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Sample records for acids potential role

  1. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Tara D Raftery; Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M.; Volz, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-...

  2. Biological roles and therapeutic potential of hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptors

    Kashan eAhmed

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, deorphanization studies have described intermediates of energy metabolism to activate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and to thereby regulate metabolic functions. GPR81, GPR109A and GPR109B, formerly known as the nicotinic acid receptor family, are encoded by clustered genes and share a high degree of sequence homology. Recently, hydroxy-carboxylic acids were identified as endogenous ligands of GPR81, GPR109A and GPR109B, and therefore these receptors have been placed into a novel receptor family of hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA receptors. The HCA1 receptor (GPR81 is activated by the glycolytic metabolite 2-hydroxy-propionic acid (lactate, the HCA2 receptor is activated by the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid and the HCA3 receptor (GPR109B is a receptor for the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. While HCA1 and HCA2 receptors are present in most mammalian species, the HCA3 receptor is exclusively found in humans and higher primates. HCA receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and mediate anti-lipolytic effects in adipocytes through Gi-type G-protein-dependent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. HCA2 and HCA3 inhibit lipolysis during conditions of increased β-oxidation such as prolonged fasting, whereas HCA1 mediates the anti-lipolytic effects of insulin in the fed state. As HCA2 is a receptor for the established anti-dyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid, HCA1 and HCA3 also represent promising drug targets and several synthetic ligands for HCA receptors have been developed. In this article, we will summarize the deorphanization and pharmacological characterization of HCA receptors. Moreover, we will discuss recent progress in elucidating the physiological and pathophysiological role to further evaluate the therapeutic potential of the HCA receptor family for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  3. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    Highlights: • Triphenyl phosphate-induced toxicity in zebrafish embryos is enhanced in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate uptake or metabolism within zebrafish embryos is not altered in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate decreases expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 in zebrafish embryos. • Triphenyl phosphate inhibits retinoic acid-induced activation of human retinoic acid receptors. - Abstract: Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5–72 h post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite – were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may

  4. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Raftery, Tara D. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M. [Division of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Volz, David C., E-mail: volz@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Triphenyl phosphate-induced toxicity in zebrafish embryos is enhanced in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate uptake or metabolism within zebrafish embryos is not altered in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate decreases expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 in zebrafish embryos. • Triphenyl phosphate inhibits retinoic acid-induced activation of human retinoic acid receptors. - Abstract: Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5–72 h post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite – were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may

  5. The potential role of boswellic acids in cancer prevention and treatment.

    Roy, Nand Kishor; Deka, Anindita; Bordoloi, Devivasha; Mishra, Srishti; Kumar, Alan Prem; Sethi, Gautam; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B

    2016-07-10

    Despite the extensive research carried out in the field of cancer therapeutics, cancer is one of the most dreadful diseases in the world with no definitive treatment to date. The key attributes responsible for this are the various limiting factors associated with conventional chemotherapeutics that primarily include adverse side-effects and development of chemoresistance. Hence, there is an utter need to find compounds that are highly safe and efficacious for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Boswellic acid, a group of pentacyclic compounds, seems to be promising enough due to its inherent anti-cancerous properties. Considering this perspective, the present review highlights the established studies related to the anti-cancer potential of boswellic acid against different cancer types. The molecular mechanisms underlying the targets of boswellic acid that are accountable for its potent anti-cancer effect are also discussed. Overall, this review projects the pieces of evidence that reveal the potential of boswellic acid as a suitable candidate that can be appropriately developed and designed into a promising anti-cancer drug. PMID:27091399

  6. The biological role of a-ketoglutaric acid in physiological processes and its therapeutic potential.

    Grzesiak, Paulina; Słupecka-Ziemilska, Monika; Woliński, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present the results of recent studies on the mechanism of action and biological role of α-ketoglutaric acid (AKG) in animals including developmental period of life. AKG is an intermediate in the Krebs cycle, which generates energy for life processes. Administration of AKG has been shown to be beneficial for proper development and function of the skeletal system during growth of young organisms, as well as in adulthood. In the form of a dietary supplement it also contributes to inhibition of osteoporosis in women. Moreover, it promotes the growth of muscle mass and accelerates wound healing. AKG has a significant impact on the morphology of the gastrointestinal tract in healthy animals and animals with damaged gastrointestinal tract mucosa. It is also a promising substance for the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome, as it stimulates beneficial changes in intestinal morphology. Recent research has also revealed that AKG has neuroprotective effects. PMID:27416627

  7. Mycolic acids – biological role and potential application in Mycobacterium detection and differentiation

    Konrad Kowalski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycolic acids are one of the basic structural elements of the cell wall of bacteria from Corynebacterineae suborder. These compounds are long-chain α-hydroxy β-alkyl fatty acids with two hydrocarbon chains: longer meromycolic and shorter α-chain meromycolic α-chain. The genus Mycobacterium is characterized by the presence of mycolic acids in length from 60 to 90 carbon atoms having a fully saturated α-chain with a defined length of 22, 24 or 26 carbon atoms. Current research indicates that not only the presence of mycolic acids in the cell wall of mycobacteria is essential for the virulence of mycobacteria. It is proved that the relationship between different types of mycolic acids, their length and the degree of cyclopropanation may vary depending on the stage of infection and mycobacterial culture conditions. At the same time it has been shown that some mycolic acid types are crucial for biofilm formation, antimycobacterial drug resistance or interactions with the immune system. Recent studies also indicate that analysis of mycolic acid profiles could be an alternative to conventional methods of diagnosis of diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy or mycobacteriosis.

  8. Mycolic acids – biological role and potential application in Mycobacterium detection and differentiation

    Konrad Kowalski; Przemysław Trzepiński; Magdalena Druszczyńska; Janusz Boratyński

    2014-01-01

    Mycolic acids are one of the basic structural elements of the cell wall of bacteria from Corynebacterineae suborder. These compounds are long-chain α-hydroxy β-alkyl fatty acids with two hydrocarbon chains: longer meromycolic and shorter α-chain meromycolic α-chain. The genus Mycobacterium is characterized by the presence of mycolic acids in length from 60 to 90 carbon atoms having a fully saturated α-chain with a defined length of 22, 24 or 26 carbon atoms. Current research indicates that no...

  9. Pharmacological Properties of Protocatechuic Acid and Its Potential Roles as Complementary Medicine

    Yoswaris Semaming

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the reported pharmacological properties of protocatechuic acid (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid found in many food plants such as olives and white grapes. PCA is a major metabolite of anthocyanin. The pharmacological actions of PCA have been shown to include strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity. In in vivo experiments using rats and mice, PCA has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory as well as antihyperglycemic and antiapoptotic activities. Furthermore, PCA has been shown to inhibit chemical carcinogenesis and exert proapoptotic and antiproliferative effects in different cancerous tissues. Moreover, in vitro studies have shown PCA to have antimicrobial activities and also to exert synergistic interaction with some antibiotics against resistant pathogens. This review aims to comprehensively summarize the pharmacological properties of PCA reported to date with an emphasis on its biological properties and mechanisms of action which could be therapeutically useful in a clinical setting.

  10. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Their potential role in blood pressure prevention and management

    2010-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from fish and fish oils appear to protect against coronary heart disease: their dietary intake is in fact inversely associated to cardiovascular disease morbidity/mortality in population studies. Recent evidence suggests that at least part of their heart protective effect is mediated by a relatively small but significant decrease in blood pressure level. In fact, omega-3 PUFAs exhibit wide-ranging biological actions that include regulating both vaso...

  11. The potential role of market mechanisms in the control of acid rain

    The remit of the study was to consider whether, and in what circumstances, market mechanisms can assist in the implementation of policies to control acid rain. The study focuses on static sources of SO2. It examines how market mechanisms might be used to control them from three viewpoints - theoretical, experience of their use in other countries, and simulations of their use in this country. The study draws from all these, in order to offer guidance on the practical benefits which could be expected to flow from their use, and on the best way to introduce them. The study took as its starting point the National Plan for reducing the UK's SO2 emissions to comply with the Large Combustion Plant Directive. These arrangements impose separate quotas, or ''bubbles'' in the parlance of emission control, on England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, for the electricity industry, refineries, and other industry. (Author)

  12. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Their potential role in blood pressure prevention and management

    Claudio Borghi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs from fish and fish oils appear to protect against coronary heart disease: their dietary intake is in fact inversely associated to cardiovascular disease morbidity/mortality in population studies. Recent evidence suggests that at least part of their heart protective effect is mediated by a relatively small but significant decrease in blood pressure level. In fact, omega-3 PUFAs exhibit wide-ranging biological actions that include regulating both vasomotor tone and renal sodium excretion, partly competing with omega- 6 PUFAs for common metabolic enzymes and thereby decreasing the production of vasocostrincting rather than vasodilating and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. PUFAs also reduce angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE activity, angiotensin II formation, TGF-beta expression, enhance eNO generation and activate the parasympathetic nervous system. The final result is improved vasodilation and arterial compliance of both small and large arteries. Preliminary clinical trials involving dyslipidemic patients, diabetics and elderly subjects, as well as normotensive and hypertensive subjects confirm this working hypothesis. Future research will clarify if PUFA supplementation could improve the antihypertensive action of specific blood pressure lowering drug classes and of statins.

  13. A potential role for plasma uric acid in the endothelial pathology of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Neida K Mita-Mendoza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory cytokinemia and systemic activation of the microvascular endothelium are central to the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Recently, 'parasite-derived' uric acid (UA was shown to activate human immune cells in vitro, and plasma UA levels were associated with inflammatory cytokine levels and disease severity in Malian children with malaria. Since UA is associated with endothelial inflammation in non-malaria diseases, we hypothesized that elevated UA levels contribute to the endothelial pathology of P. falciparum malaria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured levels of UA and soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, E-selectin (sE-Selectin, thrombomodulin (sTM, tissue factor (sTF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the plasma of Malian children aged 0.5-17 years with uncomplicated malaria (UM, n = 487 and non-cerebral severe malaria (NCSM, n = 68. In 69 of these children, we measured these same factors once when they experienced a malaria episode and twice when they were healthy (i.e., before and after the malaria transmission season. We found that levels of UA, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin and sTM increase during a malaria episode and return to basal levels at the end of the transmission season (p<0.0001. Plasma levels of UA and these four endothelial biomarkers correlate with parasite density and disease severity. In children with UM, UA levels correlate with parasite density (r = 0.092, p = 0.043, sICAM-1 (r = 0.255, p<0.0001 and sTM (r = 0.175, p = 0.0001 levels. After adjusting for parasite density, UA levels predict sTM levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Elevated UA levels may contribute to malaria pathogenesis by damaging endothelium and promoting a procoagulant state. The correlation between UA levels and parasite densities suggests that parasitized erythrocytes are one possible source of excess UA. UA-induced shedding of

  14. Bile acids and derivatives, their nuclear receptors FXR, PXR and ligands: role in health and disease and their therapeutic potential.

    Zimber, Amazia; Gespach, Christian

    2008-06-01

    Bile acids, their physiology and metabolism, their role in carcinogenesis and other major human diseases are recently undergoing significant progress. Starting in 1999 when the orphan nuclear receptor FXR was shown to be specifically activated by bile acids, these compounds became part of the arsenal of ligands of the steroid hormone superfamily of nuclear receptors, including receptors of Vitamin D3, retinoids (RAR, RXR), and thyroid hormone. Another decisive discovery pointed later that the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) is activated by the endogenous toxic lithocholic acid, as well as several xenobiotics and drugs. Bile acids have recently emerged as key regulators of their own metabolism, and of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. They have important role as promoters of esophageal and colon cancers, cholangiocarcinoma, as well as new implications in breast cancer development and metastasis. This Review will emphasize novel aspects of bile acids, FXR and PXR as regulators of interfaces at cell proliferation and differentiation, cell death, survival, invasion, and metastasis during normal development and cancer progression. Signaling pathways controlled by bile acids will be presented and discussed in relation to their impact on gene expression. The biological and pharmacological significance of bile acids and their recently developed synthetic derivatives and conjugates, as well as new development in the design of FXR agonists and antagonists for clinical applications in cancer prevention and therapy, will be evaluated. This part includes advances in the utilization of bile acid transporters in drug resistance, therapeutic targeting and delivery of anticancer drugs, as well as therapeutic combinations using new bile acid derivatives, sequestrating agents and reabsorption inhibitors, and their limitations. PMID:18537536

  15. Uric Acid-Induced Adipocyte Dysfunction Is Attenuated by HO-1 Upregulation: Potential Role of Antioxidant Therapy to Target Obesity.

    Sodhi, Komal; Hilgefort, Jordan; Banks, George; Gilliam, Chelsea; Stevens, Sarah; Ansinelli, Hayden A; Getty, Morghan; Abraham, Nader G; Shapiro, Joseph I; Khitan, Zeid

    2016-01-01

    Increased uric acid levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. To examine the mechanisms by which this occurs, we hypothesized that an increase in heme oxygenase 1, a potent antioxidant gene, will decrease uric acid levels and adipocyte dysfunction via suppression of ROS and xanthine oxidase (XO) levels. We examined the effect of uric acid on adipogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the presence and absence of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), an HO-1 inducer, and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO activity inhibitor. Uric acid increased adipogenesis by increasing NADPH oxidase expression and elevation in the adipogenesis markers C/EBPα, PPARγ, and Mest, while decreasing small lipid droplets and Wnt10b levels. We treated MSCs with fructose, a fuel source that increases uric acid levels. Our results showed that fructose increased XO expression as compared to the control and concomitant treatment with CoPP significantly decreased XO expression and uric acid levels. These beneficial effects of CoPP were reversed by SnMP, supporting a role for HO activity in mediating these effects. These findings demonstrate that increased levels of HO-1 appear crucial in modulating the phenotype of adipocytes exposed to uric acid and in downregulating XO and NADPH oxidase levels. PMID:26681956

  16. The potential role of juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase in methyl farnesoate (MF) biosynthesis in the swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus.

    Xie, Xi; Tao, Tian; Liu, Mingxin; Zhou, Yanqi; Liu, Zhiye; Zhu, Dongfa

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) and methyl farnesoate (MF) play essential roles in the development and reproduction of insects and crustaceans respectively. Juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase (JHAMT) catalyzes the methyl esterification in insect JH biosynthesis, while the corresponding step in crustacean MF biosynthesis was long thought to be catalyzed by farnesoic acid O-methyltransferase (FAMeT). However, the new discovery of JHAMT orthologs in crustaceans indicates that JHAMT may also play essential role in the MF biosynthesis in crustaceans. Here we cloned and characterized the full-length cDNA encoding JHAMT in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus (PtJHAMT). Sequence and structure analysis of PtJHAMT revealed that it was composed of a 6-stranded β sheet with 9 α helices, and contained a signature Sadenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) binding motif, which is the hallmark in all SAM dependent methyltransferases (SAM-MTs). Several active sites that are critical for the interaction of SAM and JH/FA substrate were also conserved in PtJHAMT. The gene expression of PtJHAMT was highly specific to the mandibular organ, which is the sole site of MF synthesis. PtJHAMT expression significantly increased in the late-vitellogenic stage and mature stage, which suggests a possible role of PtJHAMT in modulating ovarian development. The role of PtJHAMT and PtFAMeT in MF biosynthesis was further investigated by RNA interfering (RNAi). Injection of PtJHAMT and PtFAMeT dsRNA both led to a decrease in hemolymph MF titers. Injection of PtHMGR dsRNA caused the decrease in PtJHAMT expression, but had no effect on mRNA level of PtFAMeT. Together these results suggested that JHAMT and FAMeT are both involved in the MF biosynthesis in crustaceans, while the JHAMT is highly specific to FA substrate, and FAMeT may have more catalytic functions. PMID:26952760

  17. Experimental Evidence of ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Modulation of Inflammatory Cytokines and Bioactive Lipid Mediators: Their Potential Role in Inflammatory, Neurodegenerative, and Neoplastic Diseases

    Gabriella Calviello; Hui-Min Su; Weylandt, Karsten H.; Elena Fasano; Simona Serini; Achille Cittadini

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence has emerged over the past years to show the critical role played by inflammation in the pathogenesis of several diseases including some cardiovascular, neoplastic, and neurodegenerative diseases, previously not considered inflammation-related. The anti-inflammatory action of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), as well as their potential healthy effects against the development and progression of the same diseases, has been widely studied by our and others' laborat...

  18. Tannic acid ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and potentiates its anti-cancer activity: Potential role of tannins in cancer chemotherapy

    Doxorubicin, an anthracycline antibiotic, is widely used in the treatment of various solid tumors including breast cancer. However, its use is limited due to a variety of toxicities including cardiotoxicity. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of tannic acid, a PARG/PARP inhibitor and an antioxidant, on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 embryonic rat heart myoblasts and its anti-cancer activity in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells as well as in DMBA-induced mammary tumor animals. Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity was assessed by measurement of heart weight, plasma LDH level and histopathology. Bcl-2, Bax, PARP-1 and p53 expression were examined by western blotting. Our results show that tannic acid prevents activation of PARP-1, reduces Bax and increases Bcl-2 expression in H9c2 cells, thus, preventing doxorubicin-induced cell death. Further, it reduces the cell viability of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, increases p53 expression in mammary tumors and shows maximum tumor volume reduction, suggesting that tannic acid potentiates the anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that tannic acid ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and potentiates its anti-cancer activity both in vitro (H9c2 and MDA-MB-231 cells) as well as in in vivo model of DMBA-induced mammary tumor animals.

  19. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A., E-mail: izap1@le.ac.uk [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); John Walls Renal Unit, Leicester General Hospital Leicester (United Kingdom); Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M. [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Saleem, M.A. [Academic and Children' s Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom); Topham, P.S. [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); John Walls Renal Unit, Leicester General Hospital Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub −FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub −FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub −FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  20. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA+FA) or depleted of them (HSA−FA). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA+FA over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA−FA. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA−FA. Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes

  1. LITHOCHOLIC ACID DECREASES EXPRESSION OF UGT2B7 IN CACO-2 CELLS: A POTENTIAL ROLE FOR A NEGATIVE FARNESOID X RECEPTOR RESPONSE ELEMENT

    Lu, Yuan; Heydel, Jean-Marie; LI, XIN; Bratton, Stacie; Lindblom, Tim; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7 is the major isoform catalyzing the glucuronidation of a variety of endogenous compounds including bile acids. To determine the role of bile acids in the regulation of UGT2B7 expression, Caco-2 cells were incubated with the natural human farnesoid X receptor (hFXR) ligand, chenodeoxycholic acid, as well as the secondary bile acid, lithocholic acid, derived from chenodeoxycholic acid. Incubation of Caco-2 cells with lithocholic acid in the absence of...

  2. Potential roles of PINK1 for increased PGC-1α-mediated mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and their associations with Alzheimer disease and diabetes

    Choi, Joungil; Ravipati, Avinash; Nimmagadda, Vamshi; Schubert, Manfred; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Russell, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of PINK1 and PGC-1α proteins is implicated in both mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress potentially linking metabolic abnormality and neurodegeneration. Here, we report that PGC-1α and PINK1 expression is markedly decreased in Alzheimer disease (AD) and diabetic brains. We observed a significant down-regulation of PGC-1α and PINK1 protein expression in H2O2-treated cells but not in those cells treated with N-acetyl cysteine. The protein levels of two key enzymes of the mitochondrial β-oxidation machinery, acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, very long chain (ACADVL) and mitochondrial trifunctional enzyme subunit α are significantly decreased in AD and diabetic brains. Moreover, we observed a positive relationship between ACADVL and 64 kDa PINK1 protein levels in AD and diabetic brains. Overexpression of PGC-1α decreases lipid-droplet accumulation and increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation; down-regulation of PINK1 abolishes these effects. Together, these results provide new insights into potential cooperative roles of PINK1 and PGC-1α in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, suggesting possible regulatory roles for mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of AD and diabetes. PMID:25260493

  3. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    Hong-Yan Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungal keratitis (FK is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids (ATRA have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid receptor α (RAR α, retinoic acid receptor γ (RAR γ, and retinoid X receptor α (RXR α are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK.

  4. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    Hong-Yan; Zhou; Wei; Zhong; Hong; Zhang; Miao-Miao; Bi; Shuang; Wang; Wen-Song; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    ·Fungal keratitis(FK) is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids(ATRA)have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors.Retinoic acid receptor α(RAR α), retinoic acid receptor γ(RAR γ), and retinoid X receptor α(RXR α) are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK.

  5. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues. PMID:26314861

  6. Regulation of Arachidonic Acid Pathway and Eosinophilic Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis/ Nasal Polyposis. Potential Role of Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxins

    Pérez Novo, C

    2006-01-01

    linked to inflammation. Furthermore, EP2 and EP4 receptor expression was increased in chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyp subjects in contrast to EP1 and EP3, which were down regulated in the polyp group, suggesting a distinctive role of these receptors in the pathophysiology of nasal polyposis. Finally, based on our previous findings and parallel work of our group, we studied the influence of S. aureus enterotoxins in the regulation of both eosinophilic inflammatory and eicosanoid pathway...

  7. Growth and fatty acid characterization of microalgae isolated from municipal waste-treatment systems and the potential role of algal-associated bacteria in feedstock production

    Stemmler, Kevin; Massimi, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Much research has focused on growing microalgae for biofuel feedstock, yet there remain concerns about the feasibility of freshwater feedstock systems. To reduce cost and improve environmental sustainability, an ideal microalgal feedstock system would be fed by municipal, agricultural or industrial wastewater as a main source of water and nutrients. Nonetheless, the microalgae must also be tolerant of fluctuating wastewater quality, while still producing adequate biomass and lipid yields. To address this problem, our study focused on isolating and characterizing microalgal strains from three municipal wastewater treatment systems (two activated sludge and one aerated-stabilization basin systems) for their potential use in biofuel feedstock production. Most of the 19 isolates from wastewater grew faster than two culture collection strains under mixotrophic conditions, particularly with glucose. The fastest growing wastewater strains included the genera Chlorella and Dictyochloris. The fastest growing microalgal strains were not necessarily the best lipid producers. Under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth conditions, single strains of Chlorella and Scenedesmus each produced the highest lipid yields, including those most relevant to biodiesel production. A comparison of axenic and non-axenic versions of wastewater strains showed a notable effect of commensal bacteria on fatty acid composition. Strains grown with bacteria tended to produce relatively equal proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, which is an ideal lipid blend for biodiesel production. These results not only show the potential for using microalgae isolated from wastewater for growth in wastewater-fed feedstock systems, but also the important role that commensal bacteria may have in impacting the fatty acid profiles of microalgal feedstock. PMID:26989618

  8. Growth and fatty acid characterization of microalgae isolated from municipal waste-treatment systems and the potential role of algal-associated bacteria in feedstock production.

    Stemmler, Kevin; Massimi, Rebecca; Kirkwood, Andrea E

    2016-01-01

    Much research has focused on growing microalgae for biofuel feedstock, yet there remain concerns about the feasibility of freshwater feedstock systems. To reduce cost and improve environmental sustainability, an ideal microalgal feedstock system would be fed by municipal, agricultural or industrial wastewater as a main source of water and nutrients. Nonetheless, the microalgae must also be tolerant of fluctuating wastewater quality, while still producing adequate biomass and lipid yields. To address this problem, our study focused on isolating and characterizing microalgal strains from three municipal wastewater treatment systems (two activated sludge and one aerated-stabilization basin systems) for their potential use in biofuel feedstock production. Most of the 19 isolates from wastewater grew faster than two culture collection strains under mixotrophic conditions, particularly with glucose. The fastest growing wastewater strains included the genera Chlorella and Dictyochloris. The fastest growing microalgal strains were not necessarily the best lipid producers. Under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth conditions, single strains of Chlorella and Scenedesmus each produced the highest lipid yields, including those most relevant to biodiesel production. A comparison of axenic and non-axenic versions of wastewater strains showed a notable effect of commensal bacteria on fatty acid composition. Strains grown with bacteria tended to produce relatively equal proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, which is an ideal lipid blend for biodiesel production. These results not only show the potential for using microalgae isolated from wastewater for growth in wastewater-fed feedstock systems, but also the important role that commensal bacteria may have in impacting the fatty acid profiles of microalgal feedstock. PMID:26989618

  9. Potential for Increased Photosynthetic Performance and Crop Productivity in Response to Climate Change: role of CBFs and Gibberellic Acid

    Norman Peter Andrew Huner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose that targeting the dwarf phenotype, enhanced photosynthetic performance typically associated with the cold acclimation of winter cultivars of rye (Secale cereale L., wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and Brassica napus L. may provide a novel approach to improve crop yield and productivity under abiotic as well as biotic stress conditions. In support of this hypothesis, we provide the physiological, biochemical and molecular evidence that the dwarf phenotype induced by cold acclimation is coupled to significant enhancement in photosynthetic performance, resistance to photoinhibition and a decreased dependence on photoprotection through nonphotochemical quenching which result in enhanced biomass production and ultimately increased seed yield. These system-wide changes at the levels of phenotype, physiology and biochemistry appear to be governed by the family of C-repeat / dehydration-responsive family of transcription factors (CBF/DREB1. We relate this phenomenon to the semi-dwarf, gibberellic acid insensitive, cereal varieties developed during the green revolution of the early 1960s and 1970s. We suggest that genetic manipulation of the family of C-repeat / dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1 may provide a novel approach for the maintenance and perhaps even the enhancement of plant productivity under conditions of sub-optimal growth conditions predicted for our future climate.

