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Sample records for acids improves lipid

  1. Improved Experimental Techniques for Analyzing Nucleic Acid Transport Through Protein Nanopores in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    Costa, Justin A.

    The translocation of nucleic acid polymers across cell membranes is a fundamental requirement for complex life and has greatly contributed to genomic molecular evolution. The diversity of pathways that have evolved to transport DNA and RNA across membranes include protein receptors, active and passive transporters, endocytic and pinocytic processes, and various types of nucleic acid conducting channels known as nanopores. We have developed a series of experimental techniques, collectively known as "Wicking", that greatly improves the biophysical analysis of nucleic acid transport through protein nanopores in planar lipid bilayers. We have verified the Wicking method using numerous types of classical ion channels including the well-studied chloride selective channel, CLIC1. We used the Wicking technique to reconstitute α-hemolysin and found that DNA translocation events of types A and B could be routinely observed using this method. Furthermore, measurable differences were observed in the duration of blockade events as DNA length and composition was varied, consistent with previous reports. Finally, we tested the ability of the Wicking technology to reconstitute the dsRNA transporter Sid-1. Exposure to dsRNAs of increasing length and complexity showed measurable differences in the current transitions suggesting that the charge carrier was dsRNA. However, the translocation events occurred so infrequently that a meaningful electrophysiological analysis was not possible. Alterations in the lipid composition of the bilayer had a minor effect on the frequency of translocation events but not to such a degree as to permit rigorous statistical analysis. We conclude that in many instances the Wicking method is a significant improvement to the lipid bilayer technique, but is not an optimal method for analyzing transport through Sid-1. Further refinements to the Wicking method might have future applications in high throughput DNA sequencing, DNA computation, and molecular

  2. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples. PMID:27245345

  3. Acute Acidification of Stratum Corneum Membrane Domains Using Polyhydroxyl Acids Improves Lipid Processing and Inhibits Degradation of Corneodesmosomes

    Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Roelandt, Truus; Schürer, Nanna; Pu, Xu; Fluhr, Joachim; Giddelo, Christina; Man, Mao-Qiang; Crumrine, Debra; Roseeuw, Diane; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora; Elias, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralization of the normally acidic stratum corneum (SC) has deleterious consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis and SC integrity/cohesion attributable to serine proteases (SPs) activation leading to deactivation/degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and corneodesmosomes (CD). As an elevated pH compromises SC structure and function, we asked here whether SC hyperacidification would improve the structure and function. We lowered the pH of mouse SC using two polyhydroxyl acids (PH...

  4. Improved cellular activity of antisense peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cationic peptide-lipid (CatLip) domain

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Zachar, Vladimir; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    and therefore mechanisms that promote endosomal escape (or avoid the endosomal route) are required for improving bioavailability. A variety of auxiliary agents (chloroquine, calcium ions, or lipophilic photosensitizers) has this effect, but improved, unaided delivery would be highly advantageous in...... particular for future in vivo applications. We find that simply conjugating a lipid domain (fatty acid) to the cationic peptide (a CatLip conjugate) increases the biological effect of the corresponding PNA (CatLip) conjugates in a luciferase cellular antisense assay up to 2 orders of magnitude. The effect...... increases with increasing length of the fatty acid (C8-C16) but in parallel also results in increased cellular toxicity, with decanoic acid being optimal. Furthermore, the relative enhancement is significantly higher for Tat peptide compared to oligoarginine. Confocal microscopy and chloroquine enhancement...

  5. Improved insulin loading in poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles upon self-assembly with lipids

    Garcia Diaz, Maria; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    insulin into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles by pre-assembly with amphiphilic lipids. Insulin was complexed with soybean phosphatidylcholine or sodium caprate by self-assembly and subsequently loaded into PLGA nanoparticles by using the double emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. The......Polymeric nanoparticles are widely investigated as drug delivery systems for oral administration. However, the hydrophobic nature of many polymers hampers effective loading of the particles with hydrophilic macromolecules such as insulin. Thus, the aim of this work was to improve the loading of...

  6. Acute acidification of stratum corneum membrane domains using polyhydroxyl acids improves lipid processing and inhibits degradation of corneodesmosomes.

    Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Roelandt, Truus; Schürer, Nanna; Pu, Xu; Fluhr, Joachim; Giddelo, Christina; Man, Mao-Qiang; Crumrine, Debra; Roseeuw, Diane; Feingold, Kenneth R; Mauro, Theodora; Elias, Peter M

    2010-02-01

    Neutralization of the normally acidic stratum corneum (SC) has deleterious consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis and SC integrity/cohesion attributable to serine proteases (SPs) activation leading to deactivation/degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and corneodesmosomes (CD). As an elevated pH compromises SC structure and function, we asked here whether SC hyperacidification would improve the structure and function. We lowered the pH of mouse SC using two polyhydroxyl acids (PHA), lactobionic acid (LBA), or gluconolactone (GL). Applications of the PHA reduced the pH at all levels of SC of hairless mouse, with further selective acidification of SC membrane domains, as shown by fluorescence lifetime imaging. Hyperacidification improved permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to increased activities of two key membrane-localized, ceramide-generating hydrolytic enzymes (beta-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase), which correlated with accelerated extracellular maturation of SC lamellar membranes. Hyperacidification generated "supernormal" SC integrity/cohesion, attributable to an SP-dependent decreased degradation of desmoglein-1 (DSG1) and the induction of DSG3 expression in lower SC. As SC hyperacidification improves the structure and function, even of normal epidermis, these studies lay the groundwork for an assessment of the potential utility of SC acidification as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory dermatoses, characterized by abnormalities in barrier function, cohesion, and surface pH. PMID:19741713

  7. Glycyrrhizic acid improved lipoprotein lipase expression, insulin sensitivity, serum lipid and lipid deposition in high-fat diet-induced obese rats

    Eu Chia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome, known also as the insulin resistance syndrome, refers to the clustering of several risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Dyslipidaemia is a hallmark of the syndrome and is associated with a whole body reduction in the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL, an enzyme under the regulation of the class of nuclear receptors known as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a triterpenoid saponin, is the primary bioactive constituent of the roots of the shrub Glycyrrhiza glabra. Studies have indicated that triterpenoids could act as PPAR agonists and GA is therefore postulated to restore LPL expression in the insulin resistant state. Results Oral administration of 100 mg/kg of GA to high-fat diet-induced obese rats for 28 days led to significant reduction in blood glucose concentration and improvement in insulin sensitivity as indicated by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (p Conclusion In conclusion, GA may be a potential compound in improving dyslipidaemia by selectively inducing LPL expression in non-hepatic tissues. Such up-regulation was accompanied by a GA-mediated improvement in insulin sensitivity, which may be associated with a decrease in tissue lipid deposition. The HDL-raising effect of GA suggests the antiatherosclerotic properties of GA.

  8. Clearance of Hepatic Sphingomyelin by Olipudase Alfa Is Associated With Improvement in Lipid Profiles in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency.

    Thurberg, Beth L; Wasserstein, Melissa P; Jones, Simon A; Schiano, Thomas D; Cox, Gerald F; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD; Niemann-Pick disease type A and B) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by abnormal intracellular sphingomyelin (SM) accumulation. Prominent liver involvement results in hepatomegaly, fibrosis/cirrhosis, abnormal liver chemistries, and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Olipudase alfa (recombinant human ASM) is in clinical development as an investigational enzyme replacement therapy for the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. In a phase 1b study conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of within-patient dose escalation with olipudase alfa, measurement of SM levels in liver biopsies was used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of substrate burden. Five adult patients with non neuronopathic ASMD received escalating doses of olipudase alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Liver biopsies obtained at baseline and 26 weeks after treatment were evaluated for SM storage by histomorphometric analysis, biochemistry, and electron microscopy. Biopsies were also assessed for inflammation and fibrosis, and for the association of SM levels with liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles. At baseline, SM storage present in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes ranged from 9.8% to 53.8% of the microscopic field. After 26 weeks of treatment, statistically significant reductions in SM (P<0.0001) measured by morphometry were seen in 4 patients with evaluable liver biopsies. The 26-week biopsy of the fifth patient was insufficient for morphometric quantitation. Posttreatment SM levels ranged from 1.2% to 9.5% of the microscopic field, corresponding to an 84% to 92% relative reduction from baseline. Improvements in liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles were also observed. This study illustrates the utility of SM assessment by liver biopsy as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of disease burden in these patients. PMID:27340749

  9. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation improves fasting and postprandial plasma lipid profiles in hypertriglyceridemic men.

    Background: The effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the concentrations of different subclasses of VLDL, LDL and HDL particles, and their mean diameters in fasting and postprandial plasma has not been studied. Objective: To determine the effects of DHA supplementation on the concentrations of a...

  10. Fusidic acid betamethasone lipid cream.

    Girolomoni, G; Mattina, R; Manfredini, S; Vertuani, S; Fabrizi, G

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections of the skin and soft tissues are frequent disorders. They can be primitive infections (e.g. impetigo, folliculitis) or secondary infections complicating other diseases, particularly atopic dermatitis. The most common aetiologic agent is Staphylococcus aureus. Topical antibiotic therapy may be sufficient in many instances to control these infections. Fusidic acid is an antibiotic used topically on the skin which is very active against S. aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains, and other Gram-positive bacteria. Resistance rates to fusidic acid are stably low. A fusidic acid and betamethasone formulation in a lipid-enriched cream (lipid cream) has been recently developed in order to provide effective antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities in conjunction with a powerful emollient and moisturising effect. This preparation may be especially useful in patients with atopic-infected eczema. PMID:27121235

  11. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis. PMID:27349116

  12. Improved cellular uptake of antisense Peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cell-penetrating Peptide and a lipid domain

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    peptides known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is attracting wide attention for a variety of biologically active molecules. CPP-mediated delivery is typically based on the covalent conjugation of the (therapeutic) cargo to CPPs, and is particularly relevant for the delivery of noncharged RNA...... interference agents such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and morpholino oligomers. Although chemical conjugation to a variety of CPPs significantly improves the cellular uptake of PNAs, the bioavailability (and hence antisense activity) of CPP-PNA -conjugates is still highly limited by endocytotic entrapment...

  13. Enhancement of energy production by black ginger extract containing polymethoxy flavonoids in myocytes through improving glucose, lactic acid and lipid metabolism.

    Toda, Kazuya; Takeda, Shogo; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Nakamura, Seikou; Matsuda, Hisashi; Shimoda, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Enhancement of muscular energy production is thought to improve locomotive functions and prevent metabolic syndromes including diabetes and lipidemia. Black ginger (Kaempferia parviflora) has been cultivated for traditional medicine in Thailand. Recent studies have shown that black ginger extract (KPE) activated brown adipocytes and lipolysis in white adipose tissue, which may cure obesity-related dysfunction of lipid metabolism. However, the effect of KPE on glucose and lipid utilization in muscle cells has not been examined yet. Hence, we evaluated the effect of KPE and its constituents on energy metabolism in pre-differentiated (p) and differentiated (d) C2C12 myoblasts. KPE (0.1-10 μg/ml) was added to pC2C12 cells in the differentiation process for a week or used to treat dC2C12 cells for 24 h. After culturing, parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis were assessed. In terms of the results, KPE enhanced the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and lactic acid as well as the mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 in both types of cells. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α was enhanced in pC2C12 cells. In addition, KPE enhanced the production of ATP and mitochondrial biogenesis. Polymethoxy flavonoids in KPE including 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone enhanced the expression of GLUT4 and PGC-1α. Moreover, KPE and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone enhanced the phosphorylation of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In conclusion, KPE and its polymethoxy flavonoids were found to enhance energy metabolism in myocytes. KPE may improve the dysfunction of muscle metabolism that leads to metabolic syndrome and locomotive dysfunction. PMID:26581843

  14. Ascorbic acid improves the antioxidant activity of European grape juices by improving the juices' ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation of human LDL in vitro

    Landbo, Anne-Katrine Regel; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2001-01-01

    Antioxidant activities of red and white European grape juices towards copper induced lipid oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins (LDL) were examined in vitro. LDL lipid peroxidation was assessed spectrophotometrically by monitoring the development of conjugated lipid hydroperoxides at 234 n...

  15. Specially-Made Lipid-Based Assemblies for Improving Transmembrane Gene Delivery: Comparison of Basic Amino Acid Residue Rich Periphery.

    Jiang, Qian; Yue, Dong; Nie, Yu; Xu, Xianghui; He, Yiyan; Zhang, Shiyong; Wagner, Ernst; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-01

    Cationic lipid based assemblies provide a promising platform for effective gene condensation into nanosized particles, and the peripheral properties of the assemblies are vital for complexation and interaction with physical barriers. Here, we report three cationic twin head lipids, and each of them contains a dioleoyl-glutamate hydrophobic tail and a twin polar head of lysine, arginine, or histidine. Such lipids were proven to self-assemble in aqueous solution with well-defined nanostructures and residual amino-, guanidine-, or imidazole-rich periphery, showing strong buffering capacity and good liquidity. The assemblies with arginine (RL) or lysine (KL) periphery exhibited positive charges (∼+35 mV) and complete condensation of pDNA into nanosized complexes (∼120 nm). In contrast, assemblies composed of histidine-rich lipids (HL) showed relatively low cationic electric potential (∼+10 mV) and poor DNA binding ability. As expected, the designed RL assemblies with guanidine-rich periphery enhanced the in vitro gene transfection up to 190-fold as compared with the golden standard PEI25k and Lipofectamine 2000, especially in the presence of serum. Meanwhile, interaction with cell and endo/lysosome membrane also revealed the superiority of RL complexes, that the guanidine-rich surface efficiently promoted transmembrane process in cellular internalization and endosomal disruption. More importantly, RL complexes also succeeded beyond others in vivo with significantly (∼7-fold) enhanced expression in HepG2 tumor xenografts in mice, as well as stronger green fluorescence protein imaging in isolated tumors and tumor frozen sections. PMID:27097286

  16. Study of methods for the improvement of the anaerobic digestion of lipids and long chain fatty acids

    Affes Salah, Rim

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biochemical process that transforms diverse categories of biomass feedstock to renewable energy, in the form of methane, and contributes to resources conservation and greenhouse gases emission mitigation. Lipid-rich waste and wastewaters have a high energy potential, however efficient methane recovery with conventional anaerobic digestion technology is not easy to achieve because of a wide assortment of operational problems mainly related to the accumulation of long...

  17. Glycyrrhizic acid improved lipoprotein lipase expression, insulin sensitivity, serum lipid and lipid deposition in high-fat diet-induced obese rats

    Eu Chia; Lim Wai; Ton So; Kadir Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome, known also as the insulin resistance syndrome, refers to the clustering of several risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Dyslipidaemia is a hallmark of the syndrome and is associated with a whole body reduction in the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), an enzyme under the regulation of the class of nuclear receptors known as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a triterpenoid saponin, is th...

  18. Serum bile acids are higher in humans with prior gastric bypass: potential contribution to improved glucose and lipid metabolism

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M; Bianco, Antonio C;

    2009-01-01

    index cohort (n = 10). Total serum bile acid concentrations were higher in GB (8.90 +/- 4.84 micromol/l) than in both overweight (3.59 +/- 1.95, P = 0.005, Ov) and severely obese (3.86 +/- 1.51, P = 0.045, MOb). Bile acid subfractions taurochenodeoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, glycocholic...

  19. Minor amounts of plasma medium-chain fatty acids and no improved time trial performance after consuming lipids

    Vistisen, Bodil; Nybo, L.; Xu, Xuebing;

    2003-01-01

    Medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCT) have a potential glycogen-saving effect during exercise due to rapid hydrolysis and oxidation. However, studies comparing intake of carbohydrates (CHO) plus 80-90 g MCT with intake of CHO alone have revealed different results. The present study tested performance...... after consumption of specific structured triacylglycerol, consisting of a mixture of medium-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty acids, to prevent the adverse effects observed by MCT (pure medium-chain fatty acids) regarding gastrointestinal distress. Seven well-trained subjects cycled 3 h at 55% of...

  20. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-α-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-α plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-α activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-α mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-α-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription

  1. Lipid fatty acid profile analyses in liver and serum in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology

    Fatty acids (FA) are essential components of lipids and exhibit important biological functions. The analyses of FAs are routinely carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, after multi-step sample preparation. In this study, several key experimental factors were carefully examined, validat...

  2. Improvement of Neutral Lipid and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis by Overexpressing a Type 2 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase in Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Ying-Fang Niu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have been emerging as an important source for the production of bioactive compounds. Marine diatoms can store high amounts of lipid and grow quite quickly. However, the genetic and biochemical characteristics of fatty acid biosynthesis in diatoms remain unclear. Glycerophospholipids are integral as structural and functional components of cellular membranes, as well as precursors of various lipid mediators. In addition, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT is a key enzyme that catalyzes the last step of triacylglyceride (TAG biosynthesis. However, a comprehensive sequence-structure and functional analysis of DGAT in diatoms is lacking. In this study, an isoform of diacylglycerol acyltransferase type 2 of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was characterized. Surprisingly, DGAT2 overexpression in P. tricornutum stimulated more oil bodies, and the neutral lipid content increased by 35%. The fatty acid composition showed a significant increase in the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids; in particular, EPA was increased by 76.2%. Moreover, the growth rate of transgenic microalgae remained similar, thereby maintaining a high biomass. Our results suggest that increased DGAT2 expression could alter fatty acid profile in the diatom, and the results thus represent a valuable strategy for polyunsaturated fatty acid production by genetic manipulation.

  3. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    Alicja Zajdel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytic acid (PA has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20% compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  4. Ascorbic acid improves the antioxidant activity of European grape juices by improving the juices' ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation of human LDL in vitro

    Landbo, Anne-Katrine Regel; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2001-01-01

    grape juice exerted prooxidant activity at 5-20 muM GAE. The antioxidant activity, inhibition of lipid peroxidation of LDL in vitro, was correlated with the juices' levels of total phenols (r > 0.98, P <0.01), anthocyanins (r > 0.99, P <0.01), flavan-3-ols (r > 0.97 P <0.05), and hydroxybenzoates (r > 0...

  5. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    Alicja Zajdel; Adam Wilczok; Ludmiła Węglarz; Zofia Dzierżewicz

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the deca...

  6. Manipulation of carbon flux into fatty acid biosynthesis pathway in Dunaliella salina using AccD and ME genes to enhance lipid content and to improve produced biodiesel quality

    Ahmad Farhad Talebi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced generations of biofuels basically revolve around non-agricultural energy crops. Among those, microalgae owing to its unique characteristics i.e. natural tolerance to waste and saline water, sustainable biomass production and high lipid content (LC, is regarded by many as the ultimate choice for the production of various biofuels such as biodiesel. In the present study, manipulation of carbon flux into fatty acid biosynthesis pathway in Dunaliella salina was achieved using pGH plasmid harboring AccD and ME genes to enhance lipid content and to improve produced biodiesel quality. The stability of transformation was confirmed by PCR after several passages. Southern hybridization of AccD probe with genomic DNA revealed stable integration of the cassette in the specific positions in the chloroplast genome with no read through transcription by indigenous promoters. Comparison of the LC and fatty acid profile of the transformed algal cell line and the control revealed the over-expression of the ME/AccD genes in the transformants leading to 12% increase in total LC and significant improvements in biodiesel properties especially by increasing algal oil oxidation stability. The whole process successfully implemented herein for transforming algal cells by genes involved in lipid production pathway could be helpful for large scale biodiesel production from microalgae.

  7. Essential fatty acids and lipid mediators. Endocannabinoids

    G. Caramia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1929 Burr and Burr discovered the essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. Since then, researchers have shown a growing interest in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA as precursors of “lipid mediator” molecules, often with opposing effects, prostaglandins, prostacyclins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipossines, resolvines, protectines, maresins that regulate immunity, platelet aggregation, inflammation, etc. They showed that the balance between omega-3 and omega-6 acids has a profound influence on all the body’s inflammatory responses and a raised level of PUFA omega-3 in tissue correlate with a reduced incidence of degenerative cardiovascular disease, some mental illnesses such as depression, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The CYP-catalyzed epoxidation and hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA were established recently as the so-called third branch of AGE cascade. Cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenases convert AA to four epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET regioisomers, that produce vascular relaxation anti-inflammatory effects on blood vessels and in the kidney, promote angiogenesis, and protect ischemic myocardium and brain. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are accessible to CYP enzymes in the same way as AA. Metabolites derived from EPA include epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (EETR and hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (19- and 20-HEPE, whereas DHA include epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (21- and 22-HDoHE. For many of the CYP isoforms, the n-3 PUFAs are the preferred substrates and the available data suggest that some of the vasculo- and cardioprotective effects attributed to dietary n-3 PUFAs may be mediated by CYP-dependent metabolites of EPA and DHA. From AA derives also endocannabinoids like anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, capable of mimicking the pharmacological actions of the active principle of Cannabis sativa preparations such as

  8. Iron and hydroxyl radicals in lipid oxidation: Fenton reactions in lipid and nucleic acids co-oxidized with lipid

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals can initiate lipid peroxidation in liquids, but their high reactivity affords reaction paths so short that they are unlikely to reach lipids in membrane bilayers when formed exteriorly. EPR studies of Fenton-like reactions inducing oxidation in bulk lipids indicate that iron-dependent initiation of lipid oxidation in organelles and vesicles may result from hydroxyl radicals formed within the hydrophobic membrane interiors, where they would be inaccessible to typical hydrophilic radical scavengers. The cytotoxic or cytogenetic results of lipid peroxidation, especially in nuclear membranes, may include radiominetic chemical damage to adjacent DNA or nucleoprotein. Preliminary product analyses of nucleic acid basis cooxidized with lipids in vitro support this view.

  9. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R.; Oliva, María E.; Lombardo, Yolanda B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats. PMID:26828527

  10. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    Agustina Creus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO, was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia. A reference group consumed a control diet (CD all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA and diacylglycerol (DAG contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1 activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 were analyzed. Results show that: (a the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats.

  11. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats.

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R; Oliva, María E; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats. PMID:26828527

  12. Marine lipids and the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids

    Mu, Huiling; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Marine lipids are enriched with omega-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Omega-3 fatty acids are important membrane lipids and have many recognized health benefits, the bioavailability of these fatty acids can therefore be important for achieving...... bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids has been reported to be affected by several factors; among the important factors were the digestion and absorption processes of omega-3 containing lipids in the gastrointestinal tract. Both lipid structures and food structures can affect the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty....... In vitro studies provided a mechanistic understanding on the varied bioavailability caused by different lipid structures, the lower relative bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from FAEE formulation was closely related to the slower digestion rate of FAEE. Microencapsulated fish oil has often been...

  13. Changes in lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability during Cantonese sausage processing.

    Qiu, Chaoying; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Zhou, Feibai; Cui, Chun

    2013-03-01

    Lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability were evaluated during Cantonese sausage processing. Free fatty acids increased with concomitant decrease of phospholipids. Total content of free fatty acids at 72 h in muscle and adipose tissue was 7.341 mg/g and 3.067 mg/g, respectively. Total amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (SFA, MUFA, and PUFA) in neutral lipid exhibited a little change during processing, while the proportion of PUFA significantly decreased in the PL fraction. The main triacylglycerols were POO+SLO+OOO, PSO (P = palmitic acid, O = oleic acid, L = linoleic acid, S = stearic acid), and a preferential hydrolysis of palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid was observed. Phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were the main components of phospholipids and PE exhibited the most significant degradation during processing. Thiobarbituric acid values (TBARS) increased while peroxide values and hexanal contents varied during processing. PMID:23273460

  14. Quercetin improves insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation in vitro in a NAFLD cell model

    Li, Xiuli; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Na; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Qingyan; BAI, YUQIN; Bai, Yin; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Huiming; ZOU, JIHONG; Wang, Hongxia; SHI, TIEWEI

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases in the absence of significant alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on insulin resistance and lipid metabolic abnormalities in free fatty acid (FFA)- and insulin-induced HepG2 cell model of NAFLD, and to determine the possible underlying mechanism. Quercetin markedly improves hepatic lipid accumulation and decreases the levels of triglyceride (TG). The lipid-lower...

  15. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  16. Fatty acids from membrane lipids become incorporated into lipid bodies during Myxococcus xanthus differentiation.

    Swapna Bhat

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus responds to amino acid limitation by producing fruiting bodies containing dormant spores. During development, cells produce triacylglycerides in lipid bodies that become consumed during spore maturation. As the cells are starved to induce development, the production of triglycerides represents a counterintuitive metabolic switch. In this paper, lipid bodies were quantified in wild-type strain DK1622 and 33 developmental mutants at the cellular level by measuring the cross sectional area of the cell stained with the lipophilic dye Nile red. We provide five lines of evidence that triacylglycerides are derived from membrane phospholipids as cells shorten in length and then differentiate into myxospores. First, in wild type cells, lipid bodies appear early in development and their size increases concurrent with an 87% decline in membrane surface area. Second, developmental mutants blocked at different stages of shortening and differentiation accumulated lipid bodies proportionate with their cell length with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.76. Third, peripheral rods, developing cells that do not produce lipid bodies, fail to shorten. Fourth, genes for fatty acid synthesis are down-regulated while genes for fatty acid degradation are up regulated. Finally, direct movement of fatty acids from membrane lipids in growing cells to lipid bodies in developing cells was observed by pulse labeling cells with palmitate. Recycling of lipids released by Programmed Cell Death appears not to be necessary for lipid body production as a fadL mutant was defective in fatty acid uptake but proficient in lipid body production. The lipid body regulon involves many developmental genes that are not specifically involved in fatty acid synthesis or degradation. MazF RNA interferase and its target, enhancer-binding protein Nla6, appear to negatively regulate cell shortening and TAG accumulation whereas most cell-cell signals activate these

  17. A Role of Lipid Metabolism during Cumulus-Oocyte Complex Maturation: Impact of Lipid Modulators to Improve Embryo Production

    E. G. Prates

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oocyte intracellular lipids are mainly stored in lipid droplets (LD providing energy for proper growth and development. Lipids are also important signalling molecules involved in the regulatory mechanisms of maturation and hence in oocyte competence acquisition. Recent studies show that LD are highly dynamic organelles. They change their shape, volume, and location within the ooplasm as well as their interaction with other organelles during the maturation process. The droplets high lipid content has been correlated with impaired oocyte developmental competence and low cryosurvival. Yet the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In particular, the lipid-rich pig oocyte might be an excellent model to understand the role of lipids and fatty acid metabolism during the mammalian oocyte maturation and their implications on subsequent monospermic fertilization and preimplantation embryo development. The possibility of using chemical molecules to modulate the lipid content of oocytes and embryos to improve cryopreservation as well as its biological effects during development is here described. Furthermore, these principles of lipid content modulation may be applied not only to germ cells and embryo cryopreservation in livestock production but also to biomedical fundamental research.

  18. Pomegranate flower improves cardiac lipid metabolism in a diabetic rat model: role of lowering circulating lipids.

    Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Peng, Gang; Kota, Bhavani Prasad; Li, George Qian; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D; Li, Yuhao

    2005-07-01

    Excess triglyceride (TG) accumulation and increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation in the diabetic heart contribute to cardiac dysfunction. Punica granatum flower (PGF) is a traditional antidiabetic medicine. Here, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of PGF extract on abnormal cardiac lipid metabolism both in vivo and in vitro. Long-term oral administration of PGF extract (500 mg kg(-1)) reduced cardiac TG content, accompanied by a decrease in plasma levels of TG and total cholesterol in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, indicating improvement by PGF extract of abnormal cardiac TG accumulation and hyperlipidemia in this diabetic model. Treatment of ZDF rats with PGF extract lowered plasma FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of mRNAs encoding for FA transport protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2, and restored downregulated cardiac acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA expression in ZDF rats, whereas it showed little effect in Zucker lean rats. The results suggest that PGF extract inhibits increased cardiac FA uptake and oxidation in the diabetic condition. PGF extract and its component oleanolic acid enhanced PPAR-alpha luciferase reporter gene activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and this effect was completely suppressed by a selective PPAR-alpha antagonist MK-886, consistent with the presence of PPAR-alpha activator activity in the extract and this component. Our findings suggest that PGF extract improves abnormal cardiac lipid metabolism in ZDF rats by activating PPAR-alpha and thereby lowering circulating lipid and inhibiting its cardiac uptake. PMID:15880139

  19. Dietary Salba (Salvia hispanica L) seed rich in α-linolenic acid improves adipose tissue dysfunction and the altered skeletal muscle glucose and lipid metabolism in dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats.

