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Sample records for acidic amphipathic peptides

  1. Formulation of nucleic acid with pH-responsive amphipathic peptides for pulmonary delivery

    Liang, Wanling; 梁婉玲

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids could be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of many different diseases, but poor delivery limits their clinical application. A series of pH-responsive amphipathic peptides containing histidine or 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) derivatives, LAH and LADap peptides, were investigated in this study as nucleic acid carriers for the treatment of respiratory infectious disease. LAH and LADap peptides are cationic, amphipathic pH-responsive peptides. The major attractive ...

  2. Anisotropic Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Peptides.

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Elías-Wolff, Federico; Lindén, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe an approach to study curvature sensing by simulating the interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three amphipathic antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. Our findings provide evidence for direction-dependent curvature sensing mechanisms in amphipathic peptides and challenge existing theories of hydrophobic insertion. The buckling approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature-sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane proteins. PMID:26745422

  3. Tryptophan rotamer distributions in amphipathic peptides at a lipid surface.

    Clayton, A H; Sawyer, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    The fluorescence decay of tryptophan is a sensitive indicator of its local environment within a peptide or protein. We describe the use of frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy to determine the conformational and environmental changes associated with the interaction of single tryptophan amphipathic peptides with a phospholipid surface. The five 18-residue peptides studied are based on a class A amphipathic peptide known to associate with lipid bilayers. The peptides contain a single tryp...

  4. Design and synthesis of basic peptides having amphipathic beta-structure and their interaction with phospholipid membranes.

    Ono, S; Lee, S; Mihara, H; Aoyagi, H; Kato, T; Yamasaki, N

    1990-02-28

    Basic amphipathic beta-structural peptides, Ac-(Ser-Val-Lys-Val)n-NHCH3 (1n, n = 1-3) and Ac-(Lys-Val)n-NHCH3 (2n, n = 2-4), were synthesized and their interaction with DPPC and DPPC-DPPG (3:1) bilayers was studied by CD, dye-leakage and fluorescence experiments. The CD data indicated that oligopeptides consisting of more than eight residues with alternating hydrophobic (Val) and hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Lys) were able to form an amphipathic beta-structure in acidic phospholipid bilayers, but not or weakly in aqueous solution and in neutral phospholipid bilayers. The dye-leakage experiment showed that the basic amphipathic beta-structural peptides interact with acidic phospholipid bilayers to perturb them, but less effectively compared with basic amphipathic alpha-helical peptides. Fluorescent spectroscopic data suggest that hydrophobic side of the amphipathic peptides may immerse into membrane without deep penetration. Based on these results, we postulate that the formation of the basic amphipathic beta-structure on acidic lipid bilayers may be due to the combined effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between basic peptides and acidic lipid bilayers. PMID:2306456

  5. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes

    Chandrasekaran Sivakamasundari; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of six 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes. The net charge of the peptides at neutral pH varies from –1 to +6. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that peptides with a high net positive charge tend to fold into a helical conformation in the presence of negatively charged lipid vesicles. In helical conformation, their average hydrophobic moment and hydrophobicity would render them surface-active. The composition of amino acids on the polar face of the helix in the peptides is considerably different. The peptides show variations in their ability to permeabilise zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles. Whereas increased net positive charge favours greater permeabilisation, the distribution of charged residues in the polar face also plays a role in determining membrane activity. The distribution of amino acids in the polar face of the helix in the peptides that were investigated do not fall into the canonical classes described. Amphipathic helices, which are part of proteins, with a pattern of amino acid distribution different from those observed in class L, A and others, could help in providing newer insights into peptide–membrane interactions.

  6. Effects of Single Amino Acid Substitution on the Biophysical Properties and Biological Activities of an Amphipathic α-Helical Antibacterial Peptide Against Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Juanjuan Tan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An antimicrobial peptide, known as V13K, was utilized as the framework to study the effects of charge, hydrophobicity and helicity on the biophysical properties and biological activities of α-helical peptides. Six amino acids (Lys, Glu, Gly, Ser, Ala, and Leu were individually used to substitute the original hydrophobic valine at the selected sixteenth location on the non-polar face of V13K. The results showed that the single amino acid substitutions changed the hydrophobicity of peptide analogs as monitored by RP-HPLC, but did not cause significant changes on peptide secondary structures both in a benign buffer and in a hydrophobic environment. The biological activities of the analogs exhibited a hydrophobicity-dependent behavior. The mechanism of peptide interaction with the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria was investigated. We demonstrated that this single amino acid substitution method has valuable potential for the rational design of antimicrobial peptides with enhanced activities.

  7. Mixed α/β-Peptides as a Class of Short Amphipathic Peptide Hydrogelators with Enhanced Proteolytic Stability.

    Mangelschots, Jeroen; Bibian, Mathieu; Gardiner, James; Waddington, Lynne; Van Wanseele, Yannick; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Acevedo, Maria M Diaz; Van Mele, Bruno; Madder, Annemieke; Hoogenboom, Richard; Ballet, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Peptide hydrogels are a highly promising class of materials for biomedical application, albeit facing many challenges with regard to stability and tunability. Here, we report a new class of amphipathic peptide hydrogelators, namely mixed α/β-peptide hydrogelators. These mixed α/β-gelators possess good rheological properties (high storage moduli) and form transparent self-supporting gels with shear-thinning behavior. Infrared spectroscopy indicates the presence of β-sheets as the underlying secondary structure. Interestingly, self-assembled nanofibers of the mixed α/β-peptides display unique structural morphologies with alteration of the C-terminus (acid vs amide) playing a key role in the fiber formation and gelation properties of the resulting hydrogels. The incorporation of β3-homoamino acid residues within the mixed α/β-peptide gelators led to an increase in proteolytic stability of the peptides under nongelating conditions (in solution) as well as gelating conditions (as hydrogel). Under diluted conditions, degradation of mixed α/β-peptides in the presence of elastase was slowed down 120-fold compared to that of an α-peptide, thereby demonstrating beneficial enzymatic resistance for hydrogel applications in vivo. In addition, increased half-life values were obtained for the mixed α/β-peptides in human blood plasma, as compared to corresponding α-peptides. It was also found that the mixed α/β-peptides were amenable to injection via needles used for subcutaneous administrations. The preformed peptide gels could be sheared upon injection and were found to quickly reform to a state close to that of the original hydrogel. The shown properties of enhanced proteolytic stability and injectability hold great promise for the use of these novel mixed α/β-peptide hydrogels for applications in the areas of tissue engineering and drug delivery. PMID:26741458

  8. Contribution of Amphipathicity and Hydrophobicity to the Antimicrobial Activity and Cytotoxicity of β-Hairpin Peptides

