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Sample records for acidic microenvironment synergistically

  1. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells

    Jingnan Xu; Zhuo Song; Qiujun Guo; Jie Li

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the “seeds” and “soil,” which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Tr...

  2. Synergistic COX2 Induction by IFNγ and TNFα Self-Limits Type-1 Immunity in the Human Tumor Microenvironment.

    Wong, Jeffrey L; Obermajer, Nataša; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P; Kalinski, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance of CTL-, Th1-, and NK cell-mediated type-1 immunity is essential for effective antitumor responses. Unexpectedly, we observed that the critical soluble mediators of type-1 immune effector cells, IFNγ and TNFα, synergize in the induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), the key enzyme in prostaglandin (PG)E2synthesis, and the subsequent hyperactivation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of ovarian cancer patients. MDSC hyperactivation by type-1 immunity and the resultant overexpression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2), IL10, and additional COX2 result in strong feedback suppression of type-1 immune responses. This paradoxical immune suppression driven by type-1 immune cell activation was found to depend on the synergistic action of IFNγ and TNFα, and could not be reproduced by either of these factors alone. Importantly, from a therapeutic standpoint, these negative feedback limiting type-1 responses could be eliminated by COX2 blockade, allowing amplification of type-1 immunity in the ovarian cancer TME. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism underlying the self-limiting nature of type-1 immunity in the human TME, driven by the synergistic induction of COX2 by IFNγ and TNFα, and provide a rationale for targeting the COX2-PGE2axis to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 303-11. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26817996

  3. Acidic Tumor Microenvironment and pH-Sensing G protein-Coupled Receptors

    Justus, Calvin R.; Lixue eDong; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechani...

  4. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors

    Justus, Calvin R.; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechan...

  5. Rapid dissolution of ZnO nanocrystals in acidic cancer microenvironment leading to preferential apoptosis

    Sasidharan, Abhilash; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Raman, Sreerekha; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-09-01

    The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in acidic (pH ~5-6) cancer microenvironment causing elevated ROS stress, mitochondrial superoxide formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and cell cycle arrest at S/G2 phase leading to apoptosis. In effect, by elucidating the unique toxicity mechanism of ZnO NCs, we show that ZnO NCs can destabilize cancer cells by utilizing its own hostile acidic microenvironment, which is otherwise critical for its survival.The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in

  6. Acidic Tumor Microenvironment and pH-Sensing G protein-Coupled Receptors

    Calvin R. Justus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8, GPR68 (OGR1, and GPR132 (G2A, regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

  7. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors.

    Justus, Calvin R; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), GPR68 (OGR1), and GPR132 (G2A), regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:24367336

  8. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression and resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included conjugation of 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS)...

  9. Modulation of Acid Sphingomyelinase in Melanoma Reprogrammes the Tumour Immune Microenvironment

    Emma Assi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory microenvironment induces tumours to acquire an aggressive and immunosuppressive behaviour. Since acid sphingomyelinase (A-SMase downregulation in melanoma was shown to determine a malignant phenotype, we aimed here to elucidate the role of A-SMase in the regulation of tumour immunogenic microenvironment using in vivo melanoma models in which A-SMase was either downregulated or maintained at constitutively high levels. We found high levels of inflammatory factors in low A-SMase expressing tumours, which also displayed an immunosuppressive/protumoural microenvironment: high levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs, as well as low levels of dendritic cells (DCs. In contrast, the restoration of A-SMase in melanoma cells not only reduced tumour growth and immunosuppression, but also induced a high recruitment at tumour site of effector immune cells with an antitumoural function. Indeed, we observed a poor homing of MDSCs and Tregs and the increased recruitment of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes as well as the infiltration of DCs and CD8+/CD44high T lymphocytes. This study demonstrates that change of A-SMase expression in cancer cells is sufficient per se to tune in vivo melanoma growth and that A-SMase levels modulate immune cells at tumour site. This may be taken into consideration in the setting of therapeutic strategies.

  10. Acidic Microenvironments in Waste Rock Characterized by Neutral Drainage: Bacteria–Mineral Interactions at Sulfide Surfaces

    John W. Dockrey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial populations and microbe-mineral interactions were examined in waste rock characterized by neutral rock drainage (NRD. Samples of three primary sulfide-bearing waste rock types (i.e., marble-hornfels, intrusive, exoskarn were collected from field-scale experiments at the Antamina Cu–Zn–Mo mine, Peru. Microbial communities within all samples were dominated by neutrophilic thiosulfate oxidizing bacteria. However, acidophilic iron and sulfur oxidizers were present within intrusive waste rock characterized by bulk circumneutral pH drainage. The extensive development of microbially colonized porous Fe(III (oxyhydroxide and Fe(III (oxyhydroxysulfate precipitates was observed at sulfide-mineral surfaces during examination by field emission-scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS. Linear combination fitting of bulk extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectra for these precipitates indicated they were composed of schwertmannite [Fe8O8(OH6–4.5(SO41–1.75], lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH] and K-jarosite [KFe3(OH6(SO42]. The presence of schwertmannite and K-jarosite is indicative of the development of localized acidic microenvironments at sulfide-mineral surfaces. Extensive bacterial colonization of this porous layer and pitting of underlying sulfide-mineral surfaces suggests that acidic microenvironments can play an important role in sulfide-mineral oxidation under bulk circumneutral pH conditions. These findings have important implications for water quality management in NRD settings.

  11. High Throughput Screening of Valganciclovir in Acidic Microenvironments of Polyester Thin Films

    Teilo Schaller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ganciclovir and valganciclor are antiviral agents used for the treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis. The conventional method for administering ganciclovir in cytomegalovirus retinitis patients is repeated intravitreal injections. In order to obviate the possible detrimental effects of repeated intraocular injections, to improve compliance and to eliminate systemic side-effects, we investigated the tuning of the ganciclovir pro-drug valganciclovir and the release from thin films of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, polycaprolactone (PCL, or mixtures of both, as a step towards prototyping periocular valganciclovir implants. To investigate the drug release, we established and evaluated a high throughput fluorescence-based quantification screening assay for the detection of valganciclovir. Our protocol allows quantifying as little as 20 ng of valganciclovir in 96-well polypropylene plates and a 50× faster analysis compared to traditional HPLC measurements. This improvement can hence be extrapolated to other polyester matrix thin film formulations using a high-throughput approach. The acidic microenvironment within the polyester matrix was found to protect valganciclovir from degradation with resultant increases in the half-life of the drug in the periocular implant to 100 days. Linear release profiles were obtained using the pure polyester polymers for 10 days and 60 days formulations; however, gross phase separations of PCL and acid-terminated PLGA prevented tuning within these timeframes due to the phase separation of the polymer, valganciclovir, or both.

  12. Synergistic anti-proliferative effects of gambogic acid with docetaxel in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines

    Zou Zhengyun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background Gambogic acid has a marked anti-tumor effect for gastric and colorectal cancers in vitro and in vivo. However, recent investigations on gambogic acid have focused mainly on mono-drug therapy, and its potential role in cancer therapy has not been comprehensively illustrated. This study aimed to assess the interaction between gambogic acid and docetaxel on human gastrointestinal cancer cells and to investigate the mechanism of gambogic acid plus docetaxel treatment-induced apoptotic cell death. Methods MTT assay was used to determine IC50 values in BGC-823, MKN-28, LOVO and SW-116 cells after gambogic acid and docetaxel administration. Median effect analysis was applied for determination of synergism and antagonism. Synergistic interaction between gambogic acid and docetaxel was evaluated using the combination index (CI method. Furthermore, cellular apoptosis was analyzed by Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI double staining. Additionally, mRNA expression of drug-associated genes, i.e., β-tublin III and tau, and the apoptosis-related gene survivin, were measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Results Gambogic acid provided a synergistic effect on the cytotoxicity induced by docetaxel in all four cell lines. The combined application of gambogic acid and docetaxel enhanced apoptosis in gastrointestinal cancer cells. Moreover, gambogic acid markedly decreased the mRNA expression of docetaxel-related genes, including β-tubulin III, tau and survivin, in BGC-823 cells. Conclusions Gambogic acid plus docetaxel produced a synergistic anti-tumor effect in gastrointestinal cancer cells, suggesting that the drug combination may offer a novel treatment option for patients with gastric and colorectal cancers.

  13. Synergistic Effects of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Fatty Acids on Toxicity to Caco-2 Cells

    Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Kermanizadeh, Ali;

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids exposure may increase sensitivity of intestinal epithelial cells to cytotoxic effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs). This study evaluated the synergistic effects of ZnO NPs and palmitic acid (PA) or free fatty acids (FFAs) mixture (oleic/PA 2:1) on toxicity to human colon...... epithelial (Caco-2) cells. The ZnO NPs exposure concentration dependently induced cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells showing as reduced proliferation and activity measured by 3 different assays. PA exposure induced cytotoxicity, and coexposure to ZnO NPs and PA showed the largest cytotoxic effects. The presence of...

  14. Synergistic extraction of uranium from acidic sulfate leach liquor using D2EHPA mixed with TOPO

    Uranium extraction from sulfate leach liquor acid by D2EHPA and TOPO mixture in kerosene was investigated. The effect of different factors affecting the extraction mechanism such as sulfate leach liquor acid, D2EHPA and TOPO concentrations and temperature have been studied. The mathematical treatment for the obtained date suggested that the composition of synergistic extraction species is (UO2(D)2T). The logarithm of the apparent equilibrium constant, log Kex, of synergistic extraction reaction has been evaluated, to be 3.35 ± 0.1. The effect of temperature on extraction process was investigated and the apparent values of the thermodynamics parameters (∆H, ∆G and ∆S) were 38.2 kJ/mol, -19.1 kJ/mol and 192.5 J/mol respectively. (author)

  15. Synergistic effect of xylitol and ursolic acid combination on oral biofilms

    Zou, Yunyun; Lee, Yoon; Huh, Jinyoung; Park, Jeong-Won

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to evaluate the synergistic antibacterial effect of xylitol and ursolic acid (UA) against oral biofilms in vitro. Materials and Methods S. mutans UA 159 (wild type), S. mutans KCOM 1207, KCOM 1128 and S. sobrinus ATCC 33478 were used. The susceptibility of S. mutans to UA and xylitol was evaluated using a broth microdilution method. Based on the results, combined susceptibility was evaluated using optimal inhibitory combinations (OIC), optimal bactericidal c...

  16. Synergistic mechanism between SDBS and oleic acid in anionic flotation of rhodochrosite

    Bu, Yong-jie; Liu, Run-qing; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yue-hua

    2015-05-01

    Pure mineral flotation experiments, zeta potential testing, and infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the interfacial reactions of oleic acid (collector), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, synergist), and rhodochrosite in an anionic system. The pure mineral test shows that oleic acid has a strong ability to collect products on rhodochrosite. Under neutral to moderately alkaline conditions, low temperature (e.g., 10°C) adversely affects the flotation performance of oleic acid; the addition of SDBS significantly improves the dispersion and solubility of oleic acid, enhancing its collecting ability and flotation recovery. The zeta potential test shows that rhodochrosite interacts with oleic acid and SDBS, resulting in a more negative zeta potential and the co-adsorption of the collector and synergist at the mineral surface. Infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that when oleic acid and SDBS are used as a mixed collector, oleates along with -COO- and -COOH functional groups are formed on the mineral surface, indicating chemical adsorption on rhodochrosite. The results demonstrate that oleic acid and SDBS co-adsorb chemically on the surface of rhodochrosite, thereby improving the flotation performance of the collector.

  17. Mechanism of Sporicidal Activity for the Synergistic Combination of Peracetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Leggett, Mark J; Schwarz, J Spencer; Burke, Peter A; McDonnell, Gerald; Denyer, Stephen P; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2016-02-01

    There is still great interest in controlling bacterial endospores. The use of chemical disinfectants and, notably, oxidizing agents to sterilize medical devices is increasing. With this in mind, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and peracetic acid (PAA) have been used in combination, but until now there has been no explanation for the observed increase in sporicidal activity. This study provides information on the mechanism of synergistic interaction of PAA and H2O2 against bacterial spores. We performed investigations of the efficacies of different combinations, including pretreatments with the two oxidizers, against wild-type spores and a range of spore mutants deficient in the spore coat or small acid-soluble spore proteins. The concentrations of the two biocides were also measured in the reaction vessels, enabling the assessment of any shift from H2O2 to PAA formation. This study confirmed the synergistic activity of the combination of H2O2 and PAA. However, we observed that the sporicidal activity of the combination is largely due to PAA and not H2O2. Furthermore, we observed that the synergistic combination was based on H2O2 compromising the spore coat, which was the main spore resistance factor, likely allowing better penetration of PAA and resulting in the increased sporicidal activity. PMID:26637595

  18. Synergistic inhibition of cancer cell proliferation with a combination of δ-tocotrienol and ferulic acid

    Eitsuka, Takahiro, E-mail: eitsuka@nupals.ac.jp [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Kurata, Tadao [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo [Food and Biodynamic Chemistry Laboratory, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • δ-Tocotrienol (δ-T3) and ferulic acid (FA) synergistically inhibit cancer cell growth. • The combination of δ-T3 and FA induces G1 arrest by up-regulating p21. • The synergy is attributed to an increase in the cellular concentration of δ-T3 by FA. - Abstract: Rice bran consists of many functional compounds and thus much attention has been focused on the health benefits of its components. Here, we investigated the synergistic inhibitory effects of its components, particularly δ-tocotrienol (δ-T3) and ferulic acid (FA), against the proliferation of an array of cancer cells, including DU-145 (prostate cancer), MCF-7 (breast cancer), and PANC-1 (pancreatic cancer) cells. The combination of δ-T3 and FA markedly reduced cell proliferation relative to δ-T3 alone, and FA had no effect when used alone. Although δ-T3 induced G1 arrest by up-regulating p21 in PANC-1 cells, more cells accumulated in G1 phase with the combination of δ-T3 and FA. This synergistic effect was attributed to an increase in the cellular concentration of δ-T3 by FA. Our results suggest that the combination of δ-T3 and FA may present a new strategy for cancer prevention and therapy.

  19. pH-sensitive oncolytic adenovirus hybrid targeting acidic tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kasala, Dayananda; Hwang, June Kyu; Hu, Jun; Bae, You Han; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Although oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) are an attractive option for cancer gene therapy, the intravenous administration of naked Ad still encounters unfavorable host responses, non-specific interactions, and heterogeneity in targeted cancer cells. To overcome these obstacles and achieve specific targeting of the tumor microenvironment, Ad was coated with the pH-sensitive block copolymer, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-histidine-co-l-phenylalanine) (PEGbPHF). The physicochemical propert...

  20. The Synergistic Biologic Activity of Oleanolic and Ursolic Acids in Complex with Hydroxypropyl-γ-Cyclodextrin

    Codruţa Soica

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oleanolic and ursolic acids are natural triterpenic compounds with pentacyclic cholesterol-like structures which gives them very low water solubility, a significant disadvantage in terms of bioavailability. We previously reported the synthesis of inclusion complexes between these acids and cyclodextrins, as well as their in vivo evaluation on chemically induced skin cancer experimental models. In this study the synergistic activity of the acid mixture included inside hydroxypropyl-gamma-cyclodextrin (HPGCD was monitored using in vitro tests and in vivo skin cancer models. The coefficient of drug interaction (CDI was used to characterize the interactions as synergism, additivity or antagonism. Our results revealed an increased antitumor activity for the mixture of the two triterpenic acids, both single and in complex with cyclodextrin, thus proving their complementary biologic activities.

  1. Synergistic effects of retinoic acid and tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells: Proteomic characterization

    The anti-estrogen tamoxifen and vitamin A-related compound, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), in combination act synergistically to inhibit the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In the present study, we applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomic approach to globally analyze this synergistic effect of RA and tamoxifen. Proteomic study revealed that multiple clusters of proteins were involved in RA and tamoxifen-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, including post-transcriptional and splicing factors, proteins related to cellular proliferation or differentiation, and proteins related to energy production and internal degradation systems. The negative growth factor-transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) was secreted by RA and/or tamoxifen treatment and was studies as a potential mediator of the synergistic effects of RA and tamoxifen in apoptosis. By comparing protein alterations in treatments of RA and tamoxifen alone or in combination to those of TGFβ treatment, or co-treatment with TGFβ inhibitor SB 431542, proteomic results showed that a number of proteins were involved in TGFβ signaling pathway. These results provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of RA and tamoxifen-induced TGFβ signaling pathway in breast cancer cells

  2. Synergistic Effect of Elicitors in Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Production: Optimization and Gene Expression Studies

    Motaharehsadat Heydarian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGanoderma lucidum is one of the most well-known fungi, and has many applications in medicine. Ganoderic acid is among the valuable secondary metabolites of Ganoderma lucidum, and responsible for the inhibition of the tumor cell growth and cancer treatment. Application of ganoderic acid has been limited because of low yields of its production from Ganoderma lucidum. The present study aims to investigate the synergistic effect of elicitors including methyl jasmonate and aspirin on the production of ganoderic acid derived from Ganoderma lucidum mushroom in a shaken flasks using response surface methodology. The results showed that the optimal dose of methyl jasmonate and asprin significantly impacts on the amount of ganoderic acid production as a response (p<0.05. The proposed model predicted the maximum ganoderic acid production as 0.085 mg/ml in which the optimal concentrations obtained for methyl jasmonate and asprin were 250mM and 4.4mM, respectively. Also the influence of ganoderic acid production on the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and squalene synthase (two important metabolic pathway genes in ganoderic acid was investigated, and the results showed that these genes’ expression has increased by 10 and 11 folds, respectively.  

  3. Synergistic antidepressant-like effect of ferulic acid in combination with piperine: involvement of monoaminergic system.

    Li, Gaowen; Ruan, Lina; Chen, Ruijie; Wang, Renye; Xie, Xupei; Zhang, Meixi; Chen, Lichao; Yan, Qizhi; Reed, Miranda; Chen, Jiechun; Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Huang, Wu

    2015-12-01

    The lifetime prevalence rate for major depressive disorder (MDD) is approximately 17 % for most developed countries around the world. Dietary polyphenols are currently used as an adjuvant therapy to accelerate the therapeutic efficacy on depression. Ferulic acid (FA) or 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-cinnamic acid (Fig. 1a) is a main polyphenolic component of Chinese herb Radix Angelicae Sinensis, which is found to have antidepressant-like effects through regulating serotonergic and noradrenergic function. The present study examined the synergistic effect of low doses of FA combined with subthreshold dose of piperine, a bioavailability enhancer, on depression-like behaviors in mice, and investigated the possible mechanism. The administration of FA, even in the highest dose tested, reduced immobility time by 60 % in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests (TST and FST) in mice when compared to control. The maximal antidepressant-like effect of FA was obtained with 200 mg/kg. In addition, piperine only produced a weak antidepressant-like effect in the TST and FST. However, the evidence from the interaction analysis suggested a synergistic effect when low doses of FA were combined with a subthreshold dose of piperine. Further neurochemical evidence such as monoamine levels in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus and measurements of monoamine oxidase activity also supported a synergistic effect of FA and piperine in the enhancement of monoaminergic function. This finding supports the concept that the combination strategy might be an alternative therapy in the treatment of psychiatric disorders with high efficacy and low side effects. PMID:26220010

  4. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis

  5. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); He, Huabin [Department of Orthopedics, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Wang, Jinghe, E-mail: Xiaofeili2000@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  6. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification, effectively cutting the loading amount of platinum in the catalyst without sacrifice of performance. It is revealed that in the Pt-loaded SAPO-CHA catalyst, there exists a remarkable synergistic effect between the Brønsted acid sites and the Pt nanoparticles, the former helping to adsorb and activate the hydrocarbon molecules for NO reduction during the catalytic process. The thermal stability of SAPO-CHA also makes the composite catalyst stable and reusable without activity decay.

  7. Structural simulation of adenosine phosphate via plumbagin and zoledronic acid competitively targets JNK/Erk to synergistically attenuate osteoclastogenesis in a breast cancer model.

    Qiao, H; Wang, T-y; Yu, Z-f; Han, X-g; Liu, X-q; Wang, Y-g; Fan, Q-m; Qin, A; Tang, T-t

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer-induced osteolysis remains a challenge in clinical settings. Here, we explored the effect and mechanism of combined treatment with zoledronic acid (ZA) and plumbagin (PL), a widely investigated component derived from Plumbago zeylanica, against breast cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We found that the combined treatment with PL and ZA suppressed cell viability of precursor osteoclasts and synergistically inhibited MDA-MB-231-induced osteoclast formation (combination index=0.28) with the abrogation of recombinant mouse receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of NF-κB/MAPK (nuclear factor-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathways. Molecular docking suggested a putative binding area within c-Jun N-terminal kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (JNK/Erk) protease active sites through the structural mimicking of adenosine phosphate (ANP) by the spatial combination of PL with ZA. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay further illustrated the direct competitiveness of the dual drugs against ANP docking to phosphorylated JNK/Erk, contributing to the inhibited downstream expression of c-Jun/c-Fos/NFATc-1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1). Then, in vivo testing demonstrated that the combined administration of PL and ZA attenuated breast cancer growth in the bone microenvironment. Additionally, these molecules prevented the destruction of proximal tibia, with significant reduction of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP)-positive osteoclast cells and potentiation of apoptotic cancer cells, to a greater extent when combined than when the drugs were applied independently. Altogether, the combination treatment with PL and ZA could significantly and synergistically suppress osteoclastogenesis and inhibit tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo by simulating the spatial structure of ANP to inhibit competitively phosphorylation of c-Jun N

  8. Synergistic effect of xylitol and ursolic acid combination on oral biofilms

    Zou, Yunyun; Lee, Yoon; Huh, Jinyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to evaluate the synergistic antibacterial effect of xylitol and ursolic acid (UA) against oral biofilms in vitro. Materials and Methods S. mutans UA 159 (wild type), S. mutans KCOM 1207, KCOM 1128 and S. sobrinus ATCC 33478 were used. The susceptibility of S. mutans to UA and xylitol was evaluated using a broth microdilution method. Based on the results, combined susceptibility was evaluated using optimal inhibitory combinations (OIC), optimal bactericidal combinations (OBC), and fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC). The anti-biofilm activity of xylitol and UA on Streptococcus spp. was evaluated by growing cells in 24-well polystyrene microtiter plates for the biofilm assay. Significant mean differences among experimental groups were determined by Fisher's Least Significant Difference (p < 0.05). Results The synergistic interactions between xylitol and UA were observed against all tested strains, showing the FICs < 1. The combined treatment of xylitol and UA inhibited the biofilm formation significantly and also prevented pH decline to critical value of 5.5 effectively. The biofilm disassembly was substantially influenced by different age of biofilm when exposed to the combined treatment of xylitol and UA. Comparing to the single strain, relatively higher concentration of xylitol and UA was needed for inhibiting and disassembling biofilm formed by a mixed culture of S. mutans 159 and S. sobrinus 33478. Conclusions This study demonstrated that xylitol and UA, synergistic inhibitors, can be a potential agent for enhancing the antimicrobial and anti-biofilm efficacy against S. mutans and S. sobrinus in the oral environment. PMID:25383348

  9. Exercise and a High Fat Diet Synergistically Increase the Pantothenic Acid Requirement in Rats.

    Takahashi, Kei; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that both exercise and dietary composition increase the utilization of, and thus the requirement for, certain water-soluble vitamins. However, there have been no studies evaluating the combined impacts of exercise and dietary composition on vitamin utilization. In this experiment, rats were fed a pantothenic acid (PaA)-restricted (0.004 g PaA-Ca/kg diet) diet containing 5% (ordinary amount of dietary fat) or 20% fat (high fat), and were forced to swim until exhaustion every other day for 22 d. PaA status was assessed by urinary excretion, which reflects body stores of water-soluble vitamins. The urinary excretion of PaA in rats fed a 5% fat diet was not affected by swimming (5% fat + non-swimming vs. 5% fat + swim; p>0.05). Excretion of PaA was decreased by the high-fat diet (5% fat + non-swim vs. 20% fat + non-swim; pexercise (20% fat + non-swim vs. 20% fat + swim; pexercise and a high-fat diet. Plasma PaA concentrations showed changes similar to those seen for urinary excretion. The experiment was then repeated using rats fed a PaA-sufficient (0.016 g PaA-Ca/kg diet) diet, and PaA excretion was again synergistically decreased by the combination of exercise and a high-fat diet (pexercise and a high-fat diet synergistically increases the requirement for PaA. PMID:26226957

  10. Synergistic Effects of Linderanolide B Combined with Arbutin, PTU or Kojic Acid on Tyrosinase Inhibition.

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Chung-Yi; Chou, Hsin-Yu; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui-Min D

    2015-01-01

    Melanin uncontrollable accumulation is a serious social problem to not only women, but also men, and causes pigment over-expression disorders such as freckles, melasma or pigmented acne scars. The synergism is used widely in medication, and the effectiveness makes the drug applications more valuable. Within this experiment, three well-known compounds were chosen: kojic acid, 1-phenyl-2-thiourea (PTU) and arbutin, and they were combined individually with our substance linderanolide B, which is purified from Cinnamomum subavenium. Hence, deciphering the synergistic action of possible whitening agents was the goal of this study. The tyrosinase activity, melanin content, and the combination index (CI) values were observed in B16F10 cells, in addition, the consequences were detected by isobologram analysis. We discovered that certain melanin inhibitors showed synergistic properties when they were combined together to suppress tyrosinase activities. As a result, linderanolide B has a potential synergy on tyrosinase inhibition, and it can be used widely in cosmetic and medication industries. PMID:26343134

  11. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  12. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    Luo, Yi, E-mail: yi.luo@pfizer.com; Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  13. Synergistic hypergolic ignition of blends of dienes and dienophiles with red fuming nitric acid as oxidizer

    Panda, S.P.; Kulkarni, S.G.; Prabhakaran, C.

    1989-04-01

    Synergistic hypergolic ignition of several fuel blends and mixtures with red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) as oxidizer has been reported previously. The liquid fuels consisted of blends of 3-carene, cyclopentadiene, or norbornadiene with cardanol in the weight ratio 70:30 for the first two and 85:15 for norbornadiene. In all these cases, synergism in ignition was believed to be due to the fast and exothermic oligomerization of 3-carene, cyclopentadiene, and norbornadiene in the presence of acid. The exothermicity of the systems was enhanced by the addition of cardanol to the unsaturation of oligomers, leading to the formation of highly oxidizable phenolic ethers. Two more important reactions at the preignition stage were nitration and oxidation of the ethers leading to the production of gaseous combustibles and heat. In this case, an attempt has been made to extend the range of possible preignition reactions by introducing diene-dienophile Diels-Alder cycloaddition with low activation energy by replacing cardanol with furfuryl alcohol or furfurylideneacetone having a furan ring to behave as acid polymerizable dienes in the above systems.

