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Sample records for acidobacteria provide insight

  1. The Ecology of Acidobacteria: Moving beyond Genes and Genomes

    Kielak, Anna M.; Barreto, Cristine C.; Kowalchuk, George A.; van Veen, Johannes A.; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-01-01

    The phylum Acidobacteria is one of the most widespread and abundant on the planet, yet remarkably our knowledge of the role of these diverse organisms in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems remains surprisingly rudimentary. This blatant knowledge gap stems to a large degree from the difficulties associated with the cultivation of these bacteria by classical means. Given the phylogenetic breadth of the Acidobacteria, which is similar to the metabolically diverse Proteobacteria, it is clear that detailed and functional descriptions of acidobacterial assemblages are necessary. Fortunately, recent advances are providing a glimpse into the ecology of members of the phylum Acidobacteria. These include novel cultivation and enrichment strategies, genomic characterization and analyses of metagenomic DNA from environmental samples. Here, we couple the data from these complementary approaches for a better understanding of their role in the environment, thereby providing some initial insights into the ecology of this important phylum. All cultured acidobacterial type species are heterotrophic, and members of subdivisions 1, 3, and 4 appear to be more versatile in carbohydrate utilization. Genomic and metagenomic data predict a number of ecologically relevant capabilities for some acidobacteria, including the ability to: use of nitrite as N source, respond to soil macro-, micro nutrients and soil acidity, express multiple active transporters, degrade gellan gum and produce exopolysaccharide (EPS). Although these predicted properties allude to a competitive life style in soil, only very few of these prediction shave been confirmed via physiological studies. The increased availability of genomic and physiological information, coupled to distribution data in field surveys and experiments, should direct future progress in unraveling the ecology of this important but still enigmatic phylum. PMID:27303369

  2. Acidobacteria form a coherent but highly diverse group within the bacterial domain: evidence from environmental genomics

    Quaiser, Achim; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Lanz, Christa; Schuster, Stephan C; Treusch, Alexander H; Eck, Jürgen; Schleper, Christa

    2003-01-01

    ecological role and extensive metabolic versatility. However, the genetic and physiological information about Acidobacteria is scarce. In order to gain insight into genome structure, evolution and diversity of these microorganisms we have initiated an environmental genomic approach by constructing large...... well-studied bacterial phyla....

  3. Comparative genomics provides insight into maize adaptation in temperate regions.

    Hufford, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    A new study provides insights into the evolution of maize during its global spread into temperate regions from its origin in coastal Mexico.Please see related Research article: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-1009-x. PMID:27411931

  4. Marsupial genome sequences: providing insight into evolution and disease.

    Deakin, Janine E

    2012-01-01

    Marsupials (metatherians), with their position in vertebrate phylogeny and their unique biological features, have been studied for many years by a dedicated group of researchers, but it has only been since the sequencing of the first marsupial genome that their value has been more widely recognised. We now have genome sequences for three distantly related marsupial species (the grey short-tailed opossum, the tammar wallaby, and Tasmanian devil), with the promise of many more genomes to be sequenced in the near future, making this a particularly exciting time in marsupial genomics. The emergence of a transmissible cancer, which is obliterating the Tasmanian devil population, has increased the importance of obtaining and analysing marsupial genome sequence for understanding such diseases as well as for conservation efforts. In addition, these genome sequences have facilitated studies aimed at answering questions regarding gene and genome evolution and provided insight into the evolution of epigenetic mechanisms. Here I highlight the major advances in our understanding of evolution and disease, facilitated by marsupial genome projects, and speculate on the future contributions to be made by such sequences. PMID:24278712

  5. Numerical experiments providing new insights into plasma focus fusion devices

    Recent extensive and systematic numerical experiments have uncovered new insights into plasma focus fusion devices including the following: (1) a plasma current limitation effect, as device static inductance is reduced towards very small values; (2) scaling laws of neutron yield and soft x-ray yield as functions of storage energies and currents; (3) a global scaling law for neutron yield as a function of storage energy combining experimental and numerical data showing that scaling deterioration has probably been interpreted as neutron 'saturation'; and (4) a fundamental cause of neutron 'saturation'. The ground-breaking insights thus gained may completely change the directions of plasma focus fusion research. (author)

  6. Social network analysis provides insights into African swine fever epidemiology.

    Lichoti, Jacqueline Kasiiti; Davies, Jocelyn; Kitala, Philip M; Githigia, Samuel M; Okoth, Edward; Maru, Yiheyis; Bukachi, Salome A; Bishop, Richard P

    2016-04-01

    Pig movements play a significant role in the spread of economically important infectious diseases such as the African swine fever. Characterization of movement networks between pig farms and through other types of farm and household enterprises that are involved in pig value chains can provide useful information on the role that different participants in the networks play in pathogen transmission. Analysis of social networks that underpin these pig movements can reveal pathways that are important in the transmission of disease, trade in commodities, the dissemination of information and the influence of behavioural norms. We assessed pig movements among pig keeping households within West Kenya and East Uganda and across the shared Kenya-Uganda border in the study region, to gain insight into within-country and trans-boundary pig movements. Villages were sampled using a randomized cluster design. Data were collected through interviews in 2012 and 2013 from 683 smallholder pig-keeping households in 34 villages. NodeXL software was used to describe pig movement networks at village level. The pig movement and trade networks were localized and based on close social networks involving family ties, friendships and relationships with neighbours. Pig movement network modularity ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 and exhibited good community structure within the network implying an easy flow of knowledge and adoption of new attitudes and beliefs, but also promoting an enhanced rate of disease transmission. The average path length of 5 defined using NodeXL, indicated that disease could easily reach every node in a cluster. Cross-border boar service between Uganda and Kenya was also recorded. Unmonitored trade in both directions was prevalent. While most pig transactions in the absence of disease, were at a small scale (10km. The close social relationships between actors in pig movement networks indicate the potential for possible interventions to develop shared norms and mutually accepted

  7. Studies provide new insights into Japan's March 2011 tsunami

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    New data, field studies, modeling efforts, and surveys are revealing a wealth of information about the devastating tsunami that followed the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake. The earthquake and resulting tsunami caused massive destruction and the loss of about 20,000 lives. At the AGU Fall Meeting last week in San Francisco, Calif., scientists reported a variety of new insights about the tsunami and its effects and about tsunami defense mechanisms, ways to forecast tsunami inundation, and public perception of risk. For example, part of the reason the tsunami generated by the Tohoku quake was so large and destructive was that it was a "merging tsunami." Merging tsunamis, which have been hypothesized but not previously observed with certainty, grow in size dramatically when seafloor topography alters the direction in which the waves are traveling and causes two waves to merge into a larger wave. The alteration of wave paths by complex ocean-floor topography makes it difficult to predict where the largest waves will strike land. "Tsunamis often destroy some coastal areas while leaving others with little damage," explained Tony Song of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, at a 5 December press conference.

  8. A heterozygous moth genome provides insights into herbivory and detoxification.

    You, Minsheng; Yue, Zhen; He, Weiyi; Yang, Xinhua; Yang, Guang; Xie, Miao; Zhan, Dongliang; Baxter, Simon W; Vasseur, Liette; Gurr, Geoff M; Douglas, Carl J; Bai, Jianlin; Wang, Ping; Cui, Kai; Huang, Shiguo; Li, Xianchun; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Zhangyan; Chen, Qilin; Liu, Chunhui; Wang, Bo; Li, Xiaojing; Xu, Xiufeng; Lu, Changxin; Hu, Min; Davey, John W; Smith, Sandy M; Chen, Mingshun; Xia, Xiaofeng; Tang, Weiqi; Ke, Fushi; Zheng, Dandan; Hu, Yulan; Song, Fengqin; You, Yanchun; Ma, Xiaoli; Peng, Lu; Zheng, Yunkai; Liang, Yong; Chen, Yaqiong; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Younan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Guoqing; Fang, Lin; Li, Jingxiang; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Yadan; Gou, Caiyun; Wang, Junyi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun

    2013-02-01

    How an insect evolves to become a successful herbivore is of profound biological and practical importance. Herbivores are often adapted to feed on a specific group of evolutionarily and biochemically related host plants, but the genetic and molecular bases for adaptation to plant defense compounds remain poorly understood. We report the first whole-genome sequence of a basal lepidopteran species, Plutella xylostella, which contains 18,071 protein-coding and 1,412 unique genes with an expansion of gene families associated with perception and the detoxification of plant defense compounds. A recent expansion of retrotransposons near detoxification-related genes and a wider system used in the metabolism of plant defense compounds are shown to also be involved in the development of insecticide resistance. This work shows the genetic and molecular bases for the evolutionary success of this worldwide herbivore and offers wider insights into insect adaptation to plant feeding, as well as opening avenues for more sustainable pest management. PMID:23313953

  9. Iso-response methods provide direct insight into dendritic computations.

    Stefan Häusler

    2014-04-01

    These results demonstrate that iso-response methods are well suited to unravel complex dendritic computations in model neurons and that they can provide a powerful tool for experimental research with applications in multi-patch or optogenetic recordings.

  10. NIH scientists provide new insight into rare kidney cancer

    NIH scientists have discovered a unique feature of a rare, hereditary form of kidney cancer that may provide a better understanding of its progression and metastasis, possibly laying the foundation for the development of new targeted therapies.

  11. Athena: Providing Insight into the History of the Universe

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-01-01

    The American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics has provided a Request for Proposal which calls for a manned mission to a Near-Earth Object. It is the goal of Team COLBERT to respond to their request by providing a reusable system that can be implemented as a solid stepping stone for future manned trips to Mars and beyond. Despite Team COLBERT consisting of only students in Aerospace Engineering, in order to achieve this feat, the team must employ the use of Systems Engineering. Tools and processes from Systems Engineering will provide quantitative and semi-quantitative tools for making design decisions and evaluating items such as budgets and schedules. This paper will provide an in-depth look at some of the Systems Engineering processes employed and will step through the design process of a Human Asteroid Exploration System.

  12. The Atlantic salmon genome provides insights into rediploidization

    Lien, Sigbjorn; Koop, Ben F; Sandve, Simen R.; Miller, Jason R.; Kent, Matthew P.; Nome, Torfinn; Hvidsten, Torgeir R.; Leong, Jong S; Minkley, David R; Zimin, Aleksey; Grammes, Fabian; Grove, Harald; Gjuvsland, Arne; Walenz, Brian; Hermansen, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    The whole-genome duplication 80 million years ago of the common ancestor of salmonids (salmonid-specific fourth vertebrate whole-genome duplication, Ss4R) provides unique opportunities to learn about the evolutionary fate of a duplicated vertebrate genome in 70 extant lineages. Here we present a high-quality genome assembly for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and show that large genomic reorganizations, coinciding with bursts of transposon-mediated repeat expansions, were crucial for the post-...

  13. Elephant Transcriptome Provides Insights into the Evolution of Eutherian Placentation

    Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Sterner, Kirstin N.; Romero, Roberto; THAN, Nandor Gabor; Juan M Gonzalez; Weckle, Amy; Xing, Jun; Benirschke, Kurt; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E.

    2012-01-01

    The chorioallantoic placenta connects mother and fetus in eutherian pregnancies. In order to understand the evolution of the placenta and provide further understanding of placenta biology, we sequenced the transcriptome of a term placenta of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana) and compared these data with RNA sequence and microarray data from other eutherian placentas including human, mouse, and cow. We characterized the composition of 55,910 expressed sequence tag (i.e., cDNA) contigs u...

  14. Daphnia magna ecotoxicogenomics provides mechanistic insights into metal toxicity.

    Poynton, Helen C; Varshavsky, Julia R; Chang, Bonnie; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Chan, Sarah; Holman, Patricia S; Loguinov, Alexandre V; Bauer, Darren J; Komachi, Kelly; Theil, Elizabeth C; Perkins, Edward J; Hughes, Owen; Vulpe, Chris D

    2007-02-01

    Toxicogenomics has provided innovative approaches to chemical screening, risk assessment, and predictive toxicology. If applied to ecotoxicology, genomics tools could greatly enhance the ability to understand the modes of toxicity in environmentally relevant organisms. Daphnia magna, a small aquatic crustacean, is considered a "keystone" species in ecological food webs and is an indicator species for toxicant exposure. Our objective was to demonstrate the potential utility of gene expression profiling in ecotoxicology by identifying novel biomarkers and uncovering potential modes of action in D. magna. Using a custom D. magna cDNA microarray, we identified distinct expression profiles in response to sublethal copper, cadmium, and zinc exposures and discovered specific biomarkers of exposure including two probable metallothioneins, and a ferritin mRNA with a functional IRE. The gene expression patterns support known mechanisms of metal toxicity and reveal novel modes of action including zinc inhibition of chitinase activity. By integrating gene expression profiling into an environmentally important organism, this study provides experimental support for the utility of ecotoxicogenomics. PMID:17328222

  15. Metaproteomics provides functional insight into activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    Paul Wilmes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Through identification of highly expressed proteins from a mixed culture activated sludge system this study provides functional evidence of microbial transformations important for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was successfully operated for different levels of EBPR, removing around 25, 40 and 55 mg/l P. The microbial communities were dominated by the uncultured polyphosphate-accumulating organism "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis". When EBPR failed, the sludge was dominated by tetrad-forming alpha-Proteobacteria. Representative and reproducible 2D gel protein separations were obtained for all sludge samples. 638 protein spots were matched across gels generated from the phosphate removing sludges. 111 of these were excised and 46 proteins were identified using recently available sludge metagenomic sequences. Many of these closely match proteins from "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" and could be directly linked to the EBPR process. They included enzymes involved in energy generation, polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen synthesis, glyoxylate/TCA cycle, fatty acid beta oxidation, fatty acid synthesis and phosphate transport. Several proteins involved in cellular stress response were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Importantly, this study provides direct evidence linking the metabolic activities of "Accumulibacter" to the chemical transformations observed in EBPR. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to current EBPR metabolic models.

  16. Hotline questions provide insight on EPA's interpretation of the regs

    The RCRA/Superfund and Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Hotlines (1-800-424-9346 and 1-800-535-0202, respectively) provide the regulated community with answers to questions about the regulation of hazardous wastes under RCRA, CERCLA, and EPCRA. Some questions fielded by the Hotline staff require interpretation by EPA personnel, and these written interpretations are distributed within the agency in monthly reports. Although the interpretations are not legally binding and cannot be considered open-quotes officialclose quotes agency policy, they are helpful in understanding the regulations. Presented below are summaries of Hotline questions that are of widespread interest. The summaries are based on the RCRA/Superfund and Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Hotline Reports for June and July 1993

  17. Hotline questions provide insight on EPA's interpretation of the regs

    The RCRA/Superfund and Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Hotlines (1-800-424-9346) and 1-800-535-0202, (respectively) provide the regulated community with answers to questions about the regulation of hazardous wastes under RCRA, CERCLA, and EPCRA. Some questions fielded by the Hotline staff require interpretation by EPA personnel, and these written interpretations are distributed within the agency in monthly reports. Although the interpretations are not legally binding and cannot be considered open-quotes officialclose quotes agency policy, they are helpful in understanding the regulations. Presented below are summaries of Hotline questions that are of widespread interest. The summaries are based on the RCRA/Superfund and Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Hotline Reports for October 1995 through February 1995

  18. Monoclonal regulatory T cells provide insights into T cell suppression.

    Gubser, Céline; Schmaler, Mathias; Rossi, Simona W; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a crucial role in maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis. However an understanding of how Tregs function at a cellular and molecular level has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we make use of a T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, Rag(-/-) mouse expressing a Forkhead-Box-Protein P3 (Foxp3) transgene. This mouse provides a source of monoclonal CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T cells with a defined specificity. Here we show that monoclonal B3K506 Tregs are functional in vitro and in vivo and clearly require cognate antigen to be suppressive. We further show that the strength of Treg stimulation determines the strength of Treg mediated suppression. Finally we analysed various suppressive mechanisms used by monoclonal Tregs and found that Treg-Tconv proximity is a parameter, which correlates with enhanced suppression. PMID:27210828

  19. Chromosomal passports provide new insights into diffusion of emmer wheat.

    Ekaterina D Badaeva

    Full Text Available Emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccon schrank (syn. T. dicoccum (schrank schÜbl., is one of the earliest domesticated crops, harboring a wide range of genetic diversity and agronomically valuable traits. The crop, however, is currently largely neglected. We provide a wealth of karyotypic information from a comprehensive collection of emmer wheat and related taxa. In addition to C-banding polymorphisms, we identified 43 variants of chromosomal rearrangements in T. dicoccon; among them 26 (60.4% were novel. The T7A:5B translocation was most abundant in Western Europe and the Mediterranean. The plant genetic resources investigated here might become important in the future for wheat improvement. Based on cluster analysis four major karyotypic groups were discriminated within the T. dicoccon genepool, each harboring characteristic C-banding patterns and translocation spectra: the balkan, asian, european and ethiopian groups. We postulate four major diffusion routes of the crop and discuss their migration out of the Fertile Crescent considering latest archaeobotanical findings.

  20. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  1. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into

    Martin, F [UMR, France; Aerts, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ahren, D [Lund University, Sweden; Brun, A [UMR, France; Danchin, E [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Duchaussoy, F [UMR, France; Gibon, J [UMR, France; Kohler, A [UMR, France; Lindquist, E [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pereda, V [UMR, France; Salamov, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Shapiro, HJ [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wuyts, J [UMR, France; Blaudez, D. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France; Buee, M [UMR, France; Brokstein, P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Canbeck, B [Lund University, Sweden; Cohen, D [UMR, France; Courty, PE [UMR, France; Coutinho, PM [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Delaruelle, C [UMR, France; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deveau, A [UMR, France; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Duplessis, S [UMR, France; Fraissinet-Tachet, L [Universite de Lyon, France; Lucic, E [UMR, France; Frey-Klett, P [UMR, France; Fourrey, C [UMR, France; Feussner, I [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Gay, G [Universite de Lyon, France; Grimwood, Jane [Stanford University; Hoegger, P J [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Jain, P [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Kilaru, S [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Labbe, J [UMR, France; Lin, Y C [Ghent University, Belgium; Legue, V [UMR, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Marmeisse, R [Universite de Lyon, France; Melayah, D [Universite de Lyon, France; Montanini, B [UMR, France; Muratet, M [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Nehls, U [Eberhard-Karls-Universitat, Tubingen, Germany; Niculita-Hirzel, H [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Oudot-Le Secq, M P [UMR, France; Peter, M [UMR, France; Quesneville, H [Unite de Recherches en Genomique-Info,Evry Cedex; Rajashekar, B [Lund University, Sweden; Reich, M [UMR, France; Rouhler, N [UMR, France; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Chalot, M [UMR, France; Henrissat, B [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Kues, U [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Lucas, S [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Van de Peer, Y [Ghent University, Belgium; Podila, G [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Polle, A [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Pukkila, P J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rouze, P [Ghent University, Belgium; Sanders, I R [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Stajich, J E [University of California, Berkeley; Tunlid, A [Lund University, Sweden; Grigoriev, I. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  2. Study Provides Insights into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease: Autoimmmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome ...

    ... Related Links​ ALPS Unit, Laboratory of Immunology Autoimmune Diseases Immune System Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases National Library of ... Study Provides Insights Into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease NIH Scientists Report Findings From 20 Years of ...

  3. Forward Dynamics Simulations Provide insight into Muscle Mechanical Work during Human Locomotion

    Neptune, Richard R.; McGowan, Craig P.; Kautz, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Complex musculoskeletal models and computer simulations can provide critical insight into muscle mechanical work output during locomotion. Simulations provide both a consistent mechanical solution that can be interrogated at multiple levels (muscle fiber, musculotendon, net joint moment and whole body work) and an ideal framework to identify limitations with different estimates of muscle work and the resulting implications for metabolic cost and efficiency.

  4. Comparative sequencing provides insights about the structure and conservation of marsupial and monotreme genomes

    Margulies, Elliott H.; Maduro, Valerie V.B.; Thomas, Pamela J.; Tomkins, Jeffery P.; Amemiya, Chris T.; Luo, Meizhong; Green, Eric D

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing and comparative analyses of genomes from multiple vertebrates are providing insights about the genetic basis for biological diversity. To date, these efforts largely have focused on eutherian mammals, chicken, and fish. In this article, we describe the generation and study of genomic sequences from noneutherian mammals, a group of species occupying unusual phylogenetic positions. A large sequence data set (totaling >5 Mb) was generated for the same orthologous region in three marsu...

  5. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of th...

  6. Structure of the Hantavirus Nucleoprotein Provides Insights into the Mechanism of RNA Encapsidation.

    Olal, Daniel; Daumke, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Hantaviruses are etiological agents of life-threatening hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. The nucleoprotein (N) of hantavirus is essential for viral transcription and replication, thus representing an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We have determined the crystal structure of hantavirus N to 3.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a two-lobed, mostly α-helical structure that is distantly related to that of orthobunyavirus Ns. A basic RNA binding pocket is located at the intersection between the two lobes. We provide evidence that oligomerization is mediated by amino- and C-terminal arms that bind to the adjacent monomers. Based on these findings, we suggest a model for the oligomeric ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Our structure provides mechanistic insights into RNA encapsidation in the genus Hantavirus and constitutes a template for drug discovery efforts aimed at combating hantavirus infections. PMID:26923588

  7. Free energy calculation provides insight into the action mechanism of selective PARP-1 inhibitor.

    Cao, Ran

    2016-04-01

    Selective poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 inhibitor represents promising therapy against cancers with a good balance between efficacy and safety. Owing to the conserved structure between PARP-1 and PARP-2, most of the clinical and experimental drugs show equivalent inhibition against both targets. Most recently, it's disclosed a highly selective PARP-1 inhibitor (NMS-P118) with promising pharmacokinetic properties. Herein, we combined molecular simulation with free energy calculation to gain insights into the selective mechanism of NMS-P118. Our results suggest the reduction of binding affinity for PARP-2 is attributed to the unfavorable conformational change of protein, which is accompanied by a significant energy penalty. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis study further reveals the important role for a tyrosine residue of donor loop (Tyr889(PARP-1) and Tyr455(PARP-2)) in contributing to the ligand selectivity. Retrospective structural analysis indicates the ligand-induced movement of Tyr455(PARP-2) disrupts the intra-molecule hydrogen bonding network, which partially accounts for the "high-energy" protein conformation in the presence of NMS-P118. Interestingly, such effect isn't observed in other non-selective PARP inhibitors including BMN673 and A861695, which validates the computational prediction. Our work provides energetic insight into the subtle variations in the crystal structures and could facilitate rational design of new selective PARP inhibitor. PMID:26969680

  8. Trunk anomalies in the centipede Stigmatogaster subterranea provide insight into late-embryonic segmentation.

    Leśniewska, Małgorzata; Bonato, Lucio; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2009-09-01

    We describe and analyze naturally occurring anomalies in the segmental structures of the trunk in an isolated population of the geophilomorph centipede Stigmatogaster subterranea. Recorded anomalies include mispaired tergites, shrunk segments, variously deformed sclerites, bifurcated trunk, and defects of spiracles and sternal pore areas. One specimen has a perfect segmentally patterned trunk, but with an even number of leg-bearing segments, representing the first record of such a phenotype in adult centipedes. We interpret these anomalies as the effects of perturbation of specific morphogenetic processes in trunk segmentation, occurring at different embryonic stages. The variety of segmental anomalies found in this population provides insights into the developmental process of segmentation and its evolution in geophilomorph centipedes. Variation in dorsal mispairing anomalies demonstrates that segments, as traditionally defined in arthropod morphology, are not the effective developmental units throughout embryogenesis. PMID:19477297

  9. The Genome of Undifilum oxytropis Provides Insights into Swainsonine Biosynthesis and Locoism

    Lu, Hao; Quan, Haiyun; Ren, Zhenhui; Wang, Shuai; Xue, Ruixu; Zhao, Baoyu

    2016-01-01

    Undifilum oxytropis is a fungal endophyte of locoweeds. It produces swainsonine, which is the principal toxic ingredient of locoweeds. However, the genes, pathways and mechanisms of swainsonine biosynthesis are not known. In this study, the genome of U. oxytropis was firstly sequenced and assembled into a 70.05 megabases (Mb) draft genome, which encoded 11,057 protein-coding genes, and 54% of them were similar to current publicly available sequences. U. oxytropis genes were annotated and 164 putative genes were annotated into enzymes, such as Saccharopine dehydrogenase, Saccharopine oxidase, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, hypothesized to be involved in the biosynthesis pathway of swainsonine. The genome sequence and gene annotation of U. oxytropis will provide new insights into functional analyses. The characterization of genes in swainsonine biosynthesis will greatly facilitate locoweed poisoning research and help direct locoism management. PMID:27477109

  10. Comparative Analysis of Bat Genomes Provides Insight into the Evolution of Flight and Immunity

    Zhang, Guojie; Cowled, Christopher; Shi, Zhengli;

    2013-01-01

    Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight and are notorious reservoir hosts for some of the world's most highly pathogenic viruses, including Nipah, Hendra, Ebola, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). To identify genetic changes associated with the development of bat-specific......Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight and are notorious reservoir hosts for some of the world's most highly pathogenic viruses, including Nipah, Hendra, Ebola, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). To identify genetic changes associated with the development of bat...... that may be related to the origin of flight, as well as expansion and contraction of important gene families. Comparison of bat genomes with other mammalian species has provided new insights into bat biology and evolution....

  11. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder

  12. Whole Genome Analysis of Leptospira licerasiae Provides Insight into Leptospiral Evolution and Pathogenicity

    Selengut, Jeremy D.; Harkins, Derek M.; Patra, Kailash P.; Moreno, Angelo; Lehmann, Jason S.; Purushe, Janaki; Sanka, Ravi; Torres, Michael; Webster, Nicholas J.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Matthias, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The whole genome analysis of two strains of the first intermediately pathogenic leptospiral species to be sequenced (Leptospira licerasiae strains VAR010 and MMD0835) provides insight into their pathogenic potential and deepens our understanding of leptospiral evolution. Comparative analysis of eight leptospiral genomes shows the existence of a core leptospiral genome comprising 1547 genes and 452 conserved genes restricted to infectious species (including L. licerasiae) that are likely to be pathogenicity-related. Comparisons of the functional content of the genomes suggests that L. licerasiae retains several proteins related to nitrogen, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism which might help to explain why these Leptospira grow well in artificial media compared with pathogenic species. L. licerasiae strains VAR010T and MMD0835 possess two prophage elements. While one element is circular and shares homology with LE1 of L. biflexa, the second is cryptic and homologous to a previously identified but unnamed region in L. interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Lai. We also report a unique O-antigen locus in L. licerasiae comprised of a 6-gene cluster that is unexpectedly short compared with L. interrogans in which analogous regions may include >90 such genes. Sequence homology searches suggest that these genes were acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Furthermore, seven putative genomic islands ranging in size from 5 to 36 kb are present also suggestive of antecedent LGT. How Leptospira become naturally competent remains to be determined, but considering the phylogenetic origins of the genes comprising the O-antigen cluster and other putative laterally transferred genes, L. licerasiae must be able to exchange genetic material with non-invasive environmental bacteria. The data presented here demonstrate that L. licerasiae is genetically more closely related to pathogenic than to saprophytic Leptospira and provide insight into the genomic bases for its infectiousness

  13. Whole genome analysis of Leptospira licerasiae provides insight into leptospiral evolution and pathogenicity.

    Jessica N Ricaldi

    Full Text Available The whole genome analysis of two strains of the first intermediately pathogenic leptospiral species to be sequenced (Leptospira licerasiae strains VAR010 and MMD0835 provides insight into their pathogenic potential and deepens our understanding of leptospiral evolution. Comparative analysis of eight leptospiral genomes shows the existence of a core leptospiral genome comprising 1547 genes and 452 conserved genes restricted to infectious species (including L. licerasiae that are likely to be pathogenicity-related. Comparisons of the functional content of the genomes suggests that L. licerasiae retains several proteins related to nitrogen, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism which might help to explain why these Leptospira grow well in artificial media compared with pathogenic species. L. licerasiae strains VAR010(T and MMD0835 possess two prophage elements. While one element is circular and shares homology with LE1 of L. biflexa, the second is cryptic and homologous to a previously identified but unnamed region in L. interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Lai. We also report a unique O-antigen locus in L. licerasiae comprised of a 6-gene cluster that is unexpectedly short compared with L. interrogans in which analogous regions may include >90 such genes. Sequence homology searches suggest that these genes were acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT. Furthermore, seven putative genomic islands ranging in size from 5 to 36 kb are present also suggestive of antecedent LGT. How Leptospira become naturally competent remains to be determined, but considering the phylogenetic origins of the genes comprising the O-antigen cluster and other putative laterally transferred genes, L. licerasiae must be able to exchange genetic material with non-invasive environmental bacteria. The data presented here demonstrate that L. licerasiae is genetically more closely related to pathogenic than to saprophytic Leptospira and provide insight into the genomic bases for

  14. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Sidhu, Navdeep S. [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schreiber, Kathrin [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Becker, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Usón, Isabel [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB–CSIC), Barcelona Science Park, Baldiri Reixach 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de; Steinfeld, Robert, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  15. Contrasting soil bacterial community structure between the phyla Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria in tropical Southeast Asian and temperate Japanese forests.

    Miyashita, Naohiko T

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacterial community structures of six dominant phyla (Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria) and unclassified bacteria detected in tropical Sarawakian and temperate Japanese forests were compared based on 16S rRNA gene sequence variation. The class composition in each phylum was similar among the studied forests; however, significant heterogeneities of class frequencies were detected. Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria were the most dominant phyla in all six forests, but differed in the level of bacterial species diversity, pattern of species occurrence and association pattern of species composition with physicochemical properties in soil. Species diversity among Acidobacteria was approximately half that among Proteobacteria, based on the number of clusters and the Chao1 index, even though a similar number of sequence reads were obtained for these two phyla. In contrast, species diversity within Planctomycetes and Bacteroidetes was nearly as high as within Acidobacteria, despite many fewer sequence reads. The density of species (the number of sequence reads per cluster) correlated negatively with species diversity, and species density within Acidobacteria was approximately twice that within Proteobacteria. Although the percentage of forest-specific species was high for all bacterial groups, sampling site-specific species varied among bacterial groups, indicating limited inter-forest migration and differential movement of bacteria in forest soil. For five of the seven bacterial groups, including Acidobacteria, soil pH appeared to strongly influence species composition, but this association was not observed for Proteobacterial species. Topology of UPGMA trees and pattern of NMDS plots among the forests differed among the bacterial groups, suggesting that each bacterial group has adapted and evolved independently in each forest. PMID:26399766

  16. The Microbial Signature Provides Insight into the Mechanistic Basis of Coral Success across Reef Habitats

    Leggat, William; Bongaerts, Pim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For ecosystems vulnerable to environmental change, understanding the spatiotemporal stability of functionally crucial symbioses is fundamental to determining the mechanisms by which these ecosystems may persist. The coral Pachyseris speciosa is a successful environmental generalist that succeeds in diverse reef habitats. The generalist nature of this coral suggests it may have the capacity to form functionally significant microbial partnerships to facilitate access to a range of nutritional sources within different habitats. Here, we propose that coral is a metaorganism hosting three functionally distinct microbial interactions: a ubiquitous core microbiome of very few symbiotic host-selected bacteria, a microbiome of spatially and/or regionally explicit core microbes filling functional niches (100,000 phylotypes). We find that this coral hosts upwards of 170,000 distinct phylotypes and provide evidence for the persistence of a select group of bacteria in corals across environmental habitats of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. We further show that a higher number of bacteria are consistently associated with corals on mesophotic reefs than on shallow reefs. An increase in microbial diversity with depth suggests reliance by this coral on bacteria for nutrient acquisition on reefs exposed to nutrient upwelling. Understanding the complex microbial communities of host organisms across broad biotic and abiotic environments as functionally distinct microbiomes can provide insight into those interactions that are ubiquitous niche symbioses and those that provide competitive advantage within the hosts’ environment. PMID:27460792

  17. Hyper-dry conditions provide new insights into the cause of extreme floods after wildfire

    Moody, John A.; Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    A catastrophic wildfire in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado provided a unique opportunity to investigate soil conditions immediately after a wildfire and before alteration by rainfall. Measurements of near-surface (θ; and matric suction, ψ), rainfall, and wind velocity were started 8 days after the wildfire began. These measurements established that hyper-dryconditions (θ 3 cm-3; ψ > ~ 3 x 105 cm) existed and provided an in-situ retention curve for these conditions. These conditions exacerbate the effects of water repellency (natural and fire-induced) and limit the effectiveness of capillarity and gravity driven infiltration into fire-affected soils. The important consequence is that given hyper-dryconditions, the critical rewetting process before the first rain is restricted to the diffusion–adsorption of water-vapor. This process typically has a time scale of days to weeks (especially when the hydrologic effects of the ash layer are included) that is longer than the typical time scale (minutes to hours) of some rainstorms, such that under hyper-dryconditions essentially no rain infiltrates. The existence of hyper-dryconditions provides insight into why, frequently during the first rain storm after a wildfire, nearly all rainfall becomes runoff causing extremefloods and debris flows.

  18. Molecular fossils in modern genomes provide physiological and geochemical insights to the ancient earth (Invited)

    Dupont, C.; Caetano-Anolles, G.

    2010-12-01

    The genomes of extant organisms are ultimately derived from ancient life, thus theoretically contain insight to ancient physiology, ecology, and environments. In particular, metalloenzymes may be particularly insightful. The fundamental chemistry of trace elements dictates the molecular speciation and reactivity both within cells and the environment at large. Using protein structure and comparative genomics, we elucidate several major influences this chemistry has had upon biology. All of life exhibits the same proteome size-dependent scaling for the number of metal-binding proteins within a proteome. This fundamental evolutionary constant shows that the selection of one element occurs at the exclusion of another, with the eschewal of Fe for Zn and Ca being a defining feature of eukaryotic pro- teomes. Early life lacked both the structures required to control intracellular metal concentrations and the metal-binding proteins that catalyze electron transport and redox transformations. The development of protein structures for metal homeostasis coincided with the emergence of metal-specific structures, which predomi- nantly bound metals abundant in the Archean ocean. Potentially, this promoted the diversification of emerging lineages of Archaea and Bacteria through the establishment of biogeochemical cycles. In contrast, structures binding Cu and Zn evolved much later, pro- viding further evidence that environmental availability influenced the selection of the elements. The late evolving Zn-binding proteins are fundamental to eukaryotic cellular biology, and Zn bioavailabil- ity may have been a limiting factor in eukaryotic evolution. The results presented here provide an evolutionary timeline based on genomic characteristics, and key hypotheses can be tested by alternative geochemical methods.

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Manganese-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Provides Insight on the Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Pathway

    Lockhart, Ainsley; Zvenigorodsky, Natasha; Pedraza, Mary Ann; Lindquist, Erika

    2011-08-11

    The biosynthesis of chlorophyll and other tetrapyrroles is a vital but poorly understood process. Recent genomic advances with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have created opportunity to more closely examine the mechanisms of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway via transcriptome analysis. Manganese is a nutrient of interest for complex reactions because of its multiple stable oxidation states and role in molecular oxygen coordination. C. reinhardtii was cultured in Manganese-deplete Tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) media for 24 hours and used to create cDNA libraries for sequencing using Illumina TruSeq technology. Transcriptome analysis provided intriguing insight on possible regulatory mechanisms in the pathway. Evidence supports similarities of GTR (Glutamyl-tRNA synthase) to its Chlorella vulgaris homolog in terms of Mn requirements. Data was also suggestive of Mn-related compensatory up-regulation for pathway proteins CHLH1 (Manganese Chelatase), GUN4 (Magnesium chelatase activating protein), and POR1 (Light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase). Intriguingly, data suggests possible reciprocal expression of oxygen dependent CPX1 (coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) and oxygen independent CPX2. Further analysis using RT-PCR could provide compelling evidence for several novel regulatory mechanisms in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway.

  20. Dynamic transcriptional profiling provides insights into tuberous root development in Rehmannia glutinosa

    Peng eSun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, a herb of the Scrophulariaceae family, is widely cultivated in the Northern part of China. The tuberous root has well known medicinal properties; however, yield and quality are threatened by abiotic and biotic stresses. Understanding the molecular process of tuberous root development may help identify novel targets for its control. In the present study, we used Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly strategies to obtain a reference transcriptome that is relevant to tuberous root development. We then conducted RNA-seq quantification analysis to determine gene expression profiles of the adventitious root (AR, thickening adventitious root (TAR, and the developing tuberous root (DTR. Expression profiling identified a total of 6,974 differentially expressed unigenes during root developmental. Bioinformatics analysis and gene expression profiling revealed changes in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and plant hormone biosynthesis during root development. Moreover, we identified and allocated putative functions to the genes involved in tuberous root development, including genes related to major carbohydrate metabolism, hormone metabolism, and transcription regulation. The present study provides the initial description of gene expression profiles of AR, TAR, and DTR, which facilitates identification of genes of interest. Moreover, our work provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tuberous root development and may assist in the design and development of improved breeding schemes for different R. glutinosa varieties through genetic manipulation.

  1. The presence of bacteria within tissue provides insights into the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yunji; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Baek, Keum Jin; Alam, Jehan; Park, Hee Kyung; Choi, Youngnim

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic T cell-mediated mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiopathogenesis. Although various antigens have been considered, what actually triggers the inflammatory response of T cells is unknown. In the present study, we propose that intracellular bacteria present within tissues trigger T cell infiltration and provide target antigens. Sections of OLP (n = 36) and normal (n = 10) oral mucosal tissues were subjected to in situ hybridization using a universal probe targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and immunohistochemistry with anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, and anti-macrophage-specific antibodies. Bacteria were abundant throughout the epithelium and the lamina propria of OLP tissues, which exhibited positive correlations with the levels of infiltrated CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) cells. Furthermore, bacteria were detected within the infiltrated T cells. Pyrosequencing analysis of the mucosal microbiota from OLP patients (n = 13) and control subjects (n = 11) revealed a decrease in Streptococcus and increases in gingivitis/periodontitis-associated bacteria in OLP lesions. Using the selected bacterial species, we demonstrated that certain oral bacteria damage the epithelial physical barrier, are internalized into epithelial cells or T cells, and induce production of T cell chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5. Our findings provide insights into the pathogenesis of OLP. PMID:27383402

  2. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Sidhu, Navdeep S.; Schreiber, Kathrin; Pröpper, Kevin; Becker, Stefan; Usón, Isabel; Sheldrick, George M.; Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph; Steinfeld, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:24816101

  3. Morphological evolution in sea urchin development: hybrids provide insights into the pace of evolution.

    Byrne, Maria; Voltzow, Janice

    2004-04-01

    Hybridisations between related species with divergent ontogenies can provide insights into the bases for evolutionary change in development. One example of such hybridisations involves sea urchin species that exhibit either standard larval (pluteal) stages or those that develop directly from embryo to adult without an intervening feeding larval stage. In such crosses, pluteal features were found to be restored in fertilisations of the eggs of some direct developing sea urchins (Heliocidaris erythrogramma) with the sperm of closely (Heliocidaris tuberculata) and distantly (Pseudoboletia maculata) related species with feeding larvae. Such results can be argued to support the punctuated equilibrium model-conservation in pluteal regulatory systems and a comparatively rapid switch to direct development in evolution.1,2 Generation of hybrids between distantly related direct developers may, however, indicate evolutionary convergence. The 'rescue' of pluteal features by paternal genomes may require maternal factors from H. erythrogramma because the larva of this species has pluteal features. In contrast, pluteal features were not restored in hybridisations with the eggs of Holopneustes purpurescens, which lacks pluteal features. How much of pluteal development can be lost before it cannot be rescued in such crosses? The answer awaits hybridisations among indirect and direct developing sea urchins differing in developmental phenotype, in parallel with investigations of the genetic programs involved. PMID:15057932

  4. New insight into the Solar System's transition disk phase provided by the unusual meteorite Isheyevo

    Morris, Melissa A; Knauth, L Paul

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of planet formation are controlled by the amount of gas remaining in the natal protoplanetary disk (PPDs). Infrared observations show that PPDs undergo a transition stage at several Myr, during which gas densities are reduced. Our Solar System would have experienced such a stage. However, there is currently no data that provides insight into this crucial time in our PPD's evolution. We show that the Isheyevo meteorite contains the first definitive evidence for a transition disk stage in our Solar System. Isheyevo belongs to a class of metal-rich meteorites whose components have been dated at almost 5 Myr after the first solids in the Solar System, and exhibits unique sedimentary layers that imply formation through gentle sedimentation. We show that such layering can occur via gentle sweep-up of material found in the impact plume resulting from the collision of two planetesimals. Such sweep-up requires gas densities consistent with observed transition disks. As such, Isheyevo presents the first ev...

  5. Crystal structures of enterovirus 71 (EV71) recombinant virus particles provide insights into vaccine design.

    Lyu, Ke; Wang, Guang-Chuan; He, Ya-Ling; Han, Jian-Feng; Ye, Qing; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) remains a major health concern in the Asia-Pacific regions, and its major causative agents include human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16. A desirable vaccine against HFMD would be multivalent and able to elicit protective responses against multiple HFMD causative agents. Previously, we have demonstrated that a thermostable recombinant EV71 vaccine candidate can be produced by the insertion of a foreign peptide into the BC loop of VP1 without affecting viral replication. Here we present crystal structures of two different naturally occurring empty particles, one from a clinical C4 strain EV71 and the other from its recombinant virus containing an insertion in the VP1 BC loop. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that the inserted foreign peptide is well exposed on the particle surface without significant structural changes in the capsid. Importantly, such insertions do not seem to affect the virus uncoating process as illustrated by the conformational similarity between an uncoating intermediate of another recombinant virus and that of EV71. Especially, at least 18 residues from the N terminus of VP1 are transiently externalized. Altogether, our study provides insights into vaccine development against HFMD. PMID:25492868

  6. Obsessive compulsive disorder networks: positron emission tomography and neuropsychology provide new insights.

    Bruno Millet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation has shed new light on the central role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD. We explored this structure from a functional perspective, synchronizing neuroimaging and cognitive measures. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This case-control cross-sectional study compared 15 OCD patients without comorbidities and not currently on serotonin reuptake inhibitors or cognitive behavioural therapy with 15 healthy controls (matched for age, sex and education level on resting-state (18FDG-PET scans and a neuropsychological battery assessing executive functions. We looked for correlations between metabolic modifications and impaired neuropsychological scores. Modifications in glucose metabolism were found in frontal regions (orbitofrontal cortex and dorsolateral cortices, the cingulate gyrus, insula and parietal gyrus. Neuropsychological differences between patients and controls, which were subtle, were correlated with the metabolism of the prefrontal, parietal, and temporal cortices. CONCLUSION: As expected, we confirmed previous reports of a PFC dysfunction in OCD patients, and established a correlation with cognitive deficits. Other regions outside the prefrontal cortex, including the dorsoparietal cortex and the insula, also appeared to be implicated in the pathophysiology of OCD, providing fresh insights on the complexity of OCD syndromes.

  7. Characterization of Gain-of-Function Mutant Provides New Insights into ClpP Structure.

    Ni, Tengfeng; Ye, Fei; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hongchuan; Li, Jiahui; Zhang, Yingyi; Sun, Yinqiang; Wang, Meining; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang; Lan, Lefu; Gan, Jianhua; Zhang, Ao; Zhou, Hu; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2016-07-15

    ATP-dependent Clp protease (ClpP), a highly conserved serine protease in vast bacteria, could be converted into a noncontrollable enzyme capable of degrading mature proteins in the presence of acyldepsipeptides (ADEPs). Here, we design such a gain-of-function mutant of Staphylococcus aureus ClpP (SaClpP) capable of triggering the same level of dysfunctional activity that occurs upon ADEPs treatment. The SaClpPY63A mutant degrades FtsZ in vivo and inhibits staphylococcal growth. The crystal structure of SaClpPY63A indicates that Asn42 would be an important domino to fall for further activation of ClpP. Indeed, the SaClpPN42AY63A mutant demonstrates promoted self-activated proteolysis, which is a result of an enlarged entrance pore as observed in cryo-electron microscopy images. In addition, the expression of the engineered clpP allele phenocopies treatment with ADEPs; inhibition of cell division occurs as does showing sterilizing with rifampicin antibiotics. Collectively, we show that the gain-of-function SaClpPN42AY63A mutant becomes a fairly nonspecific protease and kills persisters by degrading over 500 proteins, thus providing new insights into the structure of the ClpP protease. PMID:27171654

  8. Multi-omics analysis of niche specificity provides new insights into ecological adaptation in bacteria.

    Zhu, Bo; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Cui, Zhouqi; Xie, Guanlin; Jin, Gulei; Kube, Michael; Li, Bin; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-08-01

    Different lifestyles, ranging from a saprophyte to a pathogen, have been reported in bacteria of one species. Here, we performed genome-wide survey of the ecological adaptation in four Burkholderia seminalis strains, distinguished by their origin as part of the saprophytic microbial community of soil or water but also including human and plant pathogens. The results indicated that each strain is separated from the others by increased fitness in medium simulating its original niche corresponding to the difference between strains in metabolic capacities. Furthermore, strain-specific metabolism and niche survival was generally linked with genomic variants and niche-dependent differential expression of the corresponding genes. In particular, the importance of iron, trehalose and d-arabitol utilization was highlighted by the involvement of DNA-methylation and horizontal gene transfer in niche-adapted regulation of the corresponding operons based on the integrated analysis of our multi-omics data. Overall, our results provided insights of niche-specific adaptation in bacteria. PMID:26859773

  9. Transcriptome analysis in different rice cultivars provides novel insights into desiccation and salinity stress responses.

    Shankar, Rama; Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Drought and salinity are the major environmental factors that affect rice productivity. Comparative transcriptome analysis between tolerant and sensitive rice cultivars can provide insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in these stress responses. In this study, the comparison of transcriptomes of a drought-tolerant [Nagina 22 (N22)] and a salinity-tolerant (Pokkali) rice cultivar with IR64 (susceptible cultivar) revealed variable transcriptional responses under control and stress conditions. A total of 801 and 507 transcripts were exclusively differentially expressed in N22 and Pokkali rice cultivars, respectively, under stress conditions. Gene ontology analysis suggested the enrichment of transcripts involved in response to abiotic stress and regulation of gene expression in stress-tolerant rice cultivars. A larger number of transcripts encoding for members of NAC and DBP transcription factor (TF) families in N22 and members of bHLH and C2H2 TF families in Pokkali exhibited differential regulation under desiccation and salinity stresses, respectively. Transcripts encoding for thioredoxin and involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism were up-regulated in N22, whereas transcripts involved in wax and terpenoid metabolism were up-regulated in Pokkali. Overall, common and cultivar-specific stress-responsive transcripts identified in this study can serve as a helpful resource to explore novel candidate genes for abiotic stress tolerance in rice. PMID:27029818

  10. Evidence for shift from Acidobacteria to Proteobacteria dominance in soil profile of boreal acid sulphate soils in Finland

    Chroňáková, Alica; Yli-Halla, M.; Bryndová, Michala; Otáhalová, Šárka; Šimek, Miloslav

    Milan: University of Milan, 2015. s. 117-118. [BAGECO 13 - Symposium on Bacterial Genetics and Ecology, The Microbial Continuity Across Changing Ecosystems /13./. 14.06.2015-18.06.2015, Milan] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acidobacteria * Proteobacteria * soil profile * boreal acid sulphate soils Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  11. Acidicapsa borealis gen. nov., sp nov and Acidicapsa ligni sp nov., subdivision 1 Acidobacteria from Sphagnum peat and decaying wood

    Kulichevskaya, I.; Kostina, L. A.; Valášková, Vendula; Rijpstra, W. I.; Damste, J. S. S.; de Boer, W.; Dedysh, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 7 (2012), s. 1512-1520. ISSN 1466-5026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : PHYLUM ACIDOBACTERIA * ENVIRONMENT * SOIL Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.112, year: 2012

  12. Ether- and ester-bound iso-diabolic acid and other lipids in members of acidobacteria subdivision 4.

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Hopmans, Ellen C; Foesel, Bärbel U; Wüst, Pia K; Overmann, Jörg; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A; Dunfield, Peter F; Houghton, Karen; Stott, Matthew B

    2014-09-01

    Recently, iso-diabolic acid (13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid) has been identified as a major membrane-spanning lipid of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, a highly diverse phylum within the Bacteria. This finding pointed to the Acidobacteria as a potential source for the bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers that occur ubiquitously in peat, soil, lakes, and hot springs. Here, we examined the lipid composition of seven phylogenetically divergent strains of subdivision 4 of the Acidobacteria, a bacterial group that is commonly encountered in soil. Acid hydrolysis of total cell material released iso-diabolic acid derivatives in substantial quantities (11 to 48% of all fatty acids). In contrast to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, 6 out of the 7 species of subdivision 4 (excepting "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum") contained iso-diabolic acid ether bound to a glycerol in larger fractional abundance than iso-diabolic acid itself. This is in agreement with the analysis of intact polar lipids (IPLs) by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), which showed the dominance of mixed ether-ester glycerides. iso-Diabolic acid-containing IPLs were not identified, because these IPLs are not released with a Bligh-Dyer extraction, as observed before when studying lipid compositions of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria. The presence of ether bonds in the membrane lipids does not seem to be an adaptation to temperature, because the five mesophilic isolates contained a larger amount of ether lipids than the thermophile "Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum." Furthermore, experiments with Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes did not reveal a major influence of growth temperature over the 50 to 69°C range. PMID:24928878

  13. Genome-wide analysis of Pax8 binding provides new insights into thyroid functions

    Ruiz-Llorente Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor Pax8 is essential for the differentiation of thyroid cells. However, there are few data on genes transcriptionally regulated by Pax8 other than thyroid-related genes. To better understand the role of Pax8 in the biology of thyroid cells, we obtained transcriptional profiles of Pax8-silenced PCCl3 thyroid cells using whole genome expression arrays and integrated these signals with global cis-regulatory sequencing studies performed by ChIP-Seq analysis Results Exhaustive analysis of Pax8 immunoprecipitated peaks demonstrated preferential binding to intragenic regions and CpG-enriched islands, which suggests a role of Pax8 in transcriptional regulation of orphan CpG regions. In addition, ChIP-Seq allowed us to identify Pax8 partners, including proteins involved in tertiary DNA structure (CTCF and chromatin remodeling (Sp1, and these direct transcriptional interactions were confirmed in vivo. Moreover, both factors modulate Pax8-dependent transcriptional activation of the sodium iodide symporter (Nis gene promoter. We ultimately combined putative and novel Pax8 binding sites with actual target gene expression regulation to define Pax8-dependent genes. Functional classification suggests that Pax8-regulated genes may be directly involved in important processes of thyroid cell function such as cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis, cell polarity, motion and adhesion, and a plethora of DNA/protein-related processes. Conclusion Our study provides novel insights into the role of Pax8 in thyroid biology, exerted through transcriptional regulation of important genes involved in critical thyrocyte processes. In addition, we found new transcriptional partners of Pax8, which functionally cooperate with Pax8 in the regulation of thyroid gene transcription. Besides, our data demonstrate preferential location of Pax8 in non-promoter CpG regions. These data point to an orphan CpG island-mediated mechanism

  14. Canine CNGA3 Gene Mutations Provide Novel Insights into Human Achromatopsia-Associated Channelopathies and Treatment.

    Naoto Tanaka

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG ion channels are key mediators underlying signal transduction in retinal and olfactory receptors. Genetic defects in CNGA3 and CNGB3, encoding two structurally related subunits of cone CNG channels, lead to achromatopsia (ACHM. ACHM is a congenital, autosomal recessive retinal disorder that manifests by cone photoreceptor dysfunction, severely reduced visual acuity, impaired or complete color blindness and photophobia. Here, we report the first canine models for CNGA3-associated channelopathy caused by R424W or V644del mutations in the canine CNGA3 ortholog that accurately mimic the clinical and molecular features of human CNGA3-associated ACHM. These two spontaneous mutations exposed CNGA3 residues essential for the preservation of channel function and biogenesis. The CNGA3-R424W results in complete loss of cone function in vivo and channel activity confirmed by in vitro electrophysiology. Structural modeling and molecular dynamics (MD simulations revealed R424-E306 salt bridge formation and its disruption with the R424W mutant. Reversal of charges in a CNGA3-R424E-E306R double mutant channel rescued cGMP-activated currents uncovering new insights into channel gating. The CNGA3-V644del affects the C-terminal leucine zipper (CLZ domain destabilizing intersubunit interactions of the coiled-coil complex in the MD simulations; the in vitro experiments showed incompetent trimeric CNGA3 subunit assembly consistent with abnormal biogenesis of in vivo channels. These newly characterized large animal models not only provide a valuable system for studying cone-specific CNG channel function in health and disease, but also represent prime candidates for proof-of-concept studies of CNGA3 gene replacement therapy for ACHM patients.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis provides new insights into cadmium accumulation in rice grain under cadmium stress

    Xue, Dawei, E-mail: dwxue@hznu.edu.cn [College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, China National Rice Research Institute, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Jiang, Hua [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base for Zhejiang Sustainable Pest and Disease Control, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Science, Hangzhou 310021 (China); Deng, Xiangxiong; Zhang, Xiaoqin [College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Wang, Hua [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base for Zhejiang Sustainable Pest and Disease Control, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Science, Hangzhou 310021 (China); Xu, Xiangbin [College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali [State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, China National Rice Research Institute, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Guo, Longbiao, E-mail: guolongbiao@caas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, China National Rice Research Institute, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Qian, Qian, E-mail: qianqian188@hotmail.com [College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, China National Rice Research Institute, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cd is the most toxic heavy metal and is a major pollutant in rice grains. • The mechanism of Cd accumulation in rice grains has not been well demonstrated. • Proteomics analysis is carried out and the verification is implemented by QPCR. • Proteins associated with ROS and photosynthesis showed large variation in expression. - Abstract: Rice is one of the most important staple crops. During the growth season, rice plants are inevitably subjected to numerous stresses, among which heavy metal stress represented by cadmium contamination not only hindering the yield of rice but also affecting the food safety by Cd accumulating in rice grains. The mechanism of Cd accumulation in rice grains has not been well elucidated. In this study, we compare the proteomic difference between two genotypes with different Cd accumulation ability in grains. Verification of differentially expressed protein-encoding genes was analyzing by quantitative PCR (QPCR) and reanalysis of microarray expression data. Forty-seven proteins in total were successfully identified through proteomic screening. GO and KEGG enrichment analysis showed Cd accumulation triggered stress-related pathways in the cells, and strongly affecting metabolic pathways. Many proteins associated with nutrient reservoir and starch-related enzyme were identified in this study suggesting that a considerably damage on grain quality was caused. The results also implied stress response was initiated by the abnormal cells and the transmission of signals may mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our research will provide new insights into Cd accumulation in rice grain under Cd stress.

  16. 3D-structured illumination microscopy provides novel insight into architecture of human centrosomes

    Katharina F. Sonnen

    2012-08-01

    Centrioles are essential for the formation of cilia and flagella. They also form the core of the centrosome, which organizes microtubule arrays important for cell shape, polarity, motility and division. Here, we have used super-resolution 3D-structured illumination microscopy to analyse the spatial relationship of 18 centriole and pericentriolar matrix (PCM components of human centrosomes at different cell cycle stages. During mitosis, PCM proteins formed extended networks with interspersed γ-Tubulin. During interphase, most proteins were arranged at specific distances from the walls of centrioles, resulting in ring staining, often with discernible density masses. Through use of site-specific antibodies, we found the C-terminus of Cep152 to be closer to centrioles than the N-terminus, illustrating the power of 3D-SIM to study protein disposition. Appendage proteins showed rings with multiple density masses, and the number of these masses was strongly reduced during mitosis. At the proximal end of centrioles, Sas-6 formed a dot at the site of daughter centriole assembly, consistent with its role in cartwheel formation. Plk4 and STIL co-localized with Sas-6, but Cep135 was associated mostly with mother centrioles. Remarkably, Plk4 formed a dot on the surface of the mother centriole before Sas-6 staining became detectable, indicating that Plk4 constitutes an early marker for the site of nascent centriole formation. Our study provides novel insights into the architecture of human centrosomes and illustrates the power of super-resolution microscopy in revealing the relative localization of centriole and PCM proteins in unprecedented detail.

  17. X-ray structure reveals a new class and provides insight into evolution of alkaline phosphatases.

    Subhash C Bihani

    Full Text Available The alkaline phosphatase (AP is a bi-metalloenzyme of potential applications in biotechnology and bioremediation, in which phosphate monoesters are nonspecifically hydrolysed under alkaline conditions to yield inorganic phosphate. The hydrolysis occurs through an enzyme intermediate in which the catalytic residue is phosphorylated. The reaction, which also requires a third metal ion, is proposed to proceed through a mechanism of in-line displacement involving a trigonal bipyramidal transition state. Stabilizing the transition state by bidentate hydrogen bonding has been suggested to be the reason for conservation of an arginine residue in the active site. We report here the first crystal structure of alkaline phosphatase purified from the bacterium Sphingomonas. sp. Strain BSAR-1 (SPAP. The crystal structure reveals many differences from other APs: 1 the catalytic residue is a threonine instead of serine, 2 there is no third metal ion binding pocket, and 3 the arginine residue forming bidentate hydrogen bonding is deleted in SPAP. A lysine and an aspargine residue, recruited together for the first time into the active site, bind the substrate phosphoryl group in a manner not observed before in any other AP. These and other structural features suggest that SPAP represents a new class of APs. Because of its direct contact with the substrate phosphoryl group, the lysine residue is proposed to play a significant role in catalysis. The structure is consistent with a mechanism of in-line displacement via a trigonal bipyramidal transition state. The structure provides important insights into evolutionary relationships between members of AP superfamily.

  18. Potential Biomarkers Found by Protein Profiling May Provide Insight for the Macrovascular Pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus

    William C. S. Cho

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is an alarming threat to health of mankind, yet its pathogenesis is unclear. The purpose of this study was to find potential biomarkers to serve as indicators for the pathogenesis of DM in a time course manner. Based on our previous findings that oxidative stress occurred at week 8, aorta lysate and sera of 102 streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic and 85 control male Sprague-Dawley rats were obtained at the 4th, 8th and 12th week after STZ injection. The protein profiles were studied employing surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technology in attomole sensitivity range. In the aorta, a multiple biomarker panel was discovered at the 4th week. At the 8th week, 4 biomarkers were found, while at the 12th week, 3 biomarkers were identified. In the sera, a triplet of 3 peaks and 2 biomarkers were all discovered to have 100% classification accuracy rate to differentiate the DM and control groups at all time intervals. Besides, 2 biomarkers were also found to have high classification value at week 12. Comparing the aorta and sera from DM and non-DM rats, a bundle of potential biomarkers with significant changes in peak intensities and high classification values were found. Two of the serum biomarkers matched with islet amyloid polypeptide and resistin in the SWISS-PROT knowledgebase. Validation has been conducted using immunoassay kits. These potential biomarkers may provide valuable insight on the pathogenesis of DM and macrovascular complications.

  19. Mitochondrial Genome and Nuclear Markers Provide New Insight into the Evolutionary History of Macaques

    Jiang, Juan; Yu, Jianqiu; Li, Jing; Li, Peng; Fan, Zhenxin; Niu, Lili; Deng, Jiabo; Yue, Bisong; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary history of macaques, genus Macaca, has been under debate due to the short times of divergence. In this study, maternal, paternal, and biparental genetic systems were applied to infer phylogenetic relationships among macaques and to trace ancient hybridization events in their evolutionary history. Using a PCR display method, 17 newly phylogenetically informative Alu insertions were identified from M. assamensis. We combined presence/absence analysis of 84 Alu elements with mitochondrial genomes as well as nuclear sequences (five autosomal genes, two Y chromosomal genes, and one X chromosomal fragment) to reconstruct a robust macaque phylogeny. Topologies generated from different inherited markers were similar supporting six well defined species groups and a close relationship of M. assamensis and M. thibetana, but differed in the placing of M. arctoides. Both Alu elements and nuclear genes supported that M. arctoides was close to the sinica group, whereas the mitochondrial data clustered it into the fascicularis/mulatta lineage. Our results reveal that a sex-biased hybridization most likely occurred in the evolutionary history of M. arctoides, and suggest an introgressive pattern of male-mediated gene flow from the ancestors of M. arctoides to the M. mulatta population followed by nuclear swamping. According to the estimation of divergence dates, the hybridization occurred around 0.88~1.77 mya (nuclear data) or 1.38~2.56 mya (mitochondrial data). In general, our study indicates that a combination of various molecular markers could help explain complicated evolutionary relationships. Our results have provided new insights into the evolutionary history of macaques and emphasize that hybridization might play an important role in macaque evolution. PMID:27135608

  20. Comparative Genome Analysis Provides Insights into the Pathogenicity of Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger; Madsen, Lone; Espejo, Romilio

    2016-01-01

    phenotypic properties may provide new insights to the mechanisms of pathogenicity in F. psychrophilum. PMID:27071075

  1. Quantitative Hydraulic Models Of Early Land Plants Provide Insight Into Middle Paleozoic Terrestrial Paleoenvironmental Conditions

    Wilson, J. P.; Fischer, W. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fossil plants provide useful proxies of Earth’s climate because plants are closely connected, through physiology and morphology, to the environments in which they lived. Recent advances in quantitative hydraulic models of plant water transport provide new insight into the history of climate by allowing fossils to speak directly to environmental conditions based on preserved internal anatomy. We report results of a quantitative hydraulic model applied to one of the earliest terrestrial plants preserved in three dimensions, the ~396 million-year-old vascular plant Asteroxylon mackei. This model combines equations describing the rate of fluid flow through plant tissues with detailed observations of plant anatomy; this allows quantitative estimates of two critical aspects of plant function. First and foremost, results from these models quantify the supply of water to evaporative surfaces; second, results describe the ability of plant vascular systems to resist tensile damage from extreme environmental events, such as drought or frost. This approach permits quantitative comparisons of functional aspects of Asteroxylon with other extinct and extant plants, informs the quality of plant-based environmental proxies, and provides concrete data that can be input into climate models. Results indicate that despite their small size, water transport cells in Asteroxylon could supply a large volume of water to the plant's leaves--even greater than cells from some later-evolved seed plants. The smallest Asteroxylon tracheids have conductivities exceeding 0.015 m^2 / MPa * s, whereas Paleozoic conifer tracheids do not reach this threshold until they are three times wider. However, this increase in conductivity came at the cost of little to no adaptations for transport safety, placing the plant’s vegetative organs in jeopardy during drought events. Analysis of the thickness-to-span ratio of Asteroxylon’s tracheids suggests that environmental conditions of reduced relative

  2. An integrated Biophysical CGE model to provide Sustainable Development Goal insights

    Sanchez, Marko; Cicowiez, Martin; Howells, Mark; Zepeda, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Future projected changes in the energy system will inevitably result in changes to the level of appropriation of environmental resources, particularly land and water, and this will have wider implications for environmental sustainability, and may affect other sectors of the economy. An integrated climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) system will provide useful insights, particularly with regard to the environmental sustainability. However, it will require adequate integration with other tools to detect economic impacts and broaden the scope for policy analysis. A computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is a well suited tool to channel impacts, as detected in a CLEW analysis, onto all sectors of the economy, and evaluate trade-offs and synergies, including those of possible policy responses. This paper will show an application of such integration in a single-country CGE model with the following key characteristics. Climate is partly exogenous (as proxied by temperature and rainfall) and partly endogenous (as proxied by emissions generated by different sectors) and has an impact on endogenous variables such as land productivity and labor productivity. Land is a factor of production used in agricultural and forestry activities which can be of various types if land use alternatives (e.g., deforestation) are to be considered. Energy is an input to the production process of all economic sectors and a consumption good for households. Because it is possible to allow for substitution among different energy sources (e.g. renewable vs non-renewable) in the generation of electricity, the production process of energy products can consider the use of natural resources such as oil and water. Water, data permitting, can be considered as an input into the production process of agricultural sectors, which is particularly relevant in case of irrigation. It can also be considered as a determinant of total factor productivity in hydro-power generation. The integration of a CLEW

  3. Complete genome sequence of Granulicella tundricola type strain MP5ACTX9T, an Acidobacteria from tundra soil

    Rawat, Suman R.; Männistö, Minna K.; Starovoytov, Valentin; Goodwin, Lynne; Nolan, Matt; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Davenport, Karen Walston; Woyke, Tanja; Häggblom, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    Granulicella tundricola strain MP5ACTX9T is a novel species of the genus Granulicella in subdivision 1 Acidobacteria . G. tundricola is a predominant member of soil bacterial communities, active at low temperatures and nutrient limiting conditions in Arctic alpine tundra. The organism is a cold-adapted acidophile and a versatile heterotroph that hydrolyzes a suite of sugars and complex polysaccharides. Genome analysis revealed metabolic versatility with genes involved in metabolism and transp...