  10. Potential for Increased Photosynthetic Performance and Crop Productivity in Response to Climate Change: role of CBFs and Gibberellic Acid

    Huner, Norman; Dahal, Keshav; Kurepin, Leonid; Savitch, Leonid; Singh, Jas; Ivanov, Alexander; Kane, Khalil; Sarhan, Fathey

    2014-04-01

    We propose that targeting the dwarf phenotype, enhanced photosynthetic performance typically associated with the cold acclimation of winter cultivars of rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and Brassica napus L. may provide a novel approach to improve crop yield and productivity under abiotic as well as biotic stress conditions. In support of this hypothesis, we provide the physiological, biochemical and molecular evidence that the dwarf phenotype induced by cold acclimation is coupled to significant enhancement in photosynthetic performance, resistance to photoinhibition and a decreased dependence on photoprotection through nonphotochemical quenching which result in enhanced biomass production and ultimately increased seed yield. These system-wide changes at the levels of phenotype, physiology and biochemistry appear to be governed by the family of C-repeat / dehydration-responsive family of transcription factors (CBF/DREB1). We relate this phenomenon to the semi-dwarf, gibberellic acid insensitive, cereal varieties developed during the “green revolution” of the early 1960s and 1970s. We suggest that genetic manipulation of the family of C-repeat / dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) may provide a novel approach for the maintenance and perhaps even the enhancement of plant productivity under conditions of sub-optimal growth conditions predicted for our future climate.

  11. Helicobacter pylori antigens, acetylsalicylic acid, LDL and 7-ketocholesterol - their potential role in destabilizing the gastric epithelial cell barrier. An in vitro model of Kato III cells.

    Gajewski, Adrian; Mnich, Eliza; Szymański, Karol; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of gastric tissue in humans by H. pylori Gram-negative bacteria initiates gastric and duodenal ulcers and even gastric cancers. Infections promote inflammation and damage to gastric epithelium which might be followed by the impairment of its barrier function. The role of H. pylori components in these processes has not been specified. H. pylori cytotoxicity may potentially increase in the milieu of anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). The lipid transport-associated molecule such as low density lipoprotein (LDL), which is a classic risk factor of coronary heart disease (CHD) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-kCh) a product of cholesterol oxidation, which may occur during the oxidative stress in LDL could also be considered as pro-inflammatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of H. pylori antigens, ASA, LDL and 7-kCh towards Kato III gastric epithelial cells, on the basis of the cell ability to reduce tetrazolium salt (MTT) and morphology of cell nuclei assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Kato III cells were stimulated for 24 h, at 37°C and 5% CO2, with H. pylori antigens: cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) protein, the urease A subunit (UreA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ASA, LDL or 7-kCh. H. pylori LPS, ASA, LDL and 7-kCh, but not H. pylori glycine acid extract (GE), demonstrated cytotoxicity against Kato III cells, which was related to a diminished percentage of MTT reducing cells and to an increased cell population with the signs of DNA damage. The results suggest that damage to gastric epithelial cells can be induced independently by H. pylori antigens, ASA and endogenous lipid transport-associated molecules. During H. pylori infection in vivo, especially in CHD patients, synergistic or antagonistic interactions between these factors might possibly influence the disease course. Further study is necessary to explain these potential effects. PMID:26619253

  12. Duality of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Mcp-1 Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle: A Potential Role of 4-Hydroxy Hexenal

    Kohji Nagayama

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA have protective effects against atherosclerosis. Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1 is a major inflammatory mediator in the progression of atherosclerosis. However, little is known about the regulation of MCP-1 by DHA and EPA in vessels and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. In this study, we compared the effect of DHA and EPA on the expression of Mcp-1 in rat arterial strips and rat VSMCs. DHA, but not EPA, suppressed Mcp-1 expression in arterial strips. Furthermore, DHA generated 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE, an end product of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, in arterial strips as measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, 4-HHE treatment suppressed Mcp-1 expression in arterial strips, suggesting 4-HHE derived from DHA may be involved in the mechanism of this phenomenon. In contrast, Mcp-1 expression was stimulated by DHA, EPA and 4-HHE through p38 kinase and the Keap1-Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 pathway in VSMCs. In conclusion, there is a dual effect of n-3 PUFAs on the regulation of Mcp-1 expression. Further study is necessary to elucidate the pathological role of this phenomenon.

  13. Role of potassium in acid secretion

    John P Geibel

    2005-01-01

    Potassium (K+) ions are critical for the activation and catalytic cycle of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase, resulting in the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the parietal cell canaliculus. As both symptom, severity and esophageal mucosal damage in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are related to the degree of acid exposure, K+ is a logical target for approaches to inhibit acid production.The probable K+ binding site on the gastric H+,K+-ATPase has recently been described and studies are elucidating how K+ activates the enzyme. K+ channels in the apical membrane of the parietal cell are implicated in the recycling of K+ and, to date, three potential K+ channels (KCNQ1, Kir2.1 and Kir4.1) have been identified. The channels represent theoretical sites for agents to control acid secretion but it will be difficult to develop selective blockers. An alternative strategy is to prevent K+ from activating gastric H+,K+-ATPase; the potassiumcompetitive acid blocker (P-CAB) class inhibits acidsecretion by binding at or near the K+ binding site.Ongoing research is further defining the role of K+ in the functioning of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase, as well as determining the clinical utility of agents directed toward this important cation.

  14. Role of succinic acid in chemical evolution

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1982-01-01

    Succinic acid is converted into other carboxylic acids by ionizing radiation. The results obtained have been correlated with the ready formation of this compound in prebiotic experiments. Its role in biological systems may be related to its prebiotic occurrence.

  15. The role of hyaluronic acid in biomineralization

    Chen, Zhen-Hua; Ren, Xiu-Li; Zhou, Hui-Hui; Li, Xu-Dong

    2012-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid has been extensively investigated due to intrinsic properties of natural origin and strong ability to bind ions in water. Hyaluronic acid is an excellent crystal modifier because its abundant negatively charged carboxyl groups can bind the cations protruding from the crystal lattice. In this review, we mainly present the latest work focus on the role of hyaluronic acid in controlling the crystallization, breaking the symmetry of crystal, and the surface funtionalization of nanocrystals.

  16. Gene expression profile of high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6J mice: in search of potential role of azelaic acid.

    Muthulakshmi, Shanmugam; Chakrabarti, Alok K; Mukherjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) elevates circulatory fatty acids and influences glucose and fat metabolism. Azelaic acid (AzA), a naturally occurring α,ω-dicarboxylic acid in wheat, rye, barley, oat seeds and sorghum, has been reported to exert antidiabetic effects in HFD-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) C57BL/6J mice. The present study was undertaken to identify the genes that are differentially modulated by treatment with AzA in HFD-fed mice. Mice were fed HFD for 10 weeks and subjected to intragastric administration of 80 mg/kg body weight (BW) of AzA daily along with HFD from 11 to 15 weeks. Lipid profile, adipokines and cytokines were examined in the plasma/liver of mice. Whole genome profiling was performed in the liver of mice using microarray and validated by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. HFD intake resulted in significantly elevated lipids (except high-density lipoproteins), resistin, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 with marked reduction in adiponectin. Administration of AzA to HFD-fed mice significantly restored the lipids, adipokines and cytokines to near normal. Transcript profiling revealed that HFD intake activated the genes involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. Treatment with AzA caused increased expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, receptor-mediated signalling, transcription, protein modification and insulin signal transduction. AzA activates insulin signal molecules leading to insulin sensitivity. The ability of AzA to modulate the expression of these genes supports the notion that AzA is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of insulin resistance associated with T2DM. PMID:25575741

  17. Retinoids: present role and future potential

    Evans, T R J; Kaye, S B

    1999-01-01

    Vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives, retinal and retinoic acid (RA), together with a large repertoire of synthetic analogues are collectively referred to as retinoids. Naturally occurring retinoids regulate the growth and differentiation of a wide variety of cell types and play a crucial role in the physiology of vision and as morphogenic agents during embryonic development. Retinoids and their analogues have been evaluated as chemoprevention agents, and also in the management o...

  18. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases.

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya; Sanyal, Arun

    2015-10-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in the amount of atherosclerosis plaque formation and decreased portal vascular resistance and portal hypotension in animal models. Furthermore, rodent models have demonstrated antifibrotic activity using bile acid receptor agonists. Early human data using a FXR agonist, obeticholic acid, have shown promising results with improvement of histological activity and even a reduction of fibrosis. Human studies are ongoing and will provide further information on bile acid receptor agonist therapies. Thus, bile acids and their derivatives have the potential for management of liver diseases and potentially other disease states including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26320013

  19. Customer's potential value: The role of learning

    Komulainen, Hanna; Mainela, Tuija; Tähtinen, Jaana

    2013-01-01

    Current views on value creation emphasize the role of the customer, mutual investments, and value co-creation. Nevertheless, at present the customer-focused research concentrates on value expectations and value experiences as outcomes but disregards the analysis of potential value that is dependent on the customer's activity and learning in the process. The present study explores customer perceived value as a multidimensional phenomenon incorporating expected, realized, and potential dimensio...

  20. Role of dust alkalinity in acid mobilization of iron

    Ito, A.; Y. Feng

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by acid gases (e.g., SO2, HNO3, N2O5, and HCl) may play a key role in the transformation of insoluble iron (Fe2O3) to soluble forms (e.g., Fe(II), inorganic soluble species of Fe(III), and organic complexes of iron). However, mineral dust particles also have a potential of neutralizing the acidic species due to the...

  1. Roles of Abscisic Acid in Fruit Ripening

    Sutthiwal SETHA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA is a plant growth regulator, and it plays a variety of important roles throughout a plant’s life cycle. These roles include seed development and dormancy, plant response to environmental stresses, and fruit ripening. ABA concentration is very low in unripe fruit, but it increases as a fruit ripens, so it is therefore believed that ABA plays an important role in regulating the rate of fruit ripening. This article reviews the effect of ABA on ripening and quality of climacteric and non-climacteric fruits. The effects of ABA application on fruit ripening are subsequently discussed. Moreover, it is found that during fruit ripening, ABA also contributes to other functions, such as ethylene and respiratory metabolism, pigment and color changes, phenolic metabolism and nutritional contents, cell wall metabolism and fruit softening, and sugar and acid metabolism. These processes are all discussed as part of the relationship between ABA and fruit ripening, and the possibilities for its commercial application and use are highlighted.

  2. Selective potentiation of alpha 1 glycine receptors by ginkgolic acid

    Galyna Maleeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycine receptors (GlyRs belong to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptor-operated channels and are involved in numerous physiological functions, including movement, vision and pain. In search for compounds performing subunit-specific modulation of GlyRs we studied action of ginkgolic acid, an abundant Ginkgo biloba product. Using patch-clamp recordings, we analysed the effects of ginkgolic acid in concentrations from 30nM to 25µM on α1- α3 and α1/β configurations of GlyR and on GABAARs expressed in cultured CHO-K1 cells and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a cells. Ginkgolic acid caused an increase in the amplitude of currents mediated by homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1/β GlyRs and provoked a left-shift of the concentration-dependent curves for glycine. Even at high concentrations (10-25 µM ginkgolic acid was not able to augment ionic currents mediated by α2 and α3 GlyRs, or by GABAAR consisting of α1/β2/γ2 subunits. Mutation of three residues (T59A/A261G/A303S in the α2 GlyR subunit to the corresponding ones from the α1 converted the action of ginkgolic acid to potentiation with a distinct decrease in EC50 for glycine, suggesting an important role for these residues in modulation by ginkgolic acid. Our results suggest that ginkgolic acid is a novel selective enhancer of α1 GlyRs

  3. Potential health implications for acid precipitation, corrosion, and metals contamination of drinking water.

    Sharpe, W E; DeWalle, D R

    1985-01-01

    Potential health effects of drinking water quality changes caused by acid precipitation are presented. Several different types of water supply are discussed and their roles in modifying acid rain impacts on drinking water are explained. Sources of metals contamination in surface water supplies are enumerated. The authors present some results from their research into acid rain impacts on roof-catchment cisterns, small surface water supplies, and lead mobilization in acid soils. A good correlat...

  4. 鼠PVRL-2慢病毒载体的构建及其在3T3-L1细胞中的表达%Potential role of mouse PVRL-2 gene in the fatty acid metabolism

    马静; 刘晓萌; 张传海; 郑宗基; 赵倩伟; 杨鸣琦; 张雷

    2013-01-01

    Excess fat and cholesterol in food such as meat,eggs or milk could lead to hyperlipoidemia in human.Currently,to explore genes expression and their mechanisms associated with lipid metabolism has been a major focus in veterinary science.Growing bodies of evidence indicated that molecular functions of fatty acid metabolism related genes such as ApoE,ApoC1 and Tomm40 were very well characterized; however,function of their chromosomal neighbor such as PVRL-2 gene in the fatty acid metabolism remains unclear.Present study was aim to investigate potential role of mouse PVRL-2 gene in regulation of fatty acid related gene expression using preadipogenic 3T3-L1 cells.The cells were infected by Lentiviral particles which was produced by lentiviral plasmid containing Pvrl2 gene,and RNA were extracted 48h post viral infection.Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed that PVRL-2 overexpressed more than 100 folds upon PVRL-2 virus transformation compared to the control.Notably,the expression of PPARα gene which is a key player in the fatty acid oxidation was strongly induced (4.5 fold increase) post PVRL-2 viral infection,but not other genes that related to the fatty acid metabolism such as CPT1A,FASN,COX7A,PGC1B,ASADM showed similar changes.Furthermore,bioinformatics analyses revealed that Nectin-2,coded by PVRL-2,should be a transmembrane protein with a signal peptide.In conclusion,the present study demonstrated that overexpression of PVRL-2 induce the expression of PPARα,which highlight the potential roles of PVRL-2 gene in fatty acid metabolism.Future studies are needed to determine detailed molecular function of PVRL-2 gene in fatty acid metabolism.%过多的脂肪和胆固醇随着肉蛋奶被人体摄入是导致人类高血脂等各种疾病诱发的原因之一,而探索脂代谢通路相关基因的表达变化及其调控机制已经成为分子生物学技术在兽医学领域中的研究热点.与高血脂有关的ApoE、ApoC1和Tomm40等基因研究较多,

  5. Potential physiological role of plant glycosidase inhibitors

    Bellincampi, D.; Carmadella, L.; Delcour, J.A.;

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes including glycosidases, transglycosidases, glycosyltransferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases are responsible for the enzymatic processing of carbohydrates in plants. A number of carbohydrate-active enzymes are produced by microbial pathogens and...... insects responsible of severe crop losses. Plants have evolved proteinaceous inhibitors to modulate the activity of several of these enzymes. The continuing discovery of new inhibitors indicates that this research area is still unexplored and may lead to new exciting developments. To date, the role of the...... inhibitors is not completely understood. Here we review recent results obtained on the best characterised inhibitors, pointing to their possible biological role in vivo. Results recently obtained with plant transformation technology indicate that this class of inhibitors has potential biotechnological...

  6. Role of bioactive fatty acids in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Juárez-Hernández, Eva; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Uribe, Misael; Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat deposition in hepatocytes, and a strong association with nutritional factors. Dietary fatty acids are classified according to their biochemical properties, which confer their bioactive roles. Monounsaturated fatty acids have a dual role in various human and murine models. In contrast, polyunsaturated fatty acids exhibit antiobesity, anti steatosic and anti-inflammatory effects. The combination of these forms of fatty acids-according to dietary type, daily intake and the proportion of n-6 to n-3 fats-can compromise hepatic lipid metabolism. A chemosensory rather than a nutritional role makes bioactive fatty acids possible biomarkers for NAFLD. Bioactive fatty acids provide health benefits through modification of fatty acid composition and modulating the activity of liver cells during liver fibrosis. More and better evidence is necessary to elucidate the role of bioactive fatty acids in nutritional and clinical treatment strategies for patients with NAFLD. PMID:27485440

  7. Endocrine and paracrine role of bile acids

    Verena Keitel, Ralf Kubitz, Dieter Häussinger

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids are not only important for the absorption of dietary lipids and fat soluble vitamins but are signalling molecules with diverse endocrine and paracrine functions. Bile acids regulate bile acid, lipid and glucose metabolism and modulate temperature and energy homeostasis. Furthermore, bile acids can not only promote cell proliferation and liver regeneration but can also induce programmed cell death. Bile acid functions are mediated through different pathways which comprise the activation of nuclear hormone receptors, of intracellular kinases and of the plasma membrane-bound, G-protein coupled bile acid receptor TGR5/Gpbar-1.

  8. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    Rakesh Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    approach to treatment. With this objective, the present review summarizes the evidence supporting the involvement of neurogenic inflammation and neuropeptides in the pathophysiology and pharmacology of migraine headache as well as its potential significance in better tailoring therapeutic interventions in migraine or other neurological disorders. In addition, we have briefly highlighted the pathophysiological role of neurogenic inflammation in various other neurological disorders.

  9. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation.

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    . With this objective, the present review summarizes the evidence supporting the involvement of neurogenic inflammation and neuropeptides in the pathophysiology and pharmacology of migraine headache as well as its potential significance in better tailoring therapeutic interventions in migraine or other neurological disorders. In addition, we have briefly highlighted the pathophysiological role of neurogenic inflammation in various other neurological disorders. PMID:27293326

  10. Antimicrobial potential of probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    Avonts, L; De Vuyst, L

    2001-01-01

    Antibacterial activity is an important characteristic of probiotics. A possible way to achieve this antibacterial activity is through the production of bacteriocins. This study shows that the commercial probiotic strains Lactobacillus johnsonii LA1 and Lactobacillus casei YIT 9029 produce bacteriocins. The nature of the antimicrobial compound could be derived from its behaviour: a narrow inhibitory spectrum (only active against closely related strains), loss of activity when treated with proteinases, and rather small molecular masses (around 6000 Da or less). Further, three bacteriocins produced by Lb. johnsonii LA1, Lb. casei YIT 9029 and Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 showed inhibitory activity against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. However, a fourth bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 was not able to inhibit H. pylori. This indicates that some bacteriocins produced by specific probiotic strains can fulfil a role in the inhibition of this common pathogen. PMID:15954651

  11. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya; Sanyal, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in t...

  12. Acidic lakes and streams in the United States: The role of acidic deposition

    A statistically designed survey of lakes and streams in acid-sensitive areas of the United States, the National Surface Water Survey (NSWS), was used to identify the role of acidic deposition, relative to other factors, in causing acidic conditions in 1,181 lakes and 4,668 streams. Atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of acid anions in 75% of the acidic lakes and 47% of the acidic streams. Organic anions are dominant in one-fourth of the acidic lakes and streams; acidic mine drainage is the dominant acid source in 25% of the acidic streams. Other causes of acidic conditions are relatively unimportant on a regional scale. Nearly all the deposition-dominated acidic systems were found in six well-delineated subpopulations that represent about one-fourth of the NSWS lake population and one-third of the NSWS stream population

  13. ACID-EXTRUDING TRANSPORTERS IN MAMMARY AND PANCREATIC ADENOCARCINOMA: REGULATION AND ROLES IN CELL MOTILITY

    Pedersen, S.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of solid tumors is an altered pH-profile compared to normal tissues. This at least in part reflects increased glycolytic metabolism, necessitating increased acid extrusion to maintain survival, and in turn stimulating cancer cell motility [1, 2]. Acid extruding transporters are therefore interesting potential targets in cancer. The overall aim of these studies was to explore the regulation and roles of acid extruding transporters in human mammary and pancreatic adenocar...

  14. Long-term potentiation in frontal cortex: Role of NMDA-modulated polysynaptic excitatory pathways

    Sutor, Bernd; Hablitz, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The present study examined the role of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in synaptic plasticity in regular-spiking cells of rat frontal cortex. Intracortical stimulation, at levels subthreshold for elicitation of action potentials, evoked a late excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) in layer II III neurons that was sensitive to the selective NMDA antagonist -2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV). This late EPSP showed marked short-term frequency-dependent depression, suggesting th...

  15. Role of dust alkalinity in acid mobilization of iron

    A. Ito

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by acid gases (e.g., SO2, HNO3, N2O5, and HCl may play a key role in the transformation of insoluble iron (Fe2O3 to soluble forms (e.g., Fe(II, inorganic soluble species of Fe(III, and organic complexes of iron. However, mineral dust particles also have a potential of neutralizing the acidic species due to the alkaline buffer ability of carbonate minerals (e.g., CaCO3 and MgCO3. Here we demonstrate the impact of dust alkalinity on the acid mobilization of iron in a three-dimensional aerosol chemistry transport model, which is incorporated with a mineral dissolution scheme. In our model simulations, most of the alkaline dust minerals cannot be entirely consumed by inorganic acids during the transport across the North Pacific Ocean. As a result, the inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution in aerosol solution during the long-range transport. Over the North Pacific Ocean, only a small fraction (<0.2% of iron dissolves from hematite in the coarse-mode dust aerosols, when assuming internally mixed with carbonate minerals. However, if the iron-containing minerals are externally mixed with carbonate minerals, a significant amount (1–2% of iron would dissolve from the acid mobilization. It implies that the alkaline content in dust aerosols might help to explain the inverse relationship between aerosol iron solubility and particle size.

  16. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    Evelien P. J. G. Neis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Roles of phytochemicals in amino acid nutrition.

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yinlong

    2011-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is often used as dietary supplements to maintain good health in animals and humans. Here, we review the current knowledge about effects of CHM (including ultra-fine Chinese herbal powder, Acanthopanax senticosus extracts, Astragalus polysaccharide, and glycyrrhetinic acid) as dietary additives on physiological and biochemical parameters in pigs, chickens and rodents. Additionally, we propose possible mechanisms for the beneficial effects of CHM on the animals. These mechanisms include (a) increased digestion and absorption of dietary amino acids; (b) altered catabolism of amino acids in the small intestine and other tissues; (c) enhanced synthesis of functional amino acids (e.g., arginine, glutamine and proline) and polyamines; and (d) improved metabolic control of nutrient utilization through cell signaling. Notably, some phytochemicals and glucocorticoids share similarities in structure and physiological actions. New research findings provide a scientific and clinical basis for the use of CHM to improve well-being in livestock species and poultry, while enhancing the efficiency of protein accretion. Results obtained from animal studies also have important implications for human nutrition and health. PMID:21196382

  18. Potential role of sirtuins in livestock production.

    Ghinis-Hozumi, Y; Antaramian, A; Villarroya, F; Piña, E; Mora, O

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD(+)-dependent histone and protein deacetylases, which have been studied during the last decade with a focus on their role in lifespan extension and age-related diseases under normal and calorie-restricted or pathological conditions. However, sirtuins also have the ability to regulate energy homeostasis as they can sense the metabolic state of the cell through the NAD(+)/NADH ratio; hence, changes in the diet can modify the expression of these enzymes. Dietary manipulations are a common practice currently being used in livestock production with favorable results, probably due in part to the enhanced activity of sirtuins. Nevertheless, sirtuin expression in livestock species has not been a research target. For these reasons, the goal of this review is to awaken interest in these enzymes for future detailed characterization in livestock species by presenting a general introduction to what sirtuins are, how they work and what is known about their role in livestock. PMID:23031219

  19. Potential role of tetrandrine in cancer therapy

    CHEN Yu-Jen

    2002-01-01

    Tetrandrine, a bisbenylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the dried root of Stephenia tetrandra S Moore, exhibits very broad pharmacological actions, including anti-tumor activity. The beneficial effects of tetrandrine on tumor cell cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, multidrug resistance, normal tissue radioprotection, and angiogenesis are most promising and deserve great attention. Tetrandrine has potential either as a tumoricidal agent or as an adjunct to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To evaluate the potential clinical efficacy of tetrandrine for cancer therapy,more mechanism-based pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic studies are required.