  14. Synergistic effect of polyaspartic acid and iodide ion on corrosion inhibition of mild steel in H2SO4

    Highlights: •Polyaspartic acid acts as a modest cathodic inhibitor for mild steel in H2SO4. •Results revealed synergistic effect between polyaspartic acid and iodide ion. •Inhibition efficiency depends on the temperature of H2SO4 medium. •XPS analysis revealed co-adsorption of polyaspartic acid and iodide ion. -- Abstract: The inhibition effect of polyaspartic acid (PASP) and its synergistic effect with KI on mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution are studied by weight loss and electrochemical methods. The inhibition efficiency increases with the concentration of PASP and increases further with the presence of 1 mM KI. Result of the zero charge potential measurement shows that iodide ion promotes the film formation of PASP greatly. The mild steel surfaces after immersion test were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. An adsorption model is proposed to elucidate the synergistic mechanism of synergistic effect

  15. Effects of Formulated Fertilizer Synergist on Abscisic Acid Accumulation, Proline Content and Photosynthetic Characteristics of Rice under Drought

    WANG Shao-xian; XIA Shi-tou; PENG Ke-qin; KUANG Feng-chun; CAO Yong; XIAO Lang-tao

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effects of formulated fertilizer synergist on the drought tolerance in rice, pot experiment was conducted to analyze the photosynthetic characteristics and the accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) and proline in middle-season rice variety Peiliangyou 93. The synergist could improve the net photosynthetic rate, and coordination between the water loss and the CO2 absorption as well as reduce the harmful effect on photosynthetic process under drought conditions. Under drought, the ABA accumulated massively both in roots and leaves, while the ABA content in roots was far higher than that in leaves. The results indicate that synergist could increase the ABA accumulation, but reduce the proline accumulation in rice plant under drought.

  16. Synergistic action of famotidine and chlorpheniramine on acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer in rats

    Zhen Qin; Chao Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the synergistic action of famotidine (FMD)and chlorpheniramine (CPA) on acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer in rats.METHODS: Chronic gastric lesions were induced in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by serosal application of the acetic acid. Forty SD rats were randomly divided into blank group (n = 8), control group (n = 8), FMD group (n= 8), CPA group (n = 8), and FMD+CPA group (n = 8).Each group was given intraperitoneally (i.p.) 0.5 mL/100g distilled water, 9 g/L NaCl saline, 4 mg/kg FMD, 10mg/kg CPA, 4 mg/kg FMD+10 mg/kg CPA, respectively,daily for 10 d. On d 10, ulcer area was determined by planimetry. The level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the liver homogenation was determined by biochemical methods and the plasma levels of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1a)and IL-8 were determined by radioimmunoassay.RESULTS: The synergistic effects of FMD+CPA group on the lesion, IL-8, 6-keto-PGF1a and MPO were confirmed.The effect of FMlD+CPA group was significantly different as compared to the control and FMD groups. The lesion (mm2) was reduced from 40.18±2.6 in control group to 6.83±2.97 in PMD+CPA group, P<0.01, and from 32.9±3.27 in FMD group to 6.83±2.97 in pMlD+CPA group,P<0.01. The plasma levels of IL-8 decreased from 0.69±0.11 ng/L in control group to 0.4±0.04 ng/L in PMD+CPA group, P<0.01, and from 0.51±0.08 ng/L in FMD group to 0.4±0.04 ng/L in PMD+CPA group, P<0.05. The level of 6-keto-PGF1a increased from 7.55±1.65 ng/L in control group to 16.62±0.97 ng/L in PMD+CPA group, P<0.01,and from 13.15±1.48 ng/L in FMD group to 16.62±0.97ng/L in PMD+CPA group, P<0.05. The levels of MPO in the liver homogenate decreased from 9.12±2.05 u/Lin control group to 4.33±0.95 u/L in PMD+CPA group,P<0.01, and from 8.3±1.29 u/L in FMD group to 4.33±0.95 u/L, P<0.01.CONCLUSION: The synergistic action of FMD and CPA on acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer in rats decreases the incidence of ulcer and also enhances the

  17. Synergistic cosolubilization of omega-3 fatty acid esters and CoQ10 in dilutable microemulsions.

    Deutch-Kolevzon, Rivka; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-10-01

    Water-dilutable microemulsions were prepared and loaded with two types of omega-3 fatty acid esters (omega-3 ethyl esters, OEE; and omega-3 triacylglycerides, OTG), each separately and together with ubiquinone (CoQ(10)). The microemulsions showed high and synergistic loading capabilities. The linear fatty acid ester (OEE) solubilization capacity was greater than that of the bulky and robust OTG. The location of the guest molecules within the microemulsions at any dilution point were determined by electrical conductivity, viscosity, DSC, SAXS, cryo-TEM, SD-NMR, and DLS. We found that OEE molecules pack well within the surfactant tails to form reverse micelles that gradually, upon water dilution, invert into bicontinuous phase and finally into O/W droplets. The CoQ(10) increases the stabilization and solubilization of the omega-3 fatty acid esters because it functions as a kosmotropic agent in the micellar system. The hydrophobic and bulky OTG molecule strongly interferes with the tail packing and spaces them significantly - mainly in the low and medium range water dilutions. When added to the micellar system, CoQ(10) forms some reverse hexagonal mesophases. The inversion into direct micelles is more difficult in comparison to the OEE system and requires additional water dilution. The OTG with or without CoQ(10) destabilizes the structures and decreases the solubilization capacity since it acts as a chaotropic agent to the micellar system and as a kosmotropic agent to hexagonal packing. These results explain the differences in the behavior of these molecules with vehicles that solubilize them in aqueous phases. Temperature disorders the bicontinuous structures and reduces the supersaturation of the system containing OEE with CoQ(10); as a result CoQ(10) crystallization is retarded. PMID:21723268

  18. PROBIOTIC PROPERTIES OF VAGINAL LACTIC ACID BACTERIA SELECTED FOR HARMONIZATION OF MICROENVIRONMENT OF REPRODUCTIVE APPARATUS

    Eva Styková

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was isolation and screening of probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from the vagina of heifers and cows with healthy reproductive apparatus. Initially tested properties were low pH tolerance, growth at different temperature, autoaggregation, fast growth and acid production. Strains were further tested for adherence to vaginal mucus. Negative selection was used and strains that did not meet tested criterion were excluded. From 244 samples taken from 122 heifers and cows were selected six strains of different taxa. Selected and identified were strains L. buchneri 5/K, L. buchneri 24S8, L. mucosae 29S8, L. mucosae 9/K and L. mucosae BiocenolTM 7697. These strains showed different biochemical properties also within a taxon and exhibited differences in the quantification of selection criteria. Further evaluation of the selected strain properties will be performed to consider their inclusion in a probiotic for local use in reproductive apparatus.

  19. Investigation and Manipulation of the Local Microenvironment of Spherical Nucleic Acid Nanoconjugates

    Briley, William Edward

    For the past several decades, tremendous efforts have been made by many to battle cancer,one of the leading causes of death in the United States and around the world. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and treatment of many genetically-based disorders such as cancer remains very difficult to this day. This is due to the fact that current technologies are unable to adequately differentiate between healthy and diseased cells. In many cases, state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutics for genetic disorders rely on targeting downstream effects that may be related to, or influenced by aberrations in gene expression, rather than targeting the up- or down-regulated transcripts themselves. This type of targeting can lead to significant off-target effects, which can translate to false positives for diagnostics, and systemic toxicity for therapeutics. This thesis discusses a nanoparticle-based conjugate which aims to increase the specificity of diagnostics, therapeutics, and biological research platforms by targeting RNA transcripts directly. This nanoconjugate, known as the spherical nucleic acid (SNA) is capable of entering live cells with negligible cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, and binding onto targeted RNA transcripts. Chapter one details the properties and synthesis of the SNA, and discusses how the cell entry/transcript binding capabilities of the SNA can be translated into therapeutic and diagnostic platforms. Chapter two then moves into the therapeutic applications of the SNA, discussing a novel platform known as the Sticky-flare, which is capable of detecting and fluorescently labeling target transcripts for real time analysis. Chapter three then investigates the function of the SNA in a therapeutic application. Specifically, the route that topically applied SNAs take to penetrate through skin is elucidated, and is contextualized by comparing the penetration of SNAs with equivalent linear DNA sequences. Linear nucleic acids are typically not capable of effecting gene

  20. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates myeloid differentiation within the human bone marrow microenvironment.

    Denis Evseenko

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow.

  1. Pronounced radiosensitization of cultured human cancer cells by COX inhibitor under acidic microenvironment

    Purpose: To demonstrate the influence of pH on the cytotoxicity and radiosensitization by COX (cyclooxygenase) -1 and -2 inhibitors using established human cancer cells in culture. Methods and Materials: Nonselective COX inhibitor, ibuprofen (IB), and selective COX-2 inhibitor, SC-236, were used to determine the cytotoxicity and radiosensitization at varying pH of culture media. Human colon carcinoma cell line (HT-29) was exposed to the drug alone and in combination with radiation at different pH of the cell culture media. The end point was clonogenic ability of the single-plated cells after the treatment. Results: Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization of IB increased with higher drug concentration and longer exposure time. The most significant radiosensitization was seen with IB (1.5 mM) for 2-h treatment at pH 6.7 before irradiation. The dose-modifying factor as defined by the ratio of radiation doses required to achieve the same effect on cell survival was 1.8 at 10% survival level. In contrast, SC-236 (50 μM for 2-8 h) showed no pH-dependent cytotoxicity. There was modest increase in the cell killing at lower doses of radiation. Conclusion: An acidic pH was an important factor affecting the increased cytotoxicity and radiosensitization by ibuprofen. Radiation response was enhanced at shoulder portion of the cell survival curve by selective COX-2 inhibitor

  2. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    Phee, Lynette M.; Betts, Jonathan W.; Bharathan, Binutha; Wareham, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffu...

  3. Synergistic Effect of Schwann Cells and Retinoic Acid on Differentiation and Synaptogenesis of Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells in vitro

    XUE-BAO ZHANG; YUAN-SHAN ZENG; WEI ZHANG; YA-YUN CHEN; WEI ZHANG; YI XIONG; SUI-JUN CHEN

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the synergistic effect of Schwann cells (YCs) and retinoic acid (RA) on differentiation and synaptogenesis of neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hippocampus of neonatal rats. Methods The classical method for 2×2 factorial analysis experiment was used to assess synergistic action of SCs and RA. NSCs were treated with RA, SCs,and SCs + RA in DMEM/F12 with 0.5% fetal bovine serum for six days, respectively. Double immunofluorescent staining was used to detect the differentiation of NSCs including nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Map2. The expression of PSD95 was used to demonstrate synaptogenesis. Results After NSCs were treated with RA or SCs, the expression of nestin and GFAP was significantly decreased while the expression of Map2 and PSD95 was significantly increased in comparison with the control. Factorial ANOVA showed that interactions between SCs and RA could induce the expression of Map2 and PSD95. Conclusion SCs and RA could promote synergistically the neuronal differentiation and synaptogenesis of hippocampal neural stem cells in vitro while they decreased the astrocytes and nestin positive NSCs.

  4. Synergistic extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid with HBMPPT and PSO in toluene

    The synergistic extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid solution by HBMPPT (4-benzoyl-2, 4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione) and PSO (Petroleum Sulfoxide) in toluene is studied. The extraction ability of HBMPPT is not as high as that of its parent (HBMPP), but the addition of a little amount of PSO significantly improved the extraction ability to U(VI), while the ability to extract Th(IV) is slightly increased. The synergistically extracted complexes may be presented as UO2(BMPPT)2·PSO for U(VI), and Th (NO3)2(BMPPT)2·PSO for Th(IV), respectively. The separation coefficient is about 1000 under certain condition when HBMPPT-PSO is used to separate U(VI) and Th(IV)

  5. Synergistic extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid media HBMPPT and TBP in toluene

    The synergistic extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid solution by HBMPPT (4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione) and TBP (tributylphosphate) in toluene was studied. The extraction ability of HBMPPT for U(VI) and Th(IV) was not so high, but when a little TBP was added in, the ability to extract U(VI) and Th(IV) was improved. The extracted complexes may be presented as UO2NO3·BMPPT·TBP and UO2(BMPPT)2·TBP for U(VI), and Th(NO3)3·BMPPT·TBP and Th(NO3)2(BMPPT)2·TBP for Th(IV), respectively, in the synergistic extraction system. The synergistic effect of HBMPPT and TBP makes the separation coefficient of U(VI)/Th(IV) or U(VI)/Eu(III) reach a high value

  6. Synergistic Rhodium/Phosphoric Acid Catalysis for the Enantioselective Addition of Oxonium Ylides to ortho-Quinone Methides.

    Alamsetti, Santosh Kumar; Spanka, Matthias; Schneider, Christoph

    2016-02-12

    We report herein a powerful and highly stereoselective protocol for the domino-type reaction of diazoesters with ortho-quinone methides generated in situ to furnish densely functionalized chromans with three contiguous stereogenic centers. A transition-metal and a Brønsted acid catalyst were shown to act synergistically to produce a transient oxonium ylide and ortho-quinone methide, respectively, in two distinct cycles. These intermediates underwent subsequent coupling in a conjugate-addition-hemiacetalization event in generally good yield with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity. PMID:26762542

  7. Phytic Acid and Sodium Chloride Show Marked Synergistic Bactericidal Effects against Nonadapted and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains.

    Kim, Nam Hee; Rhee, Min Suk

    2016-02-01

    The synergistic antimicrobial effects of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran, plus sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 were examined. Exposure to NaCl alone at concentrations up to 36% (wt/wt) for 5 min did not reduce bacterial populations. The bactericidal effects of PA alone were much greater than those of other organic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, and malic acids) under the same experimental conditions (P 7-log CFU/ml reduction). Flow cytometry confirmed that PA disrupted the cell membrane to a greater extent than did other organic acids, although the cells remained viable. The combination of PA and NaCl induced complete disintegration of the cell membrane. By comparison, none of the other organic acids acted synergistically with NaCl, and neither did NaCl-HCl solutions at the same pH values as the test solutions of PA plus NaCl. These results suggest that PA has great potential as an effective bacterial membrane-permeabilizing agent, and we show that the combination is a promising alternative to conventional chemical disinfectants. These findings provide new insight into the utility of natural compounds as novel antimicrobial agents and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antibacterial activity of PA. PMID:26637600

  8. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections.

    Phee, Lynette M; Betts, Jonathan W; Bharathan, Binutha; Wareham, David W

    2015-08-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffusion, checkerboard methodology (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] of ≤ 0.5, susceptibility breakpoint index [SBPI] of >2), and time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). The ability of FD to limit the emergence of COL resistance was assessed in the presence and absence of each drug alone and in combination. Synergy was demonstrated against all strains, with an average FICI and SBPI of 0.064 and 78.85, respectively. In time-kill assays, COL-FD was synergistic and rapidly bactericidal, including against COL-resistant strains. Fusidic acid prevented the emergence of COL resistance, which was readily selected with COL alone. This is the first description of a novel COL-FD regimen for the treatment of MDRAB. The combination was effective at low concentrations, which should be therapeutically achievable while limiting toxicity. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism underlying the interaction and the suitability of COL-FD as an unorthodox therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:25987639

  9. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    Betts, Jonathan W.; Bharathan, Binutha

    2015-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffusion, checkerboard methodology (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] of ≤ 0.5, susceptibility breakpoint index [SBPI] of >2), and time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). The ability of FD to limit the emergence of COL resistance was assessed in the presence and absence of each drug alone and in combination. Synergy was demonstrated against all strains, with an average FICI and SBPI of 0.064 and 78.85, respectively. In time-kill assays, COL-FD was synergistic and rapidly bactericidal, including against COL-resistant strains. Fusidic acid prevented the emergence of COL resistance, which was readily selected with COL alone. This is the first description of a novel COL-FD regimen for the treatment of MDRAB. The combination was effective at low concentrations, which should be therapeutically achievable while limiting toxicity. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism underlying the interaction and the suitability of COL-FD as an unorthodox therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:25987639

  10. Studies on uranium extraction from crude phosphoric acid using novel synergistic mixtures of Tris 2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphate (TEP) and Tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO)

    Extraction of uranium by organic solvents employing a novel synergistic combination of organo-phosphorus reagents is reported in this paper. In particular, the solvent mixture of Tris Ethyl Hexyl Phosphate (TEP) with Tri Octyl Phosphine Oxide (TOPO). Results on extraction from crude phosphoric acid are reported. Stripping of uranium from the organic phase was achieved with concentrated phosphoric acid, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, ammonium carbonate, sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide and sodium acetate. (author)

  11. Characterization of synergistic anti-cancer effects of docosahexaenoic acid and curcumin on DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice

    The major obstacles to the successful use of individual nutritional compounds as preventive or therapeutic agents are their efficacy and bioavailability. One approach to overcoming this problem is to use combinations of nutrients to induce synergistic effects. The objective of this research was to investigate the synergistic effects of two dietary components: docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid present in cold-water fish, and curcumin (CCM), an herbal nutrient present in turmeric, in an in vivo model of DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice. We used the carcinogen DMBA to induce breast tumors in SENCAR mice on control, CCM, DHA, or DHA + CCM diets. Appearance and tumor progression were monitored daily. The tumors were harvested 15 days following their first appearance for morphological and immunohistological analysis. Western analysis was performed to determine expression of maspin and survivin in the tumor tissues. Characterization of tumor growth was analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. Otherwise all other results are reported as mean ± SD and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc procedure. Analysis of gene microarray data indicates that combined treatment with DHA + CCM altered the profile of “PAM50” genes in the SK-BR-3 cell line from an ER-/Her-2+ to that resembling a “normal-like” phenotype. The in vivo studies demonstrated that DHA + CCM treatment reduced the incidence of breast tumors, delayed tumor initiation, and reduced progression of tumor growth. Dietary treatment had no effect on breast size development, but tumors from mice on a control diet (untreated) were less differentiated than tumors from mice fed CCM or DHA + CCM diets. The synergistic effects also led to increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, maspin, but reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, survivin. The SK-BR-3 cells and DMBA-induced tumors, both with an ER- and Her-2+ phenotype, were affected by the synergistic

  12. Differential abundance of IGF1, bile acids, and the genes involved in their signaling in the dominant follicle microenvironment of lactating cows and nulliparous heifers.

    Sanchez, Ricardo; Schuermann, Yasmin; Gagnon-Duval, Laurianne; Baldassarre, Hernan; Murphy, Bruce D; Gevry, Nicolas; Agellon, Luis B; Bordignon, Vilceu; Duggavathi, Raj

    2014-04-01

    It is well documented that incidence of fertility problems is high in lactating cows but not in heifers of the same genetic merit. Understanding the metabolic and molecular differences between fertile heifers and relatively infertile lactating cows will help us understand the pathogenesis of infertility in dairy cows. Follicular waves in lactating cows (30-50 days in milk; n = 12) and heifers (n = 10) were synchronized by ultrasound-guided follicle ablation. Follicular fluid and granulosa cells of the dominant follicle were collected by ultrasound-guided aspiration along with blood sampling on Day 6 after synchronization. Dominant and subordinate follicles were larger in lactating cows than in heifers. Metabolic stress in lactating cows was evidenced by lower glucose and higher ß-hydroxy butyric acid compared with heifers. Insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling was reduced in the dominant follicle in lactating cows through reduced insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations in plasma and follicular fluid of the dominant follicle, and reduced expression of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPPA) in their granulosa cells. We also found increased levels of total bile acids in the follicular fluid of the dominant follicle of lactating cows compared with heifers. Granulosa cells of the dominant follicle had higher expression of SLC10A2 and GPBAR1 (bile acid transporter and receptor, respectively) in lactating cows. These novel data are indicative of increased bile acid signaling within the dominant follicles of lactating cows compared with heifers. Overall, we demonstrate in the present study the metabolic, endocrine, and molecular differences within the microenvironment of the dominant follicles in lactating cows and heifers. These differences in follicular microenvironment may contribute toward abnormal ovarian function in lactating dairy cows. PMID:24503106

  13. Synergistic Accumulative Effect of Salicylic Acid and Dibutyl Phthalate on Paclitaxel Production in Corylus avellana Cell Culture

    Rezaei, A.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Suspension cell cultures of Corylus avellana were challenged with salicylic acid and its combined use with dibutyl phthalate solvent. Salicylic acid with concentrations of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg L–1 and 10% (v/v dibutyl phthalate were used and added on day 8 and 10 of subculture, respectively. The results showed that growth, viability and protein content of cells were decreased by the treatments, compared to control. In all treatments, hydrogen peroxide content and lipid peroxidation rate of cells increased, compared to those of the control cells. Activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase increased by salicylic acid and, dibutyl phthalate exaggerated effect of salicylic acid. While flavonoids content decreased by the treatments, paclitaxel content increased significantly. The extracellular paclitaxel was more affected, compared to cell-associated paclitaxel and all treatments increased paclitaxel release and specific yield compared to that of the control. The most production of paclitaxel and specific yield of it were observed under effect of combined use of salicylic acid (50 mg L–1 and dibutyl phthalate, suggesting a synergistic accumulative effect.

  14. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value. PMID:27295438

  15. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from castor oil: Production process assessment and synergistic effects in its properties

    Canoira, Laureano; Garcia Galean, Juan; Alcantara, Ramon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Fuels, ETS Ingenieros de Minas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Rios Rosas 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain); Lapuerta, Magin; Garcia-Contreras, Reyes [Maquinas y Motores Termicos, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from castor oil have been synthesized by methanolysis catalyzed by sodium methoxide and the optimal transesterification conditions have been found. However, some properties of the castor FAME render it unsuitable in pure state for its direct use as fuel in internal combustion engines. Thus, blends with reference diesel have been prepared and their properties have been evaluated. Among these properties, the oxidative stability of the blends shows a negative anti-synergistic effect, that is, all the blends have an induction period lower than the pure reference diesel and the pure castor FAME. On the contrary, the lubricity shows a positive synergistic effect, the wear scar of the blends being always lower than those of the pure components. The cold-filter plugging point of the blends shows also a singular effect, since the filterability remains identical to that of the reference diesel until around 50 vol% of castor FAME has been blended with it. The blends of castor FAME and reference diesel until approximately 40 vol% of castor FAME meet most of the specifications of the EN 590 standard. (author)

  16. The synergistic effect of ribose, carnosine, and ascorbic acid on the sensory and physico-chemical characteristics of minced bison meat

    Aliani, Michel; Ryland, Donna; Williamson, Jennifer; Rempel, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Ingredients such as ascorbic acid used to preserve redness of the raw meat, and carnosine and ribose used for flavor improvement have been incorporated into minced meats to increase consumer acceptance. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible synergistic effect of ascorbic acid, carnosine, and ribose on the sensory and physico-chemical characteristics of minced bison meat. Samples included control (Co) ±1% carnosine (C), 0.1% ascorbic acid (A), 2% ribose (R) (w/w), and com...

  17. Synergistic effect between cationic gemini surfactant and chloride ion for the corrosion inhibition of steel in sulphuric acid

    Qiu Lingguang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)], E-mail: lgqiu@ahu.edu.cn; Wu Yun; Wang Yimin; Jiang Xia [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)

    2008-02-15

    Corrosion inhibition of cold rolled steel in 0.5 mol L{sup -1} sulphuric acid by a quaternary ammonium gemini surfactant, l,3-propane-bis(dimethyl dodecylammonium bromide) (designated as 12-3-12), in the absence and presence of chloride ions was investigated at different temperatures. The results revealed significant synergistic effect between gemini 12-3-12 and chloride ions for the corrosion protection of cold rolled steel in sulphuric acid, and that the novel composite inhibitor system containing cationic gemini surfactant and chloride ions was efficient and low-cost for steel corrosion inhibition in sulphuric acid medium, even when concentration of 12-3-12 was as low as 1 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}. By fitting the obtained experimental data with Langmuir adsorption model and Arrhenius equation, some thermodynamic and kinetic parameters such as adsorption free energy, the apparent activation energy, and the pre-exponential factor were estimated. The adsorption mechanism of the gemini surfactant onto steel surface in acid medium in the absence and presence of chloride ions was also discussed, respectively.

  18. Synergistic and antagonistic effects on fatty acid composition in the liver mitochondria of rats by thyroidectomy and streptozotocin-administration.

    Nishida, M; Sasaki, T; Terada, H; Kawada, J

    1991-12-01

    The content of individual fatty acid component in mitochondria of livers from thyroidectomized (Tx) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats was measured to investigate how different hormones are interrelated to control the amount of a particular fatty acid in mitochondria. The results showed (1) diabetes, in general, affected fatty acid contents more severely than hypothyroidism, regardless of the direction of the changes; (2) Hypothyroidism and diabetes affected antagonistically the contents of C16 species and C18:1, which belong to a de novo synthesis (oleate series). However, the two pathological conditions affected synergistically those of higher unsaturated species, eg. C18:2, C20:3 and C20:4, which belong to a dietary-dependent synthesis (linoleate series). These results strongly indicated that each desaturation site and elongation site is affected in a preferential order by either thyroid hormone or insulin, and that hypothyroidism and diabetes have their effects differently on the process of de novo synthesis and the pathways initiated from an essential fatty acid in mitochondria. PMID:1837932

  19. Imaging the Tumor Microenvironment

    LeBleu, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex, heterogeneous, and dominant component of solid tumors. Cancer imaging strategies of a subset of characteristics of the tumor microenvironment are under active development and currently used modalities and novel approaches are summarized here. Understanding the dynamic and evolving functions of the tumor microenvironment is critical to accurately inform imaging and clinical care of cancer. Novel insights into distinct roles of the tumor microenvironment...

  20. Electrochemical and theoretical studies on the synergistic interaction and corrosion inhibition of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide pair on mild steel in hydrochloric acid

    Ramya, K.; Mohan, Revathi; Anupama, K.K.; Joseph, Abraham, E-mail: drabrahamj@gmail.com

    2015-01-15

    Synergistic hydrogen bonded interaction of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and its corrosion protection properties on mild steel in hydrochloric acid at different temperatures have been studied using polarization, EIS, adsorption, surface studies and computational methods. The extent of synergistic interaction increases with temperature. Quantum chemical approach used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecules and to ascertain the synergistic interaction, inhibitive effect and molecular structures. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies and the global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as total energy, E{sub HOMO}, E{sub LUMO} and gap energy (ΔE) thiosemicarbazide (TSC) interacts with benzimidazoles derivatives up to a bond length of approximately 1.99Å. This interaction represents the formation of a hydrogen bond between the thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazoles. This synergistic interaction of thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazole derivatives offer extended inhibition efficiency towards mild steel in hydrochloric acid. - Highlights: • Synergistic interaction between alkyl benzimidazoles and TSC has been studied. • Mechanism involves combination of physisorption and chemisorption. • The adsorption phenomenon obeys Langmuir isotherm. • Inhibition efficiency increases with temperature.