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have acquired extensive resistance mechanisms to protect themselves against antibiotic action. Today the bacterial membrane has become one of the “final frontiers” in the search for new compounds acting on novel targets to address the threat of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and XDR bacterial pathogens. β-Hairpin antimicrobial peptides are amphipathic, membrane-binding antibiotics that exhibit a broad range of activities against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal pathogens. However, most members of the class also possess adverse cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity that preclude their development as candidate antimicrobials. We examined peptide hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, and structure to better dissect and understand the correlation between antimicrobial activity and toxicity, membrane binding, and membrane permeability. The hydrophobicity, pI, net charge at physiological pH, and amphipathic moment for the β-hairpin antimicrobial peptides tachyplesin-1, polyphemusin-1, protegrin-1, gomesin, arenicin-3, and thanatin were determined and correlated with key antimicrobial activity and toxicity data. These included antimicrobial activity against five key bacterial pathogens and two fungi, cytotoxicity against human cell lines, and hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. Observed antimicrobial activity trends correlated with compound amphipathicity and, to a lesser extent, with overall hydrophobicity. Antimicrobial activity increased with amphipathicity, but unfortunately so did toxicity. Of note, tachyplesin-1 was found to be 8-fold more amphipathic than gomesin. These analyses identify tachyplesin-1 as a promising scaffold for rational design and synthetic optimization toward an antibiotic candidate.

  9. Effects of increasing hydrophobicity on the physical-chemical and biological properties of a class A amphipathic helical peptide.

    Datta, G; Chaddha, M; Hama, S; Navab, M; Fogelman, A M; Garber, D W; Mishra, V K; Epand, R M; Epand, R F; Lund-Katz, S; Phillips, M C; Segrest, J P; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2001-07-01

    We have recently shown that a class A amphipathic peptide 5F with increased amphipathicity protected mice from diet-induced atherosclerosis (Garber et al. J. Lipid Res. 2001. 42: 545-552). We have now examined the effects of increasing the hydrophobicity of a series of homologous class A amphipathic peptides, including 5F, on physical and functional properties related to atherosclerosis inhibition by systematically replacing existing nonpolar amino acids with phenylalanine. The peptides, based on the sequence Ac-D-W-L-K-A-F-Y-D-K-V-A-E-K-L-K-E-A-F-NH(2) (Ac-18A-NH(2) or 2F) were: 3F(3)(Ac-F(3)18A-NH(2)), 3F(14)(Ac-F(14)18A-NH(2)), 4F(Ac-F(3,14)18A-NH(2)), 5F(Ac-F(11,14,17) 18A-NH(2)), 6F(Ac-F(10,11,14,17)18A-NH(2)), and 7F(Ac-F(3,10,11,14,17) 18A-NH(2)). Measurements of aqueous solubility, HPLC retention time, exclusion pressure for penetration into an egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) monolayer, and rates of EPC solubilization revealed an abrupt increase in the hydrophobicity between peptides 4F and 5F; this was accompanied by increased ability to associate with phospholipids. The peptides 6F and 7F were less effective, indicating a limit to increased hydrophobicity for promoting lipid interaction in these peptides. Despite this marked increase in lipid affinity, these peptides were less effective than apoA-I in activating the plasma enzyme, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, with 5F activating LCAT the best (80% of apoA-I). Peptides 4F, 5F, and 6F were equally potent in inhibiting LDL-induced monocyte chemotactic activity. These studies suggest that an appropriate balance between peptide-peptide and peptide-lipid interactions is required for optimal biological activity of amphipathic peptides. These studies provide a rationale for the design of small apoA-I-mimetics with increased potency for atherosclerosis inhibition. PMID:11441137

  10. Membrane topology of a 14-mer model amphipathic peptide: a solid-state NMR spectroscopy study.

    Ouellet, Marise; Doucet, Jean-Daniel; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2007-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction between a synthetic amphipathic 14-mer peptide and model membranes by solid-state NMR. The 14-mer peptide is composed of leucines and phenylalanines modified by the addition of crown ethers and forms a helical amphipathic structure in solution and bound to lipid membranes. To shed light on its membrane topology, 31P, 2H, 15N solid-state NMR experiments have been performed on the 14-mer peptide in interaction with mechanically oriented bilayers of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The 31P, 2H, and 15N NMR results indicate that the 14-mer peptide remains at the surface of the DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC bilayers stacked between glass plates and perturbs the lipid orientation relative to the magnetic field direction. Its membrane topology is similar in DLPC and DMPC bilayers, whereas the peptide seems to be more deeply inserted in DPPC bilayers, as revealed by the greater orientational and motional disorder of the DPPC lipid headgroup and acyl chains. 15N{31P} rotational echo double resonance experiments have also been used to measure the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between the 14-mer peptide and the phospholipid headgroup of DMPC multilamellar vesicles, and the results indicate that the 14-mer peptide is in contact with the polar region of the DMPC lipids. On the basis of these studies, the mechanism of membrane perturbation of the 14-mer peptide is associated to the induction of a positive curvature strain induced by the peptide lying on the bilayer surface and seems to be independent of the bilayer hydrophobic thickness. PMID:17487978

  11. Improving membrane binding as a design strategy for amphipathic peptide hormones

    Pedersen, Søren Ljungberg; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Jurt, Simon;

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that amphipathic peptides might bind to membranes prior to activating their cognate receptors, but this has proven difficult to test. The peptide hormone PYY3-36 is believed to perform its appetite-suppressing actions through binding to hypothalamic Y2 receptors. It has...... by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement using a spin label, which confirmed that the hydrophobic residues bound to the membrane. Our studies further support the hypothesis that PYY3-36 associates with the membrane and indicate that this can be used in the design of novel molecules with high receptor binding...... potency. These observations are likely to be generally important for peptide hormones and biopharmaceutical drugs derived from them. This new 2-helix variant of PYY3-36 will be useful as a tool compound for studying peptide-membrane interactions....

  12. Differential neuroprotective potential of CRMP2 peptide aptamers conjugated to cationic, hydrophobic, and amphipathic cell penetrating peptides

    Aubin eMoutal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule-associated axonal specification collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2 is a novel target for neuroprotection. A CRMP2 peptide (TAT-CBD3 conjugated to the HIV transactivator of transcription (TAT protein’s cationic cell penetrating peptide motif (CPP protected neurons in the face of toxic levels of Ca2+ influx leaked in via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR hyperactivation. Here we tested whether replacing the hydrophilic TAT motif with alternative cationic (nona-arginine (R9, hydrophobic (membrane transport sequence (MTS of k-fibroblast growth factor or amphipathic (model amphipathic peptide (MAP CPPs could be superior to the neuroprotection bestowed by TAT-CBD3. In giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs derived from cortical neurons, the peptides translocated across plasma membranes with similar efficiencies. Cortical neurons, acutely treated with peptides prior to a toxic glutamate challenge, demonstrated enhanced efflux of R9-CBD3 compared to others. R9-CBD3 inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-evoked Ca2+ influx to a similar extent as TAT-CBD3 while MTS-CBD3 was ineffective which correlated with the ability of R9- and TAT-CBD3, but not MTS-CBD3, to block NMDAR interaction with CRMP2. Unrestricted Ca2+ influx through NMDARs leading to delayed calcium dysregulation and neuronal cell death was blocked by all peptides but MAP-CBD3. When applied acutely for 10 minutes, R9-CBD3 was more effective than TAT-CBD3 at neuroprotection while MTS- and MAP-CBD3 were ineffective. In contrast, long-term (> 24 hours treatment with MTS-CBD3 conferred neuroprotection where TAT-CBD3 failed. Neither peptide altered surface trafficking of NMDARs. Neuroprotection conferred by MTS-CBD3 peptide is likely due to its increased uptake coupled with decreased efflux when compared to TAT-CBD3. Overall, our results demonstrate that altering CPPs can bestow differential neuroprotective potential onto the CBD3 cargo.