  4. Multiple kisspeptin receptors in early Osteichthyans provide new insights into the evolution of this receptor family

    Pasquier, J.; Lafont, A._G.; Jeng, S.-R.;

    2012-01-01

    Deorphanization of GPR54 receptor a decade ago led to the characterization of the kisspeptin receptor (Kissr) in mammals and the discovery of its major role in the brain control of reproduction. While a single gene encodes for Kissr in eutherian mammals including human, other vertebrates present a...... variable number of Kissr genes, from none in birds, one or two in teleosts, to three in an amphibian, xenopus. In order to get more insight into the evolution of Kissr gene family, we investigated the presence of Kissr in osteichthyans of key-phylogenetical positions: the coelacanth, a representative of...

  5. Structural studies of Pseudomonas and Chromobacterium ω-aminotransferases provide insights into their differing substrate specificity

    The X-ray structures of two ω-aminotransferases from P. aeruginosa and C. violaceum in complex with an inhibitor offer the first detailed insight into the structural basis of the substrate specificity of these industrially important enzymes. The crystal structures and inhibitor complexes of two industrially important ω-aminotransferase enzymes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum have been determined in order to understand the differences in their substrate specificity. The two enzymes share 30% sequence identity and use the same amino acceptor, pyruvate; however, the Pseudomonas enzyme shows activity towards the amino donor β-alanine, whilst the Chromobacterium enzyme does not. Both enzymes show activity towards S-α-methylbenzylamine (MBA), with the Chromobacterium enzyme having a broader substrate range. The crystal structure of the P. aeruginosa enzyme has been solved in the holo form and with the inhibitor gabaculine bound. The C. violaceum enzyme has been solved in the apo and holo forms and with gabaculine bound. The structures of the holo forms of both enzymes are quite similar. There is little conformational difference observed between the inhibitor complex and the holoenzyme for the P. aeruginosa aminotransferase. In comparison, the crystal structure of the C. violaceum gabaculine complex shows significant structural rearrangements from the structures of both the apo and holo forms of the enzyme. It appears that the different rigidity of the protein scaffold contributes to the substrate specificity observed for the two ω-aminotransferases

  6. A neurophylogenetic approach provides new insight to the evolution of Scaphopoda.

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H; Schrödl, Michael; Lodde-Bensch, Eva; Lindberg, David R; Heß, Martin; Brennan, Gerard P; Sigwart, Julia D

    2015-01-01

    The position of scaphopods in molluscan phylogeny remains singularly contentious, with several sister relationships supported by morphological and phylogenomic data: Scaphopoda + Bivalvia (Diasoma), Scaphopoda + Cephalopoda (Variopoda), and Scaphopoda + Gastropoda. Nervous system architecture has contributed significant insights to reconstructing phylogeny in the Mollusca and other invertebrate groups, but a modern neurophylogenetic approach has not been applied to molluscs, hampered by a lack of clearly defined homologous characters that can be unequivocally compared across the radical body plan disparity among the living clades. We present the first three-dimensional reconstruction of the anterior nervous system of a scaphopod, Rhabdus rectius, using histological tomography. We also describe a new putative sensory organ, a paired and pigmented sensory mantle slit. This structure is restricted to our study species and not a general feature of scaphopods, but it forms an integral part of the description of the nervous system in R. rectius. It also highlights the potential utility of neuro-anatomical characters for multiple levels of phylogenetic inference beyond this study. This potential has not previously been exploited for the thorny problem of molluscan phylogeny. The neuroanatomy of scaphopods demonstrates a highly derived architecture that shares a number of key characters with the cephalopod nervous system, and supports a Scaphopoda + Cephalopoda grouping. PMID:26487042

  7. Fungal evolutionary genomics provides insight into the mechanisms of adaptive divergence in eukaryotes.

    Gladieux, Pierre; Ropars, Jeanne; Badouin, Hélène; Branca, Antoine; Aguileta, Gabriela; de Vienne, Damien M; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Branco, Sara; Giraud, Tatiana

    2014-02-01

    Fungi are ideal model organisms for dissecting the genomic bases of adaptive divergence in eukaryotes. They have simple morphologies and small genomes, occupy contrasting, well-identified ecological niches and tend to have short generation times, and many are amenable to experimental approaches. Fungi also display diverse lifestyles, from saprotrophs to pathogens or mutualists, and they play extremely important roles in both ecosystems and human activities, as wood decayers, mycorrhizal fungi, lichens, endophytes, plant and animal pathogens, and in fermentation or drug production. We review here recent insights into the patterns and mechanisms of adaptive divergence in fungi, including sources of divergence, genomic variation and, ultimately, speciation. We outline the various ecological sources of divergent selection and genomic changes, showing that gene loss and changes in gene expression and in genomic architecture are important adaptation processes, in addition to the more widely recognized processes of amino acid substitution and gene duplication. We also review recent findings regarding the interspecific acquisition of genomic variation and suggesting an important role for introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfers (HGTs). We show that transposable elements can mediate several of these genomic changes, thus constituting important factors for adaptation. Finally, we review the consequences of divergent selection in terms of speciation, arguing that genetic incompatibilities may not be as widespread as generally thought and that pleiotropy between adaptation and reproductive isolation is an important route of speciation in fungal pathogens. PMID:24341913

  8. Characterization of hairless (Hr) and FGF5 genes provides insights into the molecular basis of hair loss in cetaceans

    Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhengfei; Xu, Shixia; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Background Hair is one of the main distinguishing characteristics of mammals and it has many important biological functions. Cetaceans originated from terrestrial mammals and they have evolved a series of adaptations to aquatic environments, which are of evolutionary significance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying their aquatic adaptations have not been well explored. This study provided insights into the evolution of hair loss during the transition from land to water by investigat...

  9. Phylogenomic Data Support a Seventh Order of Methylotrophic Methanogens and Provide Insights into the Evolution of Methanogenesis

    Borrel, Guillaume; O’Toole, Paul W.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; Peyret, Pierre; Brugère, Jean-François; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence from sequence data from various environments, including the human gut, suggests the existence of a previously unknown putative seventh order of methanogens. The first genomic data from members of this lineage, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus alvus,” provide insights into its evolutionary history and metabolic features. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal proteins robustly indicates a monophyletic group independent of any previously kno...

  10. New data from Virginia Tech Transportation Institute provides insight into cell phone use and driving distraction

    Box, Sherri

    2009-01-01

    Several large-scale, naturalistic driving studies -- using sophisticated cameras and instrumentation in participants' personal vehicles -- conducted by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI), provide a clear picture of driver distraction and cell phone use under real-world driving conditions, according to the institute.

  11. Aging and fertility patterns in wild chimpanzees provide insights into the evolution of menopause

    Thompson, Melissa Emery; Jones, James H.; Pusey, Anne E.; Brewer-Marsden, Stella; Goodall, Jane; Marsden, David; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Nishida, Toshisada; Reynolds, Vernon; Sugiyama, Yukimaru; Wrangham, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Human menopause is remarkable in that reproductive senescence is markedly accelerated relative to somatic aging, leaving an extended post-reproductive period for a large proportion of women [1, 2]. Functional explanations for this are debated [4-11], in part because comparative data from closely-related species are inadequate. Existing studies of chimpanzees are based on very small samples and have not provided clear conclusions about the reproductive function of aging females [12-19]. These ...

  12. Stable Isotopes Provide Insight into Population Structure and Segregation in Eastern North Atlantic Sperm Whales

    Borrell, Asuncion; Velasquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M.;

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly......, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted....

  13. The HapMap Resource is Providing New Insights into Ourselves and its Application to Pharmacogenomics

    Wei Zhang; Ratain, Mark J.; M. Eileen Dolan

    2008-01-01

    The exploration of quantitative variation in complex traits such as gene expression and drug response in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The International HapMap Project provides a key resource of genotypic data on human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from four major world populations of European, African, Chinese and Japanese ancestry for researchers to associate with various phenotypic data to find genes affecting health, disease and respons...

  14. Stable Isotopes Provide Insight into Population Structure and Segregation in Eastern North Atlantic Sperm Whales

    Borrell, Asuncion; Velasquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M.; Kinze, Carl; Lockyer, Christina H.; Vighi, Morgana; Aguilar, Alex

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly highly mobile, shows indication of structuring in the eastern North Atlantic, an ocean basin in which a single population is believed to occur. To do so, we examined stable isotope values in sequential...

  15. The channel catfish genome sequence provides insights into the evolution of scale formation in teleosts.

    Liu, Zhanjiang; Liu, Shikai; Yao, Jun; Bao, Lisui; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Yun; Jiang, Chen; Sun, Luyang; Wang, Ruijia; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Tao; Zeng, Qifan; Fu, Qiang; Gao, Sen; Li, Ning; Koren, Sergey; Jiang, Yanliang; Zimin, Aleksey; Xu, Peng; Phillippy, Adam M; Geng, Xin; Song, Lin; Sun, Fanyue; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Chen, Ailu; Jin, Yulin; Yuan, Zihao; Yang, Yujia; Tan, Suxu; Peatman, Eric; Lu, Jianguo; Qin, Zhenkui; Dunham, Rex; Li, Zhaoxia; Sonstegard, Tad; Feng, Jianbin; Danzmann, Roy G; Schroeder, Steven; Scheffler, Brian; Duke, Mary V; Ballard, Linda; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Liu, Haixia; Armbruster, Jonathan; Xie, Yangjie; Kirby, Mona L; Tian, Yi; Flanagan, Mary Elizabeth; Mu, Weijie; Waldbieser, Geoffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Catfish represent 12% of teleost or 6.3% of all vertebrate species, and are of enormous economic value. Here we report a high-quality reference genome sequence of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), the major aquaculture species in the US. The reference genome sequence was validated by genetic mapping of 54,000 SNPs, and annotated with 26,661 predicted protein-coding genes. Through comparative analysis of genomes and transcriptomes of scaled and scaleless fish and scale regeneration experiments, we address the genomic basis for the most striking physical characteristic of catfish, the evolutionary loss of scales and provide evidence that lack of secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins accounts for the evolutionary loss of scales in catfish. The channel catfish reference genome sequence, along with two additional genome sequences and transcriptomes of scaled catfishes, provide crucial resources for evolutionary and biological studies. This work also demonstrates the power of comparative subtraction of candidate genes for traits of structural significance. PMID:27249958

  16. NRC test results and operations experience provide insights for a new gate valve stem force correlation

    This paper presents the results of testing sponsored by the NRC to assess valve and motor operator performance under varying pressure and fluid conditions. This effort included an examination of the methods used by the industry to predict the required stem force of a valve, and research to provide guidelines for the extrapolation of in situ test results to design basis conditions.Years ago, when most of these valves were originally installed, the industry used a set of equations to determine analytically that the valves' motor-operators were large enough and the control switches were set high enough to close the valves at their design basis conditions. Our research has identified several inconsistencies with the industry's existing gate valve stem force equation and has challenged the overly simplistic assumptions inherent in its use. This paper discusses the development of the INEL correlation, which serves as the basis for a method to bound the stem force necessary to close flexwedge gate valves whose operational characteristics have been shown to be predictable. As utilities undertake to provide assurance of their valves' operability, this ability to predict analytically the required stem force is especially important for valves that cannot be tested at design basis conditions. For such valves, the results of tests conducted at less severe conditions can be used with the INEL correlation to make the necessary prediction. ((orig.))

  17. Characterization of duplicated Dunaliella viridis SPT1 genes provides insights into early gene divergence after duplication.

    Guan, Zhenwei; Meng, Xiangzong; Sun, Zhenhua; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2008-10-15

    The sodium-dependent phosphate transporter gene from unicellular green algae Dunaliella viridis, DvSPT1, shares similarity with members of Pi transporter family. Sequencing analysis of D. viridis BAC clone containing the DvSPT1 gene revealed two inverted duplicated copies of this gene (DvSPT1 and DvSPT1-2 respectively). The duplication covered most of both genes except for their 3' downstream region. The duplicated genomic sequences exhibited 97.9% identity with a synonymous divergence of Ks=0.0126 in the coding region. This data indicated very recent gene duplication in D. viridis genome, providing an excellent opportunity to investigate sequence and expression divergence of duplicated genes at an early stage. Scattered point mutations and length polymorphism of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were predominant among the sequence divergence soon after gene duplication. Due to sequence divergence in the 5' regulatory regions and a swap of the entire 3' downstream regions (3'-UTR), DvSPT1 and DvSPT1-2 showed expression divergence in response to extra-cellular NaCl concentration changes. According to their expression patterns, the two diverged gene copies would provide better adaptation to a broader range of extra-cellular NaCl concentration. Furthermore, Southern blot analysis indicated that there might be a large phosphate transporter gene family in D. viridis. PMID:18662752

  18. Molecular taxonomy provides new insights into anopheles species of the neotropical arribalzagia series.

    Giovan F Gómez

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analysis of partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 sequences were used to evaluate initial identification and to investigate phylogenetic relationships of seven Anopheles morphospecies of the Arribalzagia Series from Colombia. Phylogenetic trees recovered highly supported clades for An. punctimaculas.s., An. calderoni, An. malefactor s.l., An. neomaculipalpus, An. apicimacula s.l., An. mattogrossensis and An. peryassui. This study provides the first molecular confirmation of An. malefactorfrom Colombia and discovered conflicting patterns of divergence for the molecular markers among specimens from northeast and northern Colombia suggesting the presence of two previously unrecognized Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs. Furthermore, two highly differentiated An. apicimacula MOTUs previously found in Panama were detected. Overall, the combined molecular dataset facilitated the detection of known and new Colombian evolutionary lineages, and constitutes the baseline for future research on their bionomics, ecology and potential role as malaria vectors.

  19. Historical ecology provides new insights for ecosystem management: Eastern Baltic cod case study

    MacKenzie, Brian; Ojaveer, Henn; Eero, Margit

    2011-01-01

    recruitment back to the 1920s, which extended knowledge of population dynamics into a time period when ecosystem state was characterized by temporally varying combinations of exploitation, climate-hydrographic conditions, marine mammal predation and eutrophication. Recovery of spatially resolved historical...... catch data from the late 1500s to early 1600s also contributed new perspectives to cod population dynamics under alternative ecosystem forcings. These new perspectives have contributed, and will likely continue to contribute to new management policies (e.g., revision of fishery management reference...... points), which should lead to higher sustainability of the population and fishery yields, and improved overall ecosystem health. These perspectives will likely continue to provide baseline information as ICES and the EU develop new policies based on maximum sustainable yield concepts....

  20. Genetic fingerprinting of plankton community provides new insights into aquatic ecology

    YAN Qingyun; YU Yuhe; FENG Weisong

    2006-01-01

    Over the past two decades, molecular techniques have been widely used in ecological study and molecular ecology has been one of the most important branches of ecology. Meanwhile, genetic fingerprinting analyses have significantly enhanced our knowledge of the diversity and evolutionary relations of the planktonic organisms. Compared with conventional approaches in ecological study ( e. g.morphological classification), genetic fingerprinting techniques are simpler and much more effective. This review provides an overview of the principles, advantages and limitations of the commonly used DNA fingerprinting techniques in plankton research. The aim of this overview is to assess where we have been, where we are now and what the future holds for solving aquatic ecological problems with molecular-level information.

  1. The ASCO Oncology Composite Provider Utilization File: New Data, New Insights.

    Barr, Thomas R; Towle, Elaine L; Barr, Thomas R; Towle, Elaine L

    2016-01-01

    As we seek to understand the changing practice environment in oncology, the need for accurate information about demand for services, distribution of the delivery system in this sector of the health economy, and other practice trends is apparent. In this article, we present analysis of the sector using one of the public use files from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in combination with other publicly available data. Medicare data are particularly useful for this analysis because cancer is associated with aging and Medicare is the primary payer in the United States for patients older than age 65. As a result, nearly all oncologists who serve adult populations are represented in these data. By combining publicly available datasets into what we call the ASCO Provider Utilization File,we can investigate a wide range of supply, demand, and practice issues. We calculate the average work performed per physician, observe regional differences in work production,and quantify the downside risk and upside potential associated with the provision of chemotherapy drugs. Comparing the supply of oncologists by state with physician work relative value units and with estimates of cancer incidence by state reveals intriguing differences in the distribution of physicians and the demand for oncology services. In addition, our analysis demonstrates significant downside practice risk associated with the provision of drug therapy to Medicare beneficiaries. The economic risk associated with the purchase and delivery of chemotherapy is of particular concern as pressure for value increases. This article provides a description of a new dataset and interesting observations from these data. PMID:26759470

  2. Rheo-NMR - how nuclear magnetic resonance is providing new insight regarding complex fluid rheology

    Over the past five decades, NMR has revolutionised chemistry, and has found widespread application in condensed matter physics, in molecular biology, in medicine and in food technology. Most recently NMR has made a significant impact in chemical engineering, where it is being extensively used for the non-invasive study of dispersion and flow in porous media. One of the most recent applications of NMR in materials science concerns its use in the study of the mechanical properties of complex fluids. This particular aspect of NMR has been extensively developed in research carried out at Massey University in New Zealand. In this short article, some of the ideas behind this work and the applications which have resulted, will be described. These examples provide a glimpse of possible applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to the study of complex fluid rheology. While this is a very new field of research in which only a handful of groups presently participate, the potential exists for a substantial increase in Rheo-NMR research activity. Systems studied to date include polymer melts and semi-dilute solutions, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals and liquid crystalline polymers, micellar solutions, food materials and colloidal suspensions. Rheo-NMR suffers in a number of respects by comparison with optical methods. It is expensive, it is difficult to use, it suffers from poor signal-to-noise ratios and the effective interpretation of spectra often depends on familiarity with the nuclear spin Hamiltonian and the associated effects of spin dynamics. Nonetheless NMR offers some unique advantages, including the ability to work with opaque materials, the ability to combine velocimetry with localised spectroscopy, and the ability to access a wide range of molecular properties relating to organisation, orientation and dynamics. Rheo-NMR has been able to provide a direct window on a variety of behaviours, including slip, shear-thinning, shear banding, yield stress

  3. Weird mammals provide insights into the evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes and dosage compensation.

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2015-12-01

    The deep divergence of mammalian groups 166 and 190 million years ago (MYA) provide genetic variation to explore the evolution of DNA sequence, gene arrangement and regulation of gene expression in mammals. With encouragement from the founder of the field, Mary Lyon, techniques in cytogenetics and molecular biology were progressively adapted to characterize the sex chromosomes of kangaroos and other marsupials, platypus and echidna-and weird rodent species. Comparative gene mapping reveals the process of sex chromosome evolution from their inception 190 MYA (they are autosomal in platypus) to their inevitable end (the Y has disappeared in two rodent lineages). Our X and Y are relatively young, getting their start with the evolution of the sex-determining SRY gene, which triggered progressive degradation of the Y chromosome. Even more recently, sex chromosomes of placental mammals fused with an autosomal region which now makes up most of the Y. Exploration of gene activity patterns over four decades showed that dosage compensation via X-chromosome inactivation is unique to therian mammals, and that this whole chromosome control process is different in marsupials and absent in monotremes and reptiles, and birds. These differences can be exploited to deduce how mammalian sex chromosomes and epigenetic silencing evolved. PMID:26690510

  4. Inter-basin movements of Mediterranean sperm whales provide insight into their population structure and conservation

    Frantzis, A.; Airoldi, S.; Notarbartolo-di-Sciara, G.; Johnson, C.; Mazzariol, S.

    2011-04-01

    The sperm whale is one of the very few deep diving mammal species in the Mediterranean Sea. Following a rare mass stranding of male sperm whales in the Adriatic Sea in December 2009, photo-identification methods were used in order to investigate previous sightings of the stranded whales in the region. Fluke photos of the stranded whales were compared with those of 153 and 128 free-ranging individuals photographed in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins, respectively. Three out of the seven stranded whales had been previously photo-identified and some of them more than once. To reach the stranding place, two of these re-identified whales performed long-range inter-basin movements of about 1600-2100 km (in a straight line) either through the Strait of Sicily or the Strait of Messina. In addition, comparisons among all whales photographed in the two Mediterranean basins revealed that one more individual first photographed in the western basin (1991) was re-identified 13 years later in the eastern basin (2004). These three cases provide the first conclusive evidence of inter-basin movement of sperm whales in the Mediterranean Sea. Inter-basin gene flow is important for the survival of the small and endangered Mediterranean sperm whale population. Mitigating the disturbance created by human activities in the straits area is crucial for its conservation.

  5. Resiniferatoxin and its analogs provide novel insights into the pharmacology of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor

    Szallasi, A.; Blumberg, P.M. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent constituent of chili peppers, represents the paradigm for the capsaicinoids or vanilloids, a family of compounds shown to stimulate and then desensitize specific subpopulations of sensory receptors, including C-polymodal nociceptors, A-delta mechanoheat nociceptors and warm receptors of the skin, as well as enteroceptors of thin afferent fibers. An exciting recent advance in the field has been the finding that resiniferatoxin (RTX), a naturally occurring diterpene containing a homovanillic acid ester, a key structural motif of capsaicin, functions as an ultrapotent capsaicin analog. For most of the responses characteristic of capsaicin, RTX is 100-10,000 fold more potent. Structure/activity analysis indicates, however, that RTX and related homovanillyl-diterpene esters display distinct spectra of activity. Specific ({sup 3}H)RTX binding provides the first direct proof for the existence of vanilloid receptors. We expect that the RTX class of vanilloids will promote rapid progress in understanding of vanilloid structure/activity requirements and mechanism.

  6. Comparative exome sequencing of metastatic lesions provides insights into the mutational progression of melanoma

    Gartner Jared J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis is characterized by spreading of neoplastic cells to an organ other than where they originated and is the predominant cause of death among cancer patients. This holds true for melanoma, whose incidence is increasing more rapidly than any other cancer and once disseminated has few therapeutic options. Here we performed whole exome sequencing of two sets of matched normal and metastatic tumor DNAs. Results Using stringent criteria, we evaluated the similarities and differences between the lesions. We find that in both cases, 96% of the single nucleotide variants are shared between the two metastases indicating that clonal populations gave rise to the distant metastases. Analysis of copy number variation patterns of both metastatic sets revealed a trend similar to that seen with our single nucleotide variants. Analysis of pathway enrichment on tumor sets shows commonly mutated pathways enriched between individual sets of metastases and all metastases combined. Conclusions These data provide a proof-of-concept suggesting that individual metastases may have sufficient similarity for successful targeting of driver mutations.

  7. Directed evolution of a model primordial enzyme provides insights into the development of the genetic code.

    Manuel M Müller

    Full Text Available The contemporary proteinogenic repertoire contains 20 amino acids with diverse functional groups and side chain geometries. Primordial proteins, in contrast, were presumably constructed from a subset of these building blocks. Subsequent expansion of the proteinogenic alphabet would have enhanced their capabilities, fostering the metabolic prowess and organismal fitness of early living systems. While the addition of amino acids bearing innovative functional groups directly enhances the chemical repertoire of proteomes, the inclusion of chemically redundant monomers is difficult to rationalize. Here, we studied how a simplified chorismate mutase evolves upon expanding its amino acid alphabet from nine to potentially 20 letters. Continuous evolution provided an enhanced enzyme variant that has only two point mutations, both of which extend the alphabet and jointly improve protein stability by >4 kcal/mol and catalytic activity tenfold. The same, seemingly innocuous substitutions (Ile→Thr, Leu→Val occurred in several independent evolutionary trajectories. The increase in fitness they confer indicates that building blocks with very similar side chain structures are highly beneficial for fine-tuning protein structure and function.

  8. Maize pan-transcriptome provides novel insights into genome complexity and quantitative trait variation

    Jin, Minliang; Liu, Haijun; He, Cheng; Fu, Junjie; Xiao, Yingjie; Wang, Yuebin; Xie, Weibo; Wang, Guoying; Yan, Jianbing

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression variation largely contributes to phenotypic diversity and constructing pan-transcriptome is considered necessary for species with complex genomes. However, the regulation mechanisms and functional consequences of pan-transcriptome is unexplored systematically. By analyzing RNA-seq data from 368 maize diverse inbred lines, we identified almost one-third nuclear genes under expression presence and absence variation, which tend to play regulatory roles and are likely regulated by distant eQTLs. The ePAV was directly used as “genotype” to perform GWAS for 15 agronomic phenotypes and 526 metabolic traits to efficiently explore the associations between transcriptomic and phenomic variations. Through a modified assembly strategy, 2,355 high-confidence novel sequences with total 1.9 Mb lengths were found absent within reference genome. Ten randomly selected novel sequences were fully validated with genomic PCR, including another two NBS_LRR candidates potentially affect flavonoids and disease-resistance. A simulation analysis suggested that the pan-transcriptome of the maize whole kernel is approaching a maximum value of 63,000 genes, and through developing two test-cross populations and surveying several most important yield traits, the dispensable genes were shown to contribute to heterosis. Novel perspectives and resources to discover maize quantitative trait variations were provided to better understand the kernel regulation networks and to enhance maize breeding. PMID:26729541

  9. Challenges to normal neural functioning provide insights into separability of motion processing mechanisms.

    Billino, Jutta; Braun, Doris I; Bremmer, Frank; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2011-10-01

    There is a long history of attempts to disentangle different visual processing mechanisms for physically different motion cues. However, underlying neural correlates and separability of networks are still under debate. We aimed to refine the current understanding by studying differential vulnerabilities when normal neural functioning is challenged. We investigated effects of ageing and extrastriate brain lesions on detection thresholds for motion defined by either luminance- or contrast modulations, known as first- and second-order motion. Both approaches focus on extrastriate processing changes and combine distributed as well as more focal constraints. Our ageing sample comprised 102 subjects covering an age range from 20 to 82 years. Threshold signal-to-noise ratios for detection approximately doubled across the age range for both motion types. Results suggest that ageing affects perception of both motion types to an equivalent degree and thus support overlapping processing resources. Underlying neural substrates were further qualified by testing perceptual performance of 18 patients with focal cortical brain lesions. We determined selective first-order motion deficits in three patients, selective second-order motion deficits in only one patient, and deficits for both motion types in three patients. Lesion analysis yielded support for common functional substrates in higher cortical regions. Functionally specific substrates remained ambiguous, but tended to cover earlier visual areas. We conclude that observed vulnerabilities of first- and second-order motion perception provide limited evidence for functional specialization at early extrastriate stages, but emphasize shared processing pathways at higher cortical levels. PMID:21807009

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of the white rot fungus Polyporus brumalis provides insight into sesquiterpene biosynthesis.

    Lee, Su-Yeon; Kim, Myungkil; Kim, Seon-Hong; Hong, Chang-Young; Ryu, Sun-Hwa; Choi, In-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Object of this study was to identify genes and enzymes that are involved in sesquiterpene biosynthesis in the wood rotting fungus, Polyporus brumalis. Sesquiterpenes, β-eudesmane and β-eudesmol, were produced by the mycelium of P. brumalis cultured in modified medium. However, theses final products were not observed when the fungus was grown in potato dextrose medium. We used next generation sequencing (NGS) to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to terpene metabolism. This approach generated 25,000 unigenes and 127 metabolic pathways that were assigned to Kyoto Encyclopedia Genes Groups (KEGG). Further analysis of samples from modified medium indicated significant upregulation of 8 unigenes involved in the mevalonate (MVA) and methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) biosynthetic pathways. These pathways generate isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), which are precursors for the synthesis of sesquiterpenes. Furthermore, genes encoding germacrene A synthase, which facilitate the cyclization of FPP, were only differentially expressed in mycelium from fungi grown in modified medium. Our data provide a resource for studying the molecular mechanisms underpinning sesquiterpene biosynthesis and terpene metabolism. PMID:26686622

  11. Weird mammals provide insights into the evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes and dosage compensation

    Jennifer A. Marshall Graves

    2015-12-01

    The deep divergence of mammalian groups 166 and 190 million years ago (MYA) provide genetic variation to explore the evolution of DNA sequence, gene arrangement and regulation of gene expression in mammals. With encouragement from the founder of the field, Mary Lyon, techniques in cytogenetics and molecular biology were progressively adapted to characterize the sex chromosomes of kangaroos and other marsupials, platypus and echidna—and weird rodent species. Comparative gene mapping reveals the process of sex chromosome evolution from their inception 190 MYA (they are autosomal in platypus) to their inevitable end (the Y has disappeared in two rodent lineages). Our X and Y are relatively young, getting their start with the evolution of the sex-determining gene, which triggered progressive degradation of the Y chromosome. Even more recently, sex chromosomes of placental mammals fused with an autosomal region which now makes up most of the Y. Exploration of gene activity patterns over four decades showed that dosage compensation via X-chromosome inactivation is unique to therian mammals, and that this whole chromosome control process is different in marsupials and absent in monotremes and reptiles, and birds. These differences can be exploited to deduce how mammalian sex chromosomes and epigenetic silencing evolved.

  12. Resiniferatoxin and its analogs provide novel insights into the pharmacology of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor

    Capsaicin, the pungent constituent of chili peppers, represents the paradigm for the capsaicinoids or vanilloids, a family of compounds shown to stimulate and then desensitize specific subpopulations of sensory receptors, including C-polymodal nociceptors, A-delta mechanoheat nociceptors and warm receptors of the skin, as well as enteroceptors of thin afferent fibers. An exciting recent advance in the field has been the finding that resiniferatoxin (RTX), a naturally occurring diterpene containing a homovanillic acid ester, a key structural motif of capsaicin, functions as an ultrapotent capsaicin analog. For most of the responses characteristic of capsaicin, RTX is 100-10,000 fold more potent. Structure/activity analysis indicates, however, that RTX and related homovanillyl-diterpene esters display distinct spectra of activity. Specific [3H]RTX binding provides the first direct proof for the existence of vanilloid receptors. We expect that the RTX class of vanilloids will promote rapid progress in understanding of vanilloid structure/activity requirements and mechanism

  13. Intraspecific Variation in Mitogenomes of Five Crassostrea Species Provides Insight into Oyster Diversification and Speciation.

    Ren, Jianfeng; Hou, Zhanhui; Wang, Haiyan; Sun, Ming-An; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Bin; Guo, Ximing

    2016-04-01

    A large number of Crassostrea oysters are found in Asia-Pacific. While analyses of interspecific variation have helped to establish historical relationships among these species, studies on intraspecific variation are necessary to understand their recent evolutionary history and current forces driving population biology. We resequenced 18 and analyzed 31 mitogenomes of five Crassostrea species from China: Crassostrea gigas, Crassostrea angulata, Crassostrea sikamea, Crassostrea ariakensis, and Crassostrea hongkongensis. Our analysis finds abundant insertions, deletions, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in all species. Intraspecific variation varies greatly among species with polymorphic sites ranging from 54 to 293 and nucleotide diversity ranging from 0.00106 to 0.00683. In all measurements, C. hongkongensis that has the narrowest geographic distribution exhibits the least sequence diversity; C. ariakensis that has the widest distribution shows the highest diversity, and species with intermediate distribution show intermediate levels of diversity. Low sequence diversity in C. hongkongensis may reflect recent bottlenecks that are probably exacerbated by human transplantation. High diversity in C. ariakensis is likely due to divergence of northern and southern China populations that have been separated without gene flow. The significant differences in mitogenome diversity suggest that the five sister species of Crassostrea have experienced different evolutionary forces since their divergence. The recent divergence of two C. ariakensis populations and the C. gigas/angulata species complex provides evidence for continued diversification and speciation of Crassostrea species along China's coast, which are shaped by unknown mechanisms in a north-south divide. PMID:26846524

  14. Proteomic analyses provide new insights into the responses of Pinus massoniana seedlings to phosphorus deficiency.

    Fan, Fuhua; Ding, Guijie; Wen, Xiaopeng

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Plants can respond defensively to phosphorus deficiency by modifying their morphology and metabolic pathways via the differential expression of low phosphate responsive genes. To better understand the mechanisms by which the Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) adapts to phosphorus deficiency, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis using an elite line exhibiting high tolerance to phosphorus deficiency. The selected seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM KH2 PO4 (control), 0.01 mM KH2 PO4 (P1), or 0.06 mM KH2 PO4 (P2) for 48 days. Total protein samples were separated via 2DE. A total of 98 differentially expressed proteins, which displayed at least 1.7-fold change expression compared to the control levels (p ≤ 0.05), were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These phosphate starvation responsive proteins were implicated in photosynthesis, defense, cellular organization, biosynthesis, energy metabolism, secondary metabolism, signal transduction etc. Therefore, these proteins might play important roles in facilitating internal phosphorus homeostasis. Additionally, the obtained data may be useful for the further characterization of gene function and may provide a foundation for a more comprehensive understanding of the adaptations of the Masson pine to phosphorus-deficient conditions. PMID:26603831

  15. Maternal separation with early weaning: a rodent model providing novel insights into neglect associated developmental deficits.

    Carlyle, Becky C; Duque, Alvaro; Kitchen, Robert R; Bordner, Kelly A; Coman, Daniel; Doolittle, Eliza; Papademetris, Xenophonios; Hyder, Fahmeed; Taylor, Jane R; Simen, Arthur A

    2012-11-01

    Child neglect is the most prevalent form of child maltreatment in the United States, and poses a serious public health concern. Children who survive such episodes go on to experience long-lasting psychological and behavioral problems, including higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, depression, alcohol and drug abuse, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and cognitive deficits. To date, most research into the causes of these life-long problems has focused on well-established targets such as stress responsive systems, including the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Using the maternal separation and early weaning model, we have attempted to provide comprehensive molecular profiling of a model of early-life neglect in an organism amenable to genomic manipulation: the mouse. In this article, we report new findings generated with this model using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, diffuse tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral analyses. We also review the validity of the maternal separation and early weaning model, which reflects behavioral deficits observed in neglected humans including hyperactivity, anxiety, and attentional deficits. Finally, we summarize the molecular characterization of these animals, including RNA profiling and label-free proteomics, which highlight protein translation and myelination as novel pathways of interest. PMID:23062306

  16. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC, which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  17. De Novo Assembly and Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Provide Insight into Lysine Biosynthesis in Toona sinensis Roem

    Xia Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis Roem is a popular leafy vegetable in Chinese cuisine and is also used as a traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, leaf samples were collected from the same plant on two development stages and then used for high-throughput Illumina RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq. 125,884 transcripts and 54,628 unigenes were obtained through de novo assembly. A total of 25,570 could be annotated with known biological functions, which indicated that the T. sinensis leaves and shoots were undergoing multiple developmental processes especially for active metabolic processes. Analysis of differentially expressed unigenes between the two libraries showed that the lysine biosynthesis was an enriched KEGG pathway, and candidate genes involved in the lysine biosynthesis pathway in T. sinensis leaves and shoots were identified. Our results provide a primary analysis of the gene expression files of T. sinensis leaf and shoot on different development stages and afford a valuable resource for genetic and genomic research on plant lysine biosynthesis.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in albacore and Atlantic bluefin tuna provides insights into worldwide population structure.

    Albaina, A; Iriondo, M; Velado, I; Laconcha, U; Zarraonaindia, I; Arrizabalaga, H; Pardo, M A; Lutcavage, M; Grant, W S; Estonba, A

    2013-12-01

    The optimal management of the commercially important, but mostly over-exploited, pelagic tunas, albacore (Thunnus alalunga Bonn., 1788) and Atlantic bluefin tuna (BFT; Thunnus thynnus L., 1758), requires a better understanding of population structure than has been provided by previous molecular methods. Despite numerous studies of both species, their population structures remain controversial. This study reports the development of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in albacore and BFT and the application of these SNPs to survey genetic variability across the geographic ranges of these tunas. A total of 616 SNPs were discovered in 35 albacore tuna by comparing sequences of 54 nuclear DNA fragments. A panel of 53 SNPs yielded FST values ranging from 0.0 to 0.050 between samples after genotyping 460 albacore collected throughout the distribution of this species. No significant heterogeneity was detected within oceans, but between-ocean comparisons (Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans along with Mediterranean Sea) were significant. Additionally, a 17-SNP panel was developed in Atlantic BFT by cross-species amplification in 107 fish. This limited number of SNPs discriminated between samples from the two major spawning areas of Atlantic BFT (FST  = 0.116). The SNP markers developed in this study can be used to genotype large numbers of fish without the need for standardizing alleles among laboratories. PMID:23668670

  19. De Novo Assembly and Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Provide Insight into Lysine Biosynthesis in Toona sinensis Roem

    Zhang, Xia; Song, Zhenqiao; Liu, Tian; Guo, Linlin; Li, Xingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Toona sinensis Roem is a popular leafy vegetable in Chinese cuisine and is also used as a traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, leaf samples were collected from the same plant on two development stages and then used for high-throughput Illumina RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq). 125,884 transcripts and 54,628 unigenes were obtained through de novo assembly. A total of 25,570 could be annotated with known biological functions, which indicated that the T. sinensis leaves and shoots were undergoing multiple developmental processes especially for active metabolic processes. Analysis of differentially expressed unigenes between the two libraries showed that the lysine biosynthesis was an enriched KEGG pathway, and candidate genes involved in the lysine biosynthesis pathway in T. sinensis leaves and shoots were identified. Our results provide a primary analysis of the gene expression files of T. sinensis leaf and shoot on different development stages and afford a valuable resource for genetic and genomic research on plant lysine biosynthesis.

  20. Molecular underpinnings of prefrontal cortex development in rodents provide insights into the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Schubert, D; Martens, G J M; Kolk, S M

    2015-07-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC), seat of the highest-order cognitive functions, constitutes a conglomerate of highly specialized brain areas and has been implicated to have a role in the onset and installation of various neurodevelopmental disorders. The development of a properly functioning PFC is directed by transcription factors, guidance cues and other regulatory molecules and requires the intricate and temporal orchestration of a number of developmental processes. Disturbance or failure of any of these processes causing neurodevelopmental abnormalities within the PFC may contribute to several of the cognitive deficits seen in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we elaborate on the specific processes underlying prefrontal development, such as induction and patterning of the prefrontal area, proliferation, migration and axonal guidance of medial prefrontal progenitors, and their eventual efferent and afferent connections. We furthermore integrate for the first time the available knowledge from genome-wide studies that have revealed genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders with experimental molecular evidence in rodents. The integrated data suggest that the pathogenic variants in the neurodevelopmental disorder-associated genes induce prefrontal cytoarchitectonical impairments. This enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of prefrontal (mis)development underlying the four major neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, that is, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia, and may thus provide clues for the development of novel therapies. PMID:25450230

  1. The Genome of Laccaria Bi color Provides Insights into Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Martin, F [UMR, France; Aerts, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ahren, D [Lund University, Sweden; Brun, A [UMR, France; Duchaussoy, F [UMR, France; Gibon, J [UMR, France; Kohler, A [UMR, France; Lindquist, E [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pereda, V [UMR, France; Salamov, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Shapiro, HJ [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wuyts, J [UMR, France; Blaudez, D [UMR, France; Buee, M [UMR, France; Brokstein, P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Canbeck, B [Lund University, Sweden; Cohen, D [UMR, France; Courty, PE [UMR, France; Coutinho, PM [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Danchin, E [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Delaruelle, C [UMR, France; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deveau, A [UMR, France; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Duplessis, S [UMR, France; Fraissinet-Tachet, L [Universite de Lyon, France; Lucic, E [UMR, France; Frey-Klett, P [UMR, France; Fourrey, C [UMR, France; Feussner, I [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Gay, G [Universite de Lyon, France; Grimwood, Jane [Stanford University; Hoegger, P J [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Jain, P [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Kilaru, S [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Labbe, J [UMR, France; Lin, Y C [Ghent University, Belgium; Legue, V [UMR, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Marmeisse, R [Universite de Lyon, France; Melayah, D [Universite de Lyon, France; Montanini, B [UMR, France; Muratet, M [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Nehls, U [Eberhard-Karls-Universitat, Tubingen, Germany; Niculita-Hirzel, H [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Oudot-Le Secq, M P [UMR, France; Peter, M [UMR, France; Quesneville, H [Unite de Recherches en Genomique-Info,Evry Cedex; Rajashekar, B [Lund University, Sweden; Reich, M [UMR, France; Rouhler, N [UMR, France; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Chalot, M [UMR, France; Henrissat, B [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Kues, U [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Lucas, S [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Van de Peer, Y [Ghent University, Belgium; Podila, G [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Polle, A [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Pukkila, P J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rouze, P [Ghent University, Belgium; Sanders, I R [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Stajich, J E [University of California, Berkeley; Tunlid, A [Lund University, Sweden; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Grigoriev, I. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and

  2. Inferences from the historical distribution of wild and domesticated maize provide ecological and evolutionary insight.

    Matthew B Hufford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The species Zea mays includes both domesticated maize (ssp. mays and its closest wild relatives known as the teosintes. While genetic and archaeological studies have provided a well-established history of Z. mays evolution, there is currently minimal description of its current and past distribution. Here, we implemented species distribution modeling using paleoclimatic models of the last interglacial (LI; ∼135,000 BP and the last glacial maximum (LGM; ∼21,000 BP to hindcast the distribution of Zea mays subspecies over time and to revisit current knowledge of its phylogeography and evolutionary history. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a large occurrence data set and the distribution modeling MaxEnt algorithm, we obtained robust present and past species distributions of the two widely distributed teosinte subspecies (ssps. parviglumis and mexicana revealing almost perfect complementarity, stable through time, of their occupied distributions. We also investigated the present distributions of primitive maize landraces, which overlapped but were broader than those of the teosintes. Our data reinforced the idea that little historical gene flow has occurred between teosinte subspecies, but maize has served as a genetic bridge between them. We observed an expansion of teosinte habitat from the LI, consistent with population genetic data. Finally, we identified locations potentially serving as refugia for the teosintes throughout epochs of climate change and sites that should be targeted in future collections. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The restricted and highly contrasting ecological niches of the wild teosintes differ substantially from domesticated maize. Variables determining the distributions of these taxa can inform future considerations of local adaptation and the impacts of climate change. Our assessment of the changing distributions of Zea mays taxa over time offers a unique glimpse into the history of maize, highlighting a

  3. Echidna venom gland transcriptome provides insights into the evolution of monotreme venom.

    Wong, Emily S W; Nicol, Stewart; Warren, Wesley C; Belov, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Monotremes (echidna and platypus) are egg-laying mammals. One of their most unique characteristic is that males have venom/crural glands that are seasonally active. Male platypuses produce venom during the breeding season, delivered via spurs, to aid in competition against other males. Echidnas are not able to erect their spurs, but a milky secretion is produced by the gland during the breeding season. The function and molecular composition of echidna venom is as yet unknown. Hence, we compared the deeply sequenced transcriptome of an in-season echidna crural gland to that of a platypus and searched for putative venom genes to provide clues into the function of echidna venom and the evolutionary history of monotreme venom. We found that the echidna venom gland transcriptome was markedly different from the platypus with no correlation between the top 50 most highly expressed genes. Four peptides found in the venom of the platypus were detected in the echidna transcriptome. However, these genes were not highly expressed in echidna, suggesting that they are the remnants of the evolutionary history of the ancestral venom gland. Gene ontology terms associated with the top 100 most highly expressed genes in echidna, showed functional terms associated with steroidal and fatty acid production, suggesting that echidna "venom" may play a role in scent communication during the breeding season. The loss of the ability to erect the spur and other unknown evolutionary forces acting in the echidna lineage resulted in the gradual decay of venom components and the evolution of a new role for the crural gland. PMID:24265746

  4. Can accelerations measured at the surface provide insight to what is happening at the drillbit?

    Myers, G.; Goldberg, D.

    2001-05-01

    Determining formation properties while drilling may assist both drillers and geologists in identifying lithologic contacts and sediment/rock interfaces even in cases where core and log data are not available. To investigate the sub-seafloor environment as part of two Seismic-While-Drilling experiments on ODP Leg 179, we recorded the vibration of the drill string using a pilot sensor system of our own design. The system consists of a 2.5g, 3-axis accelerometer rigidly attached to the drill string below the top drive with alloy wedge clamps. The system samples drill string vibrations at either 500 Hz or 250 Hz then transmits them at 115 Kbaud to a data acquisition computer for real time display and recording. Batteries in the pilot sensor supply power for up to 72 hours of continuous recording. To conduct these experiments, the ODP ship, JOIDES Resolution, drilled two holes in 714 m and 1660 m water depth in the Indian Ocean. By comparison of vertical and horizontal drill string acceleration with wireline logs and core data, variations in the petrophysical properties are correlated to drilling parameters. Drill string acceleration varies inversely with porosity from logs and core data. The signal amplitude in sediments is roughly half that in either basalt or gabbro. These signals illustrate characteristics of the advancing drillbit - significant energy radiates through the seafloor and differently through various formations; thus, it may provide a useful tool to evaluate drilling conditions and formation properties encountered at the bit. To date, the system has only been deployed on a floating platform where 8" drill pipe was used. The system may be adapted to drill pipe of varying sizes on both land and sea drilling rigs.

  5. Tectonic subsidence provides insight into possible coral reef futures under rapid sea-level rise

    Saunders, Megan I.; Albert, Simon; Roelfsema, Chris M.; Leon, Javier X.; Woodroffe, Colin D.; Phinn, Stuart R.; Mumby, Peter J.

    2016-03-01

    Sea-level rise will change environmental conditions on coral reef flats, which comprise extensive habitats in shallow tropical seas and support a wealth of ecosystem services. Rapid relative sea-level rise of 0.6 m over a relatively pristine coral reef in Solomon Islands, caused by a subduction earthquake in April 2007, generated a unique opportunity to examine in situ coral reef response to relative sea-level rise of the magnitude (but not the rate) anticipated by 2100. Extent of live coral was measured from satellite imagery in 2003, 2006, 2009 and 2012. Ecological data were obtained from microatolls and ecological surveys in May 2013. The reef was sampled at 12 locations where dense live hard coral remained absent, remained present or changed from absent to present following subsidence. Ecological data (substratum depth, live coral canopy depth, coral canopy height, substratum suitability, recruitment, diversity and Acropora presence) were measured at each location to identify factors associated with coral response to relative sea-level rise. Vertical and horizontal proliferation of coral occurred following subsidence. Lateral expansion of live coral, accomplished primarily by branching Acropora spp., resulted in lower diversity in regions which changed composition from pavement to dense live coral following subsidence. Of the ecological factors measured, biotic factors were more influential than abiotic factors; species identity was the most important factor in determining which regions of the reef responded to rapid sea-level rise. On relatively pristine reef flats under present climatic conditions, rapid relative sea-level rise generated an opportunity for hard coral to proliferate. However, the species assemblage of the existing reef was important in determining response to sea-level change, by providing previously bare substrate with a source of new coral colonies. Degraded reefs with altered species composition and slower coral growth rates may be less

  6. Echidna venom gland transcriptome provides insights into the evolution of monotreme venom.

    Emily S W Wong

    Full Text Available Monotremes (echidna and platypus are egg-laying mammals. One of their most unique characteristic is that males have venom/crural glands that are seasonally active. Male platypuses produce venom during the breeding season, delivered via spurs, to aid in competition against other males. Echidnas are not able to erect their spurs, but a milky secretion is produced by the gland during the breeding season. The function and molecular composition of echidna venom is as yet unknown. Hence, we compared the deeply sequenced transcriptome of an in-season echidna crural gland to that of a platypus and searched for putative venom genes to provide clues into the function of echidna venom and the evolutionary history of monotreme venom. We found that the echidna venom gland transcriptome was markedly different from the platypus with no correlation between the top 50 most highly expressed genes. Four peptides found in the venom of the platypus were detected in the echidna transcriptome. However, these genes were not highly expressed in echidna, suggesting that they are the remnants of the evolutionary history of the ancestral venom gland. Gene ontology terms associated with the top 100 most highly expressed genes in echidna, showed functional terms associated with steroidal and fatty acid production, suggesting that echidna "venom" may play a role in scent communication during the breeding season. The loss of the ability to erect the spur and other unknown evolutionary forces acting in the echidna lineage resulted in the gradual decay of venom components and the evolution of a new role for the crural gland.

  7. Hierarchical partitioning of metazoan protein conservation profiles provides new functional insights.

    Jonathan Witztum

    Full Text Available The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles. We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the "universal proteins", those with homologues in all 17 other species, and of the "non-universal proteins". A large number of GO terms are strongly enriched in both human and fly universal proteins. Most of these functions are known to be essential. A smaller number of GO terms, exhibiting markedly different properties, are enriched in both human and fly non-universal proteins. We further explore the non-universal proteins, whose conservation profiles are consistent with the "tree of life" (TOL consistent, as well as the TOL inconsistent proteins. Finally, we applied Quantum Clustering to the conservation profiles of the TOL consistent proteins. Each cluster is strongly associated with one or a small number of specific monophyletic clades in the tree of life. The proteins in many of these clusters exhibit strong functional enrichment associated with the "life style" of the related clades. Most previous approaches for studying function and conservation are "bottom up", studying protein families one by one, and separately assessing the conservation of each. By way of contrast, our approach is "top down". We globally partition the set of all proteins hierarchically, as described above, and then identify protein families enriched within different subdivisions. While supporting previous findings, our approach also provides a tool for discovering novel relations between protein conservation profiles, functionality, and evolutionary history as represented by the tree of life.

  8. Hierarchical partitioning of metazoan protein conservation profiles provides new functional insights.

    Witztum, Jonathan; Persi, Erez; Horn, David; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Chor, Benny

    2014-01-01

    The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles). We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO) analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the "universal proteins", those with homologues in all 17 other species, and of the "non-universal proteins". A large number of GO terms are strongly enriched in both human and fly universal proteins. Most of these functions are known to be essential. A smaller number of GO terms, exhibiting markedly different properties, are enriched in both human and fly non-universal proteins. We further explore the non-universal proteins, whose conservation profiles are consistent with the "tree of life" (TOL consistent), as well as the TOL inconsistent proteins. Finally, we applied Quantum Clustering to the conservation profiles of the TOL consistent proteins. Each cluster is strongly associated with one or a small number of specific monophyletic clades in the tree of life. The proteins in many of these clusters exhibit strong functional enrichment associated with the "life style" of the related clades. Most previous approaches for studying function and conservation are "bottom up", studying protein families one by one, and separately assessing the conservation of each. By way of contrast, our approach is "top down". We globally partition the set of all proteins hierarchically, as described above, and then identify protein families enriched within different subdivisions. While supporting previous findings, our approach also provides a tool for discovering novel relations between protein conservation profiles, functionality, and evolutionary history as represented by the tree of life. PMID:24594619

  9. Wing shape of four new bee fossils (Hymenoptera: Anthophila provides insights to bee evolution.

    Manuel Dehon

    Full Text Available Bees (Anthophila are one of the major groups of angiosperm-pollinating insects and accordingly are widely studied in both basic and applied research, for which it is essential to have a clear understanding of their phylogeny, and evolutionary history. Direct evidence of bee evolutionary history has been hindered by a dearth of available fossils needed to determine the timing and tempo of their diversification, as well as episodes of extinction. Here we describe four new compression fossils of bees from three different deposits (Miocene of la Cerdanya, Spain; Oligocene of Céreste, France; and Eocene of the Green River Formation, U.S.A.. We assess the similarity of the forewing shape of the new fossils with extant and fossil taxa using geometric morphometrics analyses. Predictive discriminant analyses show that three fossils share similar forewing shapes with the Apidae [one of uncertain tribal placement and perhaps near Euglossini, one definitive bumble bee (Bombini, and one digger bee (Anthophorini], while one fossil is more similar to the Andrenidae. The corbiculate fossils are described as Euglossopteryx biesmeijeri De Meulemeester, Michez, & Engel, gen. nov. sp. nov. (type species of Euglossopteryx Dehon & Engel, n. gen. and Bombus cerdanyensis Dehon, De Meulemeester, & Engel, sp. nov. They provide new information on the distribution and timing of particular corbiculate groups, most notably the extension into North America of possible Eocene-Oligocene cooling-induced extinctions. Protohabropoda pauli De Meulemeester & Michez, gen. nov. sp. nov. (type species of Protohabropoda Dehon & Engel, n. gen. reinforces previous hypotheses of anthophorine evolution in terms of ecological shifts by the Oligocene from tropical to mesic or xeric habitats. Lastly, a new fossil of the Andreninae, Andrena antoinei Michez & De Meulemeester, sp. nov., further documents the presence of the today widespread genus Andrena Fabricius in the Late Oligocene of France.

  10. Pathway analysis of GWAS provides new insights into genetic susceptibility to 3 inflammatory diseases.

    Hariklia Eleftherohorinou

    Full Text Available Although the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS have greatly increased the number of genes associated with common diseases, only a small proportion of the predicted genetic contribution has so far been elucidated. Studying the cumulative variation of polymorphisms in multiple genes acting in functional pathways may provide a complementary approach to the more common single SNP association approach in understanding genetic determinants of common disease. We developed a novel pathway-based method to assess the combined contribution of multiple genetic variants acting within canonical biological pathways and applied it to data from 14,000 UK individuals with 7 common diseases. We tested inflammatory pathways for association with Crohn's disease (CD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and type 1 diabetes (T1D with 4 non-inflammatory diseases as controls. Using a variable selection algorithm, we identified variants responsible for the pathway association and evaluated their use for disease prediction using a 10 fold cross-validation framework in order to calculate out-of-sample area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC. The generalisability of these predictive models was tested on an independent birth cohort from Northern Finland. Multiple canonical inflammatory pathways showed highly significant associations (p 10(-3-10(-20 with CD, T1D and RA. Variable selection identified on average a set of 205 SNPs (149 genes for T1D, 350 SNPs (189 genes for RA and 493 SNPs (277 genes for CD. The pattern of polymorphisms at these SNPS were found to be highly predictive of T1D (91% AUC and RA (85% AUC, and weakly predictive of CD (60% AUC. The predictive ability of the T1D model (without any parameter refitting had good predictive ability (79% AUC in the Finnish cohort. Our analysis suggests that genetic contribution to common inflammatory diseases operates through multiple genes interacting in functional pathways.

  11. Extensive Transcriptomic and Genomic Analysis Provides New Insights about Luminal Breast Cancers

    Tishchenko, Inna; Milioli, Heloisa Helena; Riveros, Carlos; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    luminal A and B subtypes. A proposition for a revisited delineation is provided in this study. PMID:27341628

  12. Multidimensional proteomics analysis of amniotic fluid to provide insight into the mechanisms of idiopathic preterm birth.

    Irina A Buhimschi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though recent advancement in proteomics has provided a novel perspective on several distinct pathogenetic mechanisms leading to preterm birth (inflammation, bleeding, the etiology of most preterm births still remains elusive. We conducted a multidimensional proteomic analysis of the amniotic fluid to identify pathways related to preterm birth in the absence of inflammation or bleeding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A proteomic fingerprint was generated from fresh amniotic fluid using surface-enhanced laser desorbtion ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry in a total of 286 consecutive samples retrieved from women who presented with signs or symptoms of preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Inflammation and/or bleeding proteomic patterns were detected in 32% (92/286 of the SELDI tracings. In the remaining tracings, a hierarchical algorithm was applied based on descriptors quantifying similarity/dissimilarity among proteomic fingerprints. This allowed identification of a novel profile (Q-profile based on the presence of 5 SELDI peaks in the 10-12.5 kDa mass area. Women displaying the Q-profile (mean+/-SD, gestational age: 25+/-4 weeks, n = 40 were more likely to deliver preterm despite expectant management in the context of intact membranes and normal amniotic fluid clinical results. Utilizing identification-centered proteomics techniques (fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, robotic tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry coupled with Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER ontological classifications, we determined that in amniotic fluids with Q-profile the differentially expressed proteins are primarily involved in non-inflammatory biological processes such as protein metabolism, signal transduction and transport. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Proteomic profiling of amniotic fluid coupled with non-hierarchical bioinformatics algorithms identified a

  13. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish.

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-10-01

    mm), where the tag was up to 7.6% of the lionfish's mass. Our study offers a novel in situ tagging technique that can be used to provide critical information on fish site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth in cases where ex situ tagging is not feasible. PMID:25614791

  14. Crystal structure of Anoxybacillus α-amylase provides insights into maltose binding of a new glycosyl hydrolase subclass.

    Chai, Kian Piaw; Othman, Noor Farhan Binti; Teh, Aik-Hong; Ho, Kok Lian; Chan, Kok-Gan; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Goh, Kian Mau; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-01-01

    A new subfamily of glycosyl hydrolase family GH13 was recently proposed for α-amylases from Anoxybacillus species (ASKA and ADTA), Geobacillus thermoleovorans (GTA, Pizzo, and GtamyII), Bacillus aquimaris (BaqA), and 95 other putative protein homologues. To understand this new GH13 subfamily, we report crystal structures of truncated ASKA (TASKA). ASKA is a thermostable enzyme capable of producing high levels of maltose. Unlike GTA, biochemical analysis showed that Ca(2+) ion supplementation enhances the catalytic activities of ASKA and TASKA. The crystal structures reveal the presence of four Ca(2+) ion binding sites, with three of these binding sites are highly conserved among Anoxybacillus α-amylases. This work provides structural insights into this new GH13 subfamily both in the apo form and in complex with maltose. Furthermore, structural comparison of TASKA and GTA provides an overview of the conformational changes accompanying maltose binding at each subsite. PMID:26975884

  15. Cardiac gene expression data and in silico analysis provide novel insights into human and mouse taste receptor gene regulation.

    Foster, Simon R; Porrello, Enzo R; Stefani, Maurizio; Smith, Nicola J; Molenaar, Peter; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Thomas, Walter G; Ramialison, Mirana

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are the principal mediators of the sweet, umami, bitter, and fat taste qualities in mammals. Intriguingly, the taste receptors are also expressed outside of the oral cavity, including in the gut, airways, brain, and heart, where they have additional functions and contribute to disease. However, there is little known about the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of taste receptor genes. Following our recent delineation of taste receptors in the heart, we investigated the genomic loci encoding for taste receptors to gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms that drive their expression in the heart. Gene expression analyses of healthy and diseased human and mouse hearts showed coordinated expression for a subset of chromosomally clustered taste receptors. This chromosomal clustering mirrored the cardiac expression profile, suggesting that a common gene regulatory block may control the taste receptor locus. We identified unique domains with strong regulatory potential in the vicinity of taste receptor genes. We also performed de novo motif enrichment in the proximal promoter regions and found several overrepresented DNA motifs in cardiac taste receptor gene promoters corresponding to ubiquitous and cardiac-specific transcription factor binding sites. Thus, combining cardiac gene expression data with bioinformatic analyses, this study has provided insights into the noncoding regulatory landscape for taste GPCRs. These findings also have broader relevance for the study of taste GPCRs outside of the classical gustatory system, where understanding the mechanisms controlling the expression of these receptors may have implications for future therapeutic development. PMID:25986534

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study Provides Insight into the Genetic Control of Plant Height in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    Sun, Chengming; Wang, Benqi; Yan, Lei; Hu, Kaining; Liu, Sheng; Zhou, Yongming; Guan, Chunyun; Zhang, Zhenqian; Li, Jiana; Zhang, Jiefu; Chen, Song; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong; Yi, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Plant height is a key morphological trait of rapeseed. In this study, we measured plant height of a rapeseed population across six environments. This population contains 476 inbred lines representing the major Chinese rapeseed genepool and 44 lines from other countries. The 60K Brassica Infinium® SNP array was utilized to genotype the association panel. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed via three methods, including a robust, novel, nonparametric Anderson–Darling (A–D) test. Consequently, 68 loci were identified as significantly associated with plant height (P 0.1), we found plausible candidates orthologous to the documented Arabidopsis genes involved in height regulation. One significant association found by GWAS colocalized with the established height locus BnRGA in rapeseed. Our results provide insights into the genetic basis of plant height in rapeseed and may facilitate marker-based breeding.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study Provides Insight into the Genetic Control of Plant Height in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Sun, Chengming; Wang, Benqi; Yan, Lei; Hu, Kaining; Liu, Sheng; Zhou, Yongming; Guan, Chunyun; Zhang, Zhenqian; Li, Jiana; Zhang, Jiefu; Chen, Song; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong; Yi, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Plant height is a key morphological trait of rapeseed. In this study, we measured plant height of a rapeseed population across six environments. This population contains 476 inbred lines representing the major Chinese rapeseed genepool and 44 lines from other countries. The 60K Brassica Infinium® SNP array was utilized to genotype the association panel. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed via three methods, including a robust, novel, nonparametric Anderson-Darling (A-D) test. Consequently, 68 loci were identified as significantly associated with plant height (P 0.1), we found plausible candidates orthologous to the documented Arabidopsis genes involved in height regulation. One significant association found by GWAS colocalized with the established height locus BnRGA in rapeseed. Our results provide insights into the genetic basis of plant height in rapeseed and may facilitate marker-based breeding. PMID:27512396

  18. Silver vanadium diphosphate Ag2VP2O8: Electrochemistry and characterization of reduced material providing mechanistic insights

    Silver vanadium phosphorous oxides (AgwVxPyOz) are notable battery cathode materials due to their high energy density and demonstrated ability to form in-situ Ag metal nanostructured electrically conductive networks within the cathode. While analogous silver vanadium diphosphate materials have been prepared, electrochemical evaluations of these diphosphate based materials have been limited. We report here the first electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag2VP2O8, where the structural differences associated with phosphorous oxides versus diphosphates profoundly affect the associated electrochemistry. Reminiscent of Ag2VO2PO4 reduction, in-situ formation of silver metal nanoparticles was observed with reduction of Ag2VP2O8. However, counter to Ag2VO2PO4 reduction, Ag2VP2O8 demonstrates a significant decrease in conductivity upon continued electrochemical reduction. Structural analysis contrasting the crystallography of the parent Ag2VP2O8 with that of the proposed Li2VP2O8 reduction product is employed to gain insight into the observed electrochemical reduction behavior, where the structural rigidity associated with the diphosphate anion may be associated with the observed particle fracturing upon deep electrochemical reduction. Further, the diphosphate anion structure may be associated with the high thermal stability of the partially reduced Ag2VP2O8 materials, which bodes well for enhanced safety of batteries incorporating this material. - Graphical abstract: Structure and galvanostatic intermittent titration-type test data for silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag2VP2O8. Highlights: ► First electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag2VP2O8. ► In-situ formation of Ag0 nanoparticles was observed upon electrochemical reduction. ► Structural analysis used to provide insight of the electrochemical behavior

  19. Novel information on the epitope of an inverse agonist monoclonal antibody provides insight into the structure of the TSH receptor.