  1. Electrochemical and theoretical studies on the synergistic interaction and corrosion inhibition of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide pair on mild steel in hydrochloric acid

    Synergistic hydrogen bonded interaction of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and its corrosion protection properties on mild steel in hydrochloric acid at different temperatures have been studied using polarization, EIS, adsorption, surface studies and computational methods. The extent of synergistic interaction increases with temperature. Quantum chemical approach used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecules and to ascertain the synergistic interaction, inhibitive effect and molecular structures. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies and the global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as total energy, EHOMO, ELUMO and gap energy (ΔE) thiosemicarbazide (TSC) interacts with benzimidazoles derivatives up to a bond length of approximately 1.99Å. This interaction represents the formation of a hydrogen bond between the thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazoles. This synergistic interaction of thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazole derivatives offer extended inhibition efficiency towards mild steel in hydrochloric acid. - Highlights: • Synergistic interaction between alkyl benzimidazoles and TSC has been studied. • Mechanism involves combination of physisorption and chemisorption. • The adsorption phenomenon obeys Langmuir isotherm. • Inhibition efficiency increases with temperature

  2. Composition dependence of the synergistic effect of nucleating agent and plasticizer in poly(lactic acid: A Mixture Design study

    M. K. Fehri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blends consisting of commercial poly(lactic acid (PLA, poly(lactic acid oligomer (OLA8 as plasticizer and a sulfonic salt of a phthalic ester and poly(D-lactic acid as nucleating agents were prepared by melt extrusion, following a Mixture Design approach, in order to systematically study mechanical and thermal properties as a function of composition. The full investigation was carried out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA and tensile tests. The crystallization half-time was also studied at 105 °C as a function of the blends composition. A range of compositions in which the plasticizer and the nucleation agent minimized the crystallization half-time in a synergistic way was clearly identified thanks to the application of the Mixture Design approach. The results allowed also the identification of a composition range to maximize the crystallinity developed during the rapid cooling below glass transition temperature in injection moulding, thus allowing an easier processing of PLA based materials. Moreover the mechanical properties were discussed by correlating them to the chemical structural features and thermal behaviour of blends.

  3. Synergistic effects of TAL1 over-expression and PHO13 deletion on the weak acid inhibition of xylose fermentation by industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Gou, Zi-Xi; Liu, Ze-Shen; Tang, Yue-Qin; Akamatsu, Takashi; Kida, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    In the industrial production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that can ferment xylose in the presence of inhibitors is of utmost importance. The recombinant, industrial-flocculating S. cerevisiae strain NAPX37, which can ferment xylose, was used as the parent to delete the gene encoding p-nitrophenylphosphatase (PHO13) and overexpress the gene encoding transaldolase (TAL1) to evaluate the synergistic effects of these two genes on xylose fermentation in the presence of weak acid inhibitors, including formic, acetic, or levulinic acids. TAL1 over-expression or PHO13 deletion improved xylose fermentation as well as the tolerance of NAPX37 to all three weak acids. The simultaneous deletion of PHO13 and the over-expression of TAL1 had synergistic effects and improved ethanol production and reduction of xylitol accumulation in the absence and presence of weak acid inhibitors. PMID:24966040

  4. Antisense oligonucleotides and all-trans retinoic acid have a synergistic anti-tumor effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Chen Wantao

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligonucleotides against hTR (As-ODN-hTR have shown promising results as treatment strategies for various human malignancies. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA is a signalling molecule with important roles in differentiation and apoptosis. Biological responses to ATRA are currently used therapeutically in various human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of As-ODN-hTR combined with ATRA in vivo. Methods In situ human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC models were established by subcutaneous injection of Tca8113 cells. Mice were treated with sense oligonucleotides against hTR(S-ODN-hTR alone, As-ODN-hTR alone, ATRA alone, As-ODN-hTR plus ATRA, or S-ODN-hTR plus ATRA. Tumor size and weight were assessed in the mice. Telomerase activity was detected by a TRAP assay, apoptotic cells were evaluated with a Tunel assay, the expression of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2 and Bax was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural morphological changes in the tumor specimen were examined. Results Both As-ODN-hTR and ATRA can significantly inhibit tumor growth in this OSCC xenograft solid-tumor model, and the combination of the two agents had a synergistic anti-tumorogenic effect. We also demonstrated that this anti-tumor effect correlated with inhibition of telomerase activity. Furthermore, significant increases in the number of apoptotic cells, typical apoptotic morphology and a downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2 were observed in the treated tissues. Conclusion The combination of As-ODN-hTR and ATRA has a synergistic anti-tumor effect. This anti-tumor effect can be mainly attributed to apoptosis induced by a decrease in telomerase activity. Bcl-2 plays an important role in this process. Therefore, combining As-ODN-hTR and ATRA may be an approach for the treatment of human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  5. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of fatty-acid synthase gene (FASN).

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-10-24

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  6. Antisense oligonucleotides and all-trans retinoic acid have a synergistic anti-tumor effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Antisense oligonucleotides against hTR (As-ODN-hTR) have shown promising results as treatment strategies for various human malignancies. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is a signalling molecule with important roles in differentiation and apoptosis. Biological responses to ATRA are currently used therapeutically in various human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of As-ODN-hTR combined with ATRA in vivo. In situ human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) models were established by subcutaneous injection of Tca8113 cells. Mice were treated with sense oligonucleotides against hTR(S-ODN-hTR) alone, As-ODN-hTR alone, ATRA alone, As-ODN-hTR plus ATRA, or S-ODN-hTR plus ATRA. Tumor size and weight were assessed in the mice. Telomerase activity was detected by a TRAP assay, apoptotic cells were evaluated with a Tunel assay, the expression of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2 and Bax) was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural morphological changes in the tumor specimen were examined. Both As-ODN-hTR and ATRA can significantly inhibit tumor growth in this OSCC xenograft solid-tumor model, and the combination of the two agents had a synergistic anti-tumorogenic effect. We also demonstrated that this anti-tumor effect correlated with inhibition of telomerase activity. Furthermore, significant increases in the number of apoptotic cells, typical apoptotic morphology and a downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2 were observed in the treated tissues. The combination of As-ODN-hTR and ATRA has a synergistic anti-tumor effect. This anti-tumor effect can be mainly attributed to apoptosis induced by a decrease in telomerase activity. Bcl-2 plays an important role in this process. Therefore, combining As-ODN-hTR and ATRA may be an approach for the treatment of human oral squamous cell carcinoma

  7. Synergistic permeability enhancing effect of lysophospholipids and fatty acids on lipid membranes

    Davidsen, Jesper; Mouritsen, O.G.; Jørgensen, K.

    2002-01-01

    The permeability-enhancing effects of the two surfactants, 1-paltnitoyl-2-lyso-sn-gycero-3-pllosplloclloline (lysoPPC) and palmitic acid (PA), on lipid membranes that at physiological temperatures are in the gel, fluid, and liquid-ordered phases were determined using the concentration-dependent s......The permeability-enhancing effects of the two surfactants, 1-paltnitoyl-2-lyso-sn-gycero-3-pllosplloclloline (lysoPPC) and palmitic acid (PA), on lipid membranes that at physiological temperatures are in the gel, fluid, and liquid-ordered phases were determined using the concentration......-dependent self-quenching properties of the hydrophilic marker, calcein. Adding lysoPPC to lipid membranes in the gel-phase induced a time-dependent calcein release curve that can be described by the sum of two exponentials, whereas RA induces a considerably more complex release curve. However, when lysoPPC and...

  8. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification...

  9. Synergistic Effect of Oleanolic Acid on Aminoglycoside Antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Bora Shin

    Full Text Available Difficulties involved in treating drug-resistant pathogens have created a need for new therapies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using oleanolic acid (OA, a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, as a natural adjuvant for antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii. High concentrations of OA can kill cells, partly because it generates reactive oxygen species. Measurement of the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC for OA and time-kill experiments demonstrated that it only synergizes with aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin, kanamycin. Other classes of antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin, rifampicin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline have no interactions with OA. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that genes involved in ATP synthesis and cell membrane permeability, the gene encoding glycosyltransferase, peptidoglycan-related genes, phage-related genes, and DNA repair genes were upregulated under OA. OA highly induces the expression of adk, which encodes an adenylate kinase, and des6, which encodes a linoleoyl-CoA desaturase, and deletion of these genes increased FICs; these observations indicate that adk and des6 are involved in the synergism of OA with aminoglycosides. Data obtained using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, fluorescence-conjugated gentamicin, and membrane fatty acid analysis indicates that adk and des6 are involved in changes in membrane permeability. Proton-motive force and ATP synthesis tests show that those genes are also involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our data show that OA boosts aminoglycoside uptake by changing membrane permeability and energy metabolism in A. baumannii.

  10. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies. PMID:26940270

  11. Synergistic Antibacterial Effect and Antibacterial Action Mode of Chitosan-Ferulic Acid Conjugate against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kang, Shin-Kook; Lee, Dae-Sung; Myeong, Jeong-In; Lee, Jinhwan; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Je, Jae-Young; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kim, Young-Mog

    2016-04-28

    We evaluated the synergistic antibacterial effect in combination with the chitosan-ferulic acid conjugate (CFA) and β-lactam antibiotics, such as ampicillin, penicillin, and oxacillin, against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices. CFA clearly reversed the antibacterial activity of ampicillin, penicillin, and oxacillin against MRSA in the combination mode. Among these antibiotics, the combination of oxacillin-CFA resulted in a ∑FICmin range of 0.250 and ∑FICmax of 0.563, suggesting that the oxacillin-CFA combination resulted in an antibacterial synergy effect against MRSA. In addition, we determined that CFA inhibited the mRNA expression of gene mecA and the production of PBP2a, which is a key determinant for β-lactam antibiotic resistance, in a dosedependent manner. Thus, the results obtained in this study supported the idea on the antibacterial action mechanism that oxacillin will restore the antibacterial activity against MRSA through the suppression of PBP2a production by CFA. PMID:26718468

  12. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  13. A Brønsted Acid-Amino Acid as a Synergistic Catalyst for Asymmetric List-Lerner-Barbas Aldol Reactions.

    Ramachary, Dhevalapally B; Shruthi, Kodambahalli S

    2016-03-18

    Herein, for the first time, a combination of L-amino acid, (R)-5,5-dimethyl thiazolidinium-4-carboxylate (L-DMTC) with simple Brønsted acid TFA is reported as the suitable synergistic catalyst for the List-Lerner-Barbas aldol (LLB-A) reaction of less reactive 2-azidobenzaldehydes with various ketones at ambient temperature to furnish the optically active functionalized (2-azidophenyl)alcohols with very good yields, dr's, and ee's. This method gives first time access to the novel azido-containing multifunctional compounds, which are applicable in material to medicinal chemistry. Chiral functionalized (2-azidophenyl)alcohols were transformed into different molecular scaffolds in good yields with high selectivity through Lewis acid mediated NaBH4 reduction, aza-Wittig and Staudinger reaction (azide reduction), followed by oxidative cyclizations, allenone synthesis, and click reaction, respectively. Chiral LLB-A products might become suitable starting materials for the total synthesis of natural products, ingredients, and inhibitors in medicinal chemistry. The mechanistic synergy of L-DMTC with TFA to increase the rate and selectivity of LLB-A reaction in DMSO-D6 is explained with the controlled and online NMR experiments. PMID:26907463

  14. Influence of adjunct use andcheese microenvironment on nonstarter lactic acid bacteria populations in Cheddar-type cheese

    Broadbent, Jeffery R.; Houck, K; Johnson, M E; Oberg, C. J.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated population dynamics of starter, adjunct, and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) in reduced-fat Cheddar and Colby cheese made with or without a Lactobacillus casei adjunct. Duplicate vats of cheese were manufactured and ripened at 7°C. Bacterial populations were monitored periodically by plate counts and by DNA fingerprinting of cheese isolates with the random amplified polymorphic DNA technique. Isolates that displayed a unique DNA fingerprint were identified to t...

  15. Synergistic inactivation of anaerobic wastewater biofilm by free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide

    Highlights: ► H2O2 greatly enhances the inactivation of microorganisms in biofilms by FNA. ► About 2-log of inactivation of biofilm microbes was achieved by FNA + H2O2. ► FNA + H2O2 reduced sulfide production and detached biofilm in reactors. -- Abstract: Free nitrous acid (FNA) was recently revealed to be a strong biocide for microbes in anaerobic biofilm, achieving approximately 1-log (90%) inactivation at a concentration of 0.2–0.3 mgHNO2-N/L with an exposure time longer than 6 h. The combined biocidal effects of FNA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on anaerobic wastewater biofilm are investigated in this study. H2O2 greatly enhances the inactivation of microorganisms by FNA. About 2-log (99%) of microbial inactivation was achieved when biofilms were exposed to FNA at 0.2 mgN/L or above and H2O2 at 30 mg/L or above for 6 h or longer. It was found, through response surface methodology and ridge analysis, that FNA is the primary inactivation agent and H2O2 enhances its efficiency. The loss and the subsequent slow recovery of biological activity in biofilm reactors subjected to FNA and H2O2 dosing confirmed that the chemical combination could achieve higher microbial inactivation than with FNA alone. Reaction simulation shows that intermediates of reactions between FNA and H2O2, like peroxynitrite and nitrogen dioxide, would be produced at elevated levels and are likely responsible for the synergism between FNA and H2O2. The combination of FNA and H2O2 could potentially provide an effective solution to sewer biofilm control

  16. Synergistic extraction of gadolinium from nitrate media by mixtures of bis (2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    Highlights: • The effect of operating parameters on the gadolinium extraction was investigated. • The mixture of extractants had the synergistic effects on the gadolinium extraction. • Mixture system obtained better stripping in comparison with D2EHPA system. - Abstract: The extraction of gadolinium (III) from aqueous nitrate solution with bis (2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex301), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and the mixtures of extractants was investigated. Various parameters affecting the extraction process including the pH of aqueous phase, nitrate ion, extractant concentration, temperature, and stripping agents were studied. The stoichiometric coefficients of reactive extraction, thermodynamic and equilibrium parameters were obtained for two extractants and their mixtures. The results showed that the extraction ability of Cyanex301 was lower than that of D2EHPA extractant. As a result, the extraction of Gd3+ at low concentration of Cyanex301 was investigated by the addition of D2EHPA to the extraction system. The reactive extraction in the mixture system was spontaneous in nature as referred to the negative sign of ΔG while it was not favorable in case of single Cyanex301 system as indicated by the positive sign of ΔG. The experimental results showed that the mixture of extractants provided better extraction efficiency and effective stripping performance in comparison with single D2EHPA or Cyanex301 system

  17. Synergistic Cytotoxic Effect of Gold Nanoparticles and 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy against Skin Cancer Cells

    Mahnaz Hadizadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. In this study, the epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431 and the normal fibroblasts were used to investigate whether gold nanoparticles (GNPs can induce an increase in cell death during PDT using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA as a photosensitizer. Methods: Human fibroblast and A431 cells were grown in 96-well plates. The effect of GNPs on the efficacy of 5-ALA-mediated PDT (5-ALA-PDT was evaluated by comparing the effect of 5-ALA with GNPs to the effect of 5-ALA alone. Cell viability was determined by the methyl- tetrazolium assay. Results: Dark toxicity experiments showed that 5-ALA at concentrations 0.5, 1 and 2 mM had no significant effect on cell viability of both cell lines. However, treatment of cells with 5-ALA (0.5 to 2 mM and light dose of 25 Jcm-2 led to 5-10% and 31-42% decrease in cell viability of fibroblast and A431 cells respectively. The data also shows that GNPs in both the absence and the presence of light, results in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability of both cell lines. However, the sensitivity of cancer cells to GNPs at concentrations more than 24 μg/ml was approximately 2.5- to 4-fold greater than healthy cells. Furthermore, data indicates that 5-ALA in combination with GNPs results in a synergistic reduction in viability of A431 cells. Conclusion: In summary, the findings of this study suggest that concomitant treatment with 5-ALA and GNPs may be useful in enhancing the effect of 5-ALA-PDT.

  18. Mixotrophic operation of photo-bioelectrocatalytic fuel cell under anoxygenic microenvironment enhances the light dependent bioelectrogenic activity.

    Chandra, Rashmi; Venkata Subhash, G; Venkata Mohan, S

    2012-04-01

    Electrogenic activity of photo-bioelectrocatalytic /photo-biological fuel cell (PhFC) was evaluated in a mixotrophic mode under anoxygenic microenvironment using photosynthetic consortia as biocatalyst. An acetate rich wastewater was used as anolyte for harnessing energy along with additional treatment. Mixotrophic operation facilitated good electrogenic activity and wastewater treatment associated with biomass growth. PhFC operation documented feasible microenvironment for the growth of photosynthetic bacteria compared to algae which was supported by pigment (total chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll) and diversity analysis. Pigment data also illustrated the association between bacterial and algal species. The synergistic interaction between anoxygenic and oxygenic photosynthesis was found to be suitable for PhFC operation. Light dependent deposition of electrons at electrode was relatively higher compared to dark dependent electron deposition under anoxygenic condition. PhFC documented for good volatile fatty acids removal by utilizing them as electron donor. Bioelectrochemical behavior of PhFC was evaluated by voltammetric and chronoamperometry analysis. PMID:22297047

  19. Synergistic extraction of U(VI) and separation of U(IV) and Th(IV) from nitric acid with HBMPPT and DOSO in toluene

    The synergistic extraction of U(VI) and separation of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid solution by HBMPPT (4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione) and DOSO (di-n-octyl sulfoxide) in toluene was studied. The extraction ability of HBMPPT was not so high as that of its parent (HBMPP), but when a little DOSO was added in, the ability to extract U(VI) was improved rapidly. The synergistic extracted complexes may be presented as a mixture of UO2NO3·BMPPT, UO2NO3·BMPPT·DOSO, Uo2(BMPPT)2 and UO2(BMPPT)2·DOSO for U(VI). When HBMPPT-DOSO was used to separate U(VI) from Th(IV), the separation coefficient reached 523 under certain condition

  20. Folic Acid-Targeted and Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Theranostic Nanoplatform for High-Efficiency Tri-Modal Imaging-Guided Synergistic Anticancer Phototherapy.

    Li, Na; Li, Tingting; Liu, Chen; Ye, Shiyi; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2016-05-01

    A novel nanomaterial with precisely-defined size and shape, biocompatible composition, and excellent stability, which can integrate multi modal targeted imaging and therapy into a single system for visualized therapeutics, has recently attracted significant research interest. Here, we developed a multifunctional nanoplatform based on silica-coated 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-modified gold nanorods (Au NRs) decorated with gold nanoclusters rich in the photosensitizer Ce6 (Au-Ce6 NCs). The nanoparticles also comprised folic acid and cell penetrating peptide molecules anchored on the surface, obtaining the Au@SiO2@Au-cell penetrating peptide nanocomposite. The Au-Ce6 NCs enhanced the photophysical stability, provided numerous bonding sites and offered a large surface-area and interior space to achieve a high drug loading efficiency (up to 55%). The anchored folic acid and cell penetrating peptide synergistically enhanced the efficiency of uptake of nanocomposites by HeLa cells (up to 70.7%) and improved therapeutic efficacy. The nanocomposite also has good water-solubility, excellent biocompatibility, and long-term stability against illumination and exposure to pH 3-12, thus facilitating their bioapplications in cancer theranostics. Here, the nanocomposite was established for high-resolution and noninvasive tri-modal surface-enhanced Raman spectrum/dark-field/fluorescence imaging-guided high-efficiency synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer. Our studies demonstrate that the multifunctional nanocomposite has the potential as a novel and sensitive contrast agent for complementary and synergistic theranostics in the clinic. PMID:27305812

  1. Studies on the separation and recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid medium using a synergistic mixture of 2-ethyl hexyl hydrogen 2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (PC 88-A) and Cyanex 923

    This paper describe the study on the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid medium using synergistic mixtures of 2-ethyl hexyl hydrogen 2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (PC88A) and different organophosphorous neutral donors. The extraction behaviour of uranium from phosphorous medium is investigated as a function of feed acidity of phosphoric acid. The concentration of extractants is chosen arbitrarily and it is observed that the synergistic mixture containing 5% PC88A and 5% Cyanex 923 has maximum distribution ratio for uranium. The different commonly used strippants are used to study the stripping of uranium from the same composite organic mixture. (author)

  2. Amino acid residue Y196E substitution and C-terminal peptide synergistically alleviate the toxicity of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin.

    Yao, Wenwu; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Zhuang, Xiangjin; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Hao; Ji, Bin; Xin, Wenwen; Wang, Jinglin

    2015-06-15

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by Clostridium perfringens type B and D strains, and is the causative agent of a lethal enterotoxemia in livestock animals and possibly in humans. However, many details of ETX structure and activity are not known. Therefore, it is important to clarify the relationship between ETX structure and activity. To explore the effect and mechanism of ETX amino acid residue Y196E substitution and C-terminal peptide on toxicity, four recombinant proteins, rETX (without 13 N-terminal peptides and 23 C-terminal peptides), rETX-C (rETX with 23 C-terminal peptides), rETX(Y196E) (rETX with an amino acid residue substitution at Y196) and rETX(Y196E)-C (rETX-C with a Y196E mutation), were constructed in this study. Both the amino acid residue Y196E substitution and the C-terminal peptide reduce ETX toxicity to a similar extent, and the two factors synergistically alleviate ETX toxicity. In addition, we demonstrated that the C-terminal peptides and Y196E amino acid mutation reduce the toxin toxicity in two different pathways: the C-terminal peptides inhibit the binding activity of toxins to target cells, and the Y196E amino acid mutation slightly inhibits the pore-forming or heptamer-forming process. Interaction between the two factors was not observed in pore-forming or binding assays but toxicity assays, which demonstrated that the relationship between domains of the toxin is more complicated than previously appreciated. However, the exact mechanism of synergistic action is not yet clarified. PMID:25912943

  3. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  4. Immunosuppressive microenvironment in neuroblastoma

    Vito ePistoia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the cancer immunoediting model, the interplay between tumor cells and the host immune system is crucial for the control of tumor growth. NB is a pediatric tumor that presents with metastatic disease at diagnosis in about 50% of the cases, the majority of which have poor prognosis. In this Review article, immune escape pathways adopted by human neuroblastoma (NB cells are reviewed. These include intrinsic defects of tumor cells such impaired expression of the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery and functional alterations of the tumor microenvironment induced by NB cell-derived immunosuppressive molecules as MICA and HLA-G. Finally, examples of therapeutic interventions targeting the tumor microenvironment are discussed to emphasize the concept that successful cancer treatment may be achieved using this strategy.

  5. Metabolic exchanges within tumor microenvironment.

    Chiarugi, Paola; Cirri, Paolo

    2016-09-28

    Tumor progression toward malignancy often requires a metabolic rewiring of cancer cells to meet changes in metabolic demand to forefront nutrient and oxygen withdrawal, together with strong anabolic requests to match high proliferation rate. Tumor microenvironment highly contributes to metabolic rewiring of cancer cells, fostering complete nutrient exploitation, favoring OXPHOS of lipids and glutamine at the expense of glycolysis and enhancing exchanges via extracellular microvesicles or exosomes of proteins, lipids and small RNAs among tumor and stromal cells. Noteworthy, the same molecular drivers of metabolic reprogramming within tumor and stroma are also able to elicit motility, survival and self-renewal on cancer cells, thereby sustaining successful escaping strategies to circumvent the hostile hypoxic, acidic and inflammatory environment. This review highlights the emerging role of nutrients and vesicle-mediated exchanges among tumor and stromal cells, defining their molecular pathways and offering new perspectives to develop treatments targeting this complex metabolic rewiring. PMID:26546872

  6. Synergistic Effect of Ferulic Acid and Z-Ligustilide, Major Components of A. sinensis, on Regulating Cold-Sensing Protein TRPM8 and TPRA1 In Vitro

    Yuwei Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelica sinensis has been used to attenuate cold-induced cutaneous vasospasm syndrome, such as Raynaud’s disease and frostbite, in China for many years. Ferulic acid (PubChem CID: 445858 and Z-ligustilide (PubChem CID: 529865, two major components extracted from Angelica sinensis, had been reported to inhibit vasoconstriction induced by vasoconstrictors. In this study, the pharmacological interaction in regulating cold-induced vascular smooth muscle cell contraction via cold-sensing protein TRPM8 and TRPA1 was analyzed between ferulic acid and Z-ligustilide. Pharmacological interaction on inhibiting [Ca2+]i influx evoked by TRPM8 agonist WS-12 or TRPA1 agonist ASP 7663 as well as cold-induced upregulation of TRPM8 was determined using isobolographic analysis. The isobolograms demonstrated that the combinations investigated in this study produced a synergistic interaction. Combination effect of two components in inhibiting RhoA activation and phosphorylation of MLC20 induced by WS-12 or ASP 7663 was also being quantified. These findings suggest that the therapeutic effect of Angelica sinensis on cold-induced vasospasm may be partially attributed to combinational effect, via TRPM8 and TPRA1 way, between ferulic acid and Z-ligustilide.

  7. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  8. Synergistic Effect of Azadirachta Indica Extract and Iodide Ions on the Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminium in Acid Media

    The synergistic action caused by iodide ions on the corrosion inhibition of aluminium (Al) in 0.5 M HCl in the presence of Azadirachta Indica (AZI) plant extract has been investigated using potintiodynamic polarization and impedance techniques. It is found that AZI extract inhibits the corrosion of aluminium in 0.5 M HCl. The inhibition efficiency increases with the increase in AZI extract concentration, until 24% v/v of AZI extract, then Inh.% is decreased with father increase in AZI extract concentration. The adsorption of this extract in the studied concentration is found to obey Frewendlish adsorption isotherm. The addition of iodide ions enhances the inhibition efficiency to a considerable extent. The increase in Inh.% values in presence of fixed concentration of iodide ions indicates that AZI extract forms an insoluble complex at lower AZI extract concentrations by undergoing a joint adsorption. But at higher concentrations of AZI extract, competitive adsorption is found between iodide ions and the formed complex leading to less Inh.%. The Inh.% decreased in presence of iodide ions with AZI extract than in presence of AZI extract alone at all studied iodide concentrations. The synergism parameter S θ is defined and calculated from surface coverage values. This parameter in the case of AZI extract is found to be more than unity, indicating that the enhanced inhibition efficiency caused by the addition of iodide ions

  9. Modeling Tumor Microenvironments In Vitro

    Wu, Mingming; Melody A Swartz

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression depends critically upon the interactions between the tumor cells and their microenvironment. The tumor microenvironment is heterogeneous and dynamic; it consists of extracellular matrix, stromal cells, immune cells, progenitor cells, and blood and lymphatic vessels. The emerging fields of tissue engineering and microtechnologies have opened up new possibilities for engineering physiologically relevant and spatially well-defined microenvironments. These in vitro models allow ...

  10. Growth factors in tumor microenvironment

    Zhang, Xuejing; Nie, Daotai; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation and progression. Components in the microenvironment can modulate the growth of tumor cells, their ability to progress and metastasize. A major venue of communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment is through polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. This article discusses three major classes of growth-stimulatory polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. It also d...