  13. Anti-plasmodial action of de novo-designed, cationic, lysine-branched, amphipathic, helical peptides

    Kaushik Naveen K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lack of vaccine and rampant drug resistance demands new anti-malarials. Methods In vitro blood stage anti-plasmodial properties of several de novo-designed, chemically synthesized, cationic, amphipathic, helical, antibiotic peptides were examined against Plasmodium falciparum using SYBR Green assay. Mechanistic details of anti-plasmodial action were examined by optical/fluorescence microscopy and FACS analysis. Results Unlike the monomeric decapeptides {(Ac-GXRKXHKXWA-NH2 (X = F,ΔF (Fm, ΔFm IC50 >100 μM}, the lysine-branched,dimeric versions showed far greater potency {IC50 (μM Fd 1.5 , ΔFd 1.39}. The more helical and proteolytically stable ΔFd was studied for mechanistic details. ΔFq, a K-K2 dendrimer of ΔFm and (ΔFm2 a linear dimer of ΔFm showed IC50 (μM of 0.25 and 2.4 respectively. The healthy/infected red cell selectivity indices were >35 (ΔFd, >20 (ΔFm2 and 10 (ΔFq. FITC-ΔFd showed rapid and selective accumulation in parasitized red cells. Overlaying DAPI and FITC florescence suggested that ΔFd binds DNA. Trophozoites and schizonts incubated with ΔFd (2.5 μM egressed anomalously and Band-3 immunostaining revealed them not to be associated with RBC membrane. Prematurely egressed merozoites from peptide-treated cultures were found to be invasion incompetent. Conclusion Good selectivity (>35, good resistance index (1.1 and low cytotoxicity indicate the promise of ΔFd against malaria.

  14. Osmotically induced membrane tension modulates membrane permeabilization by class L amphipathic helical peptides: nucleation model of defect formation.

    Polozov, I V; Anantharamaiah, G.M.; Segrest, J P; Epand, R M

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of action of lytic peptides on membranes is widely studied and is important in view of potential medical applications. Previously (I. V. Polozov, A. I. Polozova, E. M. Tytler, G. M. Anantharamaiah, J. P. Segrest, G. A. Woolley, and R. M., Biochemistry, 36:9237--9245) we analyzed the mechanism of membrane permeabilization by 18L, the archetype lytic peptide featuring the class L amphipathic alpha-helix, according to the classification of Segrest et al. (J. P. Segrest, G. de Loof,...

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  19. Cationic amphipathic peptides accumulate sialylated proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic host cells

    Weghuber, Julian; Aichinger, Michael C.; Brameshuber, Mario; Wieser, Stefan; Ruprecht, Verena; Plochberger, Birgit; Madl, Josef; Horner, Andreas; Reipert, Siegfried; Lohner, Karl; Henics, Tamas; Schuetz, Gerhard J

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selectively target bacterial membranes by electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids. It turned out that for inhibition of microbial growth a high CAMP membrane concentration is required, which can be realized by the incorporation of hydrophobic groups within the peptide. Increasing hydrophobicity, however, reduces the CAMP selectivity for bacterial over eukaryotic host membranes, thereby causing the risk of detrimental side-effects. In t...

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...

  1. The brown adipocyte protein CIDEA promotes lipid droplet fusion via a phosphatidic acid-binding amphipathic helix

    Barneda, David; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Gaspar, Maria L; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Prasannan, Sunil; Dormann, Dirk; Han, Gil-Soo; Jesch, Stephen A; Carman, George M; Kagan, Valerian; Parker, Malcolm G; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Dixon, Ann M; Henry, Susan A; Christian, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of energy homeostasis depends on the highly regulated storage and release of triacylglycerol primarily in adipose tissue, and excessive storage is a feature of common metabolic disorders. CIDEA is a lipid droplet (LD)-protein enriched in brown adipocytes promoting the enlargement of LDs, which are dynamic, ubiquitous organelles specialized for storing neutral lipids. We demonstrate an essential role in this process for an amphipathic helix in CIDEA, which facilitates embedding in the LD phospholipid monolayer and binds phosphatidic acid (PA). LD pairs are docked by CIDEA trans-complexes through contributions of the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal dimerization region. These complexes, enriched at the LD–LD contact site, interact with the cone-shaped phospholipid PA and likely increase phospholipid barrier permeability, promoting LD fusion by transference of lipids. This physiological process is essential in adipocyte differentiation as well as serving to facilitate the tight coupling of lipolysis and lipogenesis in activated brown fat. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07485.001 PMID:26609809

  2. Effect of Amphipathic HIV Fusion Inhibitor Peptides on POPC and POPC/Cholesterol Membrane Properties: A Molecular Simulation Study

    Luís M. S. Loura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available T-20 and T-1249 fusion inhibitor peptides were shown to interact with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC (liquid disordered, ld and POPC/cholesterol (1:1 (POPC/Chol (liquid ordered, lo bilayers, and they do so to different extents. Although they both possess a tryptophan-rich domain (TRD, T-20 lacks a pocket binding domain (PBD, which is present in T-1249. It has been postulated that the PBD domain enhances FI interaction with HIV gp41 protein and with model membranes. Interaction of these fusion inhibitor peptides with both the cell membrane and the viral envelope membrane is important for function, i.e., inhibition of the fusion process. We address this problem with a molecular dynamics approach focusing on lipid properties, trying to ascertain the consequences and the differences in the interaction of T-20 and T-1249 with ld and lo model membranes. T-20 and T-1249 interactions with model membranes are shown to have measurable and different effects on bilayer structural and dynamical parameters. T-1249’s adsorption to the membrane surface has generally a stronger influence in the measured parameters. The presence of both binding domains in T-1249 appears to be paramount to its stronger interaction, and is shown to have a definite importance in membrane properties upon peptide adsorption.

  3. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  4. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker.......A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids Complexes of Two Peptide Nucleic Acid Strands and One

    1999-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  6. A toy model of prebiotic peptide evolution: the possible role of relative amino acid abundances.