  20. Potential Role of Exercise in Retinal Health.

    Pardue, Machelle T; Chrenek, Micah A; Schmidt, Robin H; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    For many patients suffering vision loss due to retinal degeneration, the potential exists for therapeutic intervention to halt or delay disease progression. Proposed molecular, pharmacological, and surgical treatments are expensive and complicated. Finding low-cost interventions to sustain vision and thereby quality of life is vitally important. This chapter reviews findings from animal model and human subject studies indicating that physical exercise has direct, beneficial effects on regions of the central nervous system and is protective against neurodegenerative disease, including recent data from animal models showing similar effects for retina and vision. Potential local and systemic mechanistic pathways for exercise-induced retinal neuroprotection are discussed. PMID:26310173

  1. Role of acid catalysis in dimethyl ether conversion processes

    Tartamella, T.L.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Acidity plays an important role in the conversion of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) to hydrocarbons and oxygenates. In the conversion to hydrocarbons over zeolite catalyst, Broensted acidity is the main contributor to the first hydrocarbon formed. Here, acidity is also an important factor in determining olefin, paraffin, and aromatic content in the final product distribution. Catalyst life has also been found to be related to acidity content in zeolites. DME conversion to oxygenates is especially dependent on high acidity catalysts. Superacids like BF{sub 3}, HF-BF{sub 3}, and CF{sub 3}COOH have been used in the past for conversion of DME in carbonylation reactions to form methyl acetate and acetic acid at high pressures. Recently, heteropoly acids and their corresponding metal substituted salts have been used to convert DME to industrially important petrochemicals resulting in shorter reaction times and without the use of harsh operating conditions.

  2. Potential role for metformin in urologic oncology

    Sayyid, Rashid Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide. It is currently considered first-line pharmacological agent for management of diabetes mellitus type 2. Recent studies have suggested that metformin may have further benefits, especially in the field of urologic oncology. Use of metformin has been shown to be associated with decreased incidence and improved outcomes of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. These studies suggest that metformin does have a future role in the prevention and management of urologic malignancies. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings in this field and its implications on the management of urologic oncology patients. PMID:27195314

  3. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  4. Butyric acid stimulates bovine neutrophil functions and potentiates the effect of platelet activating factor.

    Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, A I; Burgos, J; Opazo, L; Castro, L; Hidalgo, M A; Figueroa, C D; Taubert, A; Hermosilla, C; Burgos, R A

    2016-08-01

    Increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production is associated with subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and activation of inflammatory processes. In humans and rodents, SCFAs modulate inflammatory responses in the gut via free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2). In bovines, butyric acid is one of the most potent FFA2 agonists. Its expression in bovine neutrophils has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a role in innate immune response in cattle. This study aimed to evaluate if butyric acid modulates oxidative and non-oxidative functions or if it can potentiate other inflammatory mediators in bovine neutrophils. Our results showed that butyric acid can activate bovine neutrophils, inducing calcium (Ca(2+)) influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, two second messengers involved in FFA2 activation. Ca(2+) influx induced by butyric acid was dependent on the extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) source and phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Butyric acid alone had no significant effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and chemotaxis; however, a priming effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, was observed. Butyric acid increased CD63 expression and induced the release of neutrophil granule markers matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and lactoferrin. Finally, we observed that butyric acid induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation without affecting cellular viability. These findings suggest that butyric acid, a component of the ruminal fermentative process, can modulate the innate immune response of ruminants. PMID:27288853

  5. Role of dust alkalinity in acid mobilization of iron

    A. Ito

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by acid gases (e.g., SO2, HNO3, N2O5, and HCl may play a key role in the transformation of insoluble iron (Fe in the oxidized or ferric (III form to soluble forms (e.g., Fe(II, inorganic soluble species of Fe(III, and organic complexes of iron. On the other hand, mineral dust particles have a potential of neutralizing the acidic species due to the alkaline buffer ability of carbonate minerals (e.g., CaCO3 and MgCO3. Here we demonstrate the impact of dust alkalinity on the acid mobilization of iron in a three-dimensional aerosol chemistry transport model that includes a mineral dissolution scheme. In our model simulations, most of the alkaline dust minerals cannot be entirely consumed by inorganic acids during the transport across the North Pacific Ocean. As a result, the inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during the long-range transport to the North Pacific Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2% dissolves from hematite in the coarse-mode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. On the other hand, a significant fraction of iron (1–2% dissolves in the fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model quantitatively reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles as suggested by measurements over the Pacific Ocean. It implies that the buffering effect of alkaline content in dust aerosols might help to explain the inverse relationship between aerosol iron solubility and particle size. We also demonstrate that the iron solubility is sensitive to the chemical specification of iron-containing minerals in dust. Compared with the dust sources, soluble iron from combustion sources contributes to a relatively marginal effect for deposition of soluble iron over the North

  6. The Role of Flavonoids as Potential Radioprotectors

    Investigations for effective and non toxic compounds with radioprotection capability led to increasing interest in naturally occurring antioxidants since most of known chemical radioprotectors (AET, WR2721, WR 1065, etc.) express toxic side effects that limit their use in medical practice. Among the promissing compounds there are flavonoids, whosentioxidant activity is based on ability of direct free radicals scavenging or stabilizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by interacting with the reactive compound of the radical. Because of the high reactivity of the hydroxyl substituents of flavonoids, radicals are made inactive. Flavonoids can also increase the function of the endogenous antioxidant enzyme systems: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and gluthation. Antioxidant effects may be also a combined result of radical scavenging and interaction with enzyme functions. Flavonoids induce activities of the immune system as well. Increased hematopoietic activity could account for the improved hematopoietic tolerance to radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated radioprotective effects of selected flavonoids (caffeic acid, chrysin, naringin and quercetin) administered to mice prior to whole-body irradiation with γ-rays (absorbed dose was 9 Gy). The survival analysis and alkaline comet assay on white blood cells were employed both on irradiated and non-irradiated animals. Blood samples were taken 30 min. after irradiation. Appropriate negative and positive control groups (administered chemical radioprotector AET, S-(2-Aminoethyl) isothiouronium bromide hydrobromide, i. p. at a dose of 281 mg kg-1 body weight) were also selected and handled in the same manner. We observed statistically significant difference in surviving time of mice pre-treated with test components and the most effective radioprotector was quercetin. Tested flavonoids were not genotoxic to non-irradiated mice and offered good

  7. Physiological roles of acid-base sensors.

    Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential for life. The macromolecules upon which living organisms depend are sensitive to pH changes, and physiological systems use the equilibrium between carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and protons to buffer their pH. Biological processes and environmental insults are constantly challenging an organism's pH; therefore, to maintain a consistent and proper pH, organisms need sensors that measure pH and that elicit appropriate responses. Mammals use multiple sensors for measuring both intracellular and extracellular pH, and although some mammalian pH sensors directly measure protons, it has recently become apparent that many pH-sensing systems measure pH via bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase. PMID:25340964

  8. Daclatasvir: potential role in hepatitis C

    Lee C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Choongho Lee College of Pharmacy, Dongguk University-Seoul, Goyang, Republic of Korea  Abstract: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It has been a tremendous burden on global health care systems. With the advent of a number of new direct-acting and host-targeting antiviral agents, current interferon-α- and ribavirin-based HCV therapy has started to move towards an interferon-sparing or even interferon-free strategy. In this regard, a recently identified NS5A inhibitor, daclatasvir, showed a great promise in clinical trials as another new class of direct-acting anti-HCV therapeutics, with a distinct mechanism of action. In this review, a variety of preclinical as well as clinical proof-of-concept studies of daclatasvir, including the studies of its discovery, mechanism of action, viral resistance, and host polymorphism profiles are reviewed. In addition, a role of daclatasvir in the future therapy for HCV patients is discussed briefly. Keywords: hepatitis C virus, nonstructural protein 5A, NS5A inhibitor, hepatitis C treatment

  9. Phospholipase A2 and 3H-hemicholinium-3 binding sites in rat brain: A potential second-messenger role for fatty acids in the regulation of high-affinity choline uptake

    The involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and fatty acid release in the regulation of sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in rat brain was assessed in vitro through the use of the specific binding of 3H-hemicholinium-3 (3H-HCh-3). Addition of arachidonic acid and other unsaturated fatty acids to rat striatal membranes in vitro resulted in a dose-dependent, temperature-independent activation of 3H-HCh-3 binding. Scatchard analysis revealed that these changes in binding result from a 2-fold increase in the affinity and capacity of 3H-HCh-3 binding. Saturated fatty acids, lysophospholipids, and phospholipids did not affect specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. Addition of defatted BSA to membranes, which had been treated previously with arachidonic acid, completely reversed the increase in specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. However, several inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism, including nordihydroguaiaretic acid, indomethacin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, did not alter arachidonic acid-induced changes in 3H-HCh-3 binding, suggesting that unsaturated fatty acids, and not their metabolites, are directly responsible for the observed activation of specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. Additionally, unsaturated fatty acids dose-dependently inhibited high-affinity 3H-choline uptake in rat striatal synaptosomes, apparently due to the disruption of synaptosomal integrity. The phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinacrine hydrochloride, trifluoperazine, and 4-bromophenacylbromide dose-dependently inhibited potassium depolarization-induced activation of specific 3H-HCh-3 binding in slices of rat brain in vitro. Similarly, both quinacrine and trifluoperazine inhibited the metabolism of phospholipids and the release of fatty acids evoked by either elevated KCl or calcium ionophore A23187

  10. Extracellular Vesicles: Role in Inflammatory Responses and Potential Uses in Vaccination in Cancer and Infectious Diseases

    Campos, João Henrique; Soares, Rodrigo Pedro; Ribeiro, Kleber; Cronemberger Andrade, André; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cells and organisms release membrane structures containing proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which have a wide range of functions concerning intercellular communication and signaling events. Recently, the characterization and understanding of their biological role have become a main research area due to their potential role in vaccination, as biomarkers antigens, early diagnostic tools, and therapeutic applications. Here, we will overview the recent advances and studies of Evs shed by tumor cells, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, focusing on their inflammatory role and their potential use in vaccination and diagnostic of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26380326

  11. Unlocked nucleic acid - an RNA modification with broad potential

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    DNA duplexes, quadruplexes or i-motifs. Moreover, UNA monomers were found to be compatible with RNase H activity, a property which is important for single stranded antisense constructs. Notably, UNA monomers can be applied in the design of superior siRNAs, combining potent gene silencing and......The first unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomer was described more than a decade ago, but only recent reports have revealed the true potential applications of this acyclic RNA mimic. UNA monomers enable the modulation of the thermodynamic stability of various nucleic acid structures such as RNA and...

  12. Roles of Intrinsic Disorder in Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions

    Dyson, H. Jane

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids typify the role of disordered segments, linkers, tails and other entities in the function of complexes that must form with high affinity and specificity but which must be capable of dissociating when no longer needed. While much of the emphasis in the literature has been on the interactions of disordered proteins with other proteins, disorder is also frequently observed in nucleic acids (particularly RNA) and in the proteins that interact with t...

  13. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes. PMID:27052717

  14. POTENTIAL OF CEREALS AND PSEUDOCEREALS FOR LACTIC ACID FERMENTATIONS

    Ľubomír Valík

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cereals and pseudocereals play a significant role in human nutrition. They are source of specific carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, fibre and wide spectrum of vitamins and minerals. Moreover, pseudocereals have a higher content of essential amino acids, e.g. lysine and tryptophan. Cereals and pseudocereals may also contain some antinutrition factors, such as phytic acid, polyphenols, trypsin inhibitors and inhibitors of α-amylase. These are responsible for reducing of protein and carbohydrate digestibility and decreasing accessibility of minerals due to complex formation. This review assesses the applications of cereals and pseudocereals in fermentation technology including the effects of lactic acid bacteria on nutrition, sensory quality and shelf-life. This work is focusing also on fermentation process of cereal matrice leading in degradation of antinutritional factors increase of nutritional value and availability of minerals, proteins and carbohydrates. Lactic acid bacteria produce many aromatic compounds that are beneficial to organoleptic atributes of the products. However, a few questions have been not answered in experiments, yet. For eample, is there any space for evaluation of their suitability to act as carriers of probiotics? Could such the attempts lead in development some special formulae suitable for consumers with food allergies or deficiencies?doi:10.5219/127

  15. Technological and economic potential of poly(lactic acid) and lactic acid derivatives

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.; Bonsignore, P.; Moon, S.H.; Frank, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}40,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food processing and industrial applications. lactic acid h,as the potential of becoming a very large volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from renewable carbohydrates for use as feedstocks for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, plant growth regulators, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and specially chemical intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from crude fermentation broths and the conversion of tactic acid to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. The development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis (ED) with bipolar membranes, extractive distillations integrated with fermentation, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The use of bipolar ED can virtually eliminate the salt or gypsum waste produced in the current lactic acid processes. In this paper, the recent technical advances in tactic and polylactic acid processes are discussed. The economic potential and manufacturing cost estimates of several products and process options are presented. The technical accomplishments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the future directions of this program at ANL are discussed.

  16. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids

    Hester M Den Ruijter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (3-PUFAs reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long term 3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated 3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated 3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (3 or sunflower oil (9, as control for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered 3-PUFAs. Plasma of 3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and isolated myocytes of 3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, 3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than 9 myocytes. In the 9 myocytes, but not in the 3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA+DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated 3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered 3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac 3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term 3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  17. Evaluation of the potential roles of microribonucleic acids in the interaction of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    Micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are endogenous, 18-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs that potently mediate post-transcriptional silencing of a broad range of genes. They are emerging as critical regulators of a broad spectrum of biological processes, including immune responses and host-pathogen inte...

  18. The role and mechanism of fatty acids in gallstones

    Shuo-Dong Wu; Kazuhisa Uchiyama; Ying Fan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholelithiasis is a common entity in China, but its etiology and pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated. Pigment stones of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct still form a high proportion in China, while they are rare in Europeans. To date, reports on fatty acids in stones remain few. We analyzed the quantity of fatty acids in different stones from Chinese and Japanese cases and discussed the role and mechanism of fatty acids in the formation of pigment stones. METHODS: Clinical data from 18 Chinese and 37 Japanese patients with different types of stones were analyzed using the procedure for extracting fatty acids from gallstones and high performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: The total fatty acid and free fatty acid contents of pigment stones were markedly higher than those in black or cholesterol stones. The ratio of free saturated to free unsaturated fatty acids was highest in intrahepatic and less in extrahepatic pigment stones, which were signiifcantly different from the other two kinds of stones. CONCLUSIONS: This indicates that phospholipase participates in the course of pigment stone formation. The action of phospholipase A1 is more important than phospholipase A2.

  19. Role of CCN2 in Amino Acid Metabolism of Chondrocytes.

    Murase, Yurika; Hattori, Takako; Aoyama, Eriko; Nishida, Takashi; Maeda-Uematsu, Aya; Kawaki, Harumi; Lyons, Karen M; Sasaki, Akira; Takigawa, Masaharu; Kubota, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    CCN2/connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a multi-functional molecule that promotes harmonized development and regeneration of cartilage through its matricellular interaction with a variety of extracellular biomolecules. Thus, deficiency in CCN2 supply profoundly affects a variety of cellular activities including basic metabolism. A previous study showed that the expression of a number of ribosomal protein genes was markedly enhanced in Ccn2-null chondrocytes. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the impact of CCN2 on amino acid and protein metabolism in chondrocytes. Comparative metabolome analysis of the amino acids in Ccn2-null and wild-type mouse chondrocytes revealed stable decreases in the cellular levels of all of the essential amino acids. Unexpectedly, uptake of such amino acids was rather enhanced in Ccn2-null chondrocytes, and the addition of exogenous CCN2 to human chondrocytic cells resulted in decreased amino acid uptake. However, as expected, amino acid consumption by protein synthesis was also accelerated in Ccn2-null chondrocytes. Furthermore, we newly found that expression of two genes encoding two glycolytic enzymes, as well as the previously reported Eno1 gene, was repressed in those cells. Considering the impaired glycolysis and retained mitochondrial membrane potential in Ccn2-null chondrocytes, these findings suggest that Ccn2 deficiency induces amino acid shortage in chondrocytes by accelerated amino acid consumption through protein synthesis and acquisition of aerobic energy. Interestingly, CCN2 was found to capture such free amino acids in vitro. Under physiological conditions, CCN2 may be regulating the levels of free amino acids in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 927-937, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26364758

  20. Sorption and leaching potential of acidic herbicides in Brazilian soils.

    Spadotto, Claudio A; Hornsby, Arthur G; Gomes, Marco A F

    2005-01-01

    Leaching of acidic herbicides (2,4-D, flumetsulam, and sulfentrazone) in soils was estimated by comparing the original and modified AF (Attenuation Factor) models for multi-layered soils (AFi). The original AFi model was modified to include the concept of pH-dependence for Kd (sorption coefficient) based on pesticide dissociation and changes in the accessibility of soil organic functional groups able to interact with the pesticide. The original and modified models, considering soil and herbicide properties, were applied to assess the leaching potential of selected herbicides in three Brazilian soils. The pH-dependent Kd values estimated for all three herbicides were observed to be always higher than pH-independent Kd values calculated using average Koc data, and therefore the original AFi model overestimated the overall leaching potential for the soils studied. PMID:15656159

  1. Potential ecological roles of flavonoids from Stellera chamaejasme

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Liming; Jin, Hui; Qin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae), a perennial weed, distributes widely in the grasslands of Russia, Mongolia and China. The plant synthesizes various secondary metabolites including a group of flavonoids. To our knowledge, flavonoids play important roles in the interactions between plants and the environment. So, what are the benefits to S. chamaejasme from producing these flavonoids? Here, we discuss the potential ecological role of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme in protecting the pla...

  2. The Roles of Organic Acids in C4 Photosynthesis

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are involved in numerous metabolic pathways in all plants. The finding that some plants, known as C4 plants, have four-carbon dicarboxylic acids as the first product of carbon fixation showed these organic acids play essential roles as photosynthetic intermediates. Oxaloacetate (OAA), malate, and aspartate (Asp) are substrates for the C4 acid cycle that underpins the CO2 concentrating mechanism of C4 photosynthesis. In this cycle, OAA is the immediate, short-lived, product of the initial CO2 fixation step in C4 leaf mesophyll cells. The malate and Asp, resulting from the rapid conversion of OAA, are the organic acids delivered to the sites of carbon reduction in the bundle-sheath cells of the leaf, where they are decarboxylated, with the released CO2 used to make carbohydrates. The three-carbon organic acids resulting from the decarboxylation reactions are returned to the mesophyll cells where they are used to regenerate the CO2 acceptor pool. NADP-malic enzyme-type, NAD-malic enzyme-type, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type C4 plants were identified, based on the most abundant decarboxylating enzyme in the leaf tissue. The genes encoding these C4 pathway-associated decarboxylases were co-opted from ancestral C3 plant genes during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Malate was recognized as the major organic acid transferred in NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 species, while Asp fills this role in NAD-malic enzyme-type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-type plants. However, accumulating evidence indicates that many C4 plants use a combination of organic acids and decarboxylases during CO2 fixation, and the C4-type categories are not rigid. The ability to transfer multiple organic acid species and utilize different decarboxylases has been suggested to give C4 plants advantages in changing and stressful environments, as well as during development, by facilitating the balance of energy between the two cell types involved in the C4 pathway of CO2

  3. Role of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids in cardiovascular disease prevention

    Lee AH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Andy H Lee1, Naoko Hiramatsu21School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Laboratory of Nutritional Science, School of Human Science and Environment, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Its prevention through a healthy lifestyle and appropriate diet is important. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA therapy has shown promise in both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. This commentary discusses the nutritional role of n-3 PUFA, including its metabolism and physiological role, comparison with n-6 series PUFA, as well as complications due to deficiency. Clinical use of n-3 PUFA for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, recommended intake, and potential adverse effects will also be examined. The available scientific evidence suggests that its supplementation and clinical use ranging from 0.4 to 1 g/day can provide tangible benefits. However, further studies are required to determine optimal dosing and the relative ratio of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid that provides maximal cardioprotection and treatment of cardiovascular disease.Keywords: alpha-linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, cardiovascular disease, fish oil, polyunsaturated fatty acids

  4. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid technology in forensic dentistry

    Pankaj Datta; Sonia Sood Datta

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) analysis methods have been applied to forensic cases. Forensic dental record comparison has been used for human identification in cases where destruction of bodily tissues or prolonged exposure to the environment has made other means of identification impractical, that is, after fire exposure or mass disaster. Teeth play an important role in identification and criminology, due to their unique characteristics and relatively high degree of phys...

  5. Potential Production of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids from Microalgae

    Noer Abyor Handayani; Dessy Ariyanti; Hady Hadiyanto

    2011-01-01

    Currently, public awareness of healthcare importance increase. Polyunsaturated fatty acid is an essential nutrition for us, such arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. The need of Polyunsaturated fatty acid generally derived from fish oil, but fish oil has a high risk chemical contamination. Microalgae are single cell microorganism, one of Phaeodactylum tricornutum which have relatively high content of eicosapentaenoic acid (29,8%). Biotechnology market of Polyunsat...

  6. Occurrence and role of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products.

    Françoise, Leroi

    2010-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in fish flesh has long been disregarded because the high post-mortem pH, the low percentage of sugars, the high content of low molecular weight nitrogenous molecules and the low temperature of temperate waters favor the rapid growth of pH-sensitive psychrotolerant marine Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium. In seafood packed in both vacuum (VP) and modified atmosphere (MAP) packaging commonly CO(2) enriched, the growth of the Gram-negative aerobic bacteria group (predominantly pseudomonads) is effectively inhibited and the number reached by LAB during storage is higher than that achieved in air but always several log units lower than the trimethylamine oxide (TMA-O) reducing and CO(2)-resistant organisms (Shewanella putrefaciens and Photobacterium phosphoreum). Accordingly, LAB are not of much concern in seafood neither aerobically stored nor VP and MAP. However, they may acquire great relevance in lightly preserved fish products (LPFP), including those VP or MAP. Fresh fish presents a very high water activity (aw) value (0.99). However, aw is reduced to about 0.96 when salt (typically 6% WP) is added to the product. As a result, aerobic Gram-negative bacteria are inhibited, which allows the growth of other organisms more resistant to reduced aw, i.e. LAB, and then they may acquire a central role in the microbial events occurring in the product. Changes in consumers' habits have led to an increase of convenient LPFP with a relative long shelf-life (at least 3 weeks) which, on the other hand, may constitute a serious problem from a safety perspective since Listeria monocytogenes and sometimes Clostridium botulinum (mainly type E) may able to grow. In any case the LAB function in marine products is complex, depending on species, strains, interaction with other bacteria and the food matrix. They may have no particular effect or they may be responsible for spoilage and, in certain cases, they may even exert

  7. The Potential Role of Honey and its Polyphenols in Preventing Heart Diseases: A Review

    Khalil, M I; Sulaiman, S A

    2010-01-01

    Honey is rich in phenolic compounds, which act as natural antioxidants and are becoming increasingly popular because of their potential role in contributing to human health. A wide range of phenolic constituents is present in honey like quercetin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), acacetin, kaempferol, galangin which have promising effect in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Many epidemiological studies have shown that regular intake of phenolic compounds is associated with reduced...