  11. Epigenetic changes in tumor microenvironment

    P Dey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The drama of cancer is not the solo performance of the malignant cells. Microenvironment of the tumor has significant contribution in carcinogenesis. Recent evidences show distinct gene promoter methylation in stromal cells of various malignant and pre-malignant tumors. These changes probably create unique tumor microenvironment, which is responsible for initiation, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. In this mini review the role of epigenetic changes of tumor microenvironment in carcinogenesis has been discussed.

  12. Retarded photooxidation of cyamemazine in biomimetic microenvironments

    Limones Herrero, Daniel; Pérez Ruiz, Raul; Jiménez Molero, María Consuelo; Miranda Alonso, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Cyamemazine (CMZ) is a neuroleptic drug that mediates cutaneous phototoxicity in humans. Here, the photobehavior of CMZ has been examined within (1)-acid glycoproteins, - and -cyclodextrins and SDS micelles. In all these microenvironments, CMZ emission was enhanced and blue-shifted, and its lifetime was longer. Irradiation of the entrapped drug at 355nm, under air; led to the N,S-dioxide. Within glycoproteins or SDS micelles the reaction was clearly slower than in phosphate buffered solution ...

  13. A synergistic antiproliferation effect of curcumin and docosahexaenoic acid in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells: unique signaling not explained by the effects of either compound alone

    Breast cancer is a collection of diseases in which molecular phenotypes can act as both indicators and mediators of therapeutic strategy. Therefore, candidate therapeutics must be assessed in the context of multiple cell lines with known molecular phenotypes. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and curcumin (CCM) are dietary compounds known to antagonize breast cancer cell proliferation. We report that these compounds in combination exert a variable antiproliferative effect across multiple breast cell lines, which is synergistic in SK-BR-3 cells and triggers cell signaling events not predicted by the activity of either compound alone. Dose response curves for CCM and DHA were generated for five breast cell lines. Effects of the DHA+ CCM combination on cell proliferation were evaluated using varying concentrations, at a fixed ratio, of CCM and DHA based on their individual ED50. Detection of synergy was performed using nonlinear regression of a sigmoid dose response model and Combination Index approaches. Cell molecular network responses were investigated through whole genome microarray analysis of transcript level changes. Gene expression results were validated by RT-PCR, and western blot analysis was performed for potential signaling mediators. Cellular curcumin uptake, with and without DHA, was analyzed via flow cytometry and HPLC. CCM+DHA had an antiproliferative effect in SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-361, MCF7 and MCF10AT cells. The effect was synergistic for SK-BR-3 (ER- PR- Her2+) relative to the two compounds individually. A whole genome microarray approach was used to investigate changes in gene expression for the synergistic effects of CCM+DHA in SK-BR-3 cells lines. CCM+DHA triggered transcript-level responses, in disease-relevant functional categories, that were largely non-overlapping with changes caused by CCM or DHA individually. Genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, inhibition of metastasis, and cell adhesion were upregulated, whereas genes involved

  14. CORROSION INHIBITION AND SYNERGISTIC EFFECT OF GREEN SCALE INHIBITOR POLYEPOXYSUCCINIC ACID%绿色阻垢剂聚环氧琥珀酸的缓蚀协同效应

    熊蓉春; 周庆; 魏刚

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of a kind of green scale inhibitor, polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) was studied based on dynamic experiments. In addition, the synergistic effect among PESA, Zn2+ and sodium gluconate was also investigated. According to the experimental data, when only PESA is used, it had fairly good effect on steel. The synergy between PESA and Zn2+ or sodium gluconate was poor. However, the synergistic effect of PESA, Zn2+ and sodium gluconate is very good. Further experiments show that the corrosion inhibition of PESA is mainly affected by oxygen atom inserted.

  15. A synergistic combination of tetraethylorthosilicate and multiphosphonic acid offers excellent corrosion protection to AA1100 aluminum alloy

    This work describes a new mechanism for the incorporation of organophosphonic acid into silane self-assembly monolayers, which has been used to protect AA1100 aluminum alloy. The protection improvement has been attributed to the fact that phosphonic structures promote the formation of strongly bonded and densely packed monolayer films, which show higher surface coverage and better adhesion than conventional silane systems. In order to evaluate the linking chemistry offered by phosphonic groups, two functionalized organophosphonic groups have been employed, 1,2-diaminoethanetetrakis methylenephosphonic acid (EDTPO) and aminotrimethylenephosphonic acid (ATMP), and combined with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) films prepared by sol–gel synthesis. Results suggest that phosphonic acids may interact with the surface through a monodentate and bidentate coordination mode and, in addition, form one or more strong and stable linkages with silicon through non-hydrolysable bonds. Therefore, the incorporation of a very low concentration of phosphonic acids on TEOS solutions favors the complete coverage of the aluminum substrate during the silanization process, which is not possible using TEOS alone. The linking capacity of phosphonic acid has been investigated by FTIR-RA spectroscopy, SEM and EDX analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and quantum mechanical calculations. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been used to study the corrosion protection revealing that EDTPO-containing films afforded more protection to the AA1100 substrate than ATMP-containing films.

  16. A synergistic combination of tetraethylorthosilicate and multiphosphonic acid offers excellent corrosion protection to AA1100 aluminum alloy

    Dalmoro, Viviane [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500 - CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departament d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering (CRnE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Campus Sud, Edifici C’, C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Santos, João H.Z. dos [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500 - CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Armelin, Elaine, E-mail: elaine.armelin@upc.edu [Departament d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering (CRnE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Campus Sud, Edifici C’, C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Alemán, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.aleman@upc.edu [Departament d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Center for Research in Nano-Engineering (CRnE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Campus Sud, Edifici C’, C/Pasqual i Vila s/n, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); and others

    2013-05-15

    This work describes a new mechanism for the incorporation of organophosphonic acid into silane self-assembly monolayers, which has been used to protect AA1100 aluminum alloy. The protection improvement has been attributed to the fact that phosphonic structures promote the formation of strongly bonded and densely packed monolayer films, which show higher surface coverage and better adhesion than conventional silane systems. In order to evaluate the linking chemistry offered by phosphonic groups, two functionalized organophosphonic groups have been employed, 1,2-diaminoethanetetrakis methylenephosphonic acid (EDTPO) and aminotrimethylenephosphonic acid (ATMP), and combined with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) films prepared by sol–gel synthesis. Results suggest that phosphonic acids may interact with the surface through a monodentate and bidentate coordination mode and, in addition, form one or more strong and stable linkages with silicon through non-hydrolysable bonds. Therefore, the incorporation of a very low concentration of phosphonic acids on TEOS solutions favors the complete coverage of the aluminum substrate during the silanization process, which is not possible using TEOS alone. The linking capacity of phosphonic acid has been investigated by FTIR-RA spectroscopy, SEM and EDX analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and quantum mechanical calculations. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been used to study the corrosion protection revealing that EDTPO-containing films afforded more protection to the AA1100 substrate than ATMP-containing films.

  17. Synergistic extraction of Nd(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III) ions with a mixture of picrolonic acid and benzo-15-crown-5 in chloroform

    Habib-ur-Rehman; Ahmed, S. [Central Analytical Facility Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, A. [Nuclear Chemistry Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Anwar, J. [Inst. of Chemistry, Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2006-07-01

    The synergistic mixture comprising picrolonic acid (HPA) and benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) in chloroform has been used for the extraction of Nd{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} and Lu{sup 3-} as representatives of lanthanide(III) ions from pH 1-2 solutions having ionic strength of 0.1 moll{sup -1} (K{sup -}/H{sup +}, Cl{sup -}). The composition of the extracted species has been determined as M(PA){sub 3}.nB15C5 where M is Nd, Tb and Lu and n = 1 or 2. The acid dissociation constant (pK{sub u}) has been evaluated to be 2.52 {+-} 0.01. The influence of various anions and cations on the extraction of these lanthanide(III) ions has also been studied and only oxalate and thiosulphate among the anions and Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} among the cations have some deleterious effect. The extraction equilibrium constants have been evaluated and discussed. (orig.)

  18. The synergistic inhibition between 8-hydroxyquinoline and chloride ion for the corrosion of cold rolled steel in 0.5 M sulfuric acid

    The corrosion inhibition of cold rolled steel in 0.5 M sulfuric acid in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline and sodium chloride (NaCl) has been investigated by using weight loss and electrochemical techniques. The inhibition efficiency increases with increasing concentration of 8-hydroxyquinoline at the same temperature, but decreases with increasing temperature studied. A synergistic effect exists when 8-hydroxyquinoline and chloride ions are used together to prevent cold rolled steel corrosion in 0.5 M sulfuric acid at every experimental temperature. The polarization curves show that 8-hydroxyquinoline is a cathodic inhibitor, while the complex of 8-hydroxyquinoline and NaCl is a mixed-type inhibitor. The experimental results suggested that the presence of chloride ions in the solution stabilizes the adsorption of 8-hydroxyquinoline molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency of 8-hydroxyquinoline. The adsorption of single 8-hydroxyquinoline follows the Temkin adsorption isotherm, but the complex accords with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Some thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption heat, adsorption entropy and adsorption free energy have been calculated by employing thermodynamic equations. Kinetic parameters such as apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor have been calculated and discussed

  19. Synergistic effects of betaine and conjugated linoleic acid on the growth and carcass composition of growing Iberian pigs.

    Fernández-Fígares, I; Conde-Aguilera, J A; Nieto, R; Lachica, M; Aguilera, J F

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the efficacy of dietary betaine, CLA, or both as growth promotants and carcass modifiers in growing Iberian pigs. Twenty gilts (20 kg of BW) were individually penned and fed barley- and soybean meal-based diets (12% CP, 0.81% Lys, and 14.8 MJ of ME/kg of DM) containing either no added betaine or CLA (control), 0.5% betaine, 1% CLA, or 0.5% betaine + 1% CLA, at 95% of ad libitum energy intake. An additional group of 5 pigs was slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment to obtain the initial body composition. At 30 kg of BW, a balance experiment was conducted. At 50 kg of BW, pigs were slaughtered and viscera was removed and weighed. Betaine or CLA alone did not affect growth performance. However, betaine + CLA increased ADG (601 vs. 558 g, P = 0.03) and gain relative to ME intake (25.4 vs. 22.2 g/MJ, P = 0.03) compared with control pigs. Digestibility of nutrients and metabolizability of energy did not differ among diets (P = 0.46 to 0.75). Carcass protein, water, and lean deposition (g/d) increased (19.8, 24.2, and 23.4%, respectively, P pigs fed betaine + CLA compared with control pigs. Similarly, protein deposition relative to ME intake increased by 28% in betaine + CLA-supplemented pigs (P pigs fed betaine + CLA-supplemented diets tended to increase (P = 0.07 to 0.09) and carcass fat content tended to decrease (P = 0.09). Similarly, estimated composition of carcass gain was affected, such that water and lean content tended to increase (P = 0.06 to 0.08), whereas fat tended to decrease (P = 0.08) in pigs fed betaine + CLA-supplemented diets. Longissimus muscle area was not altered by treatments (P = 0.49). The liver of pigs fed betaine + CLA diets had increased weight (19%, P pigs. Overall, dietary supplementation of betaine + CLA increased ADG, protein, water, and lean deposition in growing Iberian gilts. There appears to be a synergistic action when betaine and CLA are used together. PMID:18086868

  20. Gallic acid-based indanone derivative interacts synergistically with tetracycline by inhibiting efflux pump in multidrug resistant E. coli.

    Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Tiwari, Nimisha; Singh, Aastha; Kumar, Akhil; Roy, Sudeep; Negi, Arvind Singh; Pal, Anirban; Chanda, Debabrata; Sharma, Ashok; Darokar, Mahendra P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to study the synergy potential of gallic acid-based derivatives in combination with conventional antibiotics using multidrug resistant cultures of Escherichia coli. Gallic acid-based derivatives significantly reduced the MIC of tetracycline against multidrug resistant clinical isolate of E. coli. The best representative, 3-(3',4,'5'-trimethoxyphenyl)-4,5,6-trimethoxyindanone-1, an indanone derivative of gallic acid, was observed to inhibit ethidium bromide efflux and ATPase which was also supported by in silico docking. This derivative extended the post-antibiotic effect and decreased the mutation prevention concentration of tetracycline. This derivative in combination with TET was able to reduce the concentration of TNFα up to 18-fold in Swiss albino mice. This derivative was nontoxic and well tolerated up to 300 mg/kg dose in subacute oral toxicity study in mice. This is the first report of gallic acid-based indanone derivative as drug resistance reversal agent acting through ATP-dependent efflux pump inhibition. PMID:26658982

  1. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Synthesis Induce PPAR α -Regulated Fatty Acid β -Oxidative Genes: Synergistic Roles of L-FABP and Glucose

    Huan Huang; McIntosh, Avery L.; Martin, Gregory G.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Danilo Landrock; Kier, Ann B.; Friedhelm Schroeder

    2013-01-01

    While TOFA (acetyl CoA carboxylase inhibitor) and C75 (fatty acid synthase inhibitor) prevent lipid accumulation by inhibiting fatty acid synthesis, the mechanism of action is not simply accounted for by inhibition of the enzymes alone. Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a mediator of long chain fatty acid signaling to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) in the nucleus, was found to bind TOFA and its activated CoA th...

  2. Synergistic effects of dicloxacillin or clavulanic acid in combination with penicillin G or cephalothin against Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Jimenez-Valera, M; Ruiz-Bravo, A; Ramos-Cormenzana, A.

    1986-01-01

    Cultures of Yersinia enterocolitica grown at 22 degrees C produced beta-lactamases, whereas cultures grown at 37 degrees C produced these enzymes much less effectively. Both dicloxacillin and clavulanic acid inhibited the beta-lactamase activity of bacterial crude extracts and potentiated the activity of penicillin G or cephalothin against 14 Y. enterocolitica strains. It appeared that the beta-lactamase activity present in Y. enterocolitica cells grown at 37 degrees C was great enough to pla...

  3. Hypoxia and Amino Acid Supplementation Synergistically Promote the Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Silk Protein Scaffolds

    Sengupta, Sejuti; Park, Sang-Hyug; Patel, Atur; Carn, Julia; Lee, Kyongbum; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Tailoring tissue engineering strategies to match patient- and tissue-specific bone regeneration needs offers to improve clinical outcomes. As a step toward this goal, osteogenic outcomes and metabolic parameters were assessed when varying inputs into the bone formation process. Silk protein scaffolds seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells in osteogenic differentiation media were used to study in vitro osteogenesis under varied conditions of amino acid (lysine and proline) concentration and ...

  4. Lipoteichoic acid and interleukin 1 stimulate synergistically production of hepatocyte growth factor (scatter factor) in human gingival fibroblasts in culture.

    Sugiyama, A; Arakaki, R; Ohnishi, T.; Arakaki, N.; Daikuhara, Y.; Takada, H

    1996-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTA) from various gram-positive bacteria, including oral streptococci such as Streptococcus sanguis, enhanced the production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) (scatter factor) by human gingival fibroblasts in culture, whereas lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from various gram-negative bacteria did not. In contrast, LPS induced interleukin 1 activity in human gingival epithelial cells in culture, while LTA had little effect. LTA and recombinant human interleukin 1 alpha enhanced s...

  5. Muscle inflammatory response and insulin resistance: synergistic interaction between macrophages and fatty acids leads to impaired insulin action

    Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Rasouli, Neda; Nolen, Greg T.; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Starks, Tasha; Gurley, Cathy; Simpson, Pippa; McGehee, Robert E.; Kern, Philip A.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by adipose tissue expansion as well as macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue. This results in an increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines and nonesterified fatty acids, factors that cause skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Whether obesity also results in skeletal muscle inflammation is not known. In this study, we quantified macrophages immunohistochemically in vastus lateralis biopsies from eight obese and eight lean subjects. Our study demonstrates that m...

  6. Synergistic effect of natural compounds on the fatty acid-induced autophagy of activated hepatic stellate cells.

    Lee, Kuan-Wei; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Sie, Huei-Wun; Cheng, Ming-Fan; Tsai, May-Jywan; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2014-09-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal pathway to maintain cellular homeostasis, is mediated via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent pathways. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), previously termed fat- or vitamin A-storing cells, can transdifferentiate into myofibroblast-like cells and are the most relevant cell type for overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) and development of liver fibrosis during injury. However, the role of autophagy in fat metabolism of HSCs remains unclear. This study investigates the regulatory effect of natural compounds on fatty acid-induced autophagy pathways of nonchemical-induced HSC (NHSC) and thioacetamide-induced HSC. Oleic acid (OA) and palmitic acid (PA) have shown a significant effect on cell proliferation with oil red O staining and Western blot confirming that OA and PA induce fat storage ability and autophagy protein expression in NHSC. Natural compounds rutin, curcumin, antroquinonol and benzyl cinnamate treatment have shown no effect on the autophagy protein expression. Nevertheless, cells pretreated with OA and PA then treated with rutin, curcumin, antroquinonol and benzyl cinnamate could significantly induce the light chain I/II (LC3 I/II) protein expression. In mTOR-dependent pathway, the PI3K-Class I, Akt, and p-mTOR proteins were decreased with PA treatment. However, there were no significant changes in PI3K-Class III and Beclin-1 protein expressions found to imply that this autophagy is unrelated to the mTOR-independent pathway. Taken together, the present study unveils rutin and curcumin as a possible effective stimulation for fatty acid-induced autophagy via mTOR-dependent pathways in NHSC. We further suggest the benefits of these natural compounds for alleviating liver fibrosis. PMID:24857031

  7. Calcite Biohybrids as Microenvironment for Stem Cells

    Razi Vago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of composite 3D biomaterial that provides extracellular cues that govern the differentiation processes of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been developed. In the present study, we evaluated the chondrogenecity of a biohybrid composed of a calcium carbonate scaffold in its calcite polymorph and hyaluronic acid (HA. The source of the calcite scaffolding is an exoskeleton of a sea barnacle Tetraclita rifotincta (T. rifotincta, Pilsbry (1916. The combination of a calcium carbonate-based bioactive scaffold with a natural polymeric hydrogel is designed to mimic the organic-mineral composite of developing bone by providing a fine-tuned microenvironment. The results indicate that the calcite-HA interface creates a suitable microenvironment for the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, and therefore, the biohybrid may provide a tool for tissue-engineered cartilage.

  8. Tailoring the Synergistic Bronsted-Lewis acidic effects in Heteropolyacid catalysts: Applied in Esterification and Transesterification Reactions

    Tao, Meilin; Xue, Lifang; Sun, Zhong; Wang, Shengtian; Wang, Xiaohong; Shi, Junyou

    2015-09-01

    In order to investigate the influences of Lewis metals on acidic properties and catalytic activities, a series of Keggin heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts, HnPW11MO39 (M = TiIV, CuII, AlIII, SnIV, FeIII, CrIII, ZrIV and ZnII; for Ti and Zr, the number of oxygen is 40), were prepared and applied in the esterification and transesterification reactions. Only those cations with moderate Lewis acidity had a higher impact. Ti Substituted HPA, H5PW11TiO40, posse lower acid content compared with TixH3-4xPW12O40 (Ti partial exchanged protons in saturated H3PW12O40), which demonstrated that the Lewis metal as an addenda atom (H5PW11TiO40) was less efficient than those as counter cations (TixH3-4xPW12O40). On the other hand, the highest conversion reached 92.2% in transesterification and 97.4% in esterification. Meanwhile, a good result was achieved by H5PW11TiO40 in which the total selectivity of DAG and TGA was 96.7%. In addition, calcination treatment to H5PW11TiO40 make it insoluble in water which resulted in a heterogeneous catalyst feasible for reuse.

  9. Tailoring the Synergistic Bronsted-Lewis acidic effects in Heteropolyacid catalysts: Applied in Esterification and Transesterification Reactions.

    Tao, Meilin; Xue, Lifang; Sun, Zhong; Wang, Shengtian; Wang, Xiaohong; Shi, Junyou

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the influences of Lewis metals on acidic properties and catalytic activities, a series of Keggin heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts, HnPW11MO39 (M = Ti(IV), Cu(II), Al(III), Sn(IV), Fe(III), Cr(III), Zr(IV) and Zn(II); for Ti and Zr, the number of oxygen is 40), were prepared and applied in the esterification and transesterification reactions. Only those cations with moderate Lewis acidity had a higher impact. Ti Substituted HPA, H5PW11TiO40, posse lower acid content compared with Ti(x)H(3-4x)PW12O40 (Ti partial exchanged protons in saturated H3PW12O40), which demonstrated that the Lewis metal as an addenda atom (H5PW11TiO40) was less efficient than those as counter cations (Ti(x)H(3-4x)PW12O40). On the other hand, the highest conversion reached 92.2% in transesterification and 97.4% in esterification. Meanwhile, a good result was achieved by H5PW11TiO40 in which the total selectivity of DAG and TGA was 96.7%. In addition, calcination treatment to H5PW11TiO40 make it insoluble in water which resulted in a heterogeneous catalyst feasible for reuse. PMID:26374393

  10. Hybrid poly(lactic acid)/nanocellulose/nanoclay composites with synergistically enhanced barrier properties and improved thermomechanical resistance

    Trifol Guzman, Jon; Plackett, David; Sillard, Cecile;

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)‐based hybrid nanocomposites (PLA, nanoclay and nanocellulose) were prepared by reinforcing neat PLA with commercially available nanoclay (Cloisite C30B) and nanocellulose, in the form of either partially acetylated cellulose nanofibres (CNFs) or nanocrystalline cellulose......) through a reduction of up to 90% in OTR and a further reduction in the water vapour transmission rate of up to 76%. In addition, the nanocomposite films showed improved thermomechanical resistance and improved crystallisation kinetics while maintaining high film transparency. This makes the hybrid PLA...

  11. Synergistic bactericidal action of phytic acid and sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells protected by a biofilm.

    Kim, Nam Hee; Rhee, Min Suk

    2016-06-16

    The food industry must prevent the build-up of strong Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilms in food processing environments. The present study examined the bactericidal action of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran and the hulls/peels of legumes, against E. coli O157:H7 biofilms. The synergistic bactericidal effects of PA plus sodium chloride (NaCl) were also examined. E. coli O157:H7 biofilms were allowed for form on stainless steel coupons by culture in both rich (tryptic soy broth, TSB) and minimal (M9) medium at 22°C for 6days. Bacterial cells within biofilms grown in M9 medium were significantly more resistant to PA than those grown in TSB (p6.5logCFU/cm(2) reduction). Neither PA nor NaCl alone were this effective (PA, 1.6-2.7logCFU/cm(2) reduction; NaCl, <0.5logCFU/cm(2) reduction). Confocal laser scanning microscopy images of propidium iodide-treated cells showed that PA (0.4%) plus NaCl (2-4%) had marked membrane permeabilizing effects. These results suggest that a sanitizer that combines these two naturally occurring antimicrobial agents may be useful to food safety managers who encounter thick biofilm formation in food processing environments. PMID:27043385

  12. Synergistic ameliorative effects of sesame oil and alpha-lipoic acid against subacute diazinon toxicity in rats: hematological, biochemical, and antioxidant studies.

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Taha, Ramadan; Ghazy, Emad W; El-Sayed, Yasser S

    2016-01-01

    Diazinon (DZN) is a common organophosphorus insecticide extensively used for agriculture and veterinary purposes. DZN toxicity is not limited to insects; it also induces harmful effects in mammals and birds. Our experiment evaluated the protective and antioxidant potential of sesame oil (SO) and (or) alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) against DZN toxicity in male Wistar albino rats. DZN-treated animals exhibited macrocytic hypochromic anemia and significant increases in serum biochemical parameters related to liver injury, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), γ-glutamyl transferase (γGT), cholesterol, and triglycerides. They also had elevated levels of markers related to cardiac injury, such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and increased biomarkers of renal injury, urea and creatinine. DZN also increased hepatic, renal, and cardiac lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidant biomarker levels. SO and (or) ALA supplementation ameliorated the deleterious effects of DZN intoxication. Treatment improved hematology and serum parameters, enhanced endogenous antioxidant status, and reduced lipid peroxidation. Importantly, they exerted synergistic hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, and cardioprotective effects. Our findings demonstrate that SO and (or) ALA supplementation can alleviate the toxic effects of DZN via their potent antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activities. PMID:26550680

  13. Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation Exerts Its Effect through Three Synergistic Mechanisms: Proof of Principle in Phenylketonuria Mice.

    Danique van Vliet

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU was the first disorder in which severe neurocognitive dysfunction could be prevented by dietary treatment. However, despite this effect, neuropsychological outcome in PKU still remains suboptimal and the phenylalanine-restricted diet is very demanding. To improve neuropsychological outcome and relieve the dietary restrictions for PKU patients, supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAA is suggested as alternative treatment strategy that might correct all brain biochemical disturbances caused by high blood phenylalanine, and thereby improve neurocognitive functioning.As a proof-of-principle, this study aimed to investigate all hypothesized biochemical treatment objectives of LNAA supplementation (normalizing brain phenylalanine, non-phenylalanine LNAA, and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in PKU mice.C57Bl/6 Pah-enu2 (PKU mice and wild-type mice received a LNAA supplemented diet, an isonitrogenic/isocaloric high-protein control diet, or normal chow. After six weeks of dietary treatment, blood and brain amino acid and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations were assessed.In PKU mice, the investigated LNAA supplementation regimen significantly reduced blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations by 33% and 26%, respectively, compared to normal chow (p<0.01, while alleviating brain deficiencies of some but not all supplemented LNAA. Moreover, LNAA supplementation in PKU mice significantly increased brain serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations from 35% to 71% and from 57% to 86% of wild-type concentrations (p<0.01, respectively, but not brain dopamine concentrations (p = 0.307.This study shows that LNAA supplementation without dietary phenylalanine restriction in PKU mice improves brain biochemistry through all three hypothesized biochemical mechanisms. Thereby, these data provide proof-of-concept for LNAA supplementation as a valuable alternative dietary treatment strategy in PKU. Based on these

  14. Synergistic Chemotherapeutic Activity of Curcumin Bearing Methoxypolyethylene Glycol-g-Linoleic Acid Based Micelles on Breast Cancer Cells.

    Guzzarlamudi, Sofia; Singh, Pankaj K; Pawar, Vivek K; Singh, Yuvraj; Sharma, Komal; Paliwal, S K; Chourasia, Manish K; Ramana, M V; Chaurasia, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Although curcumin (Cur), has been poised to be an anticancer boon for quite some, its progress from bench to bed has been strained due to various pharmaceutical hurdles. Consequently curcumin has been entrapped in methoxy poly ethylene glycol and linoleic acid conjugated polymeric micelles (PMs) to not only tackle the routine issues but to also provide a synergetic effect against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Optimized PMs of Cur had size 186.53 ± 12.10 nm with polydispersity index 0.143 ± 0.031 and zeta potential -30.1 ± 3.2 mV. Developed formulation (Mpeg-Cla-Cur PMs) was hemocompatible and had high cytotoxicity (IC50 55.80 ± 4.63 µ/mL) against MCF-7 cells in comparison to pure Cur suspension (IC50 75.05 ± 5.75 µg/mL). As postulated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis studies revealed synergetic effect of Mpeg-Cla-Cur PMs with higher cell population in G1 phase in addition to high apoptosis of MCF-7 cells as compared to pure Cur suspension and con- trol group. Pharmacokinetic studies also show PMs enhanced MRT and T1/2 of Cur indicating its longer retention time in body. Mpeg-Cla-Cur PMs might become as an excellent chemotherapeutic alternative candidate for treatment of breast cancer with higher commercial value. PMID:27451784

  15. Synergistic Application of Black Tea Extracts and Lactic Acid Bacteria in Protecting Human Colonocytes against Oxidative Damage.