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical-computational toy model based on the assumed dynamic principles of prebiotic peptide evolution. Starting from a pool of amino acid monomers, the model describes in a generalized manner the generation of peptides and their sequential information. The model integrates the intrinsic and dynamic key elements of the initiation of biopolymerization, such as the relative amino acid abundances and polarities, as well as the oligomer reversibility, i.e. fragmentation and recombination, and peptide self-replication. Our modeling results suggest that the relative amino acid abundances, as indicated by Miller-Urey type electric discharge experiments, played a principal role in the early sequential information of peptide profiles. Moreover, the computed profiles display an astonishing similarity to peptide profiles observed in so-called biological common ancestors found in the following three microorganisms; E. coli, M. jannaschii, and S. cereviasiae. The prebiotic peptide fingerprint was obtained by the so-called polarity index method that was earlier reported as a tool for the identification of cationic amphipathic antibacterial short peptides. PMID:23741717

  7. Effects of chain length of an amphipathic polypeptide carrying the repeated amino acid sequence (LETLAKA)(n) on α-helix and fibrous assembly formation.

    Takei, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kuriki, Yukino; Yoshino, Masakuni; Yazaki, Kazumori; Kojima, Shuichi; Takei, Tsunetomo; Ueda, Takuya; Miura, Kin-ichiro

    2013-04-23

    Polypeptide α3 (21 residues), with three repeats of a seven-amino-acid sequence (LETLAKA)(3), forms an amphipathic α-helix and a long fibrous assembly. Here, we investigated the ability of α3-series polypeptides (with 14-42 residues) of various chain lengths to form α-helices and fibrous assemblies. Polypeptide α2 (14 residues), with two same-sequence repeats, did not form an α-helix, but polypeptide α2L (15 residues; α2 with one additional leucine residue on its carboxyl terminal) did form an α-helix and fibrous assembly. Fibrous assembly formation was associated with polypeptides at least as long as polypeptide α2L and with five leucine residues, indicating that the C-terminal leucine has a critical element for stabilization of α-helix and fibril formation. In contrast, polypeptides α5 (35 residues) and α6 (42 residues) aggregated easily, although they formed α-helices. A 15-35-residue chain was required for fibrous assembly formation. Electron microscopy and X-ray fiber diffraction showed that the thinnest fibrous assemblies of polypeptides were about 20 Å and had periodicities coincident with the length of the α-helix in a longitudinal direction. These results indicated that the α-helix structures were orientated along the fibrous axis and assembled into a bundle. Furthermore, the width and length of fibrous assemblies changed with changes in the pH value, resulting in variations in the charged states of the residues. Our results suggest that the formation of fibrous assemblies of amphipathic α-helices is due to the assembly of bundles via the hydrophobic faces of the helices and extension with hydrophobic noncovalent bonds containing a leucine. PMID:23530905

  8. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Amino Acid Side Chains

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of...

  9. Roles of d-Amino Acids on the Bioactivity of Host Defense Peptides

    Hao Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Host defense peptides (HDPs are positively-charged and amphipathic components of the innate immune system that have demonstrated great potential to become the next generation of broad spectrum therapeutic agents effective against a vast array of pathogens and tumor. As such, many approaches have been taken to improve the therapeutic efficacy of HDPs. Amongst these methods, the incorporation of d-amino acids (d-AA is an approach that has demonstrated consistent success in improving HDPs. Although, virtually all HDP review articles briefly mentioned about the role of d-AA, however it is rather surprising that no systematic review specifically dedicated to this topic exists. Given the impact that d-AA incorporation has on HDPs, this review aims to fill that void with a systematic discussion of the impact of d-AA on HDPs.

  10. Cleaving Double-Stranded DNA with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  11. Penetration Depth of Surfactant Peptide KL4 into Membranes Is Determined by Fatty Acid Saturation

    Antharam, Vijay C.; Elliott, Douglas W.; Mills, Frank D.; Farver, R. Suzanne; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    KL4 is a 21-residue functional peptide mimic of lung surfactant protein B, an essential protein for lowering surface tension in the alveoli. Its ability to modify lipid properties and restore lung compliance was investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. KL4 binds fluid lamellar phase PC/PG lipid membranes and forms an amphipathic helix that alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics. The binding and helicity of KL4 is dep...

  12. Penetration depth of surfactant peptide KL4 into membranes is determined by fatty acid saturation.

    Antharam, Vijay C; Elliott, Douglas W; Mills, Frank D; Farver, R Suzanne; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2009-05-20

    KL(4) is a 21-residue functional peptide mimic of lung surfactant protein B, an essential protein for lowering surface tension in the alveoli. Its ability to modify lipid properties and restore lung compliance was investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. KL(4) binds fluid lamellar phase PC/PG lipid membranes and forms an amphipathic helix that alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics. The binding and helicity of KL(4) is dependent on the level of monounsaturation in the fatty acid chains. At physiologic temperatures, KL(4) is more peripheral and dynamic in fluid phase POPC/POPG MLVs but is deeply inserted into fluid phase DPPC/POPG vesicles, resulting in immobilization of the peptide. Substantial increases in the acyl chain order are observed in DPPC/POPG lipid vesicles with increasing levels of KL(4), and POPC/POPG lipid vesicles show small decreases in the acyl chain order parameters on addition of KL(4). Additionally, a clear effect of KL(4) on the orientation of the fluid phase PG headgroups is observed, with similar changes in both lipid environments. Near the phase transition temperature of the DPPC/POPG lipid mixtures, which is just below the physiologic temperature of lung surfactant, KL(4) causes phase separation with the DPPC remaining in a gel phase and the POPG partitioned between gel and fluid phases. The ability of KL(4) to differentially partition into lipid lamellae containing varying levels of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in curvature strain suggest a mechanism for peptide-mediated lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:19450480

  13. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Duff, K.C. [Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (United Kingdom); Saxena, A.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  15. Exploiting Protected Maleimides to Modify Oligonucleotides, Peptides and Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Clément Paris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews the possibilities offered by 2,5-dimethylfuran-protected maleimides. Suitably derivatized building blocks incorporating the exo Diels-Alder cycloadduct can be introduced at any position of oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, peptides and peptoids, making use of standard solid-phase procedures. Maleimide deprotection takes place upon heating, which can be followed by either Michael-type or Diels-Alder click conjugation reactions. However, the one-pot procedure in which maleimide deprotection and conjugation are simultaneously carried out provides the target conjugate more quickly and, more importantly, in better yield. This procedure is compatible with conjugates involving oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids. A variety of cyclic peptides and oligonucleotides can be obtained from peptide and oligonucleotide precursors incorporating protected maleimides and thiols.

  16. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Claude Daneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS spectroscopic techniques.

  17. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Claude Daneault; Saïd Barazzouk

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, th...

  18. An Amphipathic Undecapeptide with All d-Amino Acids Shows Promising Activity against Colistin-Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii and a Dual Mode of Action.

    Oddo, Alberto; Thomsen, Thomas T; Kjelstrup, Susanne; Gorey, Ciara; Franzyk, Henrik; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Hansen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Multiple strains of Acinetobacter baumannii have developed multidrug resistance (MDR), leaving colistin as the only effective treatment. The cecropin-α-melittin hybrid BP100 (KKLFKKILKYL-NH2) and its analogs have previously shown activity against a wide array of plant and human pathogens. In this study, we investigated the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 BP100 analogs (four known and 14 new) against the MDR A. baumannii strain ATCC BAA-1605, as well as against a number of other clinically relevant human pathogens. Selected peptides were further evaluated against strains of A. baumannii that acquired resistance to colistin due to mutations of the lpxC, lpxD, pmrA, and pmrB genes. The novel analogue BP214 showed antimicrobial activity at 1 to 2 μM and a hemolytic 50% effective concentration (EC50) of >150 μM. The lower activity of its enantiomer suggests a dual, specific and nonspecific mode of action. Interestingly, colistin behaved antagonistically to BP214 when pmrAB and lpxC mutants were challenged. PMID:26574005

  19. Hyaluronic acid functional amphipathic and redox-responsive polymer particles for the co-delivery of doxorubicin and cyclopamine to eradicate breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells

    Hu, Kelei; Zhou, Huige; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhu; Liu, Jing; Tang, Jinglong; Li, Jiayang; Zhang, Jiakun; Sheng, Wang; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Yan; Chen, Chunying

    2015-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to transform into bulk cancer cells, to promote tumor growth and establish tumor metastasis. To effectively inhibit tumor growth and prevent metastasis, treatments with conventional chemotherapy drugs should be combined with CSC targeted drugs. In this study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new amphiphilic polymer, hyaluronic acid-cystamine-polylactic-co-glycolic acid (HA-SS-PLGA), composed of a hydrophobic PLGA head and a hydrophilic HA segment linked by a bioreducible disulfide bond. With a double emulsion method, a nano delivery system was constructed to deliver doxorubicin (DOX) and cyclopamine (CYC, a primary inhibitor of the hedgehog signaling pathway of CSCs) to both a CD44-overexpressing breast CSC subpopulation and bulk breast cancer cells and allow an on-demand release. The resulting drug-loaded NPs exhibited a redox-responsive drug release profile. Dual drug-loaded particles potently diminished the number and size of tumorspheres and HA showed a targeting effect towards breast CSCs. In vivo combination therapy further demonstrated a remarkable synergistic anti-tumor effect and prolonged survival compared to mono-therapy using the orthotopic mammary fat pad tumor growth model. The co-delivery of drug and the CSC specific inhibitor towards targeted cancer chemotherapeutics provides an insight into anticancer strategy with facile control and high efficacy.Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to transform into bulk cancer cells, to promote tumor growth and establish tumor metastasis. To effectively inhibit tumor growth and prevent metastasis, treatments with conventional chemotherapy drugs should be combined with CSC targeted drugs. In this study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new amphiphilic polymer, hyaluronic acid-cystamine-polylactic-co-glycolic acid (HA-SS-PLGA), composed of a hydrophobic PLGA head and a hydrophilic HA segment linked by a bioreducible disulfide bond

  20. Analysis of Peptides and Conjugates by Amino Acid Analysis

    Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a highly accurate method for characterization of the composition of synthetic peptides. Together with mass spectrometry, it gives a reliable control of peptide quality and quantity before conjugation and immunization.Peptides are hydrolyzed, preferably in gas phase, with 6 M...... HCl at 110 °C for 20-24 h and the resulting amino acids analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions, tryptophan is destroyed, and cysteine also, unless derivatized, and the amides, glutamine and asparagine, are deamidated to...... glutamic acid and aspartic acid, respectively. Three different ways of calculating results are suggested, and taking the above limitations into account, a quantitation better than 5 % can usually be obtained....

  1. Hyaluronic Acid Binding Peptides Prevent Experimental Staphylococcal Wound Infection

    Zaleski, Kathleen J. ; Kolodka, Tadeusz; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; McLoughlin, Rachel M.; Mary L. Delaney; Charlton, Bernard T.; Johnson, Wendy; Tzianabos, Arthur O.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of surgical wound infections. The development of mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance by this and other bacterial pathogens has prompted the search for new approaches to treat infectious diseases. Hyaluronic acid binding peptides have been shown to modulate cellular trafficking during host responses and were assessed for their ability to treat and possibly prevent experimental surgical wound infections caused by S. aureus. Treatment with these peptides...

  2. Metal-based chemosensors for amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides

    Buryak, Andrey

    2007-01-01

    An organometallic 4d transition metal complex [Cp*RhCl2]2, together with commercially available dyes, was used to construct indicator displacement assays (IDAs) for the detection of peptides, amino acids, and nucleotides. The combination of the Cp*Rh complex with the dye azophloxine was found to form a chemosensing ensemble for the sequence-selective detection of histidine- and methionine-containing peptides in water at neutral pH. A strong interaction of the rhodium complex with peptides bea...

  3. Metal-based chemosensors for amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides

    Buryak, Andrey; Severin, Kay

    2008-01-01

    An organometallic 4d transition metal complex [Cp*RhCl2]2, together with commercially available dyes, was used to construct indicator displacement assays (IDAs) for the detection of peptides, amino acids, and nucleotides. The combination of the Cp*Rh complex with the dye azophloxine was found to form a chemosensing ensemble for the sequence-selective detection of histidine- and methionine-containing peptides in water at neutral pH. A strong interaction of the rhodium complex with peptides bea...

  4. Design and Characterization of an Acid-Activated Antimicrobial Peptide

    Li, Lina; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Yarbrough, Daniel; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell; Shi, Wenyuan

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries is a microbial biofilm infection in which the metabolic activities of plaque bacteria result in a dramatic pH decrease and shift the demineralization/ remineralization equilibrium on the tooth surface towards demineralization. In addition to causing a net loss in tooth minerals creation of an acidic environment favors growth of acid enduring and acid generating species, which causes further reduction in the plaque pH. In this study we developed a prototype antimicrobial peptide ...

  5. Design and characterization of an acid-activated antimicrobial peptide.

    Li, Lina; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Yarbrough, Daniel; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell; Shi, Wenyuan

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is a microbial biofilm infection in which the metabolic activities of plaque bacteria result in a dramatic pH decrease and shift the demineralization/remineralization equilibrium on the tooth surface towards demineralization. In addition to causing a net loss in tooth minerals, creation of an acidic environment favors growth of acid-enduring and acid-generating species, which causes further reduction in the plaque pH. In this study, we developed a prototype antimicrobial peptide capable of achieving high activity exclusively at low environmental pH to target bacterial species like Streptococcus mutans that produce acid and thrive under the low pH conditions detrimental for tooth integrity. The features of clavanin A, a naturally occurring peptide rich in histidine and phenylalanine residues with pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, served as a design basis for these prototype 'acid-activated peptides' (AAPs). Employing the major cariogenic species S. mutans as a model system, the two AAPs characterized in this study exhibited a striking pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, which correlated well with the calculated charge distribution. This type of peptide represents a potential new way to combat dental caries. PMID:19878192

  6. Conjugation of fatty acids with different lengths modulates the antibacterial and antifungal activity of a cationic biologically inactive peptide.