    Oliva, M E; Ferreira, M R; Chicco, A; Lombardo, Y B

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the effect of dietary Salba (chia) seed rich in n-3 α-linolenic acid on the morphological and metabolic aspects involved in adipose tissue dysfunction and the mechanisms underlying the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in the skeletal muscle of rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD). Rats were fed a SRD for 3 months. Thereafter, half the rats continued with SRD while in the other half, corn oil (CO) was replaced by chia seed for 3 months (SRD+chia). In control group, corn starch replaced sucrose. The replacement of CO by chia seed in the SRD reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, cell volume and size distribution, improved lipogenic enzyme activities, lipolysis and the anti-lipolytic action of insulin. In the skeletal muscle lipid storage, glucose phosphorylation and oxidation were normalized. Chia seed reversed the impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthase activity, glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate and GLUT-4 protein levels as well as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. PMID:24120122

  20. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration. PMID:25227993

  1. Combined intervention with pioglitazone and n-3 fatty acids in metformin-treated type 2 diabetic patients: improvement of lipid metabolism

    Veleba, J.; Kopecký Jr., J.; Janovská, Petra; Kuda, Ondřej; Horáková, Olga; Malínská, H.; Kazdová, L.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Škop, V.; Trnovská, J.; Hájek, M.; Škoch, A.; Flachs, Pavel; Bardová, Kristina; Rossmeisl, Martin; Olza, J.; de Castro, S. G.; Calder, P. C.; Gardlo, Alžběta; Fišerová, E.; Jensen, J.; Bryhn, M.; Kopecký, Jan; Pelikánová, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, Dec 2 (2015), s. 52. ISSN 1743-7075 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13763 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : eicosapentaenoic acid * docosahexaenoic acid * indirect calorimetry * meal test * humans * hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.258, year: 2014

  2. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Ceftazidime

    Devbhuti P*,1

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation is the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids which is a free radical related process and responsible for thedevelopment of many diseases and disorders like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cancer etc. End products of lipid peroxidation aremalondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, etc. which are the ultimate mediator of toxicity. Antioxidants have the capability toinhibit lipid peroxidation. Keeping in mind this fact, the present in vitro study was carried out to evaluate lipid peroxidation induction potential of ceftazidime, a cephalosporin antibiotic and its suppression with ascorbic acid considering some laboratory markers of lipid peroxidation like MDA, 4-HNE and reduced glutathione (GSH. Goat liver was used as the lipid source. After treatment of the liver homogenate with drug and/or antioxidant the levels of 4-HNE, MDA and GSH were estimated in different samples at different hours of incubation. The results showed that the drug ceftazidime could significantly induce lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant ascorbic acid has the capability to inhibit ceftazidime-inducedlipid peroxidation.

  3. Fatty Acid and Lipid Transport in Plant Cells.

    Li, Nannan; Xu, Changcheng; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) and lipids are essential - not only as membrane constituents but also for growth and development. In plants and algae, FAs are synthesized in plastids and to a large extent transported to the endoplasmic reticulum for modification and lipid assembly. Subsequently, lipophilic compounds are distributed within the cell, and thus are transported across most membrane systems. Membrane-intrinsic transporters and proteins for cellular FA/lipid transfer therefore represent key components for delivery and dissemination. In addition to highlighting their role in lipid homeostasis and plant performance, different transport mechanisms for land plants and green algae - in the model systems Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - are compared, thereby providing a current perspective on protein-mediated FA and lipid trafficking in photosynthetic cells. PMID:26616197

  4. Simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification of wet microalgal lipid using acid.

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Kartikawati, Muliasari; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    This research demonstrated hydrolysis of wet microalgal lipid and esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) using acid in one-step process. The investigation of simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification (SHE) of wet microalgal lipid was conducted by using L27 orthogonal design and the effects of water content, volume of sulphuric acid, volume of methanol, temperature and time on SHE were examined. As a result, water content was found to be the most effective factor. The effects of various parameters on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and equilibrium relation between FAME and FFA were also examined under water content 80%. Equimolar amounts of sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid showed similar results. This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since no organic solvents are used. PMID:24080318

  5. Fatty Acids and Bioactive Lipids of Potato Cultivars: An Overview.

    Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Oraby, Hesahm Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Potato tuber is a highly nutritious, wherein genotype and environmental differences are known to exist in the shape, size and nutritional value of potatoes. Owing to its high consumption, potato could be an ideal carrier of health-promoting phytochemicals. Potato cultivars contain many bioactive lipidic compounds such as fatty acids, glycolipids, phospholipids, sterols, tocols and carotenoids, which are highly desirable in diet because of their health-promoting effects. In the scientific literature, information on the content and profile of bioactive lipidic compounds in potato cultivars are few. The concentration and stability of bioactive lipids are affected by many factors such as genotype, agronomic factors, postharvest storage, cooking and processing conditions. In this review levels and composition of bioactive lipids in terms of lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterols, tocopherols, and caroteinoids distribution in different potato cultivars including genetically modified potato (GMP) were highlighted and discussed. In addition, factors affecting bioactive lipids levels, stability and health benefits are reviewed. In consideration of potential nutritional value, detailed knowledge on lipids of potato cultivars is of major importance. PMID:27250559

  6. Improved characterization of EV preparations based on protein to lipid ratio and lipid properties.

    Xabier Osteikoetxea

    Full Text Available In recent years the study of extracellular vesicles has gathered much scientific and clinical interest. As the field is expanding, it is becoming clear that better methods for characterization and quantification of extracellular vesicles as well as better standards to compare studies are warranted. The goal of the present work was to find improved parameters to characterize extracellular vesicle preparations. Here we introduce a simple 96 well plate-based total lipid assay for determination of lipid content and protein to lipid ratios of extracellular vesicle preparations from various myeloid and lymphoid cell lines as well as blood plasma. These preparations included apoptotic bodies, microvesicles/microparticles, and exosomes isolated by size-based fractionation. We also investigated lipid bilayer order of extracellular vesicle subpopulations using Di-4-ANEPPDHQ lipid probe, and lipid composition using affinity reagents to clustered cholesterol (monoclonal anti-cholesterol antibody and ganglioside GM1 (cholera toxin subunit B. We have consistently found different protein to lipid ratios characteristic for the investigated extracellular vesicle subpopulations which were substantially altered in the case of vesicular damage or protein contamination. Spectral ratiometric imaging and flow cytometric analysis also revealed marked differences between the various vesicle populations in their lipid order and their clustered membrane cholesterol and GM1 content. Our study introduces for the first time a simple and readily available lipid assay to complement the widely used protein assays in order to better characterize extracellular vesicle preparations. Besides differentiating extracellular vesicle subpopulations, the novel parameters introduced in this work (protein to lipid ratio, lipid bilayer order, and lipid composition, may prove useful for quality control of extracellular vesicle related basic and clinical studies.

  7. Effect of deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on lipid peroxidation in cultured macrophages.

    Ljubuncic, P; Fuhrman, B.; Oiknine, J; Aviram, M.; Bomzon, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kupffer cells are essential for normal hepatic homeostasis and when stimulated, they secrete reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, eicosanoids, and cytokines. Some of these products are cytotoxic and attack nucleic acids, thiol proteins, or membrane lipids causing lipid peroxidation. Hydrophobic bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA), can damage hepatocytes by solubilising membranes and impairing mitochondrial function, as well as increasing the generation of reactive oxygen ...

  8. Effect of lipid supplementation on milk fatty acid focus on rumenic acid.

    Esperanza Prieto-Manrique

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the effect of the lipid supplementation on the concentration of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA-c9t11 or rumenic acid and other unsaturated fatty acids in bovine milk. The study addressed the concept and origin of the CLA-c9t11 in ruminants. There is an international trend to improve nutrition quality , which implies an increase in consumption of animal protein, including the healthy and rich in CLA-c9t11 dairy products. CLA-c9t11 has proved to have anticancer effects in animal models. CLA-c9t11 in the bovine milk results from the consumption of unsaturated fatty acids and from the extent of rumen biohydrogenation. Supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids of vegetable origin allows to increase the concentration of CLA-c9t11 and to decrease the proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk, but the response varies depending on the source of fat used, its level, and its interaction with basal diet

  9. Rapid lipid enrichment in omega3 fatty acids: plasma data.

    Carpentier, Yvon A; Peltier, Sebastien; Portois, Laurence; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2008-03-01

    The bolus intravenous injection of a novel medium-chain triglyceride:fish oil emulsion to normal subjects was recently reported to enrich within 60 min the phospholipid content of leucocytes and platelets in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids. The present study, conducted in second generation omega3-depleted rats, aimed at investigating whether such a procedure may also increase within 60 min the phospholipid content of omega3 fatty acids in cells located outwards the bloodstream, in this case liver cells, and whether this coincides with correction of the perturbation in the liver triglyceride fatty acid content and profile otherwise prevailing in these rats. This first report deals mainly with the fatty acid pattern of plasma lipids in male omega3-depleted rats that were non-injected or injected with either the omega3-rich emulsion or a control medium-chain triglyceride:olive oil emulsion. The results provide information on the fate of the exogenous lipids present in the lipid emulsions and injected intravenously 60 min before sacrifice. Moreover, in the uninjected omega3-depleted rats the comparison between individual plasma and liver measurements indicated positive correlations in the fatty acid profile of phospholipids and triglycerides. PMID:18288383

  10. Amino acid decarboxylations produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls in amino acid mixtures.

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; León, M Mercedes; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-10-15

    The formation of 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde in mixtures of phenylalanine, a lipid oxidation product, and a second amino acid was studied to determine the role of the second amino acid in the degradation of phenylalanine produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. The presence of the second amino acid usually increased the formation of the amine and reduced the formation of the Strecker aldehyde. The reasons for this behaviour seem to be related to the α-amino group and the other functional groups (mainly amino or similar groups) present in the side-chain of the amino acid. These groups are suggested to modify the lipid-derived reactive carbonyl but not the reaction mechanism because the Ea of formation of both 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde remained unchanged in all studied systems. All these results suggest that the amine/aldehyde ratio obtained by amino acid degradation can be modified by adding free amino acids during food formulation. PMID:27173560

  11. What makes the bioactive lipids phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid so special?

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Carter, Karen M; van Laar, Emma G; Chupin, Vladimir; Burger, Koert N J; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-12-27

    Phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid are minor but important anionic bioactive lipids involved in a number of key cellular processes, yet these molecules have a simple phosphate headgroup. To find out what is so special about these lipids, we determined the ionization behavior of phosphatidic acid (PA) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in extended (flat) mixed lipid bilayers using magic angle spinning 31P NMR. Our data show two surprising results. First, despite identical phosphomonoester headgroups, LPA carries more negative charge than PA when present in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. Dehydroxy-LPA [1-oleoyl-3-(phosphoryl)propanediol] behaves in a manner identical to that of PA, indicating that the difference in negative charge between LPA and PA is caused by the hydroxyl on the glycerol backbone of LPA and its interaction with the phosphomonoester headgroup. Second, deprotonation of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid was found to be strongly stimulated by the inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the bilayer, indicating that lipid headgroup charge depends on local lipid composition and will vary between the different subcellular locations of (L)PA. Our findings can be understood in terms of a hydrogen bond formed within the phosphomonoester headgroup of (L)PA and its destabilization by competing intra- or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. We propose that this hydrogen bonding property of (L)PA is involved in the various cellular functions of these lipids. PMID:16363814

  12. Lipoprotein lipase expression, serum lipid and tissue lipid deposition in orally-administered glycyrrhizic acid-treated rats

    Ton So

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities comprising visceral obesity, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance (IR. With the onset of IR, the expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL, a key regulator of lipoprotein metabolism, is reduced. Increased activation of glucocorticoid receptors results in MetS symptoms and is thus speculated to have a role in the pathophysiology of the MetS. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA, the bioactive constituent of licorice roots (Glycyrrhiza glabra inhibits 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 that catalyzes the activation of glucocorticoids. Thus, oral administration of GA is postulated to ameliorate the MetS. Results In this study, daily oral administration of 50 mg/kg of GA for one week led to significant increase in LPL expression in the quadriceps femoris (p p > 0.05 of the GA-treated rats compared to the control. Decrease in adipocyte size (p > 0.05 in both the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots accompanies such selective induction of LPL expression. Consistent improvement in serum lipid parameters was also observed, with decrease in serum free fatty acid, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol but elevated HDL-cholesterol (p > 0.05. Histological analysis using tissue lipid staining with Oil Red O showed significant decrease in lipid deposition in the abdominal muscle and quadriceps femoris (p p > 0.05. Conclusion Results from this study may imply that GA could counteract the development of visceral obesity and improve dyslipidaemia via selective induction of tissue LPL expression and a positive shift in serum lipid parameters respectively, and retard the development of IR associated with tissue steatosis.

  13. Major lipid classes and their fatty acids in a parasitic nematode, Ascaridia galli.

    Ghosh, Amit; Kar, Kumkum; Ghosh, D; Dey, C; Misra, K K

    2010-04-01

    The paper presents major lipid classes and their fatty acids investigated from Ascaridia galli, a nematode parasite of country fowl. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) reveals that the percent of total lipid, neutral lipid, phospholipids, and glycolipids are 1.94, 54.39, 26.95 and 18.66, respectively. Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) analysis shows that the saturated fatty acids are the major components in all the lipid fractions followed by monoenes and dienes. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were present in low amount. Stearic acids (C(18)) were the chief components among all the fatty acids in all the lipid fractions. PMID:21526035

  14. Major lipid classes and their fatty acids in a parasitic nematode, Ascaridia galli

    Ghosh, Amit; Kar, Kumkum; Ghosh, D.; Dey, C.; Misra, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents major lipid classes and their fatty acids investigated from Ascaridia galli, a nematode parasite of country fowl. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) reveals that the percent of total lipid, neutral lipid, phospholipids, and glycolipids are 1.94, 54.39, 26.95 and 18.66, respectively. Gas–liquid chromatography (GLC) analysis shows that the saturated fatty acids are the major components in all the lipid fractions followed by monoenes and dienes. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)...

  15. Pomegranate flower improves cardiac lipid metabolism in a diabetic rat model: role of lowering circulating lipids

    Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Peng, Gang; Kota, Bhavani Prasad; Li, George Qian; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li, Yuhao

    2005-01-01

    Excess triglyceride (TG) accumulation and increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation in the diabetic heart contribute to cardiac dysfunction. Punica granatum flower (PGF) is a traditional antidiabetic medicine. Here, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of PGF extract on abnormal cardiac lipid metabolism both in vivo and in vitro.Long-term oral administration of PGF extract (500 mg kg−1) reduced cardiac TG content, accompanied by a decrease in plasma levels of TG and total cholestero...

  16. Intravenous lipid and amino acids briskly increase plasma glucose concentrations in small premature infants.

    Savich, R D; Finley, S L; Ogata, E S

    1988-07-01

    We determined the glycemic response to intravenous lipid infusion alone, lipid with amino acids, or amino acids alone in 15 very small premature infants receiving constant glucose infusion during early life. Infants who received lipid or lipid and amino acids demonstrated significant increases in glucose compared with infants who received amino acids. The combination of lipid and amino acids resulted in an earlier increase than lipid alone. Although plasma insulin did not change in all three groups, infants who received amino acids alone demonstrated an appropriate increase in glucagon. These data suggest that lipid infusion, a commonly used means of providing nutrition to premature infants, may cause significant disturbances in glucoregulation, particularly when administered with amino acids. PMID:3132930

  17. Uric acid as a modulator of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Lima, William Gustavo; Martins-Santos, Maria Emília Soares; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2015-09-01

    In humans, uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism. The serum uric acid level is based on the balance between the absorption, production and excretion of purine. Uric acid is similarly produced in the liver, adipose tissue and muscle and is primarily excreted through the urinary tract. Several factors, including a high-fructose diet and the use of xenobiotics and alcohol, contribute to hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia belongs to a cluster of metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities, called metabolic syndrome, characterised by abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Hyperuricaemia reduction in the Pound mouse or fructose-fed rats, as well as hyperuricaemia induction by uricase inhibition in rodents and studies using cell culture have suggested that uric acid plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. These studies have shown that high uric acid levels regulate the oxidative stress, inflammation and enzymes associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, suggesting a mechanism for the impairment of metabolic homeostasis. Humans lacking uricase, the enzyme responsible for uric acid degradation, are susceptible to these effects. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of the effects of uric acid on the regulation of metabolism, primarily focusing on liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. PMID:26133655

  18. Effects of fatty acids on carbohydrates and lipids of canola seeds during germination

    M.L.L. Ferrarese; C. R. S. Baleroni; O. Ferrarese-Filho

    1998-01-01

    The present work was carried out to investigate the effects of caprylic acid (C8) and oleic acid (C18) on carbohydrates and lipids during canola seed germination. The results showed that oleic acid influence carbohydrate concentration but did not influence lipid concentration. Significant results were found with caprylic acid that affected carbohydrates and lipids in cotyledons after three-day germination.O presente trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de investigar os efeitos dos ácidos cap...

  19. Skeletal Muscle Lipid Deposition and Insulin Resistance: Impact of Dietary Fatty Acids and Exercise

    Evidence has mounted indicating that elevated intramuscular triacylglycerol levels are associated with diminished insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. This lipid accumulation is most likely due to enhanced fatty acid uptake into the muscle coupled with diminished mitochondrial lipid oxidation. Th...

  20. Improvement of lipid content of Chlorella minutissima MCC 5 for biodiesel production.

    Chakraborty, Sourabh; Mohanty, Debabrata; Ghosh, Supratim; Das, Debabrata

    2016-09-01

    Lipids extracted from microalgae have been considered as a potential source for the production of biodiesel. Enhancement of lipid has the limitations of low biomass productivity. So, the main objective of the present study was to deduce suitable conditions for the improvement of biomass production followed by enhancement of lipid content. After optimization, a strategy for two stage cultivation was utilized where high lipid content was obtained with a high biomass concentration. Optimization of biomass production of Chlorella minutissima MCC 5 was carried out under different intensities of light, temperatures, concentrations of nitrate and phosphate using Taguchi model. A suitable synergy of the four parameters yielded maximum biomass (1.93 g L(-1)) in airlift reactor. Temperature was found to be relatively effective than other parameters for higher biomass production. Activation energy for the cell growth was determined (47.95 kJ mol(-1)). Among the various (photo, thermal, nitrate and phosphate) stress conditions studied, nitrate limitation (1 mM) was found to be suitable for the enhancement of lipid resulting highest yield (48.26% w/w). Two stage cultivation of the microalgae yielded a maximum lipid content of 46% w/w with a biomass concentration of 2.2 g L(-1). Additionally, FAME analysis exhibited significant increase of oleic acid in the biodiesel. So, C. minutissima MCC 5 cultivated under nitrate stress could be a possible feedstock for biodiesel production. PMID:26922477

  1. Safety profile of the intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles.

    Conceição, Mariana; Mendonça, Liliana; Nóbrega, Clévio; Gomes, Célia; Costa, Pedro; Hirai, Hirokazu; Moreira, João Nuno; Lima, Maria C; Manjunath, N; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2016-03-01

    In a clinical setting, where multiple administrations of the therapeutic agent are usually required to improve the therapeutic outcome, it is crucial to assess the immunogenicity of the administered nanoparticles. In this data work, we investigated the safety profile of the repeated intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles (RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs). To evaluate local activation of the immune system, we performed analysis of mouse tissue homogenates and sections from cerebellum. To investigate peripheral activation of the immune system, we used serum of mice that were intravenously injected with RVG-9r-targeted SNALPs. These data are related and were discussed in the accompanying research article entitled "Intravenous administration of brain-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles alleviates Machado-Joseph disease neurological phenotype" (Conceição et al., in press) [1]. PMID:26958628

  2. Impact of dietary fatty acids on muscle composition, liver lipids, milt composition and sperm performance in European eel

    Butts, Ian; Baeza, R.; Støttrup, Josianne;

    2015-01-01

    In order for European eel aquaculture to be sustainable, the life cycle should be completed in captivity. Development of broodstock diets may improve the species' reproductive success in captivity, through the production of high-quality gametes. Here, our aim was to evaluate the influence...... of dietary regime on muscle composition, and liver lipids prior to induced maturation, and the resulting sperm composition and performance. To accomplish this fish were reared on three "enhanced" diets and one commercial diet, each with different levels of fatty acids, arachidonic acid (ARA......), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Neutral lipids from the muscle and liver incorporated the majority of the fatty acid profile, while phospholipids incorporated only certain fatty acids. Diet had an effect on the majority of sperm fatty acids, on the total volume of extractable milt...

  3. Effect of salicylic acid treatment on cadmium toxicity and leaf lipid composition in sunflower

    Moradkhani S.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The ameliorative effect of salicylic acid (SA on cadmium (Cd toxicity in sunflower plants was studied by investigating plant growth and fatty acid composition. Sunflower plants in two leaves stage were exposed to CdCl2 treatment (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 µM and then were treated with salicylic acid (0, 250 and 500 µM as foliage spraying. One week after the last salicylic acid treatment,plants were harvested and growth parameters were measured . Oil of leaf was extracted in a Soxhlet system and fatty acid composition were measured by gas chromatography (GC. Statistical analyses showed excess Cd reduced growth parameters (fresh weight and length of stems and roots, fresh weight and number of leavesand SA increased them compared with the control. Maximum reduction in these parameters was at 200 µmol Cd and 0µmol of SA. Cd caused a shift in fatty acids composition, resulting in a lower degree of their unsaturation and an increase in saturated fatty acids in sunflower leaves,whereas SA improved them. SA, particularly increased the percentage of linolenic acid and lowered that of palmitic acid by the same proportion. These results sugg membrane integrity due to lipids est that SA could be used as a potential growth regulator and a stabilizer ofprotection of cadmium-induced oxidative stress to improve plant resistance to Cd stress

  4. Lipid recognition propensities of amino acids in membrane proteins from atomic resolution data

    Morita Mizuki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-lipid interactions play essential roles in the conformational stability and biological functions of membrane proteins. However, few of the previous computational studies have taken into account the atomic details of protein-lipid interactions explicitly. Results To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of the recognition of lipid molecules by membrane proteins, we investigated amino acid propensities in membrane proteins for interacting with the head and tail groups of lipid molecules. We observed a common pattern of lipid tail-amino acid interactions in two different data sources, crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. These interactions are largely explained by general lipophilicity, whereas the preferences for lipid head groups vary among individual proteins. We also found that membrane and water-soluble proteins utilize essentially an identical set of amino acids for interacting with lipid head and tail groups. Conclusions We showed that the lipophilicity of amino acid residues determines the amino acid preferences for lipid tail groups in both membrane and water-soluble proteins, suggesting that tightly-bound lipid molecules and lipids in the annular shell interact with membrane proteins in a similar manner. In contrast, interactions between lipid head groups and amino acids showed a more variable pattern, apparently constrained by each protein's specific molecular function.

  5. Lipid recognition propensities of amino acids in membrane proteins from atomic resolution data

    Protein-lipid interactions play essential roles in the conformational stability and biological functions of membrane proteins. However, few of the previous computational studies have taken into account the atomic details of protein-lipid interactions explicitly. To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of the recognition of lipid molecules by membrane proteins, we investigated amino acid propensities in membrane proteins for interacting with the head and tail groups of lipid molecules. We observed a common pattern of lipid tail-amino acid interactions in two different data sources, crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. These interactions are largely explained by general lipophilicity, whereas the preferences for lipid head groups vary among individual proteins. We also found that membrane and water-soluble proteins utilize essentially an identical set of amino acids for interacting with lipid head and tail groups. We showed that the lipophilicity of amino acid residues determines the amino acid preferences for lipid tail groups in both membrane and water-soluble proteins, suggesting that tightly-bound lipid molecules and lipids in the annular shell interact with membrane proteins in a similar manner. In contrast, interactions between lipid head groups and amino acids showed a more variable pattern, apparently constrained by each protein's specific molecular function

  6. Improving lipids with prescription icosapent ethyl after previous use of fish oil dietary supplements.

    Reddy, Kota J; Chowdhury, Sumita

    2016-05-01

    Managing dyslipidemia can be challenging in patients with statin intolerance. We describe the lipid effects of icosapent ethyl 4 g/day (high-purity prescription omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid) in two coronary artery disease patients with statin intolerance who were self-treating with fish oil dietary supplements. After initiating icosapent ethyl, improvements were noted in the first and second patients, respectively, in total cholesterol (-12%; -21%), LDL cholesterol (-3%; -24%), triglycerides (-34%; -16%), non-HDL cholesterol (-12%; -22%), the omega-3 index (+42%; +8%) and eicosapentaenoic acid levels (+275%; +138%). Icosapent ethyl was well tolerated with no adverse events reported. These cases demonstrated favorable lipid effects with prescription icosapent ethyl treatment that may help optimize the care of high-risk coronary artery disease patients with statin intolerance. PMID:27070379

  7. Effect of ionizing radiation on fatty acid composition of plasma membrane lipids of liver cells

    Changes in the fatty acid compositon of total lipids and individual phospholipids of liver cell plasma membranes of intact and exposed (7.65 Gy) rats have been studied. The authors discuss the relationship between the degree of lipid oxidation and other lipid characteristics of the studied membrane after exposure to ionizing radiation

  8. Measurement of the incorporation of orally administered arachidonic acid into tissue lipids

    The applicability of a stable isotope method to monitor the mixing of dietary arachidonic acid with endogenous arachidonic acid in tissue lipids was evaluated. Rats were fed octadeuterated arachidonic acid during a 20-day period, and the entry of the dietary acid into lipid esters of various tissues was examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of their fatty acids. The rats were maintained on a fat-free diet from weaning until 63 days old to enhance the ratio of the dietary acid to endogenous arachidonate. Three separate forms of eicosatetraenoic acid in the tissue lipids could be distinguished by GC-MS: octadeuterated arachidonic acid (recent dietary origin), unlabeled arachidonic acid (maternal origin) and unlabeled 4,7,10,13-eicosatetraenoic acid (originating from palmitoleic acid). The total eicosatetraenoic acid in the tissue lipids contained about 90% arachidonate from recent dietary origin in lung, kidney, heart and fat, 70% in muscle and liver and 27% in brain. The n-7 isomer of eicosatetraenoic acid was estimated to make up 6% or less of the total eicosatetraenoic acid in lung, kidney, brain, muscle and heart tissue lipids, but it comprised around 15% of the total eicosatetraenoic acid in liver. The unlabeled arachidonic acid of maternal origin thus comprised only about 10% of the eicosatetraenoic acid in all tissues examined except muscle and brain, where it was 24% and 70% of the eicosatetraenoic acid, respectively

  9. Suppressive actions of eicosapentaenoic acid on lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Sinclair Andrew J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid droplet (LD formation and size regulation reflects both lipid influx and efflux, and is central in the regulation of adipocyte metabolism, including adipokine secretion. The length and degree of dietary fatty acid (FA unsaturation is implicated in LD formation and regulation in adipocytes. The aims of this study were to establish the impact of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5n-3 in comparison to SFA (STA; stearic acid, C18:0 and MUFA (OLA; oleic acid, C18:1n-9 on 3T3-L1 adipocyte LD formation, regulation of genes central to LD function and adipokine responsiveness. Cells were supplemented with 100 μM FA during 7-day differentiation. Results EPA markedly reduced LD size and total lipid accumulation, suppressing PPARγ, Cidea and D9D/SCD1 genes, distinct from other treatments. These changes were independent of alterations of lipolytic genes, as both EPA and STA similarly elevated LPL and HSL gene expressions. In response to acute lipopolysaccharide exposure, EPA-differentiated adipocytes had distinct improvement in inflammatory response shown by reduction in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-6 and elevation in adiponectin and leptin gene expressions. Conclusions This study demonstrates that EPA differentially modulates adipogenesis and lipid accumulation to suppress LD formation and size. This may be due to suppressed gene expression of key proteins closely associated with LD function. Further analysis is required to determine if EPA exerts a similar influence on LD formation and regulation in-vivo.

  10. Effect of mycolic acid on surface activity of binary surfactant lipid monolayers.

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2008-12-15

    In pulmonary tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis lies in close physical proximity to alveolar surfactant. Cell walls of the mycobacteria contain loosely bound, detachable surface-active lipids. In this study, the effect of mycolic acid (MA), the most abundant mycobacterial cell wall lipid, on the surface activity of phospholipid mixtures from lung surfactant was investigated using Langmuir monolayers and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the presence of mycolic acid, all the surfactant lipid mixtures attained high minimum surface tensions (between 20 and 40 mN/m) and decreased surface compressibility moduli acid. Mycolic acids could aggregate within surfactant lipid monolayers and result in disturbed monolayer surface activity. The extent of the effect of mycolic acid depended on the initial state of the monolayer, with fluid films of DPPC-POPC and DPPC-CHOL being least affected. The results imply inhibitory effects of mycolic acid toward lung surfactant lipids and could be a mechanism of lung surfactant dysfunction in pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:18848703

  11. Evening primrose oil in rheumatoid arthritis: changes in serum lipids and fatty acids.

    Jäntti, J; Nikkari, T.; Solakivi, T; Vapaatalo, H.; Isomäki, H

    1989-01-01

    The serum concentration of lipids and composition of fatty acids after overnight fasting were studied in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated for 12 weeks with either 20 ml of evening primrose oil containing 9% of gamma-linolenic acid or olive oil. The serum concentrations of oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and apolipoprotein B decreased and those of linoleic acid, gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid increased during treatment with evening primr...

  12. Oxidative stability of structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2003-01-01

    commercial antioxidant blend Grindox 117 (propyl gallate/citric acid/ascorbyl palmitate) or gallic acid to the SL was investigated. The lipid type affected the oxidative stability: SL was less stable than SO and RL. The reduced stability was most likely caused by both the structure of the lipid and...

  13. Subcellular distributions of lipids in cultured BHK cells: evidence for the enrichment of lysobisphosphatidic acid and neutral lipids in lysosomes.