    Zhao, Danyue; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-03-23

    In view of the potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to enhance the antioxidant activity of food products, this work explored the effectiveness of LAB fermented black tea samples in alleviating H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human colonocytes. The antioxidant capacity of tea samples was evaluated in terms of cyto-protectiveness, mitochondria membrane potential (Δψm)-stabilizing activity, ROS-inhibitory effect, and antioxidant enzyme-modulating activity. The effect on oxidative DNA damage and repair was studied in CCD 841 by comet assay. Results showed that the protective effect of tea pretreatment was more pronounced in normal cells (CCD 841) than in carcinomas (Caco-2), and fermented samples were invariably more effective. Higher cell viability and Δψm were maintained and ROS production was markedly inhibited with tea pretreatment. The fermented tea samples also remarkably stimulated DNA repair, resulting in fewer strand breaks and oxidative lesions. Our study implied that LAB fermentation may be an efficient way to enhance the antioxidative effectiveness of black tea flavonoid-enriched foods. PMID:26790920

  16. Inhibition of mild steel corrosion in acidic medium using synthetic and naturally occurring polymers and synergistic halide additives

    Umoren, S.A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Uyo, P.M.B 1017 Uyo (Nigeria)], E-mail: saviourumoren@yahoo.com; Ogbobe, O.; Igwe, I.O. [Department of Polymer and Textile Engineering, School of Engineering and Engineering Technology, Federal University of Technology, P.M.B. 1526 Owerri (Nigeria); Ebenso, E.E. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, National University of Lesotho, P. O. Roma180, Lesotho (South Africa)

    2008-07-15

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the presence of gum arabic (GA) (naturally occurring polymer) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) (synthetic polymer) was studied using weight loss, hydrogen evolution and thermometric methods at 30-60 deg. C. PEG was found to be a better inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in acidic medium than GA. The effect of addition of halides (KCl, KBr and KI) was also studied. Results obtained showed that inhibition efficiency (I%) increased with increase in GA and PEG concentration, addition of halides and with increase in temperature. Increase in inhibition efficiency (I%) and degree of surface coverage ({theta}) was found to follow the trend Cl{sup -} < Br{sup -} < I{sup -} which indicates that the radii and electronegativity of the halide ions play a significant role in the adsorption process. GA and PEG alone and in combination with halides were found to obey Temkin adsorption isotherm. Phenomenon of chemical adsorption is proposed from the trend of inhibition efficiency with temperature and values {delta}G{sub ads}{sup 0} obtained. The synergism parameter, S{sub I} evaluated is found to be greater than unity indicating that the enhanced inhibition efficiency caused by the addition of halides is only due to synergism.

  17. Synergistic Effect of Artificial Tears Containing Epigallocatechin Gallate and Hyaluronic Acid for the Treatment of Rabbits with Dry Eye Syndrome.

    Ching-Li Tseng

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndrome (DES is a common eye disease. Artificial tears (AT are used to treat DES, but they are not effective. In this study, we assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of AT containing epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and hyaluronic acid (HA on DES. Human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs were used in the WST-8 assay to determine the safe dose of EGCG. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HCECs showing inflammation were treated with EGCG/HA. The expression of IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was assessed by real-time PCR and AT physical properties such as the viscosity, osmolarity, and pH were examined. AT containing EGCG and HA were topically administered in a rabbit DES model established by treatment with 0.1% benzalkonium chloride (BAC. Tear secretion was assessed and fluorescein, H&E, and TUNEL staining were performed. Inflammatory cytokine levels in the corneas were also examined. The non-toxic optimal concentration of EGCG used for the treatment of HCECs in vitro was 10 μg/mL. The expression of several inflammatory genes, including IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, was significantly inhibited in inflamed HCECs treated with 10 μg/mL EGCG and 0.1% (w/v HA (E10/HA compared to that in inflamed HCECs treated with either EGCG or HA alone. AT containing E10/HA mimic human tears, with similar osmolarity and viscosity and a neutral pH. Fluorescence examination of the ocular surface of mouse eyes showed that HA increased drug retention on the ocular surface. Topical treatment of DES rabbits with AT plus E10/HA increased tear secretion, reduced corneal epithelial damage, and maintained the epithelial layers and stromal structure. Moreover, the corneas of the E10/HA-treated rabbits showed fewer apoptotic cells, lower inflammation, and decreased IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α levels. In conclusion, we showed that AT plus E10/HA had anti-inflammatory and mucoadhesive properties when used as topical eye drops and were effective for treating DES in rabbits.

  18. Studies on the extraction and separation of lanthanide ions with a synergistic extraction system combined with 1,4,10,13-tetrathia-7,16-diazacyclooctadecane and lauric acid.

    Masuda, Y; Zhang, Y; Yan, C; Li, B

    1998-05-01

    1,4,10,13-Tetrathia-7,16-diazacyclooctadecane (ATCO) and its binary extraction system containing lauric acid were studied extensively as extractants of lanthanide (M(3+)=La(3+), Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+) and Gd(3+)) in 1,2-dichloroethane solution. The percentage extraction of Ce(3+) and Eu(3+) by ATCO were only measured to be less than 5% during a pH range 5.5-7.0 in NCS(-), ClO(4)(-) and PF(6)(-) mediums respectively, which indicates that ATCO alone has very low extractability to lanthanide, due to the bad fit of metal ions in its cavity. However, when lauric acid was added to the ATCO organic phase, because of forming rare earth adduct, the percentage extraction for lanthanide until Gd(3+) was enhanced in the binary system in comparison with that did not adopt the lauric acid within the pH range 6-7. The extraction species and extraction equilibrium constants logK(ex) were found to be CeLA(3)3HA, -8.5, EuLA(3)HA, -6.7, and GdLA(2)NO(3)2HA, -1.8, respectively. The separation factor between Eu(3+) and Ce(3+) was found to be 2.5, however, poor selectivity for lanthanide was observed. From Gd(3+) to Er(3+) and Lu(3+), the synergistic effect of the binary extraction system decreases with increasing atomic number. For gadolinium, the synergistic effect becomes much weaker than that of Ce(3+) and Eu(3+), no synergistic effect existed for erbium and lutetium. Thermodynamic data for synergistic solvent extraction are also reported in this paper. The order of organic phase stability constants of the extraction species is Sm (5.8)>Pr (5.7)>Eu (5.6)>Ce (5.3)>La (5.2)>Gd (2.8). PMID:18967144

  19. A Cumulative Spore Killing Approach: Synergistic Sporicidal Activity of Dilute Peracetic Acid and Ethanol at Low pH Against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    Nerandzic, Michelle M; Sankar C, Thriveen; Setlow, Peter; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the primary method of hand hygiene in healthcare settings, but they lack activity against bacterial spores produced by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis. We previously demonstrated that acidification of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity, resulting in ethanol formulations with pH 1.5-2 that were as effective as soap and water washing in reducing levels of C difficile spores on hands. We hypothesized that the addition of dilute peracetic acid (PAA) to acidified ethanol would enhance sporicidal activity while allowing elevation of the pH to a level likely to be well tolerated on skin (ie, >3). Methods.  We tested the efficacy of acidified ethanol solutions alone or in combination with PAA against C difficile and Bacillus subtilis spores in vitro and against nontoxigenic C difficile spores on hands of volunteers. Results.  Acidification of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity against C difficile and to a lesser extent B subtilis. The addition of dilute PAA to acidified ethanol resulted in synergistic enhancement of sporicidal activity in a dose-dependent fashion in vitro. On hands, the addition of 1200-2000 ppm PAA enhanced the effectiveness of acidified ethanol formulations, resulting in formulations with pH >3 that were as effective as soap and water washing. Conclusions.  Acidification and the addition of dilute PAA induced rapid sporicidal activity in ethanol. Our findings suggest that it may be feasible to develop effective sporicidal ethanol formulations that are safe and tolerable on skin. PMID:26885539

  20. Synergistic and individual effect of glomus etunicatum root colonization and acetyl salicylic acid on root activity and architecture of tomato plants under moderate nacl stress

    A pot based experiment in plastic tunnel was conducted to investigate the changes in root morphology and root activity of the tomato plants grown under moderate NaCl stress (100 mM), pretreated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus AMF (Glomus etunicatum) root colonization and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) as salinity ameliorative agents. The results revealed that both AMF and ASA treatments significantly enhanced the fresh root weight and root morphological parameters; net length, surface area, volume, mean diameter, nodal count and number of tips to different extents as compared to those of sole salinity treatment at 90 days after transplantation. Both treatments; AMF alone and in combination with ASA significantly enhanced the root activity level in terms of triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction (2.37 and 2.40 mg g /sup -1/ h /sup -1/ respectively) as compared to the sole salinity treatment (0.40 mg g /sup -1/ h /sup -1/ ) as well as the salt free control (1.69 mg g /sup -1/ h /sup -1/) On the other hand, ASA treatment alone also uplifted root activity (1.53 mg g /sup -1/ h /sup -1/ ) which was significantly higher than that of sole salt treatment. It was inferred that under moderate saline conditions (100 mM NaCl), AMF (Glomus etunicatum) and ASA (individually or in combination) confer protective effect on plant growth by enhanced root activity and improved root architecture. Therefore, synergistic use of AMF (G. etunicatum) and ASA can be eco-friendly and economically feasible option for tomato production in marginally salt affected lands and suggests further investigations. (author)

  1. Synergistic effects in solvent-extraction systems based on alkylsalicylic acids. III. Extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from chloride media in the presence of dialkyl and diaryl sulphoxides

    Dialkyl and diaryl sulphoxides were found to cause synergistic shifts in the pH50 values for the extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from sodium chloride media by solutions of alkylsalicylic acids in xylene. The extent of the synergistic shift for a given sulphoxide increases with increasing steric bulk of the alkylsalicylic acid used. With the homologous series of dialkyl sulphoxides R2SO, where R = n-butyl, n-hexyl, and n-octyl, there is little variation in the size of the synergistic shift for a given alkylsalicylic acid. For a series of sulphoxides containing similar numbers of carbon atoms, the extent of the shift increases with the introduction of alicyclic rings, but decreases when aromatic rings are introduced, for example, in the order of R: cyclohexyl > n-hexyl > phenyl, although the effect is not very marked. For a given extractant mixture, the pH50 values decrease from lanthanum to samarium and then increase from samarium to lutetium. The separation between the pH50 values for lanthanum and lutetium increases with increasing steric bulk of both the alkylsalicylic acid (HA) and the sulphoxide (L), but the separations between adjacent lanthanides are in all cases too small to be of any practical use. Slope-analysis treatment of metal-distribution data, and measurements of the solubility of the neodymium-alkylsalicylic acid complex in xylene solutions of the sulphoxides are consistent with the extraction of a mixed-ligand complex of the type NdA3L2. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context

  3. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    Lorger, Mihaela [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, St. James’s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-22

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context.

  4. Synergistic extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid with 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (HBMPPT) and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in toluene

    The extractant HBMPPT (4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione) was synthesized from HBMPP. Its m.p. was 106-108 deg C. The synergistic extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid solution by HBMPPT and TOPO in toluene was studied. The extraction ability of HBMPPT was not so high as that of its parent (HBMPP), but when a little tri-n-octylphophine oxide (TOPO) was added the ability to extract U(VI) and Th(IV) was seriously improved. The synergistic extracted complexes may be presented as UO2NO3 x BMPPT x TOPO and UO2(BMPPT)2 x TOPO for U(VI), and Th(NO3)3 x BMPPT x TOPO and Th(NO3)2(BMPPT)2 x TOPO for Th(IV) respectively. (author)

  5. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment.

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-03-15

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  6. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C.; Tyagi, Amit K.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  7. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  8. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    Kotohiko Kimura

    Full Text Available The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments.

  9. Synergistic extraction of U(VI) with mixtures of 2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid-mono-2-ethyl hexyl ester (PC-88A) and TBP, TOPO or Cyanex 923

    The extraction of uranium (VI) from hydrochloric acid medium with PC-88A (H2A2 in dimeric form) and neutral organo phosphorous donors like TBP, TOPO and Cyanex 923 (S) in dodecane is reported. Experiments were performed with PC-88A, TOPO and Cyanex 923 alone and with the mixtures of PC-88A with TBP, TOPO or Cyanex 923. The presence of neutral donors in PC-88A solutions gave synergistic enhancement in the extraction of uranium (VI), the order being Cyanex 923 > TOPO > TBP. The species extracted with PC-88A alone is UO2(HA2)2, whereas with TOPO or Cyanex 923 alone, it is UO2Cl2.2S and with the synergistic mixtures it is UO2(HA2)2.S. The power dependencies of S and PC-88A under experimental conditions have also been evaluated using non-linear regression analysis. The equilibrium constants of synergistic extraction have been calculated and the mechanism of the extraction is discussed. The effect of different organic diluents on uranium (VI) extraction with PC-88A has also been examined. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of synergistic extraction system: Pt.2

    In the synergistic extraction of uranium nitrate with binary system of di-(1-methyl heptyl) methyl phosphate (DMHMP) and 2-ethyl hexyl 2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid (HEHEHP), there are three kinds of equilibria. The equilibrium constants of DMHMP, HEHEHP and binary synergistic extraction are determined to be lgβ10 = 3.64 (DMHMP), lgβ20 = 3.62 (HEHEHP), lgβ12 = 4.95 (DMHMP-HEHEHP). By determining the effect of temperature on the distribution ratio, ΔH, ΔZ, and ΔS of synergistic extraction are evaluated to be -2.5 X 104 J·mol-1, -2.75 x 104 J·mol-1 and 8.61 J·mol-1·K-1. The extraction mechanism of uranium nitrate are discussed. A possible structure of the synergistic extracting complex is proposed based on a cone-angle model

  11. Silica ecosystem for synergistic biotransformation

    Mutlu, Baris R.; Sakkos, Jonathan K.; Yeom, Sujin; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2016-06-01

    Synergistical bacterial species can perform more varied and complex transformations of chemical substances than either species alone, but this is rarely used commercially because of technical difficulties in maintaining mixed cultures. Typical problems with mixed cultures on scale are unrestrained growth of one bacterium, which leads to suboptimal population ratios, and lack of control over bacterial spatial distribution, which leads to inefficient substrate transport. To address these issues, we designed and produced a synthetic ecosystem by co-encapsulation in a silica gel matrix, which enabled precise control of the microbial populations and their microenvironment. As a case study, two greatly different microorganisms: Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 were encapsulated. NCIB 9816 can aerobically biotransform over 100 aromatic hydrocarbons, a feat useful for synthesis of higher value commodity chemicals or environmental remediation. In our system, NCIB 9816 was used for biotransformation of naphthalene (a model substrate) into CO2 and the cyanobacterium PCC 7942 was used to provide the necessary oxygen for the biotransformation reactions via photosynthesis. A mathematical model was constructed to determine the critical cell density parameter to maximize oxygen production, and was then used to maximize the biotransformation rate of the system.

  12. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy;

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...... methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen and...

  13. Defined three-dimensional microenvironments boost induction of pluripotency

    Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Okawa, Yuya; Ranga, Adrian; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Tabata, Yoji; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), numerous approaches have been explored to improve the original protocol, which is based on a two-dimensional (2D) cell-culture system. Surprisingly, nothing is known about the effect of a more biologically faithful 3D environment on somatic-cell reprogramming. Here, we report a systematic analysis of how reprogramming of somatic cells occurs within engineered 3D extracellular matrices. By modulating microenvironmental stiffness, degradability and biochemical composition, we have identified a previously unknown role for biophysical effectors in the promotion of iPSC generation. We find that the physical cell confinement imposed by the 3D microenvironment boosts reprogramming through an accelerated mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and increased epigenetic remodelling. We conclude that 3D microenvironmental signals act synergistically with reprogramming transcription factors to increase somatic plasticity.

  14. Human response to an individually controlled microenvironment

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Knudsen, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The response of 48 subjects to an individually controlled microenvironment was studied at room air temperatures of 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 26 degrees C An individually controlled system (ICS) comprising personalized ventilation, an under-desk air terminal device supplying cool air, a chair...... occupants who are comfortable with their microenvironment....

  15. Integrating tumor microenvironment with cancer molecular classifications

    Becht, Etienne; De Reyniès, Aurélien; Fridman, Wolf H.

    2015-01-01

    Editorial summary The composition of the tumor microenvironment is associated with a patient's prognosis and can be therapeutically targeted. A link between the cellular composition and genomic features of the tumor and its response to immunotherapy is beginning to emerge. Analyzing the microenvironment of tumor molecular subgroups can be a useful approach to tailor immunotherapies.

  16. Some Phthalocyanine and Naphthalocyanine Derivatives as Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminium in Acidic Medium: Experimental, Quantum Chemical Calculations, QSAR Studies and Synergistic Effect of Iodide Ions

    Masego Dibetsoe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of seven macrocyclic compounds comprising four phthalocyanines (Pcs namely 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc1, 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc2, 2,9,16,23-tetra-tert-butyl-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc3 and 29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc4, and three naphthalocyanines namely 5,9,14,18,23,27,32,36-octabutoxy-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc1, 2,11,20,29-tetra-tert-butyl-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc2 and 2,3-naphthalocyanine (nP3 were investigated on the corrosion of aluminium (Al in 1 M HCl using a gravimetric method, potentiodynamic polarization technique, quantum chemical calculations and quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR. Synergistic effects of KI on the corrosion inhibition properties of the compounds were also investigated. All the studied compounds showed appreciable inhibition efficiencies, which decrease with increasing temperature from 30 °C to 70 °C. At each concentration of the inhibitor, addition of 0.1% KI increased the inhibition efficiency compared to the absence of KI indicating the occurrence of synergistic interactions between the studied molecules and I− ions. From the potentiodynamic polarization studies, the studied Pcs and nPcs are mixed type corrosion inhibitors both without and with addition of KI. The adsorption of the studied molecules on Al surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, while the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters revealed that the adsorption of the studied compounds on Al surface is spontaneous and involves competitive physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. The experimental results revealed the aggregated interactions between the inhibitor molecules and the results further indicated that the peripheral groups on the compounds affect these interactions. The calculated quantum chemical parameters and the QSAR results revealed the possibility of strong interactions between the studied inhibitors and metal surface. QSAR

  17. Some Phthalocyanine and Naphthalocyanine Derivatives as Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminium in Acidic Medium: Experimental, Quantum Chemical Calculations, QSAR Studies and Synergistic Effect of Iodide Ions.

    Dibetsoe, Masego; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Fayemi, Omolola E; Yesudass, Sasikumar; Ramaganthan, Baskar; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-01-01

    The effects of seven macrocyclic compounds comprising four phthalocyanines (Pcs) namely 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc1), 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc2), 2,9,16,23-tetra-tert-butyl-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc3) and 29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc4), and three naphthalocyanines namely 5,9,14,18,23,27,32,36-octabutoxy-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc1), 2,11,20,29-tetra-tert-butyl-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc2) and 2,3-naphthalocyanine (nP3) were investigated on the corrosion of aluminium (Al) in 1 M HCl using a gravimetric method, potentiodynamic polarization technique, quantum chemical calculations and quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR). Synergistic effects of KI on the corrosion inhibition properties of the compounds were also investigated. All the studied compounds showed appreciable inhibition efficiencies, which decrease with increasing temperature from 30 °C to 70 °C. At each concentration of the inhibitor, addition of 0.1% KI increased the inhibition efficiency compared to the absence of KI indicating the occurrence of synergistic interactions between the studied molecules and I(-) ions. From the potentiodynamic polarization studies, the studied Pcs and nPcs are mixed type corrosion inhibitors both without and with addition of KI. The adsorption of the studied molecules on Al surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, while the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters revealed that the adsorption of the studied compounds on Al surface is spontaneous and involves competitive physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. The experimental results revealed the aggregated interactions between the inhibitor molecules and the results further indicated that the peripheral groups on the compounds affect these interactions. The calculated quantum chemical parameters and the QSAR results revealed the possibility of strong interactions between the studied inhibitors and metal surface. QSAR analysis on the

  18. Screeninq on Synergist of Bacillus thuringiensis Wettable Powder

    Donghua GE; Xiaohong ZHANG; Ziyan NANGONG; Ping SONG; Qinying WANG; Keqiang CAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to screen the best synergistic material for Bt wettable powder and evaluate their synergistic effect. [Method] The synergism of six different kinds of additives for Bacillus thuringiensis wettable powder (Bt WP) on the 2^nd instar larvae of Plutella xylostella was tested by method of leaf dipping in labora- tory. [Result] The mixtures of Bt with 0.1% ZnCl2, 0.5% ZnCl2, 1.0% ZnCl2, 1.0% MgCI2, 0.5% boric acid, 1.0% boric acid, 0.5% citric acid or 1.0% citric acid all ex- hibited synergistic effect, in which the synergistic effect of mixture containing 0.5% boric acid was the highest, with 17.2 synergistic ratio; followed by the mixture containing 1.0% ZnCl2, with 15.6 synergistic ratio. Moreover, addition of 0.5% boric acid could shorten the median lethal time of Bt wettable powder by about 10 h. After the mixtures of Bt with 0.5% boracic acid or 1.0% ZnCl2 was stored for 15 d at room temperature, toxicities of the two mixtures did not change significantly. [Conclusion] Boracic acid as the synergist of Bt wettable powder could not only increase insecti- cidal effect of Bt, but also accelerate its insecticidal rate. So, boracic acid could improve the disadvantages of Bt wettable powder such as poor insecticidal effect and slow insecticidal speed in a certain degree.

  19. Curcumin and Ellagic acid synergistically induce ROS generation, DNA damage, p53 accumulation and apoptosis in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    Kumar, Devbrat; Basu, Soumya; Parija, Lucy; Rout, Deeptimayee; Manna, Sanjeet; Dandapat, Jagneshwar; Debata, Priya Ranjan

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the cervix continue to be a global health issue, and the medication for the treatment for chronic HPV infection so far has not been effective. Potential anticancer and anti HPV activities of two known phytochemicals, Curcumin and Ellagic acid were evaluated in HeLa cervical cancer cells. Curcumin is a natural compound found in the root of Curcuma longa plant and Ellagic acid a polyphenol found in fruits of strawberries, raspberries and walnuts. The combination of Curcumin and Ellagic acid at various concentrations showed better anticancer properties than either of the drug when used alone as evidenced by MTT assay. Besides this, Curcumin and Ellagic acid also restore p53, induce ROS formation and DNA damage. Mechanistic study further indicated that Curcumin and Ellagic acid show anti-HPV activity as evidenced by decrease in the HPV E6 oncoprotein on HeLa cells. PMID:27261574

  20. Synergistic Effects of Lactic Acid and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate to Decontaminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Cattle Hide Sections

    Elramady, Mohamed G.; Aly, Sharif S.; Rossitto, Paul V.; Crook, Jennifer A.; Cullor, James S.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antibacterial properties of chitosan acetate (CA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), lactic acid (LA) and their synergism when combined against a nontoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Treatments that significantly reduced the concentration of E. coli O157:H7 in vitro by more than two logs were further investigated using a cattle hide decontamination model. In vitro treatments included CA (1% chitosan in 1% acetic acid vol/vol), SDS (1%...

  1. Microenvironment Determinants of Brain Metastasis

    Zhang Chenyu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metastasis accounts for 90% of cancer-related mortality. Brain metastases generally present during the late stages in the natural history of cancer progression. Recent advances in cancer treatment and management have resulted in better control of systemic disease metastatic to organs other than the brain and improved patient survival. However, patients who experience recurrent disease manifest an increasing number of brain metastases, which are usually refractory to therapies. To meet the new challenges of controlling brain metastasis, the research community has been tackling the problem with novel experimental models and research tools, which have led to an improved understanding of brain metastasis. The time-tested "seed-and-soil" hypothesis of metastasis indicates that successful outgrowth of deadly metastatic tumors depends on permissible interactions between the metastatic cancer cells and the site-specific microenvironment in the host organs. Consistently, recent studies indicate that the brain, the major component of the central nervous system, has unique physiological features that can determine the outcome of metastatic tumor growth. The current review summarizes recent discoveries on these tumor-brain interactions, and the potential clinical implications these novel findings could have for the better treatment of patients with brain metastasis.

  2. Synergistic effect of Aspergillus tubingensis CTM 507 glucose oxidase in presence of ascorbic acid and alpha amylase on dough properties, baking quality and shelf life of bread.

    Kriaa, Mouna; Ouhibi, Rabeb; Graba, Héla; Besbes, Souhail; Jardak, Mohamed; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2016-02-01

    The impact of Aspergillus tubingensis glucose oxidase (GOD) in combination with α-amylase and ascorbic acid on dough properties, qualities and shelf life of bread was investigated. Regression models of alveograph and texture parameters of dough and bread were adjusted. Indeed, the mixture of GOD (44 %) and ascorbic acid (56 %) on flour containing basal improver showed its potential as a corrective action to get better functional and rheological properties of dough and bread texture. Furthermore, wheat flour containing basal additives and enriched with GOD (63.8 %), ascorbic acid (32 %) and α- amylase (4.2 %) led to high technological bread making parameters, to decrease the crumb firmness and chewiness and to improve elasticity, adhesion, cohesion and specific volume of bread. In addition to that, the optimized formulation addition significantly reduced water activity and therefore decreased bread susceptibility to microbial spoilage. These findings demonstrated that GOD could partially substitute not only ascorbic acid but also α-amylase. The generated models allowed to predict the behavior of wheat flour containing additives in the range of values tested and to define the additives formula that led to desired rheological and baking qualities of dough. This fact provides new perspectives to compensate flour quality deficiencies at the moment of selecting raw materials and technological parameters reducing the production costs and facilitating gluten free products development. Graphical abstractᅟ. PMID:27162406

  3. The relation between the omega-3 index and arachidonic acid is bell shaped : Synergistic at low EPA plus DHA status and antagonistic at high EPA plus DHA status

    Luxwolda, Martine F.; Kuipers, Remko S.; Smit, Ella N.; Velzing-Aarts, Francien V.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The relation between docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic (EPA) vs. arachidonic acid (AA) seems characterized by both synergism and antagonism. Materials and methods: Investigate the relation between EPA + DHA and AA in populations with a wide range of EPA + DHA status and across

  4. Chromium picolinate and conjugated linoleic acid do not synergistically influence diet- and exercise-induced changes in body composition and health indexes in overweight women

    Objective: This study assessed the effects of combined chromium picolinate (CP) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation on energy-restriction and exercise-induced changes in body composition, glucose metabolism, lipid-lipoprotein profile, and blood pressure in overweight, pre-menopausal w...