    Malina, Amir; Shai, Yechiel

    2005-09-15

    Many studies have shown that an amphipathic structure and a threshold of hydrophobicity of the peptidic chain are crucial for the biological function of AMPs (antimicrobial peptides). However, the factors that dictate their cell selectivity are not yet clear. In the present study, we show that the attachment of aliphatic acids with different lengths (10, 12, 14 or 16 carbon atoms) to the N-terminus of a biologically inactive cationic peptide is sufficient to endow the resulting lipopeptides with lytic activity against different cells. Mode-of-action studies were performed with model phospholipid membranes mimicking those of bacterial, mammalian and fungal cells. These include determination of the structure in solution and membranes by using CD and ATR-FTIR (attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared) spectroscopy, membrane leakage experiments and by visualizing bacterial and fungal damage via transmission electron microscopy. The results obtained reveal that: (i) the short lipopeptides (10 and 12 carbons atoms) are non-haemolytic, active towards both bacteria and fungi and monomeric in solution. (ii) The long lipopeptides (14 and 16 carbons atoms) are highly antifungal, haemolytic only at concentrations above their MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) values and aggregate in solution. (iii) All the lipopeptides adopt a partial alpha-helical structure in 1% lysophosphatidylcholine and bacterial and mammalian model membranes. However, the two short lipopeptides contain a significant fraction of random coil in fungal membranes, in agreement with their reduced antifungal activity. (iv) All the lipopeptides have a membranolytic effect on all types of cells assayed. Overall, the results reveal that the length of the aliphatic chain is sufficient to control the pathogen specificity of the lipopeptides, most probably by controlling both the overall hydrophobicity and the oligomeric state of the lipopeptides in solution. Besides providing us with basic

  7. Non-protein amino acids in peptide design

    S Aravinda; N Shamala; Rituparna S Roy; P Balaram

    2003-10-01

    An overview of the use of non-protein amino acids in the design of conformationally well-defined peptides, based on work from the author’s laboratory, is discussed. The crystal structures of several designed oligopeptides illustrate the use -aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) in the construction of helices, D-amino acids in the design of helix termination segments and DPro-Xxx segments for nucleating of -hairpin structures. - and -amino acid residues have been used to expand the range of designed polypeptide structures.

  8. Engineering Dehydrated Amino Acid Residues in the Antimicrobial Peptide Nisin

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Rollema, Harry S.; Yap, Wyanda M.G.J.; Boot, Hein J.; Siezen, Roland J.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1992-01-01

    The small antimicrobial peptide nisin, produced by Lactococcus lactis, contains the uncommon amino acid residues dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine and five thio ether bridges. Since these structures are posttranslationally formed from Ser, Thr, and Cys residues, it is feasible to study their role i

  9. Determination of acidity constants of antimicrobial peptides by capillary electrophoresis

    Tůmová, Tereza; Monincová, Lenka; Čeřovský, Václav; Kašička, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, Suppl 1 (2015), S130. ISSN 0175-7571. [EBSA European Biophysics Congress /10./. 18.07.2015-22.07.2015, Dresden] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acidity constant * antimicrobial peptides * capillary electrophoresis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  10. Peptide nucleic acids and their potential applications in biotechnology

    Buchardt, O.; Egholm, M.; Berg, R.H.; Nielsen, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are novel DNA mimics in which the sugar-phosphate backbone has been replaced with a backbone based on amino acids1-3. PNAs exhibit sequence-specific binding to DNA and RNA with higher affinities and specificities than unmodified DNA. They,are resistant to nuclease and...... protease attack in serum and cellular extracts and, thus, appear very promising as diagnostic and biomolecular probes, and possibly as antisense and antigene drugs....

  11. Peptide nucleic acid - an opportunity for bio-nanotechnology

    Anstätt, Philipp; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    DNA is a major player in the field of bio-nanotechnology and many interesting applications have been realized using this oligonucleotide. In contrast, the use of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is a non-natural, neutral analogue of DNA with superior hybridization strengths compared to DNA, is still in its infancy in bio-nanotechnology. However, as demonstrated in this short review using selected studies, promising examples demonstrating the tremendous opportunities that PNA can offer for bi...

  12. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model;...

  13. Nucleic Acid Backbone Structure Variations: Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic analogues and mimics of the natural genetic material deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are potential gene therapeutic (antisense or antigene) drugs. One of these mimics, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), are chemically closer to peptides and proteins than to DNA, but nonetheless have retained many...... of the structural properties of DNA. These molecules have found applications as probes in genetic diagnostics and are also being developed into antisense (RNA (ribonucleic acid) interference) gene therapeutic drugs, targeting selected genes through sequence-specific recognition of (messenger or micro...

  14. Helical synthetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux

    Bielicki, John K.; Natarajan, Pradeep

    2010-04-06

    The present invention provides peptides comprising at least one amphipathic alpha helix and having an cholesterol mediating activity and a ABCA stabilization activity. The invention further provides methods of using such peptides.

  15. Enhanced cellular delivery of cell-penetrating peptide-peptide nucleic acid conjugates by photochemical internalization

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been widely used for a cellular delivery of biologically relevant cargoes including antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). Although chemical conjugation of PNA to a variety of CPPs significantly improves the cellular uptake of the PNAs, bioavailability...... (antisense activity) is still limited by endocytotic entrapment. We have shown that this low bioavailability can be greatly improved by combining CPP-PNA conjugate administration with a photochemical internalization technique using photosensitizers such as aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS(2a)) or...... cellular efficacy of CPP conjugates were evaluated by measuring luciferase activity as a result of splicing correction and was also confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of luciferase pre-mRNA....

  16. Synthesis of New Chrial Building Blocks for Novel Peptide Nucleic Acids

    WU,Jie; XU,Xiao-Yu; LIU,Ke-Liang

    2003-01-01

    N-Boc protected amino acids of analogues of peptide nucleic acid (PNA),which are a class of conformationally constrained building blocks based on 4-aminoproline backbone with chirality at 2-c and 4-c,have been synthesized.Those monomers can be used for the construction of novel peptide nucleic acid analogues.

  17. Structural Characterization of de Novo Designed L5K5W Model Peptide Isomers with Potent Antimicrobial and Varied Hemolytic Activities

    Sung-Jean Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop short antimicrobial peptides with simple amino acid compositions, we generated a series of undecapeptide isomers having the L5K5W formula. Amino acid sequences were designed to be perfectly amphipathic when folded into a helical conformation by converging leucines onto one side and lysines onto the other side of the helical axis. The single tryptophans, whose positions were varied in the primary structures, were located commonly at the critical amphipathic interface in the helical wheel projection. Helical conformations and the tryptophanyl environments of the 11 L5K5W peptides were confirmed and characterized by circular dichroism, fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All of the isomers exhibited a potent, broad-spectrum of antibacterial activity with just a slight variance in individual potency, whereas their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes were significantly diversified. Interestingly, helical dispositions and fluorescence blue shifts of the peptides in aqueous trifluoroethanol solutions, rather than in detergent micelles, showed a marked linear correlation with their hemolytic potency. These results demonstrate that our de novo design strategy for amphipathic helical model peptides is effective for developing novel antimicrobial peptides and their hemolytic activities can be estimated in correlation with structural parameters.

  18. Evidence for the extramembranous location of the putative amphipathic helix of acetylcholine receptor

    Evidence has been obtained demonstrating that the peptides GVKYIAE and AIKYIAE found in the potential amphipathic helices of the α and β subunits, respectively, of acetylcholine receptor are not buried in the membrane. The peptide KYIAE was synthesized, and polyclonal antibodies were prepared against a conjugate of bovine serum albumin and synthetic peptide. An immunoadsorbent capable of binding and subsequently releasing peptides ending with the sequence-YIAE was produced by attaching these specific antibodies to agarose. Native acetylcholine receptor was labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and Na[3H]BH4. The labeled protein was stripped of phospholipid and digested with the protease from Staphylococcus aureus strain V8. The digest was submitted to immunoadsorption to isolate the labeled indigenous peptides. As a control, α and β polypeptides prepared by gel filtration of a solution of acetylcholine receptor in detergent were stripped of detergent and labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and Na[3H]BH4 in the presence of 8 M urea. The labeled α and β polypeptides were digested and submitted to immunoadsorption. The specific radioactivities of the indigenous peptides from the α and β subunits labeled under native and denaturing conditions were nearly equal. In similar experiments using isethionyl (2',4'-dinitrophenyl)-3-aminopropionimidate as the labeling agent, the indigenous peptides from native and denatured receptor were also labeled to the same extent. Since these peptides are labeled to the same extent whether or not the protein is denatured, they cannot be buried in the membrane

  19. Detection of cancer cells using a peptide nanotube–folic acid modified graphene electrode

    Castillo, John J.; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Rozlosnik, Noemi;

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the preparation of a graphene electrode modified with a new conjugate of peptide nanotubes and folic acid for the selective detection of human cervical cancer cells over-expressing folate receptors. The functionalization of peptide nanotubes with folic acid was confirmed by...... fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The peptide nanotube–folic acid modified graphene electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The modification of the graphene electrode with peptide nanotube–folic acid led to an increase in the current signal. The......–folic acid modified electrode lowered the electron transfer resulting in a decrease in the measured current. A detection limit of 250 human cervical cancer cells per mL was obtained. Control experiments confirmed that the peptide nanotube–folic acid electrode specifically recognized folate receptors. The...

  20. Improved cellular uptake of antisense Peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cell-penetrating Peptide and a lipid domain

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    peptides known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is attracting wide attention for a variety of biologically active molecules. CPP-mediated delivery is typically based on the covalent conjugation of the (therapeutic) cargo to CPPs, and is particularly relevant for the delivery of noncharged RNA...... interference agents such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and morpholino oligomers. Although chemical conjugation to a variety of CPPs significantly improves the cellular uptake of PNAs, the bioavailability (and hence antisense activity) of CPP-PNA -conjugates is still highly limited by endocytotic entrapment...

  1. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...... and sequence specificity. In an E. coli cell extract, efficient inhibition is observed when using PNA concentrations in the nanomolar range, whereas micromolar concentrations are required for inhibition in growing cells. A mutant strain of E. coli that is more permeable to antibiotics also is more...... susceptible to antisense PNAs than the wild type. This chapter details methods for testing the antisense activities of PNA in E. coli. As an example of the specific antisense inhibition possible, we show the effects of an anti-beta-galactosidase PNA in comparison to control PNAs. With improvements in cell...

  2. Radiation chemistry of amino acids and peptides in aqueous solutions

    Radiation chemistry relevant to radiation preservation of high protein foods is reviewed. Some conclusions concerning the chemistry of irradiated amino acids, peptides, and proteins have been derived from product analysis of γ-irradiated solutions while the main mechanistic considerations result from the chemistry and kinetics of free radical intermediates observed by pulse radiolysis. The precursors of chemistry in not too concentrated solutions (-, OH, and H. Their reactivity with molecules and their preference for characteristic groups within the molecule are discussed. The reviewed reactions of the model systems are accountable for a variety of radiolytic products found in irradiated foods. From detailed understanding of radiation chemistry in aqueous and frozen systems formation of many classes of compounds can be predicted or entirely eliminated in order to corroborate and extend the conclusions reached from the animal feeding experiments concerning the formation of toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic compounds and/or reduction of the nutritional value of foods

  3. Imaging oncogene expression in breast cancer with receptor specific peptides and peptide nucleic acids

    Full text: This year, breast cancer (BC) will attack approximately 210, 000 and will take the lives of 40,000 women in the U.S. Standard screening with breast self-examination and mammography, recommended to minimize BC morbidity, miss 10-20% (up to 40% in young women) of breast cancer. Moreover, if an abnormality is found, an invasive diagnostic procedure is required to determine if the breast contains hyperplasia, atypia, or cancer. Approximately 80% of invasive procedures detect a benign pathology. BC cells express a gene product, cell surface receptor VPAC1, so named because the endogenous growth hormones Vasoctive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) and Pituitary Adenylate Cylcase Activating Peptide (PACAP) bind to VPAC1 receptors with high affinity. VPAC1 receptors are overexpressed on 100% of human breast cancer cells. Cyclin D1 is a key regulator of the cell cycle and overexpressed in 50% to 80% of breast cells, whereas it is low or absent in normal breast tissues. The human breast cancer cell line MCF7 displays elevated levels of CCND1 mRNA, encoding cyclin D1, and an elevated level of IGF1R mRNA, encoding insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. We hypothesed that 99mTc or 64Cu labeled VIP analogues, or a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) chimera specific for IGFI receptor and CCND1 mRNA, will permit us to early image breast cancer by planar, SPECT or PET imaging. We synthesized, characterized and administered i.v. 99mTc-AcGly-D (Ala)-Gly-Glyaminobutanoyl- VIP (TP3654), 64Cu diaminodithiol-aminobutanoyl-VIP (TP3982), 99mTc- AcGly-D(Ala)-Gly-Gly-PNA-D(Cys-ser-lys-Cys) chimera (WT4185) and Cu-64-DOTAPNA- D(cys-ser-lys-cys) (WT4348). A 12mer, CTGGTGTTCCAT nucleic acid sequence served as the PNA and 3 or 4 mer mismatched PNAs as negative controls. Using 99mTc-TP3654 we have successfully imaged human breast cancers not detectable by current modalities. In athymic, nude mice bearing MCF-7 human breast cancer xenographs, Cu-64-TP3982 tumour uptake was 85 times greater than 99m