    Chun-Rong Chen

    Full Text Available The TSH receptor (TSHR comprises an extracellular leucine-rich domain (LRD linked by a hinge region to the transmembrane domain (TMD. Insight into the orientation of these components to each other is required for understanding how ligands activate the receptor. We previously identified residue E251 at the LRD-hinge junction as contributing to coupling TSH binding with receptor activation. However, a single residue cannot stabilize the LRD-hinge unit. Therefore, based on the LRD crystal structure we selected for study four other potential LRD-hinge interface charged residues. Alanine substitutions of individual residues K244, E247, K250 and R255 (as well as previously known E251A did not affect TSH binding or function. However, the cumulative mutation of these residues in varying permutations, primarily K250A and R255A when associated with E251A, partially uncoupled TSH binding and function. These data suggest that these three residues, spatially very close to each other at the LRD base, interact with the hinge region. Unexpectedly and most important, monoclonal antibody CS-17, a TSHR inverse agonist whose epitope straddles the LRD-hinge, was found to interact with residues K244 and E247 at the base of the convex LRD surface. These observations, together with the functional data, exclude residues K244 and E247 from the TSHR LRD-hinge interface. Further, for CS-17 accessibility to K244 and E247, the concave surface of the TSHR LRD must be tilted forwards towards the hinge region and plasma membrane. Overall, these data provide insight into the mechanism by which ligands either activate the TSHR or suppress its constitutive activity.

  20. Physical mapping and BAC-end sequence analysis provide initial insights into the flax (Linum usitatissimum L. genome

    Cloutier Sylvie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flax (Linum usitatissimum L. is an important source of oil rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which have proven health benefits and utility as an industrial raw material. Flax seeds also contain lignans which are associated with reducing the risk of certain types of cancer. Its bast fibres have broad industrial applications. However, genomic tools needed for molecular breeding were non existent. Hence a project, Total Utilization Flax GENomics (TUFGEN was initiated. We report here the first genome-wide physical map of flax and the generation and analysis of BAC-end sequences (BES from 43,776 clones, providing initial insights into the genome. Results The physical map consists of 416 contigs spanning ~368 Mb, assembled from 32,025 fingerprints, representing roughly 54.5% to 99.4% of the estimated haploid genome (370-675 Mb. The N50 size of the contigs was estimated to be ~1,494 kb. The longest contig was ~5,562 kb comprising 437 clones. There were 96 contigs containing more than 100 clones. Approximately 54.6 Mb representing 8-14.8% of the genome was obtained from 80,337 BES. Annotation revealed that a large part of the genome consists of ribosomal DNA (~13.8%, followed by known transposable elements at 6.1%. Furthermore, ~7.4% of sequence was identified to harbour novel repeat elements. Homology searches against flax-ESTs and NCBI-ESTs suggested that ~5.6% of the transcriptome is unique to flax. A total of 4064 putative genomic SSRs were identified and are being developed as novel markers for their use in molecular breeding. Conclusion The first genome-wide physical map of flax constructed with BAC clones provides a framework for accessing target loci with economic importance for marker development and positional cloning. Analysis of the BES has provided insights into the uniqueness of the flax genome. Compared to other plant genomes, the proportion of rDNA was found to be very high whereas the proportion of known transposable

  1. The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus) genome provides new insights into the evolution of an early lineage of teleosts.

    Bian, Chao; Hu, Yinchang; Ravi, Vydianathan; Kuznetsova, Inna S; Shen, Xueyan; Mu, Xidong; Sun, Ying; You, Xinxin; Li, Jia; Li, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Ying; Tay, Boon-Hui; Thevasagayam, Natascha May; Komissarov, Aleksey S; Trifonov, Vladimir; Kabilov, Marsel; Tupikin, Alexey; Luo, Jianren; Liu, Yi; Song, Hongmei; Liu, Chao; Wang, Xuejie; Gu, Dangen; Yang, Yexin; Li, Wujiao; Polgar, Gianluca; Fan, Guangyi; Zeng, Peng; Zhang, He; Xiong, Zijun; Tang, Zhujing; Peng, Chao; Ruan, Zhiqiang; Yu, Hui; Chen, Jieming; Fan, Mingjun; Huang, Yu; Wang, Min; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Hu, Guojun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xun; Song, Linsheng; Xu, Gangchun; Xu, Pao; Xu, Junmin; O'Brien, Stephen J; Orbán, László; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus), one of the world's most expensive cultivated ornamental fishes, is an endangered species. It represents an ancient lineage of teleosts: the Osteoglossomorpha. Here, we provide a high-quality chromosome-level reference genome of a female golden-variety arowana using a combination of deep shotgun sequencing and high-resolution linkage mapping. In addition, we have also generated two draft genome assemblies for the red and green varieties. Phylogenomic analysis supports a sister group relationship between Osteoglossomorpha (bonytongues) and Elopomorpha (eels and relatives), with the two clades together forming a sister group of Clupeocephala which includes all the remaining teleosts. The arowana genome retains the full complement of eight Hox clusters unlike the African butterfly fish (Pantodon buchholzi), another bonytongue fish, which possess only five Hox clusters. Differential gene expression among three varieties provides insights into the genetic basis of colour variation. A potential heterogametic sex chromosome is identified in the female arowana karyotype, suggesting that the sex is determined by a ZW/ZZ sex chromosomal system. The high-quality reference genome of the golden arowana and the draft assemblies of the red and green varieties are valuable resources for understanding the biology, adaptation and behaviour of Asian arowanas. PMID:27089831

  2. New Insight into the Solar System’s Transition Disk Phase Provided by the Metal-rich Carbonaceous Chondrite Isheyevo

    Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Knauth, L. Paul

    2015-03-01

    Many aspects of planet formation are controlled by the amount of gas remaining in the natal protoplanetary disks (PPDs). Infrared observations show that PPDs undergo a transition stage at several megayears, during which gas densities are reduced. Our Solar System would have experienced such a stage. However, there is currently no data that provides insight into this crucial time in our PPD’s evolution. We show that the Isheyevo meteorite contains the first definitive evidence for a transition disk stage in our Solar System. Isheyevo belongs to a class of metal-rich meteorites whose components have been dated at almost 5 Myr after formation of Ca, Al-rich inclusions, and exhibits unique sedimentary layers that imply formation through gentle sedimentation. We show that such layering can occur via the gentle sweep-up of material found in the impact plume resulting from the collision of two planetesimals. Such sweep-up requires gas densities consistent with observed transition disks (10-12-10-11 g cm-3). As such, Isheyevo presents the first evidence of our own transition disk and provides new constraints on the evolution of our solar nebula.

  3. Mechanisms of cell death in canine parvovirus-infected cells provide intuitive insights to developing nanotools for medicine

    Jonna Nykky

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jonna Nykky, Jenni E Tuusa, Sanna Kirjavainen, Matti Vuento, Leona GilbertNanoscience Center and Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, FinlandAbstract: Viruses have great potential as nanotools in medicine for gene transfer, targeted gene delivery, and oncolytic cancer virotherapy. Here we have studied cell death mechanisms of canine parvovirus (CPV to increase the knowledge on the CPV life cycle in order to facilitate the development of better parvovirus vectors. Morphological studies of CPV-infected Norden laboratory feline kidney (NLFK cells and canine fibroma cells (A72 displayed characteristic apoptotic events. Apoptosis was further confirmed by activation of caspases and cellular DNA damage. However, results from annexin V-propidium iodide (PI labeling and membrane polarization assays indicated disruption of the plasma membrane uncommon to apoptosis. These results provide evidence that secondary necrosis followed apoptosis. In addition, two human cancer cell lines were found to be infected by CPV. This necrotic event over apoptotic cell death and infection in human cells provide insightful information when developing CPV as a nanotool for cancer treatments.Keywords: canine parvovirus, apoptosis, necrosis, nanoparticle, virotherapy

  4. 13,16-Dimethyl octacosanedioic acid (iso-diabolic acid), a common membrane-spanning lipid of Acidobacteria subdivisions 1 and 3

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Hopmans, E.C.; Weijers, J.W.H.; Foesel, B.U.; Overmann, J.; Dedysh, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of membrane lipids of 17 different strains representing 13 species of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the phylum Acidobacteria, a highly diverse phylum of the Bacteria, were examined by hydrolysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) and by high-performance liquid chromatography-MS

  5. Gene knockout of nuclear progesterone receptor provides insights into the regulation of ovulation by LH signaling in zebrafish

    Tang, Haipei; Liu, Yun; Li, Jianzhen; Yin, Yike; Li, Gaofei; Chen, Yu; Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran; Liu, Xiaochun; Cheng, Christopher H. K.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the luteinizing hormone surge triggers ovulation, a dynamic process leading to the release of the mature oocyte from the ovarian follicle. But how this process controlled by LH signaling remains largely unknown in non-mammalian species. In this study, we investigated the roles of nuclear progesterone receptor (npr) in LH-induced ovulation. Our results indicate that the nuclear progesterone receptor serves as an important mediator of LH action on ovulation. This conclusion is based on the following results: (1) the expression level of npr peaks at the full-grown stage of the follicles; (2) the expression of npr is stimulated by LH signaling in vitro and in vivo; and (3) the npr null females are infertile due to ovulation defects. Moreover, we further show that LH signaling could induce ptger4b expression in an npr-dependent manner, and blockage of Ptger4b could also block hCG-induced ovulation. Collectively, our results not only demonstrate that npr serves an indispensable role in mediating the action of LH on ovulation in zebrafish, but also provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the regulation of ovulation in fish. PMID:27333837

  6. Fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules provides mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain.

    Min Lin

    Full Text Available Dental thermal pain is a significant health problem in daily life and dentistry. There is a long-standing question regarding the phenomenon that cold stimulation evokes sharper and more shooting pain sensations than hot stimulation. This phenomenon, however, outlives the well-known hydrodynamic theory used to explain dental thermal pain mechanism. Here, we present a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that hot or cold stimulation-induced different directions of dentinal fluid flow and the corresponding odontoblast movements in dentinal microtubules contribute to different dental pain responses. We coupled a computational fluid dynamics model, describing the fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules, with a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, describing the discharge behavior of intradental neuron. The simulated results agreed well with existing experimental measurements. We thence demonstrated theoretically that intradental mechano-sensitive nociceptors are not "equally sensitive" to inward (into the pulp and outward (away from the pulp fluid flows, providing mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain. The model developed here could enable better diagnosis in endodontics which requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, as well as their dynamic response to the thermal stimulation used in dental practices.

  7. Fluid Mechanics in Dentinal Microtubules Provides Mechanistic Insights into the Difference between Hot and Cold Dental Pain

    Lin, Min; Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-01-01

    Dental thermal pain is a significant health problem in daily life and dentistry. There is a long-standing question regarding the phenomenon that cold stimulation evokes sharper and more shooting pain sensations than hot stimulation. This phenomenon, however, outlives the well-known hydrodynamic theory used to explain dental thermal pain mechanism. Here, we present a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that hot or cold stimulation-induced different directions of dentinal fluid flow and the corresponding odontoblast movements in dentinal microtubules contribute to different dental pain responses. We coupled a computational fluid dynamics model, describing the fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules, with a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, describing the discharge behavior of intradental neuron. The simulated results agreed well with existing experimental measurements. We thence demonstrated theoretically that intradental mechano-sensitive nociceptors are not “equally sensitive” to inward (into the pulp) and outward (away from the pulp) fluid flows, providing mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain. The model developed here could enable better diagnosis in endodontics which requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, as well as their dynamic response to the thermal stimulation used in dental practices. PMID:21448459

  8. Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces.

    Vater, Svenja M; Finlay, John; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Ederth, Thomas; Liedberg, Bo; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of zoospores of Ulva linza with cationic, arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is characterized by rapid settlement. Some spores settle (ie permanently attach) in a 'normal' manner involving the secretion of a permanent adhesive, retraction of the flagella and cell wall formation, whilst others undergo 'pseudosettlement' whereby motile spores are trapped (attached) on the SAM surface without undergoing the normal metamorphosis into a settled spore. Holographic microscopy was used to record videos of swimming zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces with different cationic oligopeptide concentrations to provide time-resolved insights into processes associated with attachment of spores. The data reveal that spore attachment rate increases with increasing cationic peptide content. Accordingly, the decrease in swimming activity in the volume of seawater above the surface accelerated with increasing surface charge. Three-dimensional trajectories of individual swimming spores showed a 'hit and stick' motion pattern, exclusively observed for the arginine-rich peptide SAMs, whereby spores were immediately trapped upon contact with the surface. PMID:25875964

  9. Neuroanatomy of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma provides insights into the evolution of the polychaete nervous system.

    Norio Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Vestimentiferan tubeworms are marine invertebrates that inhabit chemosynthetic environments, and although recent molecular phylogenetic analyses have suggested that vestimentiferan tubeworms are derived from polychaete annelids, they show some morphological features that are different from other polychaetes. For example, vestimentiferans lack a digestive tract and have less body segments and comparative neuroanatomy can provide essential insight into the vestimentiferan body plan and its evolution. In the present study, we investigated the adult nervous system in the vestimentiferan Lamellibrachia satsuma using antibodies against synapsin, serotonin, FMRMamide and acetylated α-tubulin. We also examined the expressions of neural marker genes, elav and synaptotagmin to reveal the distribution of neuronal cell bodies. Brain anatomy shows simple organization in Lamellibrachia compared to other polychaetes. This simplification is probably due to the loss of the digestive tract, passing through the body between the brain and the subesophageal ganglion. In contrast, the ventral nerve cord shows a repeated organizational structure as in the other polychaetes, despite the absence of the multiple segmentation of the trunk. These results suggest that the brain anatomy is variable depending on the function and the condition of surrounding tissues, and that the formation of the rope ladder-like nervous system of the ventral nerve cord is independent from segmentation in polychaetes.

  10. Structural analysis of the α-glucosidase HaG provides new insights into substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism.

    Shen, Xing; Saburi, Wataru; Gai, Zuoqi; Kato, Koji; Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Yu, Jian; Komoda, Keisuke; Kido, Yusuke; Matsui, Hirokazu; Mori, Haruhide; Yao, Min

    2015-06-01

    α-Glucosidases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of the α-glucosidic linkage at the nonreducing end of the substrate, are important for the metabolism of α-glucosides. Halomonas sp. H11 α-glucosidase (HaG), belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), only has high hydrolytic activity towards the α-(1 → 4)-linked disaccharide maltose among naturally occurring substrates. Although several three-dimensional structures of GH13 members have been solved, the disaccharide specificity and α-(1 → 4) recognition mechanism of α-glucosidase are unclear owing to a lack of corresponding substrate-bound structures. In this study, four crystal structures of HaG were solved: the apo form, the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate complex, the E271Q mutant in complex with its natural substrate maltose and a complex of the D202N mutant with D-glucose and glycerol. These structures explicitly provide insights into the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of HaG. A peculiar long β → α loop 4 which exists in α-glucosidase is responsible for the strict recognition of disaccharides owing to steric hindrance. Two residues, Thr203 and Phe297, assisted with Gly228, were found to determine the glycosidic linkage specificity of the substrate at subsite +1. Furthermore, an explanation of the α-glucosidase reaction mechanism is proposed based on the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate structure. PMID:26057678

  11. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provide First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses

    Meena, Seema; Kumar, Sarma R.; Venkata Rao, D. K.; Dwivedi, Varun; Shilpashree, H. B.; Rastogi, Shubhra; Shasany, Ajit K.; Nagegowda, Dinesh A.

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family) represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step toward understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass) by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases, pyrophosphatases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldo-keto reductases, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, alcohol acetyltransferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type) with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes, and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified protein sequences in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition. PMID:27516768

  12. Novel UDP-GalNAc Derivative Structures Provide Insight into the Donor Specificity of Human Blood Group Glycosyltransferase.

    Wagner, Gerd K; Pesnot, Thomas; Palcic, Monica M; Jørgensen, Rene

    2015-12-25

    Two closely related glycosyltransferases are responsible for the final step of the biosynthesis of ABO(H) human blood group A and B antigens. The two enzymes differ by only four amino acid residues, which determine whether the enzymes transfer GalNAc from UDP-GalNAc or Gal from UDP-Gal to the H-antigen acceptor. The enzymes belong to the class of GT-A folded enzymes, grouped as GT6 in the CAZy database, and are characterized by a single domain with a metal dependent retaining reaction mechanism. However, the exact role of the four amino acid residues in the specificity of the enzymes is still unresolved. In this study, we report the first structural information of a dual specificity cis-AB blood group glycosyltransferase in complex with a synthetic UDP-GalNAc derivative. Interestingly, the GalNAc moiety adopts an unusual yet catalytically productive conformation in the binding pocket, which is different from the "tucked under" conformation previously observed for the UDP-Gal donor. In addition, we show that this UDP-GalNAc derivative in complex with the H-antigen acceptor provokes the same unusual binding pocket closure as seen for the corresponding UDP-Gal derivative. Despite this, the two derivatives show vastly different kinetic properties. Our results provide a important structural insight into the donor substrate specificity and utilization in blood group biosynthesis, which can very likely be exploited for the development of new glycosyltransferase inhibitors and probes. PMID:26527682

  13. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provide First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses.

    Meena, Seema; Kumar, Sarma R; Venkata Rao, D K; Dwivedi, Varun; Shilpashree, H B; Rastogi, Shubhra; Shasany, Ajit K; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family) represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step toward understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass) by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases, pyrophosphatases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldo-keto reductases, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, alcohol acetyltransferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type) with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes, and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified protein sequences in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition. PMID:27516768

  14. Independent analysis of the flagellum surface and matrix proteomes provides insight into flagellum signaling in mammalian-infectious Trypanosoma brucei.

    Oberholzer, Michael; Langousis, Gerasimos; Nguyen, HoangKim T; Saada, Edwin A; Shimogawa, Michelle M; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Nguyen, Steven M; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2011-10-01

    The flagellum of African trypanosomes is an essential and multifunctional organelle that functions in motility, cell morphogenesis, and host-parasite interaction. Previous studies of the trypanosome flagellum have been limited by the inability to purify flagella without first removing the flagellar membrane. This limitation is particularly relevant in the context of studying flagellum signaling, as signaling requires surface-exposed proteins in the flagellar membrane and soluble signaling proteins in the flagellar matrix. Here we employ a combination of genetic and mechanical approaches to purify intact flagella from the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, in its mammalian-infectious stage. We combined flagellum purification with affinity-purification of surface-exposed proteins to conduct independent proteomic analyses of the flagellum surface and matrix fractions. The proteins identified encompass a broad range of molecular functionalities, including many predicted to function in signaling. Immunofluorescence and RNA interference studies demonstrate flagellum localization and function for proteins identified and provide insight into mechanisms of flagellum attachment and motility. The flagellum surface proteome includes many T. brucei-specific proteins and is enriched for proteins up-regulated in the mammalian-infectious stage of the parasite life-cycle. The combined results indicate that the flagellum surface presents a diverse and dynamic host-parasite interface that is well-suited for host-parasite signaling. PMID:21685506

  15. Insights into temporal variability of surface flow velocity of the Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, provided by optical satellite imagery

    Sirguey, P. J.; Redpath, T.; Fitzsimons, S.; Kääb, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Tasman Glacier is the longest and largest glacier in New Zealand, containing almost a third of New Zealand's glacier ice by volume. Recent studies have applied digital image matching techniques to measure flow velocities on the surface of the Tasman Glacier from repeat satellite imagery. These studies have, however, utilized temporally limited data sets. Additionally, precise quantification of uncertainties is not common; with an accuracy of ± 1 pixel (15 m where ASTER imagery is used) assigned in earlier studies, while no previous work has accounted for inevitably anisotropic uncertainties. Large and ambiguous uncertainties make significance assessment of small inter- to sub-annual velocity changes difficult. This study provides a decade long (2000 - 2010) record of flow velocities for the Tasman Glacier. This record has been derived from a series of annually acquired Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery. Flow-fields were derived from pairs of consecutive images using Correlation Image Analysis Software (CIAS). Repeat GPS measurements of markers installed on the glacier surface were used for optimisation of image matching and flow-field validation. Co-registration of each image pair was carefully quantified at a sub-pixel level, enabling the calculation of confidence intervals for each map of flow velocity. Uncertainties presented here are anisotropic, accounting for unequal co-registration variance between images in the x and y directions, and unique to each individual velocity measurement. Quantification of uncertainties permitted the significance of temporal velocity changes to be assessed. The results identify two major units of flow, and, an apparent disconnection between the upper Tasman and Hochstetter glaciers. Despite the existence of this discontinuity, a previously suggested complete de-coupling between ice masses at the Hochstetter Confluence was not

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-03-23

    Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel resistance

  17. Whole Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium africanum Strains from Mali Provides Insights into the Mechanisms of Geographic Restriction

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Abeel, Thomas; Shea, Terrance; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Diarra, Bassirou; Baya, Bocar; Sanogo, Moumine; Diallo, Souleymane; Earl, Ashlee M.; Bishai, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium africanum, made up of lineages 5 and 6 within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), causes up to half of all tuberculosis cases in West Africa, but is rarely found outside of this region. The reasons for this geographical restriction remain unknown. Possible reasons include a geographically restricted animal reservoir, a unique preference for hosts of West African ethnicity, and an inability to compete with other lineages outside of West Africa. These latter two hypotheses could be caused by loss of fitness or altered interactions with the host immune system. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced 92 MTC clinical isolates from Mali, including two lineage 5 and 24 lineage 6 strains. Our genome sequencing assembly, alignment, phylogeny and average nucleotide identity analyses enabled us to identify features that typify lineages 5 and 6 and made clear that these lineages do not constitute a distinct species within the MTC. We found that in Mali, lineage 6 and lineage 4 strains have similar levels of diversity and evolve drug resistance through similar mechanisms. In the process, we identified a putative novel streptomycin resistance mutation. In addition, we found evidence of person-to-person transmission of lineage 6 isolates and showed that lineage 6 is not enriched for mutations in virulence-associated genes. Conclusions This is the largest collection of lineage 5 and 6 whole genome sequences to date, and our assembly and alignment data provide valuable insights into what distinguishes these lineages from other MTC lineages. Lineages 5 and 6 do not appear to be geographically restricted due to an inability to transmit between West African hosts or to an elevated number of mutations in virulence-associated genes. However, lineage-specific mutations, such as mutations in cell wall structure, secretion systems and cofactor biosynthesis, provide alternative mechanisms that may lead to host specificity. PMID:26751217

  18. Modelling the self-assembly of elastomeric proteins provides insights into the evolution of their domain architectures.

    Hongyan Song

    Full Text Available Elastomeric proteins have evolved independently multiple times through evolution. Produced as monomers, they self-assemble into polymeric structures that impart properties of stretch and recoil. They are composed of an alternating domain architecture of elastomeric domains interspersed with cross-linking elements. While the former provide the elasticity as well as help drive the assembly process, the latter serve to stabilise the polymer. Changes in the number and arrangement of the elastomeric and cross-linking regions have been shown to significantly impact their assembly and mechanical properties. However, to date, such studies are relatively limited. Here we present a theoretical study that examines the impact of domain architecture on polymer assembly and integrity. At the core of this study is a novel simulation environment that uses a model of diffusion limited aggregation to simulate the self-assembly of rod-like particles with alternating domain architectures. Applying the model to different domain architectures, we generate a variety of aggregates which are subsequently analysed by graph-theoretic metrics to predict their structural integrity. Our results show that the relative length and number of elastomeric and cross-linking domains can significantly impact the morphology and structural integrity of the resultant polymeric structure. For example, the most highly connected polymers were those constructed from asymmetric rods consisting of relatively large cross-linking elements interspersed with smaller elastomeric domains. In addition to providing insights into the evolution of elastomeric proteins, simulations such as those presented here may prove valuable for the tuneable design of new molecules that may be exploited as useful biomaterials.

  19. Modelling the self-assembly of elastomeric proteins provides insights into the evolution of their domain architectures.

    Song, Hongyan; Parkinson, John

    2012-01-01

    Elastomeric proteins have evolved independently multiple times through evolution. Produced as monomers, they self-assemble into polymeric structures that impart properties of stretch and recoil. They are composed of an alternating domain architecture of elastomeric domains interspersed with cross-linking elements. While the former provide the elasticity as well as help drive the assembly process, the latter serve to stabilise the polymer. Changes in the number and arrangement of the elastomeric and cross-linking regions have been shown to significantly impact their assembly and mechanical properties. However, to date, such studies are relatively limited. Here we present a theoretical study that examines the impact of domain architecture on polymer assembly and integrity. At the core of this study is a novel simulation environment that uses a model of diffusion limited aggregation to simulate the self-assembly of rod-like particles with alternating domain architectures. Applying the model to different domain architectures, we generate a variety of aggregates which are subsequently analysed by graph-theoretic metrics to predict their structural integrity. Our results show that the relative length and number of elastomeric and cross-linking domains can significantly impact the morphology and structural integrity of the resultant polymeric structure. For example, the most highly connected polymers were those constructed from asymmetric rods consisting of relatively large cross-linking elements interspersed with smaller elastomeric domains. In addition to providing insights into the evolution of elastomeric proteins, simulations such as those presented here may prove valuable for the tuneable design of new molecules that may be exploited as useful biomaterials. PMID:22396636

  20. Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel group 4 thermophilic member of the phylum Acidobacteria from geothermal soils.

    Crowe, M A; Power, J F; Morgan, X C; Dunfield, P F; Lagutin, K; Rijpstra, W I C; Rijpstra, I C; Vyssotski, G N S; Sinninghe Damste, J S; Houghton, K M; Ryan, J L J; Stott, M B

    2014-01-01

    An aerobic, thermophilic, moderately acidophilic non-spore-forming bacterium, strain K22(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Mount Ngauruhoe, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, K22(T) was shown to belong to subdivision 4 of the phylum Acidobacteria and to be most closely related to 'Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum' (86 %) and Blastocatella fastidiosa (86 %). Cells stained Gram-negative and were catalase and oxidase-positive. The major fatty acids detected were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0, iso-C19 : 0 and iso-C21 : 0 when standard lipid extraction protocols were employed. Analysis of the total cell lipid acid hydrolysate also detected membrane-spanning and ether lipids, which made up approximately 40 % of the total membrane composition. These lipids included dicarboxylic (iso-diabolic) acid and the glyceryl ether of alkyl analogues of iso-C15 : 0 and iso-diabolic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 59.6 mol% and the primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Strain K22(T) grew at 50-69 °C with an optimum temperature of 65 °C and at pH 4.1-7.8 with an optimum growth pH of 6.5. NaCl tolerance was up to 1 % (w/v). Cells displayed a chemoheterotrophic and obligately aerobic metabolism. Cells grew on nutrient broth, alginate, arabinose, Casamino acids, glucose, lactate, formate, mannose, sodium alginate, peptone, sucrose, tryptone, xanthan, xylan, xylose and yeast extract. Nitrogen sources included nitrate, ammonium, urea, yeast extract and Casamino acids, but not dinitrogen gas. The distinct phylogenetic position and the phenotypic characteristics separate strain K22(T) from all other members of the class Acidobacteria and indicate that it represents a novel species and genus, for which the name Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is K22(T) ( = DSM 25857(T) = ICMP 18710(T)). PMID:24048862

  1. Reconstructing SALMFamide neuropeptide precursor evolution in the phylum Echinodermata: ophiuroid and crinoid sequence data provide new insights

    Maurice R Elphick

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea, the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea. We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids, which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialised to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the cocktails of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms.

  2. Reconstructing SALMFamide Neuropeptide Precursor Evolution in the Phylum Echinodermata: Ophiuroid and Crinoid Sequence Data Provide New Insights.

    Elphick, Maurice R; Semmens, Dean C; Blowes, Liisa M; Levine, Judith; Lowe, Christopher J; Arnone, Maria I; Clark, Melody S

    2015-01-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea), the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea), and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea) reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here, we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea) and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea). We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus, and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif, and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea) and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea) in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids), which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialized to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the "cocktails" of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms. PMID:25699014

  3. Kinetic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa arginine deiminase mutants and alternate substrates provides insight into structural determinants of function.

    Lu, Xuefeng; Li, Ling; Wu, Rui; Feng, Xiaohua; Li, Zhimin; Yang, Heyi; Wang, Canhui; Guo, Hua; Galkin, Andrey; Herzberg, Osnat; Mariano, Patrick S; Martin, Brian M; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2006-01-31

    L-Arginine deiminase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaADI) catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to citrulline and ammonia. PaADI belongs to the guanidino group-modifying enzyme superfamily (GMSF), which conserves backbone fold and a Cys-, His-, and Asp-based catalytic core. In this paper the contributions made by the PaADI core residues Cys406, His278, and Asp166 and the contribution from the neighboring Asp280 (conserved in most but not all GMSF members) to catalysis of the formation and hydrolysis of the Cys406-alkyluronium intermediate were accessed by kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants. In addition, solution hydrolysis in a chemical model of the S-alkylthiouronium intermediate was examined to reveal the importance of general base catalysis in the enzymatic reaction. Substitutions of the active site gating residue Arg401, the l-arginine C(alpha)NH(3)(+)(COO(-)) binding residues, Arg185, Arg243, and Asn160, or the His278 hydrogen bond partner, Glu224, were found to cause dramatic reductions in the enzyme turnover rate. These results are interpreted to suggest that electrostatic interactions play a dominant role in PaADI catalysis. Structural variations observed in P. aeruginosa GMSF enzymes PaADI, agmatine deiminase (PaAgDI), and N(omega),N(omega)-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (PaDDAH) indicate an early divergence of the encoding genes. Arginine analogues that are known substrates for PaAgDI and PaDDAH were tested with PaADI to define clear boundaries of biochemical function in the three hydrolases. The conservation of a catalytic core associated with the common chemical function and the divergence of substrate-binding residues (as well as one key catalytic residue) to expand the substrate range provide insight into the evolution of the catalysts that form the GMSF. PMID:16430212

  4. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases.

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2016-03-29

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze theo-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme's interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate-enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO's acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their--so far unknown--natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  5. Community proteomics provides functional insight into polyhydroxyalkanoate production by a mixed microbial culture cultivated on fermented dairy manure.

    Hanson, Andrea J; Guho, Nicholas M; Paszczynski, Andrzej J; Coats, Erik R

    2016-09-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bio-based, biodegradable polyesters that can be produced from organic-rich waste streams using mixed microbial cultures (MMCs). To maximize PHA production, MMCs are enriched for bacteria with a high polymer storage capacity through the application of aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), which consequently induces a feast-famine metabolic response. Though the feast-famine response is generally understood empirically at a macro-level, the molecular level is less refined. The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial community composition and proteome profile of an enriched MMC cultivated on fermented dairy manure. The enriched MMC exhibited a feast-famine response and was capable of producing up to 40 % (wt. basis) PHA in a fed-batch reactor. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a microbial community dominated by Meganema, a known PHA-producing genus not often observed in high abundance in enrichment SBRs. The application of the proteomic methods two-dimensional electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS revealed PHA synthesis, energy generation, and protein synthesis prominently occurring during the feast phase, corroborating bulk solution variable observations and theoretical expectations. During the famine phase, nutrient transport, acyl-CoA metabolism, additional energy generation, and housekeeping functions were more pronounced, informing previously under-determined MMC functionality under famine conditions. During fed-batch PHA production, acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase and PHA granule-bound phasin proteins were in increased abundance relative to the SBR, supporting the higher PHA content observed. Collectively, the results provide unique microbial community structural and functional insight into feast-famine PHA production from waste feedstocks using MMCs. PMID:27147532

  6. Analysis of the Proteome of the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Exposed to Aluminum Providing Insights into Aluminum Toxicity Mechanisms.

    Xie, Jun; Bai, Xiaocui; Lavoie, Michel; Lu, Haiping; Fan, Xiaoji; Pan, Xiangliang; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-09-15

    Trace aluminum (Al) concentrations can be toxic to marine phytoplankton, the basis of the marine food web, but the fundamental Al toxicity and detoxification mechanisms at the molecular levels are poorly understood. Using an array of proteomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical techniques, we describe in detail the cellular response of the model marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to a short-term sublethal Al stress (4 h of exposure to 200 μM total initial Al). A total of 2204 proteins were identified and quantified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) in response to the Al stress. Among them, 87 and 78 proteins performing various cell functions were up- and down-regulated after Al treatment, respectively. We found that photosynthesis was a key Al toxicity target. The Al-induced decrease in electron transport rates in thylakoid membranes lead to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which cause increased lipid peroxidation. Several ROS-detoxifying proteins were induced to help decrease Al-induced oxidative stress. In parallel, glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway were up-regulated in order to produce cell energy (NADPH, ATP) and carbon skeleton for cell growth, partially circumventing the Al-induced toxicity effects on photosynthesis. These cellular responses to Al stress were coordinated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways. The identification of Al-responsive proteins in the model marine phytoplankton P. tricornutum provides new insights on Al stress responses as well as a good start for further exploring Al detoxification mechanisms. PMID:26308585

  7. A holistic evolutionary and structural study of flaviviridae provides insights into the function and inhibition of HCV helicase

    Dimitrios Vlachakis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Viral RNA helicases are involved in duplex unwinding during the RNA replication of the virus. It is suggested that these helicases represent very promising antiviral targets. Viruses of the flaviviridae family are the causative agents of many common and devastating diseases, including hepatitis, yellow fever and dengue fever. As there is currently no available anti-Flaviviridae therapy, there is urgent need for the development of efficient anti-viral pharmaceutical strategies. Herein, we report the complete phylogenetic analysis across flaviviridae alongside a more in-depth evolutionary study that revealed a series of conserved and invariant amino acids that are predicted to be key to the function of the helicase. Structural molecular modelling analysis revealed the strategic significance of these residues based on their relative positioning on the 3D structures of the helicase enzymes, which may be used as pharmacological targets. We previously reported a novel series of highly potent HCV helicase inhibitors, and we now re-assess their antiviral potential using the 3D structural model of the invariant helicase residues. It was found that the most active compound of the series, compound C4, exhibited an IC50 in the submicromolar range, whereas its stereoisomer (compound C12 was completely inactive. Useful insights were obtained from molecular modelling and conformational search studies via molecular dynamics simulations. C12 tends to bend and lock in an almost “U” shape conformation, failing to establish vital interactions with the active site of HCV. On the contrary, C4 spends most of its conformational time in a straight, more rigid formation that allows it to successfully block the passage of the oligonucleotide in the ssRNA channel of the HCV helicase. This study paves the way and provides the necessary framework for the in-depth analysis required to enable the future design of new and potent anti-viral agents.

  8. The genome sequence of the metal-mobilizing, extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula provides insights into bioleaching-associated metabolism.

    Auernik, Kathryne S; Maezato, Yukari; Blum, Paul H; Kelly, Robert M

    2008-02-01

    Despite their taxonomic description, not all members of the order Sulfolobales are capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur species, which, in addition to iron oxidation, is a desirable trait of biomining microorganisms. However, the complete genome sequence of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula DSM 5348 (2.2 Mb, approximately 2,300 open reading frames [ORFs]) provides insights into biologically catalyzed metal sulfide oxidation. Comparative genomics was used to identify pathways and proteins involved (directly or indirectly) with bioleaching. As expected, the M. sedula genome contains genes related to autotrophic carbon fixation, metal tolerance, and adhesion. Also, terminal oxidase cluster organization indicates the presence of hybrid quinol-cytochrome oxidase complexes. Comparisons with the mesophilic biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 indicate that the M. sedula genome encodes at least one putative rusticyanin, involved in iron oxidation, and a putative tetrathionate hydrolase, implicated in sulfur oxidation. The fox gene cluster, involved in iron oxidation in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus, was also identified. These iron- and sulfur-oxidizing components are missing from genomes of nonleaching members of the Sulfolobales, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM 639. Whole-genome transcriptional response analysis showed that 88 ORFs were up-regulated twofold or more in M. sedula upon addition of ferrous sulfate to yeast extract-based medium; these included genes for components of terminal oxidase clusters predicted to be involved with iron oxidation, as well as genes predicted to be involved with sulfur metabolism. Many hypothetical proteins were also differentially transcribed, indicating that aspects of the iron and sulfur metabolism of M. sedula remain to be identified and characterized. PMID:18083856

  9. Comparative transcriptional profiling provides insights into the evolution and development of the zygomorphic flower of Vicia sativa (Papilionoideae.

    Zhipeng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vicia sativa (the common vetch possesses a predominant zygomorphic flower and belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae, which is related to Arabidopsis thaliana in the eurosid II clade of the core eudicots. Each vetch flower consists of 21 concentrically arranged organs: the outermost five sepals, then five petals and ten stamens, and a single carpel in the center. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored the floral transcriptome to examine a genome-scale genetic model of the zygomorphic flower of vetch. mRNA was obtained from an equal mixture of six floral organs, leaves and roots. De novo assembly of the vetch transcriptome using Illumina paired-end technology produced 71,553 unigenes with an average length of 511 bp. We then compared the expression changes in the 71,553 unigenes in the eight independent organs through RNA-Seq Quantification analysis. We predominantly analyzed gene expression patterns specific to each floral organ and combinations of floral organs that corresponded to the traditional ABC model domains. Comparative analyses were performed in the floral transcriptomes of vetch and Arabidopsis, and genomes of vetch and Medicago truncatula. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our comparative analysis of vetch and Arabidopsis showed that the vetch flowers conform to a strict ABC model. We analyzed the evolution and expression of the TCP gene family in vetch at a whole-genome level, and several unigenes specific to three different vetch petals, which might offer some clues toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying floral zygomorphy. Our results provide the first insights into the genome-scale molecular regulatory network that controls the evolution and development of the zygomorphic flower in Papilionoideae.

  10. Reconstructing SALMFamide Neuropeptide Precursor Evolution in the Phylum Echinodermata: Ophiuroid and Crinoid Sequence Data Provide New Insights

    Elphick, Maurice R.; Semmens, Dean C.; Blowes, Liisa M.; Levine, Judith; Lowe, Christopher J.; Arnone, Maria I.; Clark, Melody S.

    2015-01-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea), the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea), and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea) reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here, we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea) and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea). We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus, and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif, and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea) and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea) in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids), which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialized to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the “cocktails” of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms. PMID:25699014

  11. Mutant analysis in Arabidopsis provides insight into the molecular mode of action of the auxinic herbicide dicamba.

    Cynthia Gleason

    Full Text Available Herbicides that mimic the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid are widely used in weed control. One common auxin-like herbicide is dicamba, but despite its wide use, plant gene responses to dicamba have never been extensively studied. To further understand dicamba's mode of action, we utilized Arabidopsis auxin-insensitive mutants and compared their sensitivity to dicamba and the widely-studied auxinic herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. The mutant axr4-2, which has disrupted auxin transport into cells, was resistant to 2,4-D but susceptible to dicamba. By comparing dicamba resistance in auxin signalling F-box receptor mutants (tir1-1, afb1, afb2, afb3, and afb5, only tir1-1 and afb5 were resistant to dicamba, and this resistance was additive in the double tir1-1/afb5 mutant. Interestingly, tir1-1 but not afb5 was resistant to 2,4-D. Whole genome analysis of dicamba-induced gene expression showed that 10 hours after application, dicamba stimulated many stress-responsive and signalling genes, including those involved in biosynthesis or signalling of auxin, ethylene, and abscisic acid (ABA, with TIR1 and AFB5 required for the dicamba-responsiveness of some genes. Research into dicamba-regulated gene expression and the selectivity of auxin receptors has provided molecular insight into dicamba-regulated signalling and could help in the development of novel herbicide resistance in crop plants.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Granulicella tundricola type strain MP5ACTX9T, an Acidobacteria from tundra soil

    Rawat, Suman R. [Rutgers University; Mannisto, Minna [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Parkano, Finland; Starovoytov, Valentin [Rutgers University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Haggblom, Max [Rutgers University

    2013-01-01

    Granulicella tundricola strain MP5ACTX9T is a novel species of the genus Granulicella in subdivision 1 Acidobacteria. G. tundricola is a predominant member of soil bacterial communities, active at low temperatures and nutrient limiting conditions in Arctic alpine tundra. The organism is a cold-adapted acidophile and a versatile heterotroph that hydro-lyzes a suite of sugars and complex polysaccharides. Genome analysis revealed metabolic versatility with genes involved in metabolism and transport of carbohydrates, including gene modules encoding for the carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZy) families for the break-down, utilization and biosynthesis of diverse structural and storage polysaccharides such as plant based carbon polymers. The genome of G. tundricola strain MP5ACTX9T consists of 4,309,151 bp of a circular chromosome and five mega plasmids with a total genome con-tent of 5,503,984 bp. The genome comprises 4,705 protein-coding genes and 52 RNA genes.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Terriglobus saanensis type strain SP1PR4T, an Acidobacteria from tundra soil

    Rawat, Suman R. [Rutgers University; Mannisto, Minna [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Parkano, Finland; Starovoytov, Valentin [Rutgers University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Haggblom, Max [Rutgers University

    2012-01-01

    Terriglobus saanensis SP1PR4T is a novel species of the genus Terriglobus. T. saanensis is of ecological interest because it is a representative of the phylum Acidobacteria, which are dominant members of bacterial soil microbiota in Arctic ecosystems. T. saanensis is a cold-adapted acidophile and a versatile heterotroph utilizing a suite of simple sugars and complex polysaccharides. The genome contained an abundance of genes assigned to metabolism and transport of carbohydrates including gene modules encoding for carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) family involved in breakdown, utilization and biosynthesis of diverse structural and storage polysaccharides. T. saanensis SP1PR4T represents the first member of genus Terriglobus with a completed genome sequence, consisting of a single replicon of 5,095,226 base pairs (bp), 54 RNA genes and 4,279 protein-coding genes. We infer that the physiology and metabolic potential of T. saanensis is adapted to allow for resilience to the nutrient-deficient conditions and fluctuating temperatures of Arctic tundra soils.

  14. Characterization of a new Acidobacteria-derived moderately thermostable lipase from a Brazilian Atlantic Forest soil metagenome.

    Faoro, Helisson; Glogauer, Arnaldo; Couto, Gustavo Henrique; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Rigo, Liu Un; Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães; Monteiro, Rose Adele; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira

    2012-08-01

    A clone (LP001) expressing a new lipase gene was isolated from a metagenomic library of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest soil. The DNA insert of LP001 was fully sequenced, and 38 ORFs were identified. Comparison of ORFs, %G + C content and gene organization with sequenced bacterial genomes suggested that the fosmid DNA insert belongs to an organism of the Acidobacteria phylum. Protein domain analysis and inactivation by transposon insertion showed that the protein encoded by ORF29 was responsible for the lipase activity and was named LipAAc. The purified LipAAc lipase was capable of hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, showing the highest activity against p-nitrophenol (pNP) decanoate. The lipase was active over a pH range of 5.0-10.0 and was insensitive to divalent cations. LipAAc is moderately thermostable with optimum temperature between 50 and 60 °C and was thermally activated (80% activity increase) after 1 h incubation at 50 °C. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the LipAAc is a member of family I of bacterial lipases and clusters with other moderately thermostable lipases of this group. Comparisons of the DNA insert of fosmid LP001 with other acidobacterial genomes and sequence database suggest that lipAAc gene has a fungal origin and was acquired by horizontal transfer. PMID:22428990

  15. Comprehensive Profiling of Proteome Changes Provide Insights of Industrial Penicillium chrysogenum During Pilot and Industrial Penicillin G Fermentation.

    Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Zhao, Yan; Qiao, Bin; Lu, Hua; Chen, Yao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-07-01

    197 and 198) and CoA ligase at 80 h during the industrial process were around 2-fold of that during the pilot process, indicating that the industrial process with a higher penicillin production per cell might provide available environments to induce over-expression of IPN acyltransferase and accelerate penicillin formation. These results provide new insights into the globally potential responses of P. chrysogenum to variations of environments in different fermentation scales so as to consequently regulate the penicillin production. PMID:26961188

  16. A GTPase chimera illustrates an uncoupled nucleotide affinity and release rate, Providing insight into the activation mechanism

    Guilfoyle, Amy P.; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Font Sadurni, Josep;

    2014-01-01

    GDP release, or, alternatively, the movement is a consequence of release. To gain additional insight into the sequence of events leading to GDP release, we have created a chimeric protein comprised of Escherichia coli NFeoB and the G5 loop from the human Giα1 protein. The protein chimera retains...

  17. Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel group 4 thermophilic member of the phylum Acidobacteria from geothermal soils

    Crowe, M.A.; Power, J.F.; Morgan, X.C.; Dunfield, P.F.; Lagutin, K.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Vyssotski, M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Houghton, K.M.; Ryan, J.L.J.; Stott, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    An aerobic, thermophilic, moderately acidophilic non-spore-forming bacterium, strain K22T, wasisolated from geothermally heated soil at Mount Ngauruhoe, New Zealand. On the basis of 16SrRNA gene sequence similarity, K22T was shown to belong to subdivision 4 of the phylumAcidobacteria and to be most closely related to ‘Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum’(86 %) and Blastocatella fastidiosa (86 %). Cells stained Gram-negative and were catalase andoxidase-positive. The major fatty acids ...

  18. Novel Information on the Epitope of an Inverse Agonist Monoclonal Antibody Provides Insight into the Structure of the TSH Receptor

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Salazar, Larry M.; McLachlan, Sandra M.; Rapoport, Basil

    2012-01-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) comprises an extracellular leucine-rich domain (LRD) linked by a hinge region to the transmembrane domain (TMD). Insight into the orientation of these components to each other is required for understanding how ligands activate the receptor. We previously identified residue E251 at the LRD-hinge junction as contributing to coupling TSH binding with receptor activation. However, a single residue cannot stabilize the LRD-hinge unit. Therefore, based on the LRD crystal str...

  19. Pathway activation profiling reveals new insights into Age-related Macular Degeneration and provides avenues for therapeutic interventions

    Makarev, Evgeny; Cantor, Charles; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton; Aliper, Alexander; Csoka, Antonei Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in older people and is caused by loss of the central region of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Conventional methods of gene expression analysis have yielded important insights into AMD pathogenesis, but the precise molecular pathway alterations are still poorly understood. Therefore we developed a new software program, “AMD Medicine”, and discovered differential pathway activation profiles in samples of human RPE/choro...

  20. Genetic Diversity of Phytophthora infestans sensu lato in Ecuador Provides New Insight Into the Origin of This Important Plant Pathogen.

    Adler, N E; Erselius, L J; Chacón, M G; Flier, W G; Ordoñez, M E; Kroon, L P N M; Forbes, G A

    2004-02-01

    which two distinct pathogen genotypes have caused severe epidemics on the same host. Based on presence of unique marker alleles (restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP] and mtDNA) and genetic similarity analysis using RFLP and amplified fragment length polymorphism data, EC-3 and isolates from the Anarrhichomenum complex are genetically distinct from all genotypes of P. infestans that have been reported previously. No current theory of historical migrations for this pathogen can adequately support a Mexican origin for EC-3 and genotypes of the Anarrhichomenum complex and they may, therefore, be palaeoendemic to the Andean highlands. To date, we have identified 15 hosts in the genus Solanum, in addition to the Anarrhichomenum complex, and some unidentified species of P. infestans sensu lato in Ecuador. Five of the Solanum hosts are cultivated. One isolate was collected from Brugmansia sanguinea, which represents the first report from Ecuador of a host of this pathogen that is not in the genus Solanum. However, P. infestans sensu lato was only found on flower petals of B. sanguinea. This study provides new insights into the population structure of highly specialized genotypes of P. infestans sensu lato in the Andean highlands. The results are discussed in light of previous hypotheses regarding the geographic origin of the pathogen. PMID:18943538

  1. Genome-Wide Sequence Comparison of Centromeric Regions and BAC-Landing on Chromosomes Provide New Insights into Centromere Evolution Among Wheat, Brachypodium, and Rice

    As an emerging model system, the nearly finished sequence of Brachypodium distachyon will provide new insights into comparative and functional genomics of grass species. However, centromeres of B. distachyon are unlikely to be sequenced and assembled precisely similar to many other sequenced organis...

  2. Analysis of Transcriptome Changes Induced by Ptr ToxA in Wheat Provides Insights into the Mechanisms of Plant Susceptibility

    Iovanna Pandelova; Melania E Betts; Viola A. Manning; Larry J. Wilhelm; Todd C. Mockler; Lynda M. Ciuffetti

    2009-01-01

    To obtain greater insight into the molecular events underlying plant disease susceptibility, we studied tran-scriptome changes induced by a host-selective toxin of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, Ptr ToxA (ToxA), on its host plant, wheat. Transcriptional profiling of ToxA-treated leaves of a ToxA-sensitive wheat cultivar was performed using the GeneChip~(R) Wheat Genome Array. An improved and up-to-date annotation of the wheat microarray was generated and a new tool for array data analysis (BRAT) was developed, and both are available for public use via a web-based in-terface. Our data indicate that massive transcriptional reprogramming occurs due to ToxA treatment, including cellular responses typically associated with defense. In addition, this study supports previous results indicating that ToxA-induced cell death is triggered by impairment of the photosynthetic machinery and accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Based on results of this study, we propose that ToxA acts as both an elicitor and a virulence factor.

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography.

    Cerezo, María; Gusmão, Leonor; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, Nabeel; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Göbel, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-20

    Africa is the cradle of all human beings, and although it has been the focus of a number of genetic studies, there are many questions that remain unresolved. We have performed one of the largest and most comprehensive meta-analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages carried out in the African continent to date. We generated high-throughput mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data (230 SNPs) from 2024 Africans, where more than 500 of them were additionally genotyped for the control region. These data were analyzed together with over 12,700 control region profiles collected from the literature, representing more than 300 population samples from Africa. Insights into the African homeland of humans are discussed. Phylogeographic patterns for the African continent are shown at a high phylogeographic resolution as well as at the population and regional levels. The deepest branch of the mtDNA tree, haplogroup L0, shows the highest sub-haplogroup diversity in Southeast and East Africa, suggesting this region as the homeland for modern humans. Several demographic estimates point to the coast as a facilitator of human migration in Africa, but the data indicate complex patterns, perhaps mirroring the effect of recent continental-scaled demographic events in re-shaping African mtDNA variability. PMID:27020033

  4. Whole-genome sequence of a flatfish provides insights into ZW sex chromosome evolution and adaptation to a benthic lifestyle.

    Chen, Songlin; Zhang, Guojie; Shao, Changwei; Huang, Quanfei; Liu, Geng; Zhang, Pei; Song, Wentao; An, Na; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Hong, Yunhan; Li, Qiye; Sha, Zhenxia; Zhou, Heling; Xie, Mingshu; Yu, Qiulin; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Hui; Wang, Na; Wu, Kui; Yang, Changgeng; Zhou, Qian; Liao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linfeng; Hu, Qiaomu; Zhang, Jilin; Meng, Liang; Jin, Lijun; Tian, Yongsheng; Lian, Jinmin; Yang, Jingfeng; Miao, Guidong; Liu, Shanshan; Liang, Zhuo; Yan, Fang; Li, Yangzhen; Sun, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Ying; Du, Min; Zhao, Yongwei; Schartl, Manfred; Tang, Qisheng; Wang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Genetic sex determination by W and Z chromosomes has developed independently in different groups of organisms. To better understand the evolution of sex chromosomes and the plasticity of sex-determination mechanisms, we sequenced the whole genomes of a male (ZZ) and a female (ZW) half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). In addition to insights into adaptation to a benthic lifestyle, we find that the sex chromosomes of these fish are derived from the same ancestral vertebrate protochromosome as the avian W and Z chromosomes. Notably, the same gene on the Z chromosome, dmrt1, which is the male-determining gene in birds, showed convergent evolution of features that are compatible with a similar function in tongue sole. Comparison of the relatively young tongue sole sex chromosomes with those of mammals and birds identified events that occurred during the early phase of sex-chromosome evolution. Pertinent to the current debate about heterogametic sex-chromosome decay, we find that massive gene loss occurred in the wake of sex-chromosome 'birth'. PMID:24487278

  5. Genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis provides insight into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes susceptibility.

    Mahajan, Anubha; Go, Min Jin; Zhang, Weihua; Below, Jennifer E; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Horikoshi, Momoko; Johnson, Andrew D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Prokopenko, Inga; Saleheen, Danish; Wang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Adair, Linda S; Almgren, Peter; Atalay, Mustafa; Aung, Tin; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bao, Yuqian; Barnett, Anthony H; Barroso, Ines; Basit, Abdul; Been, Latonya F; Beilby, John; Bell, Graeme I; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bergman, Richard N; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Burtt, Noël; Cai, Qiuyin; Campbell, Harry; Carey, Jason; Cauchi, Stephane; Caulfield, Mark; Chan, Juliana C N; Chang, Li-Ching; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Chen, Han; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Chia, Kee-Seng; Chidambaram, Manickam; Chines, Peter S; Cho, Nam H; Cho, Young Min; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Collins, Francis S; Cornelis, Marylin C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Danesh, John; Das, Debashish; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimas, Antigone S; Dina, Christian; Doney, Alex S; Donnelly, Peter J; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; van Duijn, Cornelia; Dupuis, Josée; Edkins, Sarah; Elliott, Paul; Emilsson, Valur; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Escobedo, Jorge; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Florez, Jose C; Fontanillas, Pierre; Forouhi, Nita G; Forsen, Tom; Fox, Caroline; Fraser, Ross M; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Frossard, Philippe; Gao, Yutang; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Grallert, Harald; Grant, George B; Grrop, Leif C; Groves, Chrisropher J; Grundberg, Elin; Guiducci, Candace; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hara, Kazuo; Hassanali, Neelam; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayward, Caroline; Hedman, Asa K; Herder, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hovingh, Kees; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Hu, Cheng; Hu, Frank B; Hui, Jennie; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Sarah E; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Hydrie, Zafar I; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Islam, Muhammed; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jafar, Tazeen; James, Alan; Jia, Weiping; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Jonsson, Anna; Jowett, Jeremy B M; Kadowaki, Takashi; Kang, Hyun Min; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kao, Wen Hong L; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kato, Norihiro; Katulanda, Prasad; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Kirkka M; Kelly, Ann M; Khan, Hassan; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Young Jin; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Kowlessur, Sudhir; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Kristensen, Malene M; Krithika, S; Kumar, Ashish; Kumate, Jesus; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kwak, Soo Heon; Laakso, Markku; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Lawrence, Robert; Leander, Karin; Lee, Jen-Mai; Lee, Nanette R; Li, Man; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Yun; Liang, Junbin; Liju, Samuel; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Jian Jun; Lobbens, Stéphane; Long, Jirong; Loos, Ruth J F; Lu, Wei; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Ma, Ronald C W; Maeda, Shiro; Mägi, Reedik; Männisto, Satu; Matthews, David R; Meigs, James B; Melander, Olle; Metspalu, Andres; Meyer, Julia; Mirza, Ghazala; Mihailov, Evelin; Moebus, Susanne; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Bill; Nakamura, Jiro; Nakashima, Eitaro; Navarro, Pau; Ng, Peng-Keat; Nica, Alexandra C; Nilsson, Peter M; Njølstad, Inger; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohnaka, Keizo; Ong, Twee Hee; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Pankow, James S; Park, Kyong Soo; Parkin, Melissa; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Peters, Annette; Pinidiyapathirage, Janini M; Platou, Carl G; Potter, Simon; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Radha, Venkatesan; Rallidis, Loukianos; Rasheed, Asif; Rathman, Wolfgang; Rauramaa, Rainer; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rayner, N William; Rees, Simon D; Rehnberg, Emil; Ripatti, Samuli; Robertson, Neil; Roden, Michael; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Igor; Rybin, Denis; Saaristo, Timo E; Salomaa, Veikko; Saltevo, Juha; Samuel, Maria; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Scott, James; Scott, Laura J; Scott, Robert A; Segrè, Ayellet V; Sehmi, Joban; Sennblad, Bengt; Shah, Nabi; Shah, Sonia; Shera, A Samad; Shu, Xiao Ou; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sigurđsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Eric; Silveira, Angela; Sim, Xueling; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Small, Kerrin S; So, Wing Yee; Stančáková, Alena; Stefansson, Kari; Steinbach, Gerald; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Suo, Chen; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tay, Wan Ting; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tikkanen, Emmi; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Trip, Mieke D; Tsai, Fuu Jen; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Valladares-Salgado, Adan; Vedantam, Sailaja; Veglia, Fabrizio; Voight, Benjamin F; Wang, Congrong; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wennauer, Roman; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Wiltshire, Steven; Winckler, Wendy; Wong, Tien Yin; Wood, Andrew R; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Wu, Ying; Yamamoto, Ken; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Yang, Mingyu; Yengo, Loic; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Young, Robin; Zabaneh, Delilah; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Wei; Zimmet, Paul Z; Altshuler, David; Bowden, Donald W; Cho, Yoon Shin; Cox, Nancy J; Cruz, Miguel; Hanis, Craig L; Kooner, Jaspal; Lee, Jong-Young; Seielstad, Mark; Teo, Yik Ying; Boehnke, Michael; Parra, Esteban J; Chambers, Jonh C; Tai, E Shyong; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2014-03-01

    To further understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility, we aggregated published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 26,488 cases and 83,964 controls of European, east Asian, south Asian and Mexican and Mexican American ancestry. We observed a significant excess in the directional consistency of T2D risk alleles across ancestry groups, even at SNPs demonstrating only weak evidence of association. By following up the strongest signals of association from the trans-ethnic meta-analysis in an additional 21,491 cases and 55,647 controls of European ancestry, we identified seven new T2D susceptibility loci. Furthermore, we observed considerable improvements in the fine-mapping resolution of common variant association signals at several T2D susceptibility loci. These observations highlight the benefits of trans-ethnic GWAS for the discovery and characterization of complex trait loci and emphasize an exciting opportunity to extend insight into the genetic architecture and pathogenesis of human diseases across populations of diverse ancestry. PMID:24509480

  6. Structural and Mutational Analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB Provides Insight into Substrate Specificity and DNA Damage Searching

    Holland, P.; Hollis, T

    2010-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) iron(II) dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA) and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC) lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG) and 3-methylthymine (3-meT) at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a 'searching' mode and 'repair' mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  7. Structural and mutational analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB provides insight into substrate specificity and DNA damage searching.

    Paul J Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG iron(II dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG and 3-methylthymine (3-meT at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a "searching" mode and "repair" mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  8. When males are more inclined to stay at home :Insights into the partial migration of a pelagic seabird provided by geolocators and isotopes

    Perez, Cristóbal; Granadeiro, José Pedro; Dias, Maria P.; Alonso, Hany Rafael de Drummond Ludovice Garcia; Catry, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Partial migration has never been studied in pelagic seabirds, but investigating old unresolved questions in new contexts can provide useful fresh insights. We used geolocators and stable isotopes to investigate this phenomenon in a migratory pelagic seabird, the Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris diomedea). Although most birds migrated to the southern hemisphere, 8.1% of studied birds (N = 172) remained close to the breeding colony (Selvagem Grande, Madeira, Portugal), foraging within th...

  9. The Genome Sequence of the Metal-Mobilizing, Extremely Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Metallosphaera sedula Provides Insights into Bioleaching-Associated Metabolism▿ †

    Auernik, Kathryne S.; Maezato, Yukari; Paul H. Blum; Kelly, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite their taxonomic description, not all members of the order Sulfolobales are capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur species, which, in addition to iron oxidation, is a desirable trait of biomining microorganisms. However, the complete genome sequence of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula DSM 5348 (2.2 Mb, ∼2,300 open reading frames [ORFs]) provides insights into biologically catalyzed metal sulfide oxidation. Comparative genomics was used to identify pathways an...

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the scab mite Psoroptes cuniculi (Arthropoda: Arachnida) provides insights into Acari phylogeny

    Gu, Xiao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Hua; Song, Hui-Qun; Liu, Tian-Yu; Yang, Guang-You; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited available sequence information has greatly impeded population genetics, phylogenetics and systematics studies in the subclass Acari (mites and ticks). Mitochondrial (mt) DNA is well known to provide genetic markers for investigations in these areas, but complete mt genomic data have been lacking for many Acari species. Herein, we present the complete mt genome of the scab mite Psoroptes cuniculi. Methods P. cuniculi was collected from a naturally infected New Zealand white ...

  11. Molecular Signatures for the PVC Clade (Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae, and Lentisphaerae) of Bacteria Provide Insights into Their Evolutionary Relationships.

    Gupta, Radhey S; Bhandari, Vaibhav; Naushad, Hafiz Sohail

    2012-01-01

    The PVC superphylum is an amalgamation of species from the phyla Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Chlamydiae, along with the Lentisphaerae, Poribacteria, and two other candidate divisions. The diverse species of this superphylum lack any significant marker that differentiates them from other bacteria. Recently, genome sequences for 37 species covering all of the main PVC groups of bacteria have become available. We have used these sequences to construct a phylogenetic tree based upon concatenated sequences for 16 proteins and identify molecular signatures in protein sequences that are specific for the species from these phyla or those providing molecular links among them. Of the useful molecular markers identified in the present work, six conserved signature indels (CSIs) in the proteins Cyt c oxidase, UvrD helicase, urease, and a helicase-domain containing protein are specific for the species from the Verrucomicrobia phylum; three other CSIs in an ABC transporter protein, cobyrinic acid ac-diamide synthase, and SpoVG protein are specific for the Planctomycetes species. Additionally, a 3 aa insert in the RpoB protein is uniquely present in all sequenced Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, and Lentisphaerae species, providing evidence for the shared ancestry of the species from these three phyla. Lastly, we have also identified a conserved protein of unknown function that is exclusively found in all sequenced species from the phyla Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae, and Planctomycetes suggesting a specific linkage among them. The absence of this protein in Poribacteria, which branches separately from other members of the PVC clade, indicates that it is not specifically related to the PVC clade of bacteria. The molecular markers described here in addition to clarifying the evolutionary relationships among the PVC clade of bacteria also provide novel tools for their identification and for genetic and biochemical studies on these organisms. PMID:23060863

  12. Molecular Signatures for the PVC Clade (Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae and Lentisphaerae of Bacteria Provide Insights into their Evolutionary Relationships

    Radhey S. Gupta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The PVC superphylum is an amalgamation of species from the phyla Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chlamydiae, along with the Lentisphaerae, Poribacteria and two other candidate divisions. The diverse species of this superphylum lack any significant marker that differentiates them from other bacteria. Recently, genome sequences for 37 species covering all of the main PVC groups of bacteria have become available. We have used these sequences to construct a phylogenetic tree based upon concatenated sequences for 16 proteins and identify molecular signatures in protein sequences that are specific for the species from these phyla or those providing molecular links among them. Of the useful molecular markers identified in the present work, 6 conserved signature indels (CSIs in the proteins Cyt c oxidase, UvrD helicase, urease and a helicase-domain containing protein are specific for the species from the Verrucomicrobia phylum; three other CSIs in an ABC transporter protein, cobyrinic acid ac-diamide synthase and SpoVG protein are specific for the Planctomycetes species. Additionally, a 3 aa insert in the RpoB protein is uniquely present in all sequenced Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia and Lentisphaerae species, providing evidence for the shared ancestry of the species from these three phyla. Lastly, we have also identified a conserved protein of unknown function that is exclusively found in all sequenced species from the phyla Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae and Planctomycetes suggesting a specific linkage among them. The absence of this protein in Poribacteria, which branches separately from other members of the PVC clade, indicates that it is not specifically related to the PVC clade of bacteria. The molecular markers described here in addition to clarifying the evolutionary relationships among the PVC clade of bacteria also provide novel tools for their identification and for genetic and biochemical studies on these organisms.

  13. Geochemistry and travertine dating provide new insights into the hydrogeology of the Great Artesian Basin, South Australia

    Love, A.J.; Rousseau-Gueutin, P.; Priestley, S.; Keppel, M. [School of Environment, Flinders University, and NCGRT Adelaide, Australia bCSIRO Land and Water, PMB2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Shand, P. [School of Environment, Flinders University, and NCGRT Adelaide, Australia bCSIRO Land and Water, PMB2, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Adelaide Acid Sulfate Soils Centre, Adelaide University, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Karlstrom, K.; Crossey, L. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Wholing, D. [DEWNR, South Australia Government (Australia); Fulton, S. [NRETAS, Northern Territory Government (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    While of great national and societal significance, and importance in its own right, the Great Artesian Basin of Australia is an iconic example of a continental scale artesian groundwater system. New geochemical, hydrological, and neo-tectonic data suggests that existing models that involve recharge in eastern Australia, relatively simple flow paths and discharge in springs in the western margin require modification. New geochemical data indicate a small volume flux of deeply derived (endogenic) fluids mixing into the aquifer system at a continental scale. Neotectonic data indicates active tectonism today that provides a fluid pathway through faults for the deeply sourced endogenic fluids to discharge in GAB travertine depositing springs. (authors)

  14. Geochemistry and travertine dating provide new insights into the hydrogeology of the Great Artesian Basin, South Australia

    While of great national and societal significance, and importance in its own right, the Great Artesian Basin of Australia is an iconic example of a continental scale artesian groundwater system. New geochemical, hydrological, and neo-tectonic data suggests that existing models that involve recharge in eastern Australia, relatively simple flow paths and discharge in springs in the western margin require modification. New geochemical data indicate a small volume flux of deeply derived (endogenic) fluids mixing into the aquifer system at a continental scale. Neotectonic data indicates active tectonism today that provides a fluid pathway through faults for the deeply sourced endogenic fluids to discharge in GAB travertine depositing springs. (authors)

  15. Large scale genotype comparison of human papillomavirus E2-host interaction networks provides new insights for e2 molecular functions.

    Mandy Muller

    Full Text Available Human Papillomaviruses (HPV cause widespread infections in humans, resulting in latent infections or diseases ranging from benign hyperplasia to cancers. HPV-induced pathologies result from complex interplays between viral proteins and the host proteome. Given the major public health concern due to HPV-associated cancers, most studies have focused on the early proteins expressed by HPV genotypes with high oncogenic potential (designated high-risk HPV or HR-HPV. To advance the global understanding of HPV pathogenesis, we mapped the virus/host interaction networks of the E2 regulatory protein from 12 genotypes representative of the range of HPV pathogenicity. Large-scale identification of E2-interaction partners was performed by yeast two-hybrid screenings of a HaCaT cDNA library. Based on a high-confidence scoring scheme, a subset of these partners was then validated for pair-wise interaction in mammalian cells with the whole range of the 12 E2 proteins, allowing a comparative interaction analysis. Hierarchical clustering of E2-host interaction profiles mostly recapitulated HPV phylogeny and provides clues to the involvement of E2 in HPV infection. A set of cellular proteins could thus be identified discriminating, among the mucosal HPV, E2 proteins of HR-HPV 16 or 18 from the non-oncogenic genital HPV. The study of the interaction networks revealed a preferential hijacking of highly connected cellular proteins and the targeting of several functional families. These include transcription regulation, regulation of apoptosis, RNA processing, ubiquitination and intracellular trafficking. The present work provides an overview of E2 biological functions across multiple HPV genotypes.

  16. Teff, an Orphan Cereal in the Chloridoideae, Provides Insights into the Evolution of Storage Proteins in Grasses

    Xu, Jianhong; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Seed storage proteins (SSP) in cereals provide essential nutrition for humans and animals. Genes encoding these proteins have undergone rapid evolution in different grass species. To better understand the degree of divergence, we analyzed this gene family in the subfamily Chloridoideae, where the genome of teff (Eragrostis tef) has been sequenced. We find gene duplications, deletions, and rapid mutations in protein-coding sequences. The main SSPs in teff, like other grasses, are prolamins, here called eragrostins. Teff has γ- and δ-prolamins, but has no β-prolamins. One δ-type prolamin (δ1) in teff has higher methionine (33%) levels than in maize (23–25%). The other δ-type prolamin (δ2) has reduced methionine residues (<10%) and is phylogenetically closer to α prolamins. Prolamin δ2 in teff represents an intermediate between δ and α types that appears to have been lost in maize and other Panicoideae, and was replaced by the expansion of α-prolamins. Teff also has considerably larger numbers of α-prolamin genes, which we further divide into five sub-groups, where α2 and α5 represent the most abundant α-prolamins both in number and in expression. In addition, indolines that determine kernel softness are present in teff and the panicoid cereal called foxtail millet (Setaria italica) but not in sorghum or maize, indicating that these genes were only recently lost in some members of the Panicoideae. Moreover, this study provides not only information on the evolution of SSPs in the grass family but also the importance of α-globulins in protein aggregation and germplasm divergence. PMID:27190000

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 cerebellum identifies protein biomarkers and provides pathological insight.

    Stephanie M Cologna

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1 is a fatal, neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no definitive therapy. In NPC1, a pathological cascade including neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis likely contribute to the clinical phenotype. While the genetic cause of NPC1 is known, we sought to gain a further understanding into the pathophysiology by identifying differentially expressed proteins in Npc1 mutant mouse cerebella. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, 77 differentially expressed proteins were identified in Npc1 mutant mice cerebella compared to controls. These include proteins involved in glucose metabolism, detoxification/oxidative stress and Alzheimer disease-related proteins. Furthermore, members of the fatty acid binding protein family, including FABP3, FABP5 and FABP7, were found to have altered expression in the Npc1 mutant cerebellum relative to control. Translating our findings from the murine model to patients, we confirm altered expression of glutathione s-transferase α, superoxide dismutase, and FABP3 in cerebrospinal fluid of NPC1 patients relative to pediatric controls. A subset of NPC1 patients on miglustat, a glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor, showed significantly decreased levels of FABP3 compared to patients not on miglustat therapy. This study provides an initial report of dysregulated proteins in NPC1 which will assist with further investigation of NPC1 pathology and facilitate implementation of therapeutic trials.

  18. Molecular evolution and expression divergence of the Populus euphratica Hsf genes provide insight into the stress acclimation of desert poplar.

    Zhang, Jin; Jia, Huixia; Li, Jianbo; Li, Yu; Lu, Mengzhu; Hu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) family is one of the most important regulators in the plant kingdom. Hsf has been demonstrated to be involved in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormone and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of Hsf family in desert poplar, Populus euphratica. Total of 32 genes encoding Hsf were identified and they were classified into three main classes (A, B, and C). Gene structure and conserved motif analyses indicated that the members in each class were relatively conserved. Total of 10 paralogous pairs were identified in PeuHsf family, in which nine pairs were generated by whole genome duplication events. Ka/Ks analysis showed that PeuHsfs underwent purifying selection pressure. In addition, various cis-acting elements involved in hormone and stress responses located in the promoter regions of PeuHsfs. Gene expression analysis indicated that several PeuHsfs were tissue-specific expression. Compared to Arabidopsis, more PeuHsf genes were significantly induced by heat, drought, and salt stresses (21, 19, and 22 PeuHsfs, respectively). Our findings are helpful in understanding the distinguished adaptability of P. euphratica to extreme environment and providing a basis for functional analysis of PeuHsfs in the future. PMID:27425424

  19. Characterization of Arabidopsis FPS isozymes and FPS gene expression analysis provide insight into the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors in seeds.

    Verónica Keim

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes encoding farnesyl diphosphate (FPP synthase (FPS, the prenyl diphoshate synthase that catalyzes the synthesis of FPP from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP. In this study, we provide evidence that the two Arabidopsis short FPS isozymes FPS1S and FPS2 localize to the cytosol. Both enzymes were expressed in E. coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Despite FPS1S and FPS2 share more than 90% amino acid sequence identity, FPS2 was found to be more efficient as a catalyst, more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of NaCl, and more resistant to thermal inactivation than FPS1S. Homology modelling for FPS1S and FPS2 and analysis of the amino acid differences between the two enzymes revealed an increase in surface polarity and a greater capacity to form surface salt bridges of FPS2 compared to FPS1S. These factors most likely account for the enhanced thermostability of FPS2. Expression analysis of FPS::GUS genes in seeds showed that FPS1 and FPS2 display complementary patterns of expression particularly at late stages of seed development, which suggests that Arabidopsis seeds have two spatially segregated sources of FPP. Functional complementation studies of the Arabidopsis fps2 knockout mutant seed phenotypes demonstrated that under normal conditions FPS1S and FPS2 are functionally interchangeable. A putative role for FPS2 in maintaining seed germination capacity under adverse environmental conditions is discussed.

  20. Phloem sap proteome studied by iTRAQ provides integrated insight into salinity response mechanisms in cucumber plants.

    Fan, Huaifu; Xu, Yanli; Du, Changxia; Wu, Xue

    2015-07-01

    Cucumber is an economically important crop as well as a model system for plant vascular biology. Salinity is one of the major environmental factors limiting plant growth. Here, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics approach for comparative analysis of protein abundances in cucumber phloem sap in response to salt. A total of 745 distinct proteins were identified and 111 proteins were differentially expressed upon salinity in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, of which 69 and 65 proteins changed significantly in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, respectively. A bioinformatics analysis indicated that cucumber phloem employed a combination of induced metabolism, protein turnover, common stress response, energy and transport, signal transduction and regulation of transcription, and development proteins as protection mechanisms against salinity. The proteins that were mapped to the carbon fixation pathway decreased in abundance in sensitive cultivars and had no change in tolerant cultivars under salt stress, suggesting that this pathway may promote salt tolerance by stabilizing carbon fixation and maintaining the essential energy and carbohydrates in tolerant cultivars. This study leads to a better understanding of the salinity mechanism in cucumber phloem and provides a list of potential gene targets for the further engineering of salt tolerance in plants. PMID:25958826

  1. Transcriptome of the Australian Mollusc Dicathais orbita Provides Insights into the Biosynthesis of Indoles and Choline Esters

    Abdul Baten

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dicathais orbita is a mollusc of the Muricidae family and is well known for the production of the expensive dye Tyrian purple and its brominated precursors that have anticancer properties, in addition to choline esters with muscle-relaxing properties. However, the biosynthetic pathways that produce these secondary metabolites in D. orbita are not known. Illumina HiSeq 2000 transcriptome sequencing of hypobranchial glands, prostate glands, albumen glands, capsule glands, and mantle and foot tissues of D. orbita generated over 201 million high quality reads that were de novo assembled into 219,437 contigs. Annotation with reference to the Nr, Swiss-Prot and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG databases identified candidate-coding regions in 76,152 of these contigs, with transcripts for many enzymes in various metabolic pathways associated with secondary metabolite biosynthesis represented. This study revealed that D. orbita expresses a number of genes associated with indole, sulfur and histidine metabolism pathways that are relevant to Tyrian purple precursor biosynthesis, and many of which were not found in the fully annotated genomes of three other molluscs in the KEGG database. However, there were no matches to known bromoperoxidase enzymes within the D. orbita transcripts. These transcriptome data provide a significant molecular resource for gastropod research in general and Tyrian purple producing Muricidae in particular.

  2. Transcriptome of the Australian Mollusc Dicathais orbita Provides Insights into the Biosynthesis of Indoles and Choline Esters.

    Baten, Abdul; Ngangbam, Ajit Kumar; Waters, Daniel L E; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Dicathais orbita is a mollusc of the Muricidae family and is well known for the production of the expensive dye Tyrian purple and its brominated precursors that have anticancer properties, in addition to choline esters with muscle-relaxing properties. However, the biosynthetic pathways that produce these secondary metabolites in D. orbita are not known. Illumina HiSeq 2000 transcriptome sequencing of hypobranchial glands, prostate glands, albumen glands, capsule glands, and mantle and foot tissues of D. orbita generated over 201 million high quality reads that were de novo assembled into 219,437 contigs. Annotation with reference to the Nr, Swiss-Prot and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases identified candidate-coding regions in 76,152 of these contigs, with transcripts for many enzymes in various metabolic pathways associated with secondary metabolite biosynthesis represented. This study revealed that D. orbita expresses a number of genes associated with indole, sulfur and histidine metabolism pathways that are relevant to Tyrian purple precursor biosynthesis, and many of which were not found in the fully annotated genomes of three other molluscs in the KEGG database. However, there were no matches to known bromoperoxidase enzymes within the D. orbita transcripts. These transcriptome data provide a significant molecular resource for gastropod research in general and Tyrian purple producing Muricidae in particular. PMID:27447649

  3. Draft genome of the peanut A-genome progenitor (Arachis duranensis) provides insights into geocarpy, oil biosynthesis, and allergens.

    Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Hongjie; Pandey, Manish K; Yang, Qingli; Wang, Xiyin; Garg, Vanika; Li, Haifen; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Hong, Yanbin; Upadhyaya, Hari; Guo, Hui; Khan, Aamir W; Zhu, Fanghe; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Pan, Lijuan; Pierce, Gary J; Zhou, Guiyuan; Krishnamohan, Katta A V S; Chen, Mingna; Zhong, Ni; Agarwal, Gaurav; Li, Shuanzhu; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sharma, Shivali; Chen, Na; Liu, Haiyan; Janila, Pasupuleti; Li, Shaoxiong; Wang, Min; Wang, Tong; Sun, Jie; Li, Xingyu; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Mian; Yu, Lina; Wen, Shijie; Singh, Sube; Yang, Zhen; Zhao, Jinming; Zhang, Chushu; Yu, Yue; Bi, Jie; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Paterson, Andrew H; Wang, Shuping; Liang, Xuanqiang; Varshney, Rajeev K; Yu, Shanlin

    2016-06-14

    Peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.), a legume of South American origin, has high seed oil content (45-56%) and is a staple crop in semiarid tropical and subtropical regions, partially because of drought tolerance conferred by its geocarpic reproductive strategy. We present a draft genome of the peanut A-genome progenitor, Arachis duranensis, and 50,324 protein-coding gene models. Patterns of gene duplication suggest the peanut lineage has been affected by at least three polyploidizations since the origin of eudicots. Resequencing of synthetic Arachis tetraploids reveals extensive gene conversion in only three seed-to-seed generations since their formation by human hands, indicating that this process begins virtually immediately following polyploid formation. Expansion of some specific gene families suggests roles in the unusual subterranean fructification of Arachis For example, the S1Fa-like transcription factor family has 126 Arachis members, in contrast to no more than five members in other examined plant species, and is more highly expressed in roots and etiolated seedlings than green leaves. The A. duranensis genome provides a major source of candidate genes for fructification, oil biosynthesis, and allergens, expanding knowledge of understudied areas of plant biology and human health impacts of plants, informing peanut genetic improvement and aiding deeper sequencing of Arachis diversity. PMID:27247390

  4. Molecular evolution and expression divergence of the Populus euphratica Hsf genes provide insight into the stress acclimation of desert poplar

    Zhang, Jin; Jia, Huixia; Li, Jianbo; Li, Yu; Lu, Mengzhu; Hu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) family is one of the most important regulators in the plant kingdom. Hsf has been demonstrated to be involved in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormone and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of Hsf family in desert poplar, Populus euphratica. Total of 32 genes encoding Hsf were identified and they were classified into three main classes (A, B, and C). Gene structure and conserved motif analyses indicated that the members in each class were relatively conserved. Total of 10 paralogous pairs were identified in PeuHsf family, in which nine pairs were generated by whole genome duplication events. Ka/Ks analysis showed that PeuHsfs underwent purifying selection pressure. In addition, various cis-acting elements involved in hormone and stress responses located in the promoter regions of PeuHsfs. Gene expression analysis indicated that several PeuHsfs were tissue-specific expression. Compared to Arabidopsis, more PeuHsf genes were significantly induced by heat, drought, and salt stresses (21, 19, and 22 PeuHsfs, respectively). Our findings are helpful in understanding the distinguished adaptability of P. euphratica to extreme environment and providing a basis for functional analysis of PeuHsfs in the future. PMID:27425424

  5. Spatially extensive microbial biogeography of the Indian Ocean provides insights into the unique community structure of a pristine coral atoll

    Jeffries, Thomas C.; Ostrowski, Martin; Williams, Rohan B.; Xie, Chao; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Grzymski, Joseph J.; Senstius, Svend Jacob; Givskov, Michael; Hoeke, Ron; Philip, Gayle K.; Neches, Russell Y.; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Chénard, Caroline; Paulsen, Ian T.; Lauro, Federico M.

    2015-10-01

    Microorganisms act both as drivers and indicators of perturbations in the marine environment. In an effort to establish baselines to predict the response of marine habitats to environmental change, here we report a broad survey of microbial diversity across the Indian Ocean, including the first microbial samples collected in the pristine lagoon of Salomon Islands, Chagos Archipelago. This was the first large-scale ecogenomic survey aboard a private yacht employing a ‘citizen oceanography’ approach and tools and protocols easily adapted to ocean going sailboats. Our data highlighted biogeographic patterns in microbial community composition across the Indian Ocean. Samples from within the Salomon Islands lagoon contained a community which was different even from adjacent samples despite constant water exchange, driven by the dominance of the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechococcus. In the lagoon, Synechococcus was also responsible for driving shifts in the metatranscriptional profiles. Enrichment of transcripts related to photosynthesis and nutrient cycling indicated bottom-up controls of community structure. However a five-fold increase in viral transcripts within the lagoon during the day, suggested a concomitant top-down control by bacteriophages. Indeed, genome recruitment against Synechococcus reference genomes suggested a role of viruses in providing the ecological filter for determining the β-diversity patterns in this system.

  6. The Structure of a Sugar Transporter of the Glucose EIIC Superfamily Provides Insight into the Elevator Mechanism of Membrane Transport.

    McCoy, Jason G; Ren, Zhenning; Stanevich, Vitali; Lee, Jumin; Mitra, Sharmistha; Levin, Elena J; Poget, Sebastien; Quick, Matthias; Im, Wonpil; Zhou, Ming

    2016-06-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems are found in bacteria, where they play central roles in sugar uptake and regulation of cellular uptake processes. Little is known about how the membrane-embedded components (EIICs) selectively mediate the passage of carbohydrates across the membrane. Here we report the functional characterization and 2.55-Å resolution structure of a maltose transporter, bcMalT, belonging to the glucose superfamily of EIIC transporters. bcMalT crystallized in an outward-facing occluded conformation, in contrast to the structure of another glucose superfamily EIIC, bcChbC, which crystallized in an inward-facing occluded conformation. The structures differ in the position of a structurally conserved substrate-binding domain that is suggested to play a central role in sugar transport. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations suggest a potential pathway for substrate entry from the periplasm into the bcMalT substrate-binding site. These results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding substrate recognition and translocation for the glucose superfamily EIIC transporters. PMID:27161976

  7. A novel experimental model of Cryptococcus neoformans-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) provides insights into pathogenesis.

    Eschke, Maria; Piehler, Daniel; Schulze, Bianca; Richter, Tina; Grahnert, Andreas; Protschka, Martina; Müller, Uwe; Köhler, Gabriele; Höfling, Corinna; Rossner, Steffen; Alber, Gottfried

    2015-12-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has yielded major advances in fighting the HIV pandemic by restoring protective immunity. However, a significant proportion of HIV patients co-infected with the opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans paradoxically develops a life-threatening immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) during antiretroviral therapy. Despite several clinical studies, the underlying pathomecha-nisms are poorly understood. Here, we present the first mouse model of cryptococcal IRIS that allows for a detailed analysis of disease development. Lymphocyte-deficient RAG-1(-/-) mice are infected with C. neoformans and 4 weeks later adoptively transferred with purified CD4(+) T cells. Reconstitution of CD4(+) T cells is sufficient to induce a severe inflammatory disease similar to clinical IRIS in C. neoformans-infected RAG-1(-/-) mice of different genetic backgrounds and immunological phenotypes (i.e. C57BL/6 and BALB/c). Multiorgan inflammation is accompanied by a systemic release of distinct proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. IFN-γ, IL-6, and TNF-α. IRIS development is characterized by infection-dependent activation of donor CD4(+) T cells, which are the source of IFN-γ. Interestingly, IFN-γ-mediated effects are not required for disease induction. Taken together, this novel mouse model of cryptococcal IRIS provides a useful tool to verify potential mechanisms of pathogenesis, revealing targets for diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. PMID:26381487

  8. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  9. Proteomic Analysis Provides New Insights in Phosphorus Homeostasis Subjected to Pi (Inorganic Phosphate) Starvation in Tomato Plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus is a major nutrient acquired by plants via high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. To determine the adaptation and homeostasis strategy to Pi starvation, we compared the proteome analysis of tomato leaves that were treated with and without Pi (as KH2PO4) for 10 days. Among 600 reproducible proteins on 2-DE gels 46 of them were differentially expressed. These proteins were involved in major metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, transcriptional/translational regulations, carbohydrate/energy metabolism, protein synthesis, defense response, and other secondary metabolism. The results also showed that the reduction in photosynthetic pigments lowered P content under -Pi treatments. Furthermore, high-affinity Pi transporters (lePT1 and lePT2) expressed in higher amounts under -Pi treatments. Also, the accumulation of Pi transporters was observed highly in the epidermis and palisade parenchyma under +Pi treatments compared to -Pi treatments. Our data suggested that tomato plants developed reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging mechanisms to cope with low Pi content, including the up-regulation of proteins mostly involved in important metabolic pathways. Moreover, Pi-starved tomato plants increased their internal Pi utilization efficiency by increasing the Pi transporter genes and their rational localization. These results thus provide imperative information about how tomato plants respond to Pi starvation and its homeostasis. PMID:26222137

  10. Kinetic model of Nav1.5 channel provides a subtle insight into slow inactivation associated excitability in cardiac cells.

    Zheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 has been linked to the cardiac cell excitability and a variety of arrhythmic syndromes including long QT, Brugada, and conduction abnormalities. Nav1.5 exhibits a slow inactivation, corresponding to a duration-dependent bi-exponential recovery, which is often associated with various arrhythmia syndromes. However, the gating mechanism of Nav1.5 and the physiological role of slow inactivation in cardiac cells remain elusive. Here a 12-state two-step inactivation Markov model was successfully developed to depict the gating kinetics of Nav1.5. This model can simulate the Nav1.5 channel in not only steady state processes, but also various transient processes. Compared with the simpler 8-state model, this 12-state model is well-behaved in simulating and explaining the processes of slow inactivation and slow recovery. This model provides a good framework for further studying the gating mechanism and physiological role of sodium channel in excitable cells.

  11. Draft genome of the peanut A-genome progenitor (Arachis duranensis) provides insights into geocarpy, oil biosynthesis, and allergens

    Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Hongjie; Pandey, Manish K.; Yang, Qingli; Wang, Xiyin; Garg, Vanika; Li, Haifen; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Hong, Yanbin; Upadhyaya, Hari; Guo, Hui; Khan, Aamir W.; Zhu, Fanghe; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Pan, Lijuan; Pierce, Gary J.; Zhou, Guiyuan; Krishnamohan, Katta A. V. S.; Chen, Mingna; Zhong, Ni; Agarwal, Gaurav; Li, Shuanzhu; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sharma, Shivali; Chen, Na; Liu, Haiyan; Janila, Pasupuleti; Li, Shaoxiong; Wang, Min; Wang, Tong; Sun, Jie; Li, Xingyu; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Mian; Yu, Lina; Wen, Shijie; Singh, Sube; Yang, Zhen; Zhao, Jinming; Zhang, Chushu; Yu, Yue; Bi, Jie; Zhang, Xiaojun; Paterson, Andrew H.; Wang, Shuping; Liang, Xuanqiang; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Yu, Shanlin

    2016-01-01

    Peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.), a legume of South American origin, has high seed oil content (45–56%) and is a staple crop in semiarid tropical and subtropical regions, partially because of drought tolerance conferred by its geocarpic reproductive strategy. We present a draft genome of the peanut A-genome progenitor, Arachis duranensis, and 50,324 protein-coding gene models. Patterns of gene duplication suggest the peanut lineage has been affected by at least three polyploidizations since the origin of eudicots. Resequencing of synthetic Arachis tetraploids reveals extensive gene conversion in only three seed-to-seed generations since their formation by human hands, indicating that this process begins virtually immediately following polyploid formation. Expansion of some specific gene families suggests roles in the unusual subterranean fructification of Arachis. For example, the S1Fa-like transcription factor family has 126 Arachis members, in contrast to no more than five members in other examined plant species, and is more highly expressed in roots and etiolated seedlings than green leaves. The A. duranensis genome provides a major source of candidate genes for fructification, oil biosynthesis, and allergens, expanding knowledge of understudied areas of plant biology and human health impacts of plants, informing peanut genetic improvement and aiding deeper sequencing of Arachis diversity. PMID:27247390

  12. The structure of arabidopsis thaliana OST1 provides insights into the kinase regulation mechanism in response to osmotic stress

    Yunta, Cristina

    2011-11-01

    SnRK [SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1)-related protein kinase] 2.6 [open stomata 1 (OST1)] is well characterized at molecular and physiological levels to control stomata closure in response to water-deficit stress. OST1 is a member of a family of 10 protein kinases from Arabidopsis thaliana (SnRK2) that integrates abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent and ABA-independent signals to coordinate the cell response to osmotic stress. A subgroup of protein phosphatases type 2C binds OST1 and keeps the kinase dephosphorylated and inactive. Activation of OST1 relies on the ABA-dependent inhibition of the protein phosphatases type 2C and the subsequent self-phosphorylation of the kinase. The OST1 ABA-independent activation depends on a short sequence motif that is conserved among all the members of the SnRK2 family. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation. The crystallographic structure of OST1 shows that ABA-independent regulation motif stabilizes the conformation of the kinase catalytically essential α C helix, and it provides the basis of the ABA-independent regulation mechanism for the SnRK2 family of protein kinases. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A mollusk VDR/PXR/CAR-like (NR1J) nuclear receptor provides insight into ancient detoxification mechanisms.

    Cruzeiro, Catarina; Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Ruivo, Raquel; Rodrigues-Oliveira, Nádia; Santos, Miguel M; Rocha, Maria João; Rocha, Eduardo; Castro, L Filipe C

    2016-05-01

    The origin and diversification of the metazoan endocrine systems represents a fundamental research issue in biology. Nuclear receptors are critical components of these systems. A particular group named VDR/PXR/CAR (NR1I/J) is central in the mediation of detoxification responses. While orthologues have been thoroughly characterized in vertebrates, a sparse representation is currently available for invertebrates. Here, we provide the first isolation and characterization of a lophotrochozoan protostome VDR/PXR/CAR nuclear receptor (NR1J), in the estuarine bivalve the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana). Using a reporter gene assay, we evaluated the xenobiotic receptor plasticity comparing the human PXR with the S. plana NR1Jβ. Our results show that the molluscan receptor responds to a natural toxin (okadaic acid) in a similar fashion to that reported for other invertebrates. In contrast, the pesticide esfenvalerate displayed a unique response, since it down regulated transactivation at higher concentrations, while for triclosan no response was observed. Additionally, we uncovered lineage specific gene duplications and gene loss in the gene group encoding NRs in protostomes with likely impacts on the complexity of detoxification mechanisms across different phyla. Our findings pave the way for the development of multi-specific sensor tools to screen xenobiotic compounds acting via the NR1I/J group. PMID:26921727

  14. Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into the Mechanisms Underlying Wheat Plant Resistance to Stripe Rust at the Adult Plant Stage

    Hao, Yingbin; Wang, Ting; Wang, Kang; Wang, Xiaojie; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Stripe rust (or yellow rust), which is caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most devastating wheat diseases worldwide. The wheat cultivar Xingzi 9104 (XZ) is an elite wheat germplasm that possesses adult plant resistance (APR), which is non–race-specific and durable. Thus, to better understand the mechanism underlying APR, we performed transcriptome sequencing of wheat seedlings and adult plants without Pst infection, and a total of 157,689 unigenes were obtained as a reference. In total, 2,666, 783 and 2,587 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be up- or down-regulated after Pst infection at 24, 48 and 120 hours post-inoculation (hpi), respectively, based on a comparison of Pst- and mock-infected plants. Among these unigenes, the temporal pattern of the up-regulated unigenes exhibited transient expression patterns during Pst infection, as determined through a Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. In addition, a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that many biological processes, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, reactive oxygen species, photosynthesis and thiamine metabolism, which mainly control the mechanisms of lignification, reactive oxygen species and sugar, respectively, are involved in APR. In particular, the continuous accumulation of reactive oxygen species may potentially contribute to the ability of the adult plant to inhibit fungal growth and development. To validate the bioinformatics results, 6 candidate genes were selected for further functional identification using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system, and 4 candidate genes likely contribute to plant resistance against Pst infection. Our study provides new information concerning the transcriptional changes that occur during the Pst-wheat interaction at the adult stage and will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms underlying APR to Pst. PMID:26991894

  15. The Crystal Structure of Burkholderia cenocepacia DfsA Provides Insights into Substrate Recognition and Quorum Sensing Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    Spadaro, Francesca; Scoffone, Viola C; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Fumagalli, Marco; Buroni, Silvia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Forneris, Federico

    2016-06-14

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a major concern among respiratory tract infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This pathogen is particularly difficult to treat because of its high level of resistance to the clinically relevant antimicrobial agents. In B. cenocepacia, the quorum sensing cell-cell communication system is involved in different processes that are important for bacterial virulence, such as biofilm formation and protease and siderophore production. Targeting the enzymes involved in this process represents a promising therapeutic approach. With the aim of finding effective quorum sensing inhibitors, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of B. cenocepacia diffusible factor synthase A, DfsA. This bifunctional crotonase (dehydratase/thioesterase) produces the characteristic quorum sensing molecule of B. cenocepacia, cis-2-dodecenoic acid or BDSF, starting from 3-hydroxydodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure revealed the presence of a lipid molecule in the catalytic site of the enzyme, which was identified as dodecanoic acid. Our biochemical characterization shows that DfsA is able to use dodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein as a substrate, demonstrating that dodecanoic acid, the product of this reaction, is released very slowly from the DfsA active site, therefore acting as a DfsA inhibitor. This molecule shows an unprecedented conformational arrangement inside the DfsA active site. In contrast with previous hypotheses, our data illustrate how DfsA and closely related homologous enzymes can recognize long hydrophobic substrates without large conformational changes or assistance by additional regulator molecules. The elucidation of the substrate binding mode in DfsA provides the starting point for structure-based drug discovery studies targeting B. cenocepacia quorum sensing-assisted virulence. PMID:27198181

  16. Transcriptome changes in Eriocheir sinensis megalopae after desalination provide insights into osmoregulation and stress adaption in larvae.

    Hui, Min; Liu, Yuan; Song, Chengwen; Li, Yingdong; Shi, Guohui; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Eriocheir sinensis, an extremely invasive alien crab species, has important economic value in China. It encounters different salinities during its life cycle, and at the megalopal stage it faces a turning point regarding the salinity in its environment. We applied RNA sequencing to E. sinensis megalopae before (MB) and after (MA) desalination, resulting in the discovery of 21,042 unigenes and 908 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 4.32% of the unigenes). The DEGs primarily belonged to the Gene Ontology groups "Energy metabolism," "Oxidoreductase activity," "Translation," "Transport," "Metabolism," and "Stress response." In total, 33 DEGs related to transport processes were found, including 12 proton pump genes, three ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs), 13 solute carrier (SLC) family members, two sweet sugar transporter (ST) family members and three other substance transporters. Mitochondrial genes as well as genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolytic pathway, or β-oxidation pathway, which can generate energy in the form of ATP, were typically up-regulated in MA. 11 unigenes related to amino acid metabolism and a large number of genes related to protein synthesis were differentially expressed in MB and MA, indicating that E. sinensis possibly adjusts its concentration of free amino acid osmolytes for hyper-osmoregulation. Additionally, 33 salinity and oxidative stress induced genes were found to be differentially expressed, such as the LEA2, HSPs, GST and coagulation factor genes. Notably, LEA2 is an extremely hydrophilic protein that responds to desiccation and reported for the first time in crabs. Therefore, we suppose that when the environment is hypo-osmotic, the megalopae might compensate for ion loss via hyper-osmoregulation by consuming more energy, accompanied by a series of stress induced adaptions. This study provides the first genome-wide transcriptome analysis of E. sinensis megalopae for studying its osmoregulation and stress adaption

  17. Germ warfare in a microbial mat community: CRISPRs provide insights into the co-evolution of host and viral genomes.

    John F Heidelberg

    Full Text Available CRISPR arrays and associated cas genes are widespread in bacteria and archaea and confer acquired resistance to viruses. To examine viral immunity in the context of naturally evolving microbial populations we analyzed genomic data from two thermophilic Synechococcus isolates (Syn OS-A and Syn OS-B' as well as a prokaryotic metagenome and viral metagenome derived from microbial mats in hotsprings at Yellowstone National Park. Two distinct CRISPR types, distinguished by the repeat sequence, are found in both the Syn OS-A and Syn OS-B' genomes. The genome of Syn OS-A contains a third CRISPR type with a distinct repeat sequence, which is not found in Syn OS-B', but appears to be shared with other microorganisms that inhabit the mat. The CRISPR repeats identified in the microbial metagenome are highly conserved, while the spacer sequences (hereafter referred to as "viritopes" to emphasize their critical role in viral immunity were mostly unique and had no high identity matches when searched against GenBank. Searching the viritopes against the viral metagenome, however, yielded several matches with high similarity some of which were within a gene identified as a likely viral lysozyme/lysin protein. Analysis of viral metagenome sequences corresponding to this lysozyme/lysin protein revealed several mutations all of which translate into silent or conservative mutations which are unlikely to affect protein function, but may help the virus evade the host CRISPR resistance mechanism. These results demonstrate the varied challenges presented by a natural virus population, and support the notion that the CRISPR/viritope system must be able to adapt quickly to provide host immunity. The ability of metagenomics to track population-level variation in viritope sequences allows for a culture-independent method for evaluating the fast co-evolution of host and viral genomes and its consequence on the structuring of complex microbial communities.

  18. Transcriptome changes in Eriocheir sinensis megalopae after desalination provide insights into osmoregulation and stress adaption in larvae.

    Min Hui

    Full Text Available Eriocheir sinensis, an extremely invasive alien crab species, has important economic value in China. It encounters different salinities during its life cycle, and at the megalopal stage it faces a turning point regarding the salinity in its environment. We applied RNA sequencing to E. sinensis megalopae before (MB and after (MA desalination, resulting in the discovery of 21,042 unigenes and 908 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 4.32% of the unigenes. The DEGs primarily belonged to the Gene Ontology groups "Energy metabolism," "Oxidoreductase activity," "Translation," "Transport," "Metabolism," and "Stress response." In total, 33 DEGs related to transport processes were found, including 12 proton pump genes, three ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs, 13 solute carrier (SLC family members, two sweet sugar transporter (ST family members and three other substance transporters. Mitochondrial genes as well as genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolytic pathway, or β-oxidation pathway, which can generate energy in the form of ATP, were typically up-regulated in MA. 11 unigenes related to amino acid metabolism and a large number of genes related to protein synthesis were differentially expressed in MB and MA, indicating that E. sinensis possibly adjusts its concentration of free amino acid osmolytes for hyper-osmoregulation. Additionally, 33 salinity and oxidative stress induced genes were found to be differentially expressed, such as the LEA2, HSPs, GST and coagulation factor genes. Notably, LEA2 is an extremely hydrophilic protein that responds to desiccation and reported for the first time in crabs. Therefore, we suppose that when the environment is hypo-osmotic, the megalopae might compensate for ion loss via hyper-osmoregulation by consuming more energy, accompanied by a series of stress induced adaptions. This study provides the first genome-wide transcriptome analysis of E. sinensis megalopae for studying its osmoregulation and stress

  19. Genomic Analysis of the Kiwifruit Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Provides Insight into the Origins of an Emergent Plant Disease

    McCann, Honour C.; Rikkerink, Erik H. A.; Bertels, Frederic; Fiers, Mark; Lu, Ashley; Rees-George, Jonathan; Andersen, Mark T.; Gleave, Andrew P.; Haubold, Bernhard; Wohlers, Mark W.; Guttman, David S.; Wang, Pauline W.; Straub, Christina; Vanneste, Joel; Rainey, Paul B.; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    The origins of crop diseases are linked to domestication of plants. Most crops were domesticated centuries – even millennia – ago, thus limiting opportunity to understand the concomitant emergence of disease. Kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) is an exception: domestication began in the 1930s with outbreaks of canker disease caused by P. syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) first recorded in the 1980s. Based on SNP analyses of two circularized and 34 draft genomes, we show that Psa is comprised of distinct clades exhibiting negligible within-clade diversity, consistent with disease arising by independent samplings from a source population. Three clades correspond to their geographical source of isolation; a fourth, encompassing the Psa-V lineage responsible for the 2008 outbreak, is now globally distributed. Psa has an overall clonal population structure, however, genomes carry a marked signature of within-pathovar recombination. SNP analysis of Psa-V reveals hundreds of polymorphisms; however, most reside within PPHGI-1-like conjugative elements whose evolution is unlinked to the core genome. Removal of SNPs due to recombination yields an uninformative (star-like) phylogeny consistent with diversification of Psa-V from a single clone within the last ten years. Growth assays provide evidence of cultivar specificity, with rapid systemic movement of Psa-V in Actinidia chinensis. Genomic comparisons show a dynamic genome with evidence of positive selection on type III effectors and other candidate virulence genes. Each clade has highly varied complements of accessory genes encoding effectors and toxins with evidence of gain and loss via multiple genetic routes. Genes with orthologs in vascular pathogens were found exclusively within Psa-V. Our analyses capture a pathogen in the early stages of emergence from a predicted source population associated with wild Actinidia species. In addition to candidate genes as targets for resistance breeding programs, our findings highlight the

  20. Structure of the extracellular portion of CD46 provides insights into its interactions with complement proteins and pathogens.

    B David Persson

    Full Text Available The human membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46 is a central component of the innate immune system. CD46 protects autologous cells from complement attack by binding to complement proteins C3b and C4b and serving as a cofactor for their cleavage. Recent data show that CD46 also plays a role in mediating acquired immune responses, and in triggering autophagy. In addition to these physiologic functions, a significant number of pathogens, including select adenoviruses, measles virus, human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6, Streptococci, and Neisseria, use CD46 as a cell attachment receptor. We have determined the crystal structure of the extracellular region of CD46 in complex with the human adenovirus type 11 fiber knob. Extracellular CD46 comprises four short consensus repeats (SCR1-SCR4 that form an elongated structure resembling a hockey stick, with a long shaft and a short blade. Domains SCR1, SCR2 and SCR3 are arranged in a nearly linear fashion. Unexpectedly, however, the structure reveals a profound bend between domains SCR3 and SCR4, which has implications for the interactions with ligands as well as the orientation of the protein at the cell surface. This bend can be attributed to an insertion of five hydrophobic residues in a SCR3 surface loop. Residues in this loop have been implicated in interactions with complement, indicating that the bend participates in binding to C3b and C4b. The structure provides an accurate framework for mapping all known ligand binding sites onto the surface of CD46, thereby advancing an understanding of how CD46 acts as a receptor for pathogens and physiologic ligands of the immune system.

  1. Structure of the extracellular portion of CD46 provides insights into its interactions with complement proteins and pathogens.

    Persson, B David; Schmitz, Nikolaus B; Santiago, César; Zocher, Georg; Larvie, Mykol; Scheu, Ulrike; Casasnovas, José M; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    The human membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46) is a central component of the innate immune system. CD46 protects autologous cells from complement attack by binding to complement proteins C3b and C4b and serving as a cofactor for their cleavage. Recent data show that CD46 also plays a role in mediating acquired immune responses, and in triggering autophagy. In addition to these physiologic functions, a significant number of pathogens, including select adenoviruses, measles virus, human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6), Streptococci, and Neisseria, use CD46 as a cell attachment receptor. We have determined the crystal structure of the extracellular region of CD46 in complex with the human adenovirus type 11 fiber knob. Extracellular CD46 comprises four short consensus repeats (SCR1-SCR4) that form an elongated structure resembling a hockey stick, with a long shaft and a short blade. Domains SCR1, SCR2 and SCR3 are arranged in a nearly linear fashion. Unexpectedly, however, the structure reveals a profound bend between domains SCR3 and SCR4, which has implications for the interactions with ligands as well as the orientation of the protein at the cell surface. This bend can be attributed to an insertion of five hydrophobic residues in a SCR3 surface loop. Residues in this loop have been implicated in interactions with complement, indicating that the bend participates in binding to C3b and C4b. The structure provides an accurate framework for mapping all known ligand binding sites onto the surface of CD46, thereby advancing an understanding of how CD46 acts as a receptor for pathogens and physiologic ligands of the immune system. PMID:20941397

  2. Waveform modeling of historical seismograms of the 1930 Irpinia earthquake provides insight on ``blind'' faulting in Southern Apennines (Italy)

    Pino, N. A.; Palombo, B.; Ventura, G.; Perniola, B.; Ferrari, G.

    2008-05-01

    The Southern Apennines chain is related to the west-dipping subduction of the Apulian lithosphere. The strongest seismic events mostly occurred in correspondence of the chain axis along normal NW-SE striking faults parallel to the chain axis. These structures are related to mantle wedge upwelling beneath the chain. In the foreland, faulting develops along E-W strike-slip to oblique-slip faults related to the roll-back of the foreland. Similarly to other historical events in Southern Apennines, the I0 = XI (MCS intensity scale) 23 July 1930 earthquake occurred between the chain axis and the thrust front without surface faulting. This event produced more than 1400 casualties and extensive damage elongated approximately E-W. The analysis of the historical waveforms provides the chance to study the fault geometry of this "anomalous" event and allow us to clarify its geodynamic significance. Our results indicate that the MS = 6.6 1930 event nucleated at 14.6 ± 3.06 km depth and ruptured a north dipping, N100°E striking plane with an oblique motion. The fault propagated along the fault strike 32 km to the east at about 2 km/s. The eastern fault tip is located in proximity of the Vulture volcano. The 1930 hypocenter, similarly to the 1990 (MW = 5.8) Southern Apennines event, is within the Mesozoic carbonates of the Apulian foredeep and the rupture developed along a "blind" fault. The 1930 fault kinematics significantly differs from that typical of large Southern Apennines earthquakes, which occur in a distinct seismotectonic domain on late Pleistocene to Holocene outcropping faults. These results stress the role played by pre-existing, "blind" faults in the Apennines subduction setting.

  3. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    Shruti Haralalka

    Full Text Available The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs, and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre and Sticks-and-stones (Sns on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and

  4. Closed-flow column experiments—Insights into solute transport provided by a damped oscillating breakthrough behavior

    Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Transport studies that employ column experiments in closed-flow mode complement classical approaches by providing new characteristic features observed in the solute breakthrough and equilibrium between liquid and solid phase. Specific to the closed-flow mode is the recirculation of the effluent to the inflow via a mixing vessel. Depending on the ratio of volumes of mixing vessel and water-filled pore space, a damped oscillating solute concentration emerges in the effluent and mixing vessel. The oscillation characteristics, e.g., frequency, amplitude, and damping, allow for the investigation of solute transport in a similar fashion as known for classical open-flow column experiments. However, the closed loop conserves substances released during transport within the system. In this way, solute and porous medium can equilibrate with respect to physicochemical conditions. With this paper, the features emerging in the breakthrough curves of saturated column experiments run in closed-flow mode and methods of evaluation are illustrated under experimental boundary conditions forcing the appearance of oscillations. We demonstrate that the effective pore water volume and the pumping rate can be determined from a conservative tracer breakthrough curve uniquely. In this way, external preconditioning of the material, e.g., drying, can be avoided. A reactive breakthrough experiment revealed a significant increase in the pore water pH value as a consequence of the closed loop. These results highlight the specific impact of the closed mass balance. Furthermore, the basis for the modeling of closed-flow experiments is given by the derivation of constitutive equations and numerical implementation, validated with the presented experiments.

  5. Elucidation of tonic and activated B-cell receptor signaling in Burkitt's lymphoma provides insights into regulation of cell survival.

    Corso, Jasmin; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Walter, Roland; Doebele, Carmen; Mohr, Sebastian; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Ströbel, Philipp; Lenz, Christof; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Hüllein, Jennifer; Comoglio, Federico; Rieger, Michael A; Zenz, Thorsten; Wienands, Jürgen; Engelke, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Urlaub, Henning; Oellerich, Thomas

    2016-05-17

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a highly proliferative B-cell neoplasm and is treated with intensive chemotherapy that, because of its toxicity, is often not suitable for the elderly or for patients with endemic BL in developing countries. BL cell survival relies on signals transduced by B-cell antigen receptors (BCRs). However, tonic as well as activated BCR signaling networks and their relevance for targeted therapies in BL remain elusive. We have systematically characterized and compared tonic and activated BCR signaling in BL by quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify novel BCR effectors and potential drug targets. We identified and quantified ∼16,000 phospho-sites in BL cells. Among these sites, 909 were related to tonic BCR signaling, whereas 984 phospho-sites were regulated upon BCR engagement. The majority of the identified BCR signaling effectors have not been described in the context of B cells or lymphomas yet. Most of these newly identified BCR effectors are predicted to be involved in the regulation of kinases, transcription, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although tonic and activated BCR signaling shared a considerable number of effector proteins, we identified distinct phosphorylation events in tonic BCR signaling. We investigated the functional relevance of some newly identified BCR effectors and show that ACTN4 and ARFGEF2, which have been described as regulators of membrane-trafficking and cytoskeleton-related processes, respectively, are crucial for BL cell survival. Thus, this study provides a comprehensive dataset for tonic and activated BCR signaling and identifies effector proteins that may be relevant for BL cell survival and thus may help to develop new BL treatments. PMID:27155012

  6. A draft fur seal genome provides insights into factors affecting SNP validation and how to mitigate them.

    Humble, E; Martinez-Barrio, A; Forcada, J; Trathan, P N; Thorne, M A S; Hoffmann, M; Wolf, J B W; Hoffman, J I

    2016-07-01

    Custom genotyping arrays provide a flexible and accurate means of genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large number of individuals of essentially any organism. However, validation rates, defined as the proportion of putative SNPs that are verified to be polymorphic in a population, are often very low. A number of potential causes of assay failure have been identified, but none have been explored systematically. In particular, as SNPs are often developed from transcriptomes, parameters relating to the genomic context are rarely taken into account. Here, we assembled a draft Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) genome (assembly size: 2.41 Gb; scaffold/contig N50 : 3.1 Mb/27.5 kb). We then used this resource to map the probe sequences of 144 putative SNPs genotyped in 480 individuals. The number of probe-to-genome mappings and alignment length together explained almost a third of the variation in validation success, indicating that sequence uniqueness and proximity to intron-exon boundaries play an important role. The same pattern was found after mapping the probe sequences to the Walrus and Weddell seal genomes, suggesting that the genomes of species divergent by as much as 23 million years can hold information relevant to SNP validation outcomes. Additionally, reanalysis of genotyping data from seven previous studies found the same two variables to be significantly associated with SNP validation success across a variety of taxa. Finally, our study reveals considerable scope for validation rates to be improved, either by simply filtering for SNPs whose flanking sequences align uniquely and completely to a reference genome, or through predictive modelling. PMID:26683564

  7. Late Miocene insular mice from the Tusco-Sardinian palaeobioprovince provide new insights on the palaeoecology of the Oreopithecus faunas.

    Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac; van Dam, Jan A; Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Rook, Lorenzo

    2011-07-01

    Oreopithecus bambolii is one of the few hominoids that evolved under insular conditions, resulting in the development of unique adaptations that have fueled an intensive debate. The palaeoenvironment associated with this great ape has been the subject of great controversy as well. On the one hand, palaeobotanical data indicate that Oreopithecus likely inhabited mixed mesophytic forests interrupted by swamps; on the other hand, an abundance of hypsodont bovids points towards the existence of dry and open environments. Here, we provide a new approach based on the ecomorphology of the extinct endemic Muridae (rats and mice) of the so-called Oreopithecus faunas. Our results show that the successive species of endemic insular murids (Huerzelerimys and Anthracomys) evolved a number of adaptations observed only in extant family members that include significant proportions of grass in their diet. While this fits the pattern exhibited by large mammals, it contrasts with the available palaeobotanical information, which indicates that grasses were minor components of the vegetation. This contradiction may be explained because these endemic murids may have been adapted to the consumption of particular food items such as hard parts of aquatic plants (as shown by some extant murid species). However, because it is unlikely that the remaining herbivore mammals were adapted to this diet as well, we favour an alternative hypothesis that takes into account the peculiar ecological conditions of insular ecosystems leading to a density-dependent selective regime with strong competition. Such a regime would promote the selection of dental adaptations to increase feeding efficiency and durability of the dentition (such as hypsodonty) as seen in some fossil insular ruminants. This hypothesis requires further testing, but may partly account for parallel evolution of dental traits in phylogenetically unrelated insular mammals. PMID:21371736

  8. Vertical microbial community variability of carbonate-based cones may provide insight into ancient conical stromatolite formation

    Bradley, James; Daille, Leslie; Trivedi, Christopher; Bojanowski, Caitlin; Nunn, Heather; Stamps, Blake; Johnson, Hope; Stevenson, Bradley; Berelson, Will; Corsetti, Frank; Spear, John

    2016-04-01

    Stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood, and the process by which microbial mats become mineralized is a primary question in microbialite formation. Ancient conical stromatolites are primarily carbonate-based whereas the few modern analogues in hot springs are either non-mineralized or mineralized by silica. A team from the 2015 International GeoBiology Course investigated carbonate-rich microbial cones from near Little Hot Creek (LHC), Long Valley Caldera, California, to investigate how conical stromatolites might form in a hot spring carbonate system. The cones rise up from a layered microbial mat on the east side of a 45° C pool with very low flow that is super-saturated with respect to CaCO3. Cone structures are 8-30 mm in height, are rigid and do not deform when removed from the pool. Morphological characterization through environmental scanning electronic microscopy revealed that the cone structure is maintained by a matrix of intertwining microbial filaments around carbonate grains. This matrix gives rise to cone-filaments that are arranged vertically or horizontally, and provides further stability to the cone. Preliminary 16S rRNA gene analysis indicated variability of community composition between different vertical levels of the cone. The cone tip had comparatively greater abundance of filamentous cyanobacteria including Leptolingbya, Phormidium and Isosphaera and fewer heterotrophs (e.g. Chloroflexi) compared to the cone bottom. This supports the hypothesis that cone formation may depend on the differential abundance of the microbial community and their potential functional roles. Metagenomic analyses of the cones revealed potential genes related to chemotaxis and motility. Specifically, a genomic bin identified as a member of the genus Isosphaera contained an hmp chemotaxis operon implicated in gliding motility in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme. Isosphaera is a Planctomycete shown to have phototactic capabilities, and may play a role in

  9. Expression of Fused in sarcoma mutations in mice recapitulates the neuropathology of FUS proteinopathies and provides insight into disease pathogenesis

    Verbeeck Christophe

    2012-10-01

    permanent inclusions that could negatively affect RNA metabolism. Identification of mutations in other genes that cause ALS/FTD, such as C9ORF72, sentaxin, and angiogenin, lends support to the idea that defective RNA metabolism is a critical pathogenic pathway. The SBT FUS mice described here will provide a valuable platform for dissecting the pathogenic mechanism of FUS mutations, define the relationship between FTD and ALS-FUS, and help identify therapeutic targets that are desperately needed for these devastating neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Taurus II Stage Test Simulations: Using Large-Scale CFD Simulations to Provide Critical Insight into Plume Induced Environments During Design

    Struzenberg, L. L.; West, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of targeted Loci/CHEM CFD simulations to evaluate the effects of a dual-engine first-stage hot-fire test on an evolving integrated launch pad/test article design. This effort was undertaken as a part of the NESC Independent Assessment of the Taurus II Stage Test Series. The underlying conceptual model included development of a series of computational models and simulations to analyze the plume induced environments on the pad, facility structures and test article. A pathfinder simulation was first developed, capable of providing quick-turn around evaluation of plume impingement pressures on the flame deflector. Results from this simulation were available in time to provide data for an ongoing structural assessment of the deflector. The resulting recommendation was available in a timely manner and was incorporated into construction schedule for the new launch stand under construction at Wallops Flight Facility. A series of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) quasi-steady simulations representative of various key elements of the test profile was performed to identify potential concerns with the test configuration and test profile. As required, unsteady Hybrid-RANS/LES simulations were performed, to provide additional insight into critical aspects of the test sequence. Modifications to the test-specific hardware and facility structures thermal protection as well as modifications to the planned hot-fire test profile were implemented based on these simulation results.

  11. Engaging patients and caregivers in patient-centered outcomes research on advanced stage lung cancer: insights from patients, caregivers, and providers.

    Islam, K M; Opoku, Samuel T; Apenteng, Bettye A; Fetrick, Ann; Ryan, June; Copur, M; Tolentino, Addison; Vaziri, Irfan; Ganti, Apar K

    2014-12-01

    Participatory and patient-centered approaches to cancer research have been highlighted as the most appropriate means of engaging patients in the conduct of clinical research. However, there is a paucity of patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) on lung cancer. Previous studies seeking to define lung cancer treatment success have generally not included patients' and caregivers' perceptions and views in treatment decision-making. Additionally, little is known about effective strategies for the engagement of lung cancer patients in PCOR. We sought to gain insights into the perceptions of patients, caregivers, and providers on lung cancer treatment success, as well as on strategies for patient engagement in lung cancer PCOR. Four focus groups were conducted with provider, patient, and caregiver participants from four cancer centers in Nebraska and South Dakota. A total of 36 providers, patients, and caregivers participated in this study. Patients and caregivers confirmed that survival alone should not be the measure of lung cancer treatment success and that definitions of treatment success should emphasize factors such as effective clinical guidance throughout treatment, symptom management, functionality, and quality of life. Clinician participants noted that the definition of treatment success evolved over time and appeared to be linked to patients' experiences with chemotherapy. Participants identified barriers to and facilitators of research participation and suggested strategies for the recruitment and retention of research participants. Our study indicates that patients can successfully play active and engaged roles in clinical research, ranging from participant to partner. Judging from the enthusiasm of our focus group attendees, patients and caregivers want to participate and be engaged in clinical research. PMID:24744120

  12. Viroid RNA turnover: characterization of the subgenomic RNAs of potato spindle tuber viroid accumulating in infected tissues provides insights into decay pathways operating in vivo.

    Minoia, Sofia; Navarro, Beatriz; Delgado, Sonia; Di Serio, Francesco; Flores, Ricardo

    2015-02-27

    While biogenesis of viroid RNAs is well-known, how they decay is restricted to data involving host RNA silencing. Here we report an alternative degradation pathway operating on potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), the type species of nuclear-replicating viroids (family Pospiviroidae). Northern-blot hybridizations with full- and partial-length probes revealed a set of PSTVd (+) subgenomic (sg)RNAs in early-infected eggplant, some partially overlapping and reaching levels comparable to those of the genomic circular and linear forms. Part of the PSTVd (+) sgRNAs were also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana (specifically in the nuclei) and tomato, wherein they have been overlooked due to their low accumulation. Primer extensions of representative (+) sgRNAs failed to detect a common 5' terminus, excluding that they could result from aborted transcription initiated at one specific site. Supporting this view, 5'- and 3'-RACE indicated that the (+) sgRNAs have 5'-OH and 3'-P termini most likely generated by RNase-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage of longer precursors. These approaches also unveiled PSTVd (-) sgRNAs with features similar to their (+) counterparts. Our results provide a mechanistic insight on how viroid decay may proceed in vivo during replication, and suggest that synthesis and decay of PSTVd strands might be coupled as in mRNA. PMID:25662219

  13. Whole genome sequencing of a banana wild relative Musa itinerans provides insights into lineage-specific diversification of the Musa genus.

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Yu-Lan; He, Wei-Ming; Rouard, Mathieu; Li, Wei-Ming; Xu, Meng; Roux, Nicolas; Ge, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Crop wild relatives are valuable resources for future genetic improvement. Here, we report the de novo genome assembly of Musa itinerans, a disease-resistant wild banana relative in subtropical China. The assembled genome size was 462.1 Mb, covering 75.2% of the genome (615.2Mb) and containing 32, 456 predicted protein-coding genes. Since the approximate divergence around 5.8 million years ago, the genomes of Musa itinerans and Musa acuminata have shown conserved collinearity. Gene family expansions and contractions enrichment analysis revealed that some pathways were associated with phenotypic or physiological innovations. These include a transition from wood to herbaceous in the ancestral Musaceae, intensification of cold and drought tolerances, and reduced diseases resistance genes for subtropical marginally distributed Musa species. Prevalent purifying selection and transposed duplications were found to facilitate the diversification of NBS-encoding gene families for two Musa species. The population genome history analysis of M. itinerans revealed that the fluctuated population sizes were caused by the Pleistocene climate oscillations, and that the formation of Qiongzhou Strait might facilitate the population downsizing on the isolated Hainan Island about 10.3 Kya. The qualified assembly of the M. itinerans genome provides deep insights into the lineage-specific diversification and also valuable resources for future banana breeding. PMID:27531320

  14. Molecular characterization and expression profile of three Fem-1 genes in Eriocheir sinensis provide a new insight into crab sex-determining mechanism.

    Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia; Hui, Min; Liu, Yuan; Li, Yingdong

    2015-11-01

    The FEM-1 protein of Caenorhabditis elegans plays a crucial role in the nematode sex-determination pathway. Here, we reported the characterization of three members of Fem-1 gene family in Eriocheir sinensis (designated EsFem-1a, EsFem-1b, and EsFem-1c), which were homologs of the nematode FEM-1 protein. The amino acid sequences of EsFem-1a, EsFem-1b, and EsFem-1c contained eight, nine, and eight ankyrin repeats, respectively. None of the ankyrin repeats had its own specific signature, and the evolution of ankyrin repeat was not completely independent. The predicted three-dimensional structure of EsFem-1 proteins exhibited highly similar superhelical conformation, especially the N-terminal six contiguous ankyrin repeats, which provided a binding surface for the protein-protein interaction. Phylogenetic tree based on the amino acid sequences revealed that EsFem-1a, EsFem-1b, and EsFem-1c were divided into three obvious separated clades. EsFem-1 genes were highly expressed in fertilized egg, 2-4 cell and blastula stage comparing with larval stage (P<0.01), which suggested they might be maternal genes. They also showed a certain degree of sexually dimorphic expression in some tissues. Notably, the highest expression of EsFem-1a was in the hepatopancreas, with EsFem-1b in testes and EsFem-1c in muscle (P<0.05), which indicated their potential role in a broad array of tissues. In addition, the genes initially involved in sex differentiation were not limited to those specifically expressed in the developing gonad. Taken together, these results suggested that EsFem-1 might function in crab early sex determination and late gonad development. The identification of Fem-1 gene family in E. sinensis provides a new insight into crab sex-determination mechanism. PMID:26188322

  15. Integration of small RNAs, degradome and transcriptome sequencing in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii uncovers a complex regulatory network and provides insights into cadmium phytoremediation.