  5. Selective deposition of dietary α-lipoic acid in mitochondrial fraction and its synergistic effect with α-tocoperhol acetate on broiler meat oxidative stability.

    Parveen, Rashida; Asghar, Ali; Anjum, Faqir M; Khan, Muhammad I; Arshad, Muhammad Sajid; Yasmeen, Ammara

    2013-01-01

    The use of bioactive antioxidants in feed of broiler to mitigate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems is one of promising nutritional strategies. The aim of present study was to alleviate ROS production in mitochondrial fraction (MF) of meat by supplemented dietary antioxidant in feed of broiler. For this purpose, mitochondria specific antioxidant: α-lipoic acid (25 mg, 75 mg and 150 mg) with or without combination of α-tocopherol acetate (200 mg) used in normal and palm olein oxidized oil (4%) supplemented feed. One hundred and eighty one day old broiler birds were randomly divided into six treatments and provided the mentioned feed from third week. Feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR) remained statistically same in all groups while body weight decreased in supplemented groups accordingly at the end of study. The broiler meat MF antioxidant potential was significantly improved by feeding supplemented feed estimated as 1,1-di phenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity, 2,2-azinobis-(3- ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS+) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The maximum antioxidant activity was depicted in group fed on 150 mg/kg α-lipoic acid (ALA) and 200 mg/kg α-tocopherol acetate (ATA) (T4) in both breast and leg MF. Moreover, TBARS were higher in leg as compared to breast MF. Although, oxidized oil containing feed reduced the growth, lipid stability and antioxidant potential of MF whilst these traits were improved by receiving feed containing ALA and ATA. ALA and ATA showed higher deposition in T4 group while least in group received oxidized oil containing feed (T5). Positive correlation exists between DPPH free radical scavenging activity and the ABTS + reducing activity. In conclusion, ALA and ATA supplementation in feed had positive effect on antioxidant status of MF that consequently diminished the oxidative stress in polyunsaturated fatty acid enriched meat. PMID:23617815

  6. The Vascular Microenvironment and Systemic Sclerosis

    Tracy Frech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the vascular microenvironment in the pathogenesis Systemic Sclerosis (SSc is appreciated clinically as Raynaud's syndrome with capillary nail bed change. This manifestation of vasculopathy is used diagnostically in both limited and diffuse cutaneous subsets of SSc, and is thought to precede fibrosis. The degree of subsequent fibrosis may also be determined by the vascular microenvironment. This paper describes why the vascular microenvironment might determine the degree of end-organ damage that occurs in SSc, with a focus on vascular cell senescence, endothelial progenitor cells (EPC including multipotential mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, pericytes, and angiogenic monocytes. An explanation of the role of EPC, pericytes, and angiogenic monocytes is important to an understanding of SSc pathogenesis. An evolving understanding of the vascular microenvironment in SSc may allow directed treatment.

  7. Molecular targeting of liposomal nanoparticles to tumor microenvironment

    Zhao G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gang Zhao,1,2 B Leticia Rodriguez21Institute of Materia Medica, Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Shandong, China; 2Pharmaceutics Division, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: Liposomes are biodegradable and can be used to deliver drugs at a much higher concentration in tumor tissues than in normal tissues. Both passive and active drug delivery by liposomal nanoparticles can significantly reduce the toxic side effects of anticancer drugs and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of the drugs delivered. Active liposomal targeting to tumors is achieved by recognizing specific tumor receptors through tumor-specific ligands or antibodies coupled onto the surface of the liposomes, or by stimulus-sensitive drug carriers such as acid-triggered release or enzyme-triggered drug release. Tumors are often composed of tumor cells and nontumor cells, which include endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblasts, stromal, mesenchymal cells, innate, and adaptive immune cells. These nontumor cells thus form the tumor microenvironment, which could be targeted and modified so that it is unfavorable for tumor cells to grow. In this review, we briefly summarized articles that had taken advantage of liposomal nanoparticles as a carrier to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor microenvironment, and how they overcame obstacles such as nonspecific uptake, interaction with components in blood, and toxicity. Special attention is devoted to the liposomal targeting of anticancer drugs to the endothelium of tumor neovasculature, tumor associated macrophages, fibroblasts, and pericytes within the tumor microenvironment.Keywords: tumor microenvironment, endothelium, neovasculature, tumor-associated macrophages, cationic liposomes, ligand- or antibody-mediated targeting

  8. Quantifying synergistic mutual information

    Griffith, Virgil

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying cooperation among random variables in predicting a single target random variable is an important problem in many biological systems with 10s to 1000s of co-dependent variables. We review the prior literature of information theoretical measures of synergy and introduce a novel synergy measure, entitled *synergistic mutual information* and compare it against the three existing measures of cooperation. We apply all four measures against a suite of binary circuits to demonstrate our measure alone quantifies the intuitive concept of synergy across all examples.

  9. Targeting cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment: opportunities and challenges in combinatorial nanomedicine.

    Linton, Samuel S; Sherwood, Samantha G; Drews, Kelly C; Kester, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapies of the future will rely on synergy between drugs delivered in combination to achieve both maximum efficacy and decreased toxicity. Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles composed of highly tunable nanomaterials ('nanocarriers') represent the most promising approach to achieve simultaneous, cell-selective delivery of synergistic ratios of combinations of drugs within solid tumors. Nanocarriers are currently being used to co-encapsulate and deliver synergistic ratios of multiple anticancer drugs to target cells within solid tumors. Investigators exploit the unique environment associated with solid tumors, termed the tumor microenvironment (TME), to make 'smart' nanocarriers. These sophisticated nanocarriers exploit the pathological conditions in the TME, thereby creating highly targeted nanocarriers that release their drug payload in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. The translational and commercial potential of nanocarrier-based combinatorial nanomedicines in cancer therapy is now a reality as several companies have initiated human clinical trials. PMID:26153136

  10. The gadd and MyD genes define a novel set of mammalian genes encoding acidic proteins that synergistically suppress cell growth.

    Zhan, Q.; Lord, K A; Alamo, I; Hollander, M C; Carrier, F.; Ron, D; KOHN, K. W.; Hoffman, B; Liebermann, D A; Fornace, A J

    1994-01-01

    A remarkable overlap was observed between the gadd genes, a group of often coordinately expressed genes that are induced by genotoxic stress and certain other growth arrest signals, and the MyD genes, a set of myeloid differentiation primary response genes. The MyD116 gene was found to be the murine homolog of the hamster gadd34 gene, whereas MyD118 and gadd45 were found to represent two separate but closely related genes. Furthermore, gadd34/MyD116, gadd45, MyD118, and gadd153 encode acidic ...

  11. Selective deposition of dietary α-Lipoic acid in mitochondrial fraction and its synergistic effect with α-Tocoperhol acetate on broiler meat oxidative stability

    Parveen, Rashida; Asghar, Ali; Anjum, Faqir M.; Khan, Muhammad I; Arshad, Muhammad Sajid; Yasmeen, Ammara

    2013-01-01

    The use of bioactive antioxidants in feed of broiler to mitigate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems is one of promising nutritional strategies. The aim of present study was to alleviate ROS production in mitochondrial fraction (MF) of meat by supplemented dietary antioxidant in feed of broiler. For this purpose, mitochondria specific antioxidant: α-lipoic acid (25 mg, 75 mg and 150 mg) with or without combination of α-tocopherol acetate (200 mg) used in normal and palm olein ...

  12. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 Synergistically Activate Transcription of Fatty-acid Synthase Gene (FASN)*S⃞

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F.; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of...

  13. Pomegranate Juice Metabolites, Ellagic Acid and Urolithin A, Synergistically Inhibit Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle Control and Apoptosis

    Roberto Vicinanza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellagitannins (ETs from pomegranate juice (PJ are bioactive polyphenols with chemopreventive potential against prostate cancer (PCa. ETs are not absorbed intact but are partially hydrolyzed in the gut to ellagic acid (EA. Colonic microflora can convert EA to urolithin A (UA, and EA and UA enter the circulation after PJ consumption. Here, we studied the effects of EA and UA on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in DU-145 and PC-3 androgen-independent PCa cells and whether combinations of EA and UA affected cell proliferation. EA demonstrated greater dose-dependent antiproliferative effects in both cell lines compared to UA. EA induced cell cycle arrest in S phase associated with decreased cyclin B1 and cyclin D1 levels. UA induced a G2/M arrest and increased cyclin B1 and cdc2 phosphorylation at tyrosine-15, suggesting inactivation of the cyclin B1/cdc2 kinase complex. EA induced apoptosis in both cell lines, while UA had a less pronounced proapoptotic effect only in DU-145. Cotreatment with low concentrations of EA and UA dramatically decreased cell proliferation, exhibiting synergism in PC-3 cells evaluated by isobolographic analysis and combination index. These data provide information on pomegranate metabolites for the prevention of PCa recurrence, supporting the role of gut flora-derived metabolites for cancer prevention.

  14. Spatial Heterogeneity in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Yuan, Yinyin

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in studies of tumor heterogeneity have provoked new thoughts on cancer management. There is a desperate need to understand influence of the tumor microenvironment on cancer development and evolution. Applying principles and quantitative methods from ecology can suggest novel solutions to fulfil this need. We discuss spatial heterogeneity as a fundamental biological feature of the microenvironment, which has been largely ignored. Histological samples can provide spatial context of diverse cell types coexisting within the microenvironment. Advanced computer-vision techniques have been developed for spatial mapping of cells in histological samples. This has enabled the applications of experimental and analytical tools from ecology to cancer research, generating system-level knowledge of microenvironmental spatial heterogeneity. We focus on studies of immune infiltrate and tumor resource distribution, and highlight statistical approaches for addressing the emerging challenges based on these new approaches. PMID:27481837

  15. Study of the synergistic effects of all-transretinoic acid and C-phycocyanin on the growth and apoptosis of A549 cells.

    Li, Bing; Gao, Mei-Hua; Lv, Cong-Yi; Yang, Peng; Yin, Qi-Feng

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of the combination of all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and natural nontoxic C-phycocyanin (C-PC) on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the anticancer mechanism of the drug combination was revealed. Results showed both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of A549 cells in vivo. The combination of ATRA+C-PC could yield a higher inhibition rate. C-PC exerted a major effect on the proliferation of human embryo lung cells, but ATRA at a high concentration exerted an inhibitory effect. In addition, ATRA+C-PC could decrease the CDK4 mRNA level, but upregulated caspase-3 protein expression and induced cell apoptosis. A mouse model with tumor was constructed by a subcutaneous injection to the left axilla of nu nude (NU/NU) mice. Compared with the control group, the tumor weight was decreased in the single-drug treatment group and was the lowest in the combination group. C-PC+ATRA could upregulate tumor necrosis factor levels and downregulate Bcl-2 expression and the cyclin D1 gene in the tumor. C-PC could promote T cells' activities and spleen weight, but a single use of ATRA exerted an opposite effect. The dosage of ATRA could be reduced when combined with C-PC to reduce the toxic side-effects. In summary, the antitumor effects of the C-PC+ATRA combination were more significant than a single drug in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25812039

  16. Synergistic effect of steam and lactic acid against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes biofilms on polyvinyl chloride and stainless steel.

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Oh; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the individual and combined effects of steam and lactic acid (LA) on the inactivation of biofilms formed by Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and stainless steel. Six day old biofilms were developed on PVC and stainless steel coupons by using a mixture of three strains each of three foodborne pathogens at 25°C. After biofilm development, PVC and stainless steel coupons were treated with LA alone (immersed in 0.5% or 2% for 5s, 15s, and 30s), steam alone (on both sides for 5, 10, and 20s), and the combination of steam and LA. The numbers of biofilm cells of the three foodborne pathogens were significantly (ptreatments ranged from 0.11 to 2.12 log CFU/coupon. The combination treatment of steam and LA achieved an additional 0.2 to 2.11 log reduction compared to the sum of individual treatments. After a combined treatment of immersion in 2% LA for 15s or 30s followed by exposure to steam for 20s, biofilm cells of the three pathogens were reduced to below the detection limit (1.48 log). From the results of this study, bacterial populations of biofilms on PVC coupons did not receive the same thermal effect as on stainless steel coupons. Effectiveness of steam and LA may be attributed to the difference between Gram-negative and Gram-positive characteristics of the bacteria studied. The results of this study suggest that the combination of steam and LA has potential as a biofilm control intervention for food processing facilities. PMID:22647677

  17. Synergistic effect of ellagic acid and certain trace element on some biochemical disorders induced by gamma-irradiation in male albino rats

    Ionizing radiation has been found to produce deleterious effects on the biological system. The cellular damage induced by ionizing radiation is predominantly mediated through generation of ROS which when present in excess can react with certain components of the cell and cause serious system damage to various organs, tissues, cellular and subcellular structures (Ward, 1988; Nelson, 2003). Under normal conditions, there is a balance between the generation of ROS and the cellular antioxidant system. Antioxidant enzymes are part of this system responsible for removal and detoxification of free radicals and their products formed by ionizing radiation (Kilciksiz et al., 2008). Most of these enzymes are affected by trace elements which act as essential activators or cofactors for them to exert their action. So, any disturbances in trace elements level post-irradiation will in turn affect the level of these enzymes (Sorenson, 2002). Essential trace elements of the human body include zinc, copper, selenium, chromium, cobalt, iodine, manganese and molybdenum although these elements account for only 0.02 % of the total body weight they play significant roles, e.g. as active centers of enzymes or as trace bioactive substances (Kodama, 1996). They involved in many biochemical processes supporting life; the most important of these processes are cellular respiration, cellular utilization of oxygen, DNA and RNA reproduction, maintenance of cell membrane integrity, and sequestration of free radicals so they act as antioxidant (Chan et al., 1998). Polyphenols are a broad family of natural compounds widely found in plant foods, they are nutritionally important for their antioxidant activities and protective functions against disease risk caused by oxidative stress. Recent studies have shown that some phenolic compounds have antiinflammatory, anticancer, anti carcinogenic or antimutagenic activities (Maciel et al., 2011). Ellagic acid is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound

  18. Influence of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate

    Raijada, Dhara K; Singh, Saranjit; Bansal, Arvind K;

    2010-01-01

    The effect of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature was evaluated on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate, when present alone or in combinations. Oxalic acid and sodium carbonate were used as solid stressors to create acidic and alkaline pH, respectiv......The effect of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature was evaluated on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate, when present alone or in combinations. Oxalic acid and sodium carbonate were used as solid stressors to create acidic and alkaline p...... more degradation than the individual forms above critical relative humidity (85% RH). Similar higher degradation was observed between 75% RH and 85% RH in case of acid-stressed samples. In alkaline microenvironment, all the samples showed identical decomposition attributed to conversion of bisulfate...

  19. Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles for targeting the tumor microenvironment.

    Du, Jinzhi; Lane, Lucas A; Nie, Shuming

    2015-12-10

    One of the most challenging and clinically important goals in nanomedicine is to deliver imaging and therapeutic agents to solid tumors. Here we discuss the recent design and development of stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles for targeting the common attributes of solid tumors such as their acidic and hypoxic microenvironments. This class of stimuli-responsive nanoparticles is inactive during blood circulation and under normal physiological conditions, but is activated by acidic pH, enzymatic up-regulation, or hypoxia once they extravasate into the tumor microenvironment. The nanoparticles are often designed to first "navigate" the body's vascular system, "dock" at the tumor sites, and then "activate" for action inside the tumor interstitial space. They combine the favorable biodistribution and pharmacokinetic properties of nanodelivery vehicles and the rapid diffusion and penetration properties of smaller drug cargos. By targeting the broad tumor habitats rather than tumor-specific receptors, this strategy has the potential to overcome the tumor heterogeneity problem and could be used to design diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles for a broad range of solid tumors. PMID:26341694

  20. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N;

    1998-01-01

    cells (from about 45% to 25%), evidently as a result of the severely changed microenvironment. In this study we have demonstrated in vivo the development of an acidic and hypoxic bone marrow hampering normal haemopoiesis during leukaemic growth. Our data support the notion of BNML as a valuable tool for...

  1. Synergistic Chondroprotective Effect of α-Tocopherol, Ascorbic Acid, and Selenium as well as Glucosamine and Chondroitin on Oxidant Induced Cell Death and Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase-3—Studies in Cultured Chondrocytes

    Anne-Christi Graeser

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impaired antioxidant defence accompanied by chronic inflammatory processes may impair joint health. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α stimulate the expression of metalloproteinases which degrade the extracellular matrix. Little is known regarding the potential synergistic effects of natural compounds such as α-tocopherol (α-toc, ascorbic acid (AA and selenium (Se on oxidant induced cell death. Furthermore studies regarding the metalloproteinase-3 inhibitory activity of glucosamine sulfate (GS and chondroitin sulfate (CS are scarce. Therefore we have studied the effect of α-toc (0.1–2.5 µmol/L, AA (10–50 µmol/L and Se (1–50 nmol/L on t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP, 100–500 µmol/L-induced cell death in SW1353 chondrocytes. Furthermore we have determined the effect of GS and CS alone (100–500 µmol/L each and in combination on MMP3 mRNA levels and MMP3 secretion in IL-1β stimulated chondrocytes. A combination of α-toc, AA, and Se was more potent in counteracting t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity as compared to the single compounds. Similarly a combination of CS and GS was more effective in inhibiting MMP3 gene expression and secretion than the single components. The inhibition of MMP3 secretion due to GS plus CS was accompanied by a decrease in TNF-α production. Combining natural compounds such as α-toc, AA, and Se as well as GS and CS seems to be a promising strategy to combat oxidative stress and cytokine induced matrix degradation in chondrocytes.

  2. NK cells in the tumor microenvironment

    Larsen, Stine K; Gao, Yanhua; Basse, Per H

    2014-01-01

    The presence of natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the role of intratumoral NK cells is unclear. Preclinical studies have shown that, while NK cells efficiently kill circulating tumor cells of almost any origin, they...

  3. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    Lehnert Hendrik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT, migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue, metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS.

  4. Characterizing the Microenvironment Surrounding Phosphorylated Protein Sites

    Shi-Cai Fan; Xue-Gong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in various cellular processes. Due to its high complexity, the mechanism needs to be further studied. In the last few years, many methods have been contributed to this field, but almost all of them investigated the mechanism based on protein sequences around protein sites. In this study, we implement an exploration by characterizing the microenvironment surrounding phosphorylated protein sites with a modified shell model, and obtain some significant properties by the rank-sum test, such as the lack of some classes of residues, atoms, and secondary structures. Furthermore, we find that the depletion of some properties affects protein phosphorylation remarkably. Our results suggest that it is a meaningful direction to explore the mechanism of protein phosphorylation from microenvironment and we expect further findings along with the increasing size of phosphorylation and protein structure data.

  5. Analyzing the Tumor Microenvironment by Flow Cytometry.

    Young, Yoon Kow; Bolt, Alicia M; Ahn, Ryuhjin; Mann, Koren K

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is an essential tool for studying the tumor microenvironment. It allows us to quickly quantify and identify multiple cell types in a heterogeneous sample. A brief overview of flow cytometry instrumentation and the appropriate considerations and steps in building a good flow cytometry staining panel are discussed. In addition, a lymphoid tissue and solid tumor leukocyte infiltrate flow cytometry staining protocol and an example of flow cytometry data analysis are presented. PMID:27581017

  6. Temperature and humidity within the clothing microenvironment.

    Sullivan, P J; Mekjavić, I B

    1992-03-01

    The present study investigates clothing microenvironment conditions that may develop during prolonged exposure of workers to a hot environment. Five subjects were exposed to a linear increase in ambient temperature from 20-40 degrees C over a 90-min period, and then remained at 40 degrees C for an additional 90 min. During the exposures, subjects were clad in four types of helicopter personnel suits (Gore-Tex, Cotton Ventile, Nomex/Insulite, and Nomex/Neoprene), incorporating both dry-suit and wet-suit designs. Continuous assessment was made of skin temperature, rectal temperature, and of microenvironment temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure (T mu, RH mu, and VP mu) 8 mm from the surface of the skin. Results indicate that although microenvironment temperatures were similar among suits and slightly lower than that of the environment, the RH mu and VP mu were much greater than those of the ambient air. The Nomex/Insulite and Nomex/Neoprene suits showed the highest VP mu, of which only the Nomex/Insulite resulted in significantly greater increases in rectal temperature, likely due to complete covering of the body with the impermeable insulite component. The present study demonstrates the need to discern between the ambient conditions and the conditions encountered next to the skin when protective clothing is worn. PMID:1567319

  7. Effects of High Pressure Processing on Organic Acids and Vc in Blackberry Juice and Their Synergistic Antioxidant Capacities%超高压处理对黑莓汁有机酸、Vc及其协同抗氧化性的影响

    白洁; 马永昆; 张龙; 严蕊; 马善丽; 魏本喜

    2011-01-01

    The effects of high pressure processing (HPP) at 300 - 600 MPa for 15 min on organic acids and Vc in blackberry(Rubus Hull. ) juice were detected by using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatograp method and 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine colorimetry method respectively. Their synergistic antioxidant capacities were also evaluated. In blackberry juice, the dominant acid was L-malic acid, which constituted 87.98% of total acids. While α-ketoglutaric acid, acetic acid, citric acid, and butanedioic acid were detected in low amounts. After application of pressure, L-malic acid and butanedioic acid were significantly changed(P 〈 0.05). However, no significant changes in other organic acids(P 〉 0.05). L-malic acid in juice decreased by 12.2% after 300 MPa processing for 15 min, while increased by 8.53% , 6.08% and 22.35% respectively at 400 - 600 MPa processing for 15rain. Compared with the control juice, the contents of Vc were well retained and ranged from 90. 10% to 97.92% at 300 - 600 MPa. L-malic acid enhanced the scavenging activity of Vc on DPPH · with its concentration increasing, which indicated that L-malic acid synergistically enhanced the antioxidant capacity of Vc.%采用反相高效液相色谱法、2,4-二硝基苯肼法对300—600MPa处理15min的黑莓汁中有机酸、Vc进行检测分析,并采用DPPH·法对其协同抗氧化性进行评价。结果表明:黑莓汁有机酸主要是L-苹果酸,占总酸的87.98%,并含有少量的α-酮戊二酸、醋酸、柠檬酸和琥珀酸等;超高压处理对黑莓汁中琥珀酸和L-苹果酸的影响显著(P〈0.05),对其他酸作用不显著(P〉0.05)。经300MPa、15min处理,黑莓汁中L-苹果酸含量减少12.2%,400、500和600MPa处理15min后,其L-苹果酸含量分别

  8. Lactic Acid Bacteria Inducing a Weak Interleukin-12 and Tumor Necrosis Alpha Response in Human Dendritic Cells Inhibit Strongly Stimulating Lactic Acid Bacteria but Act Synergistically with Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The development and maintenance of immune homeostasis indispensably depend on signals from the gut flora. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are gram-positive (G+) organisms, are plausible significant players and have received much attention. Gram-negative (G-) commensals, such as members of the...... family Enterobacteriaceae, may, however, be immunomodulators that are as important as G+ organisms but tend to be overlooked. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial immune regulators, and therefore, the present study aimed at investigating differences among human gut flora-derived LAB and G- bacteria in their...... patterns of DC polarization. Human monocyte-derived DCs were exposed to UV-killed bacteria, and cytokine secretion and surface marker expression were analyzed. Profound differences in the DC polarization patterns were found among the strains. While strains of LAB varied greatly in their capacity to induce...

  9. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  10. The role of the microenvironment in tumor immune surveillance

    Oluwadara, Oluwadayo; Giacomelli, Luca; Brant, Xenia; Christensen, Russell; Avezova, Raisa; Kossan, George; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The evidence appears compelling that the microenvironment, and associated biological cellular and molecular factors, may contribute to the progression of a variety of tumors. The effects of the microenvironment may directly influence the plasticity of T cell lineages, which was recently discussed (O'Shea & Paul, 2010 [4]). To review the putative role of the microenvironment in modulating the commitment of tumor immune surveillance, we use the model of oral premalignant lesions.

  11. Microbial Mats on the Orkney Islands Revisited: Microenvironment and Microbial Community Composition

    Wieland, A.; Kühl, M.; McGowan, L.;

    2003-01-01

    The microenvironment and community composition of microbial mats developing on beaches in Scapa Flow (Orkney Islands) were investigated. Analysis of characteristic biomarkers (major fatty acids, hydrocarbons, alcohols, and alkenones) revealed the presence of different groups of bacteria and...... from CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) analysis. Spectral scalar irradiance measurements with fiber-optic microprobes indicated a pronounced heterogeneity concerning zonation and density of mainly anoxygenic phototrophs in Swanbister Bay mats. By microsensor and T-RFLP (terminal restriction...

  12. The influence of the microenvironment on the malignant phenotype

    Park, C. C.; Bissell, M. J.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. As tissue becomes cancerous, there are reciprocal interactions between neoplastic cells, adjacent normal cells such as stroma and endothelium, and their microenvironments. The current dominant paradigm wherein multiple genetic lesions provide both the impetus for, and the Achilles heel of, cancer might be inadequate to understand cancer as a disease process. In the following brief review, we will use selected examples to illustrate the influence of the microenvironment in the evolution of the malignant phenotype. We will also discuss recent studies that suggest novel therapeutic interventions might be derived from focusing on microenvironment and tumor cells interactions.

  13. Silica ecosystem for synergistic biotransformation

    Mutlu, Baris R.; Sakkos, Jonathan K.; Sujin Yeom; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Alptekin Aksan

    2016-01-01

    Synergistical bacterial species can perform more varied and complex transformations of chemical substances than either species alone, but this is rarely used commercially because of technical difficulties in maintaining mixed cultures. Typical problems with mixed cultures on scale are unrestrained growth of one bacterium, which leads to suboptimal population ratios, and lack of control over bacterial spatial distribution, which leads to inefficient substrate transport. To address these issues...