    Brotherus, J; Renkonen, O

    1977-03-01

    Homogenates of cultured hamster fibroblasts (BHK 21 cells) were fractionated by differential centrifugation into six main fractions: nuclear, mitochondrial, light mitochondrial, microsomal, soluble, and floating. The contents of several lipids and some marker enzymes were measured. According to the enzyme distributions, lysosomes were enriched both in the floating fraction and in the light mitochondrial fraction. Lysobisphosphatidic acid was enriched in the floating fraction more than tenfold relative to phospholipid. Cholesteryl esters and triglycerides were the main constituents of the fraction (70% of total lipids). Lysobisphosphatidic acid, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters were enriched also in the light mitochondrial fraction. Their distribution patterns were different from those of the other lipids. Electron microscopy showed that the floating fraction contained numerous lipofuscin-like particles with darkly stained peripheries and with core regions staining like droplets of neutral lipids. Similar particles, frequently containing prominent multilamellar formations, were also common in intact cells. They contained cytochemically identified acid phosphatase. We conclude that lysobisphosphatidic acid was enriched in the lysosomes of the BHK cells and that the lysosomes also contained variable amounts of neutral lipids in the form of intralysosomal droplets. PMID:845501

  14. Rapid determination of lipid peroxidation using a novel pyridoxamine-participating ferrous oxidation-sulfosalicylic acid spectrophotometric method.

    Chen, Jingnan; Cai, Danqian; Zhang, Yu

    2016-11-15

    A novel method is developed to rapidly analyze lipid peroxidation in edible oils and fatty foods at room temperature, which is called the pyridoxamine-participating ferrous oxidation-sulfosalicylic acid (PFOS) method. The PFOS method evaluates the lipid peroxide value colorimetrically via detecting the pyridoxamine-mediated pigment produced by 5-sulfosalicylic acid and Fe(3+) at 500nm, while the latter is converted from Fe(2+) in the presence of lipid peroxides. The optimized formulation was ethanol (70%, v/v), Fe(2+) (4mmol/L), 5-sulfosalicylic acid (40mmol/L) and pyridoxamine (18mmol/L). The limit of quantitation is 0.087mmol Fe(3+)/L with acceptable reproducibility. In addition, current method has a significant linear correlation with both conventional thiobarbituric acid (R(2)=0.9999) and ferric thiocyanate assays (R(2)=0.9675). This method offers a rapid technique for evaluating lipid peroxidation without heating and sophisticated instrumental procedures. Besides, current method provides a new option to evaluate the lipid peroxidation state and improve the reproducibility of ferrous-oxidation. PMID:27283678

  15. Digestion and absorption of lipids and bile acids in sheep fed stearic acid, oleic acid, or tristearin

    Sheep were fed diets containing 7.5% added stearic acid, oleic acid, or tristearin for 21 days. In addition, 50 microCi/kg cerium-141 was included for the last 10 days on experimental diets as an unabsorbed reference substance. In the rumen dietary triglycerides were approximately 50% hydrolyzed, and hydrogenation resulted in saturation of the free fatty acid fraction. Some net synthesis of phospholipids, presumably microbial phospholipids, occurred in the rumen. In the intestine immediately distal to the pylorus, extensive secretion of bile acids, cholesterol, phospholipids, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and lipase occurred. This resulted in doubling of fatty acid fluxes through the duodenum. These endogenous secretions were reabsorbed rapidly however, with the major site of lipid and bile acid absorption in the region .6 to 4 m distal to the pylorus. Additional but less absorption occurred in the more distal segments of the small intestine. Overall absorption of stearic acid, oleic acid, and tristearin supplements was in the range 60 to 70%, and no differences were apparent between fats. Unsaturated fatty acids were over 90% absorbed as compared with 55 to 65% for saturated fatty acids. No significant effect of any of the supplements was observed on ruminal total volatile fatty acids, ratios of volatile fatty acids, or on overall cellulose or caloric digestion

  16. Camphor Tree Seed Kernel Oil Reduces Body Fat Deposition and Improves Blood Lipids in Rats.

    Fu, Jing; Wang, Baogui; Gong, Deming; Zeng, Cheng; Jiang, Yihao; Zeng, Zheling

    2015-08-01

    The total and positional fatty acid composition in camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) seed kernel oil (CKO) were analyzed, and for the first time, the effect of CKO on body fat deposition and blood lipids in rats was studied. The major fatty acids in CKO were determined to be decanoic acid (C10:0, 51.49%) and dodecanoic acid (C12:0, 40.08%), and uniformly distributed at Sn-1, 3, and Sn-2 positions in triglyceride (TG). Rats were randomly divided into control, CKO, lard, and soybean oil groups. At the end of the experiment, levels of blood lipids and the fats of abdomen in the rats were measured. The main organ were weighted and used for the histological examination. The results showed that body weight and fat deposition in CKO group were significantly lower than the lard and soybean groups. Moderate consumption of CKO was found to improve the levels of blood TG and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:26130050

  17. Suppression by ellagic acid of 60Co-irradiation-induced lipid peroxidation in placenta and fetus of rats

    The effect of ellagic acid, a component of Eucalyptus maculata, on lipid peroxidation was examined in placenta and fetus of pregnant rats irradiated with 60Co. The increase in lipid peroxide levels by the irradiation of the placenta and fetus brain as well as those of the serum and organs of mother was suppressed by treatment of the mother rats with ellagic acid. This suppressing effect found in placenta and fetus was significantly correlated with that found in mother rats. Moreover, ellagic acid suppressed the morphological changes such as degeneration in the endothelial cells of placenta and liver cells of fetus caused by the irradiation and improved the survival rate after the irradiation. These suppressing effects of ellagic acid were approximately the same as those of α-tocopherol. (author)

  18. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  19. Effect of Alpha-lipoic Acid Supplementation on Serum Lipid Profile in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Elham Mirtaheri

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: In the present study, serum lipid profile was not significantly affected by ALA intervention. However, ALA supplementation aiming at prevention or treatment of dyslipidemia in RA patients should be further investigated. Keywords: Lipoic acid, Supplementation, Rheumatoid arthritis, Women, Lipid profile

  20. Research on the Changes to the Lipid/Polymer Membrane Used in the Acidic Bitterness Sensor Caused by Preconditioning

    Yuhei Harada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A taste sensor that uses lipid/polymer membranes can evaluate aftertastes felt by humans using Change in membrane Potential caused by Adsorption (CPA measurements. The sensor membrane for evaluating bitterness, which is caused by acidic bitter substances such as iso-alpha acid contained in beer, needs an immersion process in monosodium glutamate (MSG solution, called “MSG preconditioning”. However, what happens to the lipid/polymer membrane during MSG preconditioning is not clear. Therefore, we carried out three experiments to investigate the changes in the lipid/polymer membrane caused by the MSG preconditioning, i.e., measurements of the taste sensor, measurements of the amount of the bitterness substance adsorbed onto the membrane and measurements of the contact angle of the membrane surface. The CPA values increased as the preconditioning process progressed, and became stable after 3 d of preconditioning. The response potentials to the reference solution showed the same tendency of the CPA value change during the preconditioning period. The contact angle of the lipid/polymer membrane surface decreased after 7 d of MSG preconditioning; in short, the surface of the lipid/polymer membrane became hydrophilic during MSG preconditioning. The amount of adsorbed iso-alpha acid was increased until 5 d preconditioning, and then it decreased. In this study, we revealed that the CPA values increased with the progress of MSG preconditioning in spite of the decrease of the amount of iso-alpha acid adsorbed onto the lipid/polymer membrane, and it was indicated that the CPA values increase because the sensor sensitivity was improved by the MSG preconditioning.

  1. Serum lipid profile and uric acid levels in preeclampsia in University of Benin Teaching Hospital

    Enaruna, Nosakhare O; Joseph O Idemudia; Aikoriogie, Paul I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disease associated with significant maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Lipid abnormality and elevated serum uric acid have been reported as early features of the disease. We aimed to detect the level of serum lipid profile and uric acid abnormalities in severe preeclamptics in Benin City and to measure their clinical significance. Materials and Methods: A prospective case-control study was conducted with subjects presenting with se...

  2. Membrane-Bound Basic Peptides Sequester Multivalent (PIP2), but Not Monovalent (PS), Acidic Lipids

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Gambhir, Alok; Hangyás-Mihályné, Gyöngyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Rädler, Joachim; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Several biologically important peripheral (e.g., myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) and integral (e.g., the epidermal growth factor receptor) membrane proteins contain clusters of basic residues that interact with acidic lipids in the plasma membrane. Previous measurements demonstrate that the polyvalent acidic lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is bound electrostatically (i.e., sequestered) by membrane-adsorbed basic peptides corresponding to these clusters. We report he...

  3. Identification of furan fatty acids in the lipids of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Chvalová, Daniela; Špička, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed in muscle and gonad tissues of marketed common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The extracted lipids were separated into four fractions: polar lipids (PL), diacylglycerols, free fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TAG) using thin layer chromatography. FA content within the lipid fractions was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). The muscle lipids consisted primarily of TAG (96.9% of total FA), while PL were the major component of both male (67.6%) and female gonad (58.6%) lipids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids predominated in PL of all tissues (52.2-55.8% of total FA); monounsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant FA group in TAG of muscle (51.8%) and female gonads (47.8%) whereas high proportion of furan fatty acids (F-acids) (38.2%) was detected in TAG of male gonads. Eight F-acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in male gonad samples, including less common 12,15-epoxy-13,14-dimethylnonadeca-12,14-dienoic acid with even-numbered alkyl moiety. PMID:26830577

  4. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production. PMID:27038264

  5. Oxidative stability of milk drinks containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    adding potential antioxidants EDTA or gallic acid to the milk drink based on SL was investigated. The lipid type significantly affected the oxidative stability of the milk drinks: Milk drink based on SL oxidized faster than milk drink based on RL or SO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SL milk...... drink could not be ascribed was most likely influenced by the structure of the lipid and to a single factor, differences in the process applied to produce and purify the lipids. EDTA was a strong antioxidant, while gallic acid did not exert a distinct antioxidative effect in the milk drink based on SL....

  6. Suppressive actions of eicosapentaenoic acid on lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Sinclair Andrew J; Manickam Elizabeth; Cameron-Smith David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Lipid droplet (LD) formation and size regulation reflects both lipid influx and efflux, and is central in the regulation of adipocyte metabolism, including adipokine secretion. The length and degree of dietary fatty acid (FA) unsaturation is implicated in LD formation and regulation in adipocytes. The aims of this study were to establish the impact of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5n-3) in comparison to SFA (STA; stearic acid, C18:0) and MUFA (OLA; oleic acid, C18:1n-9) ...

  7. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids and oleic acid on blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities

    Tholstrup, T.; Ehnholm, C.; Jauhiainen, M.;

    2004-01-01

    cholesterol, although this claim is poorly documented. Objective: We compared the effects of a diet rich in either MCFAs or oleic acid on fasting blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities in healthy men. Design: In a study with a double-blind, randomized, crossover...... design, 17 healthy young men replaced part of their habitual dietary fat intake with 70 g MCTs (66% 8:0 and 34% 10:0) or high-oleic sunflower oil (89.4% 18:1). Each intervention period lasted 21 d, and the 2 periods were separated by a washout period of 2 wk. Blood samples were taken before and after the...... oleic acid, MCT fat unfavorably affected lipid profiles in healthy young men by increasing plasma LDL cholesterol and triacylglycerol. No changes in the activities of phospholipid transfer protein and cholesterol ester transfer protein were evident....

  8. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States); Moreau, Régis [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Hagen, Tory, E-mail: Tory.Hagen@oregonstate.edu [Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Biochemistry Biophysics Department, Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  9. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks

  10. Lipid peroxidation during n-3 fatty acid and vitamin E supplementation in humans.

    Allard, J P; Kurian, R; Aghdassi, E; Muggli, R; Royall, D

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in healthy humans the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake, alone or in combination with dL-alpha-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E) supplements on lipid peroxidation. Eighty men were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to take daily for 6 wk either menhaden oil (6.26 g, n-3 fatty acids) or olive oil supplements with either vitamin E (900 IU) or its placebo. Antioxidant vitamins, phospholipid composition, malondialdehyde (MDA), and lipid peroxides were measured in the plasma at baseline and week 6. At the same time, breath alkane output was measured. Plasma alpha-tocopherol concentration increased in those receiving vitamin E (P < 0.0001). In those supplemented with n-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA increased in plasma phospholipids (P < 0.0001) and plasma MDA and lipid peroxides increased (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Breath alkane output did not change significantly and vitamin E intake did not prevent the increase in lipid peroxidation during menhaden oil supplementation. The results demonstrate that supplementing the diet with n-3 fatty acids resulted in an increase in lipid peroxidation, as measured by plasma MDA release and lipid peroxide products, which was not suppressed by vitamin E supplementation. PMID:9168460

  11. Expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in developing endosperm of Jatropha curcas

    Gu Keyu; Yi Chengxin; Tian Dongsheng; Sangha Jatinder; Hong Yan; Yin Zhongchao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Temporal and spatial expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes are associated with the accumulation of storage lipids in the seeds of oil plants. In jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.), a potential biofuel plant, the storage lipids are mainly synthesized and accumulated in the endosperm of seeds. Although the fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in jatropha have been identified, the expression of these genes at different developing stages of endosperm has not been...

  12. Improved method to measure urinary alkoxyacetic acids

    Shih, T. S.; Chou, J. S.; Chen, C Y; Smith, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To simplify the current preparation of samples, and to improve the specificity and reliability of the conventional analytical methods to measure urinary alkoxyacetic acids. METHODS: Samples containing alkoxyacetic acids including methoxy, ethoxy, and butoxyacetic acids (MAA, EAA, and BAA) were acidified with HCl and extracted with a mixed solvent of methylene chloride and isopropyl alcohol, then analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). RESULTS: Optimal resul...

  13. Microalgae biomass production at different growth conditions assessing the lipid content and fatty acid profile for feed, food and energy applications

    Rinna, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The potential of microalgae as a source of food, feedstock and renewable energy has received considerable interest, but if microalgae production is to be economically viable and sustainable, further optimization of mass culture conditions are needed. In this work the attention was focused on the improvement of lipid productivity of two microalgae species Botryococcus braunii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and evaluation of lipid productivity and fatty acid profile of the cya...

  14. Activity of caffeic acid in different fish lipid matrices: A review

    Medina, Isabel; Undeland, Ingrid; Larsson, Karin;

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic acid, a hydroxycinnamic acid common in different vegetable sources, has been employed as a natural antioxidant for inhibiting oxidation of fish lipids present in different food matrices. The aim of this review is to discuss the mechanisms involved in the antioxidative and prooxidative eff...

  15. Biomass, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition of marine Nannochloropsis gaditana cultured in desalination concentrate.

    Matos, Ângelo Paggi; Feller, Rafael; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Sant'Anna, Ernani Sebastião

    2015-12-01

    In this study the feasibility of growing marine Nannochloropsis gaditana in desalination concentrate (DC) was explored and the influence of the DC concentration on the biomass growth, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition was assessed. The reuse of the medium with the optimum DC concentration in successive algal cultivation cycles and the additional of a carbon source to the optimized medium were also evaluated. On varying the DC concentration, the maximum biomass concentration (0.96gL(-1)) and lipid content (12.6%) were obtained for N. gaditana in the medium with the optimum DC concentration (75%). Over the course of the reuse of the optimum DC medium, three cultivation cycles were performed, observing that the biomass productivity is directly correlated to lipid productivity. Palmitic acid was the major fatty acid found in N. gaditana cells. The saturated fatty acids content of the algae enhanced significantly on increasing the DC concentration. PMID:26318921

  16. Preparation and In Vitro Evaluation of Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carriers

    Yang Chu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a phenolic antioxidant compound derived from the rhizome of the turmeric plant Curcuma longa, has proven to be a modulator of intracellular signaling pathways that control cancer cell growth, inflammation, invasion and apoptosis, revealing its anticancer potential. In this study, a Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carrier (Cur-GA-PEG-NLC was prepared by the film ultrasound method to improve the tumor-targeting ability. The drug content was detected by an UV spectrophotometry method. The encapsulation efficiency of curcumin in the nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs was determined using a mini-column centrifugation method. The encapsulation efficiency for various Cur-GA-PEG-NLC was within the range of 90.06%–95.31% and particle size was between 123.1 nm and 132.7 nm. An in vitro MTT assay showed that Cur-GA10%-PEG-NLC had significantly high cellular uptake and cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells compared with other groups.

  17. Correlation between leptin level with lipid profile and free fatty acid in liver cirrhosis patients

    Siti Maryani; Neneng Ratnasari; Siti Nurdjanah

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common condition in liver cirrhotic patients. Leptin regulates body weightphysiologically by suppressing appetite and increasing energy expenditure. Leptin is higher in femalethan male. Studies have shown correlation between leptin with metabolic factors like body massindex (BMI) and lipid profile in cirrhotic patients. This study was conducted to investigate thecorrelation between serum leptin levels with lipid profile and free fatty acid in male patients with livercirrhosi...

  18. Fatty Acid Characteristics of Isochrysis galbana Lipids Extracted Using a Microwave-Assisted Method

    Cherng-Yuan Lin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipids were extracted from Isochrysis galbana using a microwave-assisted method accompanied by various types of organic solvents. The effects of organic solvent type and microwave input energy on the fatty acid characteristics of the extracted lipids and their biodiesel product were investigated. Variations in the characteristics of the lipids extracted using a combination of n-hexane and iso-propanol solvents in both emulsion and direct mixtures were also compared. The experimental results showed that greater quantities of Isochrysis galbana lipids, and fatty acid methyl esters transesterified from those lipids, were extracted when using microwave irradiation with an organic solvent mixture of n-hexane and isopropanol in a 2:1 volumetric ratio than when using either n-hexane or isopropanol as the sole solvent. A greater quantity of Isochrysis galbana lipids was extracted when an emulsion of isopropanol solvent evenly dispersed in the continuous phase of n-hexane solvent was used than when a direct mixture of the two solvents was used. In addition, the quantity of lipids extracted from the dried Isochrysis galbana powder with the assistance of microwave irradiation was 9.08 wt% greater than when using traditional Soxhlet extraction without microwave irradiation.

  19. Improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel loaded in nanosized lipid carriers by intracellular delivery

    Nanosized lipid carriers (NLC) can improve the limited drug-loading (DL) capacity and drug expulsion during storage, and adjust the drug release profile of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In this study, Paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded NLC were prepared by solvent diffusion method using monostearin as solid lipid and oleic acid (OA) as liquid lipid matrix. The blank NLC with different OA content (the size range was from 89.5 ± 7.4 to 160.2 ± 34.6 nm) showed smaller size than the blank SLN (the size was 272.7 ± 43.6 nm), while the PTX-loaded NLC (the size range was from 481.3 ± 29.8 to 561.7 ± 38.3 nm) showed little bigger size, higher DL capacity, and faster drug in vitro release rate comparing with SLN (the size was 437.3 ± 68.2 nm). The 50 % cellular growth inhibitions (IC50) of PTX-loaded NLC with 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt % OA were 0.92 ± 0.06, 0.69 ± 0.04, 0.25 ± 0.02, and 0.12 ± 0.02 µg mL−1, respectively, while the IC50 of TaxolTM was 1.72 ± 0.09 µg mL−1. For analyzing cellular drug effect, cellular uptakes of fluorescent NLC and intracellular drug concentration were investigated. As the incorporation of OA into solid lipid matrix could accelerate both the cellular uptake and the PTX delivery, loaded by NLC, the cytotoxicity of PTX could be enhanced, and further enhanced by increasing OA content in NLC

  20. Improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel loaded in nanosized lipid carriers by intracellular delivery

    Miao, Jing, E-mail: joemj1005@163.com, E-mail: miaojing@zju.edu.cn [Zhejiang University, Department of Pharmacy, the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine (China); Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong [Zhejiang University, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Zhang, Xingguo; Li, Qian; Rao, Yuefeng [Zhejiang University, Department of Pharmacy, the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine (China); Zhao, Mengdan [Zhejiang University, Women’s Hospital, College of Medicine (China); Hu, Fuqiang, E-mail: hufq@zju.edu.cn [Zhejiang University, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China)

    2015-01-15

    Nanosized lipid carriers (NLC) can improve the limited drug-loading (DL) capacity and drug expulsion during storage, and adjust the drug release profile of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In this study, Paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded NLC were prepared by solvent diffusion method using monostearin as solid lipid and oleic acid (OA) as liquid lipid matrix. The blank NLC with different OA content (the size range was from 89.5 ± 7.4 to 160.2 ± 34.6 nm) showed smaller size than the blank SLN (the size was 272.7 ± 43.6 nm), while the PTX-loaded NLC (the size range was from 481.3 ± 29.8 to 561.7 ± 38.3 nm) showed little bigger size, higher DL capacity, and faster drug in vitro release rate comparing with SLN (the size was 437.3 ± 68.2 nm). The 50 % cellular growth inhibitions (IC{sub 50}) of PTX-loaded NLC with 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt % OA were 0.92 ± 0.06, 0.69 ± 0.04, 0.25 ± 0.02, and 0.12 ± 0.02 µg mL{sup −1}, respectively, while the IC{sub 50} of Taxol{sup TM} was 1.72 ± 0.09 µg mL{sup −1}. For analyzing cellular drug effect, cellular uptakes of fluorescent NLC and intracellular drug concentration were investigated. As the incorporation of OA into solid lipid matrix could accelerate both the cellular uptake and the PTX delivery, loaded by NLC, the cytotoxicity of PTX could be enhanced, and further enhanced by increasing OA content in NLC.

  1. Enhancement of lipid production and fatty acid profiling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 for biodiesel production.

    Karpagam, R; Preeti, R; Ashokkumar, B; Varalakshmi, P

    2015-11-01

    Lipid from microalgae is one of the putative oil resources to facilitate the biodiesel production during this era of energy dissipation and environmental pollution. In this study, the key parameters such as biomass productivity, lipid productivity and lipid content were evaluated at the early stationary phase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 cultivated in nutrient starved (nitrogen, phosphorous), glucose (0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15% and 0.2%) and vitamin B12 supplementation (0.001%, 0.002% and 0.003%) in Tris-Acetate-Phosphate (TAP) medium. The lipid content in nitrogen starved media was 61% which is 2.34 folds higher than nutrient sufficient TAP medium. Glucose supplementation has lead to proportional increase in biomass productivity with the increasing concentration of glucose whereas vitamin B12 supplementations had not shown any influence in lipid and biomass production. Further, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of C. reinhardtii, CC 1010 has revealed more than 80% of total SFA (saturated fatty acid) and MUFA (mono unsaturated fatty acid) content. Quality checking parameters of biodiesel like cetane number, saponification value, iodine number and degree of unsaturation were analyzed and the biodiesel fuel properties were found to be appropriate as per the international standards, EN 14214 and ASTM D6751. Conclusively, among all the treatments, nitrogen starvation with 0.1% glucose supplementation had yielded high lipid content in C. reinhardtii, CC 1010. PMID:25838071

  2. Serum total sialic acid, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione reductase levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Mohan, Surapaneni Krishna; PRIYAV, Vishnu

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the serum sialic acid levels, total lipid peroxidation products (MDA), and glutathione reductase activity were estimated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Serum Sialic acid is known as a parameter of inflammation. This work was undertaken to assess the potential role of sialic acid as well as oxidative stress and antioxidant status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and methods: The levels of these parameters in serum were studied in 52 subjects with rheuma...

  3. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals. PMID:24922183

  4. Isolation of lipid classes from nutritional marine oils: improved extraction strategy and discrimination studies based on the positional distribution of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on triacylglycerol structures using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    Woldemariam, Ephrem  Tilahun 

    2014-01-01

    The consumer of the 21st century have developed an awareness of the quality of food products in their diet and the impact of these products on their health which in turn has led to an escalating consumer demand for omega-3 fatty acids rich oils, functional food, dietary supplements and pharmaceuticals. The analysis of omega-3 rich oils for detecting the presence of adulterants is generally carried out by using complex, time-consuming techniques and expensive and sophisticated instruments. It ...

  5. Ontogenetic change in the lipid and fatty acid composition of scleractinian coral larvae

    Figueiredo, J.; Baird, A. H.; Cohen, M. F.; Flot, J.-F.; Kamiki, T.; Meziane, T.; Tsuchiya, M.; Yamasaki, H.

    2012-06-01

    Some scleractinian coral larvae have an extraordinary capacity to delay metamorphosis, and this is reflected in the large geographic range of many species. Coral eggs typically contain a high proportion of wax esters, which have been hypothesized to provide a source of energy for long-distance dispersal. To better understand the role of lipids in the dispersal of broadcast spawning coral larvae, ontogenetic changes in the lipid and fatty acid composition of Goniastrea retiformis were measured from the eggs until larvae were 30 days old. Egg biomass was 78.8 ± 0.5% lipids, 86.3 ± 0.2% of which were wax esters, 9.3 ± 0.0% polar lipids, 4.1 ± 0.2% sterols, and 0.3 ± 0.1% triacylglycerols. The biomass of wax esters declined significantly through time, while polar lipids, sterols and triacylglycerols remained relatively constant, suggesting that wax esters are the prime source of energy for development. The most prevalent fatty acid in the eggs was palmitic acid, a marker of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, highlighting the importance of symbiosis in coral reproductive ecology. The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids declined through time, suggesting that they are essential for larval development. Interestingly, triacylglycerols are only abundant in the propagules that contain Symbiodinium, suggesting important differences in the energetic of dispersal among species with vertical and horizontal transmission of symbionts.

  6. A potential synbiotic product improves the lipid profile of diabetic rats

    Roselino Mariana N; Pauly-Silveira Nadiége D; Cavallini Daniela CU; Celiberto Larissa S; Pinto Roseli A; Vendramini Regina C; Rossi Elizeu A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies showed that intake of yacon or some lactic acid bacteria was able to inhibit the development of diabetes mellitus, by reducing glucose and associated symptoms, for example, the lipid profile. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the consumption influence of a potential symbiotic product of soybean and yacon extract and fermented Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Lactobacillus helveticus ssp jugurti 416 in reducing blood glucose and lipid levels...

  7. Sugars, organic acids, minerals and lipids in jabuticaba

    Annete de Jesus Boari Lima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the sugar, organic acid and mineral compositions of the whole fruit and fractions (skin, pulp and seed of the Paulista (Plinia cauliflora and Sabará (Plinia jaboticaba jabuticaba tree genotypes, as well as the oil compositions of their skin and seeds. High levels of sugar, especially fructose, followed by glucose and sucrose, were encountered in the fruit. In the Paulista genotype, higher levels of total and reducing sugars were found in the pulp and skin, which was not observed when comparing the whole fruit of both genotypes. Five organic acids were found in the whole fruit and in the fractions of the two jabuticaba genotypes in quantitative order: citric acid > succinic acid > malic acid > oxalic acid > acetic acid. Potassium was the most abundant mineral found. This fruit was also shown to be rich in magnesium, phosphorus, calcium and copper. The seed oil had nearly the same constitution as the oil extracted from the skin in both genotypes and the major compounds were an unidentified phytosterol, palmitic, linoleic and oleic acids, and squalene.

  8. Enhancing Lipid Stability in Irradiated Beef Mince by Oleoresins and/ or Ascorbic Acid during Chilling Storage

    Lipid Oxidation, fatty acids profile and sensory properties of irradiated beef mince (2.5 kGy) treated with oleoresins (rosemary or ginger), ascorbic acid, or combination of ascorbic acid and oleoresins were investigated during 30 days of chilled storage. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as an indication of lipid oxidation, of irradiated control samples were significantly higher than those of non irradiated control and samples treated with rosemary and ginger oleoresins. By GC-MS analysis, it was found that the relative percentage of total saturated fatty acids (TSFA) increased in all treatments. However, the highest increase was recorded in irradiated control samples compared to non irradiated control samples. Beef mince samples treated with oleoresins (rosemary or ginger) had the best scores for discoloration and off odour. Thus, the addition of oleoresins (rosemary or ginger) to beef mince before irradiation could be an easily applied method to minimize oxidative degradation of irradiated meat

  9. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives protect Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation.