    Han, Xiaojiao; Yin, Hengfu; Song, Xixi; Zhang, Yunxing; Liu, Mingying; Sang, Jiang; Jiang, Jing; Li, Jihong; Zhuo, Renying

    2016-06-01

    The hyperaccumulating ecotype of Sedum alfredii Hance is a cadmium (Cd)/zinc/lead co-hyperaccumulating species of Crassulaceae. It is a promising phytoremediation candidate accumulating substantial heavy metal ions without obvious signs of poisoning. However, few studies have focused on the regulatory roles of miRNAs and their targets in the hyperaccumulating ecotype of S. alfredii. Here, we combined analyses of the transcriptomics, sRNAs and the degradome to generate a comprehensive resource focused on identifying key regulatory miRNA-target circuits under Cd stress. A total of 87 721 unigenes and 356 miRNAs were identified by deep sequencing, and 79 miRNAs were differentially expressed under Cd stress. Furthermore, 754 target genes of 194 miRNAs were validated by degradome sequencing. A gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of differential miRNA targets revealed that auxin, redox-related secondary metabolism and metal transport pathways responded to Cd stress. An integrated analysis uncovered 39 pairs of miRNA targets that displayed negatively correlated expression profiles. Ten miRNA-target pairs also exhibited negative correlations according to a real-time quantitative PCR analysis. Moreover, a coexpression regulatory network was constructed based on profiles of differentially expressed genes. Two hub genes, ARF4 (auxin response factor 4) and AAP3 (amino acid permease 3), which might play central roles in the regulation of Cd-responsive genes, were uncovered. These results suggest that comprehensive analyses of the transcriptomics, sRNAs and the degradome provided a useful platform for investigating Cd hyperaccumulation in S. alfredii, and may provide new insights into the genetic engineering of phytoremediation. PMID:26801211

  16. The Crystal Structure of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae Provides Insights into Mechanisms of Catalysis and Regulation

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel (Maryland); (GWU); (Georgia)

    2010-01-07

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes.

  17. The crystal structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae provides insights into mechanisms of catalysis and regulation.

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel

    2008-03-14

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes. PMID:18184660

  18. Conventional and phenomics characterization provides insight into the diversity and relationships of hypervariable scarlet (Solanum aethiopicum L. and gboma (S. macrocarpon L. eggplant complexes

    Mariola ePlazas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Scarlet (Solanum aethiopicum and gboma (S. macrocarpon eggplants are major vegetable crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Together with their respective wild ancestors (S. anguivi and S. dasyphyllum and intermediate cultivated-wild forms they constitute the so-called scarlet and gboma eggplant complexes. We used conventional descriptors and the high-throughput phenomics tool Tomato Analyzer for characterizing 63 accessions of the scarlet eggplant complex, including the four S. aethiopicum cultivar groups (Aculeatum, Gilo, Kumba, and Shum, Intermediate S. aethiopicum-S. anguivi forms, and S. anguivi, and 12 cultivated and wild accessions of the gboma eggplant complex. A large diversity was found between both complexes, showing that they are very well differentiated from each other. Within the scarlet eggplant complex, many significant differences were also found among cultivar groups, but more differences were found for fruit traits evaluated with Tomato Analyzer than with conventional descriptors. In particular, Tomato Analyzer phenomics characterization was useful for distinguishing small fruited groups (Shum, Intermediate, and S. anguivi, as well as groups for which few or no significant differences were observed for plant traits. Multivariate principal components analysis (PCA separated well all groups, except the Intermediate group which plotted between S. anguivi and small fruited S. aethiopicum accessions. For the gboma eggplant complex, S. dasyphyllum was clearly distinguished from S. macrocarpon and an important diversity was found in the latter. The results have shown that both complexes are hypervariable and have provided insight into their diversity and relationships. The information obtained has important implications for the conservation and management of genetic resources as well as for the selection and breeding of both scarlet and gboma eggplants.

  19. Protein architecture and core residues in unwound α-helices provide insights to the transport function of plant AtCHX17.

    Czerny, Daniel D; Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Anishkin, Andriy; Venema, Kees; Riaz, Zoya; Sze, Heven

    2016-09-01

    Using Arabidopsis thaliana AtCHX17 as an example, we combine structural modeling and mutagenesis to provide insights on its protein architecture and transport function which is poorly characterized. This approach is based on the observation that protein structures are significantly more conserved in evolution than linear sequences, and mechanistic similarities among diverse transporters are emerging. Two homology models of AtCHX17 were obtained that show a protein fold similar to known structures of bacterial Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, EcNhaA and TtNapA. The distinct secondary and tertiary structure models highlighted residues at positions potentially important for CHX17 activity. Mutagenesis showed that asparagine-N200 and aspartate-D201 inside transmembrane5 (TM5), and lysine-K355 inside TM10 are critical for AtCHX17 activity. We reveal previously unrecognized threonine-T170 and lysine-K383 as key residues at unwound regions in the middle of TM4 and TM11 α-helices, respectively. Mutation of glutamate-E111 located near the membrane surface inhibited AtCHX17 activity, suggesting a role in pH sensing. The long carboxylic tail of unknown purpose has an alternating β-sheet and α-helix secondary structure that is conserved in prokaryote universal stress proteins. These results support the overall architecture of AtCHX17 and identify D201, N200 and novel residues T170 and K383 at the functional core which likely participates in ion recognition, coordination and/or translocation, similar to characterized cation/H(+) exchangers. The core of AtCHX17 models according to EcNhaA and TtNapA templates faces inward and outward, respectively, which may reflect two conformational states of the alternating access transport mode for proteins belonging to the plant CHX family. PMID:27179641

  20. Transcriptome-based gene profiling provides novel insights into the characteristics of radish root response to Cr stress with next-generation sequencing.

    Xie, Yang; Ye, Shan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Xianwen; Yang, Jinlan; Feng, Haiyang; Yu, Rugang; Karanja, Benard; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an important worldwide root vegetable crop with high nutrient values and is adversely affected by non-essential heavy metals including chromium (Cr). Little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying Cr stress response in radish. In this study, RNA-Seq technique was employed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under Cr stress. Based on de novo transcriptome assembly, there were 30,676 unigenes representing 60,881 transcripts isolated from radish root under Cr stress. Differential gene analysis revealed that 2985 uingenes were significantly differentially expressed between Cr-free (CK) and Cr-treated (Cr600) libraries, among which 1424 were up-regulated and 1561 down-regulated. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that these DEGs were mainly involved in primary metabolic process, response to abiotic stimulus, cellular metabolic process and small molecule metabolic process. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis showed that the DEGs were mainly involved in protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, starch and sucrose metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, drug and xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 metabolism. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the expression patterns of 12 randomly selected DEGs were highly accordant with the results from RNA-seq. Furthermore, many candidate genes including signaling protein kinases, transcription factors and metal transporters, chelate compound biosynthesis and antioxidant system, were involved in defense and detoxification mechanisms of Cr stress response regulatory networks. These results would provide novel insight into molecular mechanism underlying plant responsiveness to Cr stress and facilitate further genetic manipulation on Cr uptake and accumulation in radish. PMID:25873924

  1. Directed evolution and structural analysis of N-carbamoyl-D-amino acid amidohydrolase provide insights into recombinant protein solubility in Escherichia coli

    Jiang, Shimin; Li, Chunhong; Zhang, Weiwen; Cai, Yuanheng; Yang, Yunlin; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2007-03-15

    One of the greatest bottlenecks in producing recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is that over-expressed target proteins are mostly present in an insoluble form without any biological activity. N-carbamoyl-D-amino-acid amidohydrolase (DCase) is an important enzyme involved in semi-synthesis of β-lactam antibiotics in industry. In this study, in order to determine the amino acid sites responsible for solubility in DCase, error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling techniques are applied to randomly mutate its encoding sequence, followed by an efficient screening based on structural complementation. Several mutants of DCase with reduced aggregation are isolated. Solubility tests of these mutants and several other mutants generated by site-directed mutagenesis indicate that three amino acid residues of DCase (A18, Y30 and K34) are related to the protein solubility in DCase. In silico structural modeling analyses further suggest that hydrophilicity and/or negative charge at these three residues may be responsible for the increased solubility of DCase proteins in E. coli. Based on the information, multiple engineering designated mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis; among them, a triple mutant A18T/Y30N/K34E (named as DCase-M3) can be over-expressed in E. coli with up to 80% of DCase-M3 protein as soluble. DCase-M3 is purified to homogeneity and a comparative analysis with WT DCase demonstrates that DCase-M3 enzyme is similar to the native DCase in terms of its kinetic and thermodynamic properties. The study provides new insights on recombinant protein solubility in E. coli.

  2. Transcriptome analysis provides new insights into liver changes induced in the rat upon dietary administration of the food additives butylated hydroxytoluene, curcumin, propyl gallate and thiabendazole

    Stierum, R.; Conesa, A.; Heijne, W.; Ommen, B.v.; Junker, K.; Scott, M.P.; Price, R.J.; Meredith, C.; Lake, B.G.; Groten, J.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptomics was performed to gain insight into mechanisms of food additives butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), curcumin (CC), propyl gallate (PG), and thiabendazole (TB), additives for which interactions in the liver can not be excluded. Additives were administered in diets for 28 days to Sprague-D

  3. Knock-down of pantothenate kinase 2 severely affects the development of the nervous and vascular system in zebrafish, providing new insights into PKAN disease.

    Zizioli, Daniela; Tiso, Natascia; Guglielmi, Adele; Saraceno, Claudia; Busolin, Giorgia; Giuliani, Roberta; Khatri, Deepak; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe; Argenton, Francesco; Finazzi, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate Kinase Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive disorder with mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2), encoding an essential enzyme for Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. The molecular connection between defects in this enzyme and the neurodegenerative phenotype observed in PKAN patients is still poorly understood. We exploited the zebrafish model to study the role played by the pank2 gene during embryonic development and get new insight into PKAN pathogenesis. The zebrafish orthologue of hPANK2 lies on chromosome 13, is a maternal gene expressed in all development stages and, in adult animals, is highly abundant in CNS, dorsal aorta and caudal vein. The injection of a splice-inhibiting morpholino induced a clear phenotype with perturbed brain morphology and hydrocephalus; edema was present in the heart region and caudal plexus, where hemorrhages with reduction of blood circulation velocity were detected. We characterized the CNS phenotype by studying the expression pattern of wnt1 and neurog1 neural markers and by use of the Tg(neurod:EGFP/sox10:dsRed) transgenic line. The results evidenced that downregulation of pank2 severely impairs neuronal development, particularly in the anterior part of CNS (telencephalon). Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of the endothelial markers cadherin-5 and fli1a, and use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP/gata1a:dsRed) transgenic line, confirmed the essential role of pank2 in the formation of the vascular system. The specificity of the morpholino-induced phenotype was proved by the restoration of a normal development in a high percentage of embryos co-injected with pank2 mRNA. Also, addition of pantethine or CoA, but not of vitamin B5, to pank2 morpholino-injected embryos rescued the phenotype with high efficiency. The zebrafish model indicates the relevance of pank2 activity and CoA homeostasis for normal neuronal development and functioning and provides evidence of an unsuspected role for this

  4. Microbial processes dominate P fluxes in a low-phosphorus temperate forest soil: insights provided by 33P and 18O in phosphate

    Pistocchi, Chiara; Tamburini, Federica; Bünemann, Else; Mészáros, Éva; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    The classical view of the P cycle in forests is that trees and mycorrhizal fungi associated with them take up most of their phosphorus as phosphate (P) from the soil solution. The soil solution is then replenished by the release of P from sorbed phases, by the dissolution of P containing minerals or by biological mineralization and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of organic P compounds. Direct insight into the processes phosphate goes through at the ecosystem level is, however, missing. Assessing the relevance of inorganic and biological processes controlling P cycling requires the use of appropriate approaches and tracers. Within the German Priority Program "Ecosystem Nutrition: Forest Strategies for limited Phosphorus Resources" we studied P forms and dynamics in organic horizons (Of/Oh) of temperate beech forest soils in Germany with contrasting soil P availability (P-poor and P-rich). We followed the fate of P from the litter into the soil pools, using isotopes as tracers (stable oxygen isotopes in water and phosphate and 33P) and relied on measurements in experimental forest sites and a three-months incubation experiment with litter addition. Using an isotopic dilution approach we were able to estimate gross (7 mg P kg‑1 d‑1 over the first month) and net mineralization rates (about 5 mg P kg‑1 d‑1 over the first 10 days) in the P-poor soil. In this soil the immobilization of P in the microbial biomass ranged from 20 to 40% of gross mineralization during the incubation, meaning that a considerable part of mineralized P contributed to replenish the available P pool. In the P-rich soil, physicochemical processes dominated exchangeable P to the point that the contribution of biological/biochemical processes was non-detectable. Oxygen isotopes in phosphate elucidated that organic P mineralization by enzymatic hydrolysis gains more importance with decreasing P availability, both under controlled and under field conditions. In summary, microbial processes dominated P

  5. Spatial distributions of sulphur species and sulphate-reducing bacteria provide insights into sulphur redox cycling and biodegradation hot-spots in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    Einsiedl, Florian; Pilloni, Giovanni; Ruth-Anneser, Bettina; Lueders, Tillman; Griebler, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) has been proven to be one of the most relevant redox reactions in the biodegradation of contaminants in groundwater. However, the possible role of sulphur species of intermediate oxidation state, as well as the role of potential re-oxidative sulphur cycling in biodegradation particularly at the groundwater table are still poorly understood. Here we used a combination of stable isotope measurements of SO42-, H2S, and S0 as well as geochemical profiling of sulphur intermediates with special emphasis on SO32-, S2O32-, and S0 to unravel possible sulphur cycling in the biodegradation of aromatics in a hydrocarbon-contaminated porous aquifer. By linking these results to the quantification of total bacterial rRNA genes and respiratory genes of sulphate reducers, as well as pyrotag sequencing of bacterial communities over depth, light is shed on possible key-organisms involved. Our results substantiate the role of DSR in biodegradation of hydrocarbons (mainly toluene) in the highly active plume fringes above and beneath the plume core. In both zones the concentration of sulphur intermediates (S0, SO32- and S2O32-) was almost twice that of other sampling-depths, indicating intense sulphur redox cycling. The dual isotopic fingerprint of oxygen and sulphur in dissolved sulphate suggested a re-oxidation of reduced sulphur compounds to sulphate especially at the upper fringe zone. An isotopic shift in δ34S of S0 of nearly +4‰ compared to the δ34S values of H2S from the same depth linked to a high abundance (∼10%) of sequence reads related to Sulphuricurvum spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) in the same depth were indicative of intensive oxidation of S0 to sulphate in this zone. At the lower plume fringe S0 constituted the main inorganic sulphur species, possibly formed by abiotic re-oxidation of H2S with Fe(III)oxides subsequent to sulphate reduction. These results provide first insights into intense sulphur redox cycling in a hydrocarbon

  6. Knock-down of pantothenate kinase 2 severely affects the development of the nervous and vascular system in zebrafish, providing new insights into PKAN disease

    Zizioli, Daniela; Tiso, Natascia; Guglielmi, Adele; Saraceno, Claudia; Busolin, Giorgia; Giuliani, Roberta; Khatri, Deepak; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe; Argenton, Francesco; Finazzi, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate Kinase Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive disorder with mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2), encoding an essential enzyme for Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. The molecular connection between defects in this enzyme and the neurodegenerative phenotype observed in PKAN patients is still poorly understood. We exploited the zebrafish model to study the role played by the pank2 gene during embryonic development and get new insight into PKAN pat...

  7. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    Abou-Ras, D.; Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-01

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe2 solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe2 layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w2 and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  8. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe2 solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe2 layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w2 and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements

  9. Novel Teleost CD4-Bearing Cell Populations Provide Insights into the Evolutionary Origins and Primordial Roles of CD4+ Lymphocytes and CD4+ Macrophages.

    Takizawa, Fumio; Magadan, Susana; Parra, David; Xu, Zhen; Korytář, Tomáš; Boudinot, Pierre; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2016-06-01

    Tetrapods contain a single CD4 coreceptor with four Ig domains that likely arose from a primordial two-domain ancestor. Notably, teleost fish contain two CD4 genes. Like tetrapod CD4, CD4-1 of rainbow trout includes four Ig domains, whereas CD4-2 contains only two. Because CD4-2 is reminiscent of the prototypic two-domain CD4 coreceptor, we hypothesized that by characterizing the cell types bearing CD4-1 and CD4-2, we would shed light into the evolution and primordial roles of CD4-bearing cells. Using newly established mAbs against CD4-1 and CD4-2, we identified two bona-fide CD4(+) T cell populations: a predominant lymphocyte population coexpressing surface CD4-1 and CD4-2 (CD4 double-positive [DP]), and a minor subset expressing only CD4-2 (CD4-2 single-positive [SP]). Although both subsets produced equivalent levels of Th1, Th17, and regulatory T cell cytokines upon bacterial infection, CD4-2 SP lymphocytes were less proliferative and displayed a more restricted TCRβ repertoire. These data suggest that CD4-2 SP cells represent a functionally distinct population and may embody a vestigial CD4(+) T cell subset, the roles of which reflect those of primeval CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, we also describe the first CD4(+) monocyte/macrophage population in a nonmammalian species. Of all myeloid subsets, we found the CD4(+) population to be the most phagocytic, whereas CD4(+) lymphocytes lacked this capacity. This study fills in an important gap in the knowledge of teleost CD4-bearing leukocytes, thus revealing critical insights into the evolutionary origins and primordial roles of CD4(+) lymphocytes and CD4(+) monocytes/macrophages. PMID:27183628

  10. COOH-Terminal Clustering of Autoantibody and T-Cell Determinants on the Structure of GAD65 Provide Insights Into the Molecular Basis of Autoreactivity

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Hampe, Christiane S.; Arafat, Yasir; Law, Ruby H.P.; Banga, J. Paul; Mackay, Ian R.; Whisstock, James C.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Rowley, Merrill J. (UWASH); (King’s College); (Monash)

    2008-11-19

    To gain structural insights into the autoantigenic properties of GAD65 in type 1 diabetes, we analyzed experimental epitope mapping data in the context of the recently determined crystal structures of GAD65 and GAD67, to allow 'molecular positioning' of epitope sites for B- and T-cell reactivity. Data were assembled from analysis of reported effects of mutagenesis of GAD65 on its reactivity with a panel of 11 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), supplemented by use of recombinant Fab to cross-inhibit reactivity with GAD65 by radioimmunoprecipitation of the same mAbs. COOH-terminal region on GAD65 was the major autoantigenic site. B-cell epitopes were distributed within two separate clusters around different faces of the COOH-terminal domain. Inclusion of epitope sites in the pyridoxal phosphate- and NH{sub 2}-terminal domains was attributed to the juxtaposition of all three domains in the crystal structure. Epitope preferences of different mAbs to GAD65 aligned with different clinical expressions of type 1 diabetes. Epitopes for four of five known reactive T-cell sequences restricted by HLA DRB1*0401 were aligned to solvent-exposed regions of the GAD65 structure and colocalized within the two B-cell epitope clusters. The continuous COOH-terminal epitope region of GAD65 was structurally highly flexible and therefore differed markedly from the equivalent region of GAD67. Structural features could explain the differing antigenicity, and perhaps immunogenicity, of GAD65 versus GAD67. The proximity of B- and T-cell epitopes within the GAD65 structure suggests that antigen-antibody complexes may influence antigen processing by accessory cells and thereby T-cell reactivity.

  11. Dietary salt loading and ion-poor water exposure provide insight into the molecular physiology of the rainbow trout gill epithelium tight junction complex.

    Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-08-01

    This study utilized dietary salt loading and ion-poor water (IPW) exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to further understand the role of fish gill epithelium tight junction (TJ) physiology in salt and water balance. Gill morphology, biochemistry and molecular physiology were examined, with an emphasis on genes encoding TJ proteins. Fish were either fed a control or salt-enriched diet (~10 % NaCl) for 4 weeks prior to IPW exposure for 24 h. Serum [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and muscle moisture content were unaltered by salt feeding, but changed in response to IPW irrespective of diet. Dietary salt loading altered the morphology (reduced Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive cell numbers and surface exposure of mitochondrion-rich cells), biochemistry (decreased vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase activity) and molecular physiology (decreased nkaα1a and cftrII mRNA abundance) of the gill in a manner indicative of reduced active ion uptake activity. But in control fish and not salt-fed fish, gill mRNA abundance of nkaα1c increased and nbc decreased after IPW exposure. Genes encoding TJ proteins were typically either responsive to salt feeding or IPW, but select genes responded to combined experimental treatment (e.g. IPW responsive but only if fish were salt-fed). Therefore, using salt feeding and IPW exposure, new insights into what factors influence gill TJ proteins and the role that specific TJ proteins might play in regulating the barrier properties of the gill epithelium have been acquired. In particular, evidence suggests that TJ proteins in the gill epithelium, or the regulatory networks that control them, respond independently to external or internal stimuli. PMID:27083431

  12. The osteopontin-controlled switching of calcium oxalate monohydrate morphologies in artificial urine provides insights into the formation of papillary kidney stones.

    Langdon, Aaron; Grohe, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The protein osteopontin (OPN) plays an important role in preventing the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) kidney stones. To gain insight into these mechanisms, crystallization was induced by addition of human kidney OPN to artificial urine (ionic strength comparable to urine; without citrate), and the OPN-COM interaction studied using a combination of scanning electron (SEM) and confocal microscopy. By SEM, we found that increasing OPN concentrations formed large monoclinic penetration twins (no protein added) and, at higher concentrations (1-, 2μg/ml OPN), super and hyper twins with crystal habits not found in previous studies. For instance, the hyper twins indicate well-facetted gearwheel-like habits with "teeth" developed in all crystallographic directions. At OPN concentrations ≥2μg/ml, a switching to small dumbbell-shaped COM habits with fine-textured surfaces occurred. Confocal microscopy of these dumbbells indicates protein incorporation in almost the entire crystal structure (in contrast to facetted COM), proposing a threshold concentration of ∼2μg/ml OPN for the facetted to the non-facetted habit transformation. Both the gearwheel-like and the dumbbell-shaped habit are again found side-by-side (presumably triggered by OPN concentration gradients within the sample) in in-vitro formed conglomerates, which resemble cross-sections of papillary kidney stones. The abrupt transformation from facetted to non-facetted habits and the unique compliance of the two in-vitro formed habits with the two main morphologies found in papillary kidney stones propose that OPN is a main effector in direct stone-forming processes. Moreover, stone structures which exhibit these two morphologies side-by-side might serve as a novel indicator for OPN concentrations surrounding those structures. PMID:27362921

  13. Deep sequencing of viroid-derived small RNAs from grapevine provides new insights on the role of RNA silencing in plant-viroid interaction.

    Beatriz Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viroids are circular, highly structured, non-protein-coding RNAs that, usurping cellular enzymes and escaping host defense mechanisms, are able to replicate and move through infected plants. Similarly to viruses, viroid infections are associated with the accumulation of viroid-derived 21-24 nt small RNAs (vd-sRNAs with the typical features of the small interfering RNAs characteristic of RNA silencing, a sequence-specific mechanism involved in defense against invading nucleic acids and in regulation of gene expression in most eukaryotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain further insights on the genesis and possible role of vd-sRNAs in plant-viroid interaction, sRNAs isolated from Vitis vinifera infected by Hop stunt viroid (HSVd and Grapevine yellow speckle viroid 1 (GYSVd1 were sequenced by the high-throughput platform Solexa-Illumina, and the vd-sRNAs were analyzed. The large majority of HSVd- and GYSVd1-sRNAs derived from a few specific regions (hotspots of the genomic (+ and (- viroid RNAs, with a prevalence of those from the (- strands of both viroids. When grouped according to their sizes, vd-sRNAs always assumed a distribution with prominent 21-, 22- and 24-nt peaks, which, interestingly, mapped at the same hotspots. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show that different Dicer-like enzymes (DCLs target viroid RNAs, preferentially accessing to the same viroid domains. Interestingly, our results also suggest that viroid RNAs may interact with host enzymes involved in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, indicating more complex scenarios than previously thought for both vd-sRNAs genesis and possible interference with host gene expression.

  14. Radiocarbon measurements of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil CO2 efflux provide unique insights into the SOM dynamics of managed loblolly pine plantations

    Vogel, J. G.; Schuur, E. A.; Bracho, R.; Jokela, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    hundred years old. The soil CO2 efflux values outside the root and microbial end-members prevented a partitioning of soil CO2 efflux, but suggested that the decomposition of very old carbon was contributing significant amounts of CO2 to efflux. Overall, the insights gained from the radiocarbon measurements suggest that very old SOM may be actively decomposed in these forests and that intensive fertilization will result in a decrease in fine root inputs of C to the soil.

  15. Moving beyond silos: How do we provide distributed personalized medicine to pregnant women everywhere at scale? Insights from PRE-EMPT.

    von Dadelszen, Peter; Magee, Laura A; Payne, Beth A; Dunsmuir, Dustin T; Drebit, Sharla; Dumont, Guy A; Miller, Suellen; Norman, Jane; Pyne-Mercier, Lee; Shennan, Andrew H; Donnay, France; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2015-10-01

    While we believe that pre-eclampsia matters-because it remains a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide-we are convinced that the time has come to look beyond single clinical entities (e.g. pre-eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, obstetric sepsis) and to look for an integrated approach that will provide evidence-based personalized care to women wherever they encounter the health system. Accurate outcome prediction models are a powerful way to identify individuals at incrementally increased (and decreased) risks associated with a given condition. Integrating models with decision algorithms into mobile health (mHealth) applications could support community and first level facility healthcare providers to identify those women, fetuses, and newborns most at need of facility-based care, and to initiate lifesaving interventions in their communities prior to transportation. In our opinion, this offers the greatest opportunity to provide distributed individualized care at scale, and soon. PMID:26433496

  16. Genome-wide association identifies nine common variants associated with fasting proinsulin levels and provides new insights into the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes

    R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); J.R. Petrie (John); T. Forsen (Tom); C. Cooper (Cyrus); M. Franzosi; A. Hamsten (Anders); E. Ferrannini (Ele); M.S. Rios; C.-G. Östenson (Claes-Göran); K. Makrilakis (Konstantinos); T.J. Forsen (Tom); C. Osmond (Clive); C. Cooper (Charles); E.M. Dennison (Elaine); K. Jameson (Karen); A.A. Sayer; T. Kuulasmaa (Teemu); A. Stancáková (Alena); L. Lind (Lars); M.N. Mannila (Maria Nastase); H. Gu (Harvest); B. Zethelius (Björn); F. Turrini (Fabiola); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); L. Pascoe (Laura); A.C. Syvanen; E. Ahlqvist (Emma); M. Horikoshi (Momoko); D. Barnes (Daniel); C. Han (Chen); A.K. Manning (Alisa); D. Rybin (Denis); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); A.M. Barker (Adam); W. Xie (Weijia); E. Eury (Elodie); J. Kerr-Conte (Julie); F. Pattou (François); P.R.V. Johnson (Paul); M. Travers (Mary); R.R. Frants (Rune); P. Eriksson (Per); L. Folkersen (Lasse); F.M. van't Hooft (Ferdinand); L.J. Scott (Laura); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C. Dina (Christian); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); C. Huth (Cornelia); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L.J. McCulloch (Laura); T. Ferreira (Teresa); H. Grallert (Harald); G. Wu (Guanming); C.J. Willer (Cristen); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); S.A. McCarroll (Steve); C. Langenberg (Claudia); O.M. Hofmann (Oliver); J. Dupuis (Josée); L. Qi (Lu); M. van Hoek (Mandy); P. Navarro (Pau); K.G. Ardlie (Kristin); R. Benediktsson (Rafn); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R. Blagieva (Roza); E. Boerwinkle (Eric); K.B. Boström (Kristina Bengtsson); B. Bravenboer (Bert); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); N.P. Burtt (Noisël); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); P.S. Chines (Peter); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); G. Crawford (Gabe); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); K.S. Elliott (Katherine); A.L. Elliott (Amanda); C. Fox (Craig); C.S. Franklin (Christopher); M. Ganser (Martha); N. Grarup (Niels); T. Green (Todd); S. Griffin (Simon); C. Guiducci (Candace); S. Hadjadj (Samy); N. Hassanali (Neelam); C. Herder (Christian); A.U. Jackson (Anne); P.R.V. Johnson (Paul R.); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); N. Klopp (Norman); A. Kong (Augustine); P. Kraft (Peter); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); T. Lauritzen (Torsten); M. Li (Man); A. Lieverse (Aloysius); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); M. Marre (Michel); T. Meitinger (Thomas); K. Midthjell (Kristian); M.A. Morken (Mario); P. Nilsson (Peter); K.R. Owen (Katharine); F. Payne (Felicity); J.R.B. Perry (John R.); A.K. Petersen; C.P. Platou (Carl); C. Proença (Christine); I. Prokopenko (Inga); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); N.R. Robertson (Neil); G. Rocheleau (Ghislain); M. Roden (Michael); M.J. Sampson (Michael); R. Saxena (Richa); B.M. Shields (Beverley); P. Shrader (Peter); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); T. Sparsø (Thomas); K. Strassburger (Klaus); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Q. Sun (Qi); B. Thorand (Barbara); J. Tichet (Jean); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); R.M. van Dam (Rob); T.W. van Haeften (Timon); T.W. van Herpt (Thijs); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); G. Bragi Walters (G.); M.N. Weedon (Michael); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S. Cauchi (Stephane); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); T. Hansen (Torben); W.A. Hide (Winston); G.A. Hitman (Graham); D. Hunter (David); K. Hveem (Kristian); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Rudan (Igor); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); L.D. Stein (Lincoln); M. Walker (Mark); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F. Hu; J.B. Meigs (James); J.S. Pankow (James); O. Pedersen (Oluf); J.C. Florez (Jose); R. Sladek (Rob); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.F. Wilson (James F); T. Illig (Thomas); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); D. Altshuler (David); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); E.K. Speliote (Elizabeth); C.J. Wille (Cristen); S.I. Bernd (Sonja); K.L. Mond (Keri); G. Thorleifsso (Gudmar); H. Lango Allen (Hana); C.M. Lindgre (Cecilia); J. Lua (Jian'an); R. Mäg (Reedik); J.C. Randal (Joshua); S. Vedanta (Sailaja); T.W. Winkle (Thomas); T. Workalemah (Tsegaselassie); I.M. Hei (Iris); V. Steinthorsdotti (Valgerdur); H.M. Stringha (Heather); M.N. Weedo (Michael); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); M.M. Woo (Margaret M.); T. Ferreir (Teresa); R.J. Weyan (Robert); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. Estrad (Karol); J. Luan; J. Nemes (James); J.-H. Par (Ju-Hyun); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); T.O. Kilpeläine (Tuomas); J. Yang (Joanna); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); T. Esko (Tõnu); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); M. Mangino (Massimo); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); R.P. Welch (Ryan); J.H. Zhao; K.K.H. Aben (Katja); D. Absher (Devin); N. Amin (Najaf); A.L. Dixon (Anna); E. Fisher (Eva); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); M.E. Goddard (Michael); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); V. Hoesel (Volker); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); S. Ketkar (Shamika); C. Lamina (Claudia); S. Li (Shengxu); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); R.H. Myers (Richard); N. Narisu (Narisu); J.R.B. Perry (John); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); S. Ripatti (Samuli); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); C. Sandholt (Camilla); L.J. Scott (Laura); N. Timpson (Nicholas); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); R.M. Watanabe (Richard); C.C. White (Charles); F. Wiklund (Fredrik); C. Barlassina (Christina); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); J.-O. Jansson (John-Olov); R.W. Lawrence (Robert); N. Pellikka (Niina); J. Shi (Jianxin); E. Thiering (Eelisabeth); H. Alavere (Helene); M.T.S. Alibrandi (Maria); P. Almgren (Peter); A.M. Arnold (Alice); T. Aspelund (Thor); L.D. Atwood (Larry); B. Balkau (Beverley); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); Y. Ben-Shlomo; R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); H. Biebermann (Heike); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); T. Boes (Tanja); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); T.A. Buchanan (Thomas); F. Busonero; H. Campbell (Harry); F.P. Cappuccio (Francesco); C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); Y.D. Ida Chen; C.-M. Chen (Chih-Mei); R. Clarke; L. 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Kettunen (Johannes); L. Kinnunen (Leena); I. Kolcic (Ivana); I.R. König (Inke); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); P. Kraft (Peter); K. Kvaløy (Kirsti); J. Laitinen (Jaana); O. Lantieri (Olivier); C. Lanzani (Chiara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); R.N. Luben (Robert); B. Ludwig (Barbara); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); M. Marre (Michel); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A. McCarthy (Anne); B. McKnight (Barbara); T. Meitinger (Thomas); O. Melander (Olle); D. Meyre (David); K. Midthjell (Kristian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); R. Mulic (Rosanda); J.S. Ngwa; M. Nelis (Mari); M.J. Neville (Matthew); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); C.J. O'Donnel (Christopher); S. O'Rahilly (Stephen); K.K. Ong (Ken); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); M. Perola (Markus); I. Pichler (Irene); K.H. 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Ouwehand (Willem); A. Hall (Anne); J.R. Thompson (John); K. Stefansson (Kari); R. Roberts (Robert); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); R. McPherson (Ruth); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Hopewell; S. Parish (Sharon); A. Offer (Alison); L. Bowman; P. Sleight (Peter); S. Armitage (Shane); R. Peto (R.); R. Collins (Rory); J.C. Chambers (John); N. Ahmed (Nabeel); M. Caulfield (Mark); P. Donnelly (Peter); P. Elliott (Paul); P. Froguel (Philippe); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Scott (James); J.S. Sehmi (Joban); W. Zhang (Weihua); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); M. Sabater-Lleal (Maria); A. Mälarstig (Anders); B. Sennblad (Bengt); J. Öhrvik (John); A. Silveira (Angela); F. van't Hooft (Ferdinand); P. Eriksson (Per); A. Hamsten (Anders); M.-L. Hellénius (Mai-Lis); G. Olsson; S. Rust (Stephan); G. Assmann (Gerd); U. Seedorf (Udo); S. Barlera (Simona); M.G. Franzosi; G. Tognoni; R. Clarke (Robert); P. Linksted (Pamela); J. Hopewell; F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Peden (John); A. Goel (Anuj); H. Ongen (Halit); T. Kyriakou (Theodosios); F. Green (Fiona); M. Farrall (Martin); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Saleheen; A. Rasheed (Asif); M.A. Zaidi (Aghar); N. Shah (Nisha); M. Samuel (Maria); C.B. Mallick (Chandana Basu); M. Azhar (Muhammad); K.S. Zaman (Khan Shah); A. Samad (Adbus); M. Ishaq (Muhammad); A. Gardezi (Ali); F.-R. Memon (Fazal-ur-Rehman); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); R. Frossard; P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J. Danesh (John)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstractOBJECTIVE - Proinsulin is a precursor of mature insulin and C-peptide. Higher circulating proinsulin levels are associated with impaired b-cell function, raised glucose levels, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies of the insulin processing pathway could provide new

  17. Systematic analysis of adaptations in aerobic capacity and submaximal energy metabolism provides a unique insight into determinants of human aerobic performance

    Vollaard, Niels B J; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dimitru; Fredriksson, Katarina;

    2009-01-01

    Deltalactate (r(2) = 0.32; P < 0.01), and Deltaacetyl-carnitine (r(2) = 0.29; P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that improvements in high-intensity aerobic performance in humans are not related to altered maximal oxygen transport capacity. Altered muscle metabolism may provide the link between training...

  18. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Weill-Med)

    2010-11-11

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD{sup +} in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD{sup +} homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD{sup +}-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  19. A Unique Set of the Burkholderia Collagen-Like Proteins Provides Insight into Pathogenesis, Genome Evolution and Niche Adaptation, and Infection Detection

    Bachert, Beth A.; Choi, Soo J.; Snyder, Anna K.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Durney, Brandon C.; Holland, Lisa A.; Amemiya, Kei; Welkos, Susan L.; Bozue, Joel A.; Cote, Christopher K.; Berisio, Rita; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, classified as category B priority pathogens, are significant human and animal pathogens that are highly infectious and broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant. Currently, the pathogenicity mechanisms utilized by Burkholderia are not fully understood, and correct diagnosis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei infection remains a challenge due to limited detection methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of a set of 13 novel Burkholderia coll...

  20. Rare loss-of-function mutation in complement component C3 provides insight into molecular and pathophysiological determinants of complement activity

    Sfyroera, Georgia; Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S.; Chen, Hui; Wu, Emilia L.; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma protein C3 is a central element in the activation and effector functions of the complement system. A hereditary dysfunction of C3 that prevents complement activation via the alternative pathway (AP) was described previously in a Swedish family, but its genetic cause and molecular consequences have remained elusive. Here we provide these missing links by pinpointing the dysfunction to a point mutation in the β-chain of C3 (c.1180T>C; p.Met373Thr). In the patient’s plasma, AP activit...

  1. Population structure and historical demography of South American sea lions provide insights into the catastrophic decline of a marine mammal population.

    Hoffman, J I; Kowalski, G J; Klimova, A; Eberhart-Phillips, L J; Staniland, I J; Baylis, A M M

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the causes of population decline is crucial for conservation management. We therefore used genetic analysis both to provide baseline data on population structure and to evaluate hypotheses for the catastrophic decline of the South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens) at the Falkland Islands (Malvinas) in the South Atlantic. We genotyped 259 animals from 23 colonies across the Falklands at 281 bp of the mitochondrial hypervariable region and 22 microsatellites. A weak signature of population structure was detected, genetic diversity was moderately high in comparison with other pinniped species, and no evidence was found for the decline being associated with a strong demographic bottleneck. By combining our mitochondrial data with published sequences from Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru, we also uncovered strong maternally directed population structure across the geographical range of the species. In particular, very few shared haplotypes were found between the Falklands and South America, and this was reflected in correspondingly low migration rate estimates. These findings do not support the prominent hypothesis that the decline was caused by migration to Argentina, where large-scale commercial harvesting operations claimed over half a million animals. Thus, our study not only provides baseline data for conservation management but also reveals the potential for genetic studies to shed light upon long-standing questions pertaining to the history and fate of natural populations. PMID:27493782

  2. Population structure and historical demography of South American sea lions provide insights into the catastrophic decline of a marine mammal population

    Hoffman, J. I.; Kowalski, G. J.; Klimova, A.; Staniland, I. J.; Baylis, A. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causes of population decline is crucial for conservation management. We therefore used genetic analysis both to provide baseline data on population structure and to evaluate hypotheses for the catastrophic decline of the South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens) at the Falkland Islands (Malvinas) in the South Atlantic. We genotyped 259 animals from 23 colonies across the Falklands at 281 bp of the mitochondrial hypervariable region and 22 microsatellites. A weak signature of population structure was detected, genetic diversity was moderately high in comparison with other pinniped species, and no evidence was found for the decline being associated with a strong demographic bottleneck. By combining our mitochondrial data with published sequences from Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru, we also uncovered strong maternally directed population structure across the geographical range of the species. In particular, very few shared haplotypes were found between the Falklands and South America, and this was reflected in correspondingly low migration rate estimates. These findings do not support the prominent hypothesis that the decline was caused by migration to Argentina, where large-scale commercial harvesting operations claimed over half a million animals. Thus, our study not only provides baseline data for conservation management but also reveals the potential for genetic studies to shed light upon long-standing questions pertaining to the history and fate of natural populations. PMID:27493782

  3. NCALM's Lessons Learned and Insights into the Future from Ten + Years of Providing Geodetic Images for the monitoring of Hazards and the Response to Disasters

    Fernandez Diaz, J. C.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Sartori, M. P.; Singhania, A.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping NCALM was created in 2003 through a grant from and National Science Foundation to support the use of airborne laser swath mapping technology (ALSM aka LiDAR) by the scientific community. NCALM's main goals are to provide research quality airborne LiDAR observations to the scientific community, to advance the state of the art in airborne laser mapping, and to train and educate graduate students with knowledge of airborne mapping to meet the needs of private industry, government agencies and academic institutions. Even before its creation, NCALM researchers had been exploring the application of LiDAR technologies for the monitoring of Geohazards and the response and recovery from man-made and natural disasters. Some of these applications include: mapping debris caused by the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks in New York; mapping thousands of km of faults along the Pacific coast of the US extending from Southern California to Alaska, through the OSU/USGS B4 and UNAVCO EarthScope projects; mapping of lava fields in Hawaii; mapping post-forest-fire zones in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA and Valles Caldera, NM; mapping beach erosion/deposition induced by hurricanes along the Panhandle and Atlantic coasts of Florida; rapid-response mapping of the Iowa river floods in 2008 and the El Mayor - Cucapah Earthquake in 2010. The experience gained and lessons learned by NCALM regarding the long term monitoring of hazards for the preparation, response and recovery of disasters range from navigating the regulatory and logistic challenges of being present in a disaster area, to the production of real-time geodetic imagery and data for support of the authorities, to performing change detection (surface deformation, sediment transport, infrastructure damage) using LiDAR data products obtained by different vendors, with different equipment and operated under different specifications. End users of the information uniquely provided by

  4. The glove-like structure of the conserved membrane protein TatC provides insight into signal sequence recognition in twin-arginine translocation.

    Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Abrol, Ravinder; Suloway, Christian J M; Clemons, William M

    2013-05-01

    In bacteria, two signal-sequence-dependent secretion pathways translocate proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Although the mechanism of the ubiquitous general secretory pathway is becoming well understood, that of the twin-arginine translocation pathway, responsible for translocation of folded proteins across the bilayer, is more mysterious. TatC, the largest and most conserved of three integral membrane components, provides the initial binding site of the signal sequence prior to pore assembly. Here, we present two crystal structures of TatC from the thermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus at 4.0 Å and 6.8 Å resolution. The membrane architecture of TatC includes a glove-shaped structure with a lipid-exposed pocket predicted by molecular dynamics to distort the membrane. Correlating the biochemical literature to these results suggests that the signal sequence binds in this pocket, leading to structural changes that facilitate higher order assemblies. PMID:23583035

  5. A whole mitochondria analysis of the Tyrolean Iceman’s leather provides insights into the animal sources of Copper Age clothing

    O’Sullivan, Niall J.; Teasdale, Matthew D.; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Maixner, Frank; Pinhasi, Ron; Bradley, Daniel G.; Zink, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The attire of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old natural mummy from the Ötzal Italian Alps, provides a surviving example of ancient manufacturing technologies. Research into his garments has however, been limited by ambiguity surrounding their source species. Here we present a targeted enrichment and sequencing of full mitochondrial genomes sampled from his clothes and quiver, which elucidates the species of production for nine fragments. Results indicate that the majority of the samples originate from domestic ungulate species (cattle, sheep and goat), whose recovered haplogroups are now at high frequency in today’s domestic populations. Intriguingly, the hat and quiver samples were produced from wild species, brown bear and roe deer respectively. Combined, these results suggest that Copper Age populations made considered choices of clothing material from both the wild and domestic populations available to them. Moreover, these results show the potential for the recovery of complete mitochondrial genomes from degraded prehistoric artefacts. PMID:27537861

  6. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of tamoxifen and its metabolites in women of different CYP2D6 phenotypes provides new insight into the tamoxifen mass balance

    Kristin eDickschen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen is a first-line endocrine agent in the mechanism-based treatment of estrogen receptor positive (ER+ mammary carcinoma and applied to breast cancer patients all over the world. Endoxifen is a secondary and highly active metabolite of tamoxifen that is formed among others by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6. It is widely accepted that CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (PM exert a pronounced decrease in endoxifen steady-state plasma concentrations compared to CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers (EM. Nevertheless, an in-depth understanding of the chain of cause and effect between CYP2D6 genotype, endoxifen steady-state plasma concentration, and subsequent tamoxifen treatment benefit still remains to be evolved.In this context, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK-modeling provides a useful tool to mechanistically investigate the impact of CYP2D6 phenotype on endoxifen formation in female breast cancer patients undergoing tamoxifen therapy.It has long been thought that only a minor percentage of endoxifen is formed via 4-hydroxytamoxifen. However, the current investigation supports very recently published data that postulates a contribution of 4-hydroxytamoxifen above 20 % to total endoxifen formation. The developed PBPK-model describes tamoxifen PK in rats and humans. Moreover, tamoxifen metabolism in dependence of CYP2D6 phenotype in populations of European female individuals is well described, thus providing a good basis to further investigate the linkage of PK, mode of action, and treatment outcome in dependence of factors such as phenotype, ethnicity or co-treatment with CYP2D6 inhibitors.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification of Jatropha curcas Aquaporin Genes and the Comparative Analysis Provides Insights into the Gene Family Expansion and Evolution in Hevea brasiliensis.

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Gong, Jun; Mo, Yeyong; Wang, Jikun; Cao, Jianhua; An, Feng; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are channel-forming integral membrane proteins that transport water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Despite the vital role of AQPs, to date, little is known in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), an important non-edible oilseed crop with great potential for the production of biodiesel. In this study, 32 AQP genes were identified from the physic nut genome and the family number is relatively small in comparison to 51 in another Euphorbiaceae plant, rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the JcAQPs were assigned to five subfamilies, i.e., nine plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), nine tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), eight NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), two X intrinsic proteins (XIPs), and four small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs). Like rubber tree and other plant species, functional prediction based on the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter, Froger's positions, and specificity-determining positions showed a remarkable difference in substrate specificity among subfamilies of JcAQPs. Genome-wide comparative analysis revealed the specific expansion of PIP and TIP subfamilies in rubber tree and the specific gene loss of the XIP subfamily in physic nut. Furthermore, by analyzing deep transcriptome sequencing data, the expression evolution especially the expression divergence of duplicated HbAQP genes was also investigated and discussed. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of Jc/HbAQP genes, but also provide a useful reference to survey the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceae plants and other plant species. PMID:27066041

  8. Genome-wide identification of Jatropha curcas aquaporin genes and the comparative analysis provides insights into the gene family expansion and evolution in Hevea brasiliensis

    Zhi eZou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are channel-forming integral membrane proteins that transport water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Despite the vital role of AQPs, to date, little is known in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae, an important non-edible oilseed crop with great potential for the production of biodiesel. In this study, 32 AQP genes were identified from the physic nut genome and the family number is relatively small in comparison to 51 in another Euphorbiaceae plant, rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.. Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the JcAQPs were assigned to five subfamilies, i.e., 9 plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs, 9 tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs, 8 NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs, 2 X intrinsic proteins (XIPs and 4 small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs. Like rubber tree and other plant species, functional prediction based on the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter, Froger’s positions and specificity-determining positions showed a remarkable difference in substrate specificity among subfamilies of JcAQPs. Genome-wide comparative analysis revealed the specific expansion of PIP and TIP subfamilies in rubber tree and the specific gene loss of the XIP subfamily in physic nut. Furthermore, by analyzing deep transcriptome sequencing data, the expression evolution especially the expression divergence of duplicated HbAQP genes was also investigated and discussed. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of Jc/HbAQP genes, but also provide a useful reference to survey the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceae plants and other plant species.

  9. Dilution of 10Be in detrital quartz by earthquake-induced landslides: Implications for determining denudation rates and potential to provide insights into landslide sediment dynamics

    West, A. Joshua; Hetzel, Ralf; Li, Gen; Jin, Zhangdong; Zhang, Fei; Hilton, Robert G.; Densmore, Alexander L.

    2014-06-01

    The concentration of 10Be in detrital quartz (10Beqtz) from river sediments is now widely used to quantify catchment-wide denudation rates but may also be sensitive to inputs from bedrock landslides that deliver sediment with low 10Beqtz. Major landslide-triggering events can provide large amounts of low-concentration material to rivers in mountain catchments, but changes in river sediment 10Beqtz due to such events have not yet been measured directly. Here we examine the impact of widespread landslides triggered by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake on 10Beqtz in sediment samples from the Min Jiang river basin, in Sichuan, China. Landslide deposit material associated with the Wenchuan earthquake has consistently lower 10Beqtz than in river sediment prior to the earthquake. River sediment 10Beqtz decreased significantly following the earthquake downstream of areas of high coseismic landslide occurrence (i.e., with greater than ∼0.3% of the upstream catchment area affected by landslides), because of input of the 10Be-depleted landslide material, but showed no systematic changes where landslide occurrence was low. Changes in river sediment 10Beqtz concentration were largest in small first-order catchments but were still significant in large river basins with areas of 104-105 km. Spatial and temporal variability in river sediment 10Beqtz has important implications for inferring representative denudation rates in tectonically active, landslide-dominated environments, even in large basins. Although the dilution of 10Beqtz in river sediment by landslide inputs may complicate interpretation of denudation rates, it also may provide a possible opportunity to track the transport of landslide sediment. The associated uncertainties are large, but in the Wenchuan case, calculations based on 10Be mixing proportions suggest that river sediment fluxes in the 2-3 years following the earthquake increased by a similar order of magnitude in the 0.25-1 mm and the sediment transfer, with

  10. De novo transcriptome assembly of a Chinese locoweed (Oxytropis ochrocephala species provides insights into genes associated with drought, salinity and cold tolerance

    Wei eHe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoweeds (toxic Oxytropis and Astraglus species, containing the toxic agent swainsonine, pose serious threats to animal husbandry on grasslands in both China and the US. Some locoweeds have evolved adaptations in order to resist various stress conditions such as drought, salt and cold. As a result they replace other plants in their communities and become an ecological problem. Currently very limited genetic information of locoweeds is available and this hinders our understanding in the molecular basis of their environmental plasticity, and the interaction between locoweeds and their symbiotic swainsonine producing endophytes. Next-generation sequencing provides a means of obtaining transcriptomic sequences in a timely manner, which is particularly useful for non-model plants. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of Oxytropis ochrocephala plants followed by a de nove assembly. Our primary aim was to provide an enriched pool of genetic sequences of an Oxytropis sp. for further locoweed research. Results: Transcriptomes of four different O. ochrocephala samples, from control (CK plants, and those that had experienced either drought (20% PEG, salt (150 mM NaCl or cold (4 °C stress were sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. From 232,209,506 clean reads 23,220,950,600 (~23 G nucleotides, 182,430 transcripts and 88,942 unigenes were retrieved, with an N50 value of 1,237. Differential expression analysis revealed putative genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs and late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins, enzymes in secondary metabolite and plant hormone biosyntheses, and transcription factors which are involved in stress tolerance in O. ochrocephala. In order to validate our sequencing results, we further analyzed the expression profiles of nine genes by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we discuss the possible mechanism of O. ochrocephala’s adaptations to stress environment. Conclusion: Our

  11. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  12. Genomic Analyses of Cladophialophora bantiana, a Major Cause of Cerebral Phaeohyphomycosis Provides Insight into Its Lifestyle, Virulence and Adaption in Host.

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Cham, Chun Yoong; Singh, Gurmit; Yew, Su Mei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Chong, Pei-Sin; Toh, Yue Fen; Atiya, Nadia; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2016-01-01

    Cladophialophora bantiana is a dematiaceous fungus with a predilection for causing central nervous system (CNS) infection manifesting as brain abscess in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. In this paper, we report comprehensive genomic analyses of C. bantiana isolated from the brain abscess of an immunocompetent man, the first reported case in Malaysia and Southeast Asia. The identity of the fungus was determined using combined morphological analysis and multilocus phylogeny. The draft genome sequence of a neurotrophic fungus, C. bantiana UM 956 was generated using Illumina sequencing technology to dissect its genetic fundamental and basic biology. The assembled 37.1 Mb genome encodes 12,155 putative coding genes, of which, 1.01% are predicted transposable elements. Its genomic features support its saprophytic lifestyle, renowned for its versatility in decomposing hemicellulose and pectin components. The C. bantiana UM 956 was also found to carry some important putative genes that engaged in pathogenicity, iron uptake and homeostasis as well as adaptation to various stresses to enable the organism to survive in hostile microenvironment. This wealth of resource will further catalyse more downstream functional studies to provide better understanding on how this fungus can be a successful and persistent pathogen in human. PMID:27570972

  13. The structural basis of chicken, swine and bovine CD8αα dimers provides insight into the co-evolution with MHC I in endotherm species

    Liu, Yanjie; Li, Xin; Qi, Jianxun; Zhang, Nianzhi; Xia, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the pivotal molecules of the adaptive immune system (AIS) maintain their inherent characteristics and relationships with their co-receptors over the course of co-evolution. CD8α, a fundamental but simple AIS component with only one immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain, is a good example with which to explore this question because it can fold correctly to form homodimers (CD8αα) and interact with peptide-MHC I (p/MHC I) with low sequence identities between different species. Hereby, we resolved the crystal structures of chicken, swine and bovine CD8αα. They are typical homodimers consisting of two symmetric IgV domains with distinct species specificities. The CD8αα structures indicated that a few highly conserved residues are important in CD8 dimerization and in interacting with p/MHC I. The dimerization of CD8αα mainly depends on the pivotal residues on the dimer interface; in particular, four aromatic residues provide many intermolecular forces and contact areas. Three residues on the surface of CD8α connecting cavities that formed most of the hydrogen bonds with p/MHC I were also completely conserved. Our data propose that a few key conserved residues are able to ensure the CD8α own structural characteristics despite the great sequence variation that occurs during evolution in endotherms. PMID:27122108

  14. The structural basis of chicken, swine and bovine CD8αα dimers provides insight into the co-evolution with MHC I in endotherm species.

    Liu, Yanjie; Li, Xin; Qi, Jianxun; Zhang, Nianzhi; Xia, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the pivotal molecules of the adaptive immune system (AIS) maintain their inherent characteristics and relationships with their co-receptors over the course of co-evolution. CD8α, a fundamental but simple AIS component with only one immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain, is a good example with which to explore this question because it can fold correctly to form homodimers (CD8αα) and interact with peptide-MHC I (p/MHC I) with low sequence identities between different species. Hereby, we resolved the crystal structures of chicken, swine and bovine CD8αα. They are typical homodimers consisting of two symmetric IgV domains with distinct species specificities. The CD8αα structures indicated that a few highly conserved residues are important in CD8 dimerization and in interacting with p/MHC I. The dimerization of CD8αα mainly depends on the pivotal residues on the dimer interface; in particular, four aromatic residues provide many intermolecular forces and contact areas. Three residues on the surface of CD8α connecting cavities that formed most of the hydrogen bonds with p/MHC I were also completely conserved. Our data propose that a few key conserved residues are able to ensure the CD8α own structural characteristics despite the great sequence variation that occurs during evolution in endotherms. PMID:27122108

  15. Fasciola hepatica: a light and electron microscope study of the ovary and of the development of oocytes within eggs in the uterus provides an insight into reproductive strategy.

    Hanna, R E B; Moffett, D; Forster, F I; Trudgett, A G; Brennan, G P; Fairweather, I

    2016-05-15

    The ultrastructure of the ovary of Fasciola hepatica collected from field-infected sheep, was compared with that of flukes from laboratory-infected rats harbouring the Oberon or the Cullompton fluke isolate. At the periphery of the ovarian tubules, in all flukes, interstitial tissue was identified that appears to provide physical support and facilitate the metabolism of the germinal-line cells. Oogonia undergo mitotic division to maintain the cell population and to produce oocytes. Early oocytes feature conspicuous synaptonemal complexes in the nucleoplasm, and these become less evident as the oocytes grow in size, move towards the core of the ovarian tubule, and synthesise osmiophilic bodies. The latter may represent cortical granules, and serve to block polyspermy. The identity of the synaptonemal complexes was confirmed by immunocytochemical labelling of synaptonemal proteins. The occurrence of synaptonemal complexes in the oocytes of all fluke types examined indicates that pairing of bivalent chromosomes, with the potential for genetic recombination and chiasmata formation, is a feature of the triploid aspermic parthenogenetic Cullompton flukes, as well as of the wild-type out-breeding field-derived and Oberon isolate flukes. In oocytes within shelled eggs in the proximal uterus of all flukes, condensed chromosomes align at meiotic metaphase plates. Following the reduction division, two equal pronuclei appear in each oocyte in the distal uterus. On the basis of these observations, a mechanism of facultative parthenogenesis for F. hepatica is proposed that accommodates the survival and clonal expansion of triploid aspermic isolates. PMID:27084479

  16. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into Immune Related Genes and the RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway in the Freshwater Planarian (Dugesia japonica.

    Qiuxiang Pang

    Full Text Available The freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica (D. japonica possesses extraordinary ability to regenerate lost organs or body parts. Interestingly, in the process of regeneration, there is little wound infection, suggesting that D. japonica has a formidable innate immune system. The importance of immune system prompted us to search for immune-related genes and RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways.Transcriptome sequencing of D. japonica was performed on an IlluminaHiSeq2000 platform. A total of 27,180 transcripts were obtained by Trinity assembler. CEGMA analysis and mapping of all trimmed reads back to the assembly result showed that our transcriptome assembly covered most of the whole transcriptome. 23,888 out of 27,180 transcripts contained ORF (open reading fragment, and were highly similar to those in Schistosoma mansoni using BLASTX analysis. 8,079 transcripts (29.7% and 8,668 (31.9% were annotated by Blast2GO and KEGG respectively. A DYNLRB-like gene was cloned to verify its roles in the immune response. Finally, the expression patterns of 4 genes (RIG-I, TRAF3, TRAF6, P38 in the RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were detected, and the results showed they are very likely to be involved in planarian immune response.RNA-Seq analysis based on the next-generation sequencing technology was an efficient approach to discover critical genes and to understand their corresponding biological functions. Through GO and KEGG analysis, several critical and conserved signaling pathways and genes related to RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway were identified. Four candidate genes were selected to identify their expression dynamics in the process of pathogen stimulation. These annotated transcripts of D. japonica provide a useful resource for subsequent investigation of other important pathways.

  17. Complex Haploinsufficiency-Based Genetic Analysis of the NDR/Lats Kinase Cbk1 Provides Insight into Its Multiple Functions in Candida albicans.

    Saputo, Sarah; Norman, Kaitlyn L; Murante, Thomas; Horton, Brooke N; Diaz, Jacinto De La Cruz; DiDone, Louis; Colquhoun, Jennifer; Schroeder, Jeremy W; Simmons, Lyle A; Kumar, Anuj; Krysan, Damian J

    2016-07-01

    Although the analysis of genetic interactions and networks is a powerful approach to understanding biology, it has not been applied widely to the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans Here, we describe the use of both screening and directed genetic interaction studies based on complex haploinsufficiency to probe the function of the R: egulation of A: ce2 and M: orphogenesis (RAM) pathway in C. albicans A library of 5200 Tn7-mutagenized derivatives of a parental strain heterozygous at CBK1, the key kinase in the RAM pathway, was screened for alterations in serum-induced filamentation. Following confirmation of phenotypes and identification of insertion sites by sequencing, a set of 36 unique double heterozygous strains showing complex haploinsufficiency was obtained. In addition to a large set of genes regulated by the RAM transcription factor Ace2, genes related to cell wall biosynthesis, cell cycle, polarity, oxidative stress, and nitrogen utilization were identified. Follow-up analysis led to the first demonstration that the RAM pathway is required for oxidative stress tolerance in a manner related to the two-component-regulated kinase Chk1 and revealed a potential direct connection between the RAM pathway and the essential Mps1 spindle pole-related kinase. In addition, genetic interactions with CDC42-related genes MSB1, a putative scaffold protein, and RGD3, a putative Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP) were identified. We also provide evidence that Rgd3 is a GAP for Cdc42 and show that its localization and phosphorylation are dependent on Cbk1. PMID:27206715

  18. Real time enzyme inhibition assays provide insights into differences in binding of neuraminidase inhibitors to wild type and mutant influenza viruses.

    Susan Barrett

    Full Text Available The influenza neuraminidase (NA inhibitors zanamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir were all designed based on the knowledge that the transition state analogue of the cleaved sialic acid, 2-deoxy,2,3-dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (DANA was a weak inhibitor of NA. While DANA bound rapidly to the NA, modifications leading to the improved potency of these new inhibitors also conferred a time dependent or slow binding phenotype. Many mutations in the NA leading to decreased susceptibility result in loss of slow binding, hence this is a phenotypic marker of many but not all resistant NAs. We present here a simplified approach to determine whether an inhibitor is fast or slow binding by extending the endpoint fluorescent enzyme inhibition assay to a real time assay and monitoring the changes in IC(50s with time. We carried out two reactions, one with a 30 min preincubation with inhibitor and the second without. The enzymatic reaction was started via addition of substrate and IC(50s were calculated after each 10 min interval up to 60 min. Results showed that without preincubation IC(50s for the wild type viruses started high and although they decreased continuously over the 60 min reaction time the final IC(50s remained higher than for pre-incubated samples. These results indicate a slow equilibrium of association and dissociation and are consistent with slow binding of the inhibitors. In contrast, for viruses with decreased susceptibility, preincubation had minimal effect on the IC(50s, consistent with fast binding. Therefore this modified assay provides additional phenotypic information about the rate of inhibitor binding in addition to the IC(50, and critically demonstrates the differential effect of incubation times on the IC(50 and K(i values of wild type and mutant viruses for each of the inhibitors.

  19. Transcriptional Profiling of Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-induced Spleen Atrophy Provides Mechanistic Insights into its Immunotoxicity in MutaMouse.

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Long, Alexandra S; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Gagné, Rémi; Kennedy, Dean A; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M; White, Paul A; Yauk, Carole L

    2016-01-01

    Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) is the most carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) examined to date. We investigated the immunotoxicity of DBC, manifested as spleen atrophy, following acute exposure of adult MutaMouse males by oral gavage. Mice were exposed to 0, 2.0, 6.2, or 20.0 mg DBC /kg-bw per day, for 3 days. Genotoxic endpoints (DBC-DNA adducts and lacZ mutant frequency in spleen and bone marrow, and red blood cell micronucleus frequency) and global gene expression changes were measured. All of the genotoxicity measures increased in a dose-dependent manner in spleen and bone marrow. Gene expression analysis showed that DBC activates p53 signaling pathways related to cellular growth and proliferation, which was evident even at the low dose. Strikingly, the expression profiles of DBC exposed mouse spleens were highly inversely correlated with the expression profiles of the only published toxicogenomics dataset of enlarged mouse spleen. This analysis suggested a central role for Bnip3l, a pro-apoptotic protein involved in negative regulation of erythroid maturation. RT-PCR confirmed expression changes in several genes related to apoptosis, iron metabolism, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling that are regulated in the opposite direction during spleen atrophy versus benzo[a]pyrene-mediated splenomegaly. In addition, benchmark dose modeling of toxicogenomics data yielded toxicity estimates that are very close to traditional toxicity endpoints. This work illustrates the power of toxicogenomics to reveal rich mechanistic information for immunotoxic compounds and its ability to provide information that is quantitatively similar to that derived from standard toxicity methods in health risk assessment. PMID:26496743

  20. Modifications of the 7-Hydroxyl Group of the Transthyretin Ligand Luteolin Provide Mechanistic Insights into Its Binding Properties and High Plasma Specificity.

    Nilsson, Lina; Larsson, Andreas; Begum, Afshan; Iakovleva, Irina; Carlsson, Marcus; Brännström, Kristoffer; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth; Olofsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid formation of the plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) has been linked to familial amyloid polyneuropathy and senile systemic amyloidosis. Binding of ligands within its natural hormone binding site can stabilize the tetrameric structure and impair amyloid formation. We have recently shown that the flavonoid luteolin stabilizes TTR in human plasma with a very high selectivity. Luteolin, however, is inactivated in vivo via glucuronidation for which the preferred site is the hydroxy group at position 7 on its aromatic A-ring. We have evaluated the properties of two luteolin variants in which the 7-hydroxy group has been exchanged for a chlorine (7-Cl-Lut) or a methoxy group (7-MeO-Lut). Using an in vitro model, based on human liver microsomes, we verified that these modifications increase the persistence of the drug. Crystal structure determinations show that 7-Cl-Lut binds similarly to luteolin. The larger MeO substituent cannot be accommodated within the same space as the chlorine or hydroxy group and as a result 7-MeO-Lut binds in the opposite direction with the methoxy group in position 7 facing the solvent. Both 7-Cl-Lut and 7-MeO-Lut qualify as high-affinity binders, but in contrast to luteolin, they display a highly non-specific binding to other plasma components. The binding of the two conformations and the key-interactions to TTR are discussed in detail. Taken together, these results show a proof-of-concept that the persistence of luteolin towards enzymatic modification can be increased. We reveal two alternative high-affinity binding modes of luteolin to TTR and that modification in position 7 is restricted only to small substituents if the original orientation of luteolin should be preserved. In addition, the present work provides a general and convenient method to evaluate the efficacy of TTR-stabilizing drugs under conditions similar to an in vivo environment. PMID:27050398

  1. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance.

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Toh, Yue Fen; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Chong, Jennifer; Lee, Kok Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia. PMID:26110649

  2. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization analysis provides new insights into the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) response to the plant probiotic microorganism Trichoderma longibrachiatum MK1.

    De Palma, Monica; D'Agostino, Nunzio; Proietti, Silvia; Bertini, Laura; Lorito, Matteo; Ruocco, Michelina; Caruso, Carla; Chiusano, Maria L; Tucci, Marina

    2016-01-15

    Trichoderma species include widespread rhizosphere-colonising fungi that may establish an opportunistic interaction with the plant, resulting in growth promotion and/or increased tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. For this reason, Trichoderma-based formulations are largely used in agriculture to improve yield while reducing the application of agro-chemicals. By using the Suppression Subtractive Hybridization method, we identified molecular mechanisms activated during the in vitro interaction between tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and the selected strain MK1 of Trichoderma longibrachiatum, and which may participate in the stimulation of plant growth and systemic resistance. Screening and sequence analysis of the subtractive library resulted in forty unique transcripts. Their annotation in functional categories revealed enrichment in cell defence/stress and primary metabolism categories, while secondary metabolism and transport were less represented. Increased transcription of genes involved in defence, cell wall reinforcement and signalling of reactive oxygen species suggests that improved plant pathogen resistance induced by T. longibrachiatum MK1 in tomato may occur through stimulation of the above mechanisms. The array of activated defence-related genes indicates that different signalling pathways, beside the jasmonate/ethylene-dependent one, collaborate to fine-tune the plant response. Our results also suggest that the growth stimulation effect of MK1 on tomato may involve a set of genes controlling protein synthesis and turnover as well as energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Transcriptional profiling of several defence-related genes at different time points of the tomato-Trichoderma interaction, and after subsequent inoculation with the pathogen Botrytis cinerea, provided novel information on genes that may specifically modulate the tomato response to T. longibrachiatum, B. cinerea or both. PMID:26705844

  3. Sequencing, De Novo Assembly, and Annotation of the Transcriptome of the Endangered Freshwater Pearl Bivalve, Cristaria plicata, Provides Novel Insights into Functional Genes and Marker Discovery

    Kang, Se Won; Hwang, Hee-Ju; Park, So Young; Park, Eun Bi; Chung, Jong Min; Song, Dae Kwon; Kim, Changmu; Kim, Soonok; Lee, Jun Sang; Han, Yeon Soo; Park, Hong Seog; Lee, Yong Seok

    2016-01-01

    mollusc, C. plicata. The transcriptome provides a comprehensive sequence resource for the conservation of genetic information in this species and enrichment of the genetic database. The development of molecular markers will assist in the genetic improvement of C. plicata. PMID:26872384

  4. Transcriptome analysis at four developmental stages of grape berry (Vitis vinifera cv. Shiraz provides insights into regulated and coordinated gene expression

    Sweetman Crystal

    2012-12-01

    expression pattern of 12 differentially expressed genes from primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Conclusions In this study we report the global transcriptional profile of Shiraz grapes at key stages of development. We have undertaken a comprehensive analysis of gene families contributing to commercially important berry characteristics and present examples of co-regulation and differential gene expression. The data reported here will provide an invaluable resource for the on-going molecular investigation of wine grapes.

  5. First Genome-Wide Association Study in an Australian Aboriginal Population Provides Insights into Genetic Risk Factors for Body Mass Index and Type 2 Diabetes

    Francis, Richard W.; Syn, Genevieve; Scaman, Elizabeth S. H.; Davis, Elizabeth; Miles, Simon J.; McLeay, Toby; Jamieson, Sarra E.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.

    2015-01-01

    A body mass index (BMI) >22kg/m2 is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Aboriginal Australians. To identify loci associated with BMI and T2D we undertook a genome-wide association study using 1,075,436 quality-controlled single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped (Illumina 2.5M Duo Beadchip) in 402 individuals in extended pedigrees from a Western Australian Aboriginal community. Imputation using the thousand genomes (1000G) reference panel extended the analysis to 6,724,284 post quality-control autosomal SNPs. No associations achieved genome-wide significance, commonly accepted as PAboriginal people in Australia >45,000 years ago. The top hit (rs10868204 Pgenotyped = 1.50x10-6; rs11140653 Pimputed_1000G = 2.90x10-7) for BMI lies 5’ of NTRK2, the type 2 neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that regulates energy balance downstream of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R). PIK3C2G (rs12816270 Pgenotyped = 8.06x10-6; rs10841048 Pimputed_1000G = 6.28x10-7) was associated with BMI, but not with T2D as reported elsewhere. BMI also associated with CNTNAP2 (rs6960319 Pgenotyped = 4.65x10-5; rs13225016 Pimputed_1000G = 6.57x10-5), previously identified as the strongest gene-by-environment interaction for BMI in African-Americans. The top hit (rs11240074 Pgenotyped = 5.59x10-6, Pimputed_1000G = 5.73x10-6) for T2D lies 5’ of BCL9 that, along with TCF7L2, promotes beta-catenin’s transcriptional activity in the WNT signaling pathway. Additional hits occurred in genes affecting pancreatic (KCNJ6, KCNA1) and/or GABA (GABRR1, KCNA1) functions. Notable associations observed for genes previously identified at genome-wide significance in other populations included MC4R (Pgenotyped = 4.49x10-4) for BMI and IGF2BP2 Pimputed_1000G = 2.55x10-6) for T2D. Our results may provide novel functional leads in understanding disease pathogenesis in this Australian Aboriginal population. PMID:25760438

  6. Metagenomics, single cell genomics, and steady-state free energy flux provide insight into the biogeochemical cycling of deep, meteoric water

    Magnabosco, C.; Lau, C. M.; Ryan, K.; Kieft, T. L.; Snyder, L.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Hendrickson, S.; Pullin, M. J.; Slater, G. F.; Simkus, D.; Borgonie, G.; van Heerden, E.; Kuloyo, O.; Maleke, M.; Tlalajoe, T.; Vermeulen, J.; Vermeulen, F.; Munro, A.; Pienaar, M.; Stepanauskas, R.; Grim, S. L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    MMO genes are also present indicating the potential for aerobic oxidation of the abiogenic hydrocarbons at low pO2. Gene products involved in microbial denitrification and N2 fixation were also identified. Together, these results provide a new, multi-dimensional picture of the biogeochemical cycling and microbial communities within the Witwatersrand Supergroup and terrestrial deep subsurface.

  7. First genome-wide association study in an Australian aboriginal population provides insights into genetic risk factors for body mass index and type 2 diabetes.

    Denise Anderson

    Full Text Available A body mass index (BMI >22kg/m2 is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D in Aboriginal Australians. To identify loci associated with BMI and T2D we undertook a genome-wide association study using 1,075,436 quality-controlled single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs genotyped (Illumina 2.5M Duo Beadchip in 402 individuals in extended pedigrees from a Western Australian Aboriginal community. Imputation using the thousand genomes (1000G reference panel extended the analysis to 6,724,284 post quality-control autosomal SNPs. No associations achieved genome-wide significance, commonly accepted as P45,000 years ago. The top hit (rs10868204 Pgenotyped = 1.50x10-6; rs11140653 Pimputed_1000G = 2.90x10-7 for BMI lies 5' of NTRK2, the type 2 neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF that regulates energy balance downstream of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R. PIK3C2G (rs12816270 Pgenotyped = 8.06x10-6; rs10841048 Pimputed_1000G = 6.28x10-7 was associated with BMI, but not with T2D as reported elsewhere. BMI also associated with CNTNAP2 (rs6960319 Pgenotyped = 4.65x10-5; rs13225016 Pimputed_1000G = 6.57x10-5, previously identified as the strongest gene-by-environment interaction for BMI in African-Americans. The top hit (rs11240074 Pgenotyped = 5.59x10-6, Pimputed_1000G = 5.73x10-6 for T2D lies 5' of BCL9 that, along with TCF7L2, promotes beta-catenin's transcriptional activity in the WNT signaling pathway. Additional hits occurred in genes affecting pancreatic (KCNJ6, KCNA1 and/or GABA (GABRR1, KCNA1 functions. Notable associations observed for genes previously identified at genome-wide significance in other populations included MC4R (Pgenotyped = 4.49x10-4 for BMI and IGF2BP2 Pimputed_1000G = 2.55x10-6 for T2D. Our results may provide novel functional leads in understanding disease pathogenesis in this Australian Aboriginal population.

  8. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes.

    Yunsheng Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China. Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention.

  9. Oedipus and insight.

    Michels, R

    1986-10-01

    Insight is a core concept in psychoanalytic theory. The Oedipus myth has been a central metaphor in the evolution of psychoanalytic theory, particularly the psychoanalytic theory of development. Similarly, Sophocles' drama, its relation to the myth, and its repeated reinterpretation throughout the ages provide a valuable metaphor for our understanding of the role of insight in psychoanalysis and in development. We may have underestimated the importance of insight in normal development while oversimplifying its significance as an agent of therapeutic change. PMID:3797556

  10. Crystal structure of the N-acetyltransferase domain of human N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase in complex with N-acetyl-L-glutamate provides insights into its catalytic and regulatory mechanisms.

    Gengxiang Zhao

    Full Text Available N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG, an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K.

  11. Crystal structure of the N-acetyltransferase domain of human N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase in complex with N-acetyl-L-glutamate provides insights into its catalytic and regulatory mechanisms.

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  12. Prevalent Exon-Intron Structural Changes in the APETALA1/FRUITFULL, SEPALLATA, AGAMOUS-LIKE6, and FLOWERING LOCUS C MADS-Box Gene Subfamilies Provide New Insights into Their Evolution

    Yu, Xianxian; Duan, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Xuehao; Ye, Lingling; Kong, Hongzhi; Xu, Guixia; Shan, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    AP1/FUL, SEP, AGL6, and FLC subfamily genes play important roles in flower development. The phylogenetic relationships among them, however, have been controversial, which impedes our understanding of the origin and functional divergence of these genes. One possible reason for the controversy may be the problems caused by changes in the exon-intron structure of genes, which, according to recent studies, may generate non-homologous sites and hamper the homology-based sequence alignment. In this study, we first performed exon-by-exon alignments of these and three outgroup subfamilies (SOC1, AG, and STK). Phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on these matrices show improved resolution and better congruence with species phylogeny. In the context of these phylogenies, we traced evolutionary changes of exon-intron structures in each subfamily. We found that structural changes have occurred frequently following gene duplication and speciation events. Notably, exons 7 and 8 (if present) suffered more structural changes than others. With the knowledge of exon-intron structural changes, we generated more reasonable alignments containing all the focal subfamilies. The resulting trees showed that the SEP subfamily is sister to the monophyletic group formed by AP1/FUL and FLC subfamily genes and that the AGL6 subfamily forms a sister group to the three abovementioned subfamilies. Based on this topology, we inferred the evolutionary history of exon-intron structural changes among different subfamilies. Particularly, we found that the eighth exon originated before the divergence of AP1/FUL, FLC, SEP, and AGL6 subfamilies and degenerated in the ancestral FLC-like gene. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the AP1/FUL, FLC, SEP, and AGL6 subfamilies. PMID:27200066

  13. Genome-wide identification, characterization and expression analyses of two TNFRs in Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis) provide insight into the disparity of responses to bacterial infections and heat stress in bivalves.

    Xing, Qiang; Yu, Qian; Dou, Huaiqian; Wang, Jing; Li, Ruojiao; Ning, Xianhui; Wang, Ruijia; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factors receptors (TNFRs) comprise a superfamily of proteins characterized by a unique cysteine-rich domain (CRD) and play important roles in diverse physiological and pathological processes in the innate immune system, including inflammation, apoptosis, autoimmunity and organogenesis. Although significant effects of TNFRs on immunity have been reported in most vertebrates as well as some invertebrates, the complete TNFR superfamily has not been systematically characterized in scallops. In this study, two different types of TNFR-like genes, including PyTNFR1 and PyTNFR2 genes were identified from Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis, Jay, 1857) through whole-genome scanning. Phylogenetic and protein structural analyses were carried out to determine the identities and evolutionary relationships of the two genes. The expression profiling of PyTNFRs was performed at different development stages, in healthy adult tissues and in hemocytes after bacterial infection and heat stress. Expression analysis revealed that both PyTNFRs were significantly induced during the acute phase (3 h) after infection with Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus) and Gram-negative (Vibrio anguillarum) bacteria, though much more dramatic chronic-phase (24 h) changes were observed after V. anguillarum challenge. For heat stress, only PyTNFR2 displayed significant elevation at 12 h and 24 h, which suggests a functional difference in the two PyTNFRs. Collectively, this study provides novel insight into the PyTNFRs and the specific role and response of TNFR-involved pathways in host immune responses against different bacterial pathogens and heat stress in bivalves. PMID:26988286

  14. A modification to the SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Region method provides phylogenetic insights within Ceratozamia (Zamiaceae Una modificación al método SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Region aporta entendimiento filogenético en Ceratozamia (Zamiaceae

    Dolores González

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationships among closely related plant species are still problematic. DNA intergenic regions often are insufficiently variable to provide desired resolution or support. In this study, a modification to the Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR method was used to find polymorphic loci for phylogenetic analyses within Ceratozamia. RAPD markers were first used to detect variation in 5 species. Then, equal length fragments found in 2 or more species were excised from the gel, purified and digested with frequent cutter restriction enzymes for isolating both ends, which have the same primer site. Digested fragments were sequenced with the RAPD primer. Variable sequences were used to design specific primers for amplifying and sequencing in all species for phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirmed the previously known high genome sequence resemblance within this genus that contrasts with its high morphological variation. Only 7 parsimony informative characters were found with this approach. Nonetheless, the Digested-SCAR (D-SCAR method provided some phylogenetic insights. Four main clades consistent with distribution ranges of the species were detected. The approach presented here was effective to solve some relationships within the genus and can potentially be implemented in other organisms to find polymorphic loci for phylogenetic studies at any taxonomic level.Las relaciones filogenéticas entre especies de plantas cercanamente relacionadas es aún problemático. Las regiones intergénicas del ADN son a menudo insuficientemente variables para proveer los niveles de resolución y soporte deseados. En este estudio, se usó una modificación al método Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR para encontrar loci polimórficos para análisis filogenéticos en Ceratozamia. Primero se usaron marcadores RAPD para detectar variación en 5 especies; luego, se cortaron del gel los fragmentos de la misma longitud en 2 o m

  15. Consumer Insights

    JANKOT

    2004-01-01

    Fang Jun, the head of consumer and market insights of Unilever Shanghai, has summarized his early life as a market in two sentences: rush about to study market changes;act all day to observe consumer behavior. And now?"Tell stories, conduct interviews and piece together different data; calculate numbers,build models and write reports."

  16. Science insights.

    Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    "Below is an essay by Prof. Tanabe originally written in Japanese. It gives an insight to Prof. Tanabe's inquiring mind and his approach to science. He also seek, as always, to inspire and nudge the young to scientific discovery". PMID:25463310

  17. World energy insight 2011

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    The World Energy Insight 2011 is the official publication of the World Energy Council. It includes interviews, articles and case studies from a distinguished panel of World Energy Council Officers, CEOs, government ministers, academics and opinion formers from all areas of the energy sector and provides perspectives from around the globe. Government, industry and NGO's offer both policy and technology perspectives. The insights within this publication add to the work that WEC is doing to provide the forum for energy leaders, along with the on-going WEC studies and programmes on Energy Policies, 2050 Energy Scenarios, Energy Resources & Technologies, Energy for Urban Innovation, Rules Of Energy Trade and Global Energy Access.

  18. T cell receptor transgenic mice provide novel insights into understanding cellular targets of TCDD: suppression of antibody production, but not the response of CD8+ T cells, during infection with influenza virus

    Although exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) clearly impairs T cell-dependent immune responses, the mechanisms underlying TCDD-induced T cell dysfunction are unclear. With the goal of determining precisely how exposure to TCDD impairs the activation of CD8+ T cells in vivo, we used a well-defined T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic system. Greater than 95% of the CD8+ T cells in F5 transgenic mice possess TCR specific for a peptide from influenza A virus expressed in the context of H-2Db. Unexpectedly, we discovered that exposure to TCDD did not alter CD8+ T cell function in the transgenic mice. Specifically, treatment of F5 mice with TCDD did not affect the recruitment of virus-specific CD8+ T cells to the lung, nor did it impair the ability of CD8+ T cells in the lymph node to produce cytokines, or to clonally expand or differentiate. This is in direct contrast to the suppressive effects of TCDD on the response of CD8+ T cells in wild-type mice. Exposure of F5 mice to TCDD induced CYP1A1 and suppressed the production of virus-specific antibodies. Likewise, upon adoptive transfer into wild-type mice, TCDD suppressed the expansion and differentiation of F5-derived CD8+ T cells. This indicates that the F5 mice and lymphocytes derived from them are not inherently resistant to the immunosuppressive effects of TCDD. Rather, our data suggest that in the context of a supraphysiological number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, the function of these cells was not affected by exposure to TCDD. Given that antibody production in the F5 mice was sensitive to suppression by TCDD, while the CD8 response was resistant, our data provide a new perspective on the ways in which exposure to TCDD adversely affects B and T lymphocyte function

  19. CGRP and its receptors provide new insights into migraine pathophysiology

    Ho, Tony W; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    vasodilatation is neither necessary nor sufficient to induce a migraine attack. Attention is now turning to the core migraine circuits in the brain, which include the trigeminal ganglia, trigeminal nucleus, medullary modulatory regions, pons, periaqueductal gray matter, hypothalamus and thalamus. Migraine...... triggers are likely to reflect a disturbance in overall balance of the circuits involved in the modulation of sensory activity, particularly those with relevance to the head. In this Review, we consider the evidence pointing towards a neuronal mechanism in migraine development, highlighting the role of...... exert their antimigraine effects via their actions on the neuronal circuit as opposed to the intracranial vasculature....

  20. A heterozygous moth genome provides insights into herbivory and detoxification

    How an insect evolves to become a successful herbivore is of profound biological and practical importance. Herbivores are often adapted to feed on a specific group of evolutionarily and biochemically related host plants, but the genetic and molecular bases for adaptation to plant defense compounds r...

  1. Psychological Autopsy Provides Insight into Gifted Adolescent Suicide.

    Cross, Tracy

    1996-01-01

    This article highlights findings of a study on the suicides of three academically talented male adolescents. Results of the psychological autopsies are reported in terms of commonalities with adolescent suicide in the general population; commonalities among the three cases related to their giftedness; and themes emerging across the cases,…

  2. Salmonella bongori provides insights into the evolution of the Salmonellae.

    Maria Fookes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The genus Salmonella contains two species, S. bongori and S. enterica. Compared to the well-studied S. enterica there is a marked lack of information regarding the genetic makeup and diversity of S. bongori. S. bongori has been found predominantly associated with cold-blooded animals, but it can infect humans. To define the phylogeny of this species, and compare it to S. enterica, we have sequenced 28 isolates representing most of the known diversity of S. bongori. This cross-species analysis allowed us to confidently differentiate ancestral functions from those acquired following speciation, which include both metabolic and virulence-associated capacities. We show that, although S. bongori inherited a basic set of Salmonella common virulence functions, it has subsequently elaborated on this in a different direction to S. enterica. It is an established feature of S. enterica evolution that the acquisition of the type III secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 has been followed by the sequential acquisition of genes encoding secreted targets, termed effectors proteins. We show that this is also true of S. bongori, which has acquired an array of novel effector proteins (sboA-L. All but two of these effectors have no significant S. enterica homologues and instead are highly similar to those found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC. Remarkably, SboH is found to be a chimeric effector protein, encoded by a fusion of the T3SS-1 effector gene sopA and a gene highly similar to the EPEC effector nleH from enteropathogenic E. coli. We demonstrate that representatives of these new effectors are translocated and that SboH, similarly to NleH, blocks intrinsic apoptotic pathways while being targeted to the mitochondria by the SopA part of the fusion. This work suggests that S. bongori has inherited the ancestral Salmonella virulence gene set, but has adapted by incorporating virulence determinants that resemble those employed by EPEC.

  3. Marsupial Genome Sequences: Providing Insight into Evolution and Disease

    Deakin, Janine E.

    2012-01-01

    Marsupials (metatherians), with their position in vertebrate phylogeny and their unique biological features, have been studied for many years by a dedicated group of researchers, but it has only been since the sequencing of the first marsupial genome that their value has been more widely recognised. We now have genome sequences for three distantly related marsupial species (the grey short-tailed opossum, the tammar wallaby, and Tasmanian devil), with the promise of many more genomes to be seq...

  4. DNA markers provide insight about common lime in historicalplantings

    Hansen, Ole Kim; Thomsen, Pernille; Rasmussen, Christine Waage

    2014-01-01

    As part of the restoration process of an avenue of common lime (Tilia × europaea) from 1760 in the Royal Danish Gardens, all remaining trees were genotyped with DNA markers before they were felled. As such, information about the nature of the plant material (clonal versus non-clonal) and mode of......, only two trees did not belong to either of the two clones. Genotyping of commercial common lime trees that would be planted in place of the felled trees during the restoration project was also performed. Samples of 20 newly planted trees all possessed the same genotype as the majority of the old felled...... subsample of the trees had the same genotype. Trees from four other locations with historical avenues/plantings from the 17th century were also genotyped. The two clones registered in the first location were also found at the other four locations. Of 76 trees from the other historical avenues/plantings...

  5. The tomato genome sequence provides insight into fleshy fruit evolution

    The genome of the inbred tomato cultivar ‘Heinz 1706’ was sequenced and assembled using a combination of Sanger and “next generation” technologies. The predicted genome size is ~900 Mb, consistent with prior estimates, of which 760 Mb were assembled in 91 scaffolds aligned to the 12 tomato chromosom...

  6. Competitive Interactions between Parasitoids Provide New Insight into Host Suppression

    Xu, Hai-Yun; Yang, Nian-Wan; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of potential inter- and intraspecific competition in parasitoid communities is crucial in the screening of efficient parasitoid species and for utilization of the best parasitoid species combinations. In this respect, the host-parasitoid systems, Bemisia tabaci and two parasitoids, Eretmocerus hayati (exotic) and Encarsia sophia (existing) were studied under laboratory conditions to investigate whether interference competition between the exotic and existing species...

  7. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Martin, Francis; Aerts, A; Ahrén, D.; Brun, Aurélie; Danchin, Etienne; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, Julien; Kohler, Annegret; Lindquist, E.; Pereda, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, Damien; Buee, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses—the union of roots and soil fungi—are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosi...

  8. Kiwi genome provides insights into evolution of a nocturnal lifestyle

    Le Duc, Diana; Renaud, Gabriel; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Almén, Markus Sällman; Huynen, Leon; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Ongyerth, Matthias; Bitarello, Barbara D.; Schiöth, Helgi B; Hofreiter, Michael; Stadler, Peter F; Pruefer, Kay; LAMBERT, David; Kelso, Janet; Schoeneberg, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Kiwi, comprising five species from the genus Apteryx, are endangered, ground-dwelling bird species endemic to New Zealand. They are the smallest and only nocturnal representatives of the ratites. The timing of kiwi adaptation to a nocturnal niche and the genomic innovations, which shaped sensory systems and morphology to allow this adaptation, are not yet fully understood. Results We sequenced and assembled the brown kiwi genome to 150-fold coverage and annotated the genome using k...

  9. Channelrhodopsins provide a breakthrough insight into strategies for curing blindness

    Hiroshi Tomita; Eriko Sugano; Hitomi Isago; Makoto Tamai

    2009-12-01

    Photoreceptor cells are the only retinal neurons that can absorb photons. Their degeneration due to some diseases or injuries leads to blindness. Retinal prostheses electrically stimulating surviving retinal cells and evoking a pseudo light sensation have been investigated over the past decade for restoring vision. Currently, a gene therapy approach is under development. Channelrhodopsin-2 derived from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a microbial-type rhodopsin. Its specific characteristic is that it functions as a light-driven cation-selective channel. It has been reported that the channelrhodopsin-2 transforms inner light-insensitive retinal neurons to light-sensitive neurons. Herein, we introduce new strategies for restoring vision by using channelrhodopsins and discuss the properties of adeno-associated virus vectors widely used in gene therapy.

  10. New Translational Research Provides Insights into Liver Dysfunction in Sepsis

    Recknagel, P; Gonnert, F. A.; Westermann, M.; Lambeck, S.; Lupp, A.; Rudiger, A.; Dyson, A.; Carré, J. E.; Kortgen, A.; Krafft, C; Popp, J.; Sponholz, C.; Fuhrmann, V.; Hilger, I; Claus, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Sepsis (blood poisoning)—a life-threatening condition caused by an inappropriate immune response to an infection—is a major global cause of death. Normally, when bacteria or other microbes enter the human body, the immune system efficiently destroys the invaders. In sepsis the immune system goes into overdrive, and the chemicals it releases into the blood to combat the infection trigger widespread inflammation (swelling). This leads to the formation of small blood ...

  11. Rare kidney tumor provides insight on metabolic changes

    Researchers in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have uncovered a number of new findings about the biology and development of a rare form of kidney cancer. They found that the disease – chromophobe renal cell carcinoma – stems in part from alteratio

  12. Why healthcare providers merge.

    Postma, Jeroen; Roos, Anne-Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In many OECD countries, healthcare sectors have become increasingly concentrated as a result of mergers. However, detailed empirical insight into why healthcare providers merge is lacking. Also, we know little about the influence of national healthcare policies on mergers. We fill this gap in the literature by conducting a survey study on mergers among 848 Dutch healthcare executives, of which 35% responded (resulting in a study sample of 239 executives). A total of 65% of the respondents was involved in at least one merger between 2005 and 2012. During this period, Dutch healthcare providers faced a number of policy changes, including increasing competition, more pressure from purchasers, growing financial risks, de-institutionalisation of long-term care and decentralisation of healthcare services to municipalities. Our empirical study shows that healthcare providers predominantly merge to improve the provision of healthcare services and to strengthen their market position. Also efficiency and financial reasons are important drivers of merger activity in healthcare. We find that motives for merger are related to changes in health policies, in particular to the increasing pressure from competitors, insurers and municipalities. PMID:26055501

  13. Insights on STEM Careers

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  14. INSIGHT, PSYCHOPATHOLOGY & SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Armstrongh, K.P. Lincoln; Chandrasekaran, R.; Perme, Bojir

    2002-01-01

    25 inpatients with schizophrenia were examined to explore the relationship between insight and psychopathology and illness severity over a four-week period. The average degree of insight improved irrespective of the type of recovery. There was no consistent relationship between the changes in insight and changes in psychopathology. The severity of mental illness and awareness of mental disorder showed a semi-independent pattern of association. It is concluded that insight operates to some ext...

  15. Deconstructing insight: EEG correlates of insightful problem solving.

    Simone Sandkühler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cognitive insight phenomenon lies at the core of numerous discoveries. Behavioral research indicates four salient features of insightful problem solving: (i mental impasse, followed by (ii restructuring of the problem representation, which leads to (iii a deeper understanding of the problem, and finally culminates in (iv an "Aha!" feeling of suddenness and obviousness of the solution. However, until now no efforts have been made to investigate the neural mechanisms of these constituent features of insight in a unified framework. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an electroencephalographic study using verbal remote associate problems, we identified neural correlates of these four features of insightful problem solving. Hints were provided for unsolved problems or after mental impasse. Subjective ratings of the restructuring process and the feeling of suddenness were obtained on trial-by-trial basis. A negative correlation was found between these two ratings indicating that sudden insightful solutions, where restructuring is a key feature, involve automatic, subconscious recombination of information. Electroencephalogram signals were analyzed in the space x time x frequency domain with a nonparametric cluster randomization test. First, we found strong gamma band responses at parieto-occipital regions which we interpreted as (i an adjustment of selective attention (leading to a mental impasse or to a correct solution depending on the gamma band power level and (ii encoding and retrieval processes for the emergence of spontaneous new solutions. Secondly, we observed an increased upper alpha band response in right temporal regions (suggesting active suppression of weakly activated solution relevant information for initially unsuccessful trials that after hint presentation led to a correct solution. Finally, for trials with high restructuring, decreased alpha power (suggesting greater cortical excitation was observed in right prefrontal

  16. 2013 insight contexts the imaginative landscape

    2012-01-01

    Insight Contexts 2013 are especially designed to develop students' thinking and writing skills for Area of Study 2: Creating and Presenting. A rich resource of information and ideas on the Context and each of the selected texts, Insight Contexts also provides students with a variety of writing tips and strategies for developing excellent Context responses.

  17. Dreaming and insight

    Edwards, Christopher L; Perrine Marie RUBY; Malinowski, Josie E.; Bennett, Paul D.; Blagrove, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to ...

  18. Parkinson's disease: insights from pathways

    Cookson, Mark R.; Bandmann, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) typically presents in sporadic fashion, but the identification of disease-causing mutations in monogenically inherited PD genes has provided crucial insight into the pathogenesis of this disorder. Mutations in autosomal recessively inherited genes, namely parkin, PINK1 and DJ-1, typically lead to early onset parkinsonism. At least two of these genes (PINK1 and parkin) appear to work in the same pathway related to maintenance of mitochondrial functional integrity under...

  19. Insight cognitif et schizophrenie

    W. El-Hage; Lafay, N.; Wassouf, I.; Jaafari, N.

    2011-01-01

    Resume La schizophrenie est souvent associee a une meconnaissance du trouble severe et persistante. Ce deficit d?insight est correle a l?hypofrontalite mais independant du pronostic de la maladie ou du quotient intellectuel. L?insight cognitif est defini comme la difference entre la capacite de reflexion sur soi et la certitude dans cette reflexion. Cette capacite est trouvee diminuee dans la schizophrenie mais augmentee en cas de depression. Ainsi, la schizophrenie avec comorbidit...

  20. Novice Academic Librarians Provide Insight into Choosing Their Careers, Graduate School Education, and First Years on the Job. A Review of: Sare, L., Bales, S., & Neville, B. (2012. New academic librarians and their perceptions of the profession. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12(2, 179-203. doi: 10.1353/pla.2012.0017

    Carol D. Howe

    2012-12-01

    profession solid, safe, and/or noble. They had further explored librarianship to determine its compatibility with their personal characteristics. Such personal reflection had led participants to graduate school where they gained a real understanding of librarianship. The participants had not generally found graduate school to be academically challenging. They had also valued practical over theoretical instruction. Once in the workplace, the participants noted the value of continuing education to strengthen the skills they had learned in graduate school. Participants benefitted the most from informal mentoring and on-the-job training, i.e. “learning by doing” (p. 192. As novice librarians, the participants had learned to feel their way around their job expectations and note the differences between their responsibilities and those of paraprofessionals in the library. As the novice librarians further defined their work, they had also learned that academic librarianship is the sum of many parts, including collaboration with peers. In evaluating their work, the participants noted that they had come to distinguish “real” academic library work, that which uses their expertise and helps society, from “other” work such as clerical work (pp. 195-196. The sixth and final category was “(reimagining the future.” Most of the participants predicted having advanced as academic librarians in the next five years but were otherwise unsure about what their futures would hold.Conclusion – The researchers made a number of valuable observations in their work with novice librarians. As the step of deciding upon a career seemed to be a murky quest, they thought it would be helpful to analyze public opinion of librarianship and use that information to offset misperceptions about what librarians do. This might help those considering librarianship to make informed and conscious decisions.The study data also provided insight into graduate school. The fact that the participants did not

  1. Twitter for travel medicine providers.

    Mills, Deborah J; Kohl, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Travel medicine practitioners, perhaps more so than medical practitioners working in other areas of medicine, require a constant flow of information to stay up-to-date, and provide best practice information and care to their patients. Many travel medicine providers are unaware of the popularity and potential of the Twitter platform. Twitter use among our travellers, as well as by physicians and health providers, is growing exponentially. There is a rapidly expanding body of published literature on this information tool. This review provides a brief overview of the ways Twitter is being used by health practitioners, the advantages that are peculiar to Twitter as a platform of social media, and how the interested practitioner can get started. Some key points about the dark side of Twitter are highlighted, as well as the potential benefits of using Twitter as a way to disseminate accurate medical information to the public. This article will help readers develop an increased understanding of Twitter as a tool for extracting useful facts and insights from the ever increasing volume of health information. PMID:26988200

  2. Provide, provide: the economics of aging.

    1998-06-26

    Most older persons face two potentially serious economic problems: (a) declining earning power and (b) declining health that can be partly offset by increased utilization of health care. The decline in earning power is largely attributable to physiological changes and to obsolescence of skills and knowledge. These adverse effects are exacerbated by public and private policies that reduce the incentives of older persons to continue work and increase the cost to employers of employing older workers. The problems of earnings replacement and health care payment are usually discussed separately, but there are several reasons why they should be considered together. First, there are often tradeoffs between the two. Money is money, and for most people there is never enough to go around. This is self-evident where private funds are concerned. Low-income elderly, for instance, frequently must choose between expensive prescription drugs and an adequate diet. For middle-income elderly, the choice may be between saving on medigap insurance or forgoing an airplane trip to a grandchild's graduation. Difficult choices are also inherent in the allocation of public funds. The same tax receipts that could be used to maintain or increase retirement benefits could be used to fund additional care, and vice versa. In discussing these tradeoffs, some analysts assert that people will gladly give up other goods and services for medical care that cures illness, relieves pain, or restores function. Others believe that some people would forgo some health insurance in order to maintain access to other goods and services. A second reason for looking at the two problems together is that they pose similar questions for public policy. How much should each generation provide for its own needs in old age, and how much should be provided by the generations that follow? How much provision should be voluntary, how much compulsory? How much intra-generational redistribution is appropriate after age 65

  3. Gambling Disorder Treatment Providers

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The information provided within this table gives a snapshot of authorized CalGETS providers with specialized training in the treatment of problem gambling behavior....

  4. Dreaming and insight

    Christopher L Edwards

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years. Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996 therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams. The need to distinguish ‘aha’ experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from ‘aha’ experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared.

  5. Dreaming and insight.

    Edwards, Christopher L; Ruby, Perrine M; Malinowski, Josie E; Bennett, Paul D; Blagrove, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish "aha" experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from "aha" experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared. PMID:24550849

  6. OpenGL Insights

    Cozzi, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Get Real-World Insight from Experienced Professionals in the OpenGL Community With OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL, real-time rendering is becoming available everywhere, from AAA games to mobile phones to web pages. Assembling contributions from experienced developers, vendors, researchers, and educators, OpenGL Insights presents real-world techniques for intermediate and advanced OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL developers. Go Beyond the Basics The book thoroughly covers a range of topics, including OpenGL 4.2 and recent extensions. It explains how to optimize for mobile devices, explores the design

  7. MAX Provider Characteristics

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MAX Provider Characteristics (PC) File Implementation Report describes the design, implementation, and results of the MAXPC prototype, which was based on three...

  8. Accident management insights from IPE's

    In response to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Generic Letter 88-20, each utility in the U.S.A. has undertaken a probabilistic severe accident study of each plant. This paper provides a high level summary of the generic PWR accident management insights that have been obtained from the IPE reports. More importantly, the paper details some of the limitations of the IPE studies with respect to accident management. The IPE studies and the methodology used was designed to provide a best estimate of the potential for a severe accident and/or for severe consequences from a core damage accident. The accepted methodology employs a number of assumptions to make the objective attainable with a reasonable expenditure of resources. However, some of the assumptions represent limitations with respect to developing an accident management program based solely on the IPE and its results. (author)

  9. Trouble, Strategic Insights

    Moran, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Strategic Insights are authored monthly by analysts with the Center for Contemporary Conflict (CCC). The CCC is the research arm of the National Security Affairs Department at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. The views expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the Naval Postgraduate School, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

  10. Update on INSIGHTS Development

    Not Listed; Eric Burgett

    2011-09-01

    INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

  11. The politics of insight.

    Salvi, Carola; Cristofori, Irene; Grafman, Jordan; Beeman, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies showed that liberals and conservatives differ in cognitive style. Liberals are more flexible, and tolerant of complexity and novelty, whereas conservatives are more rigid, are more resistant to change, and prefer clear answers. We administered a set of compound remote associate problems, a task extensively used to differentiate problem-solving styles (via insight or analysis). Using this task, several researches have proven that self-reports, which differentiate between insight and analytic problem-solving, are reliable and are associated with two different neural circuits. In our research we found that participants self-identifying with distinct political orientations demonstrated differences in problem-solving strategy. Liberals solved significantly more problems via insight instead of in a step-by-step analytic fashion. Our findings extend previous observations that self-identified political orientations reflect differences in cognitive styles. More specifically, we show that type of political orientation is associated with problem-solving strategy. The data converge with previous neurobehavioural and cognitive studies indicating a link between cognitive style and the psychological mechanisms that mediate political beliefs. PMID:26810954

  12. The politics of insight

    Salvi, Carola; Cristofori, Irene; Grafman, Jordan; Beeman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that liberals and conservatives differ in cognitive style. Liberals are more flexible, and tolerant of complexity and novelty, whereas conservatives are more rigid, are more resistant to change, and prefer clear answers. We administered a set of compound remote associate problems, a task extensively used to differentiate problem-solving styles (via insight or analysis). Using this task, several researches have proven that self-reports, which differentiate between insight and analytic problem-solving, are reliable and are associated with two different neural circuits. In our research we found that participants self-identifying with distinct political orientations demonstrated differences in problem-solving strategy. Liberals solved significantly more problems via insight instead of in a step-by-step analytic fashion. Our findings extend previous observations that self-identified political orientations reflect differences in cognitive styles. More specifically, we show that type of political orientation is associated with problem-solving strategy. The data converge with previous neurobehavioural and cognitive studies indicating a link between cognitive style and the psychological mechanisms that mediate political beliefs. PMID:26810954

  13. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels;

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...... on metered electricity consumption for different types of households. We find effects for single men and couples without children, while we find no effect for single women and households with children. We suggest that this could be because of differences in saving potential (e.g. some households do...

  14. The Provident Principal.

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  15. What HERA may provide?

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  16. Provider of Services File

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  17. Insight into Enabling Adaptive Management

    Lorne A. Greig

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry recognized a need for effective adaptive management to support management for biological diversity. However, difficulties in implementing adaptive management in the U.S. Northwest Forest Plan led the Commission to wonder if comparisons across multiple adaptive management trials in the forest sector could provide insight into the factors that serve to enable or inhibit adaptive management. This comparison and the resulting discussions among a group of seasoned practitioners, with adaptive management experience at a variety of scales and levels of complexity, led to insights into a hierarchy of ten factors that can serve to either enable or inhibit implementation. Doing high quality adaptive management is about doing good science to enable learning from management experience. Enabling adaptive management though is about working with people to understand their concerns, to develop a common understanding and an environment of trust that allows adaptive management to proceed. Careful attention to enabling factors is critical to fulfilling the promise of adaptive management.

  18. Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Insights from Deafness

    Corina, David; Singleton, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The condition of deafness presents a developmental context that provides insight into the biological, cultural, and linguistic factors underlying the development of neural systems that impact social cognition. Studies of visual attention, behavioral regulation, language development, and face and human action perception are discussed. Visually…

  19. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process of the...... process. We find that clients influence the development of human capital capabilities and management capabilities in reciprocally produced services. While in sequential produced services clients influence the development of organizational capital capabilities and management capital capabilities....... services, such as sequential or reciprocal task activities, influence the development of different types of capabilities. We study five cases of offshore-outsourced knowledge-intensive business services that are distinguished according to their reciprocal or sequential task activities in their production...

  20. Achieving Provider Engagement

    Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  1. Providence Their Guide

    A.D. Naudé

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In his preface to this book the author quotes from Milton's Paradise lost, from which the title of this book is derived: 'Som natural tears they drop'd, but wip'd them soon; The World was all before them, where to choose Thir place of rest, and Providence thir guide; They hand in hand, with wand ring steps and slow, Through Eden took thir solitarie way.

  2. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division.

  3. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  4. The Provident Sea

    Cushing, David H.

    1988-09-01

    The Provident Sea describes the history of fish stock management (including whales and seals). The book traces, on the basis of the original scientific material, the history of the management of "the provident sea" up to recent times when problems of over-exploitation have had dramatic effects upon stocks. The need for management arose mainly from the increasing industrialization of capture. Hence the preindustrial fisheries are covered, in particular the old cod fishery on the Grand Bank and the herring fishery in the North Sea, as an essential background to current problems. The origins of fisheries and whaling science are described, as is the development up to 1965 of the science and institution in fisheries, whaling, and sealing. In the sixties and seventies, certain major fishing nations took a heavy harvest of fish stocks using sophisticated and efficient gathering methods. This in turn led to conflict and one consequence was the "Law of the Sea" conference set up to try and resolve these issues.

  5. Energy providers: customer expectations

    The deregulation of the gas and electric power industries, and how it will impact on customer service and pricing rates was discussed. This paper described the present situation, reviewed core competencies, and outlined future expectations. The bottom line is that major energy consumers are very conscious of energy costs and go to great lengths to keep them under control. At the same time, solutions proposed to reduce energy costs must benefit all classes of consumers, be they industrial, commercial, institutional or residential. Deregulation and competition at an accelerated pace is the most likely answer. This may be forced by external forces such as foreign energy providers who are eager to enter the Canadian energy market. It is also likely that the competition and convergence between gas and electricity is just the beginning, and may well be overshadowed by other deregulated industries as they determine their core competencies

  6. What HERA May Provide?

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of ∼ 500 pb-1 has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of ∼ 100 pb-1, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  7. What HERA May Provide?

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  8. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  9. Osho - Insights on sex.

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore

    2013-01-01

    Sex is a mysterious phenomenon, which has puzzled even great sages. Human beings have researched and mastered the biology of sex. But that is not all. Sex needs to be understood from the spiritual perspective too. The vision of Osho is an enlightening experience in this regard. Out of the thousands of lectures, five lectures on sex made Osho most notorious. Born into a Jain family of Madhya Pradesh, Rajneesh, who later wanted himself to be called Osho, is a great master. He has spoken volumes on a wide range of topics ranging from sex to super-consciousness. His contributions in the area of sex are based on the principles of "Tantra" which has its origin from Buddhism. This article focuses on his life and insights on sex, which if understood properly, can be a stepping stone for enlightenment. PMID:23858266

  10. New insights into domestication of carrot from root transcriptome analyses

    Rong, J.; Lammers, Y.; Strasburg, J.L.; Schidlo, N.S.; Ariyurek, Y.; Jong, de T.J.; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Vrieling, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Understanding the molecular basis of domestication can provide insights into the processes of rapid evolution and crop improvement. Here we demonstrated the processes of carrot domestication and identified genes under selection based on transcriptome analyses. Results - The root transcr

  11. Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden;

    2014-01-01

    findings have the potential to provide entirely new insights into aetiology, but associations at DRD2 and several genes involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission highlight molecules of known and potential therapeutic relevance to schizophrenia, andare consistent with leadingpathophysiologicalhypotheses...

  12. Nuclear structure insight from exactly solvable pairing models

    Following a brief description of how pairing models can be solved exactly, we discuss two examples in which this exact solvability has been used to provide interesting insight into issues of importance in nuclear structure physics. One concerns the development of a new mechanism for sd dominance in interacting boson models of nuclei and the other concerns a mapping of nuclear pairing onto a classical electrostatic problem and the insight it provides into nuclear superconductivity. (Author)

  13. Accounting choices of controllers: An insight into controller deliberations

    de Groot, Therèse

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral thesis provides insights into the accounting choice process of business controllers. The main contribution is a new approach in analyzing financial accounting choices, using an interpretive methodology. Moreover, the overall framework of analysis developed in this thesis can help organizations to understand accounting choice behavior of controllers. It provides insights into the complexity of the accounting choice process, the factors influencing the accounting choices, the diff...

  14. Accounting choices of controllers : An insight into controller deliberations

    de Groot, Therèse

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral thesis provides insights into the accounting choice process of business controllers. The main contribution is a new approach in analyzing financial accounting choices, using an interpretive methodology. Moreover, the overall framework of analysis developed in this thesis can help organizations to understand accounting choice behavior of controllers. It provides insights into the complexity of the accounting choice process, the factors influencing the accounting choices, the diff...

  15. InSight Planetary Protection Status

    Benardini, James; La Duc, Myron; Willis, Jason

    The NASA Discovery Program’s next mission, Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSIght), consists of a single spacecraft that will be launched aboard an Atlas V 401 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base (Space Launch Complex 3E) during the March 2016 timeframe. The overarching mission goal is to illuminate the fundamentals of formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by investigating the interior structure and processes of Mars. The flight system consists of a heritage cruise stage, aeroshell (heatshield and backshell), and Lander from the 2008 Phoenix mission. Included in the lander payload are various cameras, a seismometer, an auxiliary sensor suite to measure wind, temperature, and pressure, and a mole to penetrate the regolith (bioburden requirements apply which require microbial reduction procedures and biological burden reporting. The InSight project is current with required PP documentation, having completed an approved Planetary Protection Plan, Subsidiary PP Plans, and a PP Implementation Plan. The InSight mission’s early planetary protection campaign has commenced, coinciding with the fabrication and assembly of payload and flight system hardware and the baseline analysis of existing flight spares. A report on the status of InSight PP activities will be provided.

  16. O insight em psiquiatria

    Ana Margarida P. Cardoso

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O sinal de que algo está a acontecer contribui para que o paciente reconheça que alguma coisa de estranho se está a passar consigo. Este reconhecimento faz com que o sujeito possa desempenhar uma função activa e seja um elemento colaborante do seu processo de recuperação. Cada doença apresenta, contudo, diferentes sintomas, uma vez que cada doença psiquiátrica consiste em diferentes perturbações com diversos efeitos sobre o funcionamento mental. Desta maneira, o fenómeno do insight que é registado em cada doença é diferente e expressa-se sob diferentes formas, não somente devido às manifestações clínicas da doença mas também devido às características individuais do sujeito.

  17. Grigor Narekatsi's astronomical insights

    Poghosyan, Samvel

    2015-07-01

    What stand out in the solid system of Gr. Narekatsi's naturalistic views are his astronomical insights on the material nature of light, its high speed and the Sun being composed of "material air". Especially surprising and fascinating are his views on stars and their clusters. What astronomers, including great Armenian academician V. Ambartsumian (scattering of stellar associations), would understand and prove with much difficulty thousand years later, Narekatsi predicted in the 10th century: "Stars appear and disappear untimely", "You who gather and scatter the speechless constellations, like a flock of sheep". Gr. Narekatsti's reformative views were manifested in all the spheres of the 10th century social life; he is a reformer of church life, great language constructor, innovator in literature and music, freethinker in philosophy and science. His ideology is the reflection of the 10th century Armenian Renaissance. During the 9th-10th centuries, great masses of Armenians, forced to migrate to the Balkans, took with them and spread reformative ideas. The forefather of the western science, which originated in the period of Reformation, is considered to be the great philosopher Nicholas of Cusa. The study of Gr. Narekatsti's logic and naturalistic views enables us to claim that Gr. Narekatsti is the great grandfather of European science.

  18. Pattern recognition: recent insights from Dectin-1

    Reid, Delyth M.; Gow, Neil AR; Brown, Gordon D.

    2009-01-01

    The β-glucan receptor Dectin-1 is an archetypical non-toll-like pattern recognition receptor expressed predominantly by myeloid cells, which can induce its own intracellular signalling and can mediate a variety of cellular responses, such as cytokine production. Recent identification of the components of these signalling pathways, such as Syk kinase, CARD9 and Raf-1, has provided novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying Dectin-1 function. Furthermore, a broader appreciation of ...

  19. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer. PMID:26890363

  20. Deconstructing Insight: EEG Correlates of Insightful Problem Solving

    Simone Sandkühler; Joydeep Bhattacharya

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive insight phenomenon lies at the core of numerous discoveries. Behavioral research indicates four salient features of insightful problem solving: (i) mental impasse, followed by (ii) restructuring of the problem representation, which leads to (iii) a deeper understanding of the problem, and finally culminates in (iv) an "Aha!" feeling of suddenness and obviousness of the solution. However, until now no efforts have been made to investigate the neural mechanisms of these co...

  1. First insights into disassembled "evapotranspiration"

    Chormański, Jarosław; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present an initial data analysis obtained from a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them fromthe total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its component transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project

  2. Providing Real Research Opoportunities to Undergraduates

    Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-01-01

    The current approach to undergraduate education focuses on teaching classes which provide the foundational knowledge for more applied experiences such as scientific research. Like most programs, Florida Institute of Technology (Florida Tech or FIT) strongly encourages undergraduate research, but is dominated by content-focused courses (e.g., "Physical Mechanics"). Research-like experiences are generally offered through "lab" classes, but these are almost always reproductions of past experiments: contrived, formulaic, and lacking the "heart" of real (i.e., potentially publishable) scientific research. Real research opportunities 1) provide students with realistic insight into the actual scientific process; 2) excite students far more than end-of-chapter problems; 3) provide context for the importance of learning math, physics, and astrophysics concepts; and 4) allow unique research progress for well-chosen problems. I have provided real research opportunities as an "Exoplanet Lab" component of my Introduction to Space Science (SPS1020) class at Florida Tech, generally taken by first-year majors in our Physics, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrobiology degree programs. These labs are a hybrid between citizen science (e.g., PlanetHunters) and simultaneously mentoring ~60 undergraduates in similar small research projects. These projects focus on problems that can be understood in the context of the course, but which benefit from "crowdsourcing". Examples include: dividing up the known planetary systems and developing a classification scheme and organizing them into populations (Fall 2013); searching through folded light curves to discover new exoplanets missed by previous pipelines (Fall 2014); and fitting n-body models to all exoplanets with known Transit Timing Variations to estimate planet masses (Fall 2015). The students love the fact that they are doing real potentially publishable research: not many undergraduates can claim to have discovered

  3. Newer insights in teledermatology practice

    Garehatty Rudrappa Kanthraj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study and practice of dermatology care using interactive audio, visual, and data communications from a distance is called teledermatology. A teledermatology practice (TP provides teleconsultation as well tele-education. Initially, dermatologists used videoconference. Convenience, cost-effectiveness and easy application of the practice made "store and forward" to emerge as a basic teledermatology tool. The advent of newer technologies like third generation (3G and fourth generation (4G mobile teledermatology (MT and dermatologists′ interest to adopt tertiary TP to pool expert (second opinion to address difficult-to-manage cases (DMCs has resulted in a rapid change in TP. Online discussion groups (ODGs, author-based second opinion teledermatology (AST, or a combination of both are the types of tertiary TP. This article analyzes the feasibility studies and provides latest insight into TP with a revised classification to plan and allocate budget and apply appropriate technology. Using the acronym CAP-HAT, which represents five important factors like case, approach, purpose, health care professionals, and technology, one can frame a TP. Store-and-forward teledermatology (SAFT is used to address routine cases (spotters. Chronic cases need frequent follow-up care. Leg ulcer and localized vitiligo need MT while psoriasis and leprosy require SAFT. Pigmented skin lesions require MT for triage and combination of teledermoscopy, telepathology, and teledermatology for diagnosis. A self-practising dermatologist and national health care system dermatologist use SAFT for routine cases and a combination of ASTwith an ODG to address a DMC. A TP alone or in combination with face-to-face consultation delivers quality care.

  4. Implementation of Insight Responsibilities in Process Engineering

    Osborne, Deborah M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes an approach for evaluating flight readiness (COFR) and contractor performance evaluation (award fee) as part of the insight role of NASA Process Engineering at Kennedy Space Center. Several evaluation methods are presented, including systems engineering evaluations and use of systems performance data. The transition from an oversight function to the insight function is described. The types of analytical tools appropriate for achieving the flight readiness and contractor performance evaluation goals are described and examples are provided. Special emphasis is placed upon short and small run statistical quality control techniques. Training requirements for system engineers are delineated. The approach described herein would be equally appropriate in other directorates at Kennedy Space Center.

  5. Perception and Information Behaviour of Institutional Repository End-Users Provides Valuable Insight for Future Development. A Review of: St. Jean, B., Rieh, S. Y., Yakel, E., & Markey, K. (2011. Unheard voices: Institutional repository end-users. College & Research Libraries, 72(1, 21-42.

    Lisa Shen

    2012-06-01

    source, which placed most IRs in a less favorable light.Additionally, researchers noted conflicting assumptions made by interviewees about IRs in the evaluation process for their content. Some interviewees believed all the content of an IR has been vetted through an approval process, while others distrusted all IR content that was not peer-reviewed.To what extent are end-users willing to return to an IR or recommend it to their peers?The great majority of interviews indicated they were likely to use IRs again in the future, and nearly all indicated they would recommend IRs to their peers. However, most interviewees did not know of any people using IRs. The few interviewees who did often knew of IR contributors rather than end-users.How do IRs fit into end-users’ information seeking behavior?Many interviewees noted that IRs provided them with content that was not commonly available through traditional publishing channels, including conference papers and dissertations. Others felt IRs made content available more quickly than other information sources. However, the results also suggested that most interviewees did not include IRs in their routine research process.Conclusion – This study identified current end-users’ perceptions of IRs and highlighted several areas for future IR development. Areas of improvement for IRs included intensifying publicity efforts; increasing content recruitment; making content recruitment policies more transparent; and improving appearance and navigation functionalities. The findings also suggested new directions for IR marketing, such as emphasizing on the networking and collaborating benefits of using IR.

  6. Text Insights: Natural Language Analytics for Understanding Social Media Engagement

    Grimm, Frank; Hartung, Matthias; Cimiano, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    We present Text Insights, an application for understanding factors of user engagement in Facebook pages. Providing analytics based on natural language processing, Text Insights is complementary to existing tools offering mainly numerical indicators of user engagement. Our system extracts keyphrases from page content in a linguistically motivated manner. Keyphrases are weighted according to their relevance as approximations of the most important topics in the community. We demonstrate that ...

  7. Evolutionary Image Transition Based on Theoretical Insights of Random Processes

    Neumann, Aneta; Alexander, Bradley; Neumann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms have been widely studied from a theoretical perspective. In particular, the area of runtime analysis has contributed significantly to a theoretical understanding and provided insights into the working behaviour of these algorithms. We study how these insights into evolutionary processes can be used for evolutionary art. We introduce the notion of evolutionary image transition which transfers a given starting image into a target image through an evolutionary process. Co...

  8. Internet Provider Facilities, Published in Not Provided, US Army.

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Internet Provider Facilities dataset as of Not Provided. Data by this publisher are often provided in Not Applicable coordinate system; in a Not Applicable...

  9. Threatened corals provide underexplored microbial habitats.

    Shinichi Sunagawa

    Full Text Available Contemporary in-depth sequencing of environmental samples has provided novel insights into microbial community structures, revealing that their diversity had been previously underestimated. Communities in marine environments are commonly composed of a few dominant taxa and a high number of taxonomically diverse, low-abundance organisms. However, studying the roles and genomic information of these "rare" organisms remains challenging, because little is known about their ecological niches and the environmental conditions to which they respond. Given the current threat to coral reef ecosystems, we investigated the potential of corals to provide highly specialized habitats for bacterial taxa including those that are rarely detected or absent in surrounding reef waters. The analysis of more than 350,000 small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA sequence tags and almost 2,000 nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that rare seawater biosphere members are highly abundant or even dominant in diverse Caribbean corals. Closely related corals (in the same genus/family harbored similar bacterial communities. At higher taxonomic levels, however, the similarities of these communities did not correlate with the phylogenetic relationships among corals, opening novel questions about the evolutionary stability of coral-microbial associations. Large proportions of OTUs (28.7-49.1% were unique to the coral species of origin. Analysis of the most dominant ribotypes suggests that many uncovered bacterial taxa exist in coral habitats and await future exploration. Our results indicate that coral species, and by extension other animal hosts, act as specialized habitats of otherwise rare microbes in marine ecosystems. Here, deep sequencing provided insights into coral microbiota at an unparalleled resolution and revealed that corals harbor many bacterial taxa previously not known. Given that two of the coral species investigated are listed as threatened under

  10. The Tarenaya hassleriana Genome Provides Insight into Reproductive Trait and Genome Evolution of Crucifers

    Cheng, S.; Bergh, van den E.; Zeng, P.; Zong, X.; Hofberger, J.; Bruijn, de S.A.; Bhide, A.S.; Kuelahoglu, C.; Bian, C.; Chen, J.; Fan, G.; Kaufmann, K.; Hall, J.C.; Becker, A.; Brautigam, A.; Weber, A.P.M.; Shi, C.; Zheng, Z.; Li, W.; Lv, M.; Tao, Y.; Wang, M.; Zou, H.; Quan, Z.; Hibberd, J.M.; Zhang, G.; Zhu, X.; Schranz, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    The Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crops, is unmatched among plants in its wealth of genomic and functional molecular data and has long served as a model for understanding gene, genome, and trait evolution. However, genome information from a phylogenetic outgroup that is e

  11. An atlas of over 90.000 conserved noncoding sequences provides insight into crucifer regulatory regions

    Haudry, A.; Platts, A.E.; Vello, E.; Hoen, D.R.; Leclerq, M.; Williamson, R.J.; Forczek, E.; Joly-Lopez, Z.; Steffen, J.G.; Hazzouri, K.M.; Dewar, K.; Stinchcombe, J.R.; Schoen, D.J.; Wang, X.; Schmutz, J.; Town, C.D.; Edger, P.P.; Pires, J.C.; Schumaker, K.S.; Jarvis, D.E.; Mandakova, T.; Lysak, M.; Bergh, van den E.; Schranz, M.E.; Harrison, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the central importance of noncoding DNA to gene regulation and evolution, understanding of the extent of selection on plant noncoding DNA remains limited compared to that of other organisms. Here we report sequencing of genomes from three Brassicaceae species (Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymb

  12. Phosphoproteomic analysis provides novel insights into stress responses in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a model diatom.

    Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Ming-kun; Li, Chong-yang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dian-bing; Zhang, Xian-en; Ge, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Protein phosphorylation on serine, threonine, and tyrosine (Ser/Thr/Tyr) is well established as a key regulatory posttranslational modification used in signal transduction to control cell growth, proliferation, and stress responses. However, little is known about its extent and function in diatoms. Phaeodactylum tricornutum is a unicellular marine diatom that has been used as a model organism for research on diatom molecular biology. Although more than 1000 protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues have been predicted in P. tricornutum, no phosphorylation event has so far been revealed by classical biochemical approaches. Here, we performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis combining protein/peptide fractionation, TiO(2) enrichment, and LC-MS/MS analyses. In total, we identified 264 unique phosphopeptides, including 434 in vivo phosphorylated sites on 245 phosphoproteins. The phosphorylated proteins were implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes, including signaling, metabolic pathways, and stress responses. Six identified phosphoproteins were further validated by Western blotting using phospho-specific antibodies. The functions of these proteins are discussed in the context of signal transduction networks in P. tricornutum. Our results advance the current understanding of diatom biology and will be useful for elucidating the phosphor-relay signaling networks in this model diatom. PMID:24712722

  13. Genome, Transcriptome, and Functional Analyses of Penicillium expansum Provide New Insights Into Secondary Metabolism and Pathogenicity.

    Ballester, Ana-Rosa; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Levin, Elena; Sela, Noa; Selma-Lázaro, Cristina; Carmona, Lourdes; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir; González-Candelas, Luis; Gabaldón, Toni

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between secondary metabolism and infection in pathogenic fungi has remained largely elusive. The genus Penicillium comprises a group of plant pathogens with varying host specificities and with the ability to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites. The genomes of three Penicillium expansum strains, the main postharvest pathogen of pome fruit, and one Pencillium italicum strain, a postharvest pathogen of citrus fruit, were sequenced and compared with 24 other fungal species. A genomic analysis of gene clusters responsible for the production of secondary metabolites was performed. Putative virulence factors in P. expansum were identified by means of a transcriptomic analysis of apple fruits during the course of infection. Despite a major genome contraction, P. expansum is the Penicillium species with the largest potential for the production of secondary metabolites. Results using knockout mutants clearly demonstrated that neither patulin nor citrinin are required by P. expansum to successfully infect apples. Li et al. ( MPMI-12-14-0398-FI ) reported similar results and conclusions in their recently accepted paper. PMID:25338147

  14. Maternal separation with early weaning: A rodent model providing novel insights into neglect associated developmental deficits

    Carlyle, Becky C.; Duque, Alvaro; Kitchen, Robert R; Bordner, Kelly A.; Coman, Daniel; DOOLITTLE, ELIZA; PAPADEMETRIS, XENOPHONIOS; Hyder, Fahmeed; Taylor, Jane R.; Simen, Arthur A.