  14. Synergistic extraction of rare earth ions (III) by HPMBP and primary amine N1923

    The synergistic extraction of rare earth ions (III) (Ln3+ = La3+, Pr3+, Eu3+, Gd3+, Tb3+, Er3+, Yb3+, and Y3+) from hydrochloric acid solution by mixtures of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP) and primary amine N1928 (R1R2CHNH2, RNH2) have been investigated in xylene at 25 ± 1 deg C. The results show that Ln (III) in the form of Ln (PMBP)3 in HPMBP solution alone are extracted into organic phase under the experimental conditions. It is found that the synergistic coefficients vary with atomic number of rare earth elements and the 'double-peak effect' is demonstrated. The mechanism of the synergistic extraction with HPMBP-N1928 are determined by the methods of slope and constant mole. The synergistic species RNH3Ln (PMBP)4 is found to be extracted into the organic phase. The synergistic extraction reactions and addition reactions of the synergistic extracting complexes in organic phase are proposed. In addition, the equilibrium constants of the synergistic extraction reactions and addition reactions of praseodymium (III) are calculated to be logK12 = 1.95, logβ12 3.94 respetively. The IR and NMR spectra of the synergistic extracing complexes of praseodymium (III) are studied as well

  15. Synergistic effect in the solvent extraction of some trivalent lanthanides

    The behaviour of Yb and La in extraction systems was studied, using as extractant binary mixtures of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA), di-(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and tributylphophate (TBP), by means of the radioactive tracers 140La and 169Yb. Different concentrations of nitric acid and NaNO3 as salting out were used in aqueous phase. Distribution coefficients obtained for the two elements, using a mixture of HTTA-TBP, were found to be much higher than those obtained with each of the extractants, showing synergistic effect. A small synergistic effect was seen to exist for La, but an antagonistic effect was observed for Yb, when a mixture of HTTA plus HDEHP was used in both cases. An antagonistic effect was also found for Yb by using a mixture of HDEHP and TBP, whereas the extraction of La was found to be independent of the TBP concentration when this mixture was employed. (Author)

  16. Synergistic Activities of an Efflux Pump Inhibitor and Iron Chelators against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Liang; Molin, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PA beta N) was paired with iron chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl, acetohydroxamic acid, and EDTA to assess synergistic activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth and biofilm formation. All of the tested iron chelators synergistically...

  17. The roles of TGFβ in the tumour microenvironment

    Pickup, Michael; Novitskiy, Sergey; Harold L Moses

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the microenvironment on tumour progression is becoming clearer. In this Review we address the role of an essential signalling pathway, that of transforming growth factor-β, in the regulation of components of the tumour microenvironment and how this contributes to tumour progression.

  18. Tumor Microenvironment: A New Treatment Target for Cancer

    Ming-Ju Tsai; Wei-An Chang; Ming-Shyan Huang; Po-Lin Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer therapy encounter a bottleneck. Relapsing/recurrent disease almost always developed eventually with resistance to the initially effective drugs. Tumor microenvironment has been gradually recognized as a key contributor for cancer progression, epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the cancer cells, angiogenesis, cancer metastasis, and development of drug resistance, while dysregulated immune responses and interactions between various components in the microenvironment ...

  19. Deadly Teamwork: Neural Cancer Stem Cells and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Lathia, Justin D.; Heddleston, John M.; Venere, Monica; Jeremy N Rich

    2011-01-01

    Neural cancers display cellular hierarchies with self-renewing tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) at the apex. Instructive cues to maintain CSCs are generated by both intrinsic networks and the niche microenvironment. The CSC-microenvironment relationship is complex as CSCs can modify their environment and extrinsic forces induce plasticity in the cellular hierarchy.

  20. Extracellular vesicles in lung microenvironment and pathogenesis.

    Fujita, Yu; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in various lung diseases. EVs are released by a variety of cells, including respiratory cells and immune cells, and they encapsulate various molecules, such as proteins and microRNAs, as modulators of intercellular communication. Cancer cell-derived EVs play crucial roles in promoting tumor progression and modifying their microenvironment. By contrast, noncancerous cell-derived EVs demonstrate protective functions against injury, such as tissue recovery and repair, to maintain physiological homeostasis. Airway cells in contact with harmful substances may alter their EV composition and modify the balanced reciprocal interactions with surrounding mesenchymal cells. We summarize the novel findings of EV function in various lung diseases, primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. PMID:26231094

  1. Human response to an individually controlled microenvironment

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Knudsen, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    with convectively heated backrest, an under-desk radiant heating panel, and a floor-heating panel were used. The temperature of the air supplied from the personalized ventilation and the under-desk device was 20 degrees C The subjects were provided with control of the flow rate and direction of the......The response of 48 subjects to an individually controlled microenvironment was studied at room air temperatures of 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 26 degrees C An individually controlled system (ICS) comprising personalized ventilation, an under-desk air terminal device supplying cool air, a chair...... personalized air, the under-desk airflow rate, the temperature of the convection flow from the chair, and the surface temperature of the heating panels. The results reveal that the thermal and air quality acceptability was significantly higher with the ICS at all room temperatures compared to the reference...

  2. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  3. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and periphe...

  4. Perspectives on the immunologic microenvironment of astrocytomas

    Hewedi IH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Iman H Hewedi,1 Nehal A Radwan,1 Lobna S Shash,1 Tarek H Elserry2 1Departments of Pathology, 2Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Background: The microenvironment of astrocytomas includes infiltrative inflammatory cells that are dynamic in nature, possibly reflecting tumor biology. We evaluated the inflammatory cell infiltrate in astrocytic tumors aiming for a better understanding of their immunobiology. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of CD68, CD3, and CD20 was investigated in 21 glioblastomas, 21 anaplastic astrocytomas, 13 diffuse astrocytomas, and 18 pilocytic astrocytomas. The inflammatory infiltrate was classified based on microanatomic location as perivascular and intratumoral, and subsequently graded semiquantitatively. Results: Perivascularly, CD68-positive infiltrate was noted in 71.4% of glioblastomas compared with 14.3% of anaplastic astrocytomas (P = 0.0001, 7.7% of diffuse astrocytomas (P = 0.0001, and 33.3% of pilocytic astrocytomas (P = 0.017. Intratumorally, 85.7% of glioblastomas exhibited CD68-positive infiltrate compared with 42.9% of anaplastic astrocytomas (P = 0.004, 38.5% of diffuse astrocytomas (P = 0.008, and 33.3% of pilocytic astrocytomas (P = 0.001. Among diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas, intratumoral CD3-positive infiltrate was only associated with glioblastoma. A CD20-positive infiltrate was only detected in the perivascular space of a single case of diffuse astrocytoma. Conclusion: These data indicate a distinct immune profile in the glioblastoma microenvironment primarily related to the prevalence of macrophages. Thus, novel glioblastoma therapies should address this key CD68-positive population and its possible role in generating an antitumor immune response. Keywords: inflammatory cell infiltrate, astrocytoma, glioblastoma, CD68, CD3

  5. Role of the tumor microenvironment in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Sun, Xian-Jun; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Mao, Ai-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with proclivity for early metastasis, which accounts for its poor prognosis. The clinical problem of pancreatic cancer is its resistance to conventional therapies, such as chemotherapy or radiation. Based upon these challenges, the focus of research on pancreatic cancer has shifted gradually towards the tumor microenvironment. The cancer microenvironment consists of various components, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, immune cells, and endocrine cells, that interact with each other, and with the cancer cells in a complex fashion. Evidence is accumulating that the cancer microenvironment plays an active role in disease progression, and efforts are being made to target this interplay between cancer cells and host cells, to improve the prognosis of the disease. In the present review, we describe the cellular microenvironment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), the major type of pancreatic cancer. Our hope is that a better understanding of the cellular microenvironment of PDA will eventually lead to better treatments for this disease. PMID:26709759

  6. Regulation of prostate cancer progression by the tumor microenvironment.

    Shiao, Stephen L; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Chung, Leland W K

    2016-09-28

    Prostate cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in North America, and despite recent advances in treatment patients with metastatic disease continue to have poor five-year survival rates. Recent studies in prostate cancer have revealed the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in the initiation and progression to advanced disease. Experimental data have uncovered a reciprocal relationship between the cells in the microenvironment and malignant tumor cells in which early changes in normal tissue microenvironment can promote tumorigenesis and in turn tumor cells can promote further pro-tumor changes in the microenvironment. In the tumor microenvironment, the presence of persistent immune infiltrates contributes to the recruitment and reprogramming of other non-immune stromal cells including cancer-associated fibroblasts and a unique recently identified population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs). These MICs, which can also be found as part of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) population in PC patients, promote cancer cell transformation, enhance metastatic potential and confer therapeutic resistance. MICs act can on other cells within the tumor microenvironment in part by secreting exosomes that reprogram adjacent stromal cells to create a more favorable tumor microenvironment to support continued cancer growth and progression. We review here the current data on the intricate relationship between inflammation, reactive stroma, tumor cells and disease progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26828013

  7. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    The tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, drives the formation and progression of melanoma tumors. Using quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal images of melanoma tumors in three spatial dimensions, we examine the physical properties of the melanoma tumor microenvironment, including the numbers of different cells types, cell size, and morphology. We also compute the nearest neighbor statistics and measure intermediate range spatial correlations between different cell types. We also calculate the step size distribution, mean-square displacement, and non-Gaussian parameter from the spatial trajectories of different cell types in the tumor microenvironment.

  8. Tumor microenvironment and cancer therapy resistance.

    Sun, Yu

    2016-09-28

    Innate resistance to various therapeutic interventions is a hallmark of cancer. In recent years, however, acquired resistance has emerged as a daunting challenge to anticancer treatments including chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapy, which abolishes the efficacy of otherwise successful regimens. Cancer cells gain resistance through a variety of mechanisms in both primary and metastatic sites, involving cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors, but the latter often remains overlooked. Mounting evidence suggests critical roles played by the tumor microenvironment (TME) in multiple aspects of cancer progression particularly therapeutic resistance. The TME decreases drug penetration, confers proliferative and antiapoptotic advantages to surviving cells, facilitates resistance without causing genetic mutations and epigenetic changes, collectively modifying disease modality and distorting clinical indices. Recent studies have set the baseline for future investigation on the intricate relationship between cancer resistance and the TME in pathological backgrounds. This review provides an updated outline of research advances in TME biology and highlights the prospect of targeting the TME as an essential strategy to overcome cancer resistance and improve therapeutic outcomes through precise intervention. In the long run, continued inputs into translational medicine remain highly desired to achieve durable responses in the current era of personalized clinical oncology. PMID:26272180

  9. [The immunosuppressive microenvironment of malignant gliomas].

    Borisov, K E; Sakaeva, D D

    2015-01-01

    The dogma of the central nervous system (CNS) as an immune-privileged site has been substantially revised in recent years. CNS is an immunocompetent organ and actively interacts with the immune system. Microglia plays a leading role in a CNS immune response. However, in malignant gliomas, there is M2-polarization of microglia acquiring immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive properties. It occurs under the influence of tumor cytokines, such as transforming growth factor-β, interleukin-10, and prostaglandin E2. M2-polarized microglia exhibits reduced phagocytic activity, changes in the expression of many cellular determinants, or inverse of their functions, STAT3 activation, and production of immunosuppressive cytokines that suppress the function of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells or CD4+ T-helper cells type I. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T-lymphocytes, which have been recruited from peripheral blood into tumor tissue, also have immunosuppressive properties. The development of new treatment options for malignant gliomas must consider the role of the microenvironment in maintaining tumor vitality and progression. PMID:26841651

  10. [Colonic microenvironment in familial helicobacter infection].

    Shcherbakov, P L; Vorob'ev, A A; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Mitrokhin, S D; Kudriavtseva, L V; Minaev, V I; Filin, V A; Petrova, N N; Zaĭtseva, S V

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the significance of the familial microenvironment in the genesis of Helicobacter infection, a clinical and instrumental investigation was made of 13 families selected by the probands who had digestive diseases associated with H. pylori: gastroduodenitis and duodenal ulcer disease. The occurrence of Helicobacter infection and gastritis in the family members was ascertained to be largely determined by their concurrent residence in the limited area, i.e. by the way of life. The contribution of the "family" factor in antral gastritis, fundal gastritis, and H. pylori infection was 60.0, 40.0, and about 90.0%, respectively. The patients with gastroenterological abnormalities associated with H. pylori were found to show changes in the species-specific and quantitative composition of the colonic microbiocenosis, which were symptomatic and revealed by bacteriological studies in 47.5% of cases and severe in 32.5%. When antihelicobacter therapy is planned, a through treatment of all family members and, if possible, pets should be made. Colonic microbiocenosis should be monitored while treating Helicobacter infection. PMID:9662996

  11. Non-coding RNA as mediators in microenvironment-breast cancer cell communication.

    Patel, Jimmy S; Hu, Madeleine; Sinha, Garima; Walker, Nykia D; Sherman, Lauren S; Gallagher, Ashley; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2016-09-28

    The tumor microenvironment has a critical role in the survival and decision of the cancer cells. These include support by enhanced angiogenesis, and metastasis or adaptation of dormancy. This article discusses methods by which the microenvironment sustains the tumor. This process is important as it will identify avenues of drug targets. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are evolving as key mediators in the interaction between the cancer cells and the microenvironment. Thus, the question is how to develop methods to effectively block the effects of the ncRNA and/or to introduce them to prevent metastasis, dormancy or to reverse dormancy. We focused on the advantages of using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for RNA delivery. MSCs can be available as "off-the-shelf" cells. Thus far, MSCs are shown to be safe when transplanted across allogeneic barriers. We discussed the various methods by which MSCs can interact with cancer cells to deliver ncRNA or antagomirs. We also include the advances and possible confounds of using these methods. Overall, this review article provides a potential method by which MSCs can be used for effective delivery of nucleic acid to treat cancer. PMID:26582656

  12. Microenvironment-Centred Dynamics in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    Matilde Cacciatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive B-cell lymphomas share high proliferative and invasive attitudes and dismal prognosis despite heterogeneous biological features. In the interchained sequence of events leading to cancer progression, neoplastic clone-intrinsic molecular events play a major role. Nevertheless, microenvironment-related cues have progressively come into focus as true determinants for this process. The cancer-associated microenvironment is a complex network of nonneoplastic immune and stromal cells embedded in extracellular components, giving rise to a multifarious crosstalk with neoplastic cells towards the induction of a supportive milieu. The immunological and stromal microenvironments have been classically regarded as essential partners of indolent lymphomas, while considered mainly negligible in the setting of aggressive B-cell lymphomas that, by their nature, are less reliant on external stimuli. By this paper we try to delineate the cardinal microenvironment-centred dynamics exerting an influence over lymphoid clone progression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  13. Formal Modeling and Analysis of Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment

    Wang, Qinsi; Miskov-Zivanov, Natasa; Liu, Bing; Faeder, James R.; Lotze, Michael; Clarke, Edmund M

    2016-01-01

    The focus of pancreatic cancer research has been shifted from pancreatic cancer cells towards their microenvironment, involving pancreatic stellate cells that interact with cancer cells and influence tumor progression. To quantitatively understand the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, we construct a computational model for intracellular signaling networks of cancer cells and stellate cells as well as their intercellular communication. We extend the rule-based BioNetGen language to depict in...

  14. Development of an in vitro microenvironment for maturing oocytes

    Ihm, Jong Eun

    2008-01-01

    The development of in vitro culture systems, comparable to the in vivo microenvironment in terms of effect on the oocyte growth and development could provide a valuable experimental tool for studying the mechanisms governing folliculogenesis. This tool might serve as well for practical clinical, agricultural, zoological, or biotechnological applications. This thesis reports on the importance of the microenvironment for the ovarian folliculogenesis process. The complexity of such a microenviro...

  15. Development of an in vitro microenvironment for maturing oocytes

    Ihm, Jong Eun; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of in vitro culture systems, comparable to the in vivo microenvironment in terms of effect on the oocyte growth and development could provide a valuable experimental tool for studying the mechanisms governing folliculogenesis. This tool might serve as well for practical clinical, agricultural, zoological, or biotechnological applications. This thesis reports on the importance of the microenvironment for the ovarian folliculogenesis process. The complexity of such a microenviro...

  16. Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Studies of Some Selected Dyes as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Acidic Medium: Gravimetric, Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical Studies and Synergistic Effect with Iodide Ions

    Thabo Peme

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion inhibition properties of some organic dyes, namely Sunset Yellow (SS, Amaranth (AM, Allura Red (AR, Tartrazine (TZ and Fast Green (FG, for mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution, were investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results showed that the studied dyes are good corrosion inhibitors with enhanced inhibition efficiencies. The inhibition efficiency of all the studied dyes increases with increase in concentration, and decreases with increase in temperature. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the dyes increases in the presence of KI due to synergistic interactions of the dye molecules with iodide (I− ions. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the studied dyes are mixed-type inhibitors both in the absence and presence of KI. The adsorption of the studied dyes on mild steel surface, with and without KI, obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves physical adsorption mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the most likely sites in the dye molecules for interactions with mild steel are the S, O, and N heteroatoms.

  17. Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Studies of Some Selected Dyes as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Acidic Medium: Gravimetric, Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical Studies and Synergistic Effect with Iodide Ions.

    Peme, Thabo; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition properties of some organic dyes, namely Sunset Yellow (SS), Amaranth (AM), Allura Red (AR), Tartrazine (TZ) and Fast Green (FG), for mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution, were investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results showed that the studied dyes are good corrosion inhibitors with enhanced inhibition efficiencies. The inhibition efficiency of all the studied dyes increases with increase in concentration, and decreases with increase in temperature. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the dyes increases in the presence of KI due to synergistic interactions of the dye molecules with iodide (I(-)) ions. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the studied dyes are mixed-type inhibitors both in the absence and presence of KI. The adsorption of the studied dyes on mild steel surface, with and without KI, obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves physical adsorption mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the most likely sites in the dye molecules for interactions with mild steel are the S, O, and N heteroatoms. PMID:26364631

  18. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds

    Euna eOh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically-important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN. Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  19. 法莫替丁与扑尔敏联合应用治疗乙酸致胃溃疡的协同作用%Synergistic Action of Famotidine and Chlorpheniramine of Acetic Acid-induced Chronic Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    陈超; 覃珍

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Previous work demonstrates that H2 receptors antagonist shows gastroprotective effect in the ethanol, aspirin and pilorous ligature-induced gastric ulcer in rats as well as in the ethanol/hydrochloric acid-induced ulcer in rats ,and H1-receptor antagonists have been reported to be potent anti-inflammatory compounds. The aim of the present study was designed to assess the synergistic action of famotidine and chlorpheniramine in the acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer model in rats. Methods:Chronic gastric lesions were induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with serosal application of acetic acid. 40 SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups:blank group,control group, famotidine (FMD) group, chlorpheniramine (CPA) group and FMD+CPA group; Every group was given intraperitoneally(i.p.) distilled water 0.5 ml/100 g、the same volume of 0.9% saline、FMD4 mg/kg、CPA10mg/kg、FMD+CPA (the same dose) respectivedly daily for 10 days. On days 10,the ulcer area was determined by planimetry, The levels of MPO in the liver homogenation was measured by bio-chemical methods and the plasma levels of 6-keto-PGF1a and IL-8 by radio-immune assay methods.Results:although FMD or CPA alone possess a potent antiulcer or anti-inflammatory activity. The synergistic effects of FMD+CPA were confirmed in the lesion area, IL-8,6-keto-PGF1a and MPO. The effect of FMD+CPA was significantly different as compared to the control and FMD reducing the lesion area (mm2) from 40.18+/-2.6 in controls to 6.83+/-2.97,P0.05),FMD+ CPA联合组与CPA组、FMD组有显著差异性(P<0.05).但是FMD+ CPA联合组与FMD组的大鼠血浆IL-8及肝组织MPO相比要明显低IL-8,P<0.05;MPO,P<0.01,提示扑尔敏有抗炎作用. 结论:联合应用H1、H2受体阻滞剂治疗胃溃疡能取得良好的疗效,尤其抗炎作用显著差异性.其机制与减少炎症因子的产生,减少对胃黏膜的损伤,改善胃黏膜血流有关.

  20. Synergistic solvent extraction investigation of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn(II), and Cs(I), using 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid mixed with different organophosphorus compounds from nitrate media. Vol. 3

    Extraction studies for investigating the effect of mixing 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid (HA) with a number of organophosphorus compounds; namely tributyl phosphate (TBP), terphenyl phosphate oxide (TPPO); tri octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) or bis-2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in benzene on the extraction of trace elements Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) from nitrate media of ionic strength, I=0.1 M were carried out. The effect of adding different organophosphorus compounds to HA was tested to account for the presence or absence of the phenomenon of synergism. It was found that TBP, TPPO, and TOPO causing some antagonistic effects for the elements studied. Extraction enhancement was only observed with bis- (2-ethyl-hexyl) -phosphoric acid (HDEHP) for all the elements investigated. The extraction mechanisms as well as the thermodynamic parameters for the mixed extracted species are discussed. 19 figs

  1. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  2. Engineering cancer microenvironments for in vitro 3-D tumor models

    Waseem Asghar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The natural microenvironment of tumors is composed of extracellular matrix (ECM, blood vasculature, and supporting stromal cells. The physical characteristics of ECM as well as the cellular components play a vital role in controlling cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, and differentiation. To mimic the tumor microenvironment outside the human body for drug testing, two-dimensional (2-D and murine tumor models are routinely used. Although these conventional approaches are employed in preclinical studies, they still present challenges. For example, murine tumor models are expensive and difficult to adopt for routine drug screening. On the other hand, 2-D in vitro models are simple to perform, but they do not recapitulate natural tumor microenvironment, because they do not capture important three-dimensional (3-D cell–cell, cell–matrix signaling pathways, and multi-cellular heterogeneous components of the tumor microenvironment such as stromal and immune cells. The three-dimensional (3-D in vitro tumor models aim to closely mimic cancer microenvironments and have emerged as an alternative to routinely used methods for drug screening. Herein, we review recent advances in 3-D tumor model generation and highlight directions for future applications in drug testing.

  3. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  4. Synergistic effect of additives including multifunctional acrylates in wood plastic composites

    Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) was prepared with simul (soft wood, density = 0.4g/cc) and butylmethacrylate (BMA) monomer using 10% methanol as the swelling agent. Effect of additives including multifunctional acrylates such as tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPGDA), trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA), oligomer acrylates like the urethane (UA), epoxy (EA) and polyester (PEA) acrylates and N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) was investigated using 1 to 3 Mrad dose at 0.8 Mrad/h. Synergistic increases in polymer loading yields was achieved in presence of the additives, particularly with the trifunctional acrylate (TMPTA). In addition, acid as well as urea were also used as co-additives and synergistic enhancement in yields of polymer loading were obtained. The synergistic polymer loading by acid addition causes substantial decrease in tensile strength of the composite; but other additives and co-additives increase both the polymer loading and the tensile strength in these systems. (author)

  5. Synergistic Man: Outcome Model for Counselors

    Rousseve, Ronald J.

    1973-01-01

    Drawing on the insights of Ruth Benedict and Abraham Maslow in their search for an ethical gauge by which to rate personal-social health, this article proposes synergistic man'' as the desired outcome model for counselors. (Author)

  6. Research on ZWR Concrete Energy Saving Synergist

    Hu Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    ZWR concrete energy saving synergist used in commodity concrete, were carried out experimental research and engineering application. The results show that the energy-boosters, in ensuring the overall performance of the concrete situation, as its content is 0.6% to 1% in cementitious material can reduce the amount of cement by 10% to 15%, significantly reduces production costs. Without changing the working properties and structural performance of the concrete, this energy saving synergist can ...

  7. The Tumor Microenvironment and Strategies to Improve Drug Distribution

    Jasdeep K Saggar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment within tumors is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of cells with varying levels of nutrients and oxygen. Differences in oxygen content result in survival or compensatory mechanisms within tumors that may favor a more malignant or lethal phenotype. Cells that are rapidly proliferating are richly nourished and preferentially located close to blood vessels. Chemotherapy can target and kill cells that are adjacent to the vasculature, while cells that reside farther away are often not exposed to adequate amounts of drug and may survive and repopulate following treatment. The characteristics of the tumor microenvironment can be manipulated in order to design more effective therapies. In this review, we describe important features of the tumor microenvironment and discuss strategies whereby drug distribution and activity may be improved.

  8. Combination therapy targeting the tumor microenvironment is effective in a model of human ocular melanoma

    Schafer Peter H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular melanoma is the leading intraocular malignancy. There is no effective treatment for metastatic ocular melanoma. We sought a treatment targeting the tumor microenvironment as well as the tumor cells. Methods Migration of HUVEC cells, the ability of HUVEC cells to form tubes, and proliferative capacity of a human ocular melanoma cell line were tested in the presence of lenalidomide and sorafenib alone and in combination. The compounds were also tested in a rat aortic ring assay and were tested in a highly aggressive human ocular melanoma xenograft model. Results Lenalidomide and Sorafenib inhibit HUVEC ability to migrate and form tubes and when used in combination the inhibition is increased. The agents alone and in combination inhibit outgrowth in the rat aortic ring model. The combination of the agents improved the inhibition over either single agent. In a xenograft model, combination therapy inhibited tumor growth over inhibition by single agent alone in a significant fashion (p Conclusion Lenalidomide and sorafenib are effective at targeting endothelial cells, inhibiting growth of ocular melanoma cells and can inhibit growth of tumors in a xenograft model as well as inhibit development of metastases. Combining these agents works in an additive to synergistic way to inhibit the growth of tumors and development of metastases.

  9. Osteoblasts generate an osteogenic microenvironment when grown on surfaces with rough microtopographies

    Boyan B. D.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoblasts respond to microarchitectural features of their substrate. On smooth surfaces (tissue culture plastic, tissue culture glass, and titanium, the cells attach and proliferate but they exhibit relatively low expression of differentiation markers in monolayer cultures, even when confluent. When grown on microrough Ti surfaces with an average roughness (Ra of 4-7 µm, proliferation is reduced but differentiation is enhanced and in some cases, is synergistic with the effects of surface microtopography. In addition, cells on microrough Ti substrates form hydroxyapatite in a manner that is more typical of bone than do cells cultured on smooth surfaces. Osteoblasts also respond to growth factors and cytokines in a surface-dependent manner. On rougher surfaces, the effects of regulatory factors like 1alpha,25(OH2D3 or 17beta-estradiol are enhanced. The response to the surface is mediated by integrins, which signal to the cell through many of the same mechanisms used by growth factors and hormones. Studies using PEG-modified surfaces indicate that increased differentiation may be related to altered attachment to the surface. When osteoblasts are grown on surfaces with chemistries or microarchitectures that reduce cell attachment and proliferation, and enhance differentiation, the cells tend to increase production of factors like TGF-beta1 that promote osteogenesis while decreasing osteoclastic activity. Thus, on microrough Ti surface, osteoblasts create a microenvironment conducive to new bone formation.

  10. Intravital Microscopy for Imaging the Tumor Microenvironment in Live Mice.

    Naumenko, Victor; Jenne, Craig; Mahoney, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    The development of intravital microscopy has provided unprecedented capacity to study the tumor microenvironment in live mice. The dynamic behavior of cancer, stromal, vascular, and immune cells can be monitored in real time, in situ, in both primary tumors and metastatic lesions, allowing treatment responses to be observed at single cell resolution and therapies tracked in vivo. These features provide a unique opportunity to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying the biology and treatment of cancer. We describe here a method for imaging the microenvironment of subcutaneous tumors grown in mice using intravital microscopy. PMID:27581025

  11. The Bone Microenvironment: a Fertile Soil for Tumor Growth.

    Buenrostro, Denise; Mulcrone, Patrick L; Owens, Philip; Sterling, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastatic disease remains a significant and frequent problem for cancer patients that can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, despite decades of research, bone metastases remain incurable. Current studies have demonstrated that many properties and cell types within the bone and bone marrow microenvironment contribute to tumor-induced bone disease. Furthermore, they have pointed to the importance of understanding how tumor cells interact with their microenvironment in order to help improve both the development of new therapeutics and the prediction of response to therapy. PMID:27255469

  12. "Smart" gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging: an imaging contrast agent responsive to the cancer microenvironment and signal amplification via pH-induced aggregation.