  8. Conceptualising the Potential Role of L1 in CLIL

    Lin, Angel M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) is a rapidly growing area of both research and practice in all parts of the world, especially in Europe and Asia. As a young discipline, CLIL has a good potential of distinguishing itself from monolingual L2 immersion education models by becoming more flexible and balanced about the role of L1 in…

  9. Potential Production of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids from Microalgae

    Noer Abyor Handayani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, public awareness of healthcare importance increase. Polyunsaturated fatty acid is an essential nutrition for us, such arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. The need of Polyunsaturated fatty acid generally derived from fish oil, but fish oil has a high risk chemical contamination. Microalgae are single cell microorganism, one of Phaeodactylum tricornutum which have relatively high content of eicosapentaenoic acid (29,8%. Biotechnology market of Polyunsaturated fatty acid is very promising for both foods and feeds, because the availability of abundant raw materials and suitable to develop in the tropics. This literature review discusses about the content of Polyunsaturated fatty acid in microalgae, omega-3, omega-6, Polyunsaturated fatty acid production processes, and applications in public health

  10. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  11. PROBIOTIC POTENTIALS AMONG LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM CURD

    Shruthy VV

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Curd is a commonly used fermented milk product in India since time immemorial. The scientific use of curd as a source of probiotic (good bacteria for health has not been much examined. The yougurt (curd containing probiotics is in Indian market and highly acclaimed. Therefore the status of curd as a source of probiotics is in question and requires scientific examination of its content, so the study was carried out. Probiotic potentials of two bacterial isolates from 20 different curd samples were identified as Lactobacillus spp. by the determination of morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics, were investigated. The antibacterial potential against diarrhoegenic bacterial pathogens was also examined. The reference strain used was Lactobacillus acidophilus, MTCC 447. The percentage survivability of the strains at pH 3.5, was found to be satisfactory (>90%. Bile salt resistance (0.3% sodium thioglycollate was found to be between 80.41% and 83.2%. The pH decrease of the strains with time showed slow acidification activity. The lactic acid production of the strains ranges from 1.83 ± 0.12 to 3.93 ± 0.07 g. The strains were β-galactosidase producer and were resistant to principal antibiotics tested. But the absence of plasmids showed that they are intrinsically resistant or chromosome encoded. Strains showed maximum inhibition zone against V. cholerae O139 (13.67 ± 0.57 to 15.33 ± 0.57 mm in comparison to other diarrhoeagenic bacteria. Only 10% of the examined curd samples had probiotic bacteria. Isolated strains of Lactobacillus spp. showed satisfactory probiotic potentials in comparison with reference strains and with antibacterial activity against diarrhoeagenic pathogens and thus maybe useful in the management of diarrhoea and also in functional food industry.

  12. Beyond plant defense: insights on the potential of salicylic and methylsalicylic acid to contain growth of the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Dieryckx, Cindy; Gaudin, Vanessa; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Girard, Vincent; Job, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Using Botrytis cinerea we confirmed in the present work several previous studies showing that salicylic acid, a main plant hormone, inhibits fungal growth in vitro. Such an inhibitory effect was also observed for the two salicylic acid derivatives, methylsalicylic and acetylsalicylic acid. In marked contrast, 5-sulfosalicylic acid was totally inactive. Comparative proteomics from treated vs. control mycelia showed that both the intracellular and extracellular proteomes were affected in the presence of salicylic acid or methylsalicylic acid. These data suggest several mechanisms that could potentially account for the observed fungal growth inhibition, notably pH regulation, metal homeostasis, mitochondrial respiration, ROS accumulation and cell wall remodeling. The present observations support a role played by the phytohormone SA and derivatives in directly containing the pathogen. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002873. PMID:26528317

  13. Beyond plant defense: insights on the potential of salicylic and methylsalicylic acid to contain growth of the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea

    Cindy eDieryckx

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Using Botrytis cinerea we confirmed in the present work several previous studies showing that salicylic acid, a main plant hormone, inhibits fungal growth in vitro. Such an inhibitory effect was also observed for the two salicylic acid derivatives, methylsalicylic and acetylsalicylic acid. In marked contrast, 5-sulfosalicylic acid was totally inactive. Comparative proteomics from treated vs control mycelia showed that both the intracellular and extracellular proteomes were affected in the presence of salicylic acid or methylsalicylic acid. These data suggest several mechanisms that could potentially account for the observed fungal growth inhibition, notably pH regulation, metal homeostasis, mitochondrial respiration, ROS accumulation and cell wall remodeling. The present observations support a role played by the phytohormone SA and derivatives in directly containing the pathogen. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002873.

  14. Potential role of ticks as vectors of bluetongue virus

    Bouwknegt, C.; Rijn, van, Michela; Schipper, J.M.J.; Holzel, D.R.; Boonstra, J.; Nijhof, A.; de, Rooij, R.; Jongejan, F.

    2010-01-01

    When the first outbreak of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV8) was recorded in North-West Europe in August 2006 and renewed outbreaks occurred in the summer of 2007 and again in 2008, the question was raised how the virus survived the winter. Since most adult Culicoides vector midges are assumed not to survive the northern European winter, and transovarial transmission in Culicoides is not recorded, we examined the potential vector role of ixodid and argasid ticks for bluetongue virus. Four sp...

  15. The Potential Role for Fusion Power in Future Energy Markets

    Full text: In order to explore the potential role for fusion in a future energy market, and clarify the conditions under which fusion may be important in different world regions, a global energy scenario model, based on the model generator TIMES supplied by the International Energy Agency, has been developed. The model covers the whole of this century and includes fusion technologies. Results are reported here. (author)

  16. Cannabinoid receptor 2: Potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation Review

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB1, CB2) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthr...

  17. Acid ceramidase and the treatment of ceramide diseases: The expanding role of enzyme replacement therapy.

    Schuchman, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    Ceramides are a diverse group of sphingolipids that play important roles in many biological processes. Acid ceramidase (AC) is one key enzyme that regulates ceramide metabolism. Early research on AC focused on the fact that it is the enzyme deficient in the rare genetic disorder, Farber Lipogranulomatosis. Recent research has revealed that deficiency of the same enzyme is responsible for a rare form of spinal muscular atrophy associated with myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Due to their diverse role in biology, accumulation of ceramides also has been implicated in the pathobiology of many other common diseases, including infectious lung diseases, diabetes, cancers and others. This has revealed the potential of AC as a therapy for many of these diseases. This review will focus on the biology of AC and the potential role of this enzyme in the treatment of human disease. PMID:27155573

  18. Recognizing protein–protein interfaces with empirical potentials and reduced amino acid alphabets

    Wodak Shoshana

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In structural genomics, an important goal is the detection and classification of protein–protein interactions, given the structures of the interacting partners. We have developed empirical energy functions to identify native structures of protein–protein complexes among sets of decoy structures. To understand the role of amino acid diversity, we parameterized a series of functions, using a hierarchy of amino acid alphabets of increasing complexity, with 2, 3, 4, 6, and 20 amino acid groups. Compared to previous work, we used the simplest possible functional form, with residue–residue interactions and a stepwise distance-dependence. We used increased computational ressources, however, constructing 290,000 decoys for 219 protein–protein complexes, with a realistic docking protocol where the protein partners are flexible and interact through a molecular mechanics energy function. The energy parameters were optimized to correctly assign as many native complexes as possible. To resolve the multiple minimum problem in parameter space, over 64000 starting parameter guesses were tried for each energy function. The optimized functions were tested by cross validation on subsets of our native and decoy structures, by blind tests on series of native and decoy structures available on the Web, and on models for 13 complexes submitted to the CAPRI structure prediction experiment. Results Performance is similar to several other statistical potentials of the same complexity. For example, the CAPRI target structure is correctly ranked ahead of 90% of its decoys in 6 cases out of 13. The hierarchy of amino acid alphabets leads to a coherent hierarchy of energy functions, with qualitatively similar parameters for similar amino acid types at all levels. Most remarkably, the performance with six amino acid classes is equivalent to that of the most detailed, 20-class energy function. Conclusion This suggests that six carefully chosen amino

  19. Antimicrobial potential of bioconverted products of omega-3 fatty acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Bioconverted omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (bEPA) and docosahexanoic acid (bDHA), obtained from the microbial conversion of non-bioconverted eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 were evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. bEPA and bDHA at 5 µl/...

  20. The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada

    The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada is assessed for the period 1980 to 2025 for large-scale uses only. Present uses of hydrogen, and specifically electrolytic hydrogen, are discussed briefly and hydrogen production processes are summarized. Only hydrogen derived from natural gas, coal, or electrolysis of sater are considered. Cost estimates of electrolytic hydrogen are obtained from a parametric equation, comparing values for unipolar water elecctrklyser technologies with those for bipolar electrolysers. Both by-products of electrolytic hydrogen production, namely heavy water and oxygen, are evaluated. Electrolytic hydrogen, based on non-fossil primary energy sources, is also considered as ankther 'liquid fuel option' for Canada along with the alcohols. The market potential for hydrogen in general and electrolytic hydrogen is assessed. Results show that the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen is large by the year 2025

  1. Ursolic acid plays a protective role in obesity-induced cardiovascular diseases.

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Yu, Ya-Mei; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Chiang, Su-Yin; Chan, Hsu-Chin; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic disturbance of obesity is one of the most common risk factors of atherosclerosis. Resistin, an obesity-induced adipokine, can induce the expression of cell adhesion molecules and the attachment of monocytes to endothelial cells, which play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Ursolic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in fruits and many herbs, exhibits an array of biological effects such as anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential underlying mechanisms of the effect of ursolic acid on resistin-induced adhesion of U937 cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data indicated that ursolic acid suppressed the adhesion of U937 to HUVECs and downregulated the expression of adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and E-selectin, in resistin-induced HUVECs by decreasing the production of intracellular reaction oxygen species (ROS) and attenuating the nuclear translocation of NFκB. Ursolic acid appeared to inhibit resistin-induced atherosclerosis, suggesting that ursolic acid may play a protective role in obesity-induced cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26991492

  2. Role in Cheese Flavour Formation of Heterofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria from Mesophilic Starter Cultures

    Pedersen, Thomas Bæk

    Undefined mesophilic cheese starters are complex ecosystems that contain both homofermentative and heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria, with the Lactococcus genera representing the former and Lceuonostoc and sometimes Lactobacillus the latter. These starters originate from old butter starters...... dairy strains had, in comparison with plant isolates, the ability to ferment citrate and lacked several genes involved in the fermentation of complex carbohydrates. The presented research in this thesis has gained insight in to the role of heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria in cheese flavour...... formation. The traditional DL-starters contained numerous of strains of heterofermentative Le. mesenteroides, whereas Le. pseudomesenteroides and  only were found in some starters. The potential of heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria to effect the flavour formation in cheese seems to be dependent on how...

  3. Lactic acid and methane: improved exploitation of biowaste potential.

    Dreschke, G; Probst, M; Walter, A; Pümpel, T; Walde, J; Insam, H

    2015-01-01

    This feasibility study investigated a two-step biorefining approach to increase the value gained by recycling of organic municipal solid waste. Firstly, lactic acid was produced via batch fermentation at 37°C using the indigenous microbiome. Experiments revealed an optimal fermentation period of 24h resulting in high yields of lactic acid (up to 37gkg(-1)). The lactic acid proportion of total volatile fatty acid content reached up to 83%. Lactobacilli were selectively enriched to up to 75% of the bacterial community. Additionally conversion of organic matter to lactic acid was increased from 22% to 30% through counteracting end product inhibition by continuous lactic acid extraction. Secondly, fermentation residues were used as co-substrate in biomethane production yielding up to 618±41Nmlbiomethaneg(-1) volatile solids. Digestate, the only end product of this process can be used as organic fertilizer. PMID:25460983

  4. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    R. Wagner

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario

  5. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    R. Wagner

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario

  6. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-08-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  7. Anglo-American capitalism: the role and potential role of social accounting

    David Collison; Colin Dey; Gwen Hannah; Lorna Stevenson

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper seeks to consider the impact and potential impact of social accounting at the macro level. It aims to explore the potential for “silent” or “shadow” social accounting to hold Anglo-American capitalism to account for its social outcomes relative to other “varieties of capitalism”. Design/methodology/approach – The role of accounting in spreading Anglo-American capitalist values is outlined. This is followed by a discussion of macro social indicators and their potential to ...

  8. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid technology in forensic dentistry

    Pankaj Datta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA analysis methods have been applied to forensic cases. Forensic dental record comparison has been used for human identification in cases where destruction of bodily tissues or prolonged exposure to the environment has made other means of identification impractical, that is, after fire exposure or mass disaster. Teeth play an important role in identification and criminology, due to their unique characteristics and relatively high degree of physical and chemical resistance. The use of a DNA profile test in forensic dentistry offers a new perspective in human identification. The DNA is responsible for storing all the genetic material and is unique to each individual. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article gives an overview of the evolution of DNA technology in the last few years, highlighting its importance in cases of forensic investigation.

  9. POST - SURGICAL WOUND CARE IN ORTHOPEDICS: ROLE OF TRANEXAMIC ACID

    Anil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Post - surgical infections constitutes a major cause of morbidity and mortality in post - operative patients in orthopaedics . Most of these are hospital acquired and organisms being resistant to major antibiotics and patients are not in a condition to be discharged from hospital. The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of Tranexaemic acid in prevention of wound inf ection in post - operative patients. A total of 120 patients were taken of which 30 each were operated for spine , intertrochanteric fractures , bipolar hemiarthroplasty and general orthopaedics ( F orearm plating , distal humeral plating , philos. Age of the pat ient were taken between 18 to 65 years. Males formed about 60% of the patients. Duration from injury to surgery was 3.56 days. Two patients out of 60 on tranexaemic acid were infected whereas 4 out of 60 patients who were not given the medicine were infected. The drug proves to be also effective in reducing wound dehiscence rate , need of prolonged antibiotics and thus overall reduces the postoperative morbidity in pa tients.

  10. The Potential Roles of Bisphenol A (BPA Pathogenesis in Autoimmunity

    Datis Kharrazian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a monomer found in commonly used consumer plastic goods. Although much attention in recent years has been placed on BPA’s impact as an endocrine disruptor, it also appears to activate many immune pathways involved in both autoimmune disease development and autoimmune reactivity provocation. The current scientific literature is void of research papers linking BPA directly to human or animal onset of autoimmunity. This paper explores the impact of BPA on immune reactivity and the potential roles these mechanisms may have on the development or provocation of autoimmune diseases. Potential mechanisms by which BPA may be a contributing risk factor to autoimmune disease development and progression include its impact on hyperprolactinemia, estrogenic immune signaling, cytochrome P450 enzyme disruption, immune signal transduction pathway alteration, cytokine polarization, aryl hydrocarbon activation of Th-17 receptors, molecular mimicry, macrophage activation, lipopolysaccharide activation, and immunoglobulin pathophysiology. In this paper a review of these known autoimmune triggering mechanisms will be correlated with BPA exposure, thereby suggesting that BPA has a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity.

  11. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  12. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  13. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Anna Edlund

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts.

  14. Peptide nucleic acids and their potential applications in biotechnology

    Buchardt, O.; Egholm, M.; Berg, R.H.; Nielsen, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are novel DNA mimics in which the sugar-phosphate backbone has been replaced with a backbone based on amino acids1-3. PNAs exhibit sequence-specific binding to DNA and RNA with higher affinities and specificities than unmodified DNA. They,are resistant to nuclease and...... protease attack in serum and cellular extracts and, thus, appear very promising as diagnostic and biomolecular probes, and possibly as antisense and antigene drugs....

  15. The crucial protective role of glutathione against tienilic acid hepatotoxicity in rats

    To investigate the hepatotoxic potential of tienilic acid in vivo, we administered a single oral dose of tienilic acid to Sprague-Dawley rats and performed general clinicopathological examinations and hepatic gene expression analysis using Affymetrix microarrays. No change in the serum transaminases was noted at up to 1000 mg/kg, although slight elevation of the serum bile acid and bilirubin, and very mild hepatotoxic changes in morphology were observed. In contrast to the marginal clinicopathological changes, marked upregulation of the genes involved in glutathione biosynthesis [glutathione synthetase and glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gcl)], oxidative stress response [heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1] and phase II drug metabolism (glutathione S-transferase and UDP glycosyltransferase 1A6) were noted after 3 or 6 h post-dosing. The hepatic reduced glutathione level decreased at 3-6 h, and then increased at 24 or 48 h, indicating that the upregulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene and the late increase in hepatic glutathione are protective responses against the oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses caused by tienilic acid. In a subsequent experiment, tienilic acid in combination with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of Gcl caused marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with extensive centrilobular hepatocyte necrosis, whereas BSO alone showed no hepatotoxicity. The elevation of ALT by this combination was observed at the same dose levels of tienilic acid as the upregulation of the Nrf2-regulated genes by tienilic acid alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that the impairment of glutathione biosynthesis may play a critical role in the development of tienilic acid hepatotoxicity through extensive oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses

  16. A review on protocatechuic Acid and its pharmacological potential.

    Kakkar, Sahil; Bais, Souravh

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids and polyphenols are heterocyclic molecules that have been associated with beneficial effects on human health, such as reducing the risk of various diseases like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular and brain diseases. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a type of widely distributed naturally occurring phenolic acid. PCA has structural similarity with gallic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid which are well-known antioxidant compounds. More than 500 plants contain PCA as active constituents imparting various pharmacological activity and these effects are due to their antioxidant activities, along with other possible mechanisms, such as anti-inflammatory properties and interaction with several enzymes. Over the past two decades, there have been an increasing number of publications on polyphenols and flavonoids, which demonstrate the importance of understanding the chemistry behind the antioxidant activities of both natural and synthesized compounds, considering the benefits from their dietary ingestion as well as pharmacological use. This work aims to review the pharmacological effects of PCA molecules in humans and the structural aspects that contribute to these effects. PMID:25006494

  17. A potential role for Drosophila mucins in development and physiology.

    Zulfeqhar A Syed

    Full Text Available Vital vertebrate organs are protected from the external environment by a barrier that to a large extent consists of mucins. These proteins are characterized by poorly conserved repeated sequences that are rich in prolines and potentially glycosylated threonines and serines (PTS. We have now used the characteristics of the PTS repeat domain to identify Drosophila mucins in a simple bioinformatics approach. Searching the predicted protein database for proteins with at least 4 repeats and a high ST content, more than 30 mucin-like proteins were identified, ranging from 300-23000 amino acids in length. We find that Drosophila mucins are present at all stages of the fly life cycle, and that their transcripts localize to selective organs analogous to sites of vertebrate mucin expression. The results could allow for addressing basic questions about human mucin-related diseases in this model system. Additionally, many of the mucins are expressed in selective tissues during embryogenesis, thus revealing new potential functions for mucins as apical matrix components during organ morphogenesis.

  18. D-Aspartic acid: an endogenous amino acid with an important neuroendocrine role.

    D'Aniello, Antimo

    2007-02-01

    D-Aspartic acid (d-Asp), an endogenous amino acid present in vertebrates and invertebrates, plays an important role in the neuroendocrine system, as well as in the development of the nervous system. During the embryonic stage of birds and the early postnatal life of mammals, a transient high concentration of d-Asp takes place in the brain and in the retina. d-Asp also acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator. Indeed, this amino acid has been detected in synaptosomes and in synaptic vesicles, where it is released after chemical (K(+) ion, ionomycin) or electric stimuli. Furthermore, d-Asp increases cAMP in neuronal cells and is transported from the synaptic clefts to presynaptic nerve cells through a specific transporter. In the endocrine system, instead, d-Asp is involved in the regulation of hormone synthesis and release. For example, in the rat hypothalamus, it enhances gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release and induces oxytocin and vasopressin mRNA synthesis. In the pituitary gland, it stimulates the secretion of the following hormones: prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), and growth hormone (GH) In the testes, it is present in Leydig cells and is involved in testosterone and progesterone release. Thus, a hypothalamus-pituitary-gonads pathway, in which d-Asp is involved, has been formulated. In conclusion, the present work is a summary of previous and current research done on the role of d-Asp in the nervous and endocrine systems of invertebrates and vertebrates, including mammals. PMID:17118457

  19. Monosilicic acid potential in phytoremediation of the contaminated areas.

    Ji, Xionghui; Liu, Saihua; Huang, Juan; Bocharnikova, Elena; Matichenkov, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    The contamination of agricultural areas by heavy metals has a negative influence on food quality and human health. Various remediation techniques have been developed for the removal and/or immobilization of heavy metals (HM) in contaminated soils. Phytoremediation is innovative technology, which has advantages (low cost, easy monitoring, high selectivity) and limitations, including long time for procedure and negative impact of contaminants on used plants. Greenhouse investigations have shown that monosilicic acid can be used for regulation of the HM (Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn) mobility in the soil-plant system. If the concentration of monosilicic acid in soil was increased from 0 to 20 mg L(-1) of Si in soil solution, the HM bioavailability was increased by 30-150%. However, the negative influence on the barley by HM was reduced under monosilicic acid application. If the concentration of monosilicic acid was increased more than 20 mg L(-1), the HM mobility in the soil was decreased by 40-300% and heavy metal uptake by plants was reduced 2-3 times. The using of the monosilicic acid may increase the phytoremediation efficiency. However the technique adaptation will be necessary for phytoremediation on certain areas. PMID:27213242

  20. System-level understanding of the potential acid-tolerance components of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 under extreme acid stress.

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    In previous study, two extremely acidophilic strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 (collection site: bioleaching leachate) and ZJJN-5 (collection site: bioleaching wastewater) were isolated from a typical industrial bio-heap in China. Here, we unraveled the potential acid-tolerance components of ZJJN-3 by comparing the physiological differences with ZJJN-5 under different acid stresses. The parameters used for comparison included intracellular pH (pHin), capsule morphology, fatty acid composition of cell membrane, transcription of key molecular chaperones, H(+)-ATPase activities and NAD(+)/NADH ratio. It was indicated that the acid-tolerance of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 was systematically regulated. Capsule first thickened and then shed off along with increased acid stress. Cell membrane maintained the intracellular stability by up-regulating the proportion of unsaturated fatty acid and cyclopropane fatty acids. Meanwhile, the transcription of key repair molecular chaperones (GrpE-DnaK-DnaJ) was up-regulated by 2.2-3.5 folds for ensuring the proper folding of peptide. Moreover, low pHin promoted ZJJN-3 to biosynthesize more H(+)-ATPase for pumping H(+) out of cells. Furthermore, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio increased due to the decreased H(+) concentration. Based on the above physiological analysis, the potential acid-tolerance components of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 were first proposed and it would be useful for better understanding how these extremophiles responded to the high acid stress. PMID:26264736

  1. The role of transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome

    Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming; Tepel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is correlated with increased cardiovascular risk and characterized by several factors, including visceral obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Several members of a large family of nonselective cation entry channels, e.g., transient receptor potential (TRP......) canonical (TRPC), vanilloid (TRPV), and melastatin (TRPM) channels, have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, disruption of TRP channel expression or function may account for the observed increased cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome patients. TRPV1 regulates...... evidence that a single TRP channelopathy may be the cause of all metabolic syndrome characteristics, further studies will help to clarify the role of specific TRP channels involved in the metabolic syndrome. (Hypertens Res 2008; 31: 1989-1995)....

  2. Potential role of atomic force microscopy in systems biology.

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Teran Arce, Fernando; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information data sets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors, and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  3. Cannabinoid receptor 2: potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation.

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-06-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB(1), CB(2)) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, autoimmune disorders, multiple sclerosis, HIV-1 infection, stroke, Alzheimer's disease to name a few), mainly mediated by CB(2) activation. Development of CB(2) agonists as therapeutic agents has been hampered by the complexity of their intracellular signaling, relative paucity of highly selective compounds and insufficient data regarding end effects in the target cells and organs. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in studies of CB(2) activation in the setting of neuroinflammation, immunomodulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:23471521

  4. The potential role of biomarkers in predicting gestational diabetes.

    Brink, Huguette S; van der Lely, Aart Jan; van der Linden, Joke

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes (GD) is a frequent complication during pregnancy and is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. It is suggested that a disturbing environment for the foetus, such as impaired glucose metabolism during intrauterine life, may result in enduring epigenetic changes leading to increased disease risk in adult life. Hence, early prediction of GD is vital. Current risk prediction models are based on maternal and clinical parameters, lacking a strong predictive value. Adipokines are mainly produced by adipocytes and suggested to be a link between obesity and its cardiovascular complications. Various adipokines, including adiponectin, leptin and TNF&, have shown to be dysregulated in GD. This review aims to outline biomarkers potentially associated with the pathophysiology of GD and discuss the role of integrating predictive biomarkers in current clinical risk prediction models, in order to enhance the identification of those at risk. PMID:27492245

  5. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a.

    Luqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Disconnected (disco-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles.

  6. The potential role of carbon labeling in a green economy

    Over the past several years, labeling schemes that focus on a wide range of environmental and social metrics have proliferated. Although little empirical evidence has been generated yet with respect to carbon footprint labels, much can be learned from our experience with similar product labels. We first review the theory and evidence on the role of product labeling in affecting consumer and firm behavior. Next, we consider the role of governments and nongovernmental organizations, concluding that international, multistakeholder organizations have a critical part to play in setting protocols and standards. We argue that it is important to consider the entire life cycle of a product being labeled and develop an international standard for measurement and reporting. Finally, we examine the potential impact of carbon product labeling, discussing methodological and trade challenges and proposing a framework for choosing products best suited for labeling. - Highlights: ► Economic theory provides rationale for product information on carbon footprint. ► Small but growing evidence that labels will affect demand and product choice. ► International protocol using multi-stakeholder process is needed. ► Product priority should be based on life-cycle emissions and likely behavior changes. ► International trade law poses low risk for voluntary private carbon footprint labels.

  7. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  8. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality. PMID:26341209

  9. ROLE OF INCREASED SERUM URIC ACID IN STROKE

    Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of hyperuricemia as a risk factor for acute stroke is debatable as it is not clear whether Serum Uric Acid ( SUA promotes or protects against the cerebrovascular disease . In this study , the serum uric acid level and other risk factors like lipid profile , S . Adenosine Deaminase was estimated in patients with acute stroke and their relationship with ischemic stroke , and the association of factors like age , sex , obesity and smoking in the development of ischemic stroke . METHODS: A prospective , randomized study conducted on 100 cases of ischemic stroke presenting to Department of Medicine , GMC , Amritsar . Risk factors fo r stroke were noted such as hypertension , diabetes mellitus , metabolic syndrome , smoking , and obesity . Serum uric acid levels were measured in cases and controls . In addition the measurement of other risk factors likes lipid profile , Fasting blood sugar an d S . Adenosine deaminase was done . The collected data were analyzed using Student’s t - test . RESULTS: Out of 100 patients , 69 were males and 31 were females . The hyperuricemia and ischemic stroke was more in males than females ( 46 vs . 23 . Hyperuricemia and ischemic stroke was associated with higher FBS ( mg/dl 122 . 33±18 . 46 and 129 . 37±15 . 40 , HbA1c ( mg/dl 6 . 87±2 . 1 and 6 . 82±6 . 21 , S . Triglyceride ( mg/dl 162 . 34±14 . 08 and 154 . 34±10 . 12 , S . Total Cholesterol ( mg/dl 169±12 . 10 and 160 . 09±14 . 10 , S . HDL - C ( mg/dl 42 . 11±10 . 17 and 45 . 16±11 . 40 , S . LDL - C ( mg/dl 119 . 85±14 . 07 and 110 . 42±12 . 67 , S . ADA ( U/L 45 . 62±7 . 90 and 49 . 47±9 . 57 at admission and at discharge respectively compared to the control . CONCLUSIONS: H yperuricemia and ischemic stroke was significantly higher in pa tients with hypertension , Diabetes mellitus , metabolic syndrome , chronic smokers and BMI > 25 kg/m2 . So control of these factors should be done to prevent future onset of ischemic stroke .

  10. Structurally modified fatty acids - clinical potential as tracers of metabolism

    Dudczak, R.; Schmoliner, R.; Angelberger, P.; Knapp, F.F.; Goodman, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recently 15-p-iodophenyl-betamethyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMPPA) was proposed for myocardial scintigraphy, as possible probe of metabolic processes other than ..beta..-oxidation. In 19 patients myocardial scintigraphy was done after i.v. BMPPA (2 to 4 mCi). Data were collected (LAO 45/sup 0//14; anterior/5) for 100 minutes in the fasted patients. From heart (H) and liver (L) organ to background (BG) ratios were calculated, and the elimination (E) behavior was analyzed from BG (V. cava region) corrected time activity curves. In 10 patients plasma and urine were examined. By CHCl/sub 3//MeOH extraction of plasma samples (90 min. pi) both in water and in organic medium soluble catabolites were found. TLC fractionation showed that those were co-migrating, compared to standards, with benzoic acid, BMPPA and triglycerides. In urine (0 to 2h pi: 4.1% dose) hippuric acid was found. It is concluded that BMPPA is a useful agent for myocardial scintigraphy. Its longer retention in the heart compared to unbranched radioiodinated fatty acids may facilitate SPECT studies. Rate of elimination and plasma analysis indicate the metabolic breakdown of BMPPA. Yet, the complexity of the supposed mechanism may impede curve interpretation in terms of specific metabolic pathways. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Exploring the Potential of Fungal Arylacetonitrilases in Mandelic Acid Synthesis

    Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Křenková, Alena; Martínková, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 5 (2015), s. 466-474. ISSN 1073-6085 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fungal arylacetonitrilases * (R)-Mandelic acid manufacture * (R,S)-Mandelonitrile hydrolysis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.876, year: 2014

  12. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of liquids have been screened as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles that involve the vaporization of sulfuric acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids is described with the results of some preliminary high temperature test data presented.

  13. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    Johan Gardères

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  14. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  15. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia: the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    Ozgocmen, Salih; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Sogut, Sadik; Akyol, Omer

    2006-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome with an unknown etiology. Recent years added new information to our understanding of FM pathophysiology. Researches on genetics, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones, oxidative stress, and mechanisms of pain modulation, central sensitization, and autonomic functions in FM revealed various abnormalities indicating that multiple factors and mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of FM. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide may play an important role in FM pathophysiology, however it is still not clear whether oxidative stress abnormalities documented in FM are the cause or the effect. This should encourage further researches evaluating the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of FM and the efficacy of antioxidant treatments (omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, vitamins and others) in double blind and placebo controlled trials. These future researches will enhance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:16328420

  16. Hypochlorous Acid as a Potential Wound Care Agent

    Wang, L.; Bassiri, M; R. Najafi; Najafi, K.; Yang, J.; Khosrovi, B; Hwong, W; Barati, E; Belisle, B; Celeri, C; Robson, MC

    2007-01-01

    Background: A topical antimicrobial that can decrease the bacterial bioburden of chronic wounds without impairing the wound's ability to heal is a therapeutic imperative. A stabilized form of hypochlorous acid (NVC-101) has been demonstrated in vitro and in standard toxicity testing to possess properties that could fulfill these criteria. Materials and Methods: Using a standard rodent model of a chronically infected granulating wound, various preparations of NVC-101 and multiple treatment reg...

  17. Excitatory amino acid transporters as potential drug targets

    Bunch, Lennart; Erichsen, Mette Navy; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are transmembrane proteins responsible for the uptake of (S)-glutamate (Glu) from the synaptic cleft, thereby terminating the glutamatergic neurotransmitter signal. Today five subtypes have been identified. Except for EAAT2, their individual ...... and detailed understanding of EAATs be obtained. Thus we encourage collaboration between organic chemists and molecular pharmacologists, who, together, may pave the way for new EAAT ligands of importance....

  18. Metabolism meets immunity: The role of free fatty acid receptors in the immune system.

    Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-08-15

    There are significant numbers of nutrient sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be found in cells of the immune system and in tissues that are involved in metabolic function, such as the pancreas or the intestinal epithelium. The family of free fatty acid receptors (FFAR1-4, GPR84), plus a few other metabolite sensing receptors (GPR109A, GPR91, GPR35) have been for this reason the focus of studies linking the effects of nutrients with immunological responses. A number of the beneficial anti-inflammatory effects credited to dietary fats such as omega-3 fatty acids are attributed to their actions on FFAR4.This might play an important protective role in the development of obesity, insulin resistance or asthma. The role of the short-chain fatty acids resulting from fermentation of fibre by the intestinal microbiota in regulating acute inflammatory responses is also discussed. Finally we assess the therapeutic potential of this family of receptors to treat pathologies where inflammation is a major factor such as type 2 diabetes, whether by the use of novel synthetic molecules or by the modulation of the individual's diet. PMID:27002183

  19. Potential Role of Olive Oil Phenolic Compounds in the Prevention of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Jose Rodríguez-Morató

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MD has been associated with a reduced incidence of neurodegenerative diseases and better cognitive performance. Virgin olive oil, the main source of lipids in the MD, is rich in minor phenolic components, particularly hydroxytyrosol (HT. HT potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions have attracted researchers’ attention and may contribute to neuroprotective effects credited to MD. In this review HT bioavailability and pharmacokinetics are presented prior to discussing health beneficial effects. In vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects together with its multiple mechanisms of action are reviewed. Other microconstituents of olive oil are also considered due to their potential neuroprotective effects (oleocanthal, triterpenic acids. Finally, we discuss the potential role of HT as a therapeutic tool in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    Cherian, M. George; Jayasurya, A.; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2003-12-10

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  1. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  2. Assessment of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis potentialities to recover metals, sulfuric acid, and recycled water from acid gold mining effluent.

    Ricci, Bárbara C; Ferreira, Carolina D; Marques, Larissa S; Martins, Sofia S; Amaral, Míriam C S

    2016-01-01

    This work assessed the potential of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to treat acid streams contaminated with metals, such as effluent from the pressure oxidation process (POX) used in refractory gold ore processing. NF and RO were evaluated in terms of rejections of sulfuric acid and metals. Regarding NF, high sulfuric acid permeation (∼100%), was observed, while metals were retained with high efficiencies (∼90%), whereas RO led to high acid rejections (gold ore processing or commercialized. A metal-enriched stream could be also recovered in NF retentate and transferred to a subsequent metal recovery stage. In addition, considering the high acid rejection obtained through the proposed system, RO permeate could be used as recycling water. PMID:27438241

  3. Potential sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids for saprophagous soil invertebrates

    Elhottová, Dana; Frouz, Jan; Krištůfek, Václav; Lukešová, Alena; Nováková, Alena; Tříska, Jan

    České Budějovice: Institute of Soil Biology AS CR, 2002, s. 31-37. ISBN 80-86525-00-7. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /6./. České Budějovice (CZ), 23.04.2001-25.04.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/99/P033; GA AV ČR IAB6066903; GA AV ČR IAA6066001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : polyunsaturated fatty acids * soil microorganisms * animal diet Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  4. Potential Antidepressant Role of Neurotransmitter CART: Implications for Mental Disorders

    Peizhong Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating public health concerns. Although no single cause of depression has been identified, it appears that interaction among genetic, epigenetic, biochemical, environmental, and psychosocial factors may explain its etiology. Further, only a fraction of depressed patients show full remission while using current antidepressants. Therefore, identifying common pathways of the disorder and using that knowledge to develop more effective pharmacological treatments are two primary targets of research in this field. Brain-enriched neurotransmitter CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript has multiple functions related to emotions. It is a potential neurotrophic factor and is involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and stress response as well as in energy homeostasis. CART is also highly expressed in limbic system, which is considered to have an important role in regulating mood. Notably, adolescents carrying a missense mutation in the CART gene exhibit increased depression and anxiety. Hence, CART peptide may be a novel promising antidepressant agent. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in depression and CART. In particular, we emphasize a new antidepressant function for CART.

  5. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  6. Potential Role of Honey in Learning and Memory

    Zahiruddin Othman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The composition and physicochemical properties of honey are variable depending on its floral source and often named according to the geographical location. The potential medicinal benefits of Tualang honey, a multifloral jungle honey found in Malaysia, have recently been attracting attention because of its reported beneficial effects in various diseases. This paper reviews the effects of honey, particularly Tualang honey, on learning and memory. Information regarding the effects of Tualang honey on learning and memory in human as well as animal models is gleaned to hypothesize its underlying mechanisms. These studies show that Tualang honey improves morphology of memory-related brain areas, reduces brain oxidative stress, increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and acetylcholine (ACh concentrations, and reduces acetylcholinesterase (AChE in the brain homogenates. Its anti-inflammatory roles in reducing inflammatory trigger and microglial activation have yet to be investigated. It is hypothesized that the improvement in learning and memory following Tualang honey supplementation is due to the significant improvement in brain morphology and enhancement of brain cholinergic system secondary to reduction in brain oxidative damage and/or upregulation of BDNF concentration. Further studies are imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanism of actions.

  7. Oils of insects and larvae consumed in Africa: potential sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Womeni Hilaire Macaire

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present the beneficial aspects of some insects consumed in sub-Saharan Africa, based on examples of insects consumed in Cameroon, to present their potential as sources of lipids and essential fatty acids. In Africa, termites, larvae of raphia weevil, caterpillars, crickets, bees, maggots, butterflies, weevil, etc. are significant sources of food. These insects belong mainly to the orders of : Isoptera, Orthoptera, Dictyoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. Depending on the species, insects are rich in proteins, minerals (K, Ca, Mg, Zn, P, Fe and/or vitamins (thiamine/B1, riboflavine/B2, pyridoxine/B6, acid pantothenic, niacin. The composition of oils extracted from the following six insects consumed in Cameroon was investigated : larvaes of raphia weevil (Rhynchophorus phoenicis, crickets (Homorocoryphus nitidulus, grasshopper (Zonocerus variegates, termites (Macrotermes sp., a variety of caterpillars (Imbrasia sp. and an unidentified caterpillar from the forest (UI carterpillar. The extraction yields of oil were 53.75%, 67.25%, 9.12%, 49.35%, 24.44% and 20.17% respectively for raphia weevil larvae, crickets, devastating crickets, termites, Imbrasia and UI caterpillar. The oil from raphia weevil mainly contains 37.60% of palmitoleic acid and 45.46% of linoleic acid. The oil from crickets is principally made up of palmitoleic acid (27.59%, linoleic acid (45.63% and α-linolenic acid (16.19%. The oil from grasshoppers is composed of palmitoleic acid (23.83%, oleic acid (10.71%, linoleic acid (21.07%, α-linolenic acid (14.76% and γ-linolenic acid (22.54%. The main components of termite oil are : palmitic acid (30.47%, oleic acid (47.52% and linoleic acid (8.79%. Palmitic acid (36.08% and linolenic acid (38.01% are the two dominant fatty acids of Imbrasia oil. As Imbrasia oil, UI caterpillar oil is composed of palmitic acid (30.80% and linolenic acid (41.79%. Stearic acid (7.04%, oleic acid

  8. Role of taurine on acid secretion in the rat stomach

    Ho Jau-Der; Chang Chia-Chieh; Huang Kai-Han; Lu Ruey-Hwa; Tsai Li Hsueh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Taurine has chemical structure similar to an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Previous studies on GABA in the stomach suggest GABAergic neuron is involved in acid secretion, but the effects of taurine are poor understood. Methods The effects of taurine on acid secretion, signal transduction, and localization of taurinergic neurons were determined in the rat stomach using everted whole stomach, RIA kit and immunohistochemical methods. Results We used...

  9. Effect of Salt Stress on Purslane and Potential Health Benefits: Oxalic Acid and Fatty Acids Profile

    Carvalho, Isabel S.; Teixeira, Mónica; Brodelius, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are crucial for human health and nutrition since they cannot be synthesized in the body and hence must be provided by the diet. Portulaca oleracea L. (purslane) is the eighth most commonly distributed plant in the world. It is a heat- and drought-tolerant plant and our previous study demonstrates that their leaf provide high amounts of antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and proteins. In the present study, we set out to characterize the oxalic acid and the fat...

  10. Role and significance of polyunsaturated fatty acids in nutrition in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis

    Ristić Vanja I.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hyperlipoproteinemia is a key factor in development of atherosclerosis, whereas regression of atherosclerosis mostly depends on decreasing the plasma level of total and LDL-cholesterol. Many studies have reported the hypocholesterolemic effect of linolenic acid. Types of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA Linoleic and α-linolenic acids are essential fatty acids. The main sources of linoleic acid are vegetable seeds and of α-linolenic acid - green parts of plants. α-linolenic acid is converted to eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Linoleic acid is converted into arachidonic acid competing with eicosapentaenoic acid in the starting point for synthesis of eicosanoids, which are strong regulators of cell functions and as such, very important in physiology and pathophysiology of cardiovascular system. Eicosanoids derived from eicosapentaenoic acid have different biological properties in regard to those derived from arachidonic acid, i.e. their global effects result in decreased vasoconstriction platelet aggregation and leukocyte toxicity. Role and significant of PUFA The n-6 to n-3 ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the food is very important, and an optimal ratio 4 to 1 in diet is a major issue. Traditional western diets present absolute or relative deficiency of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a ratio 15-20 to 1. In our diet fish and fish oil are sources of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Refined and processed vegetable oils change the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids and obtained derivates have atherogenic properties.

  11. Ferulic acid and derivatives: molecules with potential application in the pharmaceutical field

    Lívia Brenelli de Paiva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ferulic acid is a phenolic acid widely distributed in the plant kingdom. It presents a wide range of potential therapeutic effects useful in the treatments of cancer, diabetes, lung and cardiovascular diseases, as well as hepatic, neuro and photoprotective effects and antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. Overall, the pharmaceutical potential of ferulic acid can be attributed to its ability to scavenge free radicals. However, recent studies have revealed that ferulic acid presents pharmacological properties beyond those related to its antioxidant activity, such as the ability to competitively inhibit HMG-CoA reductase and activate glucokinase, contributing to reduce hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia, respectively. The present review addresses ferulic acid dietary sources, the pharmacokinetic profile, antioxidant action mechanisms and therapeutic effects in the treatment and prevention of various diseases, in order to provide a basis for understanding its mechanisms of action as well as its pharmaceutical potential.

  12. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of selective phenolic acids on T47D human breast cancer cells: potential mechanisms of action

    Kampa, Marilena; Alexaki, Vassilia-Ismini; Notas, George; Nifli, Artemissia-Phoebe; Nistikaki, Anastassia; Hatzoglou, Anastassia; Bakogeorgou, Efstathia; Kouimtzoglou, Elena; Blekas, George; Boskou, Dimitrios; Gravanis, Achille; Castanas, Elias

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The oncoprotective role of food-derived polyphenol antioxidants has been described but the implicated mechanisms are not yet clear. In addition to polyphenols, phenolic acids, found at high concentrations in a number of plants, possess antioxidant action. The main phenolic acids found in foods are derivatives of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Methods This work concentrates on the antiproliferative action of caffeic acid, syringic acid, sinapic acid, protocatech...

  13. The origin of life and the potential role of soaps

    Hanczyc, Martin M.; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2016-01-01

    Single chain amphiphiles, such as fatty acids and alkyl sulfates, have found industrial uses as emulsifying agents, lubricants, detergents and soaps. Fatty acids are also used as excipients and, because of their biochemical activity, even as active ingredients in drug formulations. The applicatio...... of chemical model systems, so called protocells, aiming at understanding how cellular life emerged on the early Earth, at the time abiotic environment, and could evolve toward contemporary cells....

  14. Chitosan grafted monomethyl fumaric acid as a potential food preservative.

    Khan, Imran; Ullah, Shafi; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims at in vitro antibacterial and antioxidant activity evaluation of chitosan modified with monomethyl fumaric acid (MFA) using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as mediator. Three different kinds of chitosan derivatives Ch-Ds-1,Ch-Ds-2 and Ch-Ds-3 were synthesized by feeding different concentration of MFA. The chemical structures of resulting materials were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HR-XRD, FT-IR and TNBS assay. The results showed that Ch-Ds-1, Ch-Ds-2 and Ch-Ds-3 were successfully synthesized. The % amino groups of chitosan modified by MFA were evaluated by TNBS assay and ranging from 1.82±0.05% to 7.88±0.04%. All the chitosan derivatives are readily soluble in water and swelled by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), toluene and dimethyl formamide (DMF). The antioxidant activity for all the chitosan derivatives have been significantly improved (P<0.05) compared to the chitosan. Upon antibacterial activity at pH 4.0, all the chitosan derivatives showed significant (P<0.05) antibacterial activity against Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes strains and Gram negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis strains compared to chitosan. In conclusion, MFA modified chitosan has shown enhanced activities along with solubility, and could be used as a novel food preservative and packaging material for long time food safety and security. PMID:27516253

  15. The role of organic acids exuded from roots in phosphorus nutrition and aluminium tolerance in acidic soils

    Soil acidity is a major problem of large areas of arable land on a global scale. Many acid soils are low in plant-available phosphorus (P) or are highly P-fixing, resulting in poor plant growth. In addition, aluminium (Al) is soluble in acid soils in the toxic Al3+ form, which also reduces plant growth. There is considerable evidence that both P deficiency and exposure to Al3+ stimulate the efflux of organic acids from roots of a range of species. Organic acids such as citrate, malate and oxalate are able to desorb or solubilise fixed soil P, making it available for plant uptake. Organic acids also chelate Al3+ to render it non-toxic, and are, therefore, involved in Al tolerance mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the literature on the role of organic acids exuded from roots in improving plant P uptake and Al-tolerance in acid soils. Research is now attempting to understand how P deficiency or exposure to Al3+ activates or induces organic acid efflux at the molecular level, with the aim of improving P acquisition and Al tolerance by conventional plant breeding and by genetic engineering. At the agronomic level, it is desirable that existing crop and pasture plants with enhanced soil-P uptake and tolerance to Al due to organic acid exudation are integrated into farming systems. (author)

  16. Erosive potential of calcium-modified acidic candies in irradiated dry mouth patients

    Jensdottir, Thorbjörg; Buchwald, Christian von; Nauntofte, Brigitte;

    2010-01-01

    Patients who have received irradiation therapy on the head and neck area are known to suffer from reduced saliva flow and may therefore use acidic candies to relieve symptoms of dry mouth. However, such acidic candies have erosive potential even among healthy individuals. Therefore, the aim of the...

  17. Microbial activity in an acid resin deposit: Biodegradation potential and ecotoxicology in an extremely acidic hydrocarbon contamination

    Acid resins are residues produced in a recycling process for used oils that was in use in the forties and fifties of the last century. The resin-like material is highly contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons, extremely acidic and co-contaminated with substituted and aromatic hydrocarbons, and heavy metals. To determine the potential for microbial biodegradation the acid resin deposit and its surroundings were screened for microbial activity by soil respiration measurements. No microbial activity was found in the core deposit. However, biodegradation of hydrocarbons was possible in zones with a lower degree of contamination surrounding the deposit. An extreme acidophilic microbial community was detected close to the core deposit. With a simple ecotoxicological approach it could be shown that the pure acid resin that formed the major part of the core deposit, was toxic to the indigenous microflora due to its extremely low pH of 0-1. - Acidity is the major toxic factor of the extremely hydrophobic and acidic mixed contamination found in an acid resin deposit

  18. Role of antioxidant enzymes in bacterial resistance to organic acids.

    Bruno-Bárcena, Jose M; Azcárate-Peril, M Andrea; Hassan, Hosni M

    2010-05-01

    Growth in aerobic environments has been shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to cause oxidative stress in most organisms. Antioxidant enzymes (i.e., superoxide dismutases and hydroperoxidases) and DNA repair mechanisms provide protection against ROS. Acid stress has been shown to be associated with the induction of Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in Lactococcus lactis and Staphylococcus aureus. However, the relationship between acid stress and oxidative stress is not well understood. In the present study, we showed that mutations in the gene coding for MnSOD (sodA) increased the toxicity of lactic acid at pH 3.5 in Streptococcus thermophilus. The inclusion of the iron chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl (DIP), diethienetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA), and O-phenanthroline (O-Phe) provided partial protection against 330 mM lactic acid at pH 3.5. The results suggested that acid stress triggers an iron-mediated oxidative stress that can be ameliorated by MnSOD and iron chelators. These findings were further validated in Escherichia coli strains lacking both MnSOD and iron SOD (FeSOD) but expressing a heterologous MnSOD from S. thermophilus. We also found that, in E. coli, FeSOD did not provide the same protection afforded by MnSOD and that hydroperoxidases are equally important in protecting the cells against acid stress. These findings may explain the ability of some microorganisms to survive better in acidified environments, as in acid foods, during fermentation and accumulation of lactic acid or during passage through the low pH of the stomach. PMID:20305033

  19. The Role of Serum Uric Acid in Preeclampsia

    Amir Taefi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The goal of this study was to assess the utility of serum uric acid in preeclampsia diagnosis and its correlation with some maternal and fetal outcomes.Materials and methods: A case-control study was performed on 26 term pregnant women with preeclampsia and 52 normal pregnant women. Serum uric acid, platelet count, hematocrit, gestational age, and birth weight of all patients were measured. Data distribution was assessed with the one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess differences between groups. Correlations between plasma uric acid and other parameters were evaluated with the Spearman’s Rho or Pearson correlation test, where appropriated. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC curves were used to assess the ability of plasma uric acid to distinguish the preeclampsia from normal subjects. Significance was set at P< 0.05.Results: The mean level of plasma uric acid was 5.8 (+2 mg/dl in cases and 4.9 mg/dl in controls (P=0.04. ROC curve analysis demonstrates the absence of obvious cut off point for plasma uric acid to distinguish preeclampsia. Sensitivity and specificity for uric acid level of 5.5 mg/dl were 61.5% and 78.8%, respectively. There was no significant linear correlation between the plasma uric acid level and other measured parameters in each group.Conclusion: On the basis of our data, the clinical utility of measuring serum uric acid levels in diagnosing preeclampsia is limited.

  20. Phenolic acid composition, antiatherogenic and anticancer potential of honeys derived from various regions in Greece.

    Spilioti, Eliana; Jaakkola, Mari; Tolonen, Tiina; Lipponen, Maija; Virtanen, Vesa; Chinou, Ioanna; Kassi, Eva; Karabournioti, Sofia; Moutsatsou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    The phenolic acid profile of honey depends greatly on its botanical and geographical origin. In this study, we carried out a quantitative analysis of phenolic acids in the ethyl acetate extract of 12 honeys collected from various regions in Greece. Our findings indicate that protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid are the major phenolic acids of the honeys examined. Conifer tree honey (from pine and fir) contained significantly higher concentrations of protocatechuic and caffeic acid (mean: 6640 and 397 µg/kg honey respectively) than thyme and citrus honey (mean of protocatechuic and caffeic acid: 437.6 and 116 µg/kg honey respectively). p-Hydroxybenzoic acid was the dominant compound in thyme honeys (mean: 1252.5 µg/kg honey). We further examined the antioxidant potential (ORAC assay) of the extracts, their ability to influence viability of prostate cancer (PC-3) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells as well as their lowering effect on TNF- α-induced adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells (HAEC). ORAC values of Greek honeys ranged from 415 to 2129 µmol Trolox equivalent/kg honey and correlated significantly with their content in protocatechuic acid (pHoney extracts reduced significantly the viability of PC-3 and MCF-7 cells as well as the expression of adhesion molecules in HAEC. Importantly, vanillic acid content correlated significantly with anticancer activity in PC-3 and MCF-7 cells (phoneys are rich in phenolic acids, in particular protocatechuic and p-hydroxybenzoic acid and exhibit significant antioxidant, anticancer and antiatherogenic activities which may be attributed, at least in part, to their phenolic acid content. PMID:24752205

  1. Hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids: Oxidised derivatives of linoleic acid and their role in inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    Vangaveti, Venkat N; Jansen, Holger; Kennedy, Richard Lee; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-08-15

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a major constituent of low-density lipoproteins. An essential fatty acid, LA is a polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is oxidised by endogenous enzymes and reactive oxygen species in the circulation. Increased levels of low-density lipoproteins coupled with oxidative stress and lack of antioxidants drive the oxidative processes. This results in synthesis of a range of oxidised derivatives, which play a vital role in regulation of inflammatory processes. The derivatives of LA include, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids, oxo-​octadecadienoic acids, epoxy octadecadecenoic acid and epoxy-keto-octadecenoic acids. In this review, we examine the role of LA derivatives and their actions on regulation of inflammation relevant to metabolic processes associated with atherogenesis and cancer. The processes affected by LA derivatives include, alteration of airway smooth muscles and vascular wall, affecting sensitivity to pain, and regulating endogenous steroid hormones associated with metabolic syndrome. LA derivatives alter cell adhesion molecules, this initial step, is pivotal in regulating inflammatory processes involving transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways, thus, leading to alteration of metabolic processes. The derivatives are known to elicit pleiotropic effects that are either beneficial or detrimental in nature hence making it difficult to determine the exact role of these derivatives in the progress of an assumed target disorder. The key may lie in understanding the role of these derivatives at various stages of development of a disorder. Novel pharmacological approaches in altering the synthesis or introduction of synthesised LA derivatives could possibly help drive processes that could regulate inflammation in a beneficial manner. Chemical Compounds: Linoleic acid (PubChem CID: 5280450), 9- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 5312830), 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 6443013), 9-oxo

  2. Phenolic acid composition, antiatherogenic and anticancer potential of honeys derived from various regions in Greece.

    Eliana Spilioti

    Full Text Available The phenolic acid profile of honey depends greatly on its botanical and geographical origin. In this study, we carried out a quantitative analysis of phenolic acids in the ethyl acetate extract of 12 honeys collected from various regions in Greece. Our findings indicate that protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid are the major phenolic acids of the honeys examined. Conifer tree honey (from pine and fir contained significantly higher concentrations of protocatechuic and caffeic acid (mean: 6640 and 397 µg/kg honey respectively than thyme and citrus honey (mean of protocatechuic and caffeic acid: 437.6 and 116 µg/kg honey respectively. p-Hydroxybenzoic acid was the dominant compound in thyme honeys (mean: 1252.5 µg/kg honey. We further examined the antioxidant potential (ORAC assay of the extracts, their ability to influence viability of prostate cancer (PC-3 and breast cancer (MCF-7 cells as well as their lowering effect on TNF- α-induced adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells (HAEC. ORAC values of Greek honeys ranged from 415 to 2129 µmol Trolox equivalent/kg honey and correlated significantly with their content in protocatechuic acid (p<0.001, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p<0.01, vanillic acid (p<0.05, caffeic acid (p<0.01, p-coumaric acid (p<0.001 and their total phenolic content (p<0.001. Honey extracts reduced significantly the viability of PC-3 and MCF-7 cells as well as the expression of adhesion molecules in HAEC. Importantly, vanillic acid content correlated significantly with anticancer activity in PC-3 and MCF-7 cells (p<0.01, p<0.05 respectively. Protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid and total phenolic content correlated significantly with the inhibition of VCAM-1 expression (p<0.05, p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively. In conclusion, Greek honeys are rich in phenolic acids, in particular protocatechuic and p-hydroxybenzoic acid and exhibit significant antioxidant, anticancer and

  3. The Role of Diet1 in Bile Acid Metabolism

    Lee, Jessica Mei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Elevated cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk for atherosclerosis, heart disease and stroke. Variations in plasma cholesterol levels among individuals are determined by the interaction of environmental and genetic factors, many of which remain to be identified. This dissertation presents the initial characterization of a novel gene Diet1, the product of which influences plasma cholesterol levels through its effects on bile acid metabolism. Bile acids are synthesized from c...

  4. Body Shaping and Volume Restoration: The Role of Hyaluronic Acid

    Hedén, Per; Sellman, Gabriella; von Wachenfeldt, Mats; Olenius, Michael; Fagrell, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Driven by the rising popularity of minimally invasive techniques, the demand for cosmetic procedures is increasing. Cosmetic body-shaping procedures can be categorized into those that remove tissue and those that add volume. This review focuses on the latter of these categories, particularly on the use of resorbable hyaluronic acid gels specifically developed for minimally invasive volume enhancement. Pilot studies of hyaluronic acid involving its injection to contour various body deformities...

  5. The Role of Serum Uric Acid in Preeclampsia

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to assess the utility of serum uric acid in preeclampsia diagnosis and its correlation with some maternal and fetal outcomes.Materials and methods: A case-control study was performed on 26 term pregnant women with preeclampsia and 52 normal pregnant women. Serum uric acid, platelet count, hematocrit, gestational age, and birth weight of all patients were measured. Data distribution was assessed with the one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Mann-Whitney U t...

  6. Role of Arachidonic Acid in Promoting Hair Growth

    Munkhbayar, Semchin; Jang, Sunhyae; Cho, A-Ri; Choi, Soon-Jin; Shin, Chang Yup; Eun, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyu Han; Kwon, Ohsang

    2016-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (AA) is an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid present in all mammalian cell membranes, and involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell survival, angiogenesis, and mitogenesis. The dermal papilla, composed of specialized fibroblasts located in the bulb of the hair follicle, contributes to the control of hair growth and the hair cycle. Objective This study investigated the effect of AA on hair growth by using in vivo and in vitro models. Met...

  7. Potential role of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    Abu Hashim H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hatem Abu HashimDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptAbstract: Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent chronic inflammatory disease affecting 5%–10% of reproductive-age women, with a prevalence of 5%–50% in infertile women and >33% of women with chronic pelvic pain. Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs are approved adjuvants for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Molecular studies have revealed the presence of aromatase P450, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ovarian estradiol, inside the endometriotic tissue, indicating local synthesis of estradiol. Thereby, AIs represent an appealing medical option for the management of different aspects of this enigmatic disease, especially pelvic pain and infertility. Accordingly, this review aims to evaluate the potential role of AIs in the treatment of endometriosis-associated symptoms, mainly pain and infertility. Notably, several studies have demonstrated that the combination of AIs with conventional therapy as oral contraceptive pills, progestins, or gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be used to control endometriosis-associated pain and pain recurrence in premenopausal women, particularly those with pain due to rectovaginal endometriosis refractory to other medical or surgical treatment. Some case reports have shown promising results in the treatment of postmenopausal endometriosis as first-line treatment, when surgery is contraindicated, or as second-line treatment in the case of postoperative recurrence. Third-generation AIs, especially letrozole, have challenged clomiphene citrate as an ovulation-induction agent in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and in cases of unexplained infertility. However, few studies are available regarding the use of AIs to treat endometriosis-associated infertility. Therefore, larger multicenter randomized trials using AIs for the treatment of endometriosis

  8. Evaluation of Sikora instead of SMP buffer to estimate the potential acidity of brazilian soils

    Maria Alice Santanna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the efficiency of the Shoemaker, McLean, Pratt (SMP buffer method in estimating soil acidity, the presence of p-nitrophenol and potassium chromate in the solution, both hazardous substances, has caused increasing environmental concerns. The purpose of this study was to test Sikora method (Sikora, 2006 as an alternative to the adapted SMP buffer method, generally used to estimate potential acidity of Southern Brazilian soils. For the test, 21 soils in the South and Cerrado regions of Brazil were sampled. (1 The potential acidity values of these soils range from 35.95 to 4.02 cmol c kg-1 of soil, reflecting a wide acidity variation. The Sikora buffer does not mimic the adapted SMP buffer used in Southern Brazil, since the former has a low ability to distinguish soils with different acidity from each other, probably due to the higher buffer capacity than of the adapted SMP solution.

  9. Benefits of omega-3 fatty acid against bone changes in salt-loaded rats: possible role of kidney

    Ahmed, Mona A.; Abd EL Samad, Abeer A

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that dietary fats are important components contributing in bone health and that bone mineral density is inversely related to sodium intake. Salt loading is also known to impose negative effects on renal function. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the polyunsaturated fatty acid omega-3 on bone changes imposed by salt loading, highlighting the role of kidney as a potential mechanism involved in this effect. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: cont...

  10. Evaluation of Hanford high level waste vitrification chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- FY 1994: Potential exothermic reactions in the presence of formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid

    A potential for an uncontrollable exothermic reaction between nitrate and organic salts during preparation of a high level waste melter feed has been identified. In order to examine this potential more closely, the thermal behavior of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) treated with various organic reductants was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were collected on simulated waste samples and their supernates treated with organics. Organic reductants used were formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid. For comparison, samples of untreated simulant and untreated simulant with added noble metals were tested. When heated, untreated simulant samples both with and without noble metals showed no exothermic behavior. All of the treated waste simulant samples showed exothermic behavior. Onset temperatures of exothermic reactions were 120 C to 210 C. Many onset temperatures, particularly those for formic acid treated samples, are well below 181 C, the estimated maximum steam coil temperature (considered to be a worst case maximum temperature for chemical process tank contents). The enthalpies of the reactions were -180 x 10-3 J/Kg supernate (-181 J/g) for the oxalic acid treated simulant supernate to -1,150 x 10-3 J/Kg supernate (-1,153 J/g) for the formic acid treated simulant supernate

  11. Higher diet-dependent renal acid load associates with higher glucocorticoid secretion and potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids in healthy children.

    Esche, Jonas; Shi, Lijie; Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Remer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic acidosis induces elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels. However, the influence of less strong daily acid loads on GCs is largely unexplored. To investigate this, we studied whether higher acid loads in children, fully within the normal range of habitual diets, associate with endogenous GCs. In a specific quasi-experimental design, we examined 200 6- to 10-year-old healthy participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study equally divided to either high or low 24-hour renal net acid excretion. Major urinary GC metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to assess daily adrenal GC secretion and metabolites of tissue cortisol catabolism (6β-hydroxycortisol and 20α-dihydrocortisol). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify urinary free cortisol and cortisone. After confounder adjustment, significant positive associations were unmasked for urinary potential renal acid load and net acid excretion with adrenal GC secretion, free cortisone, free cortisone plus cortisol, 6β-hydroxycortisol, and 20α-dihydrocortisol. An inverse association emerged for an enzymatic marker (5β-reductase) of irreversible GC inactivation. Our data suggest that existing moderate elevations in diet-dependent acid loads suffice to raise GCs and affect cortisol metabolism. Thus, potential detrimental effects of high acid loading appear to be mediated, in part, by increased GC activity via increased GC secretion and/or reduced GC inactivation. Higher cortisone levels, directly available for intracrine activation to cortisol may play a special role. PMID:27165611

  12. Roles of d-Amino Acids on the Bioactivity of Host Defense Peptides

    Hao Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Host defense peptides (HDPs are positively-charged and amphipathic components of the innate immune system that have demonstrated great potential to become the next generation of broad spectrum therapeutic agents effective against a vast array of pathogens and tumor. As such, many approaches have been taken to improve the therapeutic efficacy of HDPs. Amongst these methods, the incorporation of d-amino acids (d-AA is an approach that has demonstrated consistent success in improving HDPs. Although, virtually all HDP review articles briefly mentioned about the role of d-AA, however it is rather surprising that no systematic review specifically dedicated to this topic exists. Given the impact that d-AA incorporation has on HDPs, this review aims to fill that void with a systematic discussion of the impact of d-AA on HDPs.

  13. The role of local field potential coupling in epileptic synchronization

    Jiongxing Wu; Heng Yang; Yufeng Peng; Liangjuan Fang; Wen Zheng; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    This review hopes to clearly explain the following viewpoints: (1) Neuronal synchronization underlies brain functioning, and it seems possible that blocking excessive synchronization in an epileptic neural network could reduce or even control seizures. (2) Local field potential coupling is a very common phenomenon during synchr in networks. Removal of neurons or neuronal networks that are coupled can significantly alter the extracellular field potential. Interventions of coupling mediated by local field potentials could result in desynchronization of epileptic seizures. (3) The synchronized electrical activity generated by neurons is sensitive to changes in the size of the extracellular space, which affects the efficiency of field potential transmission and the threshold of cell excitability. (4) Manipulations of the field potential fluctuations could help block synchronization at seizure onset.

  14. Electrostatic potentials of humic acid: Fluorescence quenching measurements and comparison with model calculations

    Saito, T.; Koopal, L.K.; Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, S.

    2009-01-01

    Average electrostatic potentials of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) are measured, based on quenching of the PAHA fluorescence by neutral and cationic quencher molecules with similar structures. The obtained negative potentials increased with increasing pH at a given salt concentration and weakly

  15. Protective role of miR-23b-3p in kainic acid-induced seizure.

    Zhan, Lianbo; Yao, Yi; Fu, Huajun; Li, Zhenghui; Wang, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xiaobin; He, Wencan; Zheng, Weihong; Zhang, Yunwu; Zheng, Honghua

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs has been proposed to contribute toward epilepsy. The miRNA miR-23b-3p has been found to protect against neuronal apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we assessed the potential role of miR-23b-3p in the kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure model. We found that miR-23b-3p levels were significantly decreased in the brain cortex of mice and in cultured mouse primary neurons treated with KA. Importantly, supplement of miR-23b-3p agomir by an intacerebroventricular injection alleviated seizure behaviors and abnormal cortical electroencephalogram recordings in KA-treated mice. Together, these results indicate that miR-23b-3p plays a crucial role in suppressing seizure formation in experimental models of epilepsy and that miR-23b-3p supplement may be a potential anabolic strategy for ameliorating seizure. PMID:27232518

  16. Potential role of natural compounds against skin aging.

    Tundis, R; Loizzo, M R; Bonesi, M; Menichini, F

    2015-01-01

    Skin aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon of human life. Advancing age brings changes to all components of the integumentary system with consequent signs on the skin. Skin aging is mainly due to intrinsic (chronologic) and extrinsic aging (photo-aging). Photo-aging is a consequence of exposure to ultraviolet radiations. Despite variable economic conditions, the skin care market based on natural products continues to see strong growth. In this context, the research of naturally occurring anti-aging agents is greatly expanding and in recent years numerous plant-derived products have been investigated. This review article focuses on highlighting recent advances in current knowledge on anti-aging natural products grouped and presented according to their family origin. Plants from 35 families were reviewed. A variety of phytomolecules, derived in particular from polyphenols, triterpenes and sterols classes, demonstrated a promising activity. Among them carnosic acid, curculigoside, curcumin, glycyrrhizic acid, mangiferin, mirkoin, asiaticoside, rosmarinic acid, tectorigenin, tyrosol etc., able to inhibit tyrosinase, hyaluronidase, elastase, and collagenase, to scavenge free radicals from skin cells, to prevent trans-epidermal water loss, and to contribute to protect skin from wrinkles, were largely investigated and herein discussed. Extracts and pure compounds from Fabaceae, Asperaceae and Zingiberaceae families have shown particular interest and appear most promising in the development of anti-aging products. PMID:25723509

  17. The Role of Sulfuric Acid in Atmospheric Nucleation

    Sipilä, M.; Berndt, T.; Petäjä, T.; Brus, David; Vanhanen, J.; Stratmann, F.; Patokoski, J.; Mauldin, III, R.L.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Lihavainen, H.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 327, č. 5970 (2010), s. 1243-1246. ISSN 0036-8075 Grant ostatní: EUCAARI(XE) 036833-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nucleation * sulfuric acid * climate Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 31.364, year: 2010

  18. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  19. Role of acidic chemistries in steam treatment of aluminium alloys

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acidic chemistry on the accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys Peraluman 706TM and AA6060 under exposure to high temperature steam was investigated. Studied chemistries were based on citrates and phosphates. Results showed that the presence of citrate and phosphate anions...

  20. Yeast colony development and ammonia signalling: Role of amino acids

    Begany, Markéta; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Z.

    Vienna : Springer, 2006, A109-A109. [International Symposium on Microbial Ecology – ISME-11 /11./. Vienna (AT), 20.08.2006-25.08.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/0294; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yeast colony * amino acid Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  1. Isolation and evaluation of antiglycation potential of polyalthic acid (furano-terpene from Daniella oliveri

    Olubunmi Atolani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A furano-diterpene (polyalthic acid was isolated as a major stable compound for the first time from the oleoresin of the Daniella oliveri of the family Caesalpiniacea through column chromatography fractionation. Polyalthic acid was characterized using data obtained from EIMS, HREIMS, ESI-MS, MALDI-MS as well as 1D and 2D NMR and it was evaluated for its potential to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs using a standard in vitro antiglycation procedure. Polyalthic acid indicated a negative antiglycation potential compared to standard inhibitor that has 85% inhibition, which is an indication that polyalthic acid may not contribute to the antiglycation activity of the plant as acclaimed in folkloric medicine. The negative antiglycation observed could indicate that the polyalthic acid could trigger glycation, thereby subjecting users to various degrees of complications. The bioactivity evaluation on molinspiration evaluator indicated that polyalthic acid could be a potential drug candidate. The biological and chemical insights gained on polyalthic acid provide a good basis for future research.

  2. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590355

  3. Universities Potential Role in Local and Regional Development

    Moesby, Egon; Rolim, Cassio

    2013-01-01

    highly skilled and competent staff, it could be anticipated that universities should play a key role in facilitating such growth and development. At Aalborg University, such cooperation is taking place, and this paper sums up the practices and experiences gained therefrom. Findings: Universities have...

  4. The Controversial Role of Retinoic Acid in Fibrotic Diseases: Analysis of Involved Signaling Pathways

    Yuan-Han Qin; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Tian-Biao Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, such as liver, pulmonary and renal fibrosis, are common end-stage conditions and represent a major global health problem. Furthermore, effective therapeutic measures are presently unavailable. Extracellular matrix accumulation is the most prominent characteristic in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disease. Retinoic acid, including all-trans retinoic acid, 9-cis and 13-cis retinoic acid, play important roles in various physiological processes, such as in embryonic development, ...

  5. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. (Josai Univ., Saitama (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  6. Anti-biofilm potential of phenolic acids: the influence of environmental pH and intrinsic physico-chemical properties.

    Silva, Sara; Costa, Eduardo M; Horta, Bruno; Calhau, Conceição; Morais, Rui M; Pintado, M Manuela

    2016-09-13

    Phenolic acids are a particular group of small phenolic compounds which have exhibited some anti-biofilm activity, although the link between their activity and their intrinsic pH is not clear. Therefore, the present work examined the anti-biofilm activity (inhibition of biomass and metabolic activity) of phenolic acids in relation to the environmental pH, as well as other physico-chemical properties. The results indicate that, while Escherichia coli was not inhibited by the phenolic acids, both methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis were susceptible to the action of all phenolic acids, with the pH playing a relevant role in the activity: a neutral pH favored MRSE inhibition, while acidic conditions favored MRSA inhibition. Some links between molecular polarity and size were associated only with their potential as metabolic inhibitors, with the overall interactions hinting at a membrane-based mechanism for MRSA and a cytoplasmic effect for MRSE. PMID:27434592

  7. Role of brain glutamic acid metabolism changes in neurodegenerative pathologies

    Nina Pavlovna Kanunnikova

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an essential participant of brain metabolism. It is known that the glutamate is a neurotransmitter in a numerous part of the brain synapses and acts through various ionotropic or metabotropic receptors. Multiple alterations of the brain glutamate system are observed in both acute and chronic brain injures. Glutamate metabolism changes take place in many neurodegenerative pathologies, such as brain ischemia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyot...

  8. Role of ascorbic acid against pathogenesis in plants

    Taqi Ahmed Khan; Mohd Mazid; Firoz Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Plants vary considerably in their physiological response to various kinds of environmental stress. To prevent damage caused by pathogenic attack and to acclimate to change in their environment, plants have evolved direct and indirect mechanism for sensing and responding to pathogenic stimuli. Ascorbic acid (AA) is found in all eukaryotes including animals and plants and lack completely in prokaryotes except cyanobactaria, have been reported to have a small amount. AA has now gained significan...

  9. Role of biologically assisted pyrrhotite oxidation in acid mine drainage

    Water contaminated by acidic mine drainage (AMD) from base metal tailings and waste rock is a serious environmental problem. Previous studies have focused on pyrite as the principal acid producing mineral. In this work, the significance of pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) oxidation, both chemical and biochemical, on the acid generation process is discussed. Chemical and biochemical kinetic studies of pyrrhotite oxidation were conducted in pneumatically mixed, internal split flow reactors. Controlling variables included the specific surface area, temperature, pH, partial pressure of oxygen, and co-oxidation with pyrite. Bacterial oxidations, using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans as inoculant. included the inherent metabolic rate and cell sorption equilibria on the ore surface. Mathematical models were derived to couple the kinetics with oxygen mass transfer. The mass transport model combined mechanisms based on the shrinking radius (fine particles) and the shrinking reactive front (massive sulfides) concepts. The objective of the research was the application of fundamental kinetic and physical data to field conditions for simulating both the rate of mineral oxidation and simulating pore water quality

  10. Lipids in salicylic acid-mediated defense in plants: focusing on the roles of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate

    Qiong eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved effective defense strategies to protect themselves from various pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA is an essential signaling molecule that mediates pathogen-triggered signals perceived by different immune receptors to induce downstream defense responses. While many proteins play essential roles in regulating SA signaling, increasing evidence also supports important roles for signaling phospholipids in this process. In this review, we collate the experimental evidence in support of the regulatory roles of two phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P, and their metabolizing enzymes in plant defense, and examine the possible mechanistic interaction between phospholipid signaling and SA-dependent immunity with a particular focus on the immunity-stimulated biphasic PA production that is reminiscent of and perhaps mechanistically connected to the biphasic reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and SA accumulation during defense activation.

  11. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Biswas Sangita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Corticosteroids are standard treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing acute relapse. Because dyspeptic pain is a common side effect of this intervention, patients can be given a histamine receptor-2 antagonist, proton pump inhibitor or antacid to prevent or ameliorate this disturbance. Additionally, patients with multiple sclerosis may be taking these medications independent of corticosteroid treatment. Interventions for gastric disturbances can influence the activation state of the immune system, a principal mediator of pathology in multiple sclerosis. Although histamine release promotes inflammation, activation of the histamine receptor-2 can suppress a proinflammatory immune response, and blocking histamine receptor-2 with an antagonist could shift the balance more towards immune stimulation. Studies utilizing an animal model of multiple sclerosis indicate that histamine receptor-2 antagonists potentially augment disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis. In contrast, proton pump inhibitors appear to favor immune suppression, but have not been studied in models of multiple sclerosis. Antacids, histamine receptor-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors also could alter the intestinal microflora, which may indirectly lead to immune stimulation. Additionally, elevated gastric pH can promote the vitamin B12 deficiency that patients with multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing. Here, we review possible roles of gastric acid inhibitors on immunopathogenic mechanisms associated with multiple sclerosis.

  12. Ferulic Acid as A Potential Antioxidant Therapeutic Agent in Gamma-Irradiated Rats

    Ferulic Acid (FA) is widespread in plant foods. It possesses important biological and pharmacological properties, some of which were shown to be effective in the treatment of oxidative disorders. To investigate the therapeutic potentiality of FA on an antioxidant system of 4 Gy gamma-irradiated male rats, rats were orally administrated FA at a dosage of 200 mg/ kg body wt for 7 consecutive days. At this dose, the activities of hepatic and intestine superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were raised after administration of FA compared with the irradiated group (P< 0.05). Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were significantly lower in the liver of rats treated with FA after irradiation, whereas reduced glutathione (GSH) was markedly higher in the same group. The liver homogenates obtained from rats that had been treated with FA had higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) than those obtained from irradiated rats. Peripheral leukocyte analysis revealed an increased count and restoration body wt of rats by FA treatments. These experiments show that recovery of oxidative status by FA may play an important role in the recovery from adverse effects related to gamma-rays induced oxidative damage in rats.

  13. The role of fullerene shell upon stuffed atom polarization potential

    Amusia, Miron; Chernysheva, Larissa

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated that the polarization of the fullerene shell considerably alters the polarization potential of an atom, stuffed inside a fullerene. This essentially affects the electron elastic scattering phases as well as corresponding cross-sections. We illustrate the general trend by concrete examples of electron scattering upon endohedrals that are formed when Ne and Ar atom are stuffed inside fullerene C60. To obtain the presented results, we have suggested a simplified approach that permits to incorporate the effect of fullerenes polarizability into the endohedrals polarization potential. By applying this approach, we obtained numeric results that show strong variations in shape and magnitudes of scattering phases and cross-sections due to effect of fullerene polarization upon the endohedral polarization potential. Using concrete examples we have demonstrated that the elastic scattering of electrons upon endohedrals is an entirely quantum mechanical process, where addition of even a single atom can qualitatively alter the multi-particle cross-section.

  14. The role of fullerene shell upon stuffed atom polarization potential

    Amusia, M Ya

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polarization of the fullerene shell considerably alters the polarization potential of an atom, stuffed inside a fullerene. This essentially affects the electron elastic scattering phases as well as corresponding cross-sections. We illustrate the general trend by concrete examples of electron scattering by endohedrals of Neon and Argon. To obtain the presented results, we have suggested a simplified approach that permits to incorporate the effect of fullerenes polarizability into the Neon and Argon endohedrals polarization potential. As a result, we obtained numeric results that show strong variations in shape and magnitudes of scattering phases and cross-sections due to effect of fullerene polarization upon the endohedral polarization potential.

  15. Potential role of garcinol as an anticancer agent.

    Saadat, Nadia; Gupta, Smiti V

    2012-01-01

    Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone, is extracted from the rind of the fruit of Garcinia indica, a plant found extensively in tropical regions. Although the fruit has been consumed traditionally over centuries, its biological activities, specifically its anticancer potential is a result of recent scientific investigations. The anticarcinogenic properties of garcinol appear to be moderated via its antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and proapoptotic activities. In addition, garcinol displays effective epigenetic influence by inhibiting histone acetyltransferases (HAT 300) and by possible posttranscriptional modulation by mi RNA profiles involved in carcinogenesis. In vitro as well as some in vivo studies have shown the potential of this compound against several cancers types including breast, colon, pancreatic, and leukemia. Although this is a promising molecule in terms of its anticancer properties, investigations in relevant animal models, and subsequent human trials are warranted in order to fully appreciate and confirm its chemopreventative and/or therapeutic potential. PMID:22745638

  16. Fibrous Agricultural Biomass as a Potential Source for Bioconversion to Vanillic Acid

    Pei-Ling Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the potential of six fibrous agricultural residues, namely, oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber (OPEFBF, coconut coir fiber (CCF, pineapple peel (PP, pineapple crown leaves (PCL, kenaf bast fiber (KBF, and kenaf core fiber (KCF, as a source of ferulic acid and phenolic compounds for bioconversion into vanillic acid. The raw samples were pretreated with organosolv (NaOH-glycerol and alkaline treatment (NaOH, to produce phenol-rich black liquor. The finding showed that the highest amount of phenolic compounds and ferulic acid was produced from CCF and PP, respectively. This study also found that organosolv treatment was the superior method for phenolic compound extraction, whereas alkaline treatment was the selective method for lignin extraction. Vanillic acid production by Aspergillus niger I-1472 was only observed when the fermentation broth was fed with liquors from PP and PCL, possibly due to the higher levels of ferulic acid in those samples.

  17. Potential research money available from the Acid Deposition Program and Alberta Environment

    It is exceedingly difficult to demonstrate definitive long-term changes in animal health as a result of acid-forming emissions from sour gas wells. A summary is presented of current research in Alberta, followed by the potential for research funding by the Alberta Government/Industry Acid Deposition Program (ADRP). The Alberta Environment research budget consists of four programs in addition to the ADRP: acid deposition effects research in the Athabasca oil sands; western and northern Canada long-range transport of air pollutants; departmental monitoring; and inhalation toxicology and animal health. Animal health research, although a component of the acid deposition issue, is beyond the mandate of Alberta Environment, and the ADRP members committee does not forsee becoming involved in the long-term and complex research required to address the effects of acid-forming emissions on livestock. Funds for additional animal health research must come from other government departments and agencies whose mandate covers this area

  18. Selection of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria from fermented olives by in vitro tests

    Argyri, Anthoula; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Karatzas, Kimon Andreas; Tsakalidou, Effie; Nychas, George John; Panagou, Efstathios; Tassou, Chrysoula

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from naturally fermented olives and select candidates to be used as probiotic starters for the improvement of the traditional fermentation process and the production of newly added value functional foods. Seventy one (71) lactic acid bacterial strains (17 Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 1 Ln. pseudomesenteroides, 13 Lactobacillus plantarum, 37 Lb. pentosus, 1 Lb. paraplantarum, and 2 Lb. paracasei sub...

  19. Fibrous Agricultural Biomass as a Potential Source for Bioconversion to Vanillic Acid

    Pei-Ling Tang; Osman Hassan; Jamaliah Md-Jahim; Wan Aida Wan Mustapha; Mohamad Yusof Maskat

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the potential of six fibrous agricultural residues, namely, oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber (OPEFBF), coconut coir fiber (CCF), pineapple peel (PP), pineapple crown leaves (PCL), kenaf bast fiber (KBF), and kenaf core fiber (KCF), as a source of ferulic acid and phenolic compounds for bioconversion into vanillic acid. The raw samples were pretreated with organosolv (NaOH-glycerol) and alkaline treatment (NaOH), to produce phenol-rich black liquor. The findi...

  20. Sirtuins in vascular diseases: Emerging roles and therapeutic potential.

    D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Vitiello, Milena; Casale, Rosario; Servillo, Luigi; Giovane, Alfonso; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa

    2015-07-01

    Silent information regulator-2 (Sir-2) proteins, or sirtuins, are a highly conserved protein family of histone deacetylases that promote longevity by mediating many of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction which extends life span and reduces the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and diabetes. Here, we review the role of sirtuins (SIRT1-7) in vascular homeostasis and diseases by providing an update on the latest knowledge about their roles in endothelial damage and vascular repair mechanisms. Among all sirtuins, in the light of the numerous functions reported on SIRT1 in the vascular system, herein we discuss its roles not only in the control of endothelial cells (EC) functionality but also in other cell types beyond EC, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), smooth muscle cells (SMC), and immune cells. Furthermore, we also provide an update on the growing field of compounds under clinical evaluation for the modulation of SIRT1 which, at the state of the art, represents the most promising target for the development of novel drugs against CVD, especially when concomitant with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25766107

  1. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids and inflammation: potential application in surgical and trauma patients

    Calder P.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids used in nutritional support of surgical or critically ill patients have been based on soybean oil, which is rich in the n-6 fatty acid linoleic acid (18:2n-6. Linoleic acid is the precursor of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6. In turn, arachidonic acid in cell membrane phospholipids is the substrate for the synthesis of a range of biologically active compounds (eicosanoids including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. These compounds can act as mediators in their own right and can also act as regulators of other processes, such as platelet aggregation, blood clotting, smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte chemotaxis, inflammatory cytokine production, and immune function. There is a view that an excess of n-6 fatty acids should be avoided since this could contribute to a state where physiological processes become dysregulated. One alternative is the use of fish oil. The rationale of this latter approach is that fish oil contains long chain n-3 fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid. When fish oil is provided, eicosapentaenoic acid is incorporated into cell membrane phospholipids, partly at the expense of arachidonic acid. Thus, there is less arachidonic acid available for eicosanoid synthesis. Hence, fish oil decreases production of prostaglandins like PGE2 and of leukotrienes like LTB4. Thus, n-3 fatty acids can potentially reduce platelet aggregation, blood clotting, smooth muscle contraction, and leukocyte chemotaxis, and can modulate inflammatory cytokine production and immune function. These effects have been demonstrated in cell culture, animal feeding and healthy volunteer studies. Fish oil decreases the host metabolic response and improves survival to endotoxin in laboratory animals. Recently clinical studies performed in various patient groups have indicated benefit from this approach.

  2. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M. [Department of Biochemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Salati, Lisa M., E-mail: lsalati@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  3. Tuning intermicellar potential of Triton X-100– anthranilic acid mixed micelles

    Gunjan Verma; V K Aswal; S K Kulshreshtha; C Manohar; P A Hassan; Eric W Kaler

    2008-11-01

    Structural parameters of micelles formed by Triton X-100 in the presence of solubilized anthranilic acid at different pH values was investigated using light scattering and small angle neutron scattering. Analysis of the SANS data indicate that micelles are oblate ellipsoidal in nature with little variation in the dimensions, in the investigated pH range (from 0.5 to 6.0). The interaction potential of the micelles shows a minimum closer to the isoelectric point of anthranilic acid. A similar variation is observed in the cloud point of the micelles with pH. The observed variation in the interaction potential with pH of the micellar solution can be explained in terms of the reversal of charge on anthranilic acid due to shift in the acid–base equilibrium. The variation in interaction potential and cloud point with pH is modelled using Coulombic repulsion of charged molecules at the micelle interface.

  4. The potential protective role of Physalis peruviana L. fruit in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity.

    Dkhil, Mohamed A; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Diab, Marwa M S; Othman, Mohamed S; Aref, Ahmed M; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential protective role of Physalis peruviana L. (family Solanaceae) against cadmium-induced hepatorenal toxicity in Wistar rats. Herein, cadmium chloride (CdCl2) (6.5 mg/kg bwt/day) was intraperitoneally injected for 5 days, and methanolic extract of physalis (MEPh) was pre-administered to a group of Cd-treated rats by an oral administration at a daily dose of 200 mg/kg bwt for 5 days. The findings revealed that CdCl2 injection induced significant decreases in kidney weight and kidney index. Cadmium intoxication increased the activities of liver enzymes and the bilirubin level, in addition to the levels of uric acid, urea and creatinine were increased in the serum. The pre-administration of MEPh alleviated hepatorenal toxicity in Cd-treated rats. Physalis was noted to play a good hepatorenal protective role, reducing lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, and enhancing enzymatic activities and non-enzymatic antioxidant molecule, glutathione, in hepatic and renal tissues of Cd-treated rats. Moreover, physalis treatment was able to reverse the histopathological changes in liver and kidney tissues and also increased the expression of Bcl-2 protein in liver and kidney of rats. Overall, the results showed that MEPh can induce antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects and also exerts beneficial effects for the treatment of Cd-induced hepatorenal toxicity. PMID:25265456

  5. Potential Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV in the Pathophysiology of Heart Failure

    Thiago A. Salles

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV is a widely expressed multifunctional serine peptidase that exists as a membrane-anchored cell surface protein or in a soluble form in the plasma and other body fluids. Numerous substrates are cleaved at the penultimate amino acid by DPPIV, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-α, all of which play important roles in the cardiovascular system. In this regard, recent reports have documented that circulating DPPIV activity correlates with poorer cardiovascular outcomes in human and experimental heart failure (HF. Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that DPPIV inhibitors exert cardioprotective and renoprotective actions in a variety of experimental models of cardiac dysfunction. On the other hand, conflicting results have been found when translating these promising findings from preclinical animal models to clinical therapy. In this review, we discuss how DPPIV might be involved in the cardio-renal axis in HF. In addition, the potential role for DPPIV inhibitors in ameliorating heart disease is revised, focusing on the effects of the main DPPIV substrates on cardiac remodeling and renal handling of salt and water.

  6. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. Aim To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH 7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their correlation with symptoms. Methods Studies were identified by systematic PubMed and Embase searches. Data are presented as sample-size weighted ...

  7. Potential Effects of Caffeic Acid in Suppression of Matrix Metalloproteinases Activities in Irradiated Rats

    Great Number of researches on the potential role of antioxidant nutrients and phenolic compounds in the prevention of chronic diseases has been accumulated over the past several decades. Despite this effort, there is much that remains uncertain. Bio markers research in this field has the potential to help fill the gaps in current knowledge. The present study was designed to evaluate, in one aspect, the probable direction expression of proteolytic enzymes as indices for gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and their relationship, in other aspect with one antioxidant micro nutrient phenolic compound: caffeic acid (CA). Sprague Dawley male albino rats were administrated CA intraperitoneally (i.p.) 10 μmol/ kg body wt/ day for 8 consecutive days pre irradiation exposure (fractionated doses, instalment as 1 Gy every day up to total dose of 8 Gy). The treatment was continued for 15 successive days following irradiation processing. Quantitative assay of gelatinolytic zymo graphic analysis of serum and hepatic tissues showed that exposure to gamma-rays yields a marked significant increase in the activities of both latent and active MMP-9 (92 and 86 kDa), respectively, and both latent and active MMP-2 (72 and 66 kDa), respectively. Administration of CA significantly decreased the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in gamma-irradiated rats. Conclusion: the present findings demonstrated that irradiation-exposure leads to enhancement of enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in their inactive and active forms in the serum and liver. Meanwhile, administration of CA exhibits protective effects in gamma-irradiated rats through down-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities

  8. Occurrence and role of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products

    Leroi, Francoise

    2010-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in fish flesh has long been disregarded because the high post-mortem pH, the low percentage of sugars, the high content of low molecular weight nitrogenous molecules and the low temperature of temperate waters favor the rapid growth of pH-sensitive psychrotolerant marine Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium. In seafood packed in both vacuum (VP) and modified atmosphere (MAP) packaging commonly CO2 enriched, the growth of the Gram-ne...

  9. Relativistic Mechanics and a Special Role for the Coulomb Potential

    Boyer, Timothy H

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that a nonrelativistic mechanical system involving a general nonrelativistic potential V(|r1-r2|) between point particles at positions r1 and r2 can be extended to a Lagrangian system which is invariant under Lorentz transformation through order v^2/c^2. However, this invariance requires the introduction of velocity-dependent and acceleration-dependent forces between particles. The textbook treatments of "relativistic mechanics" can be misleading; the discussions usually deal with only one particle experiencing prescribed forces and so make no mention of these additional velocity- and acceleration-dependent forces. A simple example for a situation analogous to a parallel-plate capacitor is analyzed for all the conservation laws of Galilean invariance or Lorentz invariance. For this system, Galilean invariance requires that the mechanical momentum is given by pmech=mv but places no restriction on the position-dependent potential function. On the other hand, Lorentz invariance requires that the mech...

  10. Potential role of odanacatib in the treatment of osteoporosis

    Ng KW

    2012-01-01

    Kong Wah NgDepartment of Endocrinology and Diabetes and St Vincent’s Institute, St Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Cathepsin K is a key enzyme involved in the degradation of organic bone matrix by osteoclasts. Inhibition of bone resorption observed in human and animal models deficient for cathepsin K has identified this enzyme as a suitable target for intervention by small molecules with the potential to be used as therapeutic agents in the treatm...

  11. Potential Role of Garcinol as an Anticancer Agent

    Gupta, Smiti V.; Nadia Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone, is extracted from the rind of the fruit of Garcinia indica, a plant found extensively in tropical regions. Although the fruit has been consumed traditionally over centuries, its biological activities, specifically its anticancer potential is a result of recent scientific investigations. The anticarcinogenic properties of garcinol appear to be moderated via its antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and proapoptotic activities. In addition...

  12. Role of Early Maladaptive Schemas on Addiction Potential in Youth

    Bakhshi Bojed, Fereshteh; Nikmanesh, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug abuse in juveniles is one of the most serious problems which lead to different physical, social and educational damages and outcomes. Objectives The aim of the present study is to predict the addiction Potential in youths by their early maladaptive schemas. Materials and Methods The research sample included students of the University of Sistan and Baluchistan, Zahedan, Iran, with average age of 19-24 years. Participants were 260 undergraduate students (159 girls and 101 boys) ...

  13. Recollision scenario without tunneling : Role of the ionic core potential

    Kamor, Adam; Chandre, Cristel; UZer, Turgay; Mauger, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The standard model of strong laser physics, the recollision scenario, omits the ionic core potential after tunneling. Strikingly, although the Coulomb interaction drives all stages of recollision, the maximum energy the electrons bring back to the core is found by ignoring it. We resolve this long-standing paradox by showing that this good agreement stems from a fortuitous cancellation at high intensities. Instead of the three step model, we ?nd that the Coulomb interaction can be fully integ...

  14. Relativistic Mechanics and a Special Role for the Coulomb Potential

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that a nonrelativistic mechanical system involving a general nonrelativistic potential V(|r1-r2|) between point particles at positions r1 and r2 can be extended to a Lagrangian system which is invariant under Lorentz transformation through order v^2/c^2. However, this invariance requires the introduction of velocity-dependent and acceleration-dependent forces between particles. The textbook treatments of "relativistic mechanics" can be misleading; the discussions usually deal with...

  15. Raxibacumab: potential role in the treatment of inhalational anthrax

    Kummerfeldt, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Carlos E KummerfeldtDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Anthrax is a highly contagious and potentially fatal human disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, an aerobic, Gram-positive, spore-forming rod-shaped bacterium with worldwide distribution as a zoonotic infection in herbivore animals. Bioterrorist attacks with inhalational anthrax have prompted the development of more effective treatments. Anti...

  16. Potential Role of Honey in Learning and Memory

    Zahiruddin Othman; Rahimah Zakaria; Nik Hazlina Nik Hussain; Asma' Hassan; Nazlahshaniza Shafin; Badriya Al-Rahbi; Asma Hayati Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The composition and physicochemical properties of honey are variable depending on its floral source and often named according to the geographical location. The potential medicinal benefits of Tualang honey, a multifloral jungle honey found in Malaysia, have recently been attracting attention because of its reported beneficial effects in various diseases. This paper reviews the effects of honey, particularly Tualang honey, on learning and memory. Information regarding the effects of Tualang ho...

  17. Assessment of the antioxidant potential and fatty acid composition of four Centaurea L. taxa from Turkey.

    Aktumsek, Abdurrahman; Zengin, Gokhan; Guler, Gokalp Ozmen; Cakmak, Yavuz Selim; Duran, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    This paper focused on the assessment of antioxidant property and fatty acid composition of four Centaurea species. The antioxidant activity of its methanol extract was evaluated by several in vitro experiments including phosphomolybedum assay, DPPH assay, β-carotene/linoleic acid, ferric and cupric reducing power. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also evaluated. The methanol extract of Centaurea pulcherrima var. pulcherrima showed the superior free radical scavenging activity, linoleic acid inhibition capacity, reducing power and also had the highest total phenolic content. A significant relationship between antioxidant capacity and total phenolic components was found. The oils of Centaurea taxa were also analysed for fatty acid concentration by gas chromatography. The principal fatty acids in the species were palmitic acid (23.38-30.49%) and linoleic acid (20.19-29.93%). These findings suggest that the Centaurea species could be used as a potential source of new natural antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids in food industry, cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:23768332

  18. Potential Role of Probiotics in Mechanism of Intestinal Immunity

    Imran Rashid Rajput and Wei Fen Li*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are nonpathogenic bacteria exert a constructive influence on health or physiology of the host. Effect of probiotics in the intestinal defense against variety of diseases is well known. The probiotics are involved in the mechanism of intestinal defense, support as antagonist against pathogens, improve intestinal epithelial layer and boost the innate as well as adaptive immunity. However these responses are also exerted by intestinal components. The intestinal components as well as probiotics play a reciprocal role to enhance the immune response of the individual. The possibilities of mechanism of action include the stimulation of epithelial cells, activation of dendritic cells via toll-like receptors (TLRs, conversely produce cytokines. These observations reviewed together advocate that specific immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria should be focusing on mechanism of action via antigen presenting cells (APC.

  19. Recollision scenario without tunneling : Role of the ionic core potential

    Kamor, Adam; Uzer, Turgay; Mauger, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The standard model of strong laser physics, the recollision scenario, omits the ionic core potential after tunneling. Strikingly, although the Coulomb interaction drives all stages of recollision, the maximum energy the electrons bring back to the core is found by ignoring it. We resolve this long-standing paradox by showing that this good agreement stems from a fortuitous cancellation at high intensities. Instead of the three step model, we ?nd that the Coulomb interaction can be fully integrated into a purely classical scenario that explains recollisions without invoking tunneling.

  20. The Role of Highly Unsaturated Fatty Acids in Aquatic Food Webs

    Perhar, G.; Arhonditsis, G. B.

    2009-05-01

    .e. diatoms), at their base can attain inverted biomass distributions with efficient energy transfer between trophic levels, making HUFA pathways in aquatic food webs of special interest to fisheries and environmental managers. Built on our previous work, which implicitly considered HUFAs through a proxy (generic food quality term, which also indexes ingestibility, digestibility and toxicity), our aim is to elucidate the underlying mechanisms controlling HUFA transport through the lower aquatic food web, with an emphasis on the hypothesized somatic growth limiting potential. A biochemical submodel coupled to a plankton model has been formulated and calibrated, accounting explicitly for the omega 3 and omega 6 families of fatty acids; specifically, Alpha Linoleic acid (ALA, a precursor to EPA), EPA and DHA. Further insights into the role of HUFAs on food web dynamics and the subsequent implications on ecosystem functioning are gained through bifurcation analysis of the model. Our research aims to elucidate the existing gaps in the literature pertaining to the role and impact of HUFAs on plankton dynamics, which have traditionally been thought to be driven by stoichiometric ratios and limiting nutrients. In this study, we challenge the notion of nutrients being the primary driving factor of aquatic ecosystem patterns by introducing a modeling framework that accounts for the interplay between nutrients and HUFAs.

  1. Potential role of caveolin-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a membrane scaffolding protein, which functions to regulate intracellular compartmentalization of various signaling molecules. In the present studies, transgenic mice with a targeted disruption of the Cav-1 gene (Cav-1-/-) were used to assess the role of Cav-1 in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Treatment of wild-type mice with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases. This was correlated with decreased expression of Cav-1 in the liver. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in Cav-1-/- mice, an effect that was independent of acetaminophen metabolism. Acetaminophen administration resulted in increased hepatic expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3, as well as hemeoxygenase-1, but decreased glutathione and superoxide dismutase-1; no differences were noted between the genotypes suggesting that reduced toxicity in Cav-1-/- mice is not due to alterations in antioxidant defense. In wild-type mice, acetaminophen increased mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as cyclooxygenase-2, while 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which generates anti-inflammatory lipoxins, decreased. Acetaminophen-induced changes in MCP-1 and 15-LOX expression were greater in Cav-1-/- mice. Although expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, a potent hepatocyte mitogen, was up-regulated in the liver of Cav-1-/- mice after acetaminophen, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and survivin, markers of cellular proliferation, were delayed, which may reflect the reduced need for tissue repair. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Cav-1 plays a role in promoting inflammation and toxicity during the pathogenesis of acetaminophen-induced injury.

  2. Role of Dietary Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infant Allergies and Respiratory Diseases

    Lynette P. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal nutrition has critical effects on the developing structures and functions of the fetus. Malnutrition during pregnancy can result in low birth weight and small for gestational age babies, increase risk for infection, and impact the immune system. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have been reported to have immunomodulatory effects. Decreased consumption of omega-6 PUFAs, in favor of more anti-inflammatory omega-3 PUFAs in modern diets, has demonstrated the potential protective role of omega-3 PUFAs in allergic and respiratory diseases. In this paper, we examine the role of PUFAs consumption during pregnancy and early childhood and its influence on allergy and respiratory diseases. PUFAs act via several mechanisms to modulate immune function. Omega-3 PUFAs may alter the T helper (Th cell balance by inhibiting cytokine production which in turn inhibits immunoglobulin E synthesis and Th type 2 cell differentiation. PUFAs may further modify cellular membrane, induce eicosanoid metabolism, and alter gene expression. These studies indicate the benefits of omega-3 PUFAs supplementation. Nevertheless, further investigations are warranted to assess the long-term effects of omega-3 PUFAs in preventing other immune-mediated diseases, as well as its effects on the later immunodefense and health status during early growth and development.

  3. THE ROLE OF BACTERIAL SYMBIONTS IN AMINO ACID COMPOSITION OF BLACK BEAN APHIDS

    MingGan; De-ChengDing; Xue-xiaMiao

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the role of bacterial symbionts ( Buchnera spp. ) in the black bean aphids ( Aphis craccivora Koch), the aphids were treated with the antibiotic, rifampicin, to eliminate their intracellular symbiotic bacteria. Analysis of protein and amino acid concentration in 7-day-old of aposymbiotic aphids showed that the total protein content per mg fresh weight was significantly reduced by 29 %, but free amino acid titers were increased by 17% . The ratio of the essential amino acids was in general only around 20% essential amino acids in phloem sap of broad bean, whereas it was 44% and 37% in symbiotic and aposymbiotic aphids, respectively,suggesting that the composition of the free amino acids was unbalanced. For example, the essential amino acid,threonine represented 21. 6% of essential amino acids in symbiotic aphids, but it was only 16.7% in aposymbiotic aphids. Likewise, two nonessential amino acids, tyrosine and serine, represented 8.9% and 5.6% of total amino acids in symbiontic aphids, respectively, but they enhanced to 21.1% and 13.6% in aposymbiotic aphids. It seems likely that the elevated free amino acid concentration in aposymbiotic aphids was caused by the limited protein anabolism as the result of the unbalanced amino acid composition.

  4. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease: Potential role of molecular biometrics

    Amosy; E; M’Koma

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predominantly colonic inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) is not possible in 30% of patients. For decades, scientists have worked to find a solution to improve diagnostic accuracy for IBD, encompassing Crohn’s colitis and ulcerative colitis. Evaluating protein patterns in surgical pathology colectomy specimens of colonic mucosal and submucosal compartments, individually, has potential for diagnostic medicine by identifying integrally independent, phenotype-specific cellular and molecular characteristics. Mass spectrometry(MS) and imaging(I) MS are analytical technologies that directly measure molecular species in clinical specimens, contributing to the in-depth understanding of biological molecules. The biometric-system complexity and functional diversity is well suited to proteomic and diagnostic studies. The direct analysis of cells and tissues by Matrix-Assisted-Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) MS/IMS has relevant medical diagnostic potential. MALDI-MS/IMS detection generates molecular signatures obtained from specific cell types within tissue sections. Herein discussed is a perspective on the use of MALDI-MS/IMS and bioinformatics technologies for detection of molecular-biometric patterns and identification of differentiating proteins. I also discuss a perspective on the global challenge of transferring technologies to clinical laboratories dealing with IBD issues. The significance of serologic-immunometric advances is also discussed.

  5. Particle motion in rapidly oscillating potentials: The role of the potential's initial phase

    Rapidly oscillating potentials with a vanishing time average have been used for a long time to trap charged particles in source-free regions. It has been argued that the motion of a particle inside such a potential can be approximately described by a time independent effective potential, which does not depend upon the initial phase of the oscillating potential. However, here we show that the motion of a particle and its trapping condition significantly depend upon this initial phase for arbitrarily high frequencies of the potential's oscillation. We explain this phenomenon by showing that the motion of a particle is determined by the effective potential stated in the literature only if its initial conditions are transformed according to a transformation which we show to significantly depend on the potential's initial phase for arbitrarily high frequencies. We confirm our theoretical findings by numerical simulations. Further, we demonstrate that the found phenomenon offers different ways to manipulate the dynamics of particles which are trapped by rapidly oscillating potentials. Finally, we propose a simple experiment to verify the theoretical findings of this work

  6. Inflammatory cells′ role in acetic acid-induced colitis

    Mohammad H Sanei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free radicals are the known mechanisms responsible for inducing colitis with two origins: Inflammatory cells and tissues. Only the inflammatory cells can be controlled by corticosteroids. Our aim was to assess the importance of neutrophils as one of the inflammatory cells in inducing colitis and to evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six mice were divided into six groups of six mice each. Colitis was induced in three groups by exposing them to acetic acid through enema (group 1, ex vivo (group 3, and enema after immune suppression (group 5. Each group had one control group that was exposed to water injection instead of acetic acid. Tissue samples were evaluated and compared based on macroscopic damages and biochemical and pathological results. Results: Considering neutrophilic infiltration, there were significant differences between groups 1, 3, 5, and the control of group 1. Groups 3, 5, and their controls, and group 1 and the control of group 3 had significant differences in terms of goblet depletion. Based on tissue originated H 2 O 2 , we found significant differences between group 1 and its control and group 3, and also between groups 5 and the control of group 3. All the three groups were significantly different from their controls based on Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP and such differences were also seen between group 1 with two other groups. Conclusion: Neutrophils may not be the only cause of oxidation process in colitis, and also makes the effectiveness of corticosteroids in the treatment of this disease doubtful.

  7. The role of polycarboxylic acids in calcium phosphate mineralization.

    Tsortos, Achilles; Nancollas, George H

    2002-06-01

    The role of two polyelectrolytes, poly-L-glutamate and poly-L-aspartate, in the growth of calcium phosphate crystal phases, has been investigated at constant supersaturation. Both molecules are strong inhibitors of HAP growth when present in the solution phase but also act as hydroxyapatite and (octacalcium phosphate)-like crystal nucleators when adsorbed on germanium surfaces. The structure of the polymers in solution is presented and various adsorption models are analyzed. A "train-loop" structure of these long, flexible chain polymers on the crystal surface is consistent with all the adsorption (experimental and theoretical), inhibition, and electrophoretic mobility results. PMID:16290647

  8. In Vitro Properties of Potential Probiotic Indigenous Lactic Acid Bacteria Originating from Traditional Pickles

    Mehmet Tokatlı; Gökşen Gülgör; Simel Bağder Elmacı; Nurdan Arslankoz İşleyen; Filiz Özçelik

    2015-01-01

    The suitable properties of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains (preselected among 153 strains on the basis of their potential technological properties) isolated from traditional Çubuk pickles were examined in vitro. For this purpose, these strains (21 Lactobacillus plantarum, 11 Pediococcus ethanolidurans, and 7 Lactobacillus brevis) were tested for the ability to survive at pH 2.5, resistance to bile salts, viability in the presence of pepsin-pancreatin, ability to deconju...

  9. On the potential role of glutamate transport in mental fatigue

    Hansson Elisabeth

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mental fatigue, with decreased concentration capacity, is common in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, often appearing prior to other major mental or physical neurological symptoms. Mental fatigue also makes rehabilitation more difficult after a stroke, brain trauma, meningitis or encephalitis. As increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines are reported in these disorders, we wanted to explore whether or not proinflammatory cytokines could induce mental fatigue, and if so, by what mechanisms. It is well known that proinflammatory cytokines are increased in major depression, "sickness behavior" and sleep deprivation, which are all disorders associated with mental fatigue. Furthermore, an influence by specific proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1, on learning and memory capacities has been observed in several experimental systems. As glutamate signaling is crucial for information intake and processing within the brain, and due to the pivotal role for glutamate in brain metabolism, dynamic alterations in glutamate transmission could be of pathophysiological importance in mental fatigue. Based on this literature and observations from our own laboratory and others on the role of astroglial cells in the fine-tuning of glutamate neurotransmission we present the hypothesis that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 could be involved in the pathophysiology of mental fatigue through their ability to attenuate the astroglial clearance of extracellular glutamate, their disintegration of the blood brain barrier, and effects on astroglial metabolism and metabolic supply for the neurons, thereby attenuating glutamate transmission. To test whether our hypothesis is valid or not, brain imaging techniques should be applied with the ability to register, over time and with increasing cognitive loading, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and potassium (K+ in humans suffering from

  10. The Role of Acid Strength of Modified NaX Zeoliteson Gas Phase Ethylation of Benzene

    Sanghamitra Barman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of acid strength of modified NaX zeolites in gas phase ethylation of benzene were studied over Ce exchanged NaX zeolite of different types. Acidity of the modified zeolite was investigated by means of adsorbing ammonia at different temperature. The conversion of reactantsvaries with the acid strength as well as the different types of the zeolites. The strong acid sites are active centers while the weak acid sites are inactive. The influences of various process parameters such as temperature, space-time and the feed ratio of benzene to ethanol on benzene conversion over most acidic zeolite were studied. The kinetic and adsorption constants of the rate equations were estimated by the best fit. From the estimated kinetic constants, the activation energies and frequency factors for various reactions were determined. The activation energy values compared well with those reported by other investigators for same reactions over similar catalysts.

  11. The role of local voltage potentials in outflow tract ectopy

    Thomsen, P.E.B.; Johannessen, A.; Jons, C.;

    2010-01-01

    Discrete, fragmented, local voltage potentials (LVPs) have been observed in electrograms recorded at the ablation site in patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for arrhythmias originating in both the right and left ventricular outflow tract; however, the incidence and the significance of the...... LVP with respect to arrhythmogenesis is uncertain. We studied 25 patients with outflow tract arrhythmias referred for radiofrequency catheter ablation and recorded high-amplified intracardiac electrograms close to the site of origin of the arrhythmia. Ten patients undergoing ablation for...... ventricular premature beats. In 10 patients, ventricular parasystole was suggested by varying coupling intervals > 100 ms, and fusion beats allowing for the estimation of the least common denominator of R-R intervals. In 23 of the 25 patients, the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and intracardiac contact...

  12. Role of abscisic acid (aba) in modulating the responses of two apple rootstocks to drought stress

    Drought stress is considered as the main limiting factor for apple (Malus domestica L.) production in some semi-arid areas of China. In this study, we investigated the modulation role of abscisic acid (ABA) and fluridone (ABA synthesis inhibitor) on water relations and antioxidant enzyme system in 2-year-old seedlings of two apple rootstocks i.e. Malus sieversii (Ledeb.) Roem. (MS) and Malus hupehensis (Pamp.) Rehd. (MH). Drought stress induced ion leakage, accumulation of malondiadehyde (MDA) and decreases in leaf water potential and relative water content (RWC) in both rootstocks, which were significantly alleviated by exogenous ABA application. Drought stress also induced markedly increases in endogenous ABA content and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), and glutathione reductase (GR), to a greater magnitude in MS as compared to MH rootstock. Concentration of 100 mol/L and 50 mol/L ABA had the most positive effects on drought-stressed rootstocks of MS and MH, respectively. Spraying optimum exogenous ABA contributed to enhancement in most of the above antioxidant enzymes activities but reduction in content of MDA and maintained the appropriate leaf water potential and RWC in both rootstocks. Pretreatment with fluridone aggravated ion leakage and the accumulation of MDA in two apple rootstocks under drought stress, which was overcome by exogenous ABA application to some extent. In conclusion, the endogenous ABA was probably involved in the regulation of two apple rootstocks in responses to drought stress. (author)

  13. The Role for Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplementation in Older Adults

    Alessio Molfino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal nutrition is one of the most important determinants of healthier ageing, reducing the risk of disability, maintaining mental and physical functions, and thus preserving and ensuring a better quality of life. Dietary intake and nutrient absorption decline with age, thus increasing the risk of malnutrition, morbidity and mortality. Specific nutrients, particularly long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, might have the potential of preventing and reducing co-morbidities in older adults. Omega-3 PUFAs are able to modulate inflammation, hyperlipidemia, platelet aggregation, and hypertension. Different mechanisms contribute to these effects, including conditioning cell membrane function and composition, eicosanoid production, and gene expression. The present review analyzes the influence of omega-3 PUFAs status and intake on brain function, cardiovascular system, immune function, muscle performance and bone health in older adults. Omega-3 FAs may have substantial benefits in reducing the risk of cognitive decline in older people. The available data encourage higher intakes of omega-3 PUFAs in the diet or via specific supplements. More studies are needed to confirm the role of omega-3 FAs in maintaining bone health and preventing the loss of muscle mass and function associated with ageing. In summary, omega-3 PUFAs are now identified as potential key nutrients, safe and effective in the treatment and prevention of several negative consequences of ageing.

  14. Potential role of probiotics on colorectal cancer prevention

    Uccello Mario

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer represents the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Owing to differences in dietary habits and lifestyle, this neoplasm is more common in industrialized countries than in developing ones. Evidence from a wide range of sources supports the assumption that the link between diet and colorectal cancer may be due to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora. Discussion Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host, and they have been investigated for their protective anti-tumor effects. In vivo and molecular studies have displayed encouraging findings that support a role of probiotics in colorectal cancer prevention. Summary Several mechanisms could explain the preventive action of probiotics against colorectal cancer onset. They include: alteration of the intestinal microflora; inactivation of cancerogenic compounds; competition with putrefactive and pathogenic microbiota; improvement of the host’s immune response; anti-proliferative effects via regulation of apoptosis and cell differentiation; fermentation of undigested food; inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways.

  15. Sustainable life support on Mars - the potential roles of cyanobacteria

    Verseux, Cyprien; Baqué, Mickael; Lehto, Kirsi; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Billi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Even though technological advances could allow humans to reach Mars in the coming decades, launch costs prohibit the establishment of permanent manned outposts for which most consumables would be sent from Earth. This issue can be addressed by in situ resource utilization: producing part or all of these consumables on Mars, from local resources. Biological components are needed, among other reasons because various resources could be efficiently produced only by the use of biological systems. But most plants and microorganisms are unable to exploit Martian resources, and sending substrates from Earth to support their metabolism would strongly limit the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of their cultivation. However, resources needed to grow specific cyanobacteria are available on Mars due to their photosynthetic abilities, nitrogen-fixing activities and lithotrophic lifestyles. They could be used directly for various applications, including the production of food, fuel and oxygen, but also indirectly: products from their culture could support the growth of other organisms, opening the way to a wide range of life-support biological processes based on Martian resources. Here we give insights into how and why cyanobacteria could play a role in the development of self-sustainable manned outposts on Mars.

  16. Structural role of hydrogen bond networks in amino acid-acid systems. (I) The network with highly polarizable OHO hydrogen bonds in sarcosine-methanesulfonic acid (2:1) crystal

    The sarcosine-methanesulfonic acid (2:1) crystal was selected for examination of two problems: relations between different components of the amino acid-acid hydrogen bond network and a role of very strong and highly polarizable OHO hydrogen bond in the main structural units of the crystal: sarcosinium-sarcosine dimers (complexes). Our observations are based on phase transitions of the crystal monitored by DSC, X-ray diffraction and temperature evolutions of selected bands of IR spectra. Our experimental and DFT results provide information on the potential energy profile of the OHO proton and its evolution with temperature. The O...O distance of the primary hydrogen bond remains almost unchanged and its proton is strongly delocalized and sensitive on neighbour NHO hydrogen bond. We propose a possible mechanism of the phase transitions and coupling between νC=O vibrations of the carboxyl group and moving of the proton in neighbour OHO hydrogen bridge

  17. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O.; Knee, Joseph L.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA—H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA—HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes.

  18. Composition, texture and methane potential of cellulosic residues from Lewis acids organosolv pulping of wheat straw.

    Constant, Sandra; Barakat, Abdellatif; Robitzer, Mike; Di Renzo, Francesco; Dumas, Claire; Quignard, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    Cellulosic pulps have been successfully isolated from wheat straw through a Lewis acids organosolv treatment. The use of Lewis acids with different hardness produced pulps with different delignification degrees. The cellulosic residue was characterised by chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 physisorption, scanning electron microscopy and potential for anaerobic digestibility. Surface area and pore volume increased with the hardness of the Lewis acid, in correspondence with the decrease of the amount of lignin and hemicellulose in the pulp. The non linearity of the correlation between porosity and composition suggests that an agglomeration of cellulose fibrils occurs in the early stages of pulping. All organosolv pulps presented a significantly higher methane potential than the parent straw. A methane evolution of 295Ncm(3)/g OM was reached by a moderate improvement of the accessibility of the native straw. PMID:27295251

  19. Potential human health effects of acid rain: report of a workshop

    Goyer, Robert A.; Bachmann, John; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Ferris, Benjamin G.; Graham, Judith; Mushak, Paul; Perl, Daniel P.; Rall, David P.; Schlesinger, Richard; Sharpe, William; Wood, John M.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the potential impact of the acid precipitation phenomenon on human health. There are two major components to this phenomenon: the predepositional phase, during which there is direct human exposure to acidic substances from ambient air, and the post-depositional phase, in which the deposition of acid materials on water and soil results in the mobilization, transport, and even chemical transformation of toxic metals. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. PMID:3896772

  20. Screening of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria based on gastrointestinal properties and perfluorooctanoate toxicity.

    Xing, Jiali; Wang, Fan; Xu, Qi; Yin, Boxing; Fang, Dongsheng; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Wang, Gang; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of lactic acid bacteria capable of binding or degrading food-borne carcinogens may reduce human exposure to these deleterious compounds. In this study, 25 Lactobacillus strains isolated from human, plant, or dairy environments were investigated for their potential probiotic capacity against perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) toxicity. The PFOA binding, tolerance ability, and acid and bile salt tolerance were investigated and assessed by principal component analysis. Additionally, the effect of different pH levels and binding times was assessed. These strains exhibited different degrees of PFOA binding; the strain with the highest PFOA binding capability was Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM738, which bound to 49.40 ± 1.5 % of available PFOA. This strain also exhibited relatively good cellular antioxidative properties, acid and bile salt tolerance, and adhesion to Caco-2 cells. This study suggests that L. plantarum CCFM738 could be used as a potential probiotic in food applications against PFOA toxicity. PMID:27094185

  1. Neuraminidase inhibition of Dietary chlorogenic acids and derivatives - potential antivirals from dietary sources.

    Gamaleldin Elsadig Karar, Mohamed; Matei, Marius-Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Illenberger, Susanne; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2016-04-20

    Plants rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), caffeic acids and their derivatives have been found to exert antiviral effects against influenza virus neuroaminidase. In this study several dietary naturally occurring chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids and derivatives were screened for their inhibitory activity against neuroaminidases (NAs) from C. perfringens, H5N1 and recombinant H5N1 (N-His)-Tag using a fluorometric assay. There was no significant difference in inhibition between the different NA enzymes. The enzyme inhibition results indicated that chlorogenic acids and selected derivatives, exhibited high activities against NAs. It seems that the catechol group from caffeic acid was important for the activity. Dietary CGA therefore show promise as potential antiviral agents. However, caffeoyl quinic acids show low bioavailibility and are intensly metabolized by the gut micro flora, only low nM concentrations are observed in plasma and urine, therefore a systemic antiviral effect of these compounds is unlikely. Nevertheless, gut floral metabolites with a catechol moiety or structurally related dietary phenolics with a catechol moiety might serve as interesting compounds for future investigations. PMID:27010419

  2. Acid mine drainage in Australia: its extent and potential future liability. Supervising Scientist Report 125

    In order to better understand the impact of acid drainage in Australia and to provide a basis for assessing long-term management options, the Office of the Supervising Scientist (OSS) and the Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research (ACMRR) initiated this study to prepare a status report on acid mine drainage in Australia. The study is supported by the Minerals Council of Australia. The coverage of this study includes all mine sites where sulphidic oxidation in mine wastes or mine workings leads to the release of contaminated drainage with off-site impacts. The objectives of the study were: 1. to quantify and characterise the generation of contaminated drainage by sulphidic oxidation from historic and current mining activities in Australia; 2. to develop a classification scheme to characterise the potential for off-site impacts from sulphidic oxidation in mine wastes; 3. to compare the cost at the national level of managing sulphidic oxidation in mine wastes and any resulting contaminated drainage with other mining and environmental costs; 4. to make recommendations based on the information received to improve the understanding and management of acid mine drainage in Australia. Information was collected on the extent and management of sulphidic oxidation and acid drainage at operating, historic and derelict mines in Australia. Mining operators, environmental officers, industry representatives, state government departments and others were asked about their experience with acid mine drainage and how it is currently managed at operating and historic mine sites. Based on the information collected, the additional cost of managing potentially acid generating wastes at operating mine sites is estimated to be about AUD 60 million per year. Potentially, the financial risk could be much greater if sulphide oxidation and release of pollutants is discovered after mine closure, as was the case for historic sites like Mt Lyell, Rum Jungle or Mt Morgan. The

  3. The therapeutic potential of allosteric ligands for free fatty acid sensitive GPCRs

    Hudson, Brian D; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    identifying allosteric leads and their often flat or confusing SAR. The present review will consider the advantages and challenges associated with allosteric GPCR ligands, and examine how the particular properties of these ligands may be exploited to uncover the therapeutic potential for free fatty acid...

  4. The Potential Role(s) of Writing in Second Language Development

    Williams, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Writing is often seen as having a minor role in second language learning. This article explores recent research that suggests that writing can have a facilitative role in language development. In particular, it focuses on three features of writing: (1) its slower pace, and (2) the enduring record that it leaves, both of which can encourage…

  5. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa

    Orimo H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hideo Orimo Division of Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Hypophosphatasia (HPP is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal, perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP. TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change

  6. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa.

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP. PMID:27274262

  7. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Potential Role of Endocannabinoids Signaling

    Balapal S. Basavarajappa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the unique features of prenatal alcohol exposure in humans is impaired cognitive and behavioral function resulting from damage to the central nervous system (CNS, which leads to a spectrum of impairments referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD. Human FASD phenotypes can be reproduced in the rodent CNS following prenatal ethanol exposure. Several mechanisms are expected to contribute to the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing fetus, particularly in the developing CNS. These mechanisms may act simultaneously or consecutively and differ among a variety of cell types at specific developmental stages in particular brain regions. Studies have identified numerous potential mechanisms through which alcohol can act on the fetus. Among these mechanisms are increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, interference with the activity of growth factors, glia cells, cell adhesion molecules, gene expression during CNS development and impaired function of signaling molecules involved in neuronal communication and circuit formation. These alcohol-induced deficits result in long-lasting abnormalities in neuronal plasticity and learning and memory and can explain many of the neurobehavioral abnormalities found in FASD. In this review, the author discusses the mechanisms that are associated with FASD and provides a current status on the endocannabinoid system in the development of FASD.

  8. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    Faiza Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98% on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  9. Role and Potential Therapeutic Use of TRAIL in Diabetes

    Ahter Dilsad Sanlioglu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a TNF superfamily member, defined by its high homology to CD95L/FasL and TNF-alpha. It is known for its strong selective apoptotic effect on many transformed cell lines and tumor cells but not in most normal cell types. TRAIL appears to be a more complex molecule than predicted, with a higher therapeutic potential than previously anticipated. This is mainly because it has 5 different receptors that it can bind to in contrast to other TNF family members with one or two receptors; it is expressed widely in human tissues; and it has anti-inflammatory effects. For instance, type 1 diabetes (T1D development was exacarbated in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice when TRAIL function was blocked, and TRAIL-/- C57BL/6 mice developed T1D at a much earlier stage following streptozotocin (STZ injection, compared to mice which displayed normal TRAIL expression. Furthermore, TRAIL displayed a pro-angiogenic effect in primary human vascular endothelial cells.

  10. The potential role of biofuels within the built environment

    Lewis, C.

    1980-04-01

    The potential contribution of biofuels within both developed and developing nations is examined, particularly with respect to their utilization within the built environment. It is stressed that biomass, mainly in the forms of wood, animal dung and agricultural residues, is essentially a renewable resource and today accounts for approximately one-sixth of global fuel supplies. Examples of fuelwood consumption in European countries and in Africa are presented and the future of the bioenergy is considered, taking into account such main estimates as national energy density (energy consumed/ha of land area) and biomass productivity (net energy output/ha/year). Bioenergy production in low and high latitude countries, is also examined. The results of work on the blue-green Spirulina, an alga which contains 65-70% protein, and may yield about 200 cu m of biogas, containing 65-68% of CH4 at an energy content of 5.25 GI from 410 kg of its biomass are discussed.