    2012-01-01

    Child neglect is the most prevalent form of child maltreatment in the United States, and poses a serious public health concern. Children who survive such episodes go on to experience long-lasting psychological and behavioral problems, including higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, depression, alcohol and drug abuse, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and cognitive deficits. To date, most research into the causes of these life-long problems has focused on well-establ...

  15. Comparative Proteomic Analyses Provide New Insights into Low Phosphorus Stress Responses in Maize Leaves

    Zhang, Kewei; Liu, Hanhan; Tao, Peilin; Chen, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiency limits plant growth and development. To better understand the mechanisms behind how maize responds to phosphate stress, we compared the proteome analysis results of two groups of maize leaves that were treated separately with 1,000 µM (control, +P) and 5 µM of KH2PO4 (intervention group, −P) for 25 days. In total, 1,342 protein spots were detected on 2-DE maps and 15.43% had changed (P

  16. The human sebocyte culture model provides new insights into development and management of seborrhoea and acne.

    Zouboulis, C C; Xia, L; Akamatsu, H; Seltmann, H; Fritsch, M; Hornemann, S; Rühl, R; Chen, W; Nau, H; Orfanos, C E

    1998-01-01

    Seborrhoea and acne are exclusively human diseases and sebaceous gland differentiation is species specific. Therefore, fundamental research on human sebaceous cell function and control requires human in vitro models. The human sebocyte culture model, introduced in 1989, has been used in several studies to elucidate sebaceous gland activity and its regulation at the cellular level. Cultured human sebocytes have been shown to preserve important sebocytic characteristics, although they undergo an incomplete terminal differentiation in vitro. In vitro synthesis of free fatty acids without bacterial involvement and marked interleukin 1 alpha expression at the mRNA and protein levels with no further induction by lipopolysaccharides lead to the assumption that human sebocytes may initiate acne lesions by an intrinsic mechanism. Androgens affected sebocyte activity in vitro in a manner dependent on the localization of the sebaceous glands. In vitro stimulation of sebocyte proliferation by androgens could be completely abolished by spironolactone. Cultured sebocytes strongly expressed type 1 5 alpha-reductase and metabolized testosterone to androstenedione, 5 alpha-androstanedione, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androsterone and 5 alpha-androstanediol, whereas the levels of 5 alpha-reductase activity were probably not feedback regulated. 4,7 beta-Dimethyl-4-aza-5 alpha-cholestan-3-one, a type 1 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, induced an early, marked down-regulation of 5 alpha-reductase activity in human sebocytes in vitro, while hydrofinasteride, a type 2 inhibitor, required 10(3)-fold higher concentrations to induce similar effects. Stimulation of sebocyte proliferation by insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone and hydrocortisone indicates that the hormonal control of the sebaceous gland could be a complex mechanism. Retinoids inhibited sebocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulated lipid synthesis and sebocyte differentiation in vitro. Isotretinoin was the most potent compound. On the other hand, vitamin A was found essential for sebocyte activity and differentiation in vitro and could be partially substituted by synthetic retinoids. The inhibitory effect of isotretinoin on sebocyte proliferation was barely affected by the presence of vitamin A. The low persistent isotretinoin levels or, more likely, the considerably elevated tretinoin concentrations detected in human sebocytes after treatment with isotretinoin in vitro may be responsible for the inhibitory effect of this compound on sebocyte activity. PMID:9557220

  17. Analyzing Arabidopsis thaliana root proteome provides insights into the molecular bases of enantioselective imazethapyr toxicity

    Qian, Haifeng; Lu, Haiping; Ding, Haiyan; Lavoie, Michel; Li, Yali; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-07-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is a widely used chiral herbicide that inhibits the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). IM is thought to exert its toxic effects on amino acid synthesis mainly through inhibition of acetolactate synthase activity, but little is known about the potential effects of IM on other key biochemical pathways. Here, we exposed the model plant Arabidospsis thaliana to trace S- and R-IM enantiomer concentrations and examined IM toxicity effects on the root proteome using iTRAQ. Conventional analyses of root carbohydrates, organic acids, and enzyme activities were also performed. We discovered several previously unknown key biochemical pathways targeted by IM in Arabidospsis. 1,322 and 987 proteins were differentially expressed in response to R- and S-IM treatments, respectively. Bioinformatics and physiological analyses suggested that IM reduced the BCAA tissue content not only by strongly suppressing BCAA synthesis but also by increasing BCAA catabolism. IM also affected sugar and starch metabolism, changed the composition of root cell walls, increased citrate production and exudation, and affected the microbial community structure of the rhizosphere. The present study shed new light on the multiple toxicity mechanisms of a selective herbicide on a model plant.

  18. Comparative genomics of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Phanerochaete chrysosporium provide insight into selective ligninolysis

    Fernandez-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Ferreira, Patrica; Floudas, Dimitrios; HIbbett, David S.; Canessa, Paulo; Larrondo, Luis F.; James, Tim Y.; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Lobos, Sergio; Polanco, Ruben; Tello, Mario; Honda, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takahito; Watanabe, Takashi; Ryu, Jae San; Kubicek, Christian P.; Schmoll, Monika; Gaskell, Jill; Hammel, Kenneth E.; John, Franz J.; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Sabat, Grzegorz; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Yadav, Jagjit S.; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Lavin, Jose L.; Oguiza, Jose A.; Perez, Gumer; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramirez, Lucia; Santoyo, Francisco; Master, Emma; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Lombard, Vincent; Magnuson, Jon Karl; Kues, Ursula; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Held, Benjamin W.; Barry, Kerrie W.; LaButti, Kurt M.; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan M.; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf A.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Schwenk, Daniel; Hadar, Yitzhak; Yarden, Oded; de Vries, Ronald P.; Wiebenga, Ad; Stenlid, Jan; Eastwood, Daniel; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Berka, Randy M.; Blanchette, Robert A.; Kersten, Phil; Martinez, Angel T.; Vicuna, Rafael; Cullen, Dan

    2011-12-06

    Efficient lignin depolymerization is unique to the wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as white rot fungi. Phanerochaete chrysosporium simultaneously degrades lignin and cellulose, whereas the closely related species, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, also depolymerizes lignin but may do so with relatively little cellulose degradation. To investigate the basis for selective ligninolysis, we conducted comparative genome analysis of C. subvermispora and P. chrysosporium. Genes encoding manganese peroxidase numbered 13 and five in C. subvermispora and P. chrysosporium, respectively. In addition, the C. subvermispora genome contains at least seven genes predicted to encode laccases, whereas the P. chrysosporium genome contains none. We also observed expansion of the number of C. subvermispora desaturase-encoding genes putatively involved in lipid metabolism. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis showed substantial up-regulation of several desaturase and MnP genes in wood-containing medium. MS identified MnP proteins in C. subvermispora culture filtrates, but none in P. chrysosporium cultures. These results support the importance of MnP and a lignin degradation mechanism whereby cleavage of the dominant nonphenolic structures is mediated by lipid peroxidation products. Two C. subvermispora genes were predicted to encode peroxidases structurally similar to P. chrysosporium lignin peroxidase and, following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, the enzymes were shown to oxidize high redox potential substrates, but not Mn2. Apart from oxidative lignin degradation, we also examined cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic systems in both fungi. In summary, the C. subvermispora genetic inventory and expression patterns exhibit increased oxidoreductase potential and diminished cellulolytic capability relative to P. chrysosporium.

  19. Platypus TCRμ provides insight into the origins and evolution of a uniquely mammalian TCR locus1

    Wang, Xinxin; Parra, Zuly E.; Miller, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    TCRμ is an unconventional TCR that was first discovered in marsupials and appears to be absent from placental mammals and non-mammals. Here we show that TCRμ is also present in the duckbill platypus, an egg-laying monotreme, consistent with TCRμ being ancient and present in the last common ancestor of all extant mammals. As in marsupials, platypus TCRμ is expressed in a form containing double V domains. These V domains more closely resemble antibody V than that of conventional TCR. Platypus T...

  20. Echidna Venom Gland Transcriptome Provides Insights into the Evolution of Monotreme Venom

    Wong, Emily S.W.; Nicol, Stewart; Warren, Wesley C.; Belov, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Monotremes (echidna and platypus) are egg-laying mammals. One of their most unique characteristic is that males have venom/crural glands that are seasonally active. Male platypuses produce venom during the breeding season, delivered via spurs, to aid in competition against other males. Echidnas are not able to erect their spurs, but a milky secretion is produced by the gland during the breeding season. The function and molecular composition of echidna venom is as yet unknown. Hence, we compar...

  1. Mudskipper genomes provide insights into the terrestrial adaptation of amphibious fishes

    You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Zan, Qijie; Xu, Xun; Liu, Xin; Chen, Jieming; Wang, Jintu; Qiu, Ying; Li, Wujiao; Zhang, Xinhui; Sun, Ying; Chen, Shixi; Hong, Wanshu; Li, Yuxiang; Cheng, Shifeng; Fan, Guangyi; Shi, Chengcheng; Liang, Jie; Tom Tang, Y; Yang, Chengye; Ruan, Zhiqiang; Bai, Jie; Peng, Chao; Mu, Qian; Lu, Jun; Fan, Mingjun; Yang, Shuang; Huang, Zhiyong; Jiang, Xuanting; Fang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guojie; Zhang, Yong; Polgar, Gianluca; Yu, Hui; Li, Jia; Liu, Zhongjian; Zhang, Guoqiang; Ravi, Vydianathan; Coon, Steven L; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Wang, Jun; Shi, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    Mudskippers are amphibious fishes that have developed morphological and physiological adaptations to match their unique lifestyles. Here we perform whole-genome sequencing of four representative mudskippers to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptations. We discover an expansi...

  2. Combined metabolome and transcriptome profiling provides new insights into diterpene biosynthesis in S. pomifera glandular trichomes

    Trikka, Fotini A; Nikolaidis, Alexandros; Ignea, Codruta; Tsaballa, Aphrodite; Tziveleka, Leto-Aikaterini; Ioannou, Efstathia; Roussis, Vassilios; Stea, Eleni A; Božić, Dragana; Argiriou, Anagnostis; Kanellis, Angelos K; Kampranis, Sotirios C; Makris, Antonios M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Salvia diterpenes have been found to have health promoting properties. Among them, carnosic acid and carnosol, tanshinones and sclareol are well known for their cardiovascular, antitumor, antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. However, many of these compounds are not available at...

  3. Community Structure in Methanogenic Enrichments Provides Insight into Syntrophic Interactions in Hydrocarbon-Impacted Environments.

    Fowler, S Jane; Toth, Courtney R A; Gieg, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil involves the conversion of hydrocarbons to methanogenic substrates by syntrophic bacteria and subsequent methane production by methanogens. Assessing the metabolic roles played by various microbial species in syntrophic communities remains a challenge, but such information has important implications for bioremediation and microbial enhanced energy recovery technologies. Many factors such as changing environmental conditions or substrate variations can influence the composition and biodegradation capabilities of syntrophic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. In this study, a methanogenic crude oil-degrading enrichment culture was successively transferred onto the single long chain fatty acids palmitate or stearate followed by their parent alkanes, hexadecane or octadecane, respectively, in order to assess the impact of different substrates on microbial community composition and retention of hydrocarbon biodegradation genes. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that a reduction in substrate diversity resulted in a corresponding loss of microbial diversity, but that hydrocarbon biodegradation genes (such as assA/masD encoding alkylsuccinate synthase) could be retained within a community even in the absence of hydrocarbon substrates. Despite substrate-related diversity changes, all communities were dominated by hydrogenotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens along with bacteria including Clostridium sp., members of the Deltaproteobacteria, and a number of other phyla. Microbial co-occurrence network analysis revealed a dense network of interactions amongst syntrophic bacteria and methanogens that were maintained despite changes in the substrates for methanogenesis. Our results reveal the effect of substrate diversity loss on microbial community diversity, indicate that many syntrophic interactions are stable over time despite changes in substrate pressure, and show that syntrophic interactions amongst bacteria themselves are as important as interactions between bacteria and methanogens in complex methanogenic communities. PMID:27148240

  4. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Networks: Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropsychology Provide New Insights

    Millet, Bruno; Dondaine, Thibaut; Reymann, Jean-Michel; Bourguignon, Aurélie; Naudet, Florian; Jaafari, Nematollah; Drapier, Dominique; Turmel, Valérie; Mesbah, Habiba; Vérin, Marc; Le Jeune, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation has shed new light on the central role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We explored this structure from a functional perspective, synchronizing neuroimaging and cognitive measures. Methods and Findings This case-control cross-sectional study compared 15 OCD patients without comorbidities and not currently on serotonin reuptake inhibitors or cognitive behavioural therapy with 15 healthy controls (matched for age, sex and e...

  5. Basal Gnathostomes Provide Unique Insights into the Evolution of Vitamin B12 Binders

    Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Ruivo, Raquel; Delgado, Inês; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Castro, L. Filipe C.

    2015-01-01

    The uptake and transport of vitamin B12 (cobalamin; Cbl) in mammals involves a refined system with three evolutionarily related transporters: transcobalamin 1 (Tcn1), transcobalamin 2 (Tcn2), and the gastric intrinsic factor (Gif). Teleosts have a single documented binder with intermediate features to the human counterparts. Consequently, it has been proposed that the expansion of Cbl binders occurred after the separation of Actinopterygians. Here, we demonstrate that the diversification of this gene family took place earlier in gnathostome ancestry. Our data indicates the presence of single copy orthologs of the Sarcopterygii/Tetrapoda duplicates Tcn1 and Gif, and Tcn2, in Chondrichthyes. In addition, a highly divergent Cbl binder was found in the Elasmobranchii. We unveil a complex scenario forged by genome, tandem duplications and lineage-specific gene loss. Our findings suggest that from an ancestral transporter, exhibiting large spectrum and high affinity binding, highly specific Cbl transporters emerged through gene duplication and mutations at the binding pocket. PMID:25552533

  6. In situ neutron diffraction under high pressure-Providing an insight into working catalysts

    Kandemir, Timur [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Hansen, Thomas [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Liss, Klaus-Dieter [The Bragg Institute, ANSTO, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2232 (Australia); Naumann d' Alnoncourt, Raoul; Schloegl, Robert [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Behrens, Malte, E-mail: behrens@fhi-berlin.mpg.de [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    In the present work the construction and application of a continuous flow cell is presented, from which neutron diffraction data could be obtained during catalytic reactions at high pressure. By coupling an online gas detection system, parallel structure and activity investigations of working catalysts under industrial relevant conditions are possible. The flow cell can be operated with different feed gases in a wide range from room temperature to 603 K. Pressures from ambient up to 6 MPa are applicable. An exchangeable sample positioning system makes the flow cell suitable for several different goniomter types on a variety of instrument beam lines. Complementary operational test measurements were carried out monitoring reduction of and methanol synthesis over a Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at the high-flux powder diffraction beamline D1B at ILL and high-resolution diffraction beamline Echidna at ANSTO.

  7. Associations between transcriptional changes and protein phenotypes provide insights into immune regulation in corals.

    Fuess, Lauren E; Pinzόn C, Jorge H; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2016-09-01

    Disease outbreaks in marine ecosystems have driven worldwide declines of numerous taxa, including corals. Some corals, such as Orbicella faveolata, are particularly susceptible to disease. To explore the mechanisms contributing to susceptibility, colonies of O. faveolata were exposed to immune challenge with lipopolysaccharides. RNA sequencing and protein activity assays were used to characterize the response of corals to immune challenge. Differential expression analyses identified 17 immune-related transcripts that varied in expression post-immune challenge. Network analyses revealed several groups of transcripts correlated to immune protein activity. Several transcripts, which were annotated as positive regulators of immunity were included in these groups, and some were downregulated following immune challenge. Correlations between expression of these transcripts and protein activity results further supported the role of these transcripts in positive regulation of immunity. The observed pattern of gene expression and protein activity may elucidate the processes contributing to the disease susceptibility of species like O. faveolata. PMID:27109903

  8. A Devonian predatory fish provides insights into the early evolution of modern sarcopterygians.

    Lu, Jing; Zhu, Min; Ahlberg, Per Erik; Qiao, Tuo; Zhu, You'an; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liantao

    2016-06-01

    Crown or modern sarcopterygians (coelacanths, lungfishes, and tetrapods) differ substantially from stem sarcopterygians, such as Guiyu and Psarolepis, and a lack of transitional fossil taxa limits our understanding of the origin of the crown group. The Onychodontiformes, an enigmatic Devonian predatory fish group, seems to have characteristics of both stem and crown sarcopterygians but is difficult to place because of insufficient anatomical information. We describe the new skull material of Qingmenodus, a Pragian (~409-million-year-old) onychodont from China, using high-resolution computed tomography to image internal structures of the braincase. In addition to its remarkable similarities with stem sarcopterygians in the ethmosphenoid portion, Qingmenodus exhibits coelacanth-like neurocranial features in the otic region. A phylogenetic analysis based on a revised data set unambiguously assigns onychodonts to crown sarcopterygians as stem coelacanths. Qingmenodus thus bridges the morphological gap between stem sarcopterygians and coelacanths and helps to illuminate the early evolution and diversification of crown sarcopterygians. PMID:27386576

  9. Child Poverty in Vietnam: Providing Insights Using a Country-Specific and Multidimensional Model

    Roelen, Keetie; Gassmann, Franziska; de Neubourg, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Despite a wide under-prioritization, the issue of child poverty has received increasing attention worldwide over the last decade. The acknowledgement in Vietnam that child-specific poverty measurement is crucial for poverty efforts directed towards children, and the current lack thereof, instigated the development of a Vietnam child poverty approach. This paper proposes a country-specific, multidimensional and outcome-based approach for the measurement of the incidence, depth and severity of ...

  10. RNA sequencing atopic dermatitis transcriptome profiling provides insights into novel disease mechanisms with potential therapeutic implications

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Ungar, Benjamin; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Ewald, David Adrian; Rozenblit, Mariya; Gonzalez, Juana; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Peng, Xiangyu; Estrada, Yeriel D.; Dillon, Stacey; Krueger, James G.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes. These li...

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis provides insight into cadmium stress responses in brown algae Sargassum fusiforme

    Highlights: • Proteomic analysis of brown algae response different level Cd stress was performed. • Proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism were reduced under 1 day Cd stress. • 5 days Cd stress induced glycolysis and citrate cycle related proteins. • Graphic depiction of different metabolic pathways response to Cd stress was framed. - Abstract: Sargassum fusiforme is one of the most widely consumed seaweeds in China, Korea and Japan. In this work, we performed growth analysis and comparative proteomics to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the response to 1 day and 5 days Cd stress in S. fusiforme. Our results showed a significant decrease in growth rate and an increase in Cd ion content in S. fusiforme in response to Cd treatment. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 25 and 51 differentially expressed protein spots in S. fusiforme under 1 day and 5 days Cd stress, respectively. A great number of these proteins was metabolic enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy metabolism. Many proteins involved in the processing of genetic information showed a decrease in abundance under 1 day Cd stress. In contrast, 9 of the identified protein spots primarily involved in genetic information processing and carbohydrate metabolism were greatly enriched under 5 days Cd stress. Overall, our investigation indicated that Cd stress negatively affects the metabolic activity of S. fusiforme through the down-regulation of key metabolic enzymes. In addition, S. fusiforme may adapt to 5 days Cd stress by promoting consumption of photoassimilates through the up-regulation of glycolysis and the citrate cycle to supply energy for survival

  12. Comparative Genome Analysis Provides Insights into the Pathogenicity of Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger;

    2016-01-01

    describe the F. psychrophilum pan-genome and to examine virulence factors, prophages, CRISPR arrays, and genomic islands present in the genomes. Analysis of the genomic DNA sequences were complemented with selected phenotypic characteristics of the strains. The pan genome analysis showed that F......, independent of geographic location, year of isolation and source of isolates. Only one prophage-related sequence was found which corresponded to the previously described prophage 6H, and appeared in 5 out of 11 isolates. CRISPR array analysis revealed two different loci with dissimilar spacer content, which...

  13. Resistance Patterns Associated with HCV NS5A Inhibitors Provide Limited Insight into Drug Binding

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs have significantly improved the treatment of infection with the hepatitis C virus. A promising class of novel antiviral agents targets the HCV NS5A protein. The high potency and broad genotypic coverage are favorable properties. NS5A inhibitors are currently assessed in advanced clinical trials in combination with viral polymerase inhibitors and/or viral protease inhibitors. However, the clinical use of NS5A inhibitors is also associated with new challenges. HCV variants with decreased susceptibility to these drugs can emerge and compromise therapy. In this review, we discuss resistance patterns in NS5A with focus prevalence and implications for inhibitor binding.

  14. Large Scale Sequencing of Dothideomycetes Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and Adaptation

    Haridas, Sajeet; Crous, Pedro; Binder, Manfred; Spatafora, Joseph; Grigoriev, Igor

    2015-03-16

    Dothideomycetes is the largest and most diverse class of ascomycete fungi with 23 orders 110 families, 1300 genera and over 19,000 known species. We present comparative analysis of 70 Dothideomycete genomes including over 50 that we sequenced and are as yet unpublished. This extensive sampling has almost quadrupled the previous study of 18 species and uncovered a 10 fold range of genome sizes. We were able to clarify the phylogenetic positions of several species whose origins were unclear in previous morphological and sequence comparison studies. We analyzed selected gene families including proteases, transporters and small secreted proteins and show that major differences in gene content is influenced by speciation.

  15. Statistical Mechanics Provides Novel Insights into Microtubule Stability and Mechanism of Shrinkage

    Jain, Ishutesh; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Microtubules are cylindrical machines inside biological cells, and are crucial for many functions such as chromosome segregation, intra-cellular transport, and cell motility. They are made of 13 elastic filaments (protofilaments) that can be either in a straight or in a curved conformation depending on the chemical state of the constituent tubulin molecules. The interplay between these two conformations help microtubules to display a fascinating phenomenon known as “dynamic ins...

  16. Child Poverty in Vietnam: Providing Insights Using a Country-Specific and Multidimensional Model

    Roelen, Keetie; Gassmann, Franziska; de Neubourg, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Despite a wide under-prioritization, the issue of child poverty has received increasing attention worldwide over the last decade. The acknowledgement in Vietnam that child-specific poverty measurement is crucial for poverty efforts directed towards children, and the current lack thereof, instigated the development of a Vietnam child poverty…

  17. Statistical mechanics provides novel insights into microtubule stability and mechanism of shrinkage.

    Ishutesh Jain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are nano-machines that grow and shrink stochastically, making use of the coupling between chemical kinetics and mechanics of its constituent protofilaments (PFs. We investigate the stability and shrinkage of microtubules taking into account inter-protofilament interactions and bending interactions of intrinsically curved PFs. Computing the free energy as a function of PF tip position, we show that the competition between curvature energy, inter-PF interaction energy and entropy leads to a rich landscape with a series of minima that repeat over a length-scale determined by the intrinsic curvature. Computing Langevin dynamics of the tip through the landscape and accounting for depolymerization, we calculate the average unzippering and shrinkage velocities of GDP protofilaments and compare them with the experimentally known results. Our analysis predicts that the strength of the inter-PF interaction (E(s(m has to be comparable to the strength of the curvature energy (E(b(m such that E(s(m - E(b(m ≈ 1kBT, and questions the prevalent notion that unzippering results from the domination of bending energy of curved GDP PFs. Our work demonstrates how the shape of the free energy landscape is crucial in explaining the mechanism of MT shrinkage where the unzippered PFs will fluctuate in a set of partially peeled off states and subunit dissociation will reduce the length.

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis provides insight into cadmium stress responses in brown algae Sargassum fusiforme

    Zhang, Aiqin; Xu, Tao [Alkali Soil Natural Environmental Science Center, Northeast Forestry University, Key Laboratory of Saline–alkali Vegetation Ecology Restoration in Oil Field, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150040 (China); Zou, Huixi [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory for Subtropical Water Environment and Marine Biological Resources Protection, College of Life and Environmental Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Pang, Qiuying, E-mail: qiuying@nefu.edu.cn [Alkali Soil Natural Environmental Science Center, Northeast Forestry University, Key Laboratory of Saline–alkali Vegetation Ecology Restoration in Oil Field, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Proteomic analysis of brown algae response different level Cd stress was performed. • Proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism were reduced under 1 day Cd stress. • 5 days Cd stress induced glycolysis and citrate cycle related proteins. • Graphic depiction of different metabolic pathways response to Cd stress was framed. - Abstract: Sargassum fusiforme is one of the most widely consumed seaweeds in China, Korea and Japan. In this work, we performed growth analysis and comparative proteomics to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the response to 1 day and 5 days Cd stress in S. fusiforme. Our results showed a significant decrease in growth rate and an increase in Cd ion content in S. fusiforme in response to Cd treatment. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 25 and 51 differentially expressed protein spots in S. fusiforme under 1 day and 5 days Cd stress, respectively. A great number of these proteins was metabolic enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy metabolism. Many proteins involved in the processing of genetic information showed a decrease in abundance under 1 day Cd stress. In contrast, 9 of the identified protein spots primarily involved in genetic information processing and carbohydrate metabolism were greatly enriched under 5 days Cd stress. Overall, our investigation indicated that Cd stress negatively affects the metabolic activity of S. fusiforme through the down-regulation of key metabolic enzymes. In addition, S. fusiforme may adapt to 5 days Cd stress by promoting consumption of photoassimilates through the up-regulation of glycolysis and the citrate cycle to supply energy for survival.

  19. The Use of Agmatine Provides the New Insight in an Experimental Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Ninkovic, Milica; Stevanovic, Ivana; Stojanovic, Ivana; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Basic, Jelena; Peric, Predrag

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the hypothesis that agmatine (AGM) enhances blood brain barrier (BBB) compounds properties in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is an established animal model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS). Wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) CBA/H iNOS-/- mice, 3 months old (15 ± 5 g) were used for EAE induction by myelin basic protein (MBP) dissolved in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The animals were divided into control, CFA, EAE, EAE + AGM and AGM groups. After the development of full clinical remission, the animals were sacrificed and the immunohistochemical and biochemical examinations were performed in brain homogenates. We had noticed the increased expressions of occludin in WT and KO mice with EAE + AGM, compared to EAE groups in which these expressions were significantly decreased compared to the controls. The significant elevations of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-MMP-3 and MMP-9 in WT and KO EAE animals were decreased during AGM treatment in both groups. AGM application post EAE in WT and KO mice caused decreased level of Iba-1 stain, compared to EAE groups. The obtained results suggest beneficial AGM effects in EAE on BBB components, which might be useful for novel therapeutic strategies in MS. PMID:26141226

  20. Transcriptomics provides insight into Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) mantle function and its role in biomineralisation.

    Bjärnmark, Nadège A; Yarra, T; Churcher, A M; Felix, R C; Clark, M S; Power, D M

    2016-06-01

    The mantle is an organ common to all molluscs and is at the forefront of the biomineralisation process. The present study used the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) as a model species to investigate the structural and functional role of the mantle in shell formation. The transcriptomes of three regions of the mantle edge (umbo to posterior edge) were sequenced using Illumina technology which yielded a total of 61,674,325 reads after adapter trimming and filtering. The raw reads assembled into 179,879 transcripts with an N50 value of 1086bp. A total of 1363 transcripts (321, 223 and 816 in regions 1, 2 and 3, respectively) that differed in abundance in the three mantle regions were identified and putative function was assigned to 54% using BLAST sequence similarity searches (cut-off less than 1e(-10)). Morphological differences detected by histology of the three mantle regions was linked to functional heterogeneity by selecting the top five most abundant Pfam domains in the annotated 1363 differentially abundant transcripts across the three mantle regions. Calcium binding domains dominated region two (middle segment of the mantle edge). Candidate biomineralisation genes were mined and tested by qPCR. This revealed that Flp-like, a penicillin binding protein potentially involved in shell matrix maintenance of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), had significantly higher expression in the posterior end of the mantle edge (region one). Our findings are intriguing as they indicate that the mantle edge appears to be a heterogeneous tissue, displaying structural and functional bias. PMID:27037218

  1. Vascular Sap Proteomics: Providing Insight into Long-Distance Signaling during Stress

    Carella, Philip; Wilson, Daniel C.; Kempthorne, Christine J.; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-01-01

    The plant vascular system, composed of the xylem and phloem, is important for the transport of water, mineral nutrients, and photosynthate throughout the plant body. The vasculature is also the primary means by which developmental and stress signals move from one organ to another. Due to practical and technological limitations, proteomics analysis of xylem and phloem sap has been understudied in comparison to accessible sample types such as leaves and roots. However, recent advances in sample...

  2. Vascular sap proteomics: providing insight into long-distance signaling during stress

    Philip eCarella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The plant vascular system, composed of the xylem and phloem, is important for the transport of water, mineral nutrients, and photosynthate throughout the plant body. The vasculature is also the primary means by which developmental and stress signals move from one organ to another. Due to practical and technological limitations, proteomics analysis of xylem and phloem sap has been understudied in comparison to accessible sample types such as leaves and roots. However, recent advances in sample collection techniques and mass spectrometry technology are making it possible to comprehensively analyze vascular sap proteomes. In this mini-review we discuss the emerging field of vascular sap proteomics, with a focus on recent comparative studies to identify vascular proteins that may play roles in long-distance signaling and other processes during stress responses in plants.

  3. Vascular Sap Proteomics: Providing Insight into Long-Distance Signaling during Stress.

    Carella, Philip; Wilson, Daniel C; Kempthorne, Christine J; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-01-01

    The plant vascular system, composed of the xylem and phloem, is important for the transport of water, mineral nutrients, and photosynthate throughout the plant body. The vasculature is also the primary means by which developmental and stress signals move from one organ to another. Due to practical and technological limitations, proteomics analysis of xylem and phloem sap has been understudied in comparison to accessible sample types such as leaves and roots. However, recent advances in sample collection techniques and mass spectrometry technology are making it possible to comprehensively analyze vascular sap proteomes. In this mini-review, we discuss the emerging field of vascular sap proteomics, with a focus on recent comparative studies to identify vascular proteins that may play roles in long-distance signaling and other processes during stress responses in plants. PMID:27242852

  4. Vascular sap proteomics: providing insight into long-distance signaling during stress

    Philip eCarella; Daniel Cullen Wilson; Christine Janine Kempthorne; Robin Katrina Cameron

    2016-01-01

    The plant vascular system, composed of the xylem and phloem, is important for the transport of water, mineral nutrients, and photosynthate throughout the plant body. The vasculature is also the primary means by which developmental and stress signals move from one organ to another. Due to practical and technological limitations, proteomics analysis of xylem and phloem sap has been understudied in comparison to accessible sample types such as leaves and roots. However, recent advances in sample...

  5. Survey of the genome of Pogostemon cablin provides insights into its evolutionary history and sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis

    He, Yang; Xiao, Hongtao; Deng, Cao; Xiong, Liang; Nie, Hu; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth. (Patchouli) is an important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that has both essential oil value and a broad range of therapeutic effects. Here we report the first de novo assembled 1.15-Gb draft genome sequence for P. cablin from next-generation sequencing technology. Our assembly, with a misassembly rate of plant species. The patchouli genome will facilitate future research on secondary metabolic pathways and their regulation as well as potential selective breeding of patchouli. PMID:27198881

  6. Insights into mRNP biogenesis provided by new genetic interactions among export and transcription factors

    Estruch Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The various steps of mRNP biogenesis (transcription, processing and export are interconnected. It has been shown that the transcription machinery plays a pivotal role in mRNP assembly, since several mRNA export factors are recruited during transcription and physically interact with components of the transcription machinery. Although the shuttling DEAD-box protein Dbp5p is concentrated on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC, previous studies demonstrated that it interacts physically and genetically with factors involved in transcription initiation. Results We investigated the effect of mutations affecting various components of the transcription initiation apparatus on the phenotypes of mRNA export mutant strains. Our results show that growth and mRNA export defects of dbp5 and mex67 mutant strains can be suppressed by mutation of specific transcription initiation components, but suppression was not observed for mutants acting in the very first steps of the pre-initiation complex (PIC formation. Conclusions Our results indicate that mere reduction in the amount of mRNP produced is not sufficient to suppress the defects caused by a defective mRNA export factor. Suppression occurs only with mutants affecting events within a narrow window of the mRNP biogenesis process. We propose that reducing the speed with which transcription converts from initiation and promoter clearance to elongation may have a positive effect on mRNP formation by permitting more effective recruitment of partially-functional mRNP proteins to the nascent mRNP.

  7. Insights on short–term blooms of planktonic ciliates, provided by an easily recognised genus: Cyrtostrombidium

    Bulit, C.; Macek, Miroslav; Montagnes, D. J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-12. ISSN 0065-1583 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : bloom * conjugation * parasitism * patch * population dynamics * lagoon Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.179, year: 2013

  8. Gene Ontology Analysis of GWA Study Data Sets Provides Insights into the Biology of Bipolar Disorder

    Holmans, Peter; Green, Elaine K; Pahwa, Jaspreet Singh; Ferreira, Manuel A.R.; Purcell, Shaun M; Sklar, Pamela; Owen, Michael J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for testing overrepresentation of biological pathways, indexed by gene-ontology terms, in lists of significant SNPs from genome-wide association studies. This method corrects for linkage disequilibrium between SNPs, variable gene size, and multiple testing of nonindependent pathways. The method was applied to the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium Crohn disease (CD) data set. At a general level, the biological basis of CD is relatively well known for a complex genetic ...

  9. Gene ontology analysis of GWA study data sets provides insights into the biology of bipolar disorder.

    Holmans, Peter; Green, Elaine K; Pahwa, Jaspreet Singh; Ferreira, Manuel A R; Purcell, Shaun M; Sklar, Pamela; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Craddock, Nick

    2009-07-01

    We present a method for testing overrepresentation of biological pathways, indexed by gene-ontology terms, in lists of significant SNPs from genome-wide association studies. This method corrects for linkage disequilibrium between SNPs, variable gene size, and multiple testing of nonindependent pathways. The method was applied to the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium Crohn disease (CD) data set. At a general level, the biological basis of CD is relatively well known for a complex genetic trait, and it thus acted as a test of the method. The method, known as ALIGATOR (Association LIst Go AnnoTatOR), successfully detected biological pathways implicated in CD. The method was also applied to a meta-analysis of bipolar disorder, and it implicated the modulation of transcription and cellular activity, including that which occurs via hormonal action, as an important player in pathogenesis. PMID:19539887

  10. Fish genomes provide novel insights into the evolution of vertebrate secretin receptors and their ligand.

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Trindade, Marlene; Power, Deborah M

    2014-12-01

    The secretin receptor (SCTR) is a member of Class 2 subfamily B1 GPCRs and part of the PAC1/VPAC receptor subfamily. This receptor has long been known in mammals but has only recently been identified in other vertebrates including teleosts, from which it was previously considered to be absent. The ligand for SCTR in mammals is secretin (SCT), an important gastrointestinal peptide, which in teleosts has not yet been isolated, or the gene identified. This study revises the evolutionary model previously proposed for the secretin-GPCRs in metazoan by analysing in detail the fishes, the most successful of the extant vertebrates. All the Actinopterygii genomes analysed and the Chondrichthyes and Sarcopterygii fish possess a SCTR gene that shares conserved sequence, structure and synteny with the tetrapod homologue. Phylogenetic clustering and gene environment comparisons revealed that fish and tetrapod SCTR shared a common origin and diverged early from the PAC1/VPAC subfamily group. In teleosts SCTR duplicated as a result of the fish specific whole genome duplication but in all the teleost genomes analysed, with the exception of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), one of the duplicates was lost. The function of SCTR in teleosts is unknown but quantitative PCR revealed that in both sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) transcript abundance is high in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting it may intervene in similar processes to those in mammals. In contrast, no gene encoding the ligand SCT was identified in the ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) although it was present in the coelacanth (lobe finned fish, Sarcopterygii) and in the elephant shark (holocephalian). The genes in linkage with SCT in tetrapods and coelacanth were also identified in ray-finned fishes supporting the idea that it was lost from their genome. At present SCTR remains an orphan receptor in ray-finned fishes and it will be of interest in the future to establish why SCT was lost and which ligand substitutes for it so that full characterization of the receptor can occur. PMID:24906176

  11. Community Structure in Methanogenic Enrichments Provides Insight into Syntrophic Interactions in Hydrocarbon-Impacted Environments

    Fowler, Jane; Toth, Courtney R. A.; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    , but such information has important implications for bioremediation and microbial enhanced energy recovery technologies. Many factors such as changing environmental conditions or substrate variations can influence the composition and biodegradation capabilities of syntrophic microbial communities in hydrocarbon...... of other phyla. Microbial co-occurrence network analysis revealed a dense network of interactions amongst syntrophic bacteria and methanogens that were maintained despite changes in the substrates for methanogenesis. Our results reveal the effect of substrate diversity loss on microbial community diversity......The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil involves the conversion of hydrocarbons to methanogenic substrates by syntrophic bacteria and subsequent methane production by methanogens. Assessing the metabolic roles played by various microbial species in syntrophic communities remains a challenge...

  12. The Epigenome of Schistosoma mansoni Provides Insight about How Cercariae Poise Transcription until Infection

    Roquis, David; Lepesant, Julie Mireille; Picard, Marion A.L.; M. Freitag; Parrinello, Hugues; Groth, Marco; Emans, Rémi; Cosseau, Céline; Grunau, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Chromatin structure can control gene expression and can define specific transcription states. For example, bivalent methylation of histone H3K4 and H3K27 is linked to poised transcription in vertebrate embryonic stem cells (ESC). It allows them to rapidly engage specific developmental pathways. We reasoned that non-vertebrate metazoans that encounter a similar developmental constraint (i.e. to quickly start development into a new phenotype) might use a similar system. Schistosomes ...

  13. HIV-1 Viral RNA Dynamics at the Plasma Membrane May Provide Insight into Viral Assembly | Poster

    Many aspects of how infectious viruses assemble in cells have yet to be completely deciphered. However, as reported in a recent Journal of Virology paper, researchers may be one step closer to understanding how HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, assembles and replicates.

  14. Whole genome sequencing provides insights into the genetic determinants of invasiveness in Salmonella Dublin.

    Mohammed, M; Cormican, M

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin (S. Dublin) is one of the non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS); however, a relatively high proportion of human infections are associated with invasive disease. We applied whole genome sequencing to representative invasive and non-invasive clinical isolates of S. Dublin to determine the genomic variations among them and to investigate the underlying genetic determinants associated with invasiveness in S. Dublin. Although no particular genomic variation was found to differentiate in invasive and non-invasive isolates four virulence factors were detected within the genome of all isolates including two different type VI secretion systems (T6SS) encoded on two Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI), including SPI-6 (T6SSSPI-6) and SPI-19 (T6SSSPI-19), an intact lambdoid prophage (Gifsy-2-like prophage) that contributes significantly to the virulence and pathogenesis of Salmonella serotypes in addition to a virulence plasmid. These four virulence factors may all contribute to the potential of S. Dublin to cause invasive disease in humans. PMID:26996313

  15. Garlic (Allium sativum L.) fertility: transcriptome and proteome analyses provide insight into flower and pollen development

    Shemesh-Mayer, Einat; Ben-Michael, Tomer; Rotem, Neta; Haim D. Rabinowitch; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Perlikowski, Dawid; Sherman, Amir; Kamenetsky, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Commercial cultivars of garlic, a popular condiment, are sterile, making genetic studies and breeding of this plant challenging. However, recent fertility restoration has enabled advanced physiological and genetic research and hybridization in this important crop. Morphophysiological studies, combined with transcriptome and proteome analyses and quantitative PCR validation, enabled the identification of genes and specific processes involved in gametogenesis in fertile and male-sterile garlic ...

  16. Single-cell genomics of a rare environmental alphaproteobacterium provides unique insights into Rickettsiaceae evolution.

    Martijn, Joran; Schulz, Frederik; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Viklund, Johan; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Andersson, Siv G E; Horn, Matthias; Guy, Lionel; Ettema, Thijs J G

    2015-11-01

    The bacterial family Rickettsiaceae includes a group of well-known etiological agents of many human and vertebrate diseases, including epidemic typhus-causing pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii. Owing to their medical relevance, rickettsiae have attracted a great deal of attention and their host-pathogen interactions have been thoroughly investigated. All known members display obligate intracellular lifestyles, and the best-studied genera, Rickettsia and Orientia, include species that are hosted by terrestrial arthropods. Their obligate intracellular lifestyle and host adaptation is reflected in the small size of their genomes, a general feature shared with all other families of the Rickettsiales. Yet, despite that the Rickettsiaceae and other Rickettsiales families have been extensively studied for decades, many details of the origin and evolution of their obligate host-association remain elusive. Here we report the discovery and single-cell sequencing of 'Candidatus Arcanobacter lacustris', a rare environmental alphaproteobacterium that was sampled from Damariscotta Lake that represents a deeply rooting sister lineage of the Rickettsiaceae. Intriguingly, phylogenomic and comparative analysis of the partial 'Candidatus Arcanobacter lacustris' genome revealed the presence chemotaxis genes and vertically inherited flagellar genes, a novelty in sequenced Rickettsiaceae, as well as several host-associated features. This finding suggests that the ancestor of the Rickettsiaceae might have had a facultative intracellular lifestyle. Our study underlines the efficacy of single-cell genomics for studying microbial diversity and evolution in general, and for rare microbial cells in particular. PMID:25848874

  17. The Dendrobium catenatum Lindl. genome sequence provides insights into polysaccharide synthase, floral development and adaptive evolution.

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Qing; Bian, Chao; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Ke-Wei; Yoshida, Kouki; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Chang, Song-Bin; Chen, Fei; Shi, Yu; Su, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Li-Jun; Yin, Yayi; Lin, Min; Huang, Huixia; Deng, Hua; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhu, Shi-Lin; Zhao, Xiang; Deng, Cao; Niu, Shan-Ce; Huang, Jie; Wang, Meina; Liu, Guo-Hui; Yang, Hai-Jun; Xiao, Xin-Ju; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chen, You-Yi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Luo, Yi-Bo; Van de Peer, Yves; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Orchids make up about 10% of all seed plant species, have great economical value, and are of specific scientific interest because of their renowned flowers and ecological adaptations. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a lithophytic orchid, Dendrobium catenatum. We predict 28,910 protein-coding genes, and find evidence of a whole genome duplication shared with Phalaenopsis. We observed the expansion of many resistance-related genes, suggesting a powerful immune system responsible for adaptation to a wide range of ecological niches. We also discovered extensive duplication of genes involved in glucomannan synthase activities, likely related to the synthesis of medicinal polysaccharides. Expansion of MADS-box gene clades ANR1, StMADS11, and MIKC(*), involved in the regulation of development and growth, suggests that these expansions are associated with the astonishing diversity of plant architecture in the genus Dendrobium. On the contrary, members of the type I MADS box gene family are missing, which might explain the loss of the endospermous seed. The findings reported here will be important for future studies into polysaccharide synthesis, adaptations to diverse environments and flower architecture of Orchidaceae. PMID:26754549

  18. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae Provide Insight into Virulence and Commensalism Dynamics.

    Dea Shahinas

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae (SPPN is a recently described species of the viridans group streptococci (VGS. Although the pathogenic potential of S. pseudopneumoniae remains uncertain, it is most commonly isolated from patients with underlying medical conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. S. pseudopneumoniae can be distinguished from the closely related species, S. pneumoniae and S. mitis, by phenotypic characteristics, including optochin resistance in the presence of 5% CO2, bile insolubility, and the lack of the pneumococcal capsule. Previously, we reported the draft genome sequence of S. pseudopneumoniae IS7493, a clinical isolate obtained from an immunocompromised patient with documented pneumonia. Here, we use comparative genomics approaches to identify similarities and key differences between S. pseudopneumoniae IS7493, S. pneumoniae and S. mitis. The genome structure of S. pseudopneumoniae IS7493 is most closely related to that of S. pneumoniae R6, but several recombination events are evident. Analysis of gene content reveals numerous unique features that distinguish S. pseudopneumoniae from other streptococci. The presence of loci for competence, iron transport, pneumolysin production and antimicrobial resistance reinforce the phylogenetic position of S. pseudopneumoniae as an intermediate species between S. pneumoniae and S. mitis. Additionally, the presence of several virulence factors and antibiotic resistance mechanisms suggest the potential of this commensal species to become pathogenic or to contribute to increasing antibiotic resistance levels seen among the VGS.

  19. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Provides New Insights Into the Molecular Taxonomy of the Saccharomyces Sensu Stricto Complex

    Edwards-Ingram, Laura C.; Gent, Manda E.; Hoyle, David C.; Hayes, Andrew; Stateva, Lubomira I.; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    The science of taxonomy is constantly improving as new techniques are developed. Current practice is to construct phylogenetic trees based on the analysis of the DNA sequence of single genes, or parts of single genes. However, this approach has recently been brought into question as several tree topologies may be produced for the same clade when the sequences for various different genes are used. The availability of complete genome sequences for several organisms has seen the adoption of micr...

  20. Classification of Aortic Stenosis by Flow and Gradient Patterns Provides Insights into the Pathophysiology of Disease.

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Mittal, Tarun; Abayalingam, Mayavan; Kabir, Tito; Dalby, Miles; Cleland, John G; Baltabaeva, Aigul; Rahman Haley, Shelley

    2016-08-01

    Different patterns of flow and valve gradients can lead to diagnostic uncertainty about the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). Consecutive patients with severe AS (valve area <1 cm(2)) underwent echocardiography and computed tomography. Patients were classified into 4 groups (high-gradient/normal flow [HGNF], high-gradient/low flow [HGLF], low-gradient/normal flow [LGNF], and low-gradient/low flow [LGLF]). Low flow was defined as stroke volume index <35 mL/m(2) and low gradient as a mean aortic gradient <40 mm Hg. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) was calculated using the Agatston score. Of 181 patients, 56, 30, 46, and 49 had HGNF, HGLF, LGNF and LGLF with median AVC of 2048, 2015, 1366, and 1178 AU/m(2) (P < .0001) and valvuloarterial impedance of 4.5, 6.4, 4.2, and 5.9, respectively (P < .0001). Among those with LGLF, AVC was lower in patients with preserved compared to reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (1018 vs 2550 AU/m(2); P < .0001), but valvuloarterial impedance was similar (P = .33). The LGLF AS with preserved ejection fraction is associated with lower AVC and may identify patients with less severe AS in association with an adaptive ventricular response to high afterload. PMID:26475710

  1. Comparison of peanut gentics and physical maps provided insights on collinearity, reversions and translocations

    Genetic and physical maps are the valuable resources for peanut research community in understanding genome organization and serving as the basis for map-based cloning and marker-assisted selection. Physical maps of two diploid wild peanut progenitor species, Arachis duranensis (A genome) and A. ipae...

  2. Machine learning classifiers provide insight into the relationship between microbial communities and bacterial vaginosis

    BECK, Daniel; James A. Foster

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a disease associated with the vagina microbiome. It is highly prevalent and is characterized by symptoms including odor, discharge and irritation. No single microbe has been found to cause BV. In this paper we use random forests and logistic regression classifiers to model the relationship between the microbial community and BV. We use subsets of the microbial community features in order to determine which features are important to the classification mod...

  3. Ancient DNA Provides New Insights into the Evolutionary History of New Zealand's Extinct Giant Eagle

    Bunce Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior to human settlement 700 years ago New Zealand had no terrestrial mammals-apart from three species of bats-instead, approximately 250 avian species dominated the ecosystem. At the top of the food chain was the extinct Haast's eagle, Harpagornis moorei. H. moorei (10-15 kg; 2-3 m wingspan was 30%-40% heavier than the largest extant eagle (the harpy eagle, Harpia harpyja, and hunted moa up to 15 times its weight. In a dramatic example of morphological plasticity and rapid size increase, we show that the H. moorei was very closely related to one of the world's smallest extant eagles, which is one-tenth its mass. This spectacular evolutionary change illustrates the potential speed of size alteration within lineages of vertebrates, especially in island ecosystems.

  4. Basal Gnathostomes Provide Unique Insights into the Evolution of Vitamin B12 Binders

    Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Ruivo, Raquel; Delgado, Inês; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; L Filipe C Castro

    2014-01-01

    The uptake and transport of vitamin B12 (cobalamin; Cbl) in mammals involves a refined system with three evolutionarily related transporters: transcobalamin 1 (Tcn1), transcobalamin 2 (Tcn2), and the gastric intrinsic factor (Gif). Teleosts have a single documented binder with intermediate features to the human counterparts. Consequently, it has been proposed that the expansion of Cbl binders occurred after the separation of Actinopterygians. Here, we demonstrate that the diversification of t...

  5. A Transcriptome Atlas of Physcomitrella patens Provides Insights into the Evolution and Development of Land Plants.

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Carlos; Hernandez-Coronado, Marcela; Thamm, Anna; Catarino, Bruno; Wang, Mingyi; Dolan, Liam; Feijó, José A; Becker, Jörg D

    2016-02-01

    Identifying the genetic mechanisms that underpin the evolution of new organ and tissue systems is an aim of evolutionary developmental biology. Comparative functional genetic studies between angiosperms and bryophytes can define those genetic changes that were responsible for developmental innovations. Here, we report the generation of a transcriptome atlas covering most phases in the life cycle of the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, including detailed sporophyte developmental progression. We identified a comprehensive set of sporophyte-specific transcription factors, and found that many of these genes have homologs in angiosperms that function in developmental processes such as flowering and shoot branching. Deletion of the PpTCP5 transcription factor results in development of supernumerary sporangia attached to a single seta, suggesting that it negatively regulates branching in the moss sporophyte. Given that TCP genes repress branching in angiosperms, we suggest that this activity is ancient. Finally, comparison of P. patens and Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptomes led us to the identification of a conserved core of transcription factors expressed in tip-growing cells. We identified modifications in the expression patterns of these genes that could account for developmental differences between P. patens tip-growing cells and A. thaliana pollen tubes and root hairs. PMID:26687813

  6. A new genome of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans provides insights into adaptation to a bioleaching environment.

    Travisany, Dante; Cortés, María Paz; Latorre, Mauricio; Di Genova, Alex; Budinich, Marko; Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Parada, Pilar; González, Mauricio; Maass, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans is a sulfur oxidizing acidophilic bacterium found in many sulfur-rich environments. It is particularly interesting due to its role in bioleaching of sulphide minerals. In this work, we report the genome sequence of At. thiooxidans Licanantay, the first strain from a copper mine to be sequenced and currently used in bioleaching industrial processes. Through comparative genomic analysis with two other At. thiooxidans non-metal mining strains (ATCC 19377 and A01) we determined that these strains share a large core genome of 2109 coding sequences and a high average nucleotide identity over 98%. Nevertheless, the presence of 841 strain-specific genes (absent in other At. thiooxidans strains) suggests a particular adaptation of Licanantay to its specific biomining environment. Among this group, we highlight genes encoding for proteins involved in heavy metal tolerance, mineral cell attachment and cysteine biosynthesis. Several of these genes were located near genetic motility genes (e.g. transposases and integrases) in genomic regions of over 10 kbp absent in the other strains, suggesting the presence of genomic islands in the Licanantay genome probably produced by horizontal gene transfer in mining environments. PMID:25148779

  7. Analysis of gene expression provides insights into the mechanism of cadmium tolerance in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Chen, Minjie; Li, Yanjun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Jianying; Zheng, Chunli; Zhang, Xuefeng

    2015-02-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans plays a critical role in metal solubilization in the biomining industry, and occupies an ecological niche characterized by high acidity and high concentrations of toxic heavy metal ions. In order to investigate the possible metal resistance mechanism, the cellular distribution of cadmium was tested. The result indicated that Cd(2+) entered the cells upon initial exposure resulting in increased intracellular concentrations, followed by its excretion from the cells during subsequent growth and adaptation. Sequence homology analyses were used to identify 10 genes predicted to participate in heavy metal homeostasis, and the expression of these genes was investigated in cells cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of toxic divalent cadmium (Cd(2+)). The results suggested that one gene (cmtR A.f ) encoded a putative Cd(2+)/Pb(2+)-responsive transcriptional regulator; four genes (czcA1 A.f , czcA2 A.f , czcB1 A.f ; and czcC1 A.f ) encoded heavy metal efflux proteins for Cd(2+); two genes (cadA1 A.f and cadB1 A.f ) encoded putative cation channel proteins related to the transport of Cd(2+). No significant enhancement of gene expression was observed at low concentrations of Cd(2+) (5 mM) and most of the putative metal resistance genes were up-regulated except cmtR A.f , cadB3 A.f ; and czcB1 A.f at higher concentrations (15 and 30 mM) according to real-time polymerase chain reaction. A model was developed for the mechanism of resistance to cadmium ions based on homology analyses of the predicted genes, the transcription of putative Cd(2+) resistance genes, and previous work. PMID:25344309

  8. Fluorescently labeled bacteria provide insight on post-mortem microbial transmigration.

    Burcham, Z M; Hood, J A; Pechal, J L; Krausz, K L; Bose, J L; Schmidt, C J; Benbow, M E; Jordan, H R

    2016-07-01

    Microbially mediated mechanisms of human decomposition begin immediately after death, and are a driving force for the conversion of a once living organism to a resource of energy and nutrients. Little is known about post-mortem microbiology in cadavers, particularly the community structure of microflora residing within the cadaver and the dynamics of these communities during decomposition. Recent work suggests these bacterial communities undergo taxa turnover and shifts in community composition throughout the post-mortem interval. In this paper we describe how the microbiome of a living host changes and transmigrates within the body after death thus linking the microbiome of a living individual to post-mortem microbiome changes. These differences in the human post-mortem from the ante-mortem microbiome have demonstrated promise as evidence in death investigations. We investigated the post-mortem structure and function dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium perfringens after intranasal inoculation in the animal model Mus musculus L. (mouse) to identify how transmigration of bacterial species can potentially aid in post-mortem interval estimations. S. aureus was tracked using in vivo and in vitro imaging to determine colonization routes associated with different physiological events of host decomposition, while C. perfringens was tracked using culture-based techniques. Samples were collected at discrete time intervals associated with various physiological events and host decomposition beginning at 1h and ending at 60 days post-mortem. Results suggest that S. aureus reaches its highest concentration at 5-7 days post-mortem then begins to rapidly decrease and is undetectable by culture on day 30. The ability to track these organisms as they move in to once considered sterile space may be useful for sampling during autopsy to aid in determining post-mortem interval range estimations, cause of death, and origins associated with the geographic location of human remains during death investigations. PMID:27032615

  9. New hyperekplexia mutations provide insight into glycine receptor assembly, trafficking, and activation mechanisms

    Bode, Anna; Wood, Sian-Elin; Mullins, Jonathan G L;

    2013-01-01

    hyperekplexia. Most hyperekplexia cases are caused by mutations in the α1 subunit of the human glycine receptor (hGlyR) gene (GLRA1). Here we analyzed 68 new unrelated hyperekplexia probands for GLRA1 mutations and identified 19 mutations, of which 9 were novel. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that...

  10. Comparative anatomy of the peduncles of Thai Sugar Palms provides insight on putative sugar transport mechanisms

    Somjaiai, Pananun; Barfod, Anders; Jampeetong, Arunothai

    sap is used mainly for jaggery, syrup and different types of beverages. In this study we looked for anatomical correlates of the elevated sap flow in injured peduncles of sugar palms. Despite a limited sample size we observed that sugar producing palms differ from the reference palm Chamaedorea...

  11. Structural characterization of encapsulated ferritin provides insight into iron storage in bacterial nanocompartments

    He, Didi; Hughes, Sam; Vanden-Hehir, Sally; Georgiev, Atanas; Altenbach, Kirsten; Tarrant, Emma; Mackay, C Logan; Waldron, Kevin J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous proteins that oxidise and store iron within a protein shell to protect cells from oxidative damage. We have characterized the structure and function of a new member of the ferritin superfamily that is sequestered within an encapsulin capsid. We show that this encapsulated ferritin (EncFtn) has two main alpha helices, which assemble in a metal dependent manner to form a ferroxidase center at a dimer interface. EncFtn adopts an open decameric structure that is topologically distinct from other ferritins. While EncFtn acts as a ferroxidase, it cannot mineralize iron. Conversely, the encapsulin shell associates with iron, but is not enzymatically active, and we demonstrate that EncFtn must be housed within the encapsulin for iron storage. This encapsulin nanocompartment is widely distributed in bacteria and archaea and represents a distinct class of iron storage system, where the oxidation and mineralization of iron are distributed between two proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18972.001 PMID:27529188

  12. Can Transcriptomics Provide Insight into the Chemopreventive Mechanisms of Complex Mixtures of Phytochemicals in Humans?

    van Breda, Simone G.J.; Wilms, Lonneke C.; Gaj, Stan; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Briedé, Jacob J.; Helsper, Johannes P.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.; de Kok, Theo M.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Blueberries contain relatively large amounts of different phytochemicals, which are suggested to have chemopreventive properties, but little information is available on the underlying molecular modes of action. This study investigates whole genome gene expression changes in lymphocytes of 143 humans after a 4-week blueberry-apple juice dietary intervention. Differentially expressed genes and genes correlating with the extent of antioxidant protection were identified in four subgroups. The mag...

  13. Evaluation of two statistical methods provides insights into the complex patterns of alternative polyadenylation site switching.

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Switching between different alternative polyadenylation (APA sites plays an important role in the fine tuning of gene expression. New technologies for the execution of 3'-end enriched RNA-seq allow genome-wide detection of the genes that exhibit significant APA site switching between different samples. Here, we show that the independence test gives better results than the linear trend test in detecting APA site-switching events. Further examination suggests that the discrepancy between these two statistical methods arises from complex APA site-switching events that cannot be represented by a simple change of average 3'-UTR length. In theory, the linear trend test is only effective in detecting these simple changes. We classify the switching events into four switching patterns: two simple patterns (3'-UTR shortening and lengthening and two complex patterns. By comparing the results of the two statistical methods, we show that complex patterns account for 1/4 of all observed switching events that happen between normal and cancerous human breast cell lines. Because simple and complex switching patterns may convey different biological meanings, they merit separate study. We therefore propose to combine both the independence test and the linear trend test in practice. First, the independence test should be used to detect APA site switching; second, the linear trend test should be invoked to identify simple switching events; and third, those complex switching events that pass independence testing but fail linear trend testing can be identified.

  14. STOP-EXPOSURE STUDIES OF INHALED CHLORINE PROVIDE IMPORTANT INSIGHTS ON PATHOGENESIS

    As part of a project to inform approaches for risk assessment of inhaled irritants of interest to homeland security, a set of acute (Peay et aI., SOT 2010) and subacute (George et aI., SOT 2010) studies of inhaled chlorine (CI2) in female F344 rats was performed. The exposure des...

  15. High-throughput sequencing provides insights into genome variation and evolution in Salmonella Typhi

    Holt, Kathryn E; Parkhill, Julian; Mazzoni, Camila J; Roumagnac, Philippe; Weill, François-Xavier; Goodhead, Ian; Rance, Richard; Baker, Stephen; Maskell, Duncan J; Wain, John; Dolecek, Christiane; Achtman, Mark; Dougan, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Typhi), a human-restricted bacterial pathogen that causes typhoid, show limited genetic variation. We generated whole-genome sequences for 19 Typhi isolates using 454 (Roche) and Solexa (Illumina) technologies. Isolates, including the previously sequenced CT18 and Ty2 isolates, were selected to represent major nodes in the phylogenetic tree. Comparative analysis showed little evidence of purifying selection, antigenic variation or recombination between isolates. Rather, evolution in the Typhi population seems to be characterized by ongoing loss of gene function, consistent with a small effective population size. The lack of evidence for antigenic variation driven by immune selection is in contrast to strong adaptive selection for mutations conferring antibiotic resistance in Typhi. The observed patterns of genetic isolation and drift are consistent with the proposed key role of asymptomatic carriers of Typhi as the main reservoir of this pathogen, highlighting the need for identification and treatment of carriers. PMID:18660809

  16. Fatty acid analyses may provide insight into the progression of starvation among squamate reptiles.

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-10-01

    Fasting-induced changes in fatty acid composition have been reported to occur within the body lipids of several types of animals; however, little is known about the changes in fatty acid profiles exhibited by reptiles subjected to prolonged fasting. This study characterizes the fatty acid profiles of six reptile species subjected to sublethal periods of fasting lasting 0, 56, 112, and 168 days. Analyses of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) conducted on the total body lipids of rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox), ratsnakes (Elaphe obsoleta), pythons (Python regius), boas (Boa constrictor), true vipers (Bitis gabonica), and monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus) revealed that all of the species exhibited similar characteristic changes in their fatty acid profiles during starvation stress. According to ANOVAs, the four most effective indicators of the onset of starvation were significant increases in the [1] fatty acid unsaturation index as well as ratios of [2] linoleic to palmitoleic acid, [3] oleic to palmitic, and [4] arachidonic to total fatty acid concentrations. The results of this study suggest that FAME analyses might be useful for identifying nutritional stress and/or starvation among squamate reptiles; however, forthcoming studies will be required to validate the generality of these responses. I also review the potential limitations of this approach, and suggest experiments that will be important for future applications of FAME analyses. Ultimately, it is hoped that FAME analyses can be used in conjunction with current practices as an additional tool to characterize the prevalence of starvation experienced by free-living reptiles. PMID:18657629

  17. Domain architectures of the Scm3p protein provide insights into centromere function and evolution

    Aravind, L.; Lakshminarayan, M. Iyer; Wu, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Scm3p has been shown to be a nonhistone component of centromeric chromatin that binds stoichiometrically to CenH3–H4 histones, and to be required for the assembly of kinetochores in S. cerevisiae. Scm3p is conserved across fungi, and displays a remarkable variation in protein size, ranging from ~200 amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ~1300 amino acids in Neurospora crassa. This is primarily due a variable C-terminal segment that is linked to a conserved N-terminal, CenH3-int...

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis of aerial and subterranean pods development provides insights into seed abortion in peanut

    Wei ZHU; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Haifen; Zhu, Fanghe; Hong, Yanbin; Rajeev K. Varshney; Liang, Xuanqiang

    2014-01-01

    The peanut is a special plant for its aerial flowering but subterranean fructification. The failure of peg penetration into the soil leads to form aerial pod and finally seed abortion. However, the mechanism of seed abortion during aerial pod development remains obscure. Here, a comparative transcriptome analysis between aerial and subterranean pods at different developmental stages was produced using a customized NimbleGen microarray representing 36,158 unigenes. By comparing 4 consecutive t...

  19. X-Ray Structure Reveals a New Class and Provides Insight into Evolution of Alkaline Phosphatases

    Bihani, Subhash C.; Das, Amit; Nilgiriwala, Kayzad S.; Prashar, Vishal; Pirocchi, Michel; Apte, Shree Kumar; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan V.

    2011-01-01

    The alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a bi-metalloenzyme of potential applications in biotechnology and bioremediation, in which phosphate monoesters are nonspecifically hydrolysed under alkaline conditions to yield inorganic phosphate. The hydrolysis occurs through an enzyme intermediate in which the catalytic residue is phosphorylated. The reaction, which also requires a third metal ion, is proposed to proceed through a mechanism of in-line displacement involving a trigonal bipyramidal transitio...

  20. Structure of Ljungan virus provides insight into genome packaging of this picornavirus

    Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiangxi; Ren, Jingshan; Porta, Claudine; Wenham, Hannah; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Panjwani, Anusha; Knowles, Nick J.; Kotecha, Abhay; Siebert, C. Alistair; Lindberg, A. Michael; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Rao, Zihe; Tuthill, Tobias J.; Stuart, David I.

    2015-10-01

    Picornaviruses are responsible for a range of human and animal diseases, but how their RNA genome is packaged remains poorly understood. A particularly poorly studied group within this family are those that lack the internal coat protein, VP4. Here we report the atomic structure of one such virus, Ljungan virus, the type member of the genus Parechovirus B, which has been linked to diabetes and myocarditis in humans. The 3.78-Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure shows remarkable features, including an extended VP1 C terminus, forming a major protuberance on the outer surface of the virus, and a basic motif at the N terminus of VP3, binding to which orders some 12% of the viral genome. This apparently charge-driven RNA attachment suggests that this branch of the picornaviruses uses a different mechanism of genome encapsidation, perhaps explored early in the evolution of picornaviruses.

  1. Different gene expressions between cattle and yak provide insights into high-altitude adaptation.

    Wang, K; Yang, Y; Wang, L; Ma, T; Shang, H; Ding, L; Han, J; Qiu, Q

    2016-02-01

    DNA sequence variation has been widely reported as the genetic basis for adaptation, in both humans and other animals, to the hypoxic environment experienced at high altitudes. However, little is known about the patterns of gene expression underlying such hypoxic adaptations. In this study, we examined the differences in the transcriptomes of four organs (heart, kidney, liver and lung) between yak and cattle, a pair of closely related species distributed at high and low altitudes respectively. Of the four organs examined, heart shows the greatest differentiation between the two species in terms of gene expression profiles. Detailed analyses demonstrated that some genes associated with the oxygen supply system and the defense systems that respond to threats of hypoxia are differentially expressed. In addition, genes with significantly differentiated patterns of expression in all organs exhibited an unexpected uniformity of regulation along with an elevated frequency of nonsynonymous substitutions. This co-evolution of protein sequences and gene expression patterns is likely to be correlated with the optimization of the yak metabolic system to resist hypoxia. PMID:26538003

  2. Transcriptomic analysis provides insight into high-altitude acclimation in domestic goats.

    Tang, Qianzi; Huang, Wenyao; Guan, Jiuqiang; Jin, Long; Che, Tiandong; Fu, Yuhua; Hu, Yaodong; Tian, Shilin; Wang, Dawei; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2015-08-10

    Domestic goats are distributed in a wide range of habitats and have acclimated to their local environmental conditions. To investigate the gene expression changes of goats that are induced by high altitude stress, we performed RNA-seq on 27 samples from the three hypoxia-sensitive tissues (heart, lung, and skeletal muscle) in three indigenous populations from distinct altitudes (600 m, 2000 m, and 3000 m). We generated 129Gb of high-quality sequencing data (~4Gb per sample) and catalogued the expression profiles of 12,421 annotated hircine genes in each sample. The analysis showed global similarities and differences of high-altitude transcriptomes among populations and tissues as well as revealed that the heart underwent the most high-altitude induced expression changes. We identified numerous differentially expressed genes that exhibited distinct expression patterns, and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant-containing genes that were highly differentiated between the high- and low-altitude populations. These genes have known or potential roles in hypoxia response and were enriched in functional gene categories potentially responsible for high-altitude stress. Therefore, they are appealing candidates for further investigation of the gene expression and associated regulatory mechanisms related to high-altitude acclimation. PMID:25958351

  3. Sequencing and Analysis of a Genomic Fragment Provide an Insight into the Dunaliella viridis Genomic Sequence

    Xiao-Ming SUN; Yuan-Ping TANG; Xiang-Zong MENG; Wen-Wen ZHANG; Shan LI; Zhi-Rui DENG; Zheng-Kai XU; Ren-Tao SONG

    2006-01-01

    Dunaliella is a genus of wall-less unicellular eukaryotic green alga. Its exceptional resistances to salt and various other stresses have made it an ideal model for stress tolerance study. However, very little is known about its genome and genomic sequences. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed a 29,268 bp genomic fragment from Dunaliella viridis. The fragment showed low sequence homology to the GenBank database. At the nucleotide level, only a segment with significant sequence homology to 18S rRNA was found. The fragment contained six putative genes, but only one gene showed significant homology at the protein level to GenBank database. The average GC content of this sequence was 51.1%, which was much lower than that of close related green algae Chlamydomonas (65.7%). Significant segmental duplications were found within this fragment. The duplicated sequences accounted for about 35.7% of the entire region. Large amounts of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) were found, with strong bias towards (AC)n type (76%). Analysis of other Dunaliella genomic sequences in the GenBank database (total 25,749 bp) was in agreement with these findings. These sequence features made it difficult to sequence Dunaliella genomic sequences. Further investigation should be made to reveal the biological significance of these unique sequence features.

  4. Sequencing and analysis of a genomic fragment provide an insight into the Dunaliella viridis genomic sequence.

    Sun, Xiao-Ming; Tang, Yuan-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Zong; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Li, Shan; Deng, Zhi-Rui; Xu, Zheng-Kai; Song, Ren-Tao

    2006-11-01

    Dunaliella is a genus of wall-less unicellular eukaryotic green alga. Its exceptional resistances to salt and various other stresses have made it an ideal model for stress tolerance study. However, very little is known about its genome and genomic sequences. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed a 29,268 bp genomic fragment from Dunaliella viridis. The fragment showed low sequence homology to the GenBank database. At the nucleotide level, only a segment with significant sequence homology to 18S rRNA was found. The fragment contained six putative genes, but only one gene showed significant homology at the protein level to GenBank database. The average GC content of this sequence was 51.1%, which was much lower than that of close related green algae Chlamydomonas (65.7%). Significant segmental duplications were found within this fragment. The duplicated sequences accounted for about 35.7% of the entire region. Large amounts of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) were found, with strong bias towards (AC)(n) type (76%). Analysis of other Dunaliella genomic sequences in the GenBank database (total 25,749 bp) was in agreement with these findings. These sequence features made it difficult to sequence Dunaliella genomic sequences. Further investigation should be made to reveal the biological significance of these unique sequence features. PMID:17091199

  5. Population-specific demographic estimates provide insights into declines of Lark Buntings (Calamospiza melanocorys)

    Yackel Adams, A.A.; Skagen, S.K.; Savidge, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Many North American prairie bird populations have recently declined, and the causes of these declines remain largely unknown. To determine whether population limitation occurs during breeding, we evaluated the stability of a population of prairie birds using population-specific values for fecundity and postfledging survival. During 2001-2003, we radiomarked 67 female Lark Buntings (Calamospiza melanocorys) to determine annual fecundity and evaluate contributing factors such as nest survival and breeding response (number of breeding attempts and dispersal). Collectively, 67 females built 112 nests (1.67 ?? 0.07 nests female-1 season-1; range: 1-3); 34 were second nests and 11 were third nests. Daily nest survival estimates were similar for initial and later nests with overall nest survival (DSR 19) of 30.7% and 31.7%, respectively. Nest predation was the most common cause of failure (92%). Capture and radiomarking of females did not affect nest survival. Lark Bunting dispersal probabilities increased among females that fledged young from initial nests and females that lost their original nests late in the season. Conservative and liberal estimates of mean annual fecundity were 0.96 ?? 0.11 and 1.24 ?? 0.09 female offspring per female, respectively. Given the fecundity and juvenile-survival estimates for this population, annual adult survival values of 71-77% are necessary to achieve a stable population. Because adult survival of prairie passerines ranges between 55% and 65%, this study area may not be capable of sustaining a stable population in the absence of immigration. We contrast our population assessment with one that assumes indirect values of fecundity and juvenile survival. To elucidate limiting factors, estimation of population-specific demographic parameters is desirable. We present an approach for selecting species and areas for evaluation of population stability. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2007.

  6. The Complete Genome of Brucella Suis 019 Provides Insights on Cross-Species Infection

    Yuanzhi Wang; Zhen Wang; Xin Chen; Hui Zhang; Fei Guo; Ke Zhang; Hanping Feng; Wenyi Gu; Changxin Wu; Lei Ma; Tiansen Li; Chuangfu Chen; Shan Gao

    2016-01-01

    Brucella species are the most important zoonotic pathogens worldwide and cause considerable harm to humans and animals. In this study, we presented the complete genome of B. suis 019 isolated from sheep (ovine) with epididymitis. B. suis 019 has a rough phenotype and can infect sheep, rhesus monkeys and possibly humans. The comparative genome analysis demonstrated that B. suis 019 is closest to the vaccine strain B. suis bv. 1 str. S2. Further analysis associated the rsh gene to the pathogeni...

  7. The Complete Genome of Brucella Suis 019 Provides Insights on Cross-Species Infection.

    Wang, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Hui; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Ke; Feng, Hanping; Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Changxin; Ma, Lei; Li, Tiansen; Chen, Chuangfu; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Brucella species are the most important zoonotic pathogens worldwide and cause considerable harm to humans and animals. In this study, we presented the complete genome of B. suis 019 isolated from sheep (ovine) with epididymitis. B. suis 019 has a rough phenotype and can infect sheep, rhesus monkeys and possibly humans. The comparative genome analysis demonstrated that B. suis 019 is closest to the vaccine strain B. suis bv. 1 str. S2. Further analysis associated the rsh gene to the pathogenicity of B. suis 019, and the WbkA gene to the rough phenotype of B. suis 019. The 019 complete genome data was deposited in the GenBank database with ID PRJNA308608. PMID:26821047

  8. The Complete Genome of Brucella Suis 019 Provides Insights on Cross-Species Infection

    Yuanzhi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucella species are the most important zoonotic pathogens worldwide and cause considerable harm to humans and animals. In this study, we presented the complete genome of B. suis 019 isolated from sheep (ovine with epididymitis. B. suis 019 has a rough phenotype and can infect sheep, rhesus monkeys and possibly humans. The comparative genome analysis demonstrated that B. suis 019 is closest to the vaccine strain B. suis bv. 1 str. S2. Further analysis associated the rsh gene to the pathogenicity of B. suis 019, and the WbkA gene to the rough phenotype of B. suis 019. The 019 complete genome data was deposited in the GenBank database with ID PRJNA308608.

  9. Comparative MD analysis of the stability of transthyretin providing insight into the fibrillation mechanism

    Sørensen, Jesper; Hamelberg, Donald; Schiøtt, Birgit; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Proteins can misfold and aggregate, which is believed to be the cause of a variety of diseases, affecting very diverse organs in the body. Many questions about the nature of aggregation and the proteins that are involved in these events are still left unanswered. One of the proteins that is known...

  10. Establishing a leaf proteome reference map for Ginkgo biloba provides insight into potential ethnobotanical uses

    Although ginkgo (Maidenhair tree, Ginkgo biloba L.) is an ancient medicinal and ornamental tree, there has not previously been any systematic proteomic study of the leaves. Herein we describe results from the initial study identifying abundant ginkgo leaf proteins and present a gel reference map. Pr...

  11. Directed Evolution of a Model Primordial Enzyme Provides Insights into the Development of the Genetic Code

    Müller, Manuel M.; Allison, Jane R.; Hongdilokkul, Narupat; Gaillon, Laurent; Kast, Peter; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.; Marlière, Philippe; Hilvert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Proteins are linear polymers of a set of typically 20 different amino acid building blocks. The amino acid sequence—encoded by a genetic template—directs the folding of newly synthesized proteins into compact 3D structures and dictates the function of the protein product. Monomers containing distinct physico-chemical properties and geometries allow the formation of highly sophisticated architectures, and diverse functional groups enable enzymes to catalyze a plethora of chemica...

  12. A Devonian predatory fish provides insights into the early evolution of modern sarcopterygians

    Lu, Jing; Zhu, Min; Ahlberg, Per Erik; Qiao, Tuo; Zhu, You’an; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liantao

    2016-01-01

    Crown or modern sarcopterygians (coelacanths, lungfishes, and tetrapods) differ substantially from stem sarcopterygians, such as Guiyu and Psarolepis, and a lack of transitional fossil taxa limits our understanding of the origin of the crown group. The Onychodontiformes, an enigmatic Devonian predatory fish group, seems to have characteristics of both stem and crown sarcopterygians but is difficult to place because of insufficient anatomical information. We describe the new skull material of Qingmenodus, a Pragian (~409-million-year-old) onychodont from China, using high-resolution computed tomography to image internal structures of the braincase. In addition to its remarkable similarities with stem sarcopterygians in the ethmosphenoid portion, Qingmenodus exhibits coelacanth-like neurocranial features in the otic region. A phylogenetic analysis based on a revised data set unambiguously assigns onychodonts to crown sarcopterygians as stem coelacanths. Qingmenodus thus bridges the morphological gap between stem sarcopterygians and coelacanths and helps to illuminate the early evolution and diversification of crown sarcopterygians. PMID:27386576

  13. Six novel gammaherpesviruses of Afrotheria provide insight into the early divergence of the Gammaherpesvirinae.

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Childress, April L; Harr, Kendal E; Isaza, Ramiro

    2008-03-18

    The Afrotheria represent an early branching of placental mammals. Only two herpesviruses from Afrotheria have been previously identified, and the genus Proboscivirus in the subfamily Betaherpesvirinae has been proposed for them. Six novel gammaherpesviruses were identified in four species in the superorder Afrotheria by detection and analysis of their DNA polymerase genes. Elephantid herpesvirus 3 (ElHV3) and Elephantid herpesvirus 4 (ElHV4) were identified from conjunctival swabs from Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). ElHV3 was also found in a vaginal swab from one elephant with vaginitis. Elephantid herpesvirus 5 (ElHV5) was identified from vaginal swabs of two Asian elephants with vaginal plaques. Elephantid herpesvirus 6 was discovered in a conjunctival swab from an African elephant (Loxodonta africana). Procavid herpesvirus 1 (PrHV1) was found in spleen and conjunctival swabs of rock hyrax (Procavia capensis). Trichechid herpesvirus 1 (TrHV1) was identified from skin and buffy coats of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). ElHV3 and ElHV4 form a distinct cluster, and ElHV5, ElHV6, TrHV1, and PrHV1 form a second cluster. These viruses may have codiverged with their host species. Phylogenetic analysis of these novel herpesviruses suggests that two separate groups of gammaherpesviruses may have codiverged with the Afrotheria. PMID:17884307

  14. Mechanistic insight provided by glutaredoxin within a fusion to redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    Björnberg, Olof; Østergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) contains a dithiol disulfide pair that is thermodynamically suitable for monitoring intracellular glutathione redox potential. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1p) from yeast is known to catalyze the redox equilibrium between rxYFP and glutathione, and here, we...... have generated a fusion of the two proteins, rxYFP-Grx1p. In comparison to isolated subunits, intramolecular transfer of reducing equivalents made the fusion protein kinetically superior in reactions with glutathione. The rate of GSSG oxidation was thus improved by a factor of 3300. The reaction with...... separately and in the fusion. This could not be ascribed to the lack of an unproductive side reaction to glutaredoxin disulfide. Instead, slower alkylation kinetics with iodoacetamide indicates a better leaving-group capability of the remaining cysteine residue, which can explain the increased activity....

  15. The Genome of the “Great Speciator” Provides Insights into Bird Diversification

    Cornetti, Luca; Valente, Luis M.; Dunning, Luke T.; Quan, Xueping; Black, Richard A.; Hébert, Olivier; Savolainen, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Among birds, white-eyes (genus Zosterops) have diversified so extensively that Jared Diamond and Ernst Mayr referred to them as the “great speciator.” The Zosterops lineage exhibits some of the fastest rates of species diversification among vertebrates, and its members are the most prolific passerine island colonizers. We present a high-quality genome assembly for the silvereye (Zosterops lateralis), a white-eye species consisting of several subspecies distributed across multiple islands. We ...

  16. Metagenomic analysis provides insights into functional capacity in a hyperarid desert soil niche community.

    Vikram, Surendra; Guerrero, Leandro D; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Le, Phuong T; Seely, Mary; Cowan, Don A

    2016-06-01

    In hyperarid ecosystems, macroscopic communities are often restricted to cryptic niches, such as hypoliths (microbial communities found beneath translucent rocks), which are widely distributed in hyperarid desert environments. While hypolithic communities are considered to play a major role in productivity, the functional guilds implicated in these processes remain unclear. Here, we describe the metagenomic sequencing, assembly and analysis of hypolithic microbial communities from the Namib Desert. Taxonomic analyses using Small Subunit phylogenetic markers showed that bacterial phylotypes (93%) dominated the communities, with relatively small proportions of archaea (0.43%) and fungi (5.6%). Refseq-viral database analysis showed the presence of double stranded DNA viruses (7.8% contigs), dominated by Caudovirales (59.2%). Analysis of functional genes and metabolic pathways revealed that cyanobacteria were primarily responsible for photosynthesis with the presence of multiple copies of genes for both photosystems I and II, with a smaller but significant fraction of proteobacterial anoxic photosystem II genes. Hypolithons demonstrated an extensive genetic capacity for the degradation of phosphonates and mineralization of organic sulphur. Surprisingly, we were unable to show the presence of genes representative of complete nitrogen cycles. Taken together, our analyses suggest an extensive capacity for carbon, phosphate and sulphate cycling but only limited nitrogen biogeochemistry. PMID:26470632

  17. Oldest isotopically characterized fish otoliths provide insight to Jurassic continental climate of Europe

    Patterson, William P.

    1999-03-01

    Large, shallow, epeiric seas and adjacent lagoons such as those described herein likely played a significant role in moderating Jurassic coastal and continental climate. Jurassic (Bathonian) ocean surface temperatures in Scotland have been calculated from δ18O(CaCO3) values of a suite of the oldest well-preserved fish otoliths analyzed to date. Otolith δ18O values range from -4.7‰ to -1.9‰ (Vienna Peedee belemnite, VPDB), while δ13C(CaCO3) values vary from -5.4‰ to +1.5‰ (VPDB), representing the oldest stable isotopic record of paleodiet, paleoecology, and fish migration to date. Using a global ocean δ18O(H2O) value of -1.0‰ (Vienna standard mean ocean water, VSMOW) for an ice-free Jurassic, fish species that migrated from estuarine to open marine water record time-averaged temperatures of 23 °C. Estuarine fish, assuming a similar temperature, record variation in δ18O(H2O) values from -3.7‰ to -2.0‰ (VSMOW). That significant mixing of fresh water and seawater occurred in the Jurassic in Scotland is in general agreement with data presented by others (molluscan fauna, lithostratigraphy, paleogeography, and paleocirculation models). The δ18O values and temperatures derived in this study correspond to the meteorologic and hydrologic parameters of a mid-latitude maritime climate with low seasonality, a mean temperature of 23 °C, and abundant precipitation and humidity. The δ18O(H2O) values calculated from estuarine fish indicate that rainfall must have a δ18O(H2O) value lower than -3.7‰ (VSMOW). Values of δ18O and δ13C suggest an environment hydrologically similar to that observed in the Everglades of south Florida or the estuaries of south Texas, both notable fish nurseries today. However, sea-surface temperatures were lower than those of modern Florida or Texas as evidenced by reduced evaporative enrichment of δ18O(H2O) values.

  18. Structure of the hantavirus nucleoprotein provides insights into the mechanism of RNA encapsidation

    Daniel Olal; Oliver Daumke

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are etiological agents of life-threatening hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. The nucleoprotein (N) of hantavirus is essential for viral transcription and replication, thus representing an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We have determined the crystal structure of hantavirus N to 3.2 {Angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a two-lobed, mostly {alpha}-helical structure that is distantly related to that of orthobunyav...

  19. Comparative Genome Analysis Provides Insights into the Pathogenicity of Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger; Madsen, Lone; Espejo, Romilio; Middelboe, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    strains with respect to biofilm formation and secretion of extracellular enzymes. Global scale dispersion of virulence factors in the genomes and the abilities for biofilm formation, hemolytic activity and secretion of extracellular enzymes among the strains suggested that F. psychrophilum isolates have a...

  20. Structure of active IspH enzyme from escherichia coli provides mechanistic insights into substrate reduction

    Gräwert, Tobias

    2009-07-20

    The terminal step of the non-mevalonate pathway of terpene biosynthesis is catalyzed by IspH (see scheme). In the crystal structure of IspH from E. coli, a bound inorganic diphosphate ligand occupies the position of the diphosphate residue of the substrate. Together with mutation studies and theoretical calculations, these data support a mechanism which is analogous to the Birch reduction of allylic alcohols. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Community Structure in Methanogenic Enrichments Provides Insight into Syntrophic Interactions in Hydrocarbon-Impacted Environments

    Fowler, S. Jane; Toth, Courtney R. A.; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil involves the conversion of hydrocarbons to methanogenic substrates by syntrophic bacteria and subsequent methane production by methanogens. Assessing the metabolic roles played by various microbial species in syntrophic communities remains a challenge, but such information has important implications for bioremediation and microbial enhanced energy recovery technologies. Many factors such as changing environmental conditions or substrate variations can influence the composition and biodegradation capabilities of syntrophic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. In this study, a methanogenic crude oil-degrading enrichment culture was successively transferred onto the single long chain fatty acids palmitate or stearate followed by their parent alkanes, hexadecane or octadecane, respectively, in order to assess the impact of different substrates on microbial community composition and retention of hydrocarbon biodegradation genes. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that a reduction in substrate diversity resulted in a corresponding loss of microbial diversity, but that hydrocarbon biodegradation genes (such as assA/masD encoding alkylsuccinate synthase) could be retained within a community even in the absence of hydrocarbon substrates. Despite substrate-related diversity changes, all communities were dominated by hydrogenotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens along with bacteria including Clostridium sp., members of the Deltaproteobacteria, and a number of other phyla. Microbial co-occurrence network analysis revealed a dense network of interactions amongst syntrophic bacteria and methanogens that were maintained despite changes in the substrates for methanogenesis. Our results reveal the effect of substrate diversity loss on microbial community diversity, indicate that many syntrophic interactions are stable over time despite changes in substrate pressure, and show that syntrophic interactions amongst bacteria themselves are as important as interactions between bacteria and methanogens in complex methanogenic communities. PMID:27148240

  2. Methyl Effect in Azumamides Provides Insight Into Histone Deacetylase Inhibition by Macrocycles

    Maolanon, Alex; Villadsen, Jesper; Christensen, Niels Johan; Hoeck, Casper; Friis, Tina; Harris, Pernille; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Fristrup, Peter; Olsen, Christian Adam

    2014-01-01

    Natural, nonribosomal cyclotetrapeptides have traditionally been a rich source of inspiration for design of potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. We recently disclosed the total synthesis and full HDAC pro fi ling of the naturally occurring azumamides ( J. Med. Chem. 2013 , 56 , 6512). In...... molecular modeling, we pinpoint crucial enzyme − ligand interactions required for potent inhibition of HDAC3. Docking of additional natural products con fi rmed these features to be generally important. Combined with the structural conservation across HDACs 1 − 3, this suggests that while cyclotetrapeptides...

  3. Hierarchical Partitioning of Metazoan Protein Conservation Profiles Provides New Functional Insights

    Witztum, Jonathan; Persi, Erez; Horn, David; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Chor, Benny

    2014-01-01

    The availability of many complete, annotated proteomes enables the systematic study of the relationships between protein conservation and functionality. We explore this question based solely on the presence or absence of protein homologues (a.k.a. conservation profiles). We study 18 metazoans, from two distinct points of view: the human's and the fly's. Using the GOrilla gene ontology (GO) analysis tool, we explore functional enrichment of the “universal proteins”, those with homologues in al...

  4. DNA Barcode Libraries Provide Insight into Continental Patterns of Avian Diversification

    Lijtmaer, Darío A; Kevin C R Kerr; Barreira, Ana S.; Hebert, Paul D N; Pablo L Tubaro

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The causes for the higher biodiversity in the Neotropics as compared to the Nearctic and the factors promoting species diversification in each region have been much debated. The refuge hypothesis posits that high tropical diversity reflects high speciation rates during the Pleistocene, but this conclusion has been challenged. The present study investigates this matter by examining continental patterns of avian diversification through the analysis of large-scale DNA barcode librari...

  5. DNA barcode libraries provide insight into continental patterns of avian diversification.

    Darío A Lijtmaer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The causes for the higher biodiversity in the Neotropics as compared to the Nearctic and the factors promoting species diversification in each region have been much debated. The refuge hypothesis posits that high tropical diversity reflects high speciation rates during the Pleistocene, but this conclusion has been challenged. The present study investigates this matter by examining continental patterns of avian diversification through the analysis of large-scale DNA barcode libraries. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standardized COI datasets from the avifaunas of Argentina, the Nearctic, and the Palearctic were analyzed. Average genetic distances between closest congeners and sister species were higher in Argentina than in North America reflecting a much higher percentage of recently diverged species in the latter region. In the Palearctic genetic distances between closely related species appeared to be more similar to those of the southern Neotropics. Average intraspecific variation was similar in Argentina and North America, while the Palearctic fauna had a higher value due to a higher percentage of variable species. Geographic patterning of intraspecific structure was more complex in the southern Neotropics than in the Nearctic, while the Palearctic showed an intermediate level of complexity. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: DNA barcodes can reveal continental patterns of diversification. Our analysis suggests that avian species are older in Argentina than in the Nearctic, supporting the idea that the greater diversity of the Neotropical avifauna is not caused by higher recent speciation rates. Species in the Palearctic also appear to be older than those in the Nearctic. These results, combined with the patterns of geographic structuring found in each region, suggest a major impact of Pleistocene glaciations in the Nearctic, a lesser effect in the Palearctic and a mild effect in the southern Neotropics.

  6. Genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression patterns provide insight into polycystic ovary syndrome development

    Wang, Xiu-Xia; Wei, Jing-Zan; Jiao, Jiao; Jiang, Shu-Yi; Yu, Da-hai; Li, Da

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women. However, the epigenetic mechanism involved in PCOS progression remains largely unknown. Here, combining the DNA methylation profiling together with transcriptome analysis, we showed that (i) there were 7929 differentially methylated CpG sites (β > 0.1, P 1.5, P < 0.005) in PCOS compared to normal ovaries; (ii) 54 genes were identified with methylated...

  7. Transcription profiling provides insights into gene pathways involved in horn and scurs development in cattle

    Lehnert Sigrid A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two types of horns are evident in cattle - fixed horns attached to the skull and a variation called scurs, which refers to small loosely attached horns. Cattle lacking horns are referred to as polled. Although both the Poll and Scurs loci have been mapped to BTA1 and 19 respectively, the underlying genetic basis of these phenotypes is unknown, and so far, no candidate genes regulating these developmental processes have been described. This study is the first reported attempt at transcript profiling to identify genes and pathways contributing to horn and scurs development in Brahman cattle, relative to polled counterparts. Results Expression patterns in polled, horned and scurs tissues were obtained using the Agilent 44 k bovine array. The most notable feature when comparing transcriptional profiles of developing horn tissues against polled was the down regulation of genes coding for elements of the cadherin junction as well as those involved in epidermal development. We hypothesize this as a key event involved in keratinocyte migration and subsequent horn development. In the polled-scurs comparison, the most prevalent differentially expressed transcripts code for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, which were up regulated in scurs tissues relative to polled. Conclusion For this first time we describe networks of genes involved in horn and scurs development. Interestingly, we did not observe differential expression in any of the genes present on the fine mapped region of BTA1 known to contain the Poll locus.

  8. The genome sequence of Propionibacterium acidipropionici provides insights into its biotechnological and industrial potential

    Parizzi Lucas P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic biology allows the development of new biochemical pathways for the production of chemicals from renewable sources. One major challenge is the identification of suitable microorganisms to hold these pathways with sufficient robustness and high yield. In this work we analyzed the genome of the propionic acid producer Actinobacteria Propionibacterium acidipropionici (ATCC 4875. Results The assembled P. acidipropionici genome has 3,656,170 base pairs (bp with 68.8% G + C content and a low-copy plasmid of 6,868 bp. We identified 3,336 protein coding genes, approximately 1000 more than P. freudenreichii and P. acnes, with an increase in the number of genes putatively involved in maintenance of genome integrity, as well as the presence of an invertase and genes putatively involved in carbon catabolite repression. In addition, we made an experimental confirmation of the ability of P. acidipropionici to fix CO2, but no phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase coding gene was found in the genome. Instead, we identified the pyruvate carboxylase gene and confirmed the presence of the corresponding enzyme in proteome analysis as a potential candidate for this activity. Similarly, the phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase genes, which are considered responsible for acetate formation, were not present in the genome. In P. acidipropionici, a similar function seems to be performed by an ADP forming acetate-CoA ligase gene and its corresponding enzyme was confirmed in the proteome analysis. Conclusions Our data shows that P. acidipropionici has several of the desired features that are required to become a platform for the production of chemical commodities: multiple pathways for efficient feedstock utilization, ability to fix CO2, robustness, and efficient production of propionic acid, a potential precursor for valuable 3-carbon compounds.

  9. Whole-genome sequencing of giant pandas provides insights into demographic history and local adaptation

    Zhao, Shancen; Zheng, Pingping; Dong, Shanshan;

    2013-01-01

    dynamics remains largely unknown. We sequenced the whole genomes of 34 pandas at an average 4.7-fold coverage and used this data set together with the previously deep-sequenced panda genome to reconstruct a continuous demographic history of pandas from their origin to the present. We identify two...

  10. De novo transcriptome of Ischnura elegans provides insights into sensory biology, colour and vision genes

    Chauhan, Pallavi; Hansson, Bengt; Kraaijeveld, Ken; de Knijff, Peter; Svensson, Erik I.; Wellenreuther, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in odonates (damselflies and dragonflies) as model organisms in ecology and evolutionary biology but the development of genomic resources has been slow. So far only one draft genome (Ladona fulva) and one transcriptome assembly (Enallagma hageni) have been published. Odonates have some of the most advanced visual systems among insects and several species are colour polymorphic, and genomic and transcriptomic data would allow studying the genomic architectu...

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the substrate specificity of FAOX family members.

    Rigoldi, Federica; Spero, Ludovica; Dalle Vedove, Andrea; Redaelli, Alberto; Parisini, Emilio; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2016-07-19

    Enzymatic assays based on Fructosyl Amino Acid Oxidases (FAOX) represent a potential, rapid and economical strategy to measure glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which is in turn a reliable method to monitor the insurgence and the development of diabetes mellitus. However, the engineering of naturally occurring FAOX to specifically recognize fructosyl-valine (the glycated N-terminal residue of HbA1c) has been hindered by the paucity of information on the tridimensional structures and catalytic residues of the different FAOX that exist in nature, and in general on the molecular mechanisms that regulate specificity in this class of enzymes. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and advanced modeling techniques to investigate five different relevant wild-type FAOX (Amadoriase I, Amadoriase II, PnFPOX, FPOX-E and N1-1-FAOD) in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that drive their specificity towards polar and nonpolar substrates. Specifically, we compare these five different FAOX in terms of overall folding, ligand entry tunnels, ligand binding residues and ligand binding energies. Our work will contribute to future enzyme structure modifications aimed at the rational design of novel biosensors for the monitoring of blood glucose levels. PMID:27327839

  12. Wing Shape of Four New Bee Fossils (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) Provides Insights to Bee Evolution

    Dehon, Manuel; Michez, Denis; Nel, André; Engel, Michael S.; De Meulemeester, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Bees (Anthophila) are one of the major groups of angiosperm-pollinating insects and accordingly are widely studied in both basic and applied research, for which it is essential to have a clear understanding of their phylogeny, and evolutionary history. Direct evidence of bee evolutionary history has been hindered by a dearth of available fossils needed to determine the timing and tempo of their diversification, as well as episodes of extinction. Here we describe four new compression fossils o...

  13. Metatranscriptome Analysis of Fig Flowers Provides Insights into Potential Mechanisms for Mutualism Stability and Gall Induction

    Martinson, Ellen O.; Hackett, Jeremiah D.; Machado, Carlos A.; A Elizabeth Arnold

    2015-01-01

    A striking property of the mutualism between figs and their pollinating wasps is that wasps consistently oviposit in the inner flowers of the fig syconium, which develop into galls that house developing larvae. Wasps typically do not use the outer ring of flowers, which develop into seeds. To better understand differences between gall and seed flowers, we used a metatranscriptomic approach to analyze eukaryotic gene expression within fig flowers at the time of oviposition choice and early gal...

  14. Pan-genomic analysis provides insights into the genomic variation and evolution of Salmonella Paratyphi A.

    Weili Liang

    Full Text Available Salmonella Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A is a highly adapted, human-specific pathogen that causes paratyphoid fever. Cases of paratyphoid fever have recently been increasing, and the disease is becoming a major public health concern, especially in Eastern and Southern Asia. To investigate the genomic variation and evolution of S. Paratyphi A, a pan-genomic analysis was performed on five newly sequenced S. Paratyphi A strains and two other reference strains. A whole genome comparison revealed that the seven genomes are collinear and that their organization is highly conserved. The high rate of substitutions in part of the core genome indicates that there are frequent homologous recombination events. Based on the changes in the pan-genome size and cluster number (both in the core functional genes and core pseudogenes, it can be inferred that the sharply increasing number of pseudogene clusters may have strong correlation with the inactivation of functional genes, and indicates that the S. Paratyphi A genome is being degraded.

  15. Proteomics of thyroid tumours provides new insights into their molecular composition and changes associated with malignancy.

    Martínez-Aguilar, Juan; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Around 5% of the general population have palpable thyroid nodules. Although most thyroid tumours are benign, thyroid cancer represents the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, comprising mainly follicular and papillary thyroid carcinomas. Previous studies have shed some light on the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer but there have not been any comprehensive mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies of large scale to reveal protein expression differences between thyroid tumours and the molecular alterations associated with tumour malignancy. We applied data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry which enabled quantitative expression analysis of over 1,600 proteins from 32 specimens to compare normal thyroid tissue with the three most common tumours of the thyroid gland: follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma and papillary carcinoma. In follicular tumours, we found marked reduction of the tumour suppressor and therapeutic target extracellular protein decorin. We made the novel observation that TGFβ-induced protein ig-h3 (TGFBI) was found frequently overexpressed in follicular carcinoma compared with follicular adenoma. Proteomic pathway analysis showed changes in papillary carcinoma were associated with disruption of cell contacts (loss of E-cadherin), actin cytoskeleton dynamics and loss of differentiation markers, all hallmarks of an invasive phenotype. PMID:27025787

  16. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Provides Insight into White Matter Damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Prell, Tino; Hartung, Viktor; Tietz, Florian; Penzlin, Susanne; Ilse, Benjamin; Schweser, Ferdinand; Deistung, Andreas; Bokemeyer, Martin; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Witte, Otto W.; Grosskreutz, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterised by widespread white matter damage. There is growing evidence that disturbances in iron metabolism contribute to white matter alterations. Materials & Methods We analysed the data of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) of white matter in a cohort of 27 patients with ALS and 30 healthy age-matched controls. Results Signal alterations were found on SWI in the corpus callosum; along the corticospinal tract (subcortical motor cortex, posterior limb of the internal capsule and brainstem levels) and in the subgyral regions of frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital and limbic lobes. Alterations of white matter in the corpus callosum correlated with disease severity as assessed by the revised ALS functional rating scale. Conclusion SWI is capable of indicating iron and myelin disturbances in white matter of ALS patients. The SWI patterns observed in this study suggest that widespread alterations due to iron disturbances occur in patients with ALS and correlate with disease severity. PMID:26110427

  17. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish

    John L Akins; Morris, James A.; Green, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issue...

  18. HIV-1 Viral RNA Dynamics at the Plasma Membrane May Provide Insight into Viral Assembly | Poster

    Many aspects of how infectious viruses assemble in cells have yet to be completely deciphered. However, as reported in a recent Journal of Virology paper, researchers may be one step closer to understanding how HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, assembles and replicates.

  19. Survey of the genome of Pogostemon cablin provides insights into its evolutionary history and sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis.

    He, Yang; Xiao, Hongtao; Deng, Cao; Xiong, Liang; Nie, Hu; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth. (Patchouli) is an important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that has both essential oil value and a broad range of therapeutic effects. Here we report the first de novo assembled 1.15-Gb draft genome sequence for P. cablin from next-generation sequencing technology. Our assembly, with a misassembly rate of Lamiaceae family split ~62.80 Mya, and the divergence between patchouli and sesame occurred ~52.42 Mya, implying a potentially shared recent whole-genome duplication event. Analysis of gene homologs involved in sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis showed that patchouli contains key genes involved in more sesquiterpenoid types and has more copies of genes for each sesquiterpenoid type than several other related plant species. The patchouli genome will facilitate future research on secondary metabolic pathways and their regulation as well as potential selective breeding of patchouli. PMID:27198881

  20. Full page insight

    Cortsen, Rikke Platz

    2014-01-01

    -temporal relations within the stories told, specifically in terms of full pages in connection with apocalypses. The spatio-temporal quality of the apocalypse is complex in that it concerns an event that is an ending and at the same time a continuation of time; and this double temporal quality is, it is argued here......, something that it shares with the full page in comics. Through an analysis of several full pages from Moore titles like Swamp Thing, From Hell, Watchmen and Promethea, it is made clear why the full page provides an apt vehicle for an apocalypse in comics....

  1. Optimization : insights and applications

    Brinkhuis, Jan

    2005-01-01

    This self-contained textbook is an informal introduction to optimization through the use of numerous illustrations and applications. The focus is on analytically solving optimization problems with a finite number of continuous variables. In addition, the authors provide introductions to classical and modern numerical methods of optimization and to dynamic optimization. The book's overarching point is that most problems may be solved by the direct application of the theorems of Fermat, Lagrange, and Weierstrass. The authors show how the intuition for each of the theoretical results can be s

  2. 2016 Mars Insight Mission Design and Navigation

    Abilleira, Fernando; Frauenholz, Ray; Fujii, Ken; Wallace, Mark; You, Tung-Han

    2014-01-01

    Scheduled for a launch in the 2016 Earth to Mars opportunity, the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport (InSight) Mission will arrive to Mars in late September 2016 with the primary objective of placing a science lander on the surface of the Red Planet followed by the deployment of two science instruments to investigate the fundamental processes of terrestrial planet formation and evolution. In order to achieve a successful landing, the InSight Project has selected a launch/arrival strategy that satisfies the following key and driving requirements: (1) Deliver a total launch mass of 727 kg, (2) target a nominal landing site with a cumulative Delta V99 less than 30 m/s, and (3) approach EDL with a V-infinity upper limit of 3.941 km/s and (4) an entry flight-path angle (EFPA) of -12.5 +/- 0.26 deg, 3-sigma; the InSight trajectories have been designed such that they (5) provide UHF-band communications via Direct-To-Earth and MRO from Entry through landing plus 60 s, (6) with injection aimpoints biased away from Mars such that the probability of the launch vehicle upper stage impacting Mars is less than 1.0 X 10(exp 4) for fifty years after launch, and (7) non-nominal impact probabilities due to failure during the Cruise phase less than 1.0 X 10(exp 2).

  3. Transungual permeation: current insights.

    Bhuptani, Ronak S; Deshpande, Ketaki M; Patravale, Vandana B

    2016-08-01

    Nail disorders are beyond cosmetic concern; besides discomfort in the performance of daily chores, they disturb patients psychologically and affect their quality of life. Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is the most prevalent nail-related disorder affecting a major population worldwide. Overcoming the impenetrable nail barrier is the toughest challenge for the development of efficacious topical ungual formulation. Sophisticated techniques such as iontophoresis and photodynamic therapy have been proven to improve transungual permeation. This article provides an updated and concise discussion regarding the conventional approach and upcoming novel approaches focused to alter the nail barrier. A comprehensive description regarding preformulation screening techniques for the identification of potential ungual enhancers is also described in this review while highlighting the current pitfalls for the development of ungual delivery. PMID:26419676

  4. Understanding Insight in the Context of Q

    Coghlan, David

    2012-01-01

    In Revans' learning formula, L = P + Q, Q represents "questioning insight", by which Revans means that insight comes out of the process of questioning programmed knowledge (P) in the light of experience. We typically focus on the content of an insight rather than on the act of insight. Drawing primarily on the work of Bernard Lonergan this paper…

  5. Multitasking, Competition and Provider Payment

    Karen Eggleston

    2001-01-01

    Many important dimensions of quality health care are difficult to observe, monitor, and motivate. This paper examines how competition among providers interacts with payment system incentives when the allocation of provider effort among multiple such dimensions or ‘tasks’ is noncontractible. The framework highlights that an optimal provider payment system, including optimal risk adjustment, should take account of provider multitasking.

  6. Querying Data Providing Web Services

    Sabesan, Manivasakan

    2010-01-01

    Web services are often used for search computing where data is retrieved from servers providing information of different kinds. Such data providing web services return a set of objects for a given set of parameters without any side effects. There is need to enable general and scalable search capabilities of data from data providing web services, which is the topic of this Thesis. The Web Service MEDiator (WSMED) system automatically provides relational views of any data providing web service ...

  7. Insights on Solar Twins

    Sousa Duarte, Tharcisyo Sa e.; Soares da Costa, Jefferson; Dias do Nascimento Júnior, José

    2015-08-01

    The question about how to define a real solar twin are still active. Cayrel de Strobe et al. (1981) defined a solar twin like a star having at the same time the physical parameters, Teff, gravity, bolometric magnitude, microturbulent velocity, and chemical composition. We presented the more extensive sample of solar twins known to date. From these targets we will study the behavior of the solar twins as a function of fundamentals stellar parameters, effective temperature, luminosity, age, convective envelope mass deepening (1 - M*/M⊙), lithium abundance and rotation period. We selected the solar twins from observations with the spectropolarimeters ESPaDOnS at CFHT and the Narval at TBL and also on literature. All objects have high resolution and high signal to noise. Analyze this sample of solar twins will help us to understand how these stars whether located around of the Sun's place. Our preliminary results show that the lithium abundance presents one clear correlation with stellar age. The (1 - M*/M⊙) values obtained through our method provided good agreement with the solar value. The rotation periods allow us to assess the solar twins as a function of gyrochronology.

  8. Low Frequency Insights Into Supernova Remnants

    Dyer, K K; Borkowski, K J; Dyer, Kristy K.; Reynolds, Stephen P; Borkowski, Kazik J.

    2000-01-01

    Low frequency observations at 330 and 74 MHz can provide new insights into supernova remnants (SNR). We can test theoretical predictions for spectral index variations. Nonlinear models of shock acceleration predict that the spectra from young SNR should be slightly concave rather than power laws -- flattening toward higher energies. However, few SNR are bright and compact enough to be studied at millimeter wavelengths, restricting studies to the small range from 6 to 20 cm (a factor of 1.7 in electron energies). Observations at 330 MHz increase the electron energy baseline to a factor of 4, while providing sensitivity to larger spatial scales that are resolved out by centimeter-wavelength interferometers. Such observations can also separate thermal from nonthermal emission and detect excess free-free absorption associated with cool gas in remnants. Wide field images also provide an efficient census of both thermal and nonthermal sources over a large region.

  9. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    ... care provider is. These kinds of providers can take care of you during pregnancy and deliver your baby: ... doctor who has special education and training to take care of pregnant women and deliver babies. About 8 ...

  10. Logistic service providers and sustainable physical distribution

    Stef Weijers

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Logistic Service Providers main concern was to ensure reliability for a low price (Christopher, 2005. Dutch Logistic Service Providers still have these two aspects at the top of their list, but also have to take in a new aspect: sustainability. 88% Of the investigated Logistic Service Providers have included sustainability in the company's goals. These Logistic Service Providers have developed different strategies to achieve a higher level of sustainability. This paper presents the results of a study into what Logistic Service Providers say what they are doing, or intend to do, to improve sustainability for their transport services. In this way insight is given in the attitude of Dutch Logistic Service Providers towards sustainability and how they intend to translate this into business practise: internal solutions or new methods incorporating external partners. Methods: Various methods of the investigations were used, among which the analysis of the statements about the sustainabilityon the websites of various companies as well as the questionnaire per Internet. The research covered 50 largest logistics companies operating in the Netherlands and 60 companies that competed for the award "Lean and Green" advertised in the Netherlands. In addition, the Internet survey was answered by 41 companies that belong to the network of our university. Results: The investigation has shown that sustainability is handled by the logistics company as an integral part of the corporate strategy. In contrast, shippers depend in the choice of logistics services primarily on such classical aspects as the reliability or the price and the sustainability play a minor role. Conclusions: Trying to find methods to improve the sustainability, Dutch logistics service providers, in the first place, look for solutions that increase the efficiency and therefore the cost reduction potential. Solutions, which require the involvement of clients, were less often

  11. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  12. Tackling Disrespectful, Unprofessional Provider Behaviors.

    2016-06-01

    To address problematic provider behaviors that can affect patient safety, physician leaders at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) developed the Coworker Observation Reporting System (CORS), a systematized approach for retrieving and addressing concerns about providers reported by staff. To encourage staff members to report concerns, they have to trust that the organization is going to respond, and they also have to feel that they have a certain element of psychological safety. Selected peer messengers share staff complaints with providers, enabling them to offer their perspectives on the issues or events in question. Three years into the implementation of CORS, investigators found that the majority of providers self-correct their behaviors when reports about staff concerns are shared. Additional level 1, level 2, and level 3 interventions are built into the CORS system for providers who fail to self-correct after one or two reports. PMID:27295820

  13. Philosophical Insight and Modal Cognition

    Gerken, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    Modal rationalists uphold a strong constitutive relationship between a priori cognition and modal cognition. Since both a priori cognition and modal cognition have been taken to be characteristic of philosophical insights, I will critically assess an ambitious modal rationalism and an associated ambitious methodological rationalism. I begin by examining Kripkean cases of the necessary a posteriori in order to characterize the ambitious modal rationalism that will be the focus of my criticism....

  14. TERRAIN, PROVIDENCE COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Providence AOI consists of the costal portion of the county, and meshes up seamlessly with the Kent county AOI directly south. Ground Control is collected...

  15. Types of health care providers

    Physicians; Nurses; Health care providers; Doctors; Pharmacists ... with a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). NURSING CARE Registered nurses (RNs) have graduated from a nursing program, have ...

  16. Medicare Referring Provider DMEPOS PUF

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset, which is part of CMSs Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, details information on Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and...

  17. Should Governments Provide Catastrophe Insurance?

    Jaffee, Dwight; Russell, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina and the terrorist attacks of 9/11 2001 have focused attention on the appropriate role of government in providing insurance against catastrophes. This paper argues that wherever possible governments should follow policies which enable the continuation of a private insurance market. In the event that government must itself provide catastrophe insurance it should follow the same actuarially based pricing and reserving rules that would be followed by a competitive private market.

  18. Insights to regenerate materials: learning from nature

    García-Aznar, J. M.; Valero, C.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Javierre, E.

    2016-08-01

    Self-healing materials, both biological and engineered, integrate the ability to repair themselves and recover their functionality using the resources inherently available to them. Although significant advances have been made, in recent years, for the design of different concepts of self-healing materials, this work aims to provide some insights into how living materials are able to regenerate or heal when a fracture or injury occurs. The main sensors that regulate this adaptive and regenerative behavior are the cells. These are able to sense the mechanical alterations in their surroundings and regulate their activity in order to remove dead tissue and/or create new tissue. Therefore, understanding how cells are able to regenerate tissues under complex and multiphysics conditions can define the biomimetics guidelines to heal through inert or traditional engineering materials. In this work, we present a combination of experiments and different kinds of multiscale and multiphysics models in order to understand how mechanics regulate some mechanisms at cell and tissue level. This combination of results aims to gain insight into the development of novel strategies for self-healing materials, mimicking the behavior induced by cells and biological tissues.

  19. Financing sustainability: insights for investors, corporate executives, and policymakers

    M. Kerste; N. Rosenboom; B.J. Sikken; J. Weda

    2011-01-01

    Sustainability thinking is rapidly gaining traction. It o­ffers an inspiring vision for the future of the world and provides significant business and investment opportunities. Based on insights from over 300 empirical studies, this book explores the possibilities in the field of renewable energy fin

  20. Sole-Manrubia model of biological evolution: some new insights

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    The Sole-Manrubia model of ``macro''-evolution describes the origination, evolution and extinction of species on geological time scales. We report some properties of this model which provide deep insight into this simple model which captures several realistic features.

  1. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  2. Accounting choices of controllers : An insight into controller deliberations

    de Groot, Therèse

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral thesis provides insights into the accounting choice process of business controllers. The main contribution is a new approach in analyzing financial accounting choices, using an interpretive methodology. Moreover, the overall framework of analysis developed in this thesis can help organ

  3. Enstore with Chimera namespace provider

    Enstore is a mass storage system developed by Fermilab that provides distributed access and management of data stored on tapes. It uses a namespace service, PNFS, developed by DESY to provide a filesystem-like view of the stored data. PNFS is a legacy product and is being replaced by a new implementation, called Chimera, which is also developed by DESY. Chimera offers multiple advantages over PNFS in terms of performance and functionality. The Enstore client component, encp, has been modified to work with Chimera, as well as with any other namespace provider. We performed high load end-to-end acceptance test of Enstore with the Chimera namespace. This paper describes the modifications to Enstore, the test procedure and the results of the acceptance testing.

  4. Consumer Insight as Competitive Advantage Using Big Data and Analytics

    Adnan Veysel Ertemel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital revolution serves as a competitive advantage to businesses that are able to analyze consumer behavior in order to gain insights for their strategic advantage. After the advent of Internet, the past two decades witnessed generation of vast amount of business data. The amount of data is so huge that traditional database management system approaches falls short of managing and analyzing this data. This paper explores the characteristics of this phenomenon called Big Data together with Analytics as a tool for marketers to gain insights about consumer behavior and hence provide competitive advantage to the businesses. It also discusses some best practices as case studies.

  5. Insight and analysis problem solving in microbes to machines.

    Clark, Kevin B

    2015-11-01

    A key feature for obtaining solutions to difficult problems, insight is oftentimes vaguely regarded as a special discontinuous intellectual process and/or a cognitive restructuring of problem representation or goal approach. However, this nearly century-old state of art devised by the Gestalt tradition to explain the non-analytical or non-trial-and-error, goal-seeking aptitude of primate mentality tends to neglect problem-solving capabilities of lower animal phyla, Kingdoms other than Animalia, and advancing smart computational technologies built from biological, artificial, and composite media. Attempting to provide an inclusive, precise definition of insight, two major criteria of insight, discontinuous processing and problem restructuring, are here reframed using terminology and statistical mechanical properties of computational complexity classes. Discontinuous processing becomes abrupt state transitions in algorithmic/heuristic outcomes or in types of algorithms/heuristics executed by agents using classical and/or quantum computational models. And problem restructuring becomes combinatorial reorganization of resources, problem-type substitution, and/or exchange of computational models. With insight bounded by computational complexity, humans, ciliated protozoa, and complex technological networks, for example, show insight when restructuring time requirements, combinatorial complexity, and problem type to solve polynomial and nondeterministic polynomial decision problems. Similar effects are expected from other problem types, supporting the idea that insight might be an epiphenomenon of analytical problem solving and consequently a larger information processing framework. Thus, this computational complexity definition of insight improves the power, external and internal validity, and reliability of operational parameters with which to classify, investigate, and produce the phenomenon for computational agents ranging from microbes to man-made devices. PMID

  6. Psychophysiological prediction of choice: relevance to insight and drug addiction

    Moeller, Scott J.; Hajcak, Greg; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Dunning, Jonathan P.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2012-01-01

    An important goal of addiction research and treatment is to predict behavioural responses to drug-related stimuli. This goal is especially important for patients with impaired insight, which can interfere with therapeutic interventions and potentially invalidate self-report questionnaires. This research tested (i) whether event-related potentials, specifically the late positive potential, predict choice to view cocaine images in cocaine addiction; and (ii) whether such behaviour prediction differs by insight (operationalized in this study as self-awareness of image choice). Fifty-nine cocaine abusers and 32 healthy controls provided data for the following laboratory components that were completed in a fixed-sequence (to establish prediction): (i) event-related potential recordings while passively viewing pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine images, during which early (400–1000 ms) and late (1000–2000 ms) window late positive potentials were collected; (ii) self-reported arousal ratings for each picture; and (iii) two previously validated tasks: one to assess choice for viewing these same images, and the other to group cocaine abusers by insight. Results showed that pleasant-related late positive potentials and arousal ratings predicted pleasant choice (the choice to view pleasant pictures) in all subjects, validating the method. In the cocaine abusers, the predictive ability of the late positive potentials and arousal ratings depended on insight. Cocaine-related late positive potentials better predicted cocaine image choice in cocaine abusers with impaired insight. Another emotion-relevant event-related potential component (the early posterior negativity) did not show these results, indicating specificity of the late positive potential. In contrast, arousal ratings better predicted respective cocaine image choice (and actual cocaine use severity) in cocaine abusers with intact insight. Taken together, the late positive potential could serve as a biomarker

  7. Wind Turbine Providing Grid Support

    A variable speed wind turbine is arranged to provide additional electrical power to counteract non-periodic disturbances in an electrical grid. A controller monitors events indicating a need to increase the electrical output power from the wind turbine to the electrical grid. The controller is...... grid by outputting at least a predetermined minimum electrical power....

  8. Knudsen Gas Provides Nanobubble Stability

    Seddon, James R.T.; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    We provide a model for the remarkable stability of surface nanobubbles to bulk dissolution. The key to the solution is that the gas in a nanobubble is of Knudsen type. This leads to the generation of a bulk liquid flow which effectively forces the diffusive gas to remain local. Our model predicts th

  9. The INSIGHT SEIS VBB Experiment

    Tillier, S.; De Raucourt, S.; Lognonne, P. H.; Banerdt, B.; Mimoun, D.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Pike, W. T.; Zweifel, P.; Mance, D.; Bierwirth, M.; Laudet, P.; Perez, R.; Kerjean, L.; Hurst, K. J.; Mocquet, A.; Garcia, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    The SEIS experiment is the primary payload of the Interior Structure investigation using Seismology and Heat Transport (INSIGHT) Mission Proposal, submitted to NASA in the frame of the 2010 Discovery program, and selected for a competitive phase A study, together with two other projects. The objective of the INSIGHT SEIS experiment is the determination of the deep internal structure of Mars. In particular, geophysical parameters of first importance, such as the state (liquid/solid) and size of the core, structure of the mantle, shape of discontinuities, thickness of the crust will be determined by the experiment. It will measure seismic activity in a very broad band of signal, from the tidal frequencies (0.05 mHz) up to the short period frequencies (50 Hz), to address the widest range of scientific questions, from the state of the core to the meteoritic impact and quake rates. The instrument integrates a Very Broad Band (VBB) 3 axis seismometer, completed by another trihedron of MEMS short period seismometers, environmental sensors for pressure, wind and temperature, The sensors will be deployed on the Martian ground by a robotic arm from a Phoenix-type lander platform and protected by a wind and thermal shield. The sensor assembly, which contains all seismic sensors, the leveling system, as well as house-keeping and temperature measurements, will be deployed on the soil in order to allow the best possible mechanical coupling with the ground motion. The wind and thermal shield, the sensors' specific containers (vacuum sphere for VBBs) and a passive thermal compensation system will achieve a very high protection of the VBB against temperature and pressure variations, allowing the sensor to operate in the rough Martian thermal environment while reaching a deection threshold below 10-9 ms-2 Hz-1/2 in the VBB bandwidth. A dedicated electronics will manage the overall experiment and ultra-low noise, space qualified 24 bits A/D converters will perform the acquisition

  10. Learning-by-Doing in Transnational Operations Networks: Insights from Economic Geography

    Spring, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how insights from economic geography, which are typically explanatory or directed at policy prescription, might be utilized to provide managerial insight at firm level into the processes of and conditions for tacit knowledge transfer. Design/methodology/approach: This is a theoretical paper. The…

  11. A Developmental Approach to Educating Young Children. Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology

    Daniels, Denise H.; Clarkson, Patricia K.

    2010-01-01

    The early school years provide critical opportunities for children to develop foundational skills and positive attitudes toward learning. This book, the first in the "Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology" series, gives current and prospective PreK-3 teachers valuable insight into how young children feel, think, and learn. Denise H.…

  12. Measuring the development of insight by dental health professionals in training using workplace-based assessment.

    Prescott-Clements, L.E.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Schuwirth, L.; Gibb, E.; Hurst, Y.; Rennie, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For health professionals, the development of insight into their performance is vital for safe practice, professional development and self-regulation. This study investigates whether the development of dental trainees' insight, when provided with external feedback on performance, can be

  13. Approaching the Distinction between Intuition and Insight.

    Zhang, Zhonglu; Lei, Yi; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Intuition and insight share similar cognitive and neural basis. Though, there are still some essential differences between the two. Here in this short review, we discriminated between intuition, and insight in two aspects. First, intuition, and insight are toward different aspects of information processing. Whereas intuition involves judgment about "yes or no," insight is related to "what" is the solution. Second, tacit knowledge play different roles in between intuition and insight. On the one hand, tacit knowledge is conducive to intuitive judgment. On the other hand, tacit knowledge may first impede but later facilitate insight occurrence. Furthermore, we share theoretical, and methodological views on how to access the distinction between intuition and insight. PMID:27555833

  14. Operating experience insights supporting ageing assessments

    Be effective in ageing management means looking at the right aspects, with the right techniques, and one of the most effective tool which could be used for that purpose is the analysis of operating experience. The paper has as objective to perform a review of available operating experience, with the aim to provide a better picture about the impact of ageing effects. The IAEA International Reporting System and NRC Licensee Event Reports were chosen as reference databases, both databases being internationally recognized as important sources of information about events occurrences in the nuclear power plants. The ageing related events identified in the selected time window were analyzed in detail, and the contributions of each major degradation mechanisms that have induced the ageing related events (specific to each defined group of components) was represented and discussed. The paper demonstrates the possibility to use operating experience insights in highlighting the ageing effects. (authors)

  15. Insights into Mechanisms of Chronic Neurodegeneration

    Abigail B. Diack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of abnormal conformers of a host encoded protein in the central nervous system. The process leading to neurodegeneration is still poorly defined and thus development of early intervention strategies is challenging. Unique amongst these diseases are Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases, which have the ability to transmit between individuals. The infectious nature of these diseases has permitted in vivo and in vitro modelling of the time course of the disease process in a highly reproducible manner, thus early events can be defined. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the cell-to-cell spread of protein aggregates by a “prion-like mechanism” is common among the protein misfolding diseases. Thus, the TSE models may provide insights into disease mechanisms and testable hypotheses for disease intervention, applicable to a number of these chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. New Insights into Polycistronic Transcripts in Eukaryotes

    Haiwei Pi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria and archaea, many functionally related genes are organized into operons inorder to be transcribed and translated simultaneously. Operons are rarely seen in eukaryotesexcept for the Trypanosome and nematode, in which they are first transcribed into polycistronictranscripts but then processed into individual mature mRNAs. Recently, severalresearchers described the findings of polycistronic transcripts also in insects, which revisedthe previous thoughts that polycistronic genes were absent or few in eukaryotes. Similar toprokaryotic operons, the encoded peptides or proteins are translated simultaneously from asingle polycistronic mRNA, providing new insights into the evolution of polycistronicgenes. More interestingly, one type of the newly identified polycistronic genes encodes biologicallyimportant peptides composed of as few as 11 amino acids. These new findings willspur scientists to identify more small peptides in genome-solved organisms, and change thedefinition of coding sequences in genomic annotation.

  17. The Chinese Housing Provident Fund

    Richard J. Buttimer Jr; Anthony Yanxiang Gu; Tyler T. Yang

    2004-01-01

    The Chinese government has embarked upon an effort to reduce the number of tenants living in publicly owned housing. This is a significant challenge for any government, but may be especially so for a country where private homeownership is a new option. Out of concern that many of its citizens could not afford to purchase their housing units, the Chinese government created the Housing Provident Fund. This program, which is similar to housing fund programs in other countries such as Thailand an...

  18. Wind Turbine Providing Grid Support

    Tarnowski, Germán Claudio

    2011-01-01

    A variable speed wind turbine is arranged to provide additional electrical power to counteract non-periodic disturbances in an electrical grid. A controller monitors events indicating a need to increase the electrical output power from the wind turbine to the electrical grid. The controller is arranged to control the wind turbine as follows: after an indicating event has been detected, the wind turbine enters an overproduction period in which the electrical output power is increased, wherein ...

  19. A provider based accounting architecture

    Parhonyi, R.; Quartel, D.; Pras, A.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a novel content accounting architecture. Content accounting is becoming increasingly important since it is anticipated that in the near future more billable content will be published on the Internet. The presented architecture has a distributed functionality and an innovative view with respect to the payment system that is incorporated. The architecture enables outsourcing of the accounting functions. In particular, it is shown how Internet service providers can be involved...

  20. Providing Southern Perspectives on CSR

    Jeppesen, Søren; Kothuis, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The article seeks to contribute to the SMEs and CSR literature in developing countries by providing; a) a ‘Southern’ SME perspective, which includes the voices of managers and workers, b) a perspective of CSR, which opens up to informal CSR practices that SMEs undertake, and c) an analysis of the key institutional issues affecting the CSR practices of SMEs. It presents perceptions of CSR practices among 21 SMEs in the garment industry in South Africa, based on 40 interviews with managers and ...