    Slyshenkov, V S; Rakowska, M; Moiseenok, A G; Wojtczak, L

    1995-12-01

    Preincubation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells at 22 or 32 degrees C, but not at 0 degree C, with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine reduced lipid peroxidation (measured by production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive compounds) induced by the Fenton reaction (Fe2+ + H2O2) and partly protected the plasma membrane against the leakiness to cytoplasmic proteins produced by the same reagent. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives did not inhibit (Fe2+ + H2O2)-induced peroxidation of phospholipid multilamellar vesicles, thus indicating that their effect on the cells was not due to the scavenging mechanism. Homopantothenic acid and its 4'-phosphate ester (which are not precursors of CoA) neither protected Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation nor prevented plasma membrane leakiness under the same conditions. Incubation of the cells with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine significantly increased the amount of cellular CoA and potentiated incorporation of added palmitate into phospholipids and cholesterol esters. It is concluded that pantothenic acid and its related compounds protect the plasma membrane of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against the damage by oxygen free radicals due to increasing cellular level of CoA. The latter compound may act by diminishing propagation of lipid peroxidation and promoting repair mechanisms, mainly the synthesis of phospholipids. PMID:8582649

  10. Nutritional strategies to improve the lipid composition of meat, with emphasis on Thailand and Asia.

    Jaturasitha, S; Chaiwang, N; Kayan, A; Kreuzer, M

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews opportunities for enriching the lipids of meat with n-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs), both considered beneficial to human health. Special focus is put on feeds available and research carried out in Thailand. A differentiated consideration concerning the value of different n-3 fatty acids and isomers of CLAs is necessary. In ruminants, it is difficult to enrich the meat with n-3 fatty acids due to the extensive ruminal biohydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids, but several possibilities to enhance the proportion of the most desired CLA isomer, rumenic acid, exist. By contrast, pork and poultry meat can be easily enriched with n-3 fatty acids. With purified CLA sources, CLAs also can be enhanced, but it is difficult to achieve this exclusively for rumenic acid. An interesting approach might consist in supplementing the CLA precursor vaccenic acid instead. Possible constraints for meat quality and in the fatty acid levels achieved are outlined. PMID:27127010

  11. Improved production of rhamno lipids by a pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant

    A pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant derived by random mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, producing high level of the rhamno lipid bio surfactants was selected on Sigmund Wagner plates. The mutant designated P. aeruginosa Persian Type Culture Collection 1637 produces rhamno lipids at concentration 10 times more than present strain. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis and surface tension measurement showed that the bio surfactants produced by the mutant were identical to those produced by the wild type strain. The bio surfactants exhibited a low surface tension of 28.0 mn m-1 and a low critical micelle concentration of 9 mg l-1. Similar to the wild type strain, the mutant produced bio surfactants at the stationary phase

  12. Studies in lipid histochemistry. XIII. The OPA (osmiumtetroxide-periodic acid-alpha-naphthylamine) method for the detection of apolar lipids.

    Elleder, M

    1975-09-29

    A new procedure for the detection of apolar lipids is described. It is a modification of the OTAN method (Adams, 1959) using periodic acid which oxidatively removes lower osmium derivatives from polar sites only, leaving those in apolar lipids intact and demonstrable with alpha-naphthylamine. Control steps for the exclusion of the possible interference of some less polar complex lipids and of lipopigments are described. The described technic is superior to the conventionally used sudan dyes due partly to the fact that only aqueous solutions are employed thus excluding any extraction of lipids, partly to the more distinct coloration. PMID:171245

  13. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid.

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-06-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  14. Lipid-Nucleic Acid Supramolecular Complexes: Lipoplex Structure and the Kinetics of Formation

    Nily Dan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for synthetic gene therapy or gene silencing vehicles that can insert therapeutic nucleic acids (DNA or siRNA into cells (so-called transfection has focused interest on lipid-nucleic acid assemblies (lipoplexes. This paper reviews the kinetics pathways leading to lipoplex formation and structure. The process is qualitatively comparable to those of cluster nucleation and growth and to the adsorption of polyelectrolytes on colloidal particles: Initially is a rapid stage where the nucleic acid binds onto the surface of the cationic lipid aggregate (adsorption, or nucleation. This is followed by an intermediate step where the lipid/nucleic acid complexes flocculate to form larger structures (growth. The last and final step involves internal rearrangement, where the overall global structure remains constant while local adjustment of the nucleic acid/lipid organization takes place until the equilibrium lipoplex characteristics are obtained. This step can require unusually long time scales of order hours or longer. Understanding the kinetics of lipoplex formation is not only of fundamental interest as a multi-component, multi-length scale and multi-time scale process, but also has significant implications for the utilization of lipoplexes as carriers for gene delivery and gene silencing agents.

  15. Serum lipid profile and uric acid levels in preeclampsia in University of Benin Teaching Hospital

    Nosakhare O Enaruna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disease associated with significant maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Lipid abnormality and elevated serum uric acid have been reported as early features of the disease. We aimed to detect the level of serum lipid profile and uric acid abnormalities in severe preeclamptics in Benin City and to measure their clinical significance. Materials and Methods: A prospective case-control study was conducted with subjects presenting with severe preeclampsia to the Obstetric Unit of the UBTH, Benin City. Fasting serum lipid profile and uric acid levels of 40 severe preeclamptic subjects and 80 gestation-matched normotensive controls were done at recruitment. The preeclamptic subjects were managed according to our departmental protocol which included stabilisation and delivery. Their sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were used to generate a database for analysis. Results: The mean serum uric acid level was 28% higher in severe preeclamptics than normotensive women (5.96 ± 2.54 mg/dl versus 4.30 ± 0.85; P = 0.005. There were statistically significant differences in levels of triglycerides (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL between the preeclamptics and their normotensive controls (P = 0.006, P = 0.000, P = 0.000, respectively. Abnormal serum uric acid was associated with advanced maternal age (P = 0.000, early-onset preeclampsia (P = 0.000 and abnormal body mass index (BMI; P = 0.000. Low birth weight was more likely in preeclamptics with elevated serum uric acid levels (P = 0.041. Conclusion: Abnormality of serum uric acid in preeclampsia was significantly associated with increased frequency of complications but lipid profile abnormalities were not shown in the subjects studied. We recommend a larger scale study to determine lipid profile in normal and complicated pregnancies in our environment.

  16. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids

    Corpeleijn, Eva; Hessvik, Nina P; Bakke, Siril S;

    2010-01-01

    were extended by comparing these processes in primary cultured myotubes established from healthy lean and obese type 2 diabetic (T2D) individuals, two extremes in a range of metabolic phenotypes. ICLs were prelabeled for 2 days with 100 microM [(14)C]oleic acid (OA). ICL(OX) was studied using a (14)CO......Obesity and insulin resistance are related to both enlarged intramyocellular triacylglycerol stores and accumulation of lipid intermediates. We investigated how lipid overflow can change the oxidation of intramyocellular lipids (ICL(OX)) and intramyocellular lipid storage (ICL). These experiments...... all, a lower mitochondrial mass and lower ICL(OX) were related to a higher cell-associated OA accumulation. Second, myotubes established from obese T2D individuals showed reduced ICL(OX). ICL(OX) remained lower during uncoupling (P <0.001), even with comparable mitochondrial mass, suggesting decreased...

  17. Role of a liver fatty acid-binding protein gene in lipid metabolism in chicken hepatocytes.

    Gao, G L; Na, W; Wang, Y X; Zhang, H F; Li, H; Wang, Q G

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of the chicken liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene in lipid metabolism in hepatocytes, and the regulatory relationships between L-FABP and genes related to lipid metabolism. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference vector with L-FABP and an eukaryotic expression vector were used. Chicken hepatocytes were subjected to shRNA-mediated knockdown or L-FABP cDNA overexpression. Expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes and biochemical parameters were detected 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h after transfection with the interference or overexpression plasmids for L-FABP, PPARα and L-BABP expression levels, and the total amount of cholesterol, were significantly affected by L-FABP expression. L-FABP may affect lipid metabolism by regulating PPARα and L-BABP in chicken hepatocytes. PMID:25966259

  18. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    Shengxi Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA, one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism.

  19. Age-Specific Lipid and Fatty Acid Profiles of Atlantic Salmon Juveniles in the Varzuga River

    Svetlana A. Murzina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The age-specific lipid and fatty acid profiles of juvenile Atlantic salmon at different ages (0+, 1+, and 2+ years after hatching from nests located in the mainstream of a large Arctic River, the Varzuga River, and resettling to the favorable Sobachji shoal in autumn before overwinter are herein presented. The contemporary methods of the lipid analysis were used: thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The results show that the stability of the regulation of important functions in developing organisms is maintained through structural alterations in lipids. These alterations can be considered as a sequence of the modifications and changes in the ratios of certain lipid classes and fatty acids constituents. In general, changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs maintained the physiological limits and controls through the adaptive systems of the organism. The mechanisms of juvenile fish biochemical adaptation to the environmental conditions in the studied biotope include the modification of the energy metabolism and anabolism, and here belongs to the energy characteristics of metabolic processes.

  20. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate lysophosphatidic acid production and signaling in platelets: studies using chemical inhibitors of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity.

    Smyth, Susan S; Sciorra, Vicki A; Sigal, Yury J; Pamuklar, Zehra; Wang, Zuncai; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morris, Andrew J

    2003-10-31

    Blood platelets play an essential role in ischemic heart disease and stroke contributing to acute thrombotic events by release of potent inflammatory agents within the vasculature. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator produced by platelets and found in the blood and atherosclerotic plaques. LPA receptors on platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells regulate growth, differentiation, survival, motility, and contractile activity. Definition of the opposing pathways of synthesis and degradation that control extracellular LPA levels is critical to understanding how LPA bioactivity is regulated. We show that intact platelets and platelet membranes actively dephosphorylate LPA and identify the major enzyme responsible as lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1). Localization of LPP1 to the platelet surface is increased by exposure to LPA. A novel receptor-inactive sn-3-substituted difluoromethylenephosphonate analog of phosphatidic acid that is a potent competitive inhibitor of LPP1 activity potentiates platelet aggregation and shape change responses to LPA and amplifies LPA production by agonist-stimulated platelets. Our results identify LPP1 as a pivotal regulator of LPA signaling in the cardiovascular system. These findings are consistent with genetic and cell biological evidence implicating LPPs as negative regulators of lysophospholipid signaling and suggest that the mechanisms involve both attenuation of lysophospholipid actions at cell surface receptors and opposition of lysophospholipid production. PMID:12909631

  1. Preparation, characterization, and in vivo pharmacokinetics of nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with oleanolic acid and gentiopicrin

    Zhang KC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kunchi Zhang, Shaowa Lv, Xiuyan Li, Yufei Feng, Xin Li, Lu Liu, Shuang Li, Yongji Li School of Pharmacy, Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China Background: The purpose of this work was to develop nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs loaded simultaneously with oleanolic acid and gentiopicrin. Methods: An aqueous dispersion of NLCs was prepared successfully using a film-ultrasonic method, with glycerin monostearate as the solid lipid and oleic acid as the liquid lipid. Poloxamer 188 was used as the surfactant. A central composite design was used to optimize the technologic parameters. The characteristics of the NLCs were then investigated. Results: The encapsulation efficiency was 48.34% ± 2.76%, drug loading was 8.06% ± 0.42%, particle size was 111.0 ± 1.56 nm, polydispersity index was 0.287 ± 0.01, and zeta potential was –23.8 ± 0.36 mV for the optimized NLCs. The other physicochemical properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Drug release followed first-order kinetics and release studies confirmed that oleanolic acid and gentiopicrin fitted a sustained-release model. Compared with NLCs loaded with oleanolic acid or gentiopicrin alone, NLCs loaded with both oleanolic acid and gentiopicrin produced drug concentrations which persisted for a significantly longer time in plasma, with a linear decrement following second-order kinetics. Aspartate and alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly lower on exposure to NLCs loaded with both oleanolic acid and gentiopicrin than in negative controls. Conclusion: The results of this study confirm that oleanolic acid and gentiopicrin can be loaded simultaneously into NLCs. Compared with oleanolic acid and gentiopicrin loaded alone, sustained release and protective effects against hepatic injury were observed using NLCs loaded with both oleanolic acid and

  2. The role of thyroid hormones in regulating of fatty acid spectrum of brain lipids: ontogenetic aspect

    Rodynskiy A.G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In experiments on rats of three age groups the role of thyroid hormones in the regulation of fatty acid spectrum of cortical and hippocampus lipids was studied. It was found that on the background of decreased thyroid status content of polyunsaturated fractions of free fatty acids, significantly changed depending on the age of the animals. In particular, in juvenile rats hypothyroidism was accompanied by a decrease almost twice the number of pentacodan acid decreased lipids viscosity in neurocortex. In old rats reduce of pentacodan acid in the cortex (38% was supplemented by significant (77% decrease in linoleic and linolenic acids. Unlike the two age groups deficiency of thyroid hormones in young animals caused accumulation of free polyunsatarated fatty acids (C18: 2.3 in the cerebral cortex by 74%, which may be associated with a decrease of this fraction in fatty acid spectrum of lipids and increase of viscosity properties of the membranes. These restruc­turing may be associated with modulation of synaptic transmission of specific neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

  3. Pulmonary lung surfactant synthetic peptide concentration-dependent modulation of DPPC and POPG acyl chain order in a DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid lipid mixture.

    Krill, S L; Gupta, S L; Smith, T

    1994-05-01

    Lung surfactant-associated protein interaction with lipid matrices and the effects on lipid thermotropic phase behavior are areas of active research. Many studies limit the lipids to a single or two-component system. The current investigation utilizes a three-lipid component matrix (DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid) to investigate the impact of a synthetic surfactant protein B fragment (SP-B 53-78 DiACM) on the dynamic surface activity of the lipid admixture as measured by a Wilhelmy surface balance. Also, the modulation of the individual lipid acyl chain order by the peptide within the lipid matrix is studied through the use of thermal perturbation FTIR spectroscopy. The data clearly demonstrate a concentration-dependent effect of the peptide on the surface activity with an improvement in the dynamic surface tension diagram characteristics (decreased surface tension and increased collapse plateau) especially at low, 0.36 M%, peptide concentrations. These effects are diminished upon further addition of the peptide. FTIR spectral data demonstrate that the peptide addition results in a significant increase in the acyl chain order of the DPPC and POPG components as measured by the position of the methylene stretching vibrational bands. DPPC is most sensitive to the peptide presence, while the palmitic acid is least affected. The transition temperatures of the individual lipids are also increased with the addition of the peptide. The presence of POPG in the matrix achieves the surface activity similarly seen with natural lung surfactant relative to a DPPC/palmitic acid lipid matrix alone. Its presence increases the sensitivity of the DPPC acyl chains to the presence of the peptide. These effects on the chain order are most probably related to the increased acyl chain fluidity which POPG imparts to the lipid matrix because of the presence of the cis double bond. The phosphatidylglycerol headgroup also adds a negative charge to the lipid matrix which enhances the peptide-lipid

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid induce changes in the physical properties of a lipid bilayer model membrane.

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Morishita, Mariko; Chiba, Yoshiyuki; Tokiwa, Shinji; Takayama, Kozo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA, 18:0), oleic acid (OA, 18:1), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) on a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer by determining the phase transition temperature, fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), and detergent insolubility. Treatment with unsaturated fatty acid broadened and shifted the phase transitions of the DPPC bilayer to a lower temperature. The phase transition temperature and the value of fluorescence anisotropy of DPH at 37 degrees C decreased progressively with increasing treatment amounts of unsaturated fatty acid. A large amount of the DPPC bilayer treated with unsaturated fatty acid was dissolved in Triton X-100, obtaining a low level of detergent insolubility. These modifications of the bilayer physical properties were most pronounced with DHA and EPA treatment. These data show that unsaturated fatty acids, particularly DHA and EPA, induce a marked change in the lipid bilayer structure. The composition of fatty acids in the DPPC bilayer was similar after treatment with various unsaturated fatty acids, suggesting that the different actions of unsaturated fatty acids are attributed to change in the molecular structure (e.g., kinked conformation by double bonds). We further explored the change in physical properties induced by fatty acids dispersed in a water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion and found that unsaturated fatty acids acted efficiently on the DPPC bilayer, even when incorporated in emulsion form. PMID:16394552

  5. Lipid production of microalga Chlorella sorokiniana CY1 is improved by light source arrangement, bioreactor operation mode and deep-sea water supplements.

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Hsin-Yueh

    2016-03-01

    Microalgae-based biodiesel has been recognized as a sustainable and promising alternative to fossil diesel. High lipid productivity of microalgae is required for economic production of biodiesel from microalgae. This study was undertaken to enhance the growth and oil accumulation of an indigenous microalga Chlorella sorokiniana CY1 by applying engineering strategies using deep-sea water as the medium. First, the microalga was cultivated using LED as the immersed light source, and the results showed that the immersed LED could effectively enhance the oil/lipid content and final microalgal biomass concentration to 53.8% and 2.5 g/l, respectively. Next, the semi-batch photobioreactor operation with deep-sea water was shown to improve lipid content and microalgal growth over those from using batch and continuous cultures under similar operating conditions. The optimal replacement ratio was 50%, resulting in an oil/lipid content and final biomass concentration of 61.5% and 2.8 g/l, respectively. A long-term semi-batch culture utilizing 50%-replaced medium was carried out for four runs. The final biomass concentration and lipid productivity were 2.5 g/L and 112.2 mg/L/d, respectively. The fatty acid composition of the microalgal lipids was predominant by palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid, and this lipid quality is suitable for biodiesel production. This demonstrates that optimizing light source arrangement, bioreactor operation and deep-sea water supplements could effectively promote the lipid production of C. sorokiniana CY1 for the applications in microalgae-based biodiesel industry. PMID:26632521

  6. Selective fermentation of carbohydrate and protein fractions of Scenedesmus, and biohydrogenation of its lipid fraction for enhanced recovery of saturated fatty acids.

    Lai, YenJung Sean; Parameswaran, Prathap; Li, Ang; Aguinaga, Alyssa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-02-01

    Biofuels derived from microalgae have promise as carbon-neutral replacements for petroleum. However, difficulty extracting microalgae-derived lipids and the co-extraction of non-lipid components add major costs that detract from the benefits of microalgae-based biofuel. Selective fermentation could alleviate these problems by managing microbial degradation so that carbohydrates and proteins are hydrolyzed and fermented, but lipids remain intact. We evaluated selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass in batch experiments buffered at pH 5.5, 7, or 9. Carbohydrates were fermented up to 45% within the first 6 days, protein fermentation followed after about 20 days, and lipids (measured as fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) were conserved. Fermentation of the non-lipid components generated volatile fatty acids, with acetate, butyrate, and propionate being the dominant products. Selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass increased the amount of extractable FAME and the ratio of FAME to crude lipids. It also led to biohydrogenation of unsaturated FAME to more desirable saturated FAME (especially to C16:0 and C18:0), and the degree of saturation was inversely related to the accumulation of hydrogen gas after fermentation. Moreover, the microbial communities after selective fermentation were enriched in bacteria from families known to perform biohydrogenation, i.e., Porphyromonadaceae and Ruminococcaceae. Thus, this study provides proof-of-concept that selective fermentation can improve the quantity and quality of lipids that can be extracted from Scenedesmus. PMID:26222672

  7. Galactosylated solid lipid nanoparticles with cucurbitacin B improves the liver targetability.

    Wang, Wenyu; Zhao, Xiuli; Hu, Haiyang; Chen, Dawei; Gu, Jianchun; Deng, Yihui; Sun, Jin

    2010-04-01

    This study intended to prepare liver-targeting solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with a hepatoprotective drug, cucurbitacin B (Cuc B), using a galactosylated lipid, N-hexadecyl lactobionamide (N-HLBA). The galactosyl-lipid N-HLBA was prepared via the lactone form intermediates of lactobionic acid and synthesized by anchoring galactose to hexadecylamine lipid. The Cuc B-loaded galactosylated and conventional SLNs were successfully prepared by a high-pressure homogenization method. The two SLNs showed similar physical and pharmaceutical properties, including: the particle size measured by laser diffraction was 135 nm for galactosylated SLN (GalSLN) and 123 nm for conventional SLNs (CSLN); zeta potentials were -31.6 mV (GalSLN) and -34.3 mV(CSLN); in vitro release behavior of the two SLNs was similar, and both showed the biphasic drug release pattern with burst release at the initial stage and prolonged release afterwards. In contrast, the two SLNs demonstrated a marked difference in in vitro cellular cytotoxicity and in vivo tissue distribution performances. The IC(50) values of Cuc B in the two SLNs were by far lower than those of Cuc B solution and further Cuc B-GalSLN had about half the IC(50) value of Cuc B-CSLN. These results indicated that the encapsulation of Cuc B in SLNs resulted in the enhancement of cytotoxic activity, and galactosyl ligand could further enhance the cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of Cuc B. The weighted-average overall drug targeting efficiency (Te) was used to evaluate the liver targetability. Cuc B-GalSLN gave a relatively high (Te)(liver) value of 63.6%, approximately 2.5-times greater than that of Cuc B-CSLN (25.3%) and Cuc B solution (23.8%). In summary, the incorporation of N-HLBA into SLNs significantly enhanced the liver targetability of Cuc B-loaded SLNs and GalSLN had a great potential as a drug delivery carrier for improved liver targetability. PMID:20148709

  8. Production of lipids and docosahexasaenoic acid (DHA) by a native Thraustochytrium strain

    Shene, Carolina; Leyton, Allison; Rubilar, Mónica;

    2013-01-01

    /w. Under this growth condition lipids and DHA productivities were 50 and 23 mg/(L h), respectively. Practical applications: Consumption of long chain‐polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC‐PUFA) belonging to the omega‐3 family such as DHA has several positive effects on human and animal health. However, natural......Production of docosahexasaenoic acid (DHA) by a native Labyrinthulomycetes strain, Thraustochytriidae sp. TN5, whose growth characteristics present some differences to related strains, was scaled from shaken flask to a laboratory fermentor. The effect of the growth medium composition and growth...... conditions for (i) biomass production, (ii) lipid content of the biomass, and (iii) DHA content in the lipids was determined. Taguchi's design of experiments was used to study the influence of two discrete – carbon and nitrogen sources – and six continuous – concentrations of the carbon and nitrogen sources...

  9. Synergistic permeability enhancing effect of lysophospholipids and fatty acids on lipid membranes

    Davidsen, Jesper; Mouritsen, O.G.; Jørgensen, K.

    2002-01-01

    The permeability-enhancing effects of the two surfactants, 1-paltnitoyl-2-lyso-sn-gycero-3-pllosplloclloline (lysoPPC) and palmitic acid (PA), on lipid membranes that at physiological temperatures are in the gel, fluid, and liquid-ordered phases were determined using the concentration-dependent s......The permeability-enhancing effects of the two surfactants, 1-paltnitoyl-2-lyso-sn-gycero-3-pllosplloclloline (lysoPPC) and palmitic acid (PA), on lipid membranes that at physiological temperatures are in the gel, fluid, and liquid-ordered phases were determined using the concentration......-dependent self-quenching properties of the hydrophilic marker, calcein. Adding lysoPPC to lipid membranes in the gel-phase induced a time-dependent calcein release curve that can be described by the sum of two exponentials, whereas RA induces a considerably more complex release curve. However, when lysoPPC and...

  10. Oxidative stability during storage of structured lipids produced from fish oil and caprylic acid

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Xu, Xuebing; Timm Heinrich, Maike;

    2004-01-01

    Structured lipids produced by enzymatic or chemical methods for different applications have been receiving considerable attention. The oxidative stability of a randomized structured lipid (RFO), produced by chemical interesterification from fish oil (FO) and tricaprylin, and a specific structured...... lipid (SFO), produced by enzymatic interesterification from the same oil and caprylic acid, was compared with the stability of FO. Oils were stored at 2degreesC for 11 wk followed by storage at 20degreesC for 6 wk. In addition, the antioxidative effect of adding the metal chelators EDTA or citric acid...... storage period, and off-flavors were more pronounced in SFO. The lower oxidative stability of SFO was probably related to the initially lower quality (regarding oxidation products), which is apparently a result of the long production procedure required. Addition of metal chelators did not reduce the...

  11. Mechanisms of formation and function of eosinophil lipid bodies: inducible intracellular sites involved in arachidonic acid metabolism

    Bozza Patricia T

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies, inducible lipid-rich cytoplasmic inclusions, are characteristically abundant in cells associated with inflammation, including eosinophils. Here we reviewed the formation and function of lipid bodies in human eosinophils. We now have evidence that the formation of lipid bodies is not attributable to adverse mechanisms, but is centrally mediated by specific signal transduction pathways. Arachidonic acid and other cis fatty acids by an NSAID-inhibitable process, diglycerides, and PAF by a 5-lipoxygenase dependent pathway are potent stimulators of lipid body induction. Lipid body formation develops rapidly by processes that involve PKC, PLC, and de novo mRNA and protein synthesis. These structures clearly serve as repositoires of arachidonyl-phospholipids and are more than inert depots. Specific enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAP kinases, lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, associate with lipid bodies. Lipid bodies appear to be dynamic, organelle-like structures involved in intracellular pathways of lipid mobilization and metabolism. Indeed, increases in lipid body numbers correlated with enhanced production of both lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We hypothesize that lipid bodies are distinct inducible sites for generating eicosanoids as paracrine mediators with varied activities in inflammation. The capacity of lipid body formation to be specifically and rapidly induced in leukocytes enhances eicosanoid mediator formation, and conversely pharmacologic inhibition of lipid body induction represents a potential novel and specific target for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  12. Relation of Plasma Uric Acid Levels and the Lipid Parameters in Han and Uygur Ethnicity

    Sun Yuping; Yao Hua; Yao Wenhai; Li Qing; You Lan; Wang Qiuyun; Jiang Yan

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Hyperuricemia is a common finding in hypertension and hyperlipidemia,they are all correlated to cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to find the relationship of uric acid and plasma lipid parameters of Han and Uygur ethnicity in Xinjiang. Methods This cross-sectional health examination survey was based on a population random sample from the Urumchi, It included 1166 subjects aged from 20 to 70 years. Serum biochemical testing by Automatic Analyzer (HITACHI 7600-010).Results The uric acid in Han was higher than in Uygur(P< 0.05), men were higher than women in two ethnicities; For lipid parameters men were higher than women, in TG and HDL women were higher than in men in two ethnicity (P < 0.05). Serum uric acid was strongly related to serum triglycerides in Han as well as Uygur ethnicity ( P < 0.001); Compared with the normal group, UA, TG, CHOL, VLDL had ascending trend and HDL had descending trend (P <0.05 ) among groups in Han and Uygur ethnicity,especially Hyperuricemia-hypertriglyceridemia group,uric acid and most some lipid parameters was higher than Hyperuricemia and hypertriglyceridemia group,The prevalence of different groups in Han and Urgur was significantly different (P < 0.05). Conclusions This study shows that the UA and some lipid parameters are different in Han and Uygur ethnicity and show sexual difference; serum uric acid is markedly related to serum triglycerides; Hyperuricemia and hypertriglyceridemia show cooperated effect in uric acid and most lipid parameters. Considering the growing incidence of the potential link between hyperuricemia/hypertriglyceridemia and cardiovascular diseases, more emphasis should be put on the evolving prevalence of hyperuricemia and hypertriglyceridemia in Xinjiang.

  13. The Role of Tetraether Lipid Composition in the Adaptation of Thermophilic Archaea to Acidity

    Eric eBoyd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings, the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly

  14. GLP-1 analogue improves hepatic lipid accumulation by inducing autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway.

    He, Qin; Sha, Sha; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Ming

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) keeps rising year by year, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the most common liver disease worldwide. Clinical studies have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, liraglutide (LRG), cannot only reduce glucose levels, but also improve hepatic lipase, especially in patients also with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition, enhancing autophagy decreases lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. The aim of the present study is to explore the effect of LRG on hepatocyte steatosis and the possible role of autophagy. We set up an obesity mouse model with a high-fat diet (HFD) and induced hepatocyte steatosis with free fatty acids (FFA) in human L-O2 cells. LRG and two inhibitors of autophagy, Chloroquine (CQ) and bafilomycin A1 (Baf), were added into each group, respectively. The lipid profiles and morphological modifications of each group were tested. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to measure autophagy in this study. The autophagy protein expression of SQSTM1 (P62), and LC3B, along with the signaling pathway proteins of mTOR, phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR), AMPK, phosphorylated AMPK (p-AMPK) and Beclin1, were evaluated by western blot. Our results showed that LRG improved hepatocyte steatosis by inducing autophagy, and the AMPK/mTOR pathway is involved. These findings suggest an important mechanism for the positive effects of LRG on hepatic steatosis, and provide new evidence for clinical use of LRG in NAFLD. PMID:27208776

  15. Fatty acid composition of lipids in pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L.) seed genotypes

    Dulf Francisc V; Pamfil Doru; Baciu Adriana D; Pintea Adela

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Calendula officinalis L. (pot marigold) is an annual aromatic herb with yellow or golden-orange flowers, native to the Mediterranean climate areas. Their seeds contain significant amounts of oil (around 20%), of which about 60% is calendic acid. For these reasons, in Europe concentrated research efforts have been directed towards the development of pot marigold as an oilseed crop for industrial purposes. Results The oil content and fatty acid composition of major lipid fra...

  16. Fatty acid composition of lipids in pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L. seed genotypes

    Dulf Francisc V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calendula officinalis L. (pot marigold is an annual aromatic herb with yellow or golden-orange flowers, native to the Mediterranean climate areas. Their seeds contain significant amounts of oil (around 20%, of which about 60% is calendic acid. For these reasons, in Europe concentrated research efforts have been directed towards the development of pot marigold as an oilseed crop for industrial purposes. Results The oil content and fatty acid composition of major lipid fractions in seeds from eleven genotypes of pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L. were determined. The lipid content of seeds varied between 13.6 and 21.7 g oil/100 g seeds. The calendic and linoleic acids were the two dominant fatty acids in total lipid (51.4 to 57.6% and 28.5 to 31.9% and triacylglycerol (45.7 to 54.7% and 22.6 to 29.2% fractions. Polar lipids were also characterised by higher unsaturation ratios (with the PUFAs content between 60.4 and 66.4%, while saturates (consisted mainly of palmitic and very long-chain saturated fatty acids were found in higher amounts in sterol esters (ranging between 49.3 and 55.7% of total fatty acids. Conclusions All the pot marigold seed oils investigated contain high levels of calendic acid (more than 50% of total fatty acids, making them favorable for industrial use. The compositional differences between the genotypes should be considered when breeding and exploiting the pot marigold seeds for nutraceutical and pharmacological purposes.

  17. The hydroperoxide moiety of aliphatic lipid hydroperoxides is not affected by hypochlorous acid

    Zschaler, Josefin; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to the corresponding hydroperoxide by plant and animal lipoxygenases is an important step for the generation of bioactive lipid mediators. Thereby fatty acid hydroperoxide represent a common intermediate, also in human innate immune cells, like neutrophil granulocytes. In these cells a further key component is the heme protein myeloperoxidase producing HOCl as a reactive oxidant. On the basis of different investigation a reaction of the fatty ac...

  18. Fatty acids and algal lipids as precursors of chlorination by-products

    Yan Liang; Yuen Shan Lui; Huachang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Six common algal fatty acids (FAs) with different numbers of double bonds,lipophilic fractions and proteins extracted from the diatom Navicula pelliculosa and algal cells were chlorinated to evaluate their potential in generating disinfection by-products (DBPs).The result showed that the more double bonds in the FAs,the higher the amounts of chloroform and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) produced,but such a pattern was not observed for trichloroacetic acid (TCAA).Based on the previously reported composition of fatty acids in algal lipids,the DBP generation potentials of algal lipids were calculated.These predicted values were much lower than those measured in the chlorinated algal lipophilic fraction,suggesting unknown lipophilic fraction(s) served as potent DBPs precursors.Another calculation attempted to predict DBP production in algal cells based on algal lipid and protein composition,given quantified measured DBP production per unit algal lipid and proteins.The analysis showed that the observed DBP production was similar to that predicted (< 35% difference),suggesting that algal biochemical compositions may serve as a bioindicator for preliminary estimation of chloroform,DCAA and TCAA formation upon chlorinating algae.

  19. Improved Productivity of Neutral Lipids in Chlorella sp. A2 by Minimal Nitrogen Supply

    Zhu, Junying; Chen, Weixian; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Xin; He, Chenliu; Rong, Junfeng; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen starvation is an efficient environmental pressure for increasing lipid accumulation in microalgae, but it could also significantly lower the biomass productivity, resulting in lower lipid productivity. In this study, green alga Chlorella sp. A2 was cultivated by using a minimal nitrogen supply strategy under both laboratory and outdoor cultivation conditions to evaluate biomass accumulation and lipid production. Results showed that minimal nitrogen supply could promote neutral lipid accumulation of Chlorella sp. A2 without a significant negative effect on cell growth. In laboratory cultivation mode, alga cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition could generate 74 and 416% (w/w) more neutral lipid productivity than cells cultured with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. In outdoor cultivation mode, lipid productivity of cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition is approximately 10 and 88% higher than the one with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. Notably, the results of photosynthetic analysis clarified that minimal nitrogen supply reduced the loss of photosynthetic capacity to keep CO2 fixation during photosynthesis for biomass production. The minimal nitrogen supply strategy for microalgae cultivation could promote neutral lipid accumulation without a significant negative effect on cell growth, resulting in a significant improvement in the lipid productivity. PMID:27148237

  20. In vivo incorporation of labeled fatty acids in rat liver lipids after oral administration

    Striking differences were found in the compartmentalization of fatty acids into liver lipid fractions. The saturated fatty acids--lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic--were incorporated into phosphoglycerides at faster rates with increasing chain lengths, while triglyceride incorporation was almost uniform. The degree of incorporation of the unsaturated fatty acids into phosphoglycerides (structural) compared to triglyceride (storage and energy) was the converse of their oxidation rates. The incorporation of oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids was mainly into triglyceride, whereas dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid were preferentially incorporated into phosphoglycerides. The data suggest that distribution of each fatty acid is different depending on its destination for structural or energy function

  1. In vivo incorporation of labeled fatty acids in rat liver lipids after oral administration

    Leyton, J.; Drury, P.J.; Crawford, M.A.

    1987-08-01

    Striking differences were found in the compartmentalization of fatty acids into liver lipid fractions. The saturated fatty acids--lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic--were incorporated into phosphoglycerides at faster rates with increasing chain lengths, while triglyceride incorporation was almost uniform. The degree of incorporation of the unsaturated fatty acids into phosphoglycerides (structural) compared to triglyceride (storage and energy) was the converse of their oxidation rates. The incorporation of oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids was mainly into triglyceride, whereas dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid were preferentially incorporated into phosphoglycerides. The data suggest that distribution of each fatty acid is different depending on its destination for structural or energy function.

  2. Expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in developing endosperm of Jatropha curcas

    Gu Keyu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporal and spatial expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes are associated with the accumulation of storage lipids in the seeds of oil plants. In jatropha (Jatropha curcas L., a potential biofuel plant, the storage lipids are mainly synthesized and accumulated in the endosperm of seeds. Although the fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in jatropha have been identified, the expression of these genes at different developing stages of endosperm has not been systemically investigated. Results Transmission electron microscopy study revealed that the oil body formation in developing endosperm of jatropha seeds initially appeared at 28 days after fertilization (DAF, was actively developed at 42 DAF and reached to the maximum number and size at 56 DAF. Sixty-eight genes that encode enzymes, proteins or their subunits involved in fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis were identified from a normalized cDNA library of jatropha developing endosperm. Gene expression with quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that the 68 genes could be collectively grouped into five categories based on the patterns of relative expression of the genes during endosperm development. Category I has 47 genes and they displayed a bell-shaped expression pattern with the peak expression at 28 or 42 DAF, but low expression at 14 and 56 DAF. Category II contains 8 genes and expression of the 8 genes was constantly increased from 14 to 56 DAF. Category III comprises of 2 genes and both genes were constitutively expressed throughout endosperm development. Category IV has 9 genes and they showed a high expression at 14 and 28 DAF, but a decreased expression from 42 to 56 DAF. Category V consists of 2 genes and both genes showed a medium expression at 14 DAF, the lowest expression at 28 or 42 DAF, and the highest expression at 56 DAF. In addition, genes encoding enzymes or proteins with similar function were

  3. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactivity: reaction conditions and the role of iron, antioxidants and lipid peroxy radicals on the quantitation of plasma lipid peroxides

    Wade, C.R.; van Rij, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of Fe/sup 3 +/, lipid peroxy radicals and the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene on the 2-thiobarbituric (TBA) acid quantitation of plasma lipid peroxides were investigated. Whole plasma and plasma fractions prepared by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) protein precipitation and lipid extraction, demonstrated markedly differing TBA reactivities in the presence or absence of added Fe/sup 3 +/. Examination of the spectral profiles of the TBA reacted whole plasma and TCA precipitated fractions demonstrated the presence of interfering compounds which gave rise to an artifactual increase in lipid peroxide concentrations. In contrast the TBA reacted lipid extracts had low levels of interfering compounds that could be removed by our previously described high pressure liquid chromatographic method. Further characterization of the TBA reactivity of the lipid extract showed that Fe/sup 3 +/ at an optimal concentration of 0.5 mM was necessary for the quantitative decomposition of the lipid peroxides to the TBA reactive product malondialdehyde (MDA). However the presence of Fe/sup 3 +/ resulted in further peroxidation of any unsaturated lipids present.

  4. Effect of methyl-branched fatty acids on the structure of lipid bilayers.

    Poger, David; Caron, Bertrand; Mark, Alan E

    2014-12-01

    Methyl-branched fatty acids are widespread in prokaryotic membranes. Although anteiso and iso branching (that is on the antepenultimate and penultimate carbons) and the presence of multiple methyl branches in the phytanoyl chain are known to modify the thermotropic behavior and enhance the fluidity of lipid bilayers, little is known about the effect of methyl branching on the structure of lipid bilayers. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine systematically the impact of one or more methyl branches at different positions along the sn-1 palmitoyl chain on the structural properties of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid bilayer. It is found that methyl branching reduces lipid condensation, decreases the bilayer thickness, and lowers chain ordering. Branching also results in the formation of kinks at the branching point, thereby enhancing the fluidity of lipid bilayers. Furthermore, this effect varies in a methyl-position-dependent fashion. In the case of polymethylated chains, the simulations suggest that if the gap between the methyl groups is sufficient (two or three carbons), the effects of the methyl branches are additive and equivalent to the combined effect of the corresponding monomethyl-branched lipids. PMID:25380125

  5. A potential synbiotic product improves the lipid profile of diabetic rats

    Roselino Mariana N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that intake of yacon or some lactic acid bacteria was able to inhibit the development of diabetes mellitus, by reducing glucose and associated symptoms, for example, the lipid profile. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the consumption influence of a potential symbiotic product of soybean and yacon extract and fermented Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Lactobacillus helveticus ssp jugurti 416 in reducing blood glucose and lipid levels in an animal model. Methods Diabetes mellitus was chemically induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight. The rats were divided into four groups (n=10: GI – non-diabetic animals that received only a standard chow diet (negative control, GII – diabetic animals that received only chow diet (positive control, GIII – diabetic animals that received the chow diet + 1 mL/kg body weight/day of soybean and yacon unfermented product, GIV – diabetic rats that received the chow diet + 1 mL/kg body weight/day of soybean and yacon fermented product. There was a seven-week treatment period and the following parameters were evaluated: animal body weight, food and water intake, blood glucose, enzyme activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT, triglycerides levels, total cholesterol, HDL-C, non-HDL-C. Cell viability of the fermented product was checked weekly for a seven-week period. Results The product average viable population was 108-109 CFU/mL, by ensuring both the rods and cocci regular intake. No difference was observed between the water and feed intake and body weight of groups that received unfermented and fermented products and the untreated diabetic group. The same was observed for the blood glucose and AST and ALT activities, while some improvement was observed for a lipid profile, represented by reduction of triglycerides level by 15.07% and 33.50% in groups III and IV

  6. Preparation, Characterization and Evaluation of Quetiapine Fumarate Solid Lipid Nanoparticles to Improve the Oral Bioavailability

    Narala, Arjun; VEERABRAHMA, KISHAN

    2013-01-01

    Quetiapine fumarate is an antipsychotic drug with poor oral bioavailability (9%) due to first-pass metabolism. Present work is an attempt to improve oral bioavailability of quetiapine fumarate by incorporating in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). Six quetiapine fumarate SLN formulations were developed using three different lipids by hot homogenisation followed by ultrasonication. The drug excipient compatibility was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Stable quetiapine fumarate...

  7. Effects of lipids and oleic acid on biomass development in anaerobic fixed-bed reactors. Part II: Oleic acid toxicity and biodegradability.

    Alves, M M; Vieira, J A; Pereira, R M; Pereira, M A; Mota, M

    2001-01-01

    Oleic acid toxicity and biodegradability were followed during long-term operation of two similar anaerobic fixed-bed units. When treating an oleate based effluent, the sludge from the bioreactor that was acclimated with lipids during the first operation period, showed a higher tolerance to oleic acid toxicity (IC50 = 137 mg/l) compared with the sludge fed with a non-fat substrate (IC50 = 80 mg/l). This sludge showed also the highest biodegradation capacity of oleic acid, achieving maximum methane production rates between 33 and 46 mlCH4(STP)/gVS.day and maximum percentages of methanization between 85 and 98% for the range of concentrations between 500 and 900 mg oleate/l. When oleate was the sole carbon source fed to both digesters, the biomass became encapsulated with organic matter, possibly oleate or an intermediate of its degradation, e.g. stearate that was degraded at a maximum rate of 99 mlCH4(STP)/gVS.day. This suggests the possibility of using adsorption-degradation cycles for the treatment of LCFA based effluents. Both tolerance to toxicity and biodegradability of oleic acid were improved by acclimatization with lipids or oleate below a threshold concentration. PMID:11257881

  8. Remodeling lipid metabolism and improving insulin responsiveness in human primary myotubes.

    Lauren M Sparks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Disturbances in lipid metabolism are strongly associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. We hypothesized that activation of cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways in cultured human myotubes would provide further insight into regulation of lipid storage, lipolysis, lipid oxidation and insulin responsiveness. METHODS: Human myoblasts were isolated from vastus lateralis, purified, cultured and differentiated into myotubes. All cells were incubated with palmitate during differentiation. Treatment cells were pulsed 1 hour each day with forskolin and ionomycin (PFI during the final 3 days of differentiation to activate the cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways. Control cells were not pulsed (control. Mitochondrial content, (14C lipid oxidation and storage were measured, as well as lipolysis and insulin-stimulated glycogen storage. Myotubes were stained for lipids and gene expression measured. RESULTS: PFI increased oxidation of oleate and palmitate to CO(2 (p<0.001, isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis (p = 0.01, triacylglycerol (TAG storage (p<0.05 and mitochondrial DNA copy number (p = 0.01 and related enzyme activities. Candidate gene and microarray analysis revealed increased expression of genes involved in lipolysis, TAG synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis. PFI increased the organization of lipid droplets along the myofibrillar apparatus. These changes in lipid metabolism were associated with an increase in insulin-mediated glycogen storage (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways in myotubes induces a remodeling of lipid droplets and functional changes in lipid metabolism. These results provide a novel pharmacological approach to promote lipid metabolism and improve insulin responsiveness in myotubes, which may be of therapeutic importance for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  9. Equivalent Isopropanol Concentrations of Aromatic Amino Acids Interactions with Lipid Vesicles.

    Johnson, Merrell A; Ray, Bruce D; Wassall, Stephen R; Petrache, Horia I

    2015-08-01

    We show that the interaction of aromatic amino acids with lipid bilayers can be characterized by conventional 1D [Formula: see text]H NMR spectroscopy using reference spectra obtained in isopropanol-d8/D[Formula: see text]O solutions. We demonstrate the utility of this method with three different peptides containing tyrosine, tryptophan, or phenylalanine amino acids in the presence of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine lipid membranes. In each case, we determine an equivalent isopropanol concentration (EIC) for each hydrogen site of aromatic groups, in essence constructing a map of the chemical environment. These EIC maps provide information on relative affinities of aromatic side chains for either PC or PS bilayers and also inform on amino acid orientation preference when bound to membranes. PMID:25691267

  10. Prevention of cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid metabolic alterations in l-NAME hypertensive rats by sinapic acid-Role of HMG-CoA reductase.

    Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Raja, Boobalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-04-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of sinapic acid, a bioactive phenolic acid on high blood pressure associated cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid alterations in N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Sinapic acid was administered to rats orally at a dosage of 40mg/kg everyday for a period of 4 weeks. Sinapic acid treatment significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, organ weights (liver and kidney), lipid peroxidation products in tissues (liver and kidney), activities of hepatic marker enzymes and the levels of renal function markers in serum of l-NAME rats. Sinapic acid treatment also significantly increased the level of plasma nitric oxide metabolites, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in tissues of l-NAME rats. Tissue damage was assessed by histopathological examination. Alterations in plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, level of plasma lipoproteins and tissue lipids were corrected by sinapic acid treatment in l-NAME rats. Sinapic acid treatment significantly decreased the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in plasma and liver, whereas the activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase was significantly increased in the plasma of hypertensive rats. Docking result showed the interaction between sinapic acid and HMG-CoA reductase. Sinapic acid has shown best ligand binding energy of -5.5kcal/M. Moreover, in chick embryo model, sinapic acid improved vessel density on chorioallantoic membrane. These results of the present study concludes that sinapic acid acts as a protective agent against hypertension associated cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid alterations. PMID:26945821

  11. Characterization of lipids and fatty acids of the soil derived fungus Cladosporium sp.

    Verma, Shikha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Cladosporium sp. was explored for its potential ability to produce lipids, fatty acids and protein. The lipids were characterized by the quantification of acylglycerols and fatty acids. Alterations in lipid and protein accumulation were observed by changing the growth medium, carbon source type (glucose and dextrose and content, growth period and by developing salt stress through the incorporation of NaCl in the formulation of the medium. Lipid content was found to vary from 6.8 ± 0.3 to 27.3 ± 2.8%, w/w. The major fatty acids accumulated were palmitic, oleic and linoleic. The lipid fraction obtained from a Potato- dextrose medium (containing 2% dextrose and 4% NaCl accumulated 73.7 ± 3.7%, w/w, oleic acid. Some lipid fractions were found to have fatty acid ratios like saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated close to 1:1:1 w/w/w. Triacylglycerol was obtained as the major constituent of lipid fractions.El hongo Cladosporium sp. fue estudiado por a su potencial para producir lípidos, ácidos grasos y proteínas. Los lípidos fueron caracterizados por la cuantificación de acilgliceroles y ácidos grasos. Alteraciones en la acumulación de proteínas y lípidos fue observada por cambios en el medio de crecimiento, el tipo y contenido de la fuente de carbono (glucosa o dextrosa, el período de crecimiento y por desarrollo de estrés salino a través de la incorporación de NaCl en el medio de formulación. El contenido lipídico vario desde 6.8% ± 0.3 hasta 27.3% ± 2.8 %, w/w. Los principales ácidos grasos acumulados fueron ácido palmítico, oleico y linoleico. La fracción lipídica obtenida con el medio de patatadextrosa (conteniendo 2% dextrosa y 4% NaCl acumulo un 73.7% ± 3.7 w/w de ácido oleico. Algunas fracciones lipídicas encontradas tuvieron una proporción saturado: monoinsaturado: poliinsaturado cercana a 1:1:1 w/w/w. Los triglicérido fueron los principales constituyentes de la fracción lipídica.

  12. Improved Fatty Acid Profile Soybean MON 87705

    Directorate, Issued by Health Canada's Food

    2014-01-01

    Health Canada has notified Monsanto Canada Inc. that it has no objection to the food use of Improved Fatty Acid Profile Soybean MON 87705. The Department conducted a comprehensive assessment of this variety according to its Guidelines for the Safety Assessment of Novel Foods. These Guidelines are based upon internationally accepted principles for establishing the safety of foods with novel traits. The following provides a summary of the notification from Monsanto Ca...

  13. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% α-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+α-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid

  14. Gamma radiation effects on fattly acid composition of lipids in cotton leaves

    The mechanism of high irradiation dose (30 kR) effect on the lipid fatty acid composition of cotton leaves was studied in the ontogenesis. The experiment was carried out in vegetation vials (capacity 25 kg, humidity level - 65% of full water capacity). Before seeding, each vial was fertilized with 5g P2O5, 3g K2O and 5gN as an auxillary nutrition during vegetation. The test vials also contained 0.4 - 0.5 g CaO per kg of soil. A portion of irradiated seeds was soaked in 1.5% solution of CaO and Ca(NO3)2 before seeding. The cotton seeds were gamma-irradiated at 50 R/sec in the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Usbec SSR Academy of Sciences. The fatty acid composition of mature leaf lipids determined by gas-liquid chromatography proved to change in the blooming phase. Leaves of irradiated plants contained traces of myristic acid, higher levels of palmitic, palmitoleinic and strearinic acids and lower levels of oleinic and linoleic acids. Lower content of fatty acids with long carbon chains seemed to handicap the renewal of membranes and their components, especially in mitochondria. When irradiated seeds were soaked in calcium salt solution and CaO is added to the soil, the amount of unsaturated long chain fatty acids increased. The fact probably promotes the membrane renewal in irradiated plants

  15. Culture media optimization of Porphyridium purpureum: production potential of biomass, total lipids, arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    Kavitha, Mysore Doddaiah; Kathiresan, Shanmugam; Bhattacharya, Sila; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Porphyridium purpureum a red marine microalga is known for phycobiliproteins (PB), polyunsaturated fatty acids and sulphated exopolysaccharides. In the present study, effects of media constituents for the production of different polyunsaturated fatty acids from P. purpureum were considered using a response surface methodology (RSM). A second order polynomial was used to predict the response functions in terms of the independent variables such as the concentrations of sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The response functions were production of biomass yield, total lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids like arachidonic acid (AA 20:4) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5). Results corroborated that maximum Biomass (0.95 gL(-1)) yield was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (14.89 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (3.93 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (0.96 gL(-1)) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.09 gL(-1)). Optimum total lipid (17.9 % w/w) and EPA (34.6 % w/w) content was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (29.98 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (9.34 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (1.86 gL(-1)). Variation in concentration of potassium dihydrogen phosphate for both lipid (0.01gL(-1)) and EPA content (0.20 gL(-1)) was observed. The optimum conditions for biomass, total lipid, AA and EPA varied indicating their batch mode of growth and interaction effect of the salt. PMID:27407193

  16. Omega-3 enriched egg production: the effect of α -linolenic ω -3 fatty acid sources on laying hen performance and yolk lipid content and fatty acid composition.

    Antruejo, A; Azcona, J O; Garcia, P T; Gallinger, C; Rosmini, M; Ayerza, R; Coates, W; Perez, C D

    2011-12-01

    1. Diets high in total lipids, saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and having high ω-6:ω-3 fatty acid ratios, have been shown to be related to increased instances of coronary heart disease, while diets high in ω-3 fatty acids have been shown to decrease the risk. 2. Feeding ω-3 fatty acid diets to laying hens has been shown to improve the quality of eggs produced in terms of saturation and ω-3 content. 3. A study was undertaken to determine if the ω-3 fatty acid source, when fed to hens, influences the amount transferred to eggs. 4. Flaxseed and flaxseed oil, along with chia seed and chia seed oil, were the two main sources of ω-3 fatty acid examined during the 84 d trial. 5. All α-linolenic enriched treatments yielded significantly higher ω-3 fatty acid contents per g of yolk and per yolk, than the non-α-linolenic enriched diets. Chia oil and chia seed yielded 54·5 and 63·5% more mg of ω-3 fatty acid per g of yolk for the 56 d test period, and 13·4 and 66·2% more for the 84 d test period, than flaxseed oil and flaxseed, respectively. 6. The differences in omega-3 content were significant, except for the chia oil compared with the flax oil, at the end of the trial. 7. This trial has shown that differences in conversion exist among ω-3 fatty acid sources, at least when fed to hens, and indicates that chia may hold a significant potential as a source of ω-3 fatty acid for enriching foods, thereby making these foods a healthier choice for consumers. PMID:22221241

  17. Effect of a bovine lung surfactant protein isolate (SP-B/C) on egg phosphatidylglycerol acyl chain order in a lipid mixture with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitic acid.

    Krill, S L; Gupta, S L

    1994-04-01

    Dynamic surface tension measurements of films of a d62 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine:L-alpha-phosphatidyl-DL - glycerol:d31 palmitic acid (d62-DPPC:EggPG:d31-PA) lipid matrix in the presence of a bovine pulmonary surfactant protein isolate (SP-B/C) demonstrate the improved surface activity over that of the lipids alone. Thus, significant interaction of the proteins with the lipid matrix is demonstrated. The effect of SP-B/C on the acyl chain order of the negatively charged EggPG within a d62-DPPC:EggPG:d31-PA lipid matrix in D2O saline was investigated in thermal perturbation Fourier transform IR spectroscopic studies. The EggPG thermotropic phase behavior was determined independently of the other lipid components with perdeuterated lipids and D2O. The data demonstrate the high degree of EggPG acyl chain disorder in the absence of the protein isolate. A broad transition occurs between 30 and 40 degrees C. The addition of the protein isolate did not alter the acyl chain order at 0.281 and 1.46 mg/mL of protein. However, alterations in the lipid carbonyl vibrational mode were observed. PMID:8046609

  18. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats

    HOSOMI, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding...

  19. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    Atigadda, Venkatram R.; Xia, Gang; Desphande, Anil; Boerma, LeeAnn J.; Lobo-Ruppert, Susan; Grubbs, Clinton J.; Smith, Craig D; Brouillette, Wayne J.; Muccio, Donald D.

    2014-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-pos...

  20. Lipid Body Organelles within the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: A Role for Intracellular Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    Toledo, Daniel A. M.; Roque, Natália R.; Teixeira, Lívia; Milán-Garcés, Erix A.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Almeida, Mariana R.; Andrade, Gustavo F. S.; Martins, Jefferson S.; Pinho, Roberto R.; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; D’Avila, Heloisa

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells contain varying amounts of cytosolic lipidic inclusions termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets (LDs). In mammalian cells, such as macrophages, these lipid-rich organelles are formed in response to host-pathogen interaction during infectious diseases and are sites for biosynthesis of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). Less clear are the functions of LBs in pathogenic lower eukaryotes. In this study, we demonstrated that LBs, visualized by light microscopy with different probes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are produced in trypomastigote forms of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas’ disease, after both host interaction and exogenous AA stimulation. Quantitative TEM revealed that LBs from amastigotes, the intracellular forms of the parasite, growing in vivo have increased size and electron-density compared to LBs from amastigotes living in vitro. AA-stimulated trypomastigotes released high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and showed PGE2 synthase expression. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated increased unsaturated lipid content and AA incorporation in stimulated parasites. Moreover, both Raman and MALDI mass spectroscopy revealed increased AA content in LBs purified from AA-stimulated parasites compared to LBs from unstimulated group. By using a specific technique for eicosanoid detection, we immunolocalized PGE2 within LBs from AA-stimulated trypomastigotes. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LBs from the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are not just lipid storage inclusions but dynamic organelles, able to respond to host interaction and inflammatory events and involved in the AA metabolism. Acting as sources of PGE2, a potent immunomodulatory lipid mediator that inhibits many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, newly-formed parasite LBs may be implicated with the pathogen survival in its host. PMID:27490663

  1. Nicotinic acid supplementation in diet favored intramuscular fat deposition and lipid metabolism in finishing steers.

    Yang, Zhu-Qing; Bao, Lin-Bin; Zhao, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Can-Yu; Zhou, Shan; Wen, Lu-Hua; Fu, Chuan-Bian; Gong, Jian-Ming; Qu, Ming-Ren

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) acting as the precursor of NAD(+)/NADH and NADP(+)/NADPH, participates in many biochemical processes, e.g. lipid metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary NA on carcass traits, meat quality, blood metabolites, and fat deposition in Chinese crossbred finishing steers. Sixteen steers with the similar body weight and at the age of 24 months were randomly allocated into control group (feeding basal diet) and NA group (feeding basal diet + 1000 mg/kg NA). All experimental cattle were fed a 90% concentrate diet and 10% forage straw in a 120-day feeding experiment. The results showed that supplemental NA in diet increased longissimus area, intramuscular fat content (17.14% vs. 9.03%), marbling score (8.08 vs. 4.30), redness (a*), and chroma (C*) values of LD muscle, but reduced carcass fat content (not including imtramuscular fat), pH24 h and moisture content of LD muscle, along with no effect on backfat thickness. Besides, NA supplementation increased serum HDL-C concentration, but decreased the serum levels of LDL-C, triglyceride, non-esterified fatty acid, total cholesterol, and glycated serum protein. In addition, NA supplementation increased G6PDH and ICDH activities of LD muscle. These results suggested that NA supplementation in diet improves the carcass characteristics and beef quality, and regulates the compositions of serum metabolites. Based on the above results, NA should be used as the feed additive in cattle industry. PMID:27048556

  2. Efficacy of boswellic acid on lysosomal acid hydrolases, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant status in gouty arthritic mice

    Evan Prince Sabina; Haridas Indu; Mahaboobkhan Rasool

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the efficacy of boswellic acid against monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in mice. Methods:The mice were divided into four experimental groups. Group I served as control;mice in group II were injected with monosodium urate crystal;group III consisted of monosodium urate crystal-induced mice who were treated with boswellic acid (30 mg/kg/b.w.);group IV comprised monosodium urate crystal-induced mice who were treated with indomethacin (3 mg/kg/b.w.). Paw volume and levels/activities of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidant status and inflammatory mediator TNF-αwere determined in control and monosodium urate crystal-induced mice. In addition, the levels of β-glucuronidase and lactate dehydrogenase were also measured in monosodium urate crystal-incubated polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) in vitro. Results:The activities of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and tumour necrosis factor-αlevels and paw volume were increased significantly in monosodium urate crystal-induced mice, whereas the activities of antioxidant status were in turn decreased. However, these changes were modulated to near normal levels upon boswellic acid administration. In vitro, boswellic acid reduced the level of β-glucuronidase and lactate dehydrogenase in monosodium urate crystal-incubated PMNL in concentration dependent manner when compared with control cells. Conclusions: The results obtained in this study further strengthen the anti-inflammatory/antiarthritic effect of boswellic acid, which was already well established by several investigators.

  3. Fatty acid composition in leaf lipids of some Carex L. (Cyperaceae species from Northeast Anatolia (Turkey

    Olgun, Arzu

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid composition of 16 species of Carex from 15 sections are reported. The palmitic acid is the dominant fatty acid in lipid of all species and sections surveyed. The linoleic and linolenic acids were the second most abundant fatty acids. Taxonomic value and phylogenetic implications of results are discussed.Se presenta la composición en ácidos grasos de 16 especies de Carex (de 15 secciones. El ácido palmítico es el ácido graso dominante en los lípidos de todas las especies examinadas, seguidos por los ácidos linoleico y linolenico. El valor taxonómico y las implicaciones filogenéticas de los resultados son discutidos.

  4. Investigation of the roles of the substances in serum lipids and their constitutive fatty acids in chronic urticaria.

    Kobayashi, S

    1989-06-01

    The newly-generated lipid mediators include products of arachidonate metabolism, prostaglandins and leukotrienes. In this study, serum lipids and fatty acids, including arachidonic acid (C20:4) were examined in 12 normal subjects (6 males and 6 females) and 23 subjects with chronic urticaria (6 males and 17 females), including 17 who made an excellent or good recovery (4 males and 13 females). The results indicated a relationship between chronic urticaria and serum lipids and fatty acids. The omega 6 (n-6) and omega 3 (n-3) series of polyunsaturated fatty acids and lipid peroxidation were suggested that may be one of the mediators in chronic urticaria. Pantethine, glutathione and ascorbic acid were effective in controlling chronic urticaria. PMID:2794222

  5. Pectin-lipid self-assembly: influence on the formation of polyhydroxy fatty acids nanoparticles.

    Susana Guzman-Puyol

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles, named cutinsomes, have been prepared from aleuritic (9,10,16-trihidroxipalmitic acid and tomato fruit cutin monomers (a mixture of mainly 9(10,16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (85%, w/w and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (7.5%, w/w with pectin in aqueous solution. The process of formation of the nanoparticles of aleuritic acid plus pectin has been monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, while their chemical and morphological characterization was analyzed by ATR-FTIR, TEM, and non-contact AFM. The structure of these nanoparticles can be described as a lipid core with a pectin shell. Pectin facilitated the formation of nanoparticles, by inducing their aggregation in branched chains and favoring the condensation between lipid monomers. Also, pectin determined the self-assembly of cutinsomes on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG surfaces, causing their opening and forming interconnected structures. In the case of cutin monomers, the nanoparticles are fused, and the condensation of the hydroxy fatty acids is strongly affected by the presence of the polysaccharide. The interaction of pectin with polyhydroxylated fatty acids could be related to an initial step in the formation of the plant biopolyester cutin.

  6. Lipid Peroxidation Inhibitation Activity of Maillard Reaction Products Derived from Sugar-amino Acid Model Systems

    Nanjing Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the lipid peroxidation inhibitation activity of Maillard Reaction Products (MRPs derived from sugar (glucose, fructose, lactose and maltose and 18 amino acid model systems in soybean oil. MRPs were produced by heating at 130°C for 2 h. Of the 18 amino acids-fructose model systems studied, MRPs derived from fructose-leucine, fructose-methionine, fructose-phenylalanine and fructose-isoleucine model sytems showed high lipid peroxidation inhibitation activity and best performance was observed from fructose-phenylalanine MRPs. Interestingly, glucose-phenylalanine MRPs also exhibited high inhibitation activity and inhibitation activity of both glucose-phenylalanine and fructose-phenylalanine MRPs exceeded 87% even with concentration at 1.1 wt % after 8 days storage.

  7. Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid decreases de novo lipid synthesis in human adipocytes

    Obsen, Thomas; Faergeman, Nils J; Chung, Soonkyu;

    2012-01-01

    ,12 CLA, but not 9,11 CLA, decreased total cellular lipids within 3 days and the ratio of monounsaturated FA (MUFA) to saturated FA, and increased C18:0 acyl-CoA levels within 24 h. Consistent with these data, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1 mRNA and protein levels were down-regulated by 10,12 CLA within......Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces adiposity in vivo. However, mechanisms mediating these changes are unclear. Therefore, we treated cultures of human adipocytes with trans-10, cis-12 (10,12) CLA, cis-9, trans-11 (9,11) CLA or other trans fatty acids (FA), and measured indices of lipid...... is due, in part, to the rapid repression of lipogenic transcription factors that regulate MUFA synthesis, suggesting an anti-obesity mechanism unique to this trans FA....

  8. Lipid and fatty acid digestibility in Calanus copepod and krill oil by Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.)

    Colombo-Hixson, Stefanie M.; Olsen, Rolf Erik; Milley, Joyce E.; Lall, Santosh P

    2010-01-01

    Marine zooplankton represent a significant biomass of marine lipid that could supply lipid in diets for farmed marine fish. Digestibility of lipid and fatty acids of the copepod, Calanus finmarchicus and Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba by farmed juvenile Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) was investigated. Halibut were fed diets containing one of the following test oils at 15% inclusion level: fish oil (FO), Calanus copepod oil (CO) and Euphausia krill oil (KO). KO contained the ...

  9. Production of lipids containing high levels of docosahexaenoic acid from empty palm fruit bunches by Aurantiochytrium sp. KRS101.

    Hong, Won-Kyung; Yu, Anna; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Oh, Baek-Rock; Kim, Chul Ho; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Yang, Ji-Won; Kondo, Akihiko; Seo, Jeong-Woo

    2013-07-01

    The oleaginous microalga Aurantiochytrium sp. KRS101 was cultivated in enzymatic hydrolysates of alkali-pretreated empty palm fruit bunches (EFBs), without prior detoxification process. The maximal levels of lipid and docosahexaenoic acid synthesized were 12.5 and 5.4 g L⁻¹ after cultivation for 36 h. Similar lipid levels were also obtained via simultaneous saccharification and cultivation. The results suggested that EFB is a promising source for production of useful lipids by the microalgal strain. PMID:23053417

  10. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of (lyso)phosphatidic acids, (lyso)phosphatidylserines and other lipid classes.

    Cífková, Eva; Hájek, Roman; Lísa, Miroslav; Holčapek, Michal

    2016-03-25

    The goal of this work is a systematic optimization of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation of acidic lipid classes (namely phosphatidic acids-PA, lysophosphatidic acids-LPA, phosphatidylserines-PS and lysophosphatidylserines-LPS) and other lipid classes under mass spectrometry (MS) compatible conditions. The main parameters included in this optimization are the type of stationary phases used in HILIC, pH of the mobile phase, the type and concentration of mobile phase additives. Nine HILIC columns with different chemistries (unmodified silica, modified silica using diol, 2-picolylamine, diethylamine and 1-aminoanthracene and hydride silica) are compared with the emphasis on peak shapes of acidic lipid classes. The optimization of pH is correlated with the theoretical calculation of acidobasic equilibria of studied lipid classes. The final method using the hydride column, pH 4 adjusted by formic acid and the gradient of acetonitrile and 40mmol/L of aqueous ammonium formate provides good peak shapes for all analyzed lipid classes including acidic lipids. This method is applied for the identification of lipids in real samples of porcine brain and kidney extracts. PMID:26858118

  11. Skeletal muscle structural lipids improve during weight-maintenance after a very low calorie dietary intervention

    Haugaard, Steen B; Vaag, Allan; Mu, Huiling; Madsbad, Sten

    2009-01-01

    SMPL omega-3 FA, which is a lipid entity that influences insulin action. METHODS: Nine obese subjects (BMI = 35.7 +/- 1.0 kg/m(2)), who had completed an 8 weeks VLCD (weight-loss = -9.7 +/- 1.6 kg, P < 0.001), had obtained skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) before and after a dietician......-guided 24-weeks weight-maintenance program (-1.2 +/- 1.5 kg, P = ns). SMPL FA composition was determined by gas liquid chromatography. During the preceding VLCD, insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) and glycemic control (HbA1c) improved but no change in SMPL omega-3 FA was observed. During the weight......-maintenance program five subjects received the pancreas lipase inhibitor Orlistat 120 mg t.i.d. versus placebo. RESULTS: HOMA-IR and HbA1c stabilized and SMPL total omega-3 FA, docosahexaenoic acid and ratio of n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated FA increased by 24% (P < 0.01), 35% (P < 0.02) and 26% (P < 0.01), respectively...

  12. Platelet activation and platelet-monocyte aggregate formation by the atherosclerotic plaque lipid lysophosphatidic acid

    Haserück, Nadine

    2007-01-01

    Oxidized LDL and platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiovascular diseases. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a thrombogenic substance that accumulates in mildly-oxidized LDL and in human atherosclerotic lesions, and is responsible for the initial platelet activation, shape change, induced by mildly-oxidized LDL and extracts of lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques (Siess et al., 1999 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1999). LPA directly induced platelet shape c...

  13. Fatty Acid Desaturase 1 (FADS1) Gene Polymorphisms Control Human Hepatic Lipid Composition

    Wang, Libo; Athinarayanan, Shaminie; Jiang, Guanglong; Chalasani, Naga; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) genes and their variants have been associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes including liver enzymes and hepatic fat accumulation but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to delineate the role of FADSs in modulating lipid composition in human liver. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of a variety of phospholipids, sphingolipids and ceramides among 154 human liver tissue samples. The associations between previously Genome-wide Association St...

  14. Status of lipid peroxidation, glutathione, ascorbic acid, vitamin E and antioxidant enzymes in patients with osteoarthritis

    Surapaneni Krishna; Venkataramana G

    2007-01-01

    Background : The exact pro-oxidant and antioxidant status in osteoarthritis patients is still not clear. To add a new insight to the question, changes in the erythrocyte lipid peroxidation products (MDA), levels of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid and plasma vitamin E (nonenzymatic antioxidant parameters); and activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase in erythrocytes and plasma glutathione - S - transferase (GST) were measured in pati...

  15. Supplemental N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in diet: their influence on lipid metabolism in the rat

    Rauchová, Hana; Pavelka, Stanislav; Vokurková, Martina; Tribulová, N.; Soukup, Tomáš

    Bratislava: Slovak University of Technology, 2013, s. 140-145. ISBN 978-80-227-3959-7. [Industrial Toxicology 2013 /33./. Svit, Vysoké Tatry (SK), 19.06.2013-21.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : lipid metabolism * n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids * thyroid hormones Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  16. Determination of Total Lipids as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME) by in situ Transesterification: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure is based on a whole biomass transesterification of lipids to fatty acid methyl esters to represent an accurate reflection of the potential of microalgal biofuels. Lipids are present in many forms and play various roles within an algal cell, from cell membrane phospholipids to energy stored as triacylglycerols.

  17. Dietary α-linolenic acid-rich flaxseed oil prevents against alcoholic hepatic steatosis via ameliorating lipid homeostasis at adipose tissue-liver axis in mice

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Feng, Kun; He, Chengwei; Li, Peng; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in serum and liver tissue biopsies are the common characteristics in patients with alcoholic liver disease. The α-linolenic acid (ALA) is a plant-derived n-3 PUFA and is rich in flaxseed oil. However, the impact of ALA on alcoholic fatty liver is largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the potential protective effects of ALA-rich flaxseed oil (FO) on ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and observed that dietary FO supplementation effectively attenuated the ethanol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in mice. Ethanol exposure stimulated adipose lipolysis but reduced fatty acid/lipid uptake, which were normalized by FO. Our investigations into the corresponding mechanisms demonstrated that the ameliorating effect of FO might be associated with the lower endoplasmic reticulum stress and normalized lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. In the liver, alcohol exposure stimulated hepatic fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis, which were attenuated by FO. Additionally, dietary FO upregulated plasma adiponectin concentration, hepatic adiponectin receptor 2 expression, and the activation of hepatic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Collectively, dietary FO protects against alcoholic hepatic steatosis by improving lipid homeostasis at the adipose tissue-liver axis, suggesting that dietary ALA-rich flaxseed oil might be a promising approach for prevention of alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:27220557

  18. Role of forage species and conservation method in ruminal lipid metabolism, mammary lipogenesis and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows

    Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, Anni

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to develop forage-rich diets for dairy cows for altering milk fatty acid composition, with the potential to improve human health. Emphasis was placed on the potential to decrease milk fat medium chain saturated fatty acids (SFA; 12:0, 14:0 and 16:0) and increase cis-9 18:1 and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) concentrations, 18:3n-3 in particular. Experiments encompassed detailed investigations of ruminal and mammary lipid metabolis...

  19. Simultaneous improvement in production of microalgal biodiesel and high-value alpha-linolenic acid by a single regulator acetylcholine

    Parsaeimehr, Ali; Sun, Zhilan; Dou, Xiao; Chen, Yi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Photoautotrophic microalgae are a promising avenue for sustained biodiesel production, but are compromised by low yields of biomass and lipids at present. We are developing a chemical approach to improve microalgal accumulation of feedstock lipids as well as high-value alpha-linolenic acid which in turn might provide a driving force for biodiesel production. Results We demonstrate the effectiveness of the small bioactive molecule “acetylcholine” on accumulation of biomass, total li...

  20. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids affect tissue lipid composition but not de novo lipogenesis in finishing pigs

    Bee, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Influence de l'apport des acides linoléiques conjugués dans l'alimentation sur la composition des tissus adipeux et la lipogenèse de novo chez les porcs en finition. Plusieurs travaux ont révélé que les acides linoléiques conjugués (conjugated linoleic acids : CLA) ont une influence importante sur le métabolisme des lipides et des protéines. En revanche, les effets des CLA sur le profil des acides gras dans les tissus adipeux chez le porc sont peu connus. Dans cette étude, nous avons détermin...

  1. Short term exposure to perluoroalkyl acids causes increase of hepatic lipid and triglyceride in conjunction with liver hypertrophy

    ABSTRACT BODY: Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to extensive use of industrial and consumer products. These chemicals activate peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-alpha (PPARa) in liver and after lipid metabolism. The current stu...

  2. Vitamins C and E Improve Regrowth and Reduce Lipid Peroxidation of Blackberry Shoot Tips Following Cryopreservation

    Oxidative processes involved in cryopreservation protocols may be responsible for the reduced viability of tissues after liquid nitrogen (LN) exposure. Antioxidants that counteract these reactions should improve recovery. This study focused on oxidative lipid injury and the effects of exogenous vit...

  3. Total lipids and fatty acid profile in the liver of wild and farmed catla catla fish

    Hassan, M.; Shaihid chatha, S. A.; Tahira, I.; Hussain, B.

    2010-07-01

    This experimental work was aimed to study the moisture content, total lipids and fatty acid profile in the liver of wild and farmed freshwater major carp Catla catla of three different weight categories designated as W{sub 1} (601-900g), W{sub 2} (901- 1200)g and W{sub 3} (1201-1500g). Seven fish specimens of each of the three weight categories of wild and farmed Catla catla were obtained from Trimu Head, Jhang and Fish Hatchery, Satiana Road and Faisalabad, respectively. The fish were dissected to remove the liver and after weighing, liver samples were prepared and subjected to chemical analysis. Wild Catla catla liver had a significantly (p <0.05) higher moisture content as compared to the farmed species. Farmed Catla catla deposited significantly (p < 0.05) higher lipid contents in liver. Proportions of saturated fatty acids varied irregularly in the lipids of the liver from both wild and farmed Catla catla. Saturated fatty acids C12:0, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C20:0 and C22:0 were identified with considerable percentages in the liver of Catla catla from both habitats and monounsaturated fatty acid C18:1 was found in considerable amounts in the liver of both major carp. Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as C18:3 (n-6) and C20: 2 (n-6) were detected in the liver of the wild fish of W{sub 2} and W{sub 3} and was similar in the W{sub 3} weight category of the farmed species. (Author) 22 refs.

  4. Correlation between leptin level with lipid profile and free fatty acid in liver cirrhosis patients

    Siti Maryani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is a common condition in liver cirrhotic patients. Leptin regulates body weightphysiologically by suppressing appetite and increasing energy expenditure. Leptin is higher in femalethan male. Studies have shown correlation between leptin with metabolic factors like body massindex (BMI and lipid profile in cirrhotic patients. This study was conducted to investigate thecorrelation between serum leptin levels with lipid profile and free fatty acid in male patients with livercirrhosis. This was a cross sectional study that conducted at Gastroentero-Hepatology Clinic andInternal Ward at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta. The inclusion criteria were patients withliver cirrhosis > 18 years old, male, with Child-Pugh classification B and C, and provided informedconsent. The exclusion criteria were liver cirrhotic patients with comorbidity chronic kidney disease,chronic heart failure, diabetic, cancer, infection/septic, pregnancy, breast feeding, and steroid use.Data collecting was performed by anamnesis, physical examination, abdominal ultrasonographyexamination, and blood chemistry test. Pearson test was used to evaluate the correlation betweenthe serum leptin level with the lipid profile and free fatty acid. The results showed that no significantnegative correlation was observed between the serum leptin level with the total cholesterol (r= -0.052; p=0.766, high-density lipoprotein/HDL (r= -0.078; p=0.658 and triglyceride (r= -0.170; p=0.328 in male patients with liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, no significant positive correlationwas observed between the serum leptin levels with the low-density lipoprotein/LDL (r= -0.013; p=0.942 and free fatty acid/FFA (r= 0.007; p=0.968. In conclusion, there was no correlationbetween serum leptin levels with lipid profile and FFA in male patients with liver cirrhosis.

  5. PPARd IS A LIPID SENSOR AND A REGULATOR OF FATTY ACID OXIDATION IN PANCREATIC β-CELLS

    Ravnskjær, Kim; Nielsen, Tina; Børgesen, Michael; Mandrup, Susanne

    islets and in the insulinoma cell line INS-1E. This is reflected at the functional level in activity assays using a PPRE-driven luciferase reporter construct. The fatty acids oleic, arachidonic and linolenic acid are able to acivate this construct synergistically with the synthetic RXR agonist LG100268......-oleate oxidation. The current observations suggest that PPARd is an important lipid sensor and regulator of lipid oxidation in pancreatic b-cells....

  6. Elucidation and identification of amino acid containing membrane lipids using liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Moore, E.K.; Hopmans, E.C.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Villanueva, L; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Intact polar lipids (IPLs) are the building blocks of cell membranes, and amino acid containing IPLs havebeen observed to be involved in response to changing environmental conditions in various species of bacteri a. High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) has become the primary method for analysis ofIPLs. Many glycerol-free amino acid containing membrane lipids (AA-IPLs), which are structurally different thanabundant aminophospholipids, have not been char...

  7. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of Mediterranean macro-algae as dynamic factors for biodiesel production

    Dahlia M. El Maghraby; Eman M. Fakhry

    2015-01-01

    Using the total lipid contents and fatty acid profiles, the marine macro-algae Jania rubens (Rhodophyceae), Ulva linza (Chlorophyceae) and Padina pavonica (Phaeophyceae) were evaluated for biodiesel production during the spring, summer and autumn. Seawater parameters such as pH, salinity and temperature were measured. The total lipid content varied from 1.56% (J. rubens) to 4.14% (U. linza) of dry weight, with the highest values occurring in spring. The fatty acid methyl ester profiles were a...

  8. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation: lipid content and hepatic histology in healthy Wistar rats

    Lilia Ferreira Santos-Zago

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the effects of the consumption of two commercial conjugated linoleic acid (CLA mixtures on lipid content and liver histology of healthy rats. The investigation was carried out using thirty rats divided into three groups: C (control, AE (AdvantEdge®CLA, and CO (CLA One®. The concentration of CLA was 2% of feed consumption, and the animals were supplemented daily for 42 days. The total lipid content of the liver was determined, and the histology of the organ was examined by Transmission Electronic Microscopy. The results of total liver lipid contents did not exhibit significant differences between the groups. With regard to hepatic histology, it was observed that although fat globules were visibly present in higher numbers and bigger size in the CLA groups, the organ histology was considered normal since both cytoplasm and organelles showed integrity. It was concluded that even though liver microscopic images indicated the presence of fat globules in the liver, from a statistical point of view, the supplementation for 42 days did not bring about lipid accumulation, nor did it alter hepatic histology.

  9. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  10. Fatty Acid Profiling of Lipid A Isolated from Indigenous salmonella typhi strain by gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    Typhoid, caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), is a major health problem worldwide especially in developing countries. Lipopolysaccharides are one of the main virulence factors of S. Typhi. Hydrophobic lipid A anchors the lipopolysaccharides into the bacterial outer membrane and also serves as the epicenter of endotoxicity, which is linked to the presence of several fatty acid chains. Fatty acid profiling is, therefore, very important to understand the endotoxicity of these pathogenic bacteria. To profile lipid A with respect to its fatty acid constituents, a S. Typhi was isolated from blood culture of a typhoid patient from the Faisalabad region of Pakistan. After its complete identification using biochemical and molecular techniques, this bacterium was cultivated in a fermentor. The cell pellet obtained was subjected to hot phenol process to extract and purify lipopolysaccharides. Acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharides yielded lipid A, which was subjected to analyses using GC-MS after derivatization into their fatty acid methyl esters. The fatty acid methyl esters were identified on the basis of their retention times, compared with standards as well as characteristic mass fragmentation patterns of their respective mass spectra. This fatty acid profiling revealed the occurrence of dodecanoic acid (C12:0), tetradecanoic acid (C14:0), 3-hydroxy tetradecanoic acid (3-OH C14:0) and hexadecanoic acid (C16:0) in the lipid A component of S. Typhi strain with the relative percentage abundances 8.5%, 12.5%, 55.9% and 23.1%, respectively. (author)

  11. Monthly Changes of Glycogen, Lipid and Free Amino Acid of Oyster

    ZHANG Zhicui; XUE Changhu; GAO Xin; LI Zhaojie; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    Monthly difference of the chemical composition of oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was analyzed.The components analyzed included glycogen, fatty acid and free amino acid (FAA).The content of glycogen was high in January and March (2.89 and 2.82 g(100 g)- 1 on average, respectively) and low in October (2.07 g(100 g)- 1 on average).The low content of neutral lipids in October reflected a relatively poor nutritional value of oyster (1.42 g(100 g) -1 on average).The main fatty acids of oyster were palmitic acid(16:0),oleic acid(18:1),eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA,20:5w-3) and docosahexaenoic acid(DHA,22:6w-3).The major FAAs of oyster were Taurine,Glutamicacid,Glycin,Alanine, Arginine and Proline.Taurine was the most abundant FAA with its content ranging from 603 mg(100 g)- 1 to 1139 mg(100 g) -1.The high contents of glycogen, polyunsaturated fatty acid and FAA showed that oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was nutritionally good in January and March.

  12. Monthly changes of glycogen, lipid and free amino acid of oyster

    Zhicui, Zhang; Changhu, Xue; Xin, Gao; Zhaojie, Li; Qi, Wang

    2006-07-01

    Monthly difference of the chemical composition of oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was analyzed. The components analyzed included glycogen, fatty acid and free amino acid (FAA). The content of glycogen was high in January and March (2.89 and 2.82 g(100g)-1 on average, respectively) and low in October (2.07 g(100g)-1 on avarage). The low content of neutral lipids in October reflected a relatively poor nutritional value of oyster (1.42 g(100 g)-1 on average). The main fatty acids of oyster were palmitic acid (16:0), oleic acid (18:1), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20: 5ω-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6ω-3). The major FAAs of oyster were Taurine, Glutamicacid, Glycin, Alanine, Arginine and Proline. Taurine was the most abundant FAA with its content ranging from 603 mg (100g)-1 to 1139 mg(100g)-1. The high contents of glycogen, polyunsaturated fatty acid and FAA showed that oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was nutritionally good in January and March.

  13. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in rats: Lipid analyses and lipase activities in liver and spleen

    We report the biological characterization of an animal model of a genetic lipid storage disease analogous to human Wolman's disease. Affected rats accumulated cholesteryl esters (13.3-fold), free cholesterol (2.8-fold), and triglycerides (5.4-fold) in the liver, as well as cholesteryl esters (2.5-fold) and free cholesterol (1.33-fold) in the spleen. Triglycerides did not accumulate, and the levels actually decreased in the spleen. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides showed high percentages of linoleic acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) in both organs, especially in the liver. No accumulation of phospholipids, neutral glycosphingolipids, or gangliosides was found in the affected rats. Acid lipase activity for [14C]triolein, [14C]cholesteryl oleate, and 4-methyl-umbelliferyl oleate was deficient in both the liver and spleen of affected rats. Lipase activity at neutral pH was normal in both liver and spleen. Heterozygous rats showed intermediate utilization of these substrates in both organs at levels between those for affected rats and those for normal controls, although they did not accumulate any lipids. These data suggest that these rats represent an animal counterpart of Wolman's disease in humans

  14. EFFECTS OF HARVEST STAGE ON THE TOTAL LIPID AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF FOUR CYLINDROTHECA STRAINS

    梁英; 麦康森; 孙世春

    2002-01-01

    Four strains of Cylindrotheca (B156, B164, B196, and B200) wereharvested at three phases in the growth curve and their total lipid and fatty acid composition were determined. Total lipid reached highest values in the late stationary phase in B156 (24.0%), B164 (26.6%) and B200 (17.3%), in the exponential phase in B196 (15.5%). Saturated fatty acids increased with the development of the culture in B156 and B196, and reached their highest values in the late stationary phase in B156 (41.7%) and B196 (45.1%), in the early stationary phase in B164 (45.4%) and B200 (37.6%). Monounsaturated fatty acids increased with the development of the culture in B196 and B200, and reached their highest values inthe late stationary phase in B196 (32.4%) and B200 (32.8%), in the early stationary phase in B164 (31.0%) and in the exponential phase in B156 (29.3%). Polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased in the later phases of the culture in B164, B196 and B200, and peaked in the exponential phase in B164 (29.5%), B196 (42.9%) and B200 (37.3%), and in the early stationary phase in B156 (32.0%). ``

  15. Understanding interactions of oleic acid with basic drugs in solid lipids on different biopharmaceutical levels

    Zdravka Misic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the impact of intestinal supersaturation on absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs has raised much interest among researchers. A focus has been mostly to study excipient effects on maintenance of drug supersaturation. The aim of the present study was to better understand the effects of drug-excipient interactions on the level of the anhydrous formulation, upon dispersion in simple buffer media and, in particular, regarding precipitation kinetics. A solid lipid-based formulation comprising PEG-32 stearate and oleic acid (OA (8:2 w/w was developed as a model. Loratadine (pKa = 4.33 and carvedilol (pKa = 8.74 were chosen as basic drugs. UV/FTIR spectroscopy and viscometry were used to characterize drug-OA molecular interactions in solution, while solid formulations were studied using x-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and van’t Hoff solubility-temperature plots. Precipitation kinetics of drug formulations was real-time monitored in phosphate buffer (pH = 6.5 by focused beam reflectance measurements. It was found that the addition of OA in the formulations resulted in substantial drug solubility increase. Although the drug-OA interactions appeared to be partially lost upon formulation dispersion, the extent of precipitation was markedly lowered compared to the formulations without OA. A Precipitation number (Pnc was introduced as a ratio of a relevant residence time of drug in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT to the induction time (the onset time of crystalline precipitation. Without OA, Pnc was already taking critical values (>1, while the anhydrous formulation was still below saturation for both model drugs. Interestingly, the addition of OA resulted in amorphous instead of crystalline precipitates, which is advantageous for drug re-dissolution and absorption. In conclusion, this study provides an improved understanding of OA and basic drug interactions on different levels of in vitro performance for more rational oral formulation

  16. Improved hepatic lipid composition following short-term exercise in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas; Kelly, Karen R;

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, low levels of polyunsaturated lipids, and adiponectin are implicated in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Objective: We examined the effects of short-term aerobic exercise on these metabolic risk factors...... to assess reactive oxygen species production during the OGTT. Circulating glucose, insulin, and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin were determined from plasma. Main Outcome: Short-term aerobic exercise training improved hepatic lipid composition in patients with NAFLD. Results: Exercise training...... after the exercise program and the increase was positively correlated with the increase in liver PUI (r = 0.52, P = .05). Body weight remained stable during the program (P > .05). Conclusion: Short-term exercise can target hepatic lipid composition, which may reduce the risk of NAFLD progression...

  17. Catanionic lipid nanosystems improve pharmacokinetics and anti-lung cancer activity of curcumin.

    Li, Songlin; Fang, Chunshu; Zhang, Jingqing; Liu, Bilin; Wei, Zhuanqin; Fan, Xiaoqing; Sui, Zheng; Tan, Qunyou

    2016-08-01

    Novel catanionic lipid nanosystems (CLNs) incorporating curcumin (CCM) were developed, and improvements in pharmacokinetics and enhanced anti-lung cancer activity were observed. CCM was present in a lipid matrix surrounded by cationic, anionic and zwitterionic surfactants, forming the core-shell nanosystems. Compared with free CCM, the CCM-CLNs had much higher oral and intravenous bioavailabilities due to enhanced absorption and reduced clearance. The CCM-CLNs exhibited greater cytotoxicity in Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells, which might have been due to increased antiproliferative, proapoptotic and anti-invasive activities and induction of cell cycle arrest. The CCM-CLNs increased the antitumor efficacy of CCM and decreased the tumor growth rate in tumor-bearing mice. This is the first report of induction of apoptosis in LLC cells by CCM through the PI3K/Akt/FoxO1/Bim signaling pathway. Catanionic lipid nanocarriers show promise for the therapeutic delivery of insoluble anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26995093

  18. Perturbations in polar lipids, starvation survival and reproduction following exposure to unsaturated fatty acids or environmental toxicants in Daphnia magna.

    Sengupta, Namrata; Gerard, Patrick D; Baldwin, William S

    2016-02-01

    Acclimating to toxicant stress is energy expensive. In laboratory toxicology tests dietary conditions are ideal, but not in natural environments where nutrient resources vary in quality and quantity. We compared the effects of additional lipid resources, docosahexaenoic acid (n-3; DHA) or linoleic acid (n-6; LA), or the effects of the toxicants, atrazine or triclosan on post-treatment starvation survival, reproduction, and lipid profiles. Chemical exposure prior to starvation had chemical-specific effects as DHA showed moderately beneficial effects on starvation survival and all of the other chemicals showed adverse effects on either survival or reproduction. Surprisingly, pre-exposure to triclosan inhibits adult maturation and in turn completely blocks reproduction during the starvation phase. The two HR96 activators tested, atrazine and LA adversely reduce post-reproduction survival 70% during starvation and in turn show poor fecundity. DHA and LA show distinctly different lipid profiles as DHA primarily increases the percentage of large (>37 carbon) phosphatidylcholine (PC) species and LA primarily increases the percentage of smaller (triclosan moderately perturb a large number of different phospholipids including several phosphatidylethanolamine species. Some of these polar lipid species may be biomarkers for diets rich in specific fatty acids or toxicant classes. Overall our data demonstrates that toxicants can perturb lipid utilization and storage in daphnids in a chemical specific manner, and different chemicals can produce distinct polar lipid profiles. In summary, biological effects caused by fatty acids and toxicants are associated with changes in the production and use of lipids. PMID:26606184

  19. Effect of lipid supplementation on milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acids in dairy cows.

    Baumann, E; Chouinard, P Y; Lebeuf, Y; Rico, D E; Gervais, R

    2016-08-01

    Eight ruminally fistulated, multiparous Holstein cows were arranged in a double 4×4 Latin square with 14-d periods to investigate the effects of lipid supplementation on performance, rumen parameters, the milk odd- and branched-chain fatty acid (OBCFA) profile, and the relationships between milk OBCFA and rumen parameters. Lipid supplementation is known to inhibit microbial growth in the rumen, decrease de novo microbial fatty acid synthesis, and increase the uptake of circulating fatty acids by the mammary gland; treatments were selected to isolate these effects on the milk OBCFA profile. The 4 treatments were (1) a lipid-free emulsion medium infused in the rumen (CTL), (2) soybean oil as a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids infused in the rumen (RSO), (3) saturated fatty acids (38% 16:0, 40% 18:0) infused in the rumen (RSF), and (4) saturated fatty acids infused in the abomasum (ASF). Fat supplements were provided continuously as emulsions at a rate of 450g/d. Preplanned contrasts compared CTL to RSO, RSO to RSF, and RSF to ASF. Infusing RSO slightly decreased ruminal pH, but did not affect volatile fatty acids profile and milk fat concentration as compared with CTL. The yields of energy-corrected milk, fat, and protein were greater with RSF compared with RSO. The concentration of odd-chain fatty acids was decreased by RSO, whereas even-chain iso fatty acids were not affected. Milk fat concentration of 17:0 + cis-9 17:1 was higher for RSF than for RSO, due to the saturated fatty acids supplement containing 2% 17:0 + cis-9 17:1. Limited differences were observed in the milk OBCFA profile between RSF and ASF. A multiple regression analysis yielded the following equation for predicting rumen pH based on milk fatty acids: pH=6.24 - (0.56×4:0) + (1.67 × iso 14:0) + (4.22 × iso 15:0) + (9.41×22:0). Rumen propionate concentration was negatively correlated with milk fat concentration of iso 14:0 and positively correlated with milk 15:0, whereas the acetate

  20. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast

    Flore Dagorn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL fatty acids (FAs and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight varied from 7.1% (winter to 8.6% (spring. Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring to 50.4% (winter. Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter. Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter. Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5% and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5% were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter. Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin.

  1. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast.

    Dagorn, Flore; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Kendel, Melha; Beninger, Peter G; Rabesaotra, Vony; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2016-01-01

    Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg) on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL) fatty acids (FAs) and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight) varied from 7.1% (winter) to 8.6% (spring). Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring) to 50.4% (winter). Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter). Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs) with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter). Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5%) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5%) were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter). Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin. PMID:27231919

  2. Improved analysis of 1H-MR spectra in the presence of mobile lipids.

    Auer, D P; Gössl, C; Schirmer, T; Czisch, M

    2001-09-01

    Focal brain lesions can be associated with proton magnetic resonance spectra (1H-MRS)-detectable mobile lipids, reflecting severe tissue degradation and necrosis. However, advanced fitting procedures, such as the LCModel, fail to adequately fit spectra in the presence of lipid resonances. To overcome this, different approaches to generate lipid model spectra were compared using a phantom, real in vivo data, and simulated data. Twenty-six in vivo short-echo time (TE) 1H-MRS from 21 malignant gliomas, four infections, and one ischemia were analyzed to evaluate the performance of the modified LCModel fit. Adding simulated aliphatic resonances at 1.3 and 0.9 ppm improved the overall fitting quality remarkably and allowed good separation of lactate and alanine. Also, a better differentiation of glioblastomas and anaplastic gliomas was achieved. In conclusion, we propose a simple way to efficiently include lipid resonances in the LCModel, allowing a better fit of in vivo short-TE 1H-MRS, and demonstrate the diagnostic potential of quantitative assessment of mobile lipids in brain tumors. PMID:11550257

  3. Tailored host-guest lipidic cubic phases: a protocell model exhibiting nucleic acid recognition.

    Komisarski, Marek; Osornio, Yazmin M; Siegel, Jay S; Landau, Ehud M

    2013-01-21

    A classical conundrum in origin-of-life studies relates to the nature of the first chemical system: was it a carrier of genetic information or a facilitator of cellular compartmentalization? Here we present a system composed of tailor-made nucleolipids and hydrated monoolein, which assemble at ambient temperatures to form host-guest lipidic cubic phase (LCP) materials that are stable in bulk water and can perform both functions. As such, they may represent a molecular model for a protocell in origin-of-life studies. Nucleolipids within the lipidic material sequester and bind selectively complementary oligonucleotide sequences from solution by virtue of base-pairing; noncomplementary sequences diffuse freely between the LCP material and the bulk aqueous environment. Sequence specific enrichment of nucleic acids within the LCP material demonstrates an effective mechanism for selection of genetic material in these cell-mimetic systems. PMID:23239006

  4. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats.

    Hosomi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding capacity than casein digest. Male Wistar rats were fed an AIN-93G diet containing 1% (wt/wt) EPL or l-lysine. After 4 weeks of feeding these diets, the marked decrease in serum and liver triacylglycerol contents by the EPL diet was partly attributed to increased fecal fatty acid excretion. The activities of hepatic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis, were enhanced in rats fed EPL diet. The increased fatty acid biosynthesis activity due to dietary EPL may be prevented by the enhancement of fecal fatty acid excretion. The hypocholesterolemic effect of EPL was mediated by increased fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretions due to the EPL digest suppressing micellar lipid solubility and high bile acid binding capacity. These results show that dietary EPL has beneficial effects that could help prevent lifestyle-related diseases such as hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:25866749

  5. SMA-SH: Modified Styrene-Maleic Acid Copolymer for Functionalization of Lipid Nanodiscs.

    Lindhoud, Simon; Carvalho, Vanessa; Pronk, Joachim W; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve

    2016-04-11

    Challenges in purification and subsequent functionalization of membrane proteins often complicate their biochemical and biophysical characterization. Purification of membrane proteins generally involves replacing the lipids surrounding the protein with detergent molecules, which can affect protein structure and function. Recently, it was shown that styrene-maleic acid copolymers (SMA) can dissolve integral membrane proteins from biological membranes into nanosized discs. Within these nanoparticles, proteins are embedded in a patch of their native lipid bilayer that is stabilized in solution by the amphipathic polymer that wraps the disc like a bracelet. This approach for detergent-free purification of membrane proteins has the potential to greatly simplify purification but does not facilitate conjugation of functional compounds to the membrane proteins. Often, such functionalization involves laborious preparation of protein variants and optimization of labeling procedures to ensure only minimal perturbation of the protein. Here, we present a strategy that circumvents several of these complications through modifying SMA by grafting the polymer with cysteamine. The reaction results in SMA that has solvent-exposed sulfhydrils (SMA-SH) and allows tuning of the coverage with SH groups. Size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that SMA-SH dissolves lipid bilayer membranes into lipid nanodiscs, just like SMA. In addition, we demonstrate that, just like SMA, SMA-SH solubilizes proteoliposomes into protein-loaded nanodiscs. We covalently modify SMA-SH-lipid nanodiscs using thiol-reactive derivatives of Alexa Fluor 488 and biotin. Thus, SMA-SH promises to simultaneously tackle challenges in purification and functionalization of membrane proteins. PMID:26974006

  6. Growth Response and Fatty Acid Composition of Juvenile Procambarus clarkii Fed Different Sources of Dietary Lipid

    WEN Xiao-bo; KU Yao-mei; ZHOU Kai-ya

    2003-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding various sources of dietary lipidon weight gain, feed conversion, survival and fatty acid composition of juvenile red swamp crawfish, Procam-barus clarkii. Six semi-purified diets containing vitamin-free casein, defatted soybean meal, 0.5% cholinechloride, 0.5 % glycine and 0.5 % cholesterol were supplemented with 6.0 % of either anchovy oil, linseed oil,soybean oil, rapeseed oil, safflower oil or pork lard. Each diet was fed to crawfish (3.07±0.21 g averageweight) in three replicate aquaria for 60 days. Survival rate, weight gain and feed conversion were best forcrawfish fed the diet containing anchovy oil. Crawfish fed the linseed oil diet had the second highest weightgain, followed by crawfish on soybean oil, repaseed oil, safflower oil and pork lard diets, respectively. Feedconversion values were a reflection of weight gain. Results showed that both n-6 and n-3 fatty acids are dietaryessential for juvenile Procambarus clarkii, although n-3 fatty acids promoted faster growth than n-6. Howev-er, highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) (20 : 5n-3 and 22 : 6n-3) had better growth-promoting effect than18 : 3n-3, due probably to the limited ability of crawfish to bioconvert fatty acids to polyenoic forms of longerchain length. The fatty acid composition of the crawfish generally reflected that of the dietary lipids, especial-ly for the diets containing unsaturated fatty acids.

  7. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, but not gallic acid, strongly inhibited oxidative deterioration

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Thomsen, Mikael Holm;

    2001-01-01

    attributed to its ability to chelate free metal ions and iron from egg yolk located at the oil-water interface. Gallic acid reduced the levels of both free radicals and lipid hydroperoxides but promoted slightly the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaise and influenced the profile of volatiles. Gallic......The antioxidative effects of gallic acid, EDTA, and extra emulsifier Panodan DATEM TR in mayonnaise enriched with 16% fish oil were investigated. EDTA reduced the formation of free radicals, lipid hydroperoxides, volatiles, and fishy and rancid off-flavors. The antioxidative effect of EDTA was...... acid may therefore promote the decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides to volatile oxidation products. Addition of extra emulsifier reduced the lipid hydroperoxide levels but did not influence the level of free radicals or the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaisse; however, it appeared to alter...

  8. Effect of substratum, serum and linoleic acid on the lipid synthesis of isolated alveolar type II cells

    The authors examined the effect of cellular substratum (plastic or amnionic basement membrane (ABM)) and serum additive (fetal bovine (FBS), pork, horse, rat or human) on phospholipid synthesis in alveolar type II cells. The cells were isolated from adult rats, cultured for 48 hours under the various substratum and serum conditions, and then incubated for an additional 2 hours with [1-14C] acetate. ABM consistently caused a significant increase in the percent of radiolabel incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) and/or phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Serum also had a significant effect with the highest values of PC and saturated PC being obtained with rat serum and the highest PG values with horse serum. The fatty acid composition of the sera used varied according to species with the largest variations in percent linoleic acid. Supplementing media with linoleic acid resulted in a marked increase in saturated PC values and a fall in PG values. Therefore, they conclude that: 1) ABM improves differentiated function, 2) FBS supplementation may not be optimal, and 3) the different effects of linoleic acid supplementation on PC, saturated PC, and PG values suggests an independent regulation of synthesis for these lipid species in vitro

  9. Counteracting foaming caused by lipids or proteins in biogas reactors using rapeseed oil or oleic acid as antifoaming agents

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; Einarsdottir, E. S.;

    2015-01-01

    deterioration of the methanogenic process. Many commercial antifoams are derivatives of fatty acids or oils. However, it is well known that lipids can induce foaming in manure based biogas plants. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of rapeseed oil and oleic acid on foam reduction and process performance...... carboxylic ends, is responsible for their foam promoting or foam counteracting behaviour. Thus, it was concluded that the fatty acids and oils could suppress foaming, while salt of fatty acids could generate foam....

  10. Preparation and evaluation of chitosan/ellagic acid/erythrocyte membrane lipid hemostatic composite sponge

    贺庆; 敖强; 王臻; 刘伟强; 龚锴; 公衍道; 张秀芳

    2013-01-01

      背景:部分文献报道壳聚糖对严重创伤的止血效果有限,因此以壳聚糖为基础止血剂的促凝血活性还有待进一步增强。目的:制备一种新型的壳聚糖/鞣花酸/红细胞膜脂复合海绵,评价其促凝血活性和细胞毒性。方法:通过冻干法制备壳聚糖海绵和壳聚糖乙酸盐海绵,然后再通过静电吸附法制备壳聚糖/鞣花酸/红细胞膜脂复合海绵。血浆复钙时间法观察3种海绵的促凝血活性,并检测3种海绵对 SD 大鼠肝脏的止血效果及对 L929细胞的毒性。结果与结论:壳聚糖/鞣花酸/红细胞膜脂复合海绵组的血浆复钙时间、出血时间、失血量均显著少于壳聚糖海绵组和壳聚糖乙酸盐海绵组(P <0.01)。细胞实验显示壳聚糖/鞣花酸/红细胞膜脂复合海绵无细胞毒性。说明壳聚糖/鞣花酸/红细胞膜脂复合海绵具有良好的促凝血活性且无细胞毒性。%BACKGROUND: Some previous studies have indicated that the hemostatic effect of chitosan is limited when dealing with severe injuries. Therefore, the procoagulant activity of chitosan-based hemostatic agents needs to be enhanced. OBJECTIVE: To prepare a novel chitosan/el agic acid/erythrocyte membrane lipid composite sponge and to evaluate its procoagulant activity and cytotoxicity.METHODS: Chitosan sponge and chitosan acetate sponge were prepared by freeze-drying method. Then chitosan/el agic acid/erythrocyte membrane lipid composite sponge was prepared by electrostatic adsorption method. Procoagulant activity of the chitosan, chitosan acetate, and chitosan/el agic acid/erythrocyte membrane lipid sponges was evaluated by the plasma recalcification time method. Hemostatic effect of these sponges was evaluated in the Sprague Dawley rat liver bleeding model, and the cytotoxicity to L929 cel line was evaluated. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The plasma recalcification time, bleeding time and blood loss of the chitosan/el agic acid

  11. OPTIMIZED DETERMINATION OF MALONDIALDEHYDE IN PLASMA-LIPID EXTRACTS USING 1,3-DIETHYL-2-THIOBARBITURIC ACID - INFLUENCE OF DETECTION METHOD AND RELATIONS WITH LIPIDS AND FATTY-ACIDS IN PLASMA FROM HEALTHY-ADULTS

    HOVING, EB; LAING, C; RUTGERS, HM; TEGGELER, M; VANDOORMAAL, JJ; MUSKIET, FAJ

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the influence of different concentrations of Fe3+, phosphoric acid, butylated hydroxytoluene and glutathione on the production of the malondialdehyde-1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid adduct in plasma lipid extracts. Following organic solvent extraction the stable product was analyze

  12. Palmitoleic acid reduces intramuscular lipid and restores insulin sensitivity in obese sheep

    Duckett SK

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Susan K Duckett, Gabriela Volpi-Lagreca, Mariano Alende, Nathan M LongAnimal and Veterinary Sciences Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USAAbstract: Obese sheep were used to assess the effects of palmitoleic (C16:1 cis-9 acid infusion on lipogenesis and circulating insulin levels. Infusion of 10 mg/kg body weight (BW/day C16:1 intravenously in obese sheep reduced (P<0.01 weight gain by 77%. Serum palmitoleic levels increased (P<0.05 in a linear manner with increasing levels of C16:1 infusion. Cis-11 vaccenic (C18:1 cis-11 acid, a known elongation product of palmitoleic acid, was also elevated (P<0.05 in serum after 14 days and 21 days of infusion. Plasma insulin levels were lower (P<0.05 (10 mg/kg BW/day C16:1 than controls (0 mg/kg BW/day C16:1 at 14 days and 28 days of infusion. Infusion of C16:1 resulted in linear increases in tissue concentrations of palmitoleic, cis-11 vaccenic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosapentaenoic acids in a dose-dependent manner. Total lipid content of the semitendinosus (ST muscle and mesenteric adipose tissue was reduced (P<0.01 in both 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg BW C16:1 dose levels. Total lipid content and mean adipocyte size in the longissimus muscle was reduced (P<0.05 in the 10 mg/kg BW C16:1 dose level only, whereas total lipid content and adipocyte size of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was not altered. Total lipid content of the liver was also unchanged with C16:1 infusion. Palmitoleic acid infusion upregulated (P<0.05 acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, fatty acid elongase-6 (ELOVL6, and Protein kinase, AMP-activated, alpha 1 catalytic subunit, transcript variant 1 (AMPK mRNA expressions in liver, subcutaneous adipose, and ST muscle compared to the controls. However, mRNA expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1B differed between tissues. In the subcutaneous adipose and liver, C16:1 infusion upregulated (P<0.05 GLUT4 and CPT1B, whereas these genes were

  13. Age-related changes in retinoic, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid modulation in nuclear lipid metabolism.

    Gaveglio, Virginia L; Pascual, Ana C; Giusto, Norma M; Pasquaré, Susana J

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this work was to study how age-related changes could modify several enzymatic activities that regulate lipid mediator levels in nuclei from rat cerebellum and how these changes are modulated by all-trans retinoic acid (RA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA). The higher phosphatidate phosphohydrolase activity and lower diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activity observed in aged animals compared with adults could augment diacylglycerol (DAG) availability in the former. Additionally, monoacylglycerol (MAG) availability could be high due to an increase in lysophosphatidate phosphohydrolase (LPAPase) activity and a decrease in monocylglycerol lipase activity. Interestingly, RA, DHA and AA were observed to modulate these enzymatic activities and this modulation was found to change in aged rats. In adult nuclei, whereas RA led to high DAG and MAG production through inhibition of their hydrolytic enzymes, DHA and AA promoted high MAG production by LPAPase and DAGL stimulation. In contrast, in aged nuclei RA caused high MAG generation whereas DHA and AA diminished it through LPAPase activity modulation. These results demonstrate that aging promotes a different nuclear lipid metabolism as well as a different type of non-genomic regulation by RA, DHA and AA, which could be involved in nuclear signaling events. PMID:27355428

  14. Improving the lipid stability and sensory characteristics of irradiated minced beef by using natural herbal extracts

    The objective of the present work was to use natural herbal extracts to minimize lipid oxidation and improve the sensory characteristics of irradiated minced beef. Beef longissimus dorsi were minced, mixed with herbal extracts as appropriate and packed in polyethylene bags (50 g each). There were four treatment groups: (1) untreated controls, (2) irradiated with cobalt-60 gamma-rays to either 2 or 4.5 kGy, (3) addition of extracts of one of marjoram, rosemary or sage to a final concentration of 0.04 % (v/w), (4) combination treatment with either 2 or 4.5 kGy irradiation, plus herbal extract at 0.04 % (v/w) added pre-irradiation. Aerobically packaged samples were then placed into storage at 5 degree C. At specified time intervals samples were withdrawn to be analyzed for thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TEARS), sensory characteristics and psychrotrophic bacterial counts, Results demonstrated a significant benefit of the addition of herbal extracts to the minced beef prior to irradiation. All three extracts generally lowered the TBARS values in both control and irradiated samples, with marjoram being the most effective, followed by sage and rosemary in that order of efficacy. As regards radiation effected off-odour, all three extracts generally lowered the off-odour score, with marjoram and sage being most effective, and rosemary being somewhat less so. All three extracts protected against radiation effected colour loss. Addition of herbal extracts prior to irradiation resulted in significant increase (p< 0.05) in the acceptability scores for all irradiated samples in the post-irradiation period, with rosemary being somewhat less effective than sage and marjoram. Addition of herbal extracts alone to the minced meat did not affect the psychrotrophic bacterial counts of treated samples. The combination treatment with herbal extracts plus

  15. Lipids, curvature stress, and the action of lipid prodrugs: free fatty acids and lysolipid enhancement of drug transport across liposomal membranes.

    Jespersen, Henrik; Andersen, Jonas H; Ditzel, Henrik J; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2012-01-01

    Molecular shape and its impact on bilayer curvature stress are powerful concepts for describing the effects of lipids and fatty acids on fundamental membrane properties, such as passive permeability and derived properties like drug transport across liposomal membranes. We illustrate these relationships by studying the effects of fatty acids and lysolipids on the permeation of a potent anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, across the bilayer of a liposome in which the drug is encapsulated. Using a simple fluorescence assay, we have systematically studied the passive permeation of doxorubicin across liposomal membranes in different lipid phases: the solid-ordered phase (DPPC bilayers), the liquid-disordered phase (POPC lipid bilayers), and the liquid-ordered phase induced by high levels of cholesterol (DOPC + cholesterol lipid bilayers). The effect of different free fatty acids (FA) and lysolipids (LL), separately and in combination, on permeability was assessed to elucidate the possible mechanism of phospholipase A(2)-triggered release in cancer tissue of liposomal doxorubicin formulations. In all cases, FAs applied separately lead to significant enhancement of permeability, most pronounced in liquid-disordered bilayers and less pronounced in solid and solid-ordered bilayers. LLs applied separately had only a marginal effect on permeability. FA and LL applied in combination lead to a synergistic enhancement of permeability in solid bilayers, whereas in liquid-disordered bilayers, the combined effect suppressed the otherwise strong permeability enhancement due to the FAs. PMID:21839138

  16. Lipid metabolic dose response to dietary alpha-linolenic acid in monk parrot (Myiopsitta monachus).

    Petzinger, Christina; Heatley, J J; Bailey, Christopher A; Bauer, John E

    2014-03-01

    Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) are susceptible to atherosclerosis, a progressive disease characterized by the formation of plaques in the arteries accompanied by underlying chronic inflammation. The family of n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA), have consistently been shown to reduce atherosclerotic risk factors in humans and other mammals. Some avian species have been observed to convert α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) to EPA and DHA (Htin et al. in Arch Geflugelk 71:258-266, 2007; Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013). Therefore, the metabolic effects of including flaxseed oil, as a source of ALA, in the diet at three different levels (low, medium, and high) on the lipid metabolism of Monk parrots was evaluated through measuring plasma total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), triacylglycerols (TAG), and phospholipid fatty acids. Feed intake, body weight, and body condition score were also assessed. Thus the dose and possible saturation response of increasing dietary ALA at constant linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LNA) concentration on lipid metabolism in Monk parrots (M. monachus) was evaluated. Calculated esterified cholesterol in addition to plasma TC, FC, and TAG were unaltered by increasing dietary ALA. The high ALA group had elevated levels of plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3, 22:5n-3). The medium and high ALA groups had suppressed plasma phospholipid 20:2n-6 and adrenic acid (22:4n-6, ADA) compared to the low ALA group. When the present data were combined with data from a previous study (Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013) a dose response to dietary ALA was observed when LNA was constant. Plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, DPAn-3, DHA, and total n-3 were positively correlated while 20:2n-6, di-homo-gamma-linoleic acid (20:3n-6Δ7), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), ADA, and total n-6 were inversely correlated with dietary en% ALA. PMID

  17. Effects of furfural and acetic acid on growth and lipid production from glucose and xylose by Rhodotorula glutinis

    Zhang, Guochang; French, William Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Alley, Earl; Paraschivescu, Maria [Dave C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 9595, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic sugars to triacylglycerols (a biodiesel or renewable diesel feedstock) was investigated using the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis (ATCC 15125). In the shake flask experiments, R. glutinis was first grown in a nitrogen-rich medium utilizing an artificial acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass switchgrass as the sole carbon and energy source. Once the culture had reached the stationary phase, the cells were harvested and transferred to a fresh nitrogen-free media containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars for lipid accumulation. Analysis of the data collected showed that the yeast were able to grow in the medium containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars as the carbon and energy source. The net specific Growth rate(s) indicated that the presence of acetic acid and furfural in the artificial acid hydrolysate inhibited the growth of R. glutinis on glucose, but not the growth on xylose. The lipid accumulated in the cells, determined by gravimetrical method, increased from initial 4.3%-39.0% of dry cell mass weight. The major fatty acids of the accumulated lipids were palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and {gamma}-linoleic acid. These results indicate that it is feasible to convert the sugars in acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass to triacylglycerols using R. glutinis. (author)

  18. EVALUATION OF ANTIPEROXIDATIVE POTENTIAL OF ASCORBIC ACID ON BUSULFAN-INDUCED LIPID PEROXIDATION USING 4-HYDROXY-2-NONENAL AND NITRIC OXIDE AS MODEL MARKERS

    Supratim Ray

    2012-01-01

    The study was designed with an aim to evaluate the antiperoxidative potential of ascorbic acid on busulfan-induced lipid peroxidation. The study was performed in vitro using goat liver as lipid source. This evaluation was done by measuring the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and nitric oxide (NO) content of liver tissue homogenates as markers of lipid peroxidation. The study reveals the lipid peroxidation induction capacity of busulfan and the antiperoxidative potential of ascorbic acid on busulf...

  19. Improvement in the Iatroscan thin-layer chromatographic-flame ionisation detection analysis of marine lipids. Separation and quantitation of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in standards and natural samples.

    Striby, L; Lafont, R; Goutx, M

    1999-07-23

    Mono- and diacylglycerols are important intermediates in glycerolipid biodegradation and intracellular signalling pathways. A method for mass determination of these lipid classes in marine particles was developed using the Iatroscan, which combines thin layer chromatography (TLC) and flame ionisation detection (FID) techniques. We improved existing protocols by adding two elution steps: hexane-diethyl-ether-formic acid (70:30:0.2, v/v/v) after triacylglycerol and free fatty acid scan, and acetone 100% followed by chloroform-acetone-formic acid (99:1:0.2, v/v/v) after 1,2 diacylglycerols. Diacylglycerol isomers 1,2 and 1,3 were separated from each other, as well as from free sterols in standards and marine lipids from sediment trap particles. Monoacylglycerols were separated from pigments and galactosyl-lipids in the same trap samples and in a rich pigment phytoplankton extract of Dunaliella viridis. Quantitation of each class in samples was performed after calibration with 0.5 to 2 micrograms of standards. As many as 17 lipid classes can be identified and quantified in samples using this proposed six-step development. PMID:10457435

  20. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  1. Myocardial Lipid Profiling During Time Course of High Fat Diet and its Relationship to the Expression of Fatty Acid Transporters

    Ewa Harasim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It is well documented that increased fatty acids (FA supply causes lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscles. Whether the same mechanism is present in the heart is still unclear. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the content of specific myocardial lipid fractions during feeding rats a high fat diet (HFD for 5 weeks. Moreover, the relation between changes in myocardial lipid content, whole body insulin resistance and the expression of fatty acid transporters in each week of HFD was established. Methods: Gas liquid chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography were used to determine the content of lipid fractions in the left ventricle. Expression of selected proteins was estimated by Western blot technique. All measurements were made after each week of HFD. Results: As expected, lipid profile in myocardium was altered by HFD in different weeks of the study with the most intense changes in triacylglycerols, long chain fatty acid-CoA and ceramide. Furthermore, there was a significant elevation of plasmalemmal (the 4th and the 5th week and mitochondrial expression (from the 3rd to the 5th week of fatty acid translocase. Conclusion: High fat diet affects myocardial lipid profile in each week of its duration and causes alternations in FA metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

  2. Influence of a subinhibitory dose of antifungal fatty acids from Sporothrix flocculosa on cellular lipid composition in fungi.

    Benyagoub, M; Willemot, C; Bélanger, R R

    1996-10-01

    Antifungal fatty acids produced by the biocontrol fungus Sporothrix flocculosa were studied on the basis of their effect on growth and cellular lipid composition of three fungi, Cladosporium cucumerinum, Fusarium oxysporum, and S. flocculosa, whose growth was decreased by 51, 33, and 5%, respectively, when exposed to 0.4 mg fatty acid per ml. The sensitivity to fatty acid antibiotics from S. flocculosa was related to a high degree of unsaturation of phospholipid fatty acids and a low proportion of sterols. The major responses of sensitive fungi to sublethal doses of antifungal fatty acids from liquid culture of S. flocculosa were: (i) a decrease in total lipid; (ii) an increase in the degree of fatty acid unsaturation (18:1 > 18:2 > 18:3); (iii) an increase in free fatty acids and phosphatidic acid and a decrease in total phospholipids; and (iv) an increase in sterol/phospholipid ratio. These modifications in lipid composition led to an increase in membrane fluidity in sensitive fungi as demonstrated by assessment of fluoresence anisotropy using liposomes and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene probe. This alteration in the physical state of lipids appears to be responsible for the previously demonstrated alteration of membrane structure and function in fungi confronted to S. flocculosa. PMID:8898307

  3. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    Lina Lindberg

    Full Text Available When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555 cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP2C 2.2× and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP2C 2.7×, when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to

  4. Comparison of fatty acid composition in total lipid of diapause and non-diapause larvae of Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    ABBAS KHANI; SAEID MOHARRAMIPOUR; MOHSEN BARZEGAR; HOSSEIN NADERI-MANESH

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the fatty acid composition of the total lipid extracted from the whole body of Cydia pomonella L. larvae were determined by gas chromatography. The six most abundant fatty acids in both non-diapause and diapause larvae of codling moth were oleic (35%-39%), palmitic (23%-33%), linoleic (16%-30%), palmitoleic (5%-10%),stearic (1.5%-3.0%) and linolenic acids (1.0%-2.5%). This represents a typical complement of Lepidopteran fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of total lipid of C. pomonella larvae was related to diapause. In similarity to most other reports, the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids increased in diapause initiation state. The total lipid of diapause larvae contained more linoleic acid (25.8% vs. 16.1%) and less palmitic acid (24.7% vs. 33.4%),than that ofnon-diapause larvae. The weight percentage of linoleic acid (C18:2) increased from 16% to 26% from early-August through early-September during transition to diapause,while palmitic acid (C16:0) decreased from 33% to 25% at the same time. These changes resulted in an increase in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) from 1.72 in non-diapause larvae to 2.63 in diapause larvae.

  5. A High Legume Low Glycemic Index Diet Improves Serum Lipid Profiles in Men

    Zhang, Zhiying; Lanza, Elaine; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Bagshaw, Deborah; Rovine, Michael J.; Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Bobe, Gerd; Chapkin, Robert S.; Hartman, Terryl J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that fiber consumption facilitates weight loss and improves lipid profiles; however, the beneficial effects of high fermentable fiber low glycemic index (GI) diets under conditions of weight maintenance are unclear. In the Legume Inflammation Feeding Experiment, a randomized controlled cross-over feeding study, 64 middle-aged men who had undergone colonoscopies within the previous 2 years received both a healthy American (HA) diet (no legume consumption, fiber cons...

  6. Rituximab therapy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis improves alveolar macrophage lipid homeostasis

    Malur Anagha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rationale Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP patients exhibit an acquired deficiency of biologically active granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF attributable to GM-CSF specific autoantibodies. PAP alveolar macrophages are foamy, lipid-filled cells with impaired surfactant clearance and markedly reduced expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ and the PPARγ-regulated ATP binding cassette (ABC lipid transporter, ABCG1. An open label proof of concept Phase II clinical trial was conducted in PAP patients using rituximab, a chimeric murine-human monoclonal antibody directed against B lymphocyte specific antigen CD20. Rituximab treatment decreased anti-GM-CSF antibody levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and 7/9 patients completing the trial demonstrated clinical improvement as measured by arterial blood oxygenation. Objectives This study sought to determine whether rituximab therapy would restore lipid metabolism in PAP alveolar macrophages. Methods BAL samples were collected from patients pre- and 6-months post-rituximab infusion for evaluation of mRNA and lipid changes. Results Mean PPARγ and ABCG1 mRNA expression increased 2.8 and 5.3-fold respectively (p ≤ 0.05 after treatment. Lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2 (a key enzyme in surfactant degradation mRNA expression was severely deficient in PAP patients pre-treatment but increased 2.8-fold post-treatment. In supplemental animal studies, LPLA2 deficiency was verified in GM-CSF KO mice but was not present in macrophage-specific PPARγ KO mice compared to wild-type controls. Oil Red O intensity of PAP alveolar macrophages decreased after treatment, indicating reduced intracellular lipid while extracellular free cholesterol increased in BAL fluid. Furthermore, total protein and Surfactant protein A were significantly decreased in the BAL fluid post therapy. Conclusions Reduction in GM

  7. Targeting Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism to Improve Glucose Metabolism in Cardiometabolic Disease

    Johan W.E. Jocken

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease prevalence on the rise, there is a growing need for improved strategies to prevent or treat obesity and insulin resistance, both of which are major risk factors for these chronic diseases. Impairments in adipose tissue lipid metabolism seem to play a critical role in these disorders. In the classical picture of intracellular lipid breakdown, cytosolic lipolysis was proposed as the sole mechanism for triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipocytes. Recent evidence suggests involvement of several hormones, membrane receptors, and intracellular signalling cascades, which has added complexity to the regulation of cytosolic lipolysis. Interestingly, a specific form of autophagy, called lipophagy, has been implicated as alternative lipolytic pathway. Defective regulation of cytosolic lipolysis and lipophagy might have substantial effects on lipid metabolism, thereby contributing to adipose tissue dysfunction, insulin resistance, and related cardiometabolic (cMet diseases. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of classical lipolysis and lipophagy in adipocyte lipid metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, the question of whether modulation of adipocyte lipolysis and lipophagy might be a potential therapeutic target to combat cMet disorders will be addressed.

  8. Ether- and ester-bound iso-diabolic acid and other lipids in members of acidobacteria subdivision 4.

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Hopmans, Ellen C; Foesel, Bärbel U; Wüst, Pia K; Overmann, Jörg; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A; Dunfield, Peter F; Houghton, Karen; Stott, Matthew B

    2014-09-01

    Recently, iso-diabolic acid (13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid) has been identified as a major membrane-spanning lipid of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, a highly diverse phylum within the Bacteria. This finding pointed to the Acidobacteria as a potential source for the bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers that occur ubiquitously in peat, soil, lakes, and hot springs. Here, we examined the lipid composition of seven phylogenetically divergent strains of subdivision 4 of the Acidobacteria, a bacterial group that is commonly encountered in soil. Acid hydrolysis of total cell material released iso-diabolic acid derivatives in substantial quantities (11 to 48% of all fatty acids). In contrast to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, 6 out of the 7 species of subdivision 4 (excepting "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum") contained iso-diabolic acid ether bound to a glycerol in larger fractional abundance than iso-diabolic acid itself. This is in agreement with the analysis of intact polar lipids (IPLs) by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), which showed the dominance of mixed ether-ester glycerides. iso-Diabolic acid-containing IPLs were not identified, because these IPLs are not released with a Bligh-Dyer extraction, as observed before when studying lipid compositions of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria. The presence of ether bonds in the membrane lipids does not seem to be an adaptation to temperature, because the five mesophilic isolates contained a larger amount of ether lipids than the thermophile "Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum." Furthermore, experiments with Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes did not reveal a major influence of growth temperature over the 50 to 69°C range. PMID:24928878

  9. Engineering of lipid prodrug-based, hyaluronic acid-decorated nanostructured lipid carriers platform for 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin combination gastric cancer therapy

    Qu CY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Ying Qu,1,* Min Zhou,1,* Ying-wei Chen,2 Mei-mei Chen,3 Feng Shen,1 Lei-Ming Xu11Digestive Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Xinhua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Digestive Department, Xinhua Hospital, School of medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The first-line chemotherapy treatment protocol for gastric cancer is combination chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and cisplatin (CDDP. The aim of this study was to engineer prodrug-based nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC platform for codelivery of 5-FU and CDDP to enhance therapy and decrease toxicity.Methods: First, 5-FU-stearic acid lipid conjugate was synthesized by two steps. Second, 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP were loaded in NLC. Finally, hyaluronic acid (HA was coated onto NLC surface. Average size, zeta potential, and drug loading capacity of NLC were evaluated. Human gastric cancer cell line BGC823 (BGC823 cells was used for the testing of in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In vivo antitumor activity of NLC was evaluated in mice bearing BGC823 cells model.Results: HA-coated 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP-loaded NLC (HA-FU/C-NLC showed a synergistic effect in combination therapy and displayed the greatest antitumor activity than all of the free drugs or uncoated NLC in vitro and in vivo.Conclusion: This work reveals that HA-coated NLC could be used as a novel carrier to codeliver 5-FU and CDDP for gastric cancer therapy. HA-FU/C-NLC could be a promising targeted and combinational therapy in nanomedicine.Keywords: gastric cancer, nanostructured lipid carriers, hyaluronic acid, combination chemotherapy, lipid prodrug

  10. Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna

    Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

  11. Docosapentaenoic acid derived metabolites and mediators - The new world of lipid mediator medicine in a nutshell.

    Weylandt, Karsten-H

    2016-08-15

    Recent years have seen the description and elucidation of a new class of anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators. The arachidonic acid (AA)-derived compounds in this class are called lipoxins and have been described in great detail since their discovery thirty years ago. The new players are mediators derived from fish oil omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Taken together, these mediators are also called specialized pro-resolution mediators (SPMs). As compared to the AA/EPA/DHA-derived compounds, research regarding mediators formed from the n-3 and n-6 docosapentaenoic acids (DPAn-3 and DPAn-6) is sparse. However, mono- di- and trihydroxy derivates of the DPAs have anti-inflammatory properties as well, even though mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory action have not been fully elucidated. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding the DPA-derived SPMs and their actions. PMID:26546723

  12. Incorporation of conjugated linoleic acid and vaccenic acid into lipids from rat tissues and plasma

    Lund, Pia; Sejrsen, Kristen; Straarup, Ellen Marie

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incorporation of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) into triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL) of tissues and plasma, and to interpret the role of dietary-derived vaccenic acid (VA) in increasing the tissue content of CLA (c9,t11) and the...... influence on the fatty acid profile. We fed five groups of rats semi-purified diets with varying levels of CLA and VA: control butter with low CLA (c9,t11) and VA; control butter added 5% CLA (c9,t11); control butter added 5% Tonalin [equal amount of CLA (c9,t11) and CLA (t10,c12)]; control butter added 5...

  13. Plant pentacyclic triterpenic acids as modulators of lipid membrane physical properties.

    Prades, Jesús; Vögler, Oliver; Alemany, Regina; Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Funari, Sérgio S; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Barceló, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    Free triterpenic acids (TTPs) present in plants are bioactive compounds exhibiting multiple nutriceutical activities. The underlying molecular mechanisms have only been examined in part and mainly focused on anti-inflammatory properties, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, in all of which TTPs frequently affect membrane-related proteins. Based on the structural characteristics of TTPs, we assume that their effect on biophysical properties of cell membranes could play a role for their biological activity. In this context, our study is focused on the compounds, oleanolic (3β-hydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, OLA), maslinic (2α,3β-dihydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, MSL) and ursolic ((3β)-3-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid, URL) as the most important TTPs present in orujo olive oil. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and Laurdan fluorescence data provide experimental evidence that OLA, MSL and URL altered the structural properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC-Cholesterol (Cho) rich membranes, being located into the polar-hydrophobic interphase. Specifically, in DPPC membranes, TTPs altered the structural order of the L(β'), phase without destabilizing the lipid bilayer. The existence of a nonbilayer isotropic phase in coexistence with the liquid crystalline L(α) phase, as observed in DPPC:URL samples, indicated the presence of lipid structures with high curvature (probably inverted micelles). In DPPC:Cho membranes, TTPs affected the membrane phase properties increasing the Laurdan GP values above 40°C. MSL and URL induced segregation of Cho within the bilayer, in contrast to OLA, that reduced the structural organization of the membrane. These results strengthen the relevance of TTP interactions with cell membranes as a molecular mechanism underlying their broad spectrum of biological effects. PMID:21167812

  14. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling*

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background: A multiprotein complex designated as lipolysome degrades intracellular triglycerides and contains proteins such as adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) and its co-activator Cgi-58. Results: Cgi-58 interacts with fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps), which impact Atgl-mediated lipolysis and lipid signaling. Conclusion: Fabps modulate Atgl-mediated TG hydrolysis and link lipolysis with intracellular lipid ligand shuttling. Significance: Novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of...

  15. Differential Effects of Dietary Lipids on Growth Performance, Digestibility, Fatty Acid Composition and Histology of African Catfish (Heterobranchus longifilis) Fingerlings

    Theophilus Olayiwola Babalola; David Friday Apata; James Sunday Omotosho; Musibau Ayinde Adebayo

    2011-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the influence of fish oil (FO), two terrestrial animal fats (lard (PL) and poultry oil (CF)) and three vegetable oils (palm kernel (PKO), sheabutter (SBO) and sunflower (SFO)) as the dietary lipid sources on the growth performance, nutrient digestibility, fatty acid (FA) composition and histology of Hetero-branchus longifilis. Six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets containing 6% of added fat from the lipid sources were formulated and used. Eac...

  16. Effect of dietary poly unsaturated fatty acids on total brain lipid concentration and anxiety levels of electron beam irradiated mice

    The whole brain irradiation causes injury to the nervous system at various levels. Omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids are very much essential for the growth and development of nervous system. Dietary supplementation of these nutrients will promote the development of injured neuronal cells. Therefore this study was undertaken to establish the role of Omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids on total brain lipid concentration, lipid peroxidation and anxiety levels in the irradiated mice. The effect of Electron Beam Radiation (EBR) on total brain lipid concentration, lipid peroxidation and anxiety level were investigated in male Swiss albino mice. The study groups were subjected to a sub-lethal dose of EBR and also the flax seed extract and fish oil were given orally to the irradiated mice. Irradiated groups show significant elevation in anxiety levels when compared to control group, indicating the acute radiation effects on the central nervous system. But the oral supplementation of dietary PUFA source decrees the anxiety level in the irradiated group. The analysis of lipid peroxidation showed a significant level of changes when compared between control and radiation groups. Dietary PUFA supplementation showed a significant level of decrease in the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated groups. The observation of total lipids in brain shows decrease in concentration in the irradiated groups, the differences in the variables follow the similar patterns as of that the MDA levels. This study suggests that the dietary intake of PUFAs may help in prevention and recovery of the oxidative stress caused by radiation. (author)

  17. Lipid Use and Misuse by the Heart.

    Schulze, P Christian; Drosatos, Konstantinos; Goldberg, Ira J

    2016-05-27

    The heart utilizes large amounts of fatty acids as energy providing substrates. The physiological balance of lipid uptake and oxidation prevents accumulation of excess lipids. Several processes that affect cardiac function, including ischemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, sepsis, and most forms of heart failure lead to altered fatty acid oxidation and often also to the accumulation of lipids. There is now mounting evidence associating certain species of these lipids with cardiac lipotoxicity and subsequent myocardial dysfunction. Experimental and clinical data are discussed and paths to reduction of toxic lipids as a means to improve cardiac function are suggested. PMID:27230639

  18. Overproduction and secretion of free fatty acids through disrupted neutral lipid recycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Leber, Christopher; Polson, Brian; Fernandez-Moya, Ruben; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2015-03-01

    The production of fuels and chemicals from biorenewable resources is important to alleviate the environmental concerns, costs, and foreign dependency associated with the use of petroleum feedstock. Fatty acids are attractive biomolecules due to the flexibility of their iterative biosynthetic pathway, high energy content, and suitability for conversion into other secondary chemicals. Free fatty acids (FFAs) that can be secreted from the cell are particularly appealing due to their lower harvest costs and straightforward conversion into a broad range of biofuel and biochemical products. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to overproduce extracellular FFAs by targeting three native intracellular processes. β-oxidation was disrupted by gene knockouts in FAA2, PXA1 and POX1, increasing intracellular fatty acids levels up to 55%. Disruptions in the acyl-CoA synthetase genes FAA1, FAA4 and FAT1 allowed the extracellular detection of free fatty acids up to 490mg/L. Combining these two disrupted pathways, a sextuple mutant (Δfaa1 Δfaa4 Δfat1 Δfaa2 Δpxa1 Δpox1) was able to produce 1.3g/L extracellular free fatty acids. Further diversion of carbon flux into neutral lipid droplet formation was investigated by the overexpression of DGA1 or ARE1 and by the co-overexpression of a compatible lipase, TGL1, TGL3 or TGL5. The sextuple mutant overexpressing the diacylglycerol acyltransferase, DGA1, and the triacylglycerol lipase, TGL3, yielded 2.2g/L extracellular free fatty acids. This novel combination of pathway interventions led to 4.2-fold higher extracellular free fatty acid levels than previously reported for S. cerevisiae. PMID:25461829

  19. Improved stability of free-standing lipid bilayers based on nanoporous alumina films

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Taira, Tasuku; Oshima, Azusa; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we propose a method for improving the stability of free-standing bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) by preparing BLMs across nanoporous alumina films. The use of porous alumina reduced individual membrane size to improve the BLM stability. The BLMs were stable under an applied voltage of ±1 V. The lifetime of the BLMs was 16-30 h with and without incorporated gramicidin channels. Electric properties of the BLMs as a platform for channel-current recordings are also discussed. Since the total area of the BLMs is still large to facilitate protein incorporation, our approach is useful for designing highly sensitive biosensors based on channel proteins.

  20. The Use of Statin Substitutes to Improve the Lipid Profile in Liver Dysfunctional Male Albino Rats

    More attention has been drawn to different strategies for prevention of cardiovascular associated with liver dysfunction. The aim of the present study is to compare between statin and free fat- milk supplemented with multivitamins in hyperlipidaemic male rats with or without liver dysfunction induced by CCl4. The animals were allocated to 7 equal experimental groups (16 rats each): control group, hypercholesterolemic group, hypercholestero-lemic-statin group, hypercholesterolemic-free fat milk-multivitamins group, hypercholesterolemic-CCl4 group, hypercholesterolemic-CCl4-statin group, and hypercholesterolemic-CCl4- fat-free milk-multivita-mins group. After one month half of the rats of each group were decapitated and the rest of the animals were decapitated after two months. Lipid profile, relative liver weight, liver function, CPK and LDH were determined. The effectiveness of statin drug in the management of blood lipids was confirmed without improving or worsening liver functions. Meanwhile, this effectiveness worsened in hypercholesterolemic rats treated with CCl4 as compared to hypercholesterolemic group. Administration of fat-free milk with multivitamins, as an alternative remedy for statin drug, has improved lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic rats and it revealed no changes in liver enzymes in hypercholesterolemic rats with liver dysfunction indicating the favorable use of them as hypolipotropic agent without affecting liver metabolism

  1. Postprandial lipid responses to an alpha-linolenic acid-rich oil, olive oil and butter in women: A randomized crossover trial

    Rosenquist Anna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postprandial lipaemia varies with gender and the composition of dietary fat due to the partitioning of fatty acids between beta-oxidation and incorporation into triacylglycerols (TAGs. Increasing evidence highlights the importance of postprandial measurements to evaluate atherogenic risk. Postprandial effects of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA in women are poorly characterized. We therefore studied the postprandial lipid response of women to an ALA-rich oil in comparison with olive oil and butter, and characterized the fatty acid composition of total lipids, TAGs, and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs in plasma. Methods A randomized crossover design (n = 19 was used to compare the postprandial effects of 3 meals containing 35 g fat. Blood samples were collected at regular intervals for 7 h. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA (significant difference = P Results No significant difference was seen in incremental area under the curve (iAUC plasma-TAG between the meals. ALA and oleic acid levels were significantly increased in plasma after ALA-rich oil and olive oil meals, respectively. Palmitic acid was significantly increased in plasma-TAG after the butter meal. The ratios of 18:2 n-6 to18:3 n-3 in plasma-TAGs, three and seven hours after the ALA-rich oil meal, were 1.5 and 2.4, respectively. The corresponding values after the olive oil meal were: 13.8 and 16.9; and after the butter meal: 9.0 and 11.6. Conclusions The postprandial p-TAG and NEFA response in healthy pre-menopausal women was not significantly different after the intake of an ALA-rich oil, olive oil and butter. The ALA-rich oil significantly affected different plasma lipid fractions and improved the ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids several hours postprandially.

  2. Phytoglycogen octenyl succinate, an amphiphilic carbohydrate nanoparticle, and epsilon-polylysine to improve lipid oxidative stability of emulsions.

    Scheffler, Siqi L; Wang, Xue; Huang, Lei; San-Martin Gonzalez, Fernanda; Yao, Yuan

    2010-01-13

    Phytoglycogen octenyl succinate (PG-OS) and epsilon-polylysine (EPL) were used to form oil-in-water emulsions with enhanced lipid oxidative stability. PG-OS is an amphiphilic carbohydrate nanoparticle prepared using octenyl succinate (OS) substitution of phytoglycogen (PG). PG-OS had a dispersed molecular density nearly 20 times that of waxy corn starch octenyl succinate (WCS-OS). Fish oil-in-water emulsions were prepared using PG-OS, WCS-OS, and Tween 20, stored at 55 degrees C for 6 days, and monitored for the accumulation of hydroperoxide and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The result indicated that PG-OS may lead to high lipid oxidative stability, and that the addition of EPL may further improve the oxidative stability of emulsions. To address the interaction between PG-OS and EPL, zeta-potential was determined for various systems. The results indicated a possible formation of an interfacial complex layer comprising both PG-OS and EPL. This complex layer may provide both physical and electrostatic barriers against pro-oxidative compounds. PMID:19928899

  3. Improvement of Lipid Profile and Antioxidant Status of Hyperlipidaemic Albino Rats by Gamma-irradiated Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.)

    Hyper-Lipidemia is a dominant risk factor that contributes to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Safflower is rich in the essential omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and phenolic compounds which are known to be effective for the treatment of hyper- lipidemia. This study was performed to examine the efficacy of safflower to ameliorate the induced hyper-lipidemia in rats. The results obtained revealed that rats fed on high fat diet (HFD) significantly induced an increase in lipid profile, glucose and some liver enzymes as well as elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) associated with a significant decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL-C), glutathione (GSH) content and some antioxidant enzymes activity. However, when rats received HFD containing either raw or irradiated safflower (1% w/w), a significant improvement in the above mentioned parameters was seen. In conclusion, safflower supplementation in diet of rats pointed out to a promising role of safflower, a natural product, on antioxidant enzymes, liver function and lipid profile of hyper-lipidemic rats, regardless if it is irradiated or not

  4. Hexadecenoic Fatty Acid Isomers in Human Blood Lipids and Their Relevance for the Interpretation of Lipidomic Profiles

    Sansone, Anna; Tolika, Evanthia; Louka, Maria; Sunda, Valentina; Deplano, Simone; Melchiorre, Michele; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Formisano, Cesare; Di Micco, Rosa; Faraone Mennella, Maria Rosaria; Ferreri, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) are emerging health biomarkers, and in particular the ratio between palmitoleic acid (9cis-16:1) and palmitic acid (16:0) affords the delta-9 desaturase index that is increased in obesity. Recently, other positional and geometrical MUFA isomers belonging to the hexadecenoic family (C16 MUFA) were found in circulating lipids, such as sapienic acid (6cis-16:1), palmitelaidic acid (9trans-16:1) and 6trans-16:1. In this work we report: i) the identification of sapienic acid as component of human erythrocyte membrane phospholipids with significant increase in morbidly obese patients (n = 50) compared with age-matched lean controls (n = 50); and ii) the first comparison of erythrocyte membrane phospholipids (PL) and plasma cholesteryl esters (CE) in morbidly obese patients highlighting that some of their fatty acid levels have opposite trends: increases of both palmitic and sapienic acids with the decrease of linoleic acid (9cis,12cis-18:2, omega-6) in red blood cell (RBC) membrane PL were reversed in plasma CE, whereas the increase of palmitoleic acid was similar in both lipid species. Consequentially, desaturase enzymatic indexes gave different results, depending on the lipid class used for the fatty acid content. The fatty acid profile of morbidly obese subjects also showed significant increases of stearic acid (C18:0) and C20 omega-6, as well as decreases of oleic acid (9cis-18:1) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega-3) as compared with lean healthy controls. Trans monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were also measured and found significantly increased in both lipid classes of morbidly obese subjects. These results highlight the C16 MUFA isomers as emerging metabolic marker provided that the assignment of the double bond position and geometry is correctly performed, thus identifying the corresponding lipidomic pathway. Since RBC membrane PL and plasma CE have different fatty acid trends, caution must also be used in the

  5. Sage Tea Drinking Improves Lipid Profile and Antioxidant Defences in Humans

    Cristina Pereira-Wilson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Salvia officinalis (common sage is a plant with antidiabetic properties. A pilot trial (non-randomized crossover trial with six healthy female volunteers (aged 40-50 was designed to evaluate the beneficial properties of sage tea consumption on blood glucose regulation, lipid profile and transaminase activity in humans. Effects of sage consumption on erythrocytes’ SOD and CAT activities and on Hsp70 expression in lymphocytes were also evaluated. Four weeks sage tea treatment had no effects on plasma glucose. An improvement in lipid profile was observed with lower plasma LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels as well as higher plasma HDL cholesterol levels during and two weeks after treatment. Sage tea also increased lymphocyte Hsp70 expression and erythrocyte SOD and CAT activities. No hepatotoxic effects or other adverse effects were observed.

  6. Lipid membrane partitioning of lysolipids and fatty acids: Effects of membrane phase structure and detergent chain length

    Høyrup, Lise Pernille Kristine; Davidsen, Jesper; Jørgensen, Kent

    2001-01-01

    The lipid membrane partitioning of lysolipids (lysoPC) and fatty acids (FA) into unilamellar vesicles composed of saturated DC$-16$/PC phospholipids has been determined by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The calorimetric titrations were performed at low temperatures in the ordere...... on, for example, the lipid membrane permeability and the activity of membrane associated enzymes such as phospholipase A$-2$/.......The lipid membrane partitioning of lysolipids (lysoPC) and fatty acids (FA) into unilamellar vesicles composed of saturated DC$-16$/PC phospholipids has been determined by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The calorimetric titrations were performed at low temperatures in the ordered...... gel phase and at high temperatures in the disordered fluid phase of the phospholipid membrane vesicles. The long saturated acyl chains of the lysolipids and fatty acids varied from 10 to 16 carbon atoms and all titrations were performed below the critical micellar concentrations (cmc) of the...

  7. Lipid and fatty acid composition of mesocarp and seed of avocado fruits harvested at northern range in Japan.

    Takenaga, Fumio; Matsuyama, Kaori; Abe, Shin; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Itoh, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    The lipid and fatty acid composition of the mesocarp and seed of avocado fruit grown and harvested in Japan, which is located at the northern range of the avacado, was investigated and compared to an imported avocado purchased commercially. The potential of the avocado mesocarp as an agricultural product in Japan was also explored. Total lipids (TL) accounted for approximately 20% of the mesocarp. Further analysis showed that the neutral lipid (NL) fraction accounted for at least 95% of the TL, and almost 90% of NL was triacylglycerol. Monoenoic acids accounted for at least 65% of the total fatty acids, and oleic acid, which is regarded as an especially important functional component of avacado accounted for approximately 50% of the monounsaturated fatty acids. A comparison of the Japanese avocado cultivars and an imported avocado cultivar in the present study revealed no significant differences in the lipid and fatty acid compositions. Therefore, production of avocado fruit, which is rich in various nutritional components, is expected to be increased on a larger number of farms in Japan in the future. It is believed to be necessary to carry out further verification, such as the establishment of a cultivation technique adoptable to Japan, examination of optimal soil and land features, and cultivar selection. PMID:18838831

  8. Palmitic acid-labeled lipids selectively incorporated into platelet cytoskeleton during aggregation

    Previous experiments showed that during the early stages (20-30 seconds) of aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2 microM) or thrombin (0.1 U/mL) of rabbit or human platelets prelabeled with [3H]palmitic acid, labeled lipid became associated with the cytoskeleton isolated after lysis with 1% Triton X-100, 5 mM EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)]-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid. The association appeared to be related to the number of sites of contact and was independent of the release of granule contents. We have now investigated the nature of the labeled lipids by thin-layer and column chromatography and found differences between the distribution of the label in intact platelets (both stimulated and unstimulated) and the isolated cytoskeletons. In both species, and with either ADP or thrombin as aggregating agent, 70-85% of the label in both intact platelets and in the cytoskeletons was in phospholipids. The distribution of label among the phospholipids in the cytoskeletons was similar to that in intact platelets except that the percentage of label in phosphatidylcholine was significantly higher in the cytoskeletons of human platelets than in the intact platelets, and the percentage of label in phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylinositol was significantly lower in the cytoskeletons of rabbit platelets and thrombin-aggregated human platelets than in intact platelets. The cytoskeletons contained a lower percentage of label in triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester than the intact platelets. Contrary to a report in the literature, we found no evidence for the incorporation of diacylglycerol and palmitic acid into the cytoskeleton

  9. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid β-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity

  10. Effects of Glycyrrhizic Acid on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ, Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL, Serum Lipid and HOMA-IR in Rats

    Chia Yoke Yin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on ligand binding potential of glycyrrhizic acid, a potential agonist to PPARγ, displayed encouraging results in amelioration of metabolic syndrome. The regulation of gene cassettes by PPARγ affects glucose homeostasis, lipid, lipoprotein metabolism and adipogenesis. This study was performed to determine the effects of GA on total PPARγ and LPL expression levels, lipid parameters and HOMA-IR. Oral administration of 100 mg/kg GA for 24 hours resulted in an increase in insulin sensitivity with decreases in blood glucose, serum insulin and HOMA-IR. Improvement in serum lipid parameters was also observed with a decrease in triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and an elevation in HDL-cholesterol. GA administration also resulted in up-regulation of total PPARγ and LPL expression levels in the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, abdominal and quadriceps femoris muscles, as well as liver and kidney, with a significant up-regulation only in the visceral adipose tissue, abdominal and quadriceps femoris muscles. Thus, oral administration of 100 mg/kg GA for 24 hours improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles and induced upregulation of total PPARγ and LPL expression levels in all studied tissues.