    Song, Jaejung; Kim, Jeesu; Hwang, Sekyu; Jeon, Mansik; Jeong, Sanghwa; Kim, Chulhong; Kim, Sungjee

    2016-07-01

    'Smart' gold nanoparticles can respond to mild acidic environments, rapidly form aggregates, and shift the absorption to red and near-infrared. They were used as a photoacoustic imaging agent responsive to the cancer microenvironment, and have demonstrated the cancer-specific accumulation at the cellular level and an amplified signal which is twice higher than the control in vivo. PMID:27292365

  13. Exosomes from the tumor microenvironment as reciprocal regulators that enhance prostate cancer progression.

    Liu, Che-Ming; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Shen, Chia-Ning; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Shigemura, Katsumi; Sung, Shian-Ying

    2016-09-01

    Distant organ metastasis of prostate cancer is a puzzle, and various theories have successively arisen to explain the mechanism of lethal cancer progression. While perhaps agreeable to many cancer biologists, the very statement of "seed and soil" proposed by Stephan Paget in 1881 is arguably still the major statement for organ-specific cancer metastasis. Since recent studies showed important correlations of regulation of cancer cells and the microenvironment, exosomes from cancer and stromal cells seem to create another important niche for metastasis. Stromal cells pretreated with exosomes from metastatic cancer cells increase the potential of change stromal cells. The poorly metastatic cancer cells could also enhance malignancy through transfer of proteins, microribonucleic acid and messenger ribonucleic acid to recipient cancer cells. Herein, we reviewed extracellular exosomes as a factor involved in cross-talk between stromal and prostate cancer epithelial cells. PMID:27397852

  14. MicroRNA Targeting to Modulate Tumor Microenvironment.

    Kuninty, Praneeth R; Schnittert, Jonas; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Communication between stromal cells and tumor cells initiates tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Stromal cells include cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumor-associated macrophages, pericytes, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in the tumor microenvironment have emerged as key players involved in the development of cancer and its progression. miRNAs are small endogenous non-protein-coding RNAs that negatively regulate the expression of multiple target genes at post-transcriptional level and thereby control many cellular processes. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of miRNAs dysregulated in different stromal cells and their impact on the regulation of intercellular crosstalk in the tumor microenvironment. We also discuss the therapeutic significance potential of miRNAs to modulate the tumor microenvironment. Since miRNA delivery is quite challenging and the biggest hurdle for clinical translation of miRNA therapeutics, we review various non-viral miRNA delivery systems that can potentially be used for targeting miRNA to stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26835418

  15. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  16. Operation of the computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure has been developed to extend atomic oxygen modeling capability to include shadowing and reflections. The model uses average exposure conditions established by the direct exposure model and extends the application of these conditions to treat surfaces of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  17. Air temperature investigation in microenvironment around a human body

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the temperature boundary layer around a human body in a quiescent indoor environment. The air temperature, mean in time and standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations around a breathing thermal manikin are examined in relation to the room temperatur...... accurate measurements of occupant's thermal microenvironment....

  18. Impact of Microenvironment and Stem-Like Plasticity in Cholangiocarcinoma

    Raggi, Chiara; Invernizzi, Pietro; Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    or tumor microenvironment (TME) likely promotes initiation and progression of this malignancy contributing to its heterogeneity. This review will emphasize the dynamic interplay between stem-like intrinsic and TME-extrinsic pathways, which may represent novel options for multi-targeted therapies in...

  19. Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

    Rahat, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and autoimmune diseases are fundamentally different pathological conditions. In cancer, the immune response is suppressed and unable to eradicate the transformed self-cells, while in autoimmune diseases it is hyperactivated against a self-antigen, leading to tissue injury. Yet, mechanistically, similarities in the triggering of the immune responses can be observed. In this review, we highlight some parallel aspects of the microenvironment in cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially hypoxia, and the role of macrophages, neutrophils, and their interaction. Macrophages, owing to their plastic mode of activation, can generate a pro- or antitumoral microenvironment. Similarly, in autoimmune diseases, macrophages tip the Th1/Th2 balance via various effector cytokines. The contribution of neutrophils, an additional plastic innate immune cell population, to the microenvironment and disease progression is recently gaining more prominence in both cancer and autoimmune diseases, as they can secrete cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as acquire an enhanced ability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that are now considered important initiators of autoimmune diseases. Understanding the contribution of macrophages and neutrophils to the cancerous or autoimmune microenvironment, as well as the role their interaction and cooperation play, may help identify new targets and improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26997761

  20. Endothelin-1 in the tumor microenvironment correlates with melanoma invasion.

    Chiriboga, Luis; Meehan, Shane; Osman, Iman; Glick, Michael; de la Cruz, Gelo; Howell, Brittny S; Friedman-Jiménez, George; Schneider, Robert J; Jamal, Sumayah

    2016-06-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a vasoactive peptide that also plays a role in the tanning response of the skin. Animal and cell culture studies have also implicated ET-1 in melanoma progression, but no association studies have been performed to link ET-1 expression and melanoma in humans. Here, we present the first in-vivo study of ET-1 expression in pigmented lesions in humans: an ET-1 immunohistochemical screen of melanocytic nevi, melanoma in situ lesions, invasive melanomas, metastatic melanomas, and blue nevi was performed. Twenty-six percent of melanocytic nevi and 44% of melanoma in situ lesions demonstrate ET-1 expression in the perilesional microenvironment, whereas expression in nevus or melanoma cells was rare to absent. In striking contrast, 100% of moderately to highly pigmented invasive melanomas contained numerous ET-1-positive cells in the tumor microenvironment, with 79% containing ET-1-positive melanoma cells, confirmed by co-staining with melanoma tumor marker HMB45. Hypopigmented invasive melanomas had reduced ET-1 expression, suggesting a correlation between ET-1 expression and pigmented melanomas. ET-1-positive perilesional cells were CD68-positive, indicating macrophage origin. Sixty-two percent of highly pigmented metastatic melanomas demonstrated ET-1 expression in melanoma cells, in contrast to 28.2% of hypopigmented specimens. Eighty-nine percent of benign nevi, known as blue nevi, which have a dermal localization, were associated with numerous ET-1-positive macrophages in the perilesional microenvironment, but no ET-1 expression was detected in the melanocytes. We conclude that ET-1 expression in the microenvironment increases with advancing stages of melanocyte transformation, implicating a critical role for ET-1 in melanoma progression, and the importance of the tumor microenvironment in the melanoma phenotype. PMID:26825037

  1. The role of autophagy induced by tumor microenvironment in different cells and stages of cancer

    Yang, Xue; Yu, Dan-Dan; Yan, Fei; Jing, Ying-Ying; Han, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Kai; Liang, Lei; Hou, Jing; Li-xin WEI

    2015-01-01

    Development of a tumor is a very complex process, and invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors are hallmarks and are difficult problems to overcome. The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in controlling tumor fate and autophagy induced by the tumor microenvironment is attracting more and more attention. Autophagy can be induced by several stressors in the tumor microenvironment and autophagy modifies the tumor microenvironment, too. Autophagy has dual roles in tumor growth. In ...

  2. Recapitulation of complex transport and action of drugs at the tumor microenvironment using tumor-microenvironment-on-chip.

    Han, Bumsoo; Qu, Chunjing; Park, Kinam; Konieczny, Stephen F; Korc, Murray

    2016-09-28

    Targeted delivery aims to selectively distribute drugs to targeted tumor tissues but not to healthy tissues. This can address many clinical challenges by maximizing the efficacy but minimizing the toxicity of anti-cancer drugs. However, a complex tumor microenvironment poses various barriers hindering the transport of drugs and drug delivery systems. New tumor models that allow for the systematic study of these complex environments are highly desired to provide reliable test beds to develop drug delivery systems for targeted delivery. Recently, research efforts have yielded new in vitro tumor models, the so called tumor-microenvironment-on-chip, that recapitulate certain characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. These new models show benefits over other conventional tumor models, and have the potential to accelerate drug discovery and enable precision medicine. However, further research is warranted to overcome their limitations and to properly interpret the data obtained from these models. In this article, key features of the in vivo tumor microenvironment that are relevant to drug transport processes for targeted delivery were discussed, and the current status and challenges for developing in vitro transport model systems were reviewed. PMID:26688098

  3. Acidosis Sensing Receptor GPR65 Correlates with Anti-Apoptotic Bcl-2 Family Member Expression in CLL Cells: Potential Implications for the CLL Microenvironment

    Rosko, Ashley E.; McColl, Karen S.; Zhong, Fei; Ryder, Christopher B; Chang, Ming-Jin; Sattar, Abdus; Caimi, Paolo F.; Hill, Brian T; Al-harbi, Sayer; Almasan, Alexandru; Distelhorst, Clark W.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is generally an acidic environment, yet the effect of extracellular acidosis on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is not well established. Here we are the first to report that the extracellular acid sensing G-protein coupled receptor, GPR65, is expressed in primary CLL cells where its level correlate strongly with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member levels. GPR65 expression is found normally within the lymphoid lineage and has not been previously reported in CLL. We...

  4. Mathematical description, optimization and prediction of synergistic interaction of fluoride and xylitol.

    Petin, Vladislav G; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kritsky, Roman O; Komarova, Ludmila N

    2008-06-01

    The potential ability of various physical or chemical agents to enhance their effect when they are applied simultaneously with each other is well-known. The purpose of this study was to adjust a simple mathematical model to describe, optimize and predict a synergistic interaction between fluoride and xylitol on acid production by mutans streptococci. The model suggests that the synergism is caused by the additional effective damage arising from an interaction of sublesions induced by each agent. These sublesions are considered to be ineffective when each agent is used individually. The predictions of the model were verified by comparison with experimental data published by other researchers. It was shown that the model describes the experimental data, predicts the greatest value of the synergistic effect and the condition under which it can be achieved. The synergistic effect appeared to decline with any deviation from the optimal value of the ratio of effective damages produced by each agent alone. PMID:18367232

  5. Some common regularities of synergistic effects display

    Our purpose here is to review and discuss some new general rules of synergistic effect display. The response of various biological objects to the simultaneous combined action of hyperthermia with ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, ultrasound and some chemical agents was analysed using the experimental data obtained by authors. To check the universality of the regularities of synergistic effect display, the results published by others were also involved. The data presented strongly invoke the need to elaborate a new theoretical conception of the synergy which, being useful for environmental radiation protection, took into account the new regularities revealed. (author)

  6. Synthetic Phenolic Antioxidants and Their Metabolites in Indoor Dust from Homes and Microenvironments.

    Wang, Wei; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Minh, Tu Binh; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic phenolic antioxidants (SPAs), including 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene (BHT), are extensively used in food, cosmetic and plastic industries. Nevertheless, limited information is available on human exposures, other than the dietary sources, to SPAs. In this study, occurrence of 9 SPAs and their metabolites/degradation products was determined in 339 indoor dust collected from 12 countries. BHT was found in 99.5% of indoor dust samples from homes and microenvironments at concentrations that ranged from BHT metabolites in house dust (0.01-35.1 μg/g) and their concentrations accounted for 9.2-58% of the sum concentrations (∑SPAs). 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(hydroxymethyl)phenol (BHT-OH), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (BHT-Q) were the major derivatives of BHT found in dust samples. The concentrations of gallic acid esters (gallates) in dust from homes and microenvironments ranged from BHT via house dust ingestion ranged from 0.40 to 222 ng/kg/d (95th percentile). PMID:26629709

  7. Synergistic effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and retinoic acid on inducing the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into neuron-like cells in adult rats in vitro

    Yonghai Liu; Yucheng Song; Zunsheng Zhang; Xia Shen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND; Under induction of retinoic acid (RA), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can differentiate into nerve cells or neuron-like cells, which do not survive for a long time, so those are restricted to an application. Other neurotrophic factors can also differentiate into neuronal cells through inducing BMSCs; especially, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can delay natural death of neurons and play a key role in survival and growth of neurons. The combination of them is beneficial for differentiation of BMSCs.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of BDNF combining with RA on inducing differentiation of BMSCs to nerve cells of adult rats and compare the results between common medium group and single BDNF group.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING : Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the Clinical Neurological Laboratory of Xuzhou MedicalCollege from September 2003 to April 2005. A total of 24 SD rats, of either gender, 2 months old,weighing 130-150 g, were provided by Experimental Animal Center of Xuzhou Medical College [certification: SYXK (su) 2002-0038]. Materials and reagents: low-glucose DMEM medium, bovine serum, BDNF,RA, trypsin, separating medium of lymphocyte, monoclonal antibody of mouse-anti-nestin, neuro-specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibody, SABC kit, and diaminobenzidine (DAB) color agent. All these mentioned above were mainly provided by SIGMA Company, GIBCO Company and Boshide Company.METHODS: Bone marrow of SD rats was selected for density gradient centrifugation. BMSCs were undertaken primary culture and subculture; and then, those cells were induced respectively in various mediums in total of 3 groups, including control group (primary culture), BDNF group (20 μg/L BDNF) and BDNF+RA group (20 μg/L BDNF plus 20 μg/L RA). On the 3rd and the 7th days after induction, BMSCs were stained immunocytochemically with

  8. Synergistic antioxidant activity of green tea with some herbs

    Dheeraj P Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, etc. are caused by free radicals that are byproducts of metabolic pathways. Selected plants namely Vitis vinifera, Phyllanthus emblica L., Punica granatum, Cinnamomum cassia, Ginkgo biloba L., and Camellia sinensis Linn. are reported to produce antioxidant property. This study is undertaken to support the hypothesis that formulation of a polyherbal combination of these plants shows a synergistic effect with green tea. The extracts of each drug were characterized by phytochemical studies and tests for phenolics and flavonoids. In vitro antioxidant activity for individual drug and its combination was determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, superoxide, and nitric oxide free radical scavenging methods. Our results suggest that a combination of all these herbs with green tea can synergistically enhance antioxidant activity and thus lower doses of each herb with green tea may be used. Antioxidant potential of polyherbal combination was also comparable to that of standard ascorbic acid. Studies showed that selected individual plants contained abundant quantity of phenolics and flavonoids and their polyherbal combination with green tea was found to produce best antioxidant activity among all individual extracts. This will help in avoiding undesirable side effects due to higher doses of single herb.

  9. Alkene carboboration enabled by synergistic catalysis.

    Smith, Kevin B; Logan, Kaitlyn M; You, Wei; Brown, M Kevin

    2014-09-15

    A synergistic Pd/Cu system for the coupling of alkenes, (Bpin)2 (pin = pinacolate), and aryl/vinyl bromides is disclosed. This method allows for the catalytic generation of secondary Csp(3)-Cu nucleophiles in situ and subsequent Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling. PMID:25113669

  10. Developing Synergistic Knowledge in Student Groups.

    Mu, Shaohua; Gnyawali, Devi R.

    2003-01-01

    Examines factors that influence the development of synergistic knowledge in student groups. Data on senior-level undergraduate business students who analyzed complex company cases and presented their analyses to the class suggest positive influences of team psychological safety and social interaction and a negative influence of task conflict on…

  11. A study for radiation-related tumor microenvironment

    Son, Young Sook; Hong, Seok Il; Kim, Young Soon; Jin Yong Jae; Lee, Tae Hee; Chung, Eun Kyung; Yi, Jae Yeun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Yun Young; Kang, Sin Keun

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in radiation-induced modification and changes of biological factors and physicochemical factors of tumor microenvironment and develop techniques and agents for the modification of tumor microenvironment which is favorable for efficient radio-cancer therapy based on our basic study. We established in vitro tumor invasion and angiogenesis model, elucidated the importance of MMPs activation and the MMPs/TIMPs complex in the invasive transition of tumor. Furthermore we showed the signaling pathway for MMPs induction through EGF receptor and TGF beta 1 stimulated E-M transition. We also established primary culture of human endothelial cells and tubule forming condition which is utilized for the detection of novel angiogenic factors. We also identified hypoxia induced signaling pathway and showed that GBE improved blood perfusion which may increase the effectiveness of radio-cancer therapy.

  12. Metabolomics Analyses of Cancer Cells in Controlled Microenvironments.

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Avizonis, Daina; St-Pierre, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex and heterogeneous milieu in which cancer cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to fuel their growth. Cancer cell lines grown in vitro using traditional culture methods represent key experimental models to gain a mechanistic understanding of tumor biology. This protocol describes the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to assess metabolic changes in cancer cells grown under varied levels of oxygen and nutrients that may better mimic the tumor microenvironment. Intracellular metabolite changes, metabolite uptake and release, as well as stable isotope ((13)C) tracer analyses are done in a single experimental setup to provide an integrated understanding of metabolic adaptation. Overall, this chapter describes some essential tools and methods to perform comprehensive metabolomics analyses. PMID:27581029

  13. Tumor microenvironment: The culprit for ovarian cancer metastasis?

    Luo, Zhongyue; Wang, Qiu; Lau, Wayne Bond; Lau, Bonnie; Xu, Lian; Zhao, Linjie; Yang, Huiliang; Feng, Min; Xuan, Yu; Yang, Yanfei; Lei, Lingzi; Wang, Chenlu; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan; Zhou, Shengtao

    2016-07-28

    Despite chemotherapy and surgical debulking options, ovarian cancer recurs and disseminates frequently, with poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis still remain unelucidated. The tumor microenvironment, consisting of stromal cells (including fibroblasts, macrophages, regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, endothelial cells, pericytes and platelets), the extracellular matrix component (EMC) (including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, integrins, and other secreted molecules) and exosomes (small extracellular vesicles loaded with molecules), establishes an autocrine-paracrine communication circuit that reinforces invasion and cancer cell metastasis via reciprocal signaling. Recent evidences have unraveled the significant contribution of tumor microenvironment to ovarian cancer metastasis. In this review, we provide a comprehensive landscape of the reciprocity between tumor stroma and ovarian cancer cells upon metastasis, aiming to offer novel clues on the development of novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer in future clinical practice. PMID:27131957

  14. A study for radiation-related tumor microenvironment

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in radiation-induced modification and changes of biological factors and physicochemical factors of tumor microenvironment and develop techniques and agents for the modification of tumor microenvironment which is favorable for efficient radio-cancer therapy based on our basic study. We established in vitro tumor invasion and angiogenesis model, elucidated the importance of MMPs activation and the MMPs/TIMPs complex in the invasive transition of tumor. Furthermore we showed the signaling pathway for MMPs induction through EGF receptor and TGF beta 1 stimulated E-M transition. We also established primary culture of human endothelial cells and tubule forming condition which is utilized for the detection of novel angiogenic factors. We also identified hypoxia induced signaling pathway and showed that GBE improved blood perfusion which may increase the effectiveness of radio-cancer therapy

  15. The Tumor Microenvironment and Strategies to Improve Drug Distribution

    JasdeepKSaggar; IanFTannock

    2013-01-01

    The microenvironment within tumors is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of cells with varying levels of nutrients and oxygen. Differences in oxygen content result in survival or compensatory mechanisms within tumors that may favor a more malignant or lethal phenotype. Cells that are rapidly proliferating are richly nourished and preferentially located close to blood vessels. Chemotherapy can target and kill cells that are adjacent to the vasculature, while cells that reside farther away are...

  16. Oxidative Stress, Tumor Microenvironment, and Metabolic Reprogramming: A Diabolic Liaison

    Paola Chiarugi; Tania Fiaschi

    2012-01-01

    Conversely to normal cells, where deregulated oxidative stress drives the activation of death pathways, malignant cells exploit oxidative milieu for its advantage. Cancer cells are located in a very complex microenvironment together with stromal components that participate to enhance oxidative stress to promote tumor progression. Indeed, convincing experimental and clinical evidence underline the key role of oxidative stress in several tumor aspects thus affecting several characteristics of c...

  17. Breast cancer stem cells, cytokine networks, and the tumor microenvironment

    Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors, including breast cancer, are maintained by a subpopulation of cells that display stem cell properties, mediate metastasis, and contribute to treatment resistance. These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are regulated by complex interactions with the components of the tumor microenvironment — including mesenchymal stem cells, adipocytes, tumor associated fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells — through networks of cytokines and growth factors. Since these components have a direct...

  18. Engineering Cell and Tissue Mechanical Microenvironments for Regenerative Medicine

    Tsou, Danielle An-Chi

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of tissue engineering is to create technologies that will improve or replace biological function of diseased or damaged cells and tissues. The purpose of my thesis work is to determine how the mechanical properties of the murine microenvironment, specifically matrix stiffness, can affect the function and behavior of cells and tissues. Previous research has shown that stiffness is a powerful mechanical property; it is associated with breast and liver cancer, and can also be ...

  19. Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Microenvironment and Molecular Mechanisms

    Yi-Wen Zang; Xiao-Dong Gu; Jian-Bin Xiang; Zong-You Chen

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract malignancies in the world. Owing to the newer and more effective systemic therapies, the life of colorectal cancer patients can be remarkably prolonged, and the incidence of brain metastases is increasing. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Here we review the tumor microenvironment and metastasis associated molecules in brain metastases from colorectal cancer. A furthe...

  20. Aging of the microenvironment influences clonality in hematopoiesis.

    Virag Vas

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of the age-associated exponential increase in the incidence of leukemia are not known in detail. Leukemia as well as aging are initiated and regulated in multi-factorial fashion by cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The role of aging of the microenvironment for leukemia initiation/progression has not been investigated in great detail so far. Clonality in hematopoiesis is tightly linked to the initiation of leukemia. Based on a retroviral-insertion mutagenesis approach to generate primitive hematopoietic cells with an intrinsic potential for clonal expansion, we determined clonality of transduced hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs exposed to a young or aged microenvironment in vivo. While HPCs displayed primarily oligo-clonality within a young microenvironment, aged animals transplanted with identical pool of cells displayed reduced clonality within transduced HPCs. Our data show that an aged niche exerts a distinct selection pressure on dominant HPC-clones thus facilitating the transition to mono-clonality, which might be one underlying cause for the increased age-associated incidence of leukemia.

  1. Obesity, metabolism and the microenvironment: Links to cancer

    Sneha Sundaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, cancer research has focused on identifying mutations or amplification of genes within the tumor, which informed the development of targeted therapies against affected pathways. This work often considers tumor cells in isolation; however, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells strongly influences tumor onset and progression. This is the so-called "seed and soil" hypothesis wherein the seed (cancer cell is fed and molded by the metabolites, growth factors, modifications of the extracellular matrix or angiogenic factors provided by the soil (or stroma. Currently, 65% of the US population is obese or overweight; similarly staggering figures are reported in US children and globally. Obesity mediates and can exacerbate, both normal and tumor microenvironment dysfunction. Many obesity-associated endocrine, metabolic and inflammatory mediators are suspected to play a role in oncogenesis by modifying systemic nutrient metabolism and the nutrient substrates available locally in the stroma. It is vitally important to understand the biological processes linking obesity and cancer to develop better intervention strategies aimed at curbing the carcinogenic events associated with obesity. In this review, obesity-driven changes in both the normal and tumor microenvironment, alterations in metabolism, and release of signaling molecules such as endocrine, growth, and inflammatory mediators will be highlighted. In addition, we will discuss the effects of the timing of obesity onset or particular "windows of susceptibility," with a focus on breast cancer etiology.

  2. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation.

  3. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation. PMID:27484403

  4. New approaches to image thyroid cancer cells and microenvironment

    Poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid cancer (UDTC) are still life-threatening pathologies, because of the lack of well-established diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In the past, many attempts have been made to develop radiopharmaceutical to diagnose or treat radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory metastases or recurrences, with limited results. Indeed, it was not possible to find a specific and over expressed marker to be used as target of radiopharmaceuticals or targeted therapies. Nowadays, with novel advances in the field of tumor microenvironment, many new markers are available to be used as suitable targets for targeted therapies interfering with signalling pathways of cells involved in the mechanisms that favour tumor growth and metastatization. This opened new perspective in the use of radiopharmaceuticals targeting components of tumor microenvironment for early diagnosis, pre-operative staging or therapy planning and follow up with targeted drugs. In the present review we present the state of novel approaches to image thyroid cancer and its microenvironment, focusing on RAI-refractory thyroid cancer as a real clinical problem to be solved.

  5. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...... the cocultivation of 403 undomesticated E. coli strains with a characterized E. coli K-12 strain was detected at a significant frequency. The survey suggests that different mechanisms underlie the observed stimulation, yet synergistic development of biofilm within the subset of E. coli isolates (n...... = 56) exhibiting the strongest effects was most often linked to conjugative transmission of natural plasmids carried by the E. coli isolates (70%). Thus, the capacity of an isolate to promote the biofilm through cocultivation was (i) transferable to the K-12 strain, (ii) was linked with the acquisition...

  6. Culture and neuroscience: additive or synergistic?

    Losin, Elizabeth A. Reynolds; DAPRETTO, MIRELLA; Iacoboni, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of cultural phenomena using neuroscientific methods—cultural neuroscience (CN)—is receiving increasing attention. Yet it is unclear whether the integration of cultural study and neuroscience is merely additive, providing additional evidence of neural plasticity in the human brain, or truly synergistic, yielding discoveries that neither discipline could have achieved alone. We discuss how the parent fields to CN: cross-cultural psychology, psychological anthropology and cogni...

  7. Synergistic modeling of call center operations

    2006-01-01

    We synergistically apply queueing theory, integer programming, and stochastic simulation to determine an optimal staffing policy for a repair call handling center. A stationary Markovian queueing model is employed to determine minimal staffing levels for a sequence of time intervals with varying call volumes and mean handling times. These staffing requirements populate an integer program model for determining the mix of call agent shifts that will achieve service quality standards at minimum ...

  8. In vitro synergistic activity between bismuth subcitrate and various antimicrobial agents against Campylobacter pyloridis (C. pylori).

    Van Caekenberghe, D L; Breyssens, J

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro interactions between bismuth subcitrate and a variety of antimicrobial agents against 12 Campylobacter pyloridis (C. pylori) isolates were studied by the agar dilution checkerboard technique. The combination of bismuth subcitrate with the older quinolone, oxolinic acid, produced synergistic activity against all strains. This observation, however, could not be extended to the (aryl) fluoroquinolones, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and difloxacin, since synergy was rare or absent when bis...

  9. Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Read, Jolene

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECV) are membrane compartments shed from all types of cells in various physiological and pathological states. In recent years, ECV have gained an increasing interest from the scientific community for their role as an intercellular communicator that plays important roles in modifying the tumor microenvironment. Multiple techniques have been established to collect ECV from conditioned media of cell culture or physiological fluids. The gold standard methodology is differential centrifugation. Although alternative techniques exist to collect ECV, these techniques have not proven suitable as a substitution for the ultracentrifugation procedure. PMID:27581023

  10. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Aline Lopes Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME. In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME.