers of agriculture. Highest N content was found under forest (699, 654, 623 and 597 kg/ha, at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm depth, respectively, followed by grassland, horticulture and agriculture and least in wasteland. Maximum exchangeable Ca and Mg were found in grassland (0.801 c mol kg-1 and 0.402 c mol kg-1, respectively.Exchangeable K and Al were higher under forest (0.231 c mol kg-1 and 1.89 c mol kg-1, respectively least in wasteland. Soil biological properties were highest under surface soil of forest (576 mg kg-1, 31.24 mg kg-1, 6.55 mg kg-1, 29.6 mg PNP g-1h-1 and 35.65 μg TPF 24 h-1 g-1 dry soil, respectively for MBC, MBN, MBP, APHA and DHA and least in 45-60 cm layer, under wasteland. The forest had a higher fertility index and soil evaluation factor followed by grassland, horticulture, agriculture as compared to wasteland.

  16. Basis of antimalarial action: non-weak base effects of chloroquine on acid vesicle pH

    Krogstad, D.J.; Schlesinger, P.H.

    1987-03-01

    Biologically active concentrations of chloroquine increase the pH of the parasite's acid vesicles within 3-5 min. This increase in pH results from two mechanisms, one of which is markedly reduced in chloroquine-resistant parasites. Because chloroquine is a weak base, it increases vesicle pH by that mechanism in chloroquine-susceptible and resistant parasites and mammalian cells (based on its two pKs and on the delta pH between the acid vesicle and the extracellular environment). In chloroquine-susceptible parasites, but not resistant parasites or mammalian cells, chloroquine increases the pH of acid vesicles 700- to 800-fold more than can be accounted for by its properties as a weak base. The increase in acid vesicle pH caused by these non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine in susceptible parasites suggests that chloroquine acts by interfering with acid vesicle functions in the parasite such as the endocytosis and proteolysis of hemoglobin, and the intracellular targeting of lysosomal enzymes. The non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine on parasite vesicle pH are also responsible for its safety because these chloroquine concentrations do not affect mammalian cells.

  17. Leaching behavior of heavy metals and transformation of their speciation in polluted soil receiving simulated acid rain.

    Shun-an Zheng

    Full Text Available Heavy metals that leach from contaminated soils under acid rain are of increasing concern. In this study, simulated acid rain (SAR was pumped through columns of artificially contaminated purple soil. Column leaching tests and sequential extraction were conducted for the heavy metals Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn to determine the extent of their leaching as well as to examine the transformation of their speciation in the artificially contaminated soil columns. Results showed that the maximum leachate concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn were less than those specified in the Chinese Quality Standards for Groundwater (Grade IV, thereby suggesting that the heavy metals that leached from the polluted purple soil receiving acid rain may not pose as risks to water quality. Most of the Pb and Cd leachate concentrations were below their detection limits. By contrast, higher Cu and Zn leachate concentrations were found because they were released by the soil in larger amounts as compared with those of Pb and Cd. The differences in the Cu and Zn leachate concentrations between the controls (SAR at pH 5.6 and the treatments (SAR at pH 3.0 and 4.5 were significant. Similar trends were observed in the total leached amounts of Cu and Zn. The proportions of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn in the EXC and OX fractions were generally increased after the leaching experiment at three pH levels, whereas those of the RES, OM, and CAR fractions were slightly decreased. Acid rain favors the leaching of heavy metals from the contaminated purple soil and makes the heavy metal fractions become more labile. Moreover, a pH decrease from 5.6 to 3.0 significantly enhanced such effects.

  18. Leaching behavior of heavy metals and transformation of their speciation in polluted soil receiving simulated acid rain.

    Zheng, Shun-an; Zheng, Xiangqun; Chen, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals that leach from contaminated soils under acid rain are of increasing concern. In this study, simulated acid rain (SAR) was pumped through columns of artificially contaminated purple soil. Column leaching tests and sequential extraction were conducted for the heavy metals Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn to determine the extent of their leaching as well as to examine the transformation of their speciation in the artificially contaminated soil columns. Results showed that the maximum leachate concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn were less than those specified in the Chinese Quality Standards for Groundwater (Grade IV), thereby suggesting that the heavy metals that leached from the polluted purple soil receiving acid rain may not pose as risks to water quality. Most of the Pb and Cd leachate concentrations were below their detection limits. By contrast, higher Cu and Zn leachate concentrations were found because they were released by the soil in larger amounts as compared with those of Pb and Cd. The differences in the Cu and Zn leachate concentrations between the controls (SAR at pH 5.6) and the treatments (SAR at pH 3.0 and 4.5) were significant. Similar trends were observed in the total leached amounts of Cu and Zn. The proportions of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn in the EXC and OX fractions were generally increased after the leaching experiment at three pH levels, whereas those of the RES, OM, and CAR fractions were slightly decreased. Acid rain favors the leaching of heavy metals from the contaminated purple soil and makes the heavy metal fractions become more labile. Moreover, a pH decrease from 5.6 to 3.0 significantly enhanced such effects. PMID:23185399

  19. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids. PMID:24240104

  20. Acid and base resistance in Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri: role of rpoS and growth pH.

    Small, P.; Blankenhorn, D; Welty, D; Zinser, E; Slonczewski, J L

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 strains and Shigella flexneri grown to stationary phase can survive several hours at pH 2 to 3, which is considerably lower than the acid limit for growth (about pH 4.5). A 1.3-kb fragment cloned from S. flexneri conferred acid resistance on acid-sensitive E. coli HB101; sequence data identified the fragment as a homolog of rpoS, the growth phase-dependent sigma factor sigma 38. The clone also conferred acid resistance on S. flexneri rpoS::Tn10 but not on Salmonella typh...

  1. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  2. Association of the pr Peptides with Dengue Virus at Acidic pH Blocks Membrane Fusion

    Yu, I.-M.; Holdaway, H.A.; Chipman, P.R.; Kuhn, R.J.; Rossmann, M.G.; Chen, J.; Purdue

    2010-07-27

    Flavivirus assembles into an inert particle that requires proteolytic activation by furin to enable transmission to other hosts. We previously showed that immature virus undergoes a conformational change at low pH that renders it accessible to furin (I. M. Yu, W. Zhang, H. A. Holdaway, L. Li, V. A. Kostyuchenko, P. R. Chipman, R. J. Kuhn, M. G. Rossmann, and J. Chen, Science 319:1834-1837, 2008). Here we show, using cryoelectron microscopy, that the structure of immature dengue virus at pH 6.0 is essentially the same before and after the cleavage of prM. The structure shows that after cleavage, the proteolytic product pr remains associated with the virion at acidic pH, and that furin cleavage by itself does not induce any major conformational changes. We also show by liposome cofloatation experiments that pr retention prevents membrane insertion, suggesting that pr is present on the virion in the trans-Golgi network to protect the progeny virus from fusion within the host cell.

  3. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations.

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~4 and ~11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH~14 and brown at pH~2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH~14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH~2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH~2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450cm(-1), 616 to 632cm(-1), 1332 to 1343cm(-1) etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~1548cm(-1) in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~1580cm(-1). Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH~14. For example, the 423cm(-1) band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~447cm(-1) in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~850, ~1067 and ~1214cm(-1) in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH~2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH~14). The DFT calculations for these

  4. Changes in the pH and other soil chemical parameters in soil surrounding wood ant (.i.Formica polyctena./i.) nests

    Jílková, Veronika; Matějíček, L.; Frouz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2011), s. 72-76. ISSN 1164-5563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : wood ants * soil pH * nutrients Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.578, year: 2011

  5. Using Digital Elevation Model to Improve Soil pH Prediction in an Alpine Doline

    G. BUTTAFU0C; R. COMOLLI; A. CASTRIGNAN(O)

    2011-01-01

    Among spatial interpolation techniques, geostatistics is generally preferred because it takes into account the spatial correlation between neighbouring observations in order to predict attribute values at unsampled locations. A doline of approximately 15 000 m2 at 1900 m above sea level (North Italy) was selected as the study area to estimate a digital elevation model (DEM) using geostatistics,to provide a realistic distribution of the errors and to demonstrate whether using widely available secondary data provided more accurate estimates of soil pH than those obtained by univariate kriging. Elevation was measured at 467 randomly distributed points that were converted into a regular DEM using ordinary kriging. Further. 110 pits were located using spatial simulated annealing (SSA) method. The interpolation techniques were multi-linear regression analysis (MLR), ordinary kriging (OK), regression kriging (RK), knging with external drift (KED) and multi-collocated ordinary cokriging (CKmc). A cross-validation test was used to assess the prediction performances of the different algorithms and then evaluate which methods performed best. RK and KED yielded better results than the more complex CKmc and OK. The choice of the most appropriate interpolation method accounting for redundant auxiliary information was strongly conditioned by site specific situations.

  6. Development of Sorghum Tolerant to Acid Soil Using Induced Mutation with Gamma Irradiation

    S. Human

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity still becomes a problem in some dryland agricultural areas in Indonesia. Development of dryland farming system may be focused on crops that are required less water such as sorghum. Sorghum is a cereal crop that is usually grown under hot and dry condition and it is ideal for Indonesia. Sorghum is a good source of food, animal feed and raw material for ethanol. Indonesia is currently looking for alternative renewable energy resources and sorghum is regarded as one of the promising source of bioethanol as bioenergy. Unfortunately, most agricultural land in western part of the country particularly in Sumatera and Kalimantan is dryland and dominated by acid soil. The main constraint of crop production in acid soil is deficiency and Al toxicity. Therefore, development of sorghum cultivation in dryland farming system requires a variety which is tolerant to such conditions. Sorghum breeding for acid soil tolerance had been conducted at PATIR-BATAN by using induced mutations with gamma irradiation. The breeding objective was to search for sorghum genotypes tolerant to acid soil condition and with regard to sorghum use for bioethanol production. A number of 66 breeding materials, including the mutants, had been screened for acid soil tolerance on land with soil pH of 4.2 and 39% Al saturation in Lampung Province. Ten sorghum genotypes had been identified as high yielding in the acid soil condition. The mutant lines GH-ZB-41-07, YT30-39-07, B-76 and B-92 had grain yield higher (>4.5 t/ha than the control plants (Durra, Mandau and Numbu. Sorghum mutants ZH30-29-07, ZH30-30-07 and ZH30-35-07 were promising for grain-base bioethanol production with ethanol yield exceeded 2,000 l/ha. Meanwhile, the sweet sorghum mutants ZH30-35-07, ZH30-30-07 and ZH30-29-07 had brix content of 11.59, 11.95 and 10.50%, respectively. These mutant lines are promising to be developed further in sorghum breeding since they are highly tolerant to acid soils.

  7. Development Of Sorghum Tolerant To Acid Soil Using Induced Mutation With Gamma Irradiation

    Water scarcity still becomes a problem in some dry land agricultural areas in indonesia. Development of dry land farming system may be focused on crops that are required less water such sorghum. Sorghum is a cereal crop that is usually grown under hot and dry condition and it is ideal for Indonesia. Sorghum is good source of food, animal feed and raw material for ethanol. Indonesia is currently looking for alternative renewable energy resources and sorghum is regarded as one of the promising source of bio ethanol as bio energy. Unfortunately, most agricultural land in western part of the country particularly in Sumatera and Kalimantan is dry land and dominated by acid soil. The main constrain of crop production in acid soil is a deficiency and Al toxic. Therefore, development of sorghum cultivation in dry land farming system requires a variety which is tolerant to such conditions. Sorghum breeding for acid soil tolerance had been conducted at PATIR-BATAN by using induced mutations with gamma irradiation. The breeding objective was search for sorghum genotype tolerant to acid soil condition and regard to sorghum use for bio ethanol production. A number of 66 breeding materials, including the mutants, had been screened for acid soil tolerance on land with soil pH of 4.2 and 39 % Al saturation in Lampung Province. Ten sorghum genotypes had been identified as high yielding in the acid soil condition. the mutant lines GHZB41-07, YT30-39-07, B-76 and B-29 had grain yield higher(>4.5 t/ha) than the control plants (Durra, Mandau and Numbu). Sorghum mutants ZH30-29-07, ZH30-30-07 and ZH30-35-07 were promising for grain base bio etahnol production with ethanol yield exceeded 2,000 l/ha. Meanwhile, the sweet sorghum mutants ZH30-35-07, ZH30-29-07 had brix content of 11.59, 11.95 and 10.50%, respectively. These mutant lines are promising to be developed further in sorghum breeding since they are highly tolerant to acid soils. (author)

  8. Adsorption of U(VI) by humic acid extracted from soil

    Humic acid (HA) was extracted from the soil by using the procedure recommeded by International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) with minor modifications. It was characterized by the element analysis and the IR spectra. Then the adsorption behaviors of U(VI) on the extracted HA were investigated by the static experimental method. The results show that more than 80% of the total U(VI) can be adsorbed by 5 mg humic acid at pH=3 from 20 mL aqueous solution of 0.84 x 10-4 mol/L U(VI) and the adsorption is increased with increasing pH in the range of 1-3 and decreased with increasing pH in the range of 3-10. The relationship between the concentration of U(VI) in aqueous solution and the adsorbed U(VI) is in accord with the Langmuir equation in the U(VI) concentration range from 10-6 to 10-4 mol/L. In the presence of Al3+, Ca2+, Nd3+, Eu3+, CO32- , SO42-, citric acid and EDTA, the adsorption of U(VI) on the humic acid is decreased relative to that in the absence of these ligands and bivalent and trivalent cations, while the effects of K+ and NO3- are insignificant. The effect of temperature in the range of 0-40 degree C on the adsorption of U(VI) was investigated. (authors)

  9. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  10. Swelling characteristics of hydroxyethylmethacrylate/ methacrylic acid pH -sensitive hydrogel as a drug delivery system

    M. Falamarzian- J. Varshosaz

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyethyl methacrylate /methacrylic acid (HEMA/MAA copolymer cross-linked with ethylenglycol dimethacrylate was prepared by a bulk.free radical polymerization method. The results indicate that this polymer is a pH -sensitive hydrogel which is collapsed in the acidic medium but completely swollen in the alkaline and neutral pH . it was determined that a proportion of 40% of MAA, the ionizing monomer of this hydrogel, was the best concentration among the different percentages used which showed a non-Fickian water transport mechanism. Increasing MAA content from 20 to 70% was accompanied with a change in water transport mechanism from Fickian to non-Fickian. However, increasing the percentage of MAA from 40 to 70 didn't improve the swelling capacity of this polymer. Pore size determination by a solute exclusion technique, showed the greatest distribution in the hydrogel with 40% MAA compared to other percentages of this monomer used. About 75% of the pores were less than 16.5 A in diameter in this polymer which is important specially in loading the hydrogel with macromoiecular drugs like proteines.

  11. Soil remediation: humic acids as natural surfactants in the washings of highly contaminated soils

    The remediation of the highly contaminated site around the former chemical plant of ACNA (near Savona) in Northern Italy is a top priority in Italy. The aim of the present work was to contribute in finding innovative and environmental-friendly technology to remediate soils from the ACNA contaminated site. Two soils sampled from the ACNA site (A and B), differing in texture and amount and type of organic contaminants, were subjected to soil washings by comparing the removal efficiency of water, two synthetic surfactants, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100 (TX100), and a solution of a natural surfactant, a humic acid (HA) at its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The extraction of pollutants by sonication and soxhlet was conducted before and after the soil washings. Soil A was richer in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas soil B had a larger content of thiophenes. Sonication resulted more analytically efficient in the fine-textured soil B. The coarse-textured soil A was extracted with a general equal efficiency also by soxhlet. Clean-up by water was unable to exhaustively remove contaminants from the two soils, whereas all the organic surfactants revealed very similar efficiencies (up to 90%) in the removal of the contaminants from the soils. Hence, the use of solutions of natural HAs appears as a better choice for soil washings of highly polluted soils due to their additional capacity to promote microbial activity, in contrast to synthetic surfactants, for a further natural attenuation in washed soils. - Solutions of natural humic acids appear to be a better choice for washing highly polluted soils

  12. Optimizing Available Phosphorus in Calcareous Soils Fertilized with Diammonium Phosphate and Phosphoric Acid Using Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm

    Asif Naeem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms ( were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L−1 were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with . Moreover, at all the levels of , P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L−1, compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation.

  13. Remediation of Steel Slag on Acidic Soil Contaminated by Heavy Metal

    Haihong; GU; Fuping; LI; Xiang; GUAN; Zhongwei; LI; Qiang; YU

    2013-01-01

    The technology of in situ immobilization with amendments is an important measure that remediates the soil contaminated by heavy metals, and selecting economical and effective amendments is the key. The effects and mechanism of steel slag, the silicon-rich alkaline byproduct which can remediate acidic soil contaminated by heavy metal, are mainly introduced in this paper to provide theory reference for future research. Firstly, the paper analyzes current research situation of in situ immobilization with amendments. Then, it introduces the main physicochemical properties of steel slag, and the effect on soil pH value as well as heavy metal activity. Besides, the paper elaborates the promoting effect on silicon-requiring plant and the strengthening mechanism for its resistant capability of heavy metal. According to the analysis, the application of steel slag could be a potential valuable strategy to remediate acidic soil contaminated by heavy metal by modifying the transformation of heavy metals in both soil and plant, so that the translocation of heavy metal in food chain is reduced.

  14. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water.

    Church, Clinton D; Wilkin, Richard T; Alpers, Charles N; Rye, Robert O; McCleskey, R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 per thousand heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. PMID:17956615

  15. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    Alpers Charles N

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5. The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1 preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2 stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2–3 ‰ heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3 reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures.

  16. Transcriptional profile of maize roots under acid soil growth

    Mattiello Lucia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aluminum (Al toxicity is one of the most important yield-limiting factors of many crops worldwide. The primary symptom of Al toxicity syndrome is the inhibition of root growth leading to poor water and nutrient absorption. Al tolerance has been extensively studied using hydroponic experiments. However, unlike soil conditions, this method does not address all of the components that are necessary for proper root growth and development. In the present study, we grew two maize genotypes with contrasting tolerance to Al in soil containing toxic levels of Al and then compared their transcriptomic responses. Results When grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al, the Al-sensitive genotype (S1587-17 showed greater root growth inhibition, more Al accumulation and more callose deposition in root tips than did the tolerant genotype (Cat100-6. Transcriptome profiling showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in S1587-17 grown in acid soil, probably due to secondary effects of Al toxicity. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of organic acids, which are frequently associated with an Al tolerance response, were not differentially regulated in both genotypes after acid soil exposure. However, genes related to the biosynthesis of auxin, ethylene and lignin were up-regulated in the Al-sensitive genotype, indicating that these pathways might be associated with root growth inhibition. By comparing the two maize lines, we were able to discover genes up-regulated only in the Al-tolerant line that also presented higher absolute levels than those observed in the Al-sensitive line. These genes encoded a lipase hydrolase, a retinol dehydrogenase, a glycine-rich protein, a member of the WRKY transcriptional family and two unknown proteins. Conclusions This work provides the first characterization of the physiological and transcriptional responses of maize roots when grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al. The

  17. Predicting Thermodynamic Behaviors of Non-Protein Amino Acids as a Function of Temperature and pH

    Kitadai, Norio

    2016-03-01

    Why does life use α-amino acids exclusively as building blocks of proteins? To address that fundamental question from an energetic perspective, this study estimated the standard molal thermodynamic data for three non-α-amino acids (β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and ɛ-aminocaproic acid) and α-amino- n-butyric acid in their zwitterionic, negative, and positive ionization states based on the corresponding experimental measurements reported in the literature. Temperature dependences of their heat capacities were described based on the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. The obtained dataset was then used to calculate the standard molal Gibbs energies ( ∆G o) of the non-α-amino acids as a function of temperature and pH. Comparison of their ∆G o values with those of α-amino acids having the same molecular formula showed that the non-α-amino acids have similar ∆G o values to the corresponding α-amino acids in physiologically relevant conditions (neutral pH, <100 °C). In acidic and alkaline pH, the non-α-amino acids are thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding α-ones over a broad temperature range. These results suggest that the energetic cost of synthesis is not an important selection pressure to incorporate α-amino acids into biological systems.

  18. Contrasting effects of manure and compost on soil pH, heavy metal availability and growth of Chenopodium album L. in a soil contaminated by pyritic mine waste.

    Walker, David J; Clemente, Rafael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2004-10-01

    Chenopodium album L. was found to be one of the initial plant species colonising a heavy metal-contaminated site, polluted by pyritic (sulphide-rich) waste from the Aznalcóllar mine spill (South-western Spain). This indicates its importance in the re-vegetation of this soil. In a pot experiment, C. album was sown in soil collected from the contaminated site, either non-amended or amended with cow manure or compost produced from olive leaves and olive mill wastewater, in order to study the effect on heavy metal bioavailability and soil pH. In non-amended and compost-amended soils, soil acidification, probably resulting from oxidation and hydrolysis of sulphide, led to increases in the concentrations of soluble sulphate and plant-available Cu, Zn and Mn in the soil (extractable with 0.1 M CaCl(2)). Under these conditions, shoot growth of C. album was negligible and shoot concentrations of Zn (2,420-5,585 microg g(-1)) and Mn (5,513-8,994 microg g(-1)) were phytotoxic. Manure application greatly increased shoot growth and reduced the shoot concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mn, and their plant-available concentrations in the soil. These effects appeared to be related to an increase of soil pH, due to an inhibition of sulphide oxidation/hydrolysis, relative to the non-amended soil. For metal sulphides-contaminated soil, liable to acidification, manure application appears to be able to enhance the initial stages of re-vegetation, by species such as C. album. PMID:15312738

  19. Interactions between organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers modify phosphate sorption processes in an acid soil

    Sckefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Center, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

    2008-07-15

    To determine how organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers interact to modify P sorption processes, three phosphate fertilizers were applied to lignite- and compost-amended acid soil and incubated for either 3 or 26 days. The fertilizers applied were potassium dihydrogen phosphate, triple superphosphate, and diammonium phosphate (DAP). After 3 days of incubation, sorption of all three P sources was decreased in the lignite-amended treatments, whereas P sorption was increased in the compost-amended treatments. Increased incubation time (26 days) resulted in significantly decreased P sorption when DAP was added to lignite-amended treatments. Addition of triple superphosphate increased P sorption in lignite- and compost-amended treatments and decreased solution pH compared with DAP application. In addition to the effect of P source, differences in P sorption between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were driven by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment and fertilizer addition also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. It is proposed that the combination of lignite and DAP may contribute to decreased P sorption in acid soils, with the positive effects likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  20. Mechanisms for the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils of southern China

    Zhang, Jin-Bo; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhu, Tong-bin; Yang, Wen-Yan; Müller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils in southern China are not well understood. Here, we simultaneously quantified the gross N transformation rates of various subtropical acidic forest soils located in southern China (southern soil) and those of temperate forest soils located in northern China (northern soil). We found that acidic southern soils had significantly higher gross rates of N mineralization and significantly higher turnover rates but a much ...

  1. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-03-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  2. Microbiological aspects of determination of trichloroacetic acid in soil

    Soils have been shown to possess a strong microbial trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-degrading activity. High TCA-degradation rate was also observed during soil extraction with water. For correct measurements of TCA levels in soil all TCA-degrading activities have to be inhibited immediately after sampling before analysis. We used rapid freezing of soil samples (optimally in liquid nitrogen) with subsequent storage and slow thawing before analysis as an efficient technique for suppressing the degradation. Frozen soil samples stored overnight at −20 °C and then thawed slowly exhibited very low residual TCA-degrading activity for several hours. Omitting the above procedure could lead to the confusing differences between the TCA levels previously reported in the literature

  3. Leaching characteristics of toxic constituents from coal fly ash mixed soils under the influence of pH

    Komonweeraket, Kanokwan [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cetin, Bora, E-mail: bora.cetin@sdsmt.edu [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Benson, Craig H., E-mail: chbenson@wisc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Aydilek, Ahmet H., E-mail: aydilek@umd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Edil, Tuncer B., E-mail: edil@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The impact of pH on the leaching of elements and metals from fly ash mixed soils. • Generally Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr follows a cationic leaching pattern. • The leaching of As and Se shows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. • The leaching behavior of elements does not change based on material type. • Different fly ash types show different abilities in immobilizing trace elements. - Abstract: Leaching behaviors of Arsenic (As), Barium (Ba), Calcium (Ca), Cadmium (Cd), Magnesium (Mg), Selenium (Se), and Strontium (Sr) from soil alone, coal fly ash alone, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures, were studied at a pH range of 2–14 via pH-dependent leaching tests. Seven different types of soils and coal fly ashes were tested. Results of this study indicated that Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr showed cationic leaching pattern while As and Se generally follows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. On the other hand, leaching of Ba presented amphoteric-like leaching pattern but less pH-dependent. In spite of different types and composition of soil and coal fly ash investigated, the study reveals the similarity in leaching behavior as a function of pH for a given element from soil, coal fly ash, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures. The similarity is most likely due to similar controlling mechanisms (e.g., solubility, sorption, and solid-solution formation) and similar controlling factors (e.g., leachate pH and redox conditions). This offers the opportunity to transfer knowledge of coal fly ash that has been extensively characterized and studied to soil stabilized with coal fly ash. It is speculated that unburned carbon in off-specification coal fly ashes may provide sorption sites for Cd resulting in a reduction in concentration of these elements in leachate from soil-coal fly ash mixture. Class C fly ash provides sufficient CaO to initiate the pozzolanic reaction yielding hydrated cement products that oxyanions, including As and Se, can be incorporated into.

  4. Leaching characteristics of toxic constituents from coal fly ash mixed soils under the influence of pH

    Highlights: • The impact of pH on the leaching of elements and metals from fly ash mixed soils. • Generally Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr follows a cationic leaching pattern. • The leaching of As and Se shows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. • The leaching behavior of elements does not change based on material type. • Different fly ash types show different abilities in immobilizing trace elements. - Abstract: Leaching behaviors of Arsenic (As), Barium (Ba), Calcium (Ca), Cadmium (Cd), Magnesium (Mg), Selenium (Se), and Strontium (Sr) from soil alone, coal fly ash alone, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures, were studied at a pH range of 2–14 via pH-dependent leaching tests. Seven different types of soils and coal fly ashes were tested. Results of this study indicated that Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr showed cationic leaching pattern while As and Se generally follows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. On the other hand, leaching of Ba presented amphoteric-like leaching pattern but less pH-dependent. In spite of different types and composition of soil and coal fly ash investigated, the study reveals the similarity in leaching behavior as a function of pH for a given element from soil, coal fly ash, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures. The similarity is most likely due to similar controlling mechanisms (e.g., solubility, sorption, and solid-solution formation) and similar controlling factors (e.g., leachate pH and redox conditions). This offers the opportunity to transfer knowledge of coal fly ash that has been extensively characterized and studied to soil stabilized with coal fly ash. It is speculated that unburned carbon in off-specification coal fly ashes may provide sorption sites for Cd resulting in a reduction in concentration of these elements in leachate from soil-coal fly ash mixture. Class C fly ash provides sufficient CaO to initiate the pozzolanic reaction yielding hydrated cement products that oxyanions, including As and Se, can be incorporated into

  5. CHARGE DEVELOPMENT AND ACID-BASE CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL AND COMPOST HUMIC ACIDS

    P. A. CAMPITELLI

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous works, the acid-base properties, charging behavior and chemical heterogeneity of humic substances have been studied using different mathematical equations to fit the experimental data. The objective of this research is to study the charge behavior, acid-base properties and analyze the chemical heterogeneity of humic acids (HA extracted from soil and composted municipal solid waste by potentiometric titrations. The humic acids extracted from compost have some characteristics and behavior similar to those obtained from soil. The negative charge development of HA extracted from composted material are lower than those extracted from soil and increase as ionic strength increase. The amount of carboxylic groups is lower in compost HA than in soil HA The heterogeneity of HA extracted from compost is higher than those extracted from soil. As the time of composting period increase the humification processes that take place trends to produce compost HA that has similar characteristics to soil HA. We suggest that HA extracted from composted material are macromolecules "like soil humic acids", i.e. "humiclike fraction"

  6. Potential sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids for saprophagous soil invertebrates

    Elhottová, Dana; Frouz, Jan; Krištůfek, Václav; Lukešová, Alena; Nováková, Alena; Tříska, Jan

    České Budějovice: Institute of Soil Biology AS CR, 2002, s. 31-37. ISBN 80-86525-00-7. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /6./. České Budějovice (CZ), 23.04.2001-25.04.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/99/P033; GA AV ČR IAB6066903; GA AV ČR IAA6066001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : polyunsaturated fatty acids * soil microorganisms * animal diet Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Effect of application of coal powder and lime on alfalfa growth on copper polluted acidic soil

    Józefaciuk G.

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a combined treatment of copper contaminated acid soil with lime and a coal powder decreases copper toxicity due to a synergetic effect of pH increase and association of Cu2+ ions in organo-mineral complexes. A two-year-long pot experiment with alfalfa was carried out on a pseudopodzolic soil contaminated with four Cu levels in the range 0-900 mg kg-1 soil. The amendments applied were lime, coal powder and a precomposted mixture of lime and coal powder. The compost and lime application increased yield and decreased copper content in plants at all levels of copper pollution. Coal powder alone depressed plant growth. The combined application of lime and coal powder maintained soil pH in the optimum range (5.1-5.6 during the whole experiment and had a pronounced effect on yield of the second and next crops, depending on the level of liming.

  8. Case studies related to the management of soil acidity and infertility in the West-African Moist Savannah

    Although the soil pH and base status of the soils in the West African Moist Savannah Zone (MSZ) are usually favourable, their buffer capacity is usually low, indicating that while soil acidity may not be a problem initially, inappropriate management of these soils may induce soil-acidity-related problems in the medium to long term. The current paper addresses 3 topics that are closely related to the management of soil pH (acidity) in the West African MSZ. A first experiment addressed the release of P from low reactivity phosphate rock (PR) by mixing it with various N fertilizers. Mixing ammonium-sulphate, urea, and calcium-ammonium nitrate with PR substantially enhanced the soil Olsen-P content, but not for soils with an initial pH above 5.5, while potassium nitrate did not change the Olsen-P content. Changes in soil pH could be predicted based on the production of nitrate from ammonium (nitrification) and the soil buffer capacity. A second experiment examined the changes in topsoil pH as affected by long term management based on the application of organic inputs derived from hedgerow trees (Leucaena leucocephala and Senna siamea), fertilizer, or both. Maize crop yields declined steadily over the 16 years studied, but the least so in the Senna + fertilizer treatment where in 2002 still 2.2 t ha-1 of maize were obtained. The fertilizer only treatment led to a yield of 0.4 t ha-1 in 2002, while the absolute control without any inputs yielded a mere 40 kg ha-1 in the same year. Nitrogen fertilizer use efficiency was usually higher in the Senna treatment compared to the control or the Leucaena treatment. Interactions between fertilizer and organic matter additions were negative for the Leucaena treatments in the first three years, and positive for the Senna treatment in the last 6 years. Trees had a positive effect on the maintenance of exchangeable cations in the topsoil. Exchangeable Ca, Mg and K - and hence ECEC - were only slightly reduced after 16 years of

  9. Uptake of cadmium, zinc, lead, and copper by earthworms near a zinc-smelting complex: influence of soil pH and organic matter

    Ma, W.; Edelman, T.; van Beersum, I.; Jans, T.

    1983-04-01

    Soil samples were taken from 31 sites near Eindhoven, The Netherlands, mainly along transects of 1 to 15 km from the nearest zinc smelter. Earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) were taken from the upper 20 cm soil layer and analyzed from accumulation of Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cd, Zn, and Pb appeared to be more strongly accumulated by L. rubellus when present in soil with a low pH value. Cu was the only exception in this regard; its uptake by L. rubellus was not significantly influenced by soil pH. The organic matter content of the soil played a significant role only in the worm uptake of Pb. Soil Pb content, soil pH, and soil organic matter content together accounted for almost 70% of the variance in worm Pb content. The results indicate that L. rubellus accumulates Pb more strongly in soil with a low pH and low organic matter content than in soil with higher values of these parameters. The demonstrated influence of pH and organic matter content on element concentration in earthworms emphasizes the importance of soil factors in governing the entrance of toxic metal elements into the food web. (JMT)

  10. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  11. Biochar's effect on soil nitrous oxide emissions from a maize field with lime-adjusted pH treatment

    Hüppi, R.; Felber, R.; Neftel, A.; Six, J.; Leifeld, J.

    2015-07-01

    Biochar, a carbon-rich, porous pyrolysis product of organic residues may positively affect plant yield and can, owing to its inherent stability, promote soil carbon sequestration when amended to agricultural soils. Another possible effect of biochar is the reduction in emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of laboratory incubations have shown significantly reduced N2O emissions from soil when mixed with biochar. Emission measurements under field conditions however are more scarce and show weaker or no reductions, or even increases in N2O emissions. One of the hypothesized mechanisms for reduced N2O emissions from soil is owing to the increase in soil pH following the application of alkaline biochar. To test the effect of biochar on N2O emissions in a temperate maize system, we set up a field trial with a 20 t ha-1 biochar treatment, a limestone treatment adjusted to the same pH as the biochar treatment, and a control treatment without any addition. An automated static chamber system measured N2O emissions for each replicate plot (n = 3) every 3.6 h over the course of 8 months. The field was conventionally fertilised at a rate of 160 kg-N ha-1 in 3 applications of 40, 80 and 40 kg-N ha-1. Cumulative N2O emissions were 53 % smaller in the biochar compared to the control treatment. However, the effect of the treatments overall was not statistically significant (p = 0.26) because of the large variability in the dataset. Limed soils emitted similar mean cumulative amounts of N2O as the control. This indicates that the observed N2O reduction effect of biochar was not caused by a pH effect.

  12. Barren Acidic Soil Assessment using Seismic Refraction Survey

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.; Zawawi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the geophysics subsurface exploration techniques used to determine subsurface profile characteristics. From past experience, seismic refraction method is commonly used to detect soil layers, overburden, bedrock, etc. However, the application of this method on barren geomaterials remains limited due to several reasons. Hence, this study was performed to evaluate the subsurface profile characteristics of barren acidic soil located in Ayer Hitam, Batu Pahat, Johor using seismic refraction survey. The seismic refraction survey was conducted using ABEM Terraloc MK 8 (seismograph), a sledge hammer weighing 7 kg (source) and 24 units of 10 Hz geophones (receiver). Seismic data processing was performed using OPTIM software which consists of SeisOpt@picker (picking the first arrival and seismic configureuration data input) and SeisOpt@2D (generating 2D image of barren acidic soil based on seismic velocity (primary velocity, Vp) distribution). It was found that the barren acidic soil profile consists of three layers representing residual soil (Vp= 200-400 m/s) at 0-2 m, highly to completely weathered soil (Vp= 500-1800 m/s) at 3-8 m and shale (Vp= 2100-6200 m/s) at 9-20 m depth. Furthermore, result verification was successfully done through the correlation of seismic refraction data based on physical mapping and the geological map of the study area. Finally, it was found that the seismic refraction survey was applicable for subsurface profiling of barren acidic soil as it was very efficient in terms of time, cost, large data coverage and sustainable.

  13. The potential of fresh leaves to improve acid-soil infertility

    The amounts of nitrogen fixed by six leguminous tree species (Gliricidia sepium, Parkia speciosa, Azadirachta excelsa, Paraserianthes falcataria, Acacia mangium and Leucaena leucocephala) were measured over a 30-month period, using the 15N-dilution method and two non-fixing checks (Hopea odorata and Khaya ivorensis). Paraserianthes falcataria was found to be the fastest growing and the highest in N2-fixing ability. The potential of green leaves of P. falcataria to function as an ameliorant of acid tropical soils was studied using polyvinyl leaching tubes with an anion-cation resin bag placed at the bottom end. The leaching tubes, 8 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length, were inserted into the soil and immediately taken out with the column of soil inside. A bag containing 25 g of mixed resin was placed at the lower end of each hole, and the tubes were immediately reinserted into the soil. Fresh leaves (25-g aliquots) of P. falcataria were placed on the soil surface (as mulch) within the tubes or were incorporated into the top 20 cm of the soil. Four tubes were sampled randomly at 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 days later. The soil in each tube was divided into the top 10 cm and the bottom 10 to 20 cm and the resin bag was also sampled and analysed for mineral N, exchangeable bases, and exchangeable Al. Mineral N build-up in the soil was higher in the leaf-incorporated than in the leaf-mulch treatment. Mulching resulted in a greater build-up of exchangeable Ca and was effective in reducing exchangeable Al saturation (93%) with a concomitant increase in pH in the top soil (data not shown). Leaching of nitrates was more pronounced in the mulched treatment than incorporated, while losses of Ca were more pronounced in the incorporated treatment (data not shown)

  14. Measuring plant cell wall extension (creep) induced by acidic pH and by alpha-expansin.

    Durachko, Daniel M; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Growing plant cell walls characteristically exhibit a property known as 'acid growth', by which we mean they are more extensible at low pH (extensometer measurements. To measure acid-induced extension, the walls are initially buffered at neutral pH, resulting in low activity of expansins that are components of the native cell walls. Upon buffer exchange to acidic pH, expansins are activated and the cell walls extend rapidly. We also demonstrate expansin activity in a reconstitution assay. For this part, we use a brief heat treatment to denature the native expansins in the cell wall samples. These inactivated cell walls do not extend even in acidic buffer, but addition of expansins to the cell walls rapidly restores their ability to extend. PMID:19279553

  15. Chloroacetic acids - Degradation intermediates of organic matter in forest soil

    Matucha, Miroslav; Gryndler, Milan; Schröder, P.; Forczek, Sándor; Uhlířová, H.; Fuksová, Květoslava; Rohlenová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2007), s. 382-385. ISSN 0038-0717 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/0874; GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : trichloroacetic acid * dichloroacetic acid * chlorination * soil organic matter Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.580, year: 2007

  16. Simulation of soil response to acidic deposition scenarios in Europe

    The chemical response of European forest soils to three emission-deposition scenarios for the year 1960-2050, i.e. official energy pathways (OEP), current reduction plans (CRP) and maximum feasible reductions (MFR), was evaluated with the SMART model (Simulation Model for Acidification's Regional Trends). Calculations were made for coniferous and deciduous forests on 80 soil types occurring on the FAO soil map of Europe, using a gradient of 1.0 degree C longitude x 0.5 degree latitude. Results indicated that the area with nitrogen saturated soils, i.e. soils with elevated NO3 concentrations (>0.02 molcm-3) will increase in the future for all scenarios, even for the MFR scenario. The area with acidified soils, with a high Al concentration (> 0.2 molcm-3) and Al/BC ratio (>1 mol-1) and a low pH (3 and Al concentrations mainly occurred in western, central and eastern Europe. Uncertainties in the initial values of C/N ratios and base saturation, and in the description of N dynamics in the SMART model had the largest impact on the temporal development of forested areas exceeding critical parameter values. Despite uncertainties involved, predicted general trends are plausible and reliable. 61 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  17. Metal ion complexation properties of fulvic acids extracted from composted sewage sludge as compared to a soil fulvic acid.

    Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G; Oliveira, César J S

    2002-07-01

    Complexation properties of an anthropogenic fulvic acid (FA) extracted from a composted sewage sludge (csFA) for Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) were studied at pH=6 and at a concentration of 25 mg L(-1). For the case of Cu(II), a particular analysis of the complexation phenomena was done at pH values of 3, 4, 5 and 6 and at aqueous FA concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 mg L(-1) by synchronous excitation molecular fluorescence spectroscopy (SyF). Potentiometric titrimetry with Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and H+ ion-selective electrodes and acid-base conductimetric titrations were used to obtain experimental information about the acid properties and complexation phenomena. A comparison of the results obtained for csFA with a natural soil FA (sFA) was made. Differences have been detected in the structural composition of the two samples and in the structure of the binding sites. In the csFA, binding site structures containing nitrogen probably play an important role in the complexation, besides oxygen containing structures. Complexation by sFA is mainly due to carboxylic and phenolic structures. Nevertheless, this work shows that csFA have macroscopic complexation properties (magnitude of the conditional stability constant and binding sites concentration) somewhat similar to the natural sFA samples. PMID:12188141

  18. Effect of systemic pH on pHi and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pHi), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH4Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO3 (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pHi and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pHi did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability

  19. Adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) under controlled pH and Eh by soil minerals

    Preliminary experiments indicated that a potentiostat could be used to control the Eh of soil slurries (kaolinite). Results so far indicate that the major amount of adsorption occurs in the first 15 minutes, that Pu(VI) adsorbs less than Pu(IV), that an increase in pH increases the adsorption, and that an increase in surface area and/or cation exchange capacity also increases the adsorption. 4 figs

  20. Litter quality and pH are strong drivers of carbon turnover and distribution in alpine grassland soils

    K. Budge

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Alpine soils are expected to contain large amounts of labile carbon (C which may become a further source of atmospheric CO2 as a of global warming. However, there is little data available on these soils, and understanding of the influence of environmental factors on soil organic matter (SOM turnover is limited. We extracted 30 cm deep cores from five grassland sites along a small elevation gradient from 2285 to 2653 m above sea level (a.s.l. in the central Swiss Alps. Our aim was to determine the quantity, degree of stabilization and mean residence time (MRT of SOM in relation to site factors such as temperature, soil pH, vegetation, and organic matter (OM structure. Soil fractions obtained by size and density fractionation revealed a high proportion of labile particulate organic matter C (POM C % mostly in the uppermost soil layers. POM C in the top 20 cm across the gradient ranged from 39.6–57.6% in comparison to 7.2–29.6% reported in previous studies for lower elevation soils (810–1960 m a.s.l.. At the highest elevation, MRTs measured by means of radiocarbon dating and turnover modelling, increased between fractions of growing stability from 90 years in free POM (fPOM to 534 years in the mineral-associated fraction (mOM. Depending on elevation and pH, plant community data indicated considerable variation in the quantity and quality of litter input, and these patterns could be reflected in the dynamics of soil C. 13C NMR data confirmed the direct relationship of OM composition to MRT. While temperature is likely to be a major cause for the slow turnover rate observed, other factors such as litter quality and soil pH, as well as the combination of all factors, play an important role in causing small-scale variability of SOM turnover. Ignoring this interplay of controlling factors may impair the performance of models to project SOM responses to environmental change.

  1. Reduction of radiostrontium mobility in acid soils by carbonate treatment

    Development of chemical treatments to immobilize 90Sr in soil to prevent its leaching from radioactive waste disposed in shallow land burial sites is highly desirable. Six in situ carbonate-precipitating treatments, varying the amounts of carbonate, alkaline earth cation (Ca or Ba as chlorides), and order of addition were examined for their ability to immobilize radiostrontium in laboratory soil columns. The Na2CO3-followed by CaCl2-treatment was most consistently successful at reducing the leachability of radiostrontium by 0.05M CaCl2 from three low organic matter-acid soils, immobilizing as much as 53% of added radiostrontium. For the high organic matter-slightly acid soil, Na2CO3 alone, without supplemental Ca or Ba, resulted in the best immobilization (39%); dissolution of soil organic matter and the alkalinity-induced aggregate dispersion probably interfered with CaCO3 and/or BaCO3 precipitation. Success of the treatments is based primarily on their ability to generate, in situ, Ca(Sr,Mg)CO3 or Ba(Ca,Mg,Sr)CO3 precipitates that exchange radiostrontium very slowly with eluting Ca ions. Allied tests with 137Cs, which is commonly codisposed with 90Sr, indicated that the treatments describe did not interfere with the natural tendency of the selected soils to fix 137Cs strongly

  2. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  3. Isolation and fractionation of soil humin using alkaline urea and dimethylsulphoxide plus sulphuric acid

    Song, Guixue; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Novotny, Etelvino H.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2011-01-01

    Humin, the most recalcitrant and abundant organic fraction of soils and of sediments, is a significant contributor to the stable carbon pool in soils and is important for the global carbon budget. It has significant resistance to transformations by microorganisms. Based on the classical operational definition, humin can include any humic-type substance that is not soluble in water at any pH. We demonstrate in this study how sequential exhaustive extractions with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) + 6 M urea, followed by dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) + 6% ( v/ v) sulphuric acid (H2SO4) solvent systems, can extract 70-80% of the residual materials remaining after prior exhaustive extractions in neutral and aqueous basic media. Solid-state 13C NMR spectra have shown that the components isolated in the base + urea system were compositionally similar to the humic and fulvic acid fractions isolated at pH 12.6 in the aqueous media. The NMR spectra indicated that the major components isolated in the DMSO + H2SO4 medium had aliphatic hydrocarbon associated with carboxyl functionalities and with lesser amounts of carbohydrate and peptide and minor amounts of lignin-derived components. The major components will have significant contributions from long-chain fatty acids, waxes, to cuticular materials. The isolates in the DMSO + H2SO4 medium were compositionally similar to the organic components that resisted solvation and remained associated with the soil clays. It is concluded that the base + urea system released humic and fulvic acids held by hydrogen bonding or by entrapment within the humin matrix. The recalcitrant humin materials extracted in DMSO + H2SO4 are largely biological molecules (from plants and the soil microbial population) that are likely to be protected from degradation by their hydrophobic moieties and by sorption on the soil clays. Thus, the major components of humin do not satisfy the classical definitions for humic substances which emphasise that these arise from

  4. Determination of Minimal Duration Essential for Isolation of Humic Acids From Soils in Forest Restoration Programmes

    Mohd R. N. Hanisah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate whether a simple and rapid method could be developed for extracting, fractionating and purifying soil HA in forest rehabilitation programmes. Humic acids from 10 g of soil were extracted with 100 mL of 0.10 M NaOH. Different extraction periods (4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h were tested. Samples were centrifuged (16,211 G for 15 min at the end of each extraction period. The dark-coloured supernatant liquor containing HA was decanted and the pH of the solution adjusted to 1.0 using 6 M HCl. After acidification, the fractionation periods evaluated were 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h. After each fractionation period, the sample was transferred to a polyethylene bottle and centrifuged (16,211 G for 10 min. The HA were purified by suspending them in 100 mL distilled water, centrifuged (16,211 G for 10 min. After repeating this procedure three times, the supernatant was analyzed for Na, Mg and K. Standard procedures were used to characterize the HA (C, E4/E6, phenolic OH, carboxylic COOH, total acidity and soil (pH, C, organic matter. Although there was significant effect of different extraction periods on yield of HA, there was no significant relationship between fractionation period and yield of HA. There was also no significant relationship between fractionation periods and yield of HA for different extraction periods studied. In terms of purification, the distilled water used in this study was able to effectively purify HA (e.g., reduction in mineral matter such as Na+ of the soil without altering the true nature of HA as C, E4/E6, phenolic OH, carboxylic COOH, total acidity values of the acids were consistent with those reported in the literature. The significance of this work is that it enables the isolation of HA from soil within 9 h (4 h extraction period, 4 h fractionation period and 1 h purification period instead of the existing range of 2-7 days, hence helping in facilitating the idea of producing for

  5. Soil pH, total phosphorus, climate and distance are the major factors influencing microbial activity at a regional spatial scale.

    Cao, Haichuan; Chen, Ruirui; Wang, Libing; Jiang, Lanlan; Yang, Fen; Zheng, Shixue; Wang, Gejiao; Lin, Xiangui

    2016-01-01

    Considering the extensive functional redundancy in microbial communities and great difficulty in elucidating it based on taxonomic structure, studies on the biogeography of soil microbial activity at large spatial scale are as important as microbial community structure. Eighty-four soil samples were collected across a region from south to north China (about 1,000 km) to address the questions if microbial activity displays biogeographic patterns and what are driving forces. These samples represented different soil types, land use and climate. Redundancy analysis and nonmetric multidimensional scaling clearly revealed that soil microbial activities showed distinct differentiation at different sites over a regional spatial scale, which were strongly affected by soil pH, total P, rainfall, temperature, soil type and location. In addition, microbial community structure was greatly influenced by rainfall, location, temperature, soil pH and soil type and was correlated with microbial activity to some extent. Our results suggest that microbial activities display a clear geographic pattern that is greatly altered by geographic distance and reflected by climate, soil pH and total P over large spatial scales. There are common (distance, climate, pH and soil type) but differentiated aspects (TP, SOC and N) in the biogeography of soil microbial community structure and activity. PMID:27170469

  6. Enzyme Activities in Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA)-Polluted Soils

    ZHANG Wei; LIN Kuang-Fei; YANG Sha-Sha; ZHANG Meng

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a popular additive of the chemical industry; its effect on activities of important soil enzymes is not well understood.A laboratory incubation experiment was carried out to analyze the PFOA-induced changes in soil urease,catalase,and phosphatase activities.During the entire incubation period,the activities of the three soil enzymes generally declined with increasing PFOA concentration,following certain dose-response relationships.The values of EC10,the contaminant concentration at which the biological activity is inhibited by 10%,of PFOA for the soil enzyme activity calculated from the modeling equation of the respective dose-response curve suggested a sensitivity order of phosphatase > catalase > urease.The effect of PFOA on soil enzyme activities provided a basic understanding of the eco-toxicological effect of PFOA in the environment.Results of this study supported using soil phosphatase as a convenient biomarker for ecological risk assessment of PFOA-polluted soils.

  7. Rapid 3D Patterning of Poly(acrylic acid) Ionic Hydrogel for Miniature pH Sensors.

    Yin, Ming-Jie; Yao, Mian; Gao, Shaorui; Zhang, A Ping; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Wai, Ping-Kong A

    2016-02-17

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), as a highly ionic conductive hydrogel, can reversibly swell/deswell according to the surrounding pH conditions. An optical maskless -stereolithography technology is presented to rapidly 3D pattern PAA for device fabrication. A highly sensitive miniature pH sensor is demonstrated by in situ printing of periodic PAA micropads on a tapered optical microfiber. PMID:26643765

  8. Acid-base pH curves in vitro with mixtures of pure cultures of human oral microorganisms.

    Wijeyeweera, R L; Kleinberg, I

    1989-01-01

    Pure cultures of microorganisms commonly found in supragingival plaque were incubated alone and in combinations to determine the bacterial contribution to the pH-fall-pH-rise that is the central characteristic of the Stephan-curve pH change seen in plaque in vivo after brief exposure to a sugar solution. To avoid the complicating conditions of saliva flow and plaque diffusion, experiments were done with bacterial suspensions in incubations in vitro. In an initial experimental series where each microorganism was incubated only with glucose, all but a few produced the initial pH fall. Some also showed a subsequent small, sharp rise in the pH which then quickly levelled off; this was due to metabolism of endogenous substrate accumulated by most microorganisms during their growth in culture. When arginolytic and non-arginolytic bacteria were each then incubated with both glucose and arginine present (the glucose substrate to stimulate a pH fall and the arginine to stimulate a pH rise), the non-arginolytic gave a progressively more acidic pH response with progressive increase in the cell concentration, whereas the arginolytic bacteria produced a much smaller and variable pH decrease with similar cell concentration increase. Mixing pure cultures of either arginolytic or non-arginolytic bacteria gave acid-base pH responses similar to those of their respective pure cultures, whereas mixing arginolytic with non-arginolytic bacteria resulted in an approximate averaging of their different curves. The organisms present in highest proportion in a mixture had the greatest effects. The outcome of mixing the most numerous streptococcal and actinomyces species found normally in supragingival plaque indicated that the well-established difference in the acidity level of the Stephan pH response of caries-active and caries-inactive plaques could be due to differences in the proportions of their arginolytic and non-arginolytic members. PMID:2675801

  9. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-01

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy. PMID:25412478

  10. Effect of Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on Cl- Adsorption by Variable Charge Soils

    XU Ren-Kou; ANG Ma-Li; WANG Qiang-Sheng; JI Guo-Liang1

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids exist widely in soils and have been implicated in many soil processes.The objective of the present paper was to evaluate effect of two LMW organic acids, citric acid and oxalic acid, on Cl- adsorption by three variable charge soils, a latosol, a lateritic red soil and a red soil, using a batch method. The results showed that the presence of citric acid and oxalic acid led to a decrease in Cl- adsorption with larger decreases for citric acid. Among the different soils Gl- adsorption in the lateritic red soil and the red soil was more affected by both the LMW organic acids than that in the latosol.

  11. Lactic acid fermentation from food waste with indigenous microbiota: Effects of pH, temperature and high OLR.

    Tang, Jialing; Wang, Xiaochang; Hu, Yisong; Zhang, Yongmei; Li, Yuyou

    2016-06-01

    The effects of pH, temperature and high organic loading rate (OLR) on lactic acid production from food waste without extra inoculum addition were investigated in this study. Using batch experiments, the results showed that although the hydrolysis rate increased with pH adjustment, the lactic acid concentration and productivity were highest at pH 6. High temperatures were suitable for solubilization but seriously restricted the acidification processes. The highest lactic acid yield (0.46g/g-TS) and productivity (278.1mg/Lh) were obtained at 37°C and pH 6. In addition, the lactic acid concentration gradually increased with the increase in OLR, and the semi-continuous reactor could be stably operated at an OLR of 18g-TS/Ld. However, system instability, low lactic acid yield and a decrease in VS removal were noticed at high OLRs (22g-TS/Ld). The concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the fermentation mixture were relatively low but slightly increased with OLR, and acetate was the predominant VFA component. Using high-throughput pyrosequencing, Lactobacillus from the raw food waste was found to selectively accumulate and become dominant in the semi-continuous reactor. PMID:27040090

  12. Development of On-Line Spectroscopic pH Monitoring for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants: Weak Acid Schemes

    Casella, Amanda J.; Hylden, Laura R.; Campbell, Emily L.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Smith, Frances N.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2015-05-19

    Knowledge of real-time solution properties and composition is a necessity for any spent nuclear fuel reprocessing method. Metal-ligand speciation in aqueous solutions derived from the dissolved commercial spent fuel is highly dependent upon the acid concentration/pH, which influences extraction efficiency and the resulting speciation in the organic phase. Spectroscopic process monitoring capabilities, incorporated in a counter current centrifugal contactor bank, provide a pathway for on-line real-time measurement of solution pH. The spectroscopic techniques are process-friendly and can be easily configured for on-line applications, while classic potentiometric pH measurements require frequent calibration/maintenance and have poor long-term stability in aggressive chemical and radiation environments. Our research is focused on developing a general method for on-line determination of pH of aqueous solutions through chemometric analysis of Raman spectra. Interpretive quantitative models have been developed and validated under the range of chemical composition and pH using a lactic acid/lactate buffer system. The developed model was applied to spectra obtained on-line during solvent extractions performed in a centrifugal contactor bank. The model predicted the pH within 11% for pH > 2, thus demonstrating that this technique could provide the capability of monitoring pH on-line in applications such as nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  13. Biochar's effect on soil nitrous oxide emissions from a maize field with lime adjusted pH treatment

    Hüppi, Roman; Leifeld, Jens; Felber, Raphael; Neftel, Albrecht; Six, Johan

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich, porous product from pyrolysis of organic residues. Especially tropical soils have shown positive response in yield to biochar addition. Its high stability in soil makes biochar a potent carbon sequestration option at the same time. A number of laboratory incubations have shown significantly reduced nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soil when mixed with biochar. Emission measurements from the field show the same trend but are much more scarce. One of the hypothesized mechanisms for reduced N2O emissions from soil is owing to the increase in soil pH from the application of alkaline biochar. To test the effect of biochar on N2O emissions from a temperate maize system, we set up a field trial with a 20 t/ha biochar treatment, a limestone treatment adjusted to the same pH as with biochar and a control without addition. An automated static chamber greenhouse gas measurement system measured N2O emissions for each replicated (n=3) every 3.6 hours. The field was conventionally fertilised at a rate of 160 kg-N/ha in 3 doses of 40, 80 and 40 kg-N/ha. Cumulative emissions show a significant reduction for N2O in the biochar treatment by about 55 % relative to the control. The limed treatment shows similar emissions than control but with higher variability. This suggests that the N2O reduction effect of biochar is not mainly due to its liming effect. In conclusion, we confirm that biochar is a promising material to reduce N2O emissions from intensively managed agricultural soils.

  14. Evaluation of the occurrence of soils with pH higher than 8.4 observed within the Countryside Survey. Project SP1304 Final Report

    Lebron, Inma; Keith, Aidan M.; Hughes, Steven; Reynolds, Brian; Robinson, David; Cooper, David; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil pH values in the UK have generally increased during the last three decades but this increase has been particularly pronounced in the South-East of England. There has also been a progressive increase, since the first Countryside Survey in 1978, in soils with pH values of 8.3 and above, indicating that pH may not be controlled by the presence of calcite alone. The maximum pH value in solution when calcite reaches saturation at atmospheric conditions is 8.3, but higher values can be reached...

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of the Rhizosphere Soil Microbiome with Respect to Phytic Acid Utilization

    Unno, Yusuke; Shinano, Takuro

    2012-01-01

    While phytic acid is a major form of organic phosphate in many soils, plant utilization of phytic acid is normally limited; however, culture trials of Lotus japonicus using experimental field soil that had been managed without phosphate fertilizer for over 90 years showed significant usage of phytic acid applied to soil for growth and flowering and differences in the degree of growth, even in the same culture pot. To understand the key metabolic processes involved in soil phytic acid utilizat...

  16. Determination of low molecular weight organic acids in soil, plants, and water by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Li, Ying-Hui; Huang, Bi-Xia; Shan, Xiao-Quan

    2003-03-01

    Determination of low molecular weight organic acids in soils and plants by capillary zone electrophoresis was accomplished using a phthalate buffer and indirect UV detection mode. The influence of some crucial parameters, such as pH, buffer concentration and surfactant were investigated. A good separation of seven organic acids was achieved within 5 min using an electrolyte containing 15 mmol L(-1) potassium hydrogen phthalate, 0.5 mmol L(-1) myristyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), and 5% methanol (MeOH) (v/v) at pH 5.60, separation voltage -20 kV, and temperature 25 degrees C. The relative standard deviation (n=5) of the method was found to be in range 0.18-0.56% for migration time and 3.2-4.8% for peak area. The limit of detection ranged between 0.5 micro mol L(-1) to 6 micro mol L(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The recovery of standard organic acids added to real samples ranged from 87 to 119%. This method was simple, rapid and reproducible, and could be applied to the simultaneous determination of organic acids in environmental samples. PMID:12664177

  17. Citramalic acid and salicylic acid in sugar beet root exudates solubilize soil phosphorus

    Karlovsky Petr

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In soils with a low phosphorus (P supply, sugar beet is known to intake more P than other species such as maize, wheat, or groundnut. We hypothesized that organic compounds exuded by sugar beet roots solubilize soil P and that this exudation is stimulated by P starvation. Results Root exudates were collected from plants grown in hydroponics under low- and high-P availability. Exudate components were separated by HPLC, ionized by electrospray, and detected by mass spectrometry in the range of mass-to-charge ratio (m/z from 100 to 1000. Eight mass spectrometric signals were enhanced at least 5-fold by low P availability at all harvest times. Among these signals, negative ions with an m/z of 137 and 147 were shown to originate from salicylic acid and citramalic acid. The ability of both compounds to mobilize soil P was demonstrated by incubation of pure substances with Oxisol soil fertilized with calcium phosphate. Conclusions Root exudates of sugar beet contain salicylic acid and citramalic acid, the latter of which has rarely been detected in plants so far. Both metabolites solubilize soil P and their exudation by roots is stimulated by P deficiency. These results provide the first assignment of a biological function to citramalic acid of plant origin.

  18. Extracellular alkaline-acid pH shifts evoked by iontophoresis of glutamate and aspartate in turtle cerebellum.

    Chesler, M; Rice, M E

    1991-01-01

    The effect of glutamate and aspartate iontophoresis on extracellular pH was investigated in the turtle cerebellum in vitro. Both amino acids produced a rapid alkaline transient, typically followed by a prolonged acidification. These responses could be evoked in all layers of the cerebellum. Transition from bicarbonate to N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid-buffered media amplified the pH shifts. Similar alkaline-acid transients could be evoked in the molecular layer by electrical stimulation of the parallel fibers or the ipsilateral peduncle, or by superfusion of glutamate or aspartate. However, no alkaline shifts were evoked in the granular layer by either parallel fiber or peduncle stimulation. In contrast, the iontophoretically induced alkaline shifts were largest in the granular layer. Compared with the stimulus-evoked alkalinizations, the iontophoretic alkaline shifts were relatively insensitive to Mn2+ or Cd2+. These data suggest that the activity-dependent alkalinization of brain extracellular space is generated by a bicarbonate-independent mechanism related to excitatory synaptic transmission. The results are consistent with a flux of hydrogen ions through cationic channels, but do not support a direct role for voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. In view of the sensitivity of ion channels to changes in external pH, and the magnitude of the amino acid-induced pH shifts, these results indicate that extracellular pH could play an important modulatory role in excitatory synaptic transmission. PMID:1711651

  19. Acidic nanoparticles are trafficked to lysosomes and restore an acidic lysosomal pH and degradative function to compromised ARPE-19 cells.

    Gabriel C Baltazar

    Full Text Available Lysosomal enzymes function optimally in acidic environments, and elevation of lysosomal pH can impede their ability to degrade material delivered to lysosomes through autophagy or phagocytosis. We hypothesize that abnormal lysosomal pH is a key aspect in diseases of accumulation and that restoring lysosomal pH will improve cell function. The propensity of nanoparticles to end up in the lysosome makes them an ideal method of delivering drugs to lysosomes. This study asked whether acidic nanoparticles could traffic to lysosomes, lower lysosomal pH and enhance lysosomal degradation by the cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19. Acidic nanoparticles composed of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA 502 H, PLGA 503 H and poly (DL-lactide (PLA colocalized to lysosomes of ARPE-19 cells within 60 min. PLGA 503 H and PLA lowered lysosomal pH in cells compromised by the alkalinizing agent chloroquine when measured 1 hr. after treatment, with acidification still observed 12 days later. PLA enhanced binding of Bodipy-pepstatin-A to the active site of cathepsin D in compromised cells. PLA also reduced the cellular levels of opsin and the lipofuscin-like autofluorescence associated with photoreceptor outer segments. These observations suggest the acidification produced by the nanoparticles was functionally effective. In summary, acid nanoparticles lead to a rapid and sustained lowering of lysosomal pH and improved degradative activity.

  20. The pH profile for acid-induced elongation of coleoptile and epicotyl sections is consistent with the acid-growth theory

    Cleland, R. E.; Buckley, G.; Nowbar, S.; Lew, N. M.; Stinemetz, C.; Evans, M. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    The acid-growth theory predicts that a solution with a pH identical to that of the apoplast of auxin-treated tissues (4.5.-5.0) should induce elongation at a rate comparable to that of auxin. Different pH profiles for elongation have been obtained, however, depending on the type of pretreatment between harvest of the sections and the start of the pH-incubations. To determine the acid sensitivity under in vivo conditions, oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile, maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile and pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyl sections were abraded so that exogenous buffers could penetrate the free space, and placed in buffered solutions of pH 3.5-6.5 without any preincubation. The extension, without auxin, was measured over the first 3 h. Experiments conducted in three laboratories produced similar results. For all three species, sections placed in buffer without pretreatment elongated at least threefold faster at pH 5.0 than at 6.0 or 6.5, and the rate elongation at pH 5.0 was comparable to that induced by auxin. Pretreatment of abraded sections with pH-6.5 buffer or distilled water adjusted to pH 6.5 or above gave similar results. We conclude that the pH present in the apoplast of auxin-treated coleoptile and stems is sufficiently low to account for the initial growth response to auxin.

  1. Immobilization of Zn, Cu, and Pb in contaminated soils using phosphate rock and phosphoric acid

    Considerable research has been done on P-induced Pb immobilization in Pb-contaminated soils. However, application of P to soils contaminated with multiple heavy metals is limited. The present study examined effectiveness of phosphoric acid (PA) and/or phosphate rock (PR) in immobilizing Pb, Cu, and Zn in two contaminated soils. The effectiveness was evaluated using water extraction, plant uptake, and a simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET) mimicking metal uptake in the acidic environment of human stomach. The possible mechanisms for metal immobilization were elucidated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical speciation program Visual MINTEQ. Compared to the control, all P amendments significantly reduced Pb water solubility, phytoavailability, and bioaccessibility by 72-100%, 15-86%, and 28-92%, respectively. The Pb immobilization was probably attributed to the formation of insoluble Pb phosphate minerals. Phosphorus significantly reduced Cu and Zn water solubility by 31-80% and 40-69%, respectively, presumably due to their sorption on minerals (e.g., calcite and phosphate phases) following CaO addition. However, P had little effect on the Cu and Zn phytoavailability; while the acid extractability of Cu and Zn induced by SBET (pH 2) were even elevated by up to 48% and 40%, respectively, in the H3PO4 treatments (PA and PR + PA). Our results indicate that phosphate was effective in reducing Pb availability in terms of water solubility, bioaccessibility, and phytoavailability. Caution should be exercised when H3PO4 was amended to the soil co-contaminated with Cu and Zn since the acidic condition of SBET increased Cu and Zn bioaccessibility though their water solubility was reduced.

  2. Stabilization of Organic Matter by Biochar Application in Compost-amended Soils with Contrasting pH Values and Textures

    Shih-Hao Jien

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Food demand and soil sustainability have become urgent concerns because of the impacts of global climate change. In subtropical and tropical regions, practical management that stabilizes and prevents organic fertilizers from rapid decomposition in soils is necessary. This study conducted a short-term (70 days incubation experiment to assess the effects of biochar application on the decomposition of added bagasse compost in three rural soils with different pH values and textures. Two rice hull biochars, produced through slow pyrolization at 400 °C (RHB-400 and 700 °C (RHB-700, with application rates of 1%, 2%, and 4% (w/w, were separately incorporated into soils with and without compost (1% (w/w application rate. Experimental results indicated that C mineralization rapidly increased at the beginning in all treatments, particularly in those involving 2% and 4% biochar. The biochar addition increased C mineralization by 7.9%–48% in the compost-amended soils after 70 days incubation while the fractions of mineralized C to applied C significantly decreased. Moreover, the estimated maximum of C mineralization amount in soils treated with both compost and biochar were obviously lower than expectation calculated by a double exponential model (two pool model. Based on the micromorphological observation, added compost was wrapped in the soil aggregates formed after biochar application and then may be protected from decomposing by microbes. Co-application of compost with biochar may be more efficient to stabilize and sequester C than individual application into the studied soils, especially for the biochar produced at high pyrolization temperature.

  3. Diphenylarsinic acid contaminated soil remediation by titanium dioxide (P25) photocatalysis: Degradation pathway, optimization of operating parameters and effects of soil properties.

    Wang, A-nan; Teng, Ying; Hu, Xue-feng; Wu, Long-hua; Huang, Yu-juan; Luo, Yong-ming; Christie, Peter

    2016-01-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is formed during the leakage of arsenic chemical weapons in sites and poses a high risk to biota. However, remediation methods for DPAA contaminated soils are rare. Here, the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) process by nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) was applied to degrade DPAA in soil. The degradation pathway was firstly studied, and arsenate was identified as the final product. Then, an orthogonal array experimental design of L9(3)(4), only 9 experiments were needed, instead of 81 experiments in a conventional one-factor-at-a-time, was used to optimize the operational parameters soil:water ratio, TiO2 dosage, irradiation time and light intensity to increase DPAA removal efficiency. Soil:water ratio was found to have a more significant effect on DPAA removal efficiency than other properties. The optimum conditions to treat 4 g soil with a DPAA concentration of 20 mg kg(-1) were found to be a 1:10 soil: water ratio, 40 mW cm(-2) light intensity, 5% TiO2 in soil, and a 3-hour irradiation time, with a removal efficiency of up to 82.7%. Furthermore, this method (except for a change in irradiation time from 3 to 1.5h) was validated in nine different soils and the removal efficiencies ranged from 57.0 to 78.6%. Removal efficiencies were found to be negatively correlated with soil electrical conductivity, organic matter content, pH and total phosphorus content. Finally, coupled with electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement, these soil properties affected the generation of OH• by TiO2 in soil slurry. This study suggests that TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation is a promising treatment for removing DPAA from soil. PMID:26410709

  4. Adsorption of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in soils

    Rampazzo, N.; Rampazzo Todorovic, G.; Mentler, A.; Blum, W. E. H.

    2013-03-01

    The results showed that glyphosate is initially adsorbed mostly in the upper 2 cm. It is than transported and adsorbed after few days in deeper soil horizons with concomitant increasing content of its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid. Moreover, Fe-oxides seem to be a key parameter for glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic adsorption in soils. This study confirmed previous studies: the analysis showed lower contents of dithionite-soluble and Fe-oxides for the Chernozem, with consequently lower adsorption of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic as compared with the Cambisol and the Stagnosol.

  5. The effect of the soil pH on 134Cs transfer factors for soybean and sunflower plants; 134Cs fate in the extracted seed-oil

    The effect of soil pH on 134Cs TFs as well as the fate of 134Cs in the extracted oil was studied in a greenhouse experiment with soybean and sunflower plants. A soil with pH 4.2 was used as a basis and its pH value has increased to 5.7, 6.5 and 7.6 (by the addition of different amounts of Ca(OH)2). The lowest TF value was observed in the calcareous soil (pH 7.6), while the highest in the lowest pH (4.2) for the vegetative part and in the pH 6.5 for the edible part for both studied plants. TFs were practically the same for soya plants grown on the three lowest soil pH and reduced significantly only at pH 7.6 for either pods or other plant material. However, the lowest/highest TF was ∼ 4 for pods and ∼ 6 for the other plant material. For the sunflower plants while TFs for other plant material reduced from lowest to highest soil pH by only a factor of 2, for the seeds TFs remained rather constant. The difference in TF between the two studied species in each soil pH was in some cases higher than the difference due to pH effect. When an oil fraction (∼ 20 %) was extracted from seeds of both plants, no 134Cs was detected. Refs. 4 (author)

  6. Active microorganisms in forest soils differ from the total community yet are shaped by the same environmental factors: the influence of pH and soil moisture.

    Romanowicz, Karl J; Freedman, Zachary B; Upchurch, Rima A; Argiroff, William A; Zak, Donald R

    2016-10-01

    Predicting the impact of environmental change on soil microbial functions requires an understanding of how environmental factors shape microbial composition. Here, we investigated the influence of environmental factors on bacterial and fungal communities across an expanse of northern hardwood forest in Michigan, USA, which spans a 500-km regional climate gradient. We quantified soil microbial community composition using high-throughput DNA sequencing on coextracted rDNA (i.e. total community) and rRNA (i.e. active community). Within both bacteria and fungi, total and active communities were compositionally distinct from one another across the regional gradient (bacteria P = 0.01; fungi P soil moisture, pH, SOM carboxyl content, as well as C and N concentration. Our study highlights the importance of distinguishing between metabolically active microorganisms and the total community, and emphasizes that the same environmental factors shape the total and active communities of bacteria and fungi in this ecosystem. PMID:27387909

  7. Nitrification in acid coniferous forests: Some soils do, some soils don't

    Nugroho, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in the global nitrogen cycle. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) were long thought to be the sole microorganisms capable of autotrophic ammonia oxidation, the rate-limited step in nitrification. This thesis elucidates the relation between the presence of AOB, environmental factors and nitrification rates in the soil layer of acid coniferous forests. Especially, the question why some acid forests show nitrification while others do not, is addressed in this thesis.

  8. Eosinophil viability is increased by acidic pH in a cAMP- and GPR65-dependent manner

    Kottyan, Leah C.; Collier, Ann R.; Cao, Khanh H.; Niese, Kathryn A; Hedgebeth, Megan; Radu, Caius G.; Owen N Witte; Gurjit K Khurana Hershey; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Zimmermann, Nives

    2009-01-01

    The microenvironment of the lung in asthma is acidic, yet the effect of acidity on inflammatory cells has not been well established. We now demonstrate that acidity inhibits eosinophil apoptosis and increases cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner between pH 7.5 and 6.0. Notably, acidity induced eosinophil cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) production and enhanced cellular viability in an adenylate cyclase–dependent manner. Furthermore, we identify G protein-coupled receptor 65 (...

  9. Anti-biofilm potential of phenolic acids: the influence of environmental pH and intrinsic physico-chemical properties.

    Silva, Sara; Costa, Eduardo M; Horta, Bruno; Calhau, Conceição; Morais, Rui M; Pintado, M Manuela

    2016-09-13

    Phenolic acids are a particular group of small phenolic compounds which have exhibited some anti-biofilm activity, although the link between their activity and their intrinsic pH is not clear. Therefore, the present work examined the anti-biofilm activity (inhibition of biomass and metabolic activity) of phenolic acids in relation to the environmental pH, as well as other physico-chemical properties. The results indicate that, while Escherichia coli was not inhibited by the phenolic acids, both methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis were susceptible to the action of all phenolic acids, with the pH playing a relevant role in the activity: a neutral pH favored MRSE inhibition, while acidic conditions favored MRSA inhibition. Some links between molecular polarity and size were associated only with their potential as metabolic inhibitors, with the overall interactions hinting at a membrane-based mechanism for MRSA and a cytoplasmic effect for MRSE. PMID:27434592

  10. Pineapple yield and quality on a banana soil of the Canary Islands irrigated with acid and saline water

    Alvarez, C E; Carracedo Torres, A. E.; Iglesias-Jiménez, Emeterio; Bravo, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr) plants, cultivar "Red Spanish", weree grown in a greenhouse in 300-L containers, with soil from a banana plantation, and irrigated with saline and acid waters, Essential chemical soil chartacteristics were a pH of 6.9 electrical conductivity (EC) 1.26 dS m$ and available nutrient status 188 ppm P, 11,95 meq (100-g)$ Ca, 5.25 meq (100-g)$ Mg, 3.96 meq (100-g)$ K, and 2.17 meq (100-g)Na. Irrigation water treatments consisted of control (tap water); 7, 14, 21, ...

  11. The influence of acid rain on the intake of trace elements into rice plant from soils

    Rice plant samples were grown in 14 cultivative pots by irrigation using the six conditions of artificial acid rain waters (pH: 6.5, 6.0, 4.5, 3.5, 3.0 and 2.5) and tap water (pH: 7.5). The rice grain yielded were separated into three parts, i.e., polished rice, bran and chaff, and they were reduced to powder one by one. Twenty six element contents in the three parts of grain (each 14 samp