  4. Helical 1:1 α/Sulfono-γ-AA Heterogeneous Peptides with Antibacterial Activity.

    She, Fengyu; Nimmagadda, Alekhya; Teng, Peng; Su, Ma; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-05-01

    As one of the greatest threats facing the 21st century, antibiotic resistance is now a major public health concern. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer an alternative approach to combat emerging multi-drug-resistant bacteria. It is known that helical HDPs such as magainin 2 and its analogs adopt cationic amphipathic conformations upon interaction with bacterial membranes, leading to membrane disruption and subsequent bacterial cell death. We have previously shown that amphipathic sulfono-γ-AApeptides could mimic magainin 2 and exhibit bactericidal activity. In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that amphipathic helical 1:1 α/sulfono-γ-AA heterogeneous peptides, in which regular amino acids and sulfono-γ-AApeptide building blocks are alternatively present in a 1:1 pattern, display potent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) suggests that the lead sequences adopt defined helical structures. The subsequent studies including fluorescence microscopy and time-kill experiments indicate that these hybrid peptides exert antimicrobial activity by mimicking the mechanism of HDPs. Our findings may lead to the development of HDP-mimicking antimicrobial peptidomimetics that combat drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. In addition, our results also demonstrate the effective design of a new class of helical foldamer, which could be employed to interrogate other important biological targets such as protein-protein interactions in the future. PMID:27030636

  5. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Medical College of University of Cornell, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Lampson, M A [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Medical College of University of Cornell, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Greathouse, D V [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); II, R E Koeppe [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Andersen, O S [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Medical College of University of Cornell, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2006-07-19

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)-Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly-alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  6. An expanded set of amino acid analogs for the ribosomal translation of unnatural peptides.

    Matthew C T Hartman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The application of in vitro translation to the synthesis of unnatural peptides may allow the production of extremely large libraries of highly modified peptides, which are a potential source of lead compounds in the search for new pharmaceutical agents. The specificity of the translation apparatus, however, limits the diversity of unnatural amino acids that can be incorporated into peptides by ribosomal translation. We have previously shown that over 90 unnatural amino acids can be enzymatically loaded onto tRNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have now used a competition assay to assess the efficiency of tRNA-aminoacylation of these analogs. We have also used a series of peptide translation assays to measure the efficiency with which these analogs are incorporated into peptides. The translation apparatus tolerates most side chain derivatives, a few alpha,alpha disubstituted, N-methyl and alpha-hydroxy derivatives, but no beta-amino acids. We show that over 50 unnatural amino acids can be incorporated into peptides by ribosomal translation. Using a set of analogs that are efficiently charged and translated we were able to prepare individual peptides containing up to 13 different unnatural amino acids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that a diverse array of unnatural building blocks can be translationally incorporated into peptides. These building blocks provide new opportunities for in vitro selections with highly modified drug-like peptides.

  7. The structural flexibility of the preferredoxin transit peptide.

    Wienk, H L; Czisch, M; de Kruijff, B

    1999-06-25

    In order to obtain insight into the structural flexibility of chloroplast targeting sequences, the Silene pratensis preferredoxin transit peptide was studied by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In water, the peptide is unstructured, with a minor propensity towards helix formation from Val-9 to Ser-12 and from Gly-30 to Ser-40. In 50% (v/v) trifluoroethanol, structurally independent N- and C-terminal helices are stabilized. The N-terminal helix appears to be amphipathic, with hydrophobic and hydroxylated amino acids on opposite sides. The C-terminal helix comprises amino acids Met-29-Gly-50 and is destabilized at Gly-39. No ordered tertiary structure was observed. The results are discussed in terms of protein import into chloroplasts, in which the possible interactions between the transit peptide and lipids are emphasized. PMID:10405168

  8. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and functi...

  9. Biomimetic PEG hydrogels crosslinked with minimal plasmin-sensitive tri-amino acid peptides

    Jo, Suk Jo; Rizzi, Simone C.; Ehrbar, Martin; Weber, Franz E.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2010-01-01

    Semi-synthetic, proteolytically degradable polymer hydrogels have proven effective as scaffolds to augment bone and skin regeneration in animals. However, high costs due to expensive peptide building blocks pose a significant hurdle towards broad clinical usage of these materials. Here we demonstrate that tri-amino acid peptides bearing lysine (or arginine), flanked by two cysteine residues for crosslinking, are adequate as minimal plasmin-sensitive peptides in poly(ethylene glycol)-based hyd...

  10. The impact of amino acid side chain mutations in conformational design of peptides and proteins

    Laufer, B.; Frank, A.O.; Chatterjee, J; Neubauer, T; Mas Moruno, Carlos; Kummerlöwe, G.; Kessler, H.

    2010-01-01

    Local energetic effects of amino acid replacements are often considered to have only a moderate influence on the backbone conformation of proteins or peptides. As these effects are difficult to determine experimentally, no comparison has yet been performed. However, knowledge of the influence of side chain mutations is essential in protein homology modeling and in optimizing biologically active peptide ligands in medicinal chemistry. Furthermore, the tool of N-methylation of peptides is of in...

  11. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  12. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  13. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  14. Improved cellular activity of antisense peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cationic peptide-lipid (CatLip) domain

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Zachar, Vladimir; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    and therefore mechanisms that promote endosomal escape (or avoid the endosomal route) are required for improving bioavailability. A variety of auxiliary agents (chloroquine, calcium ions, or lipophilic photosensitizers) has this effect, but improved, unaided delivery would be highly advantageous in...... particular for future in vivo applications. We find that simply conjugating a lipid domain (fatty acid) to the cationic peptide (a CatLip conjugate) increases the biological effect of the corresponding PNA (CatLip) conjugates in a luciferase cellular antisense assay up to 2 orders of magnitude. The effect...... increases with increasing length of the fatty acid (C8-C16) but in parallel also results in increased cellular toxicity, with decanoic acid being optimal. Furthermore, the relative enhancement is significantly higher for Tat peptide compared to oligoarginine. Confocal microscopy and chloroquine enhancement...

  15. Tetrazine-Containing Amino Acid for Peptide Modification and Live Cell Labeling.

    Zhongqiu Ni

    Full Text Available A novel amino acid derivative 3-(4-(1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine-3-yl phenyl-2-aminopropanoic acid was synthesized in this study. The compound possessed better water-solubility and was synthesized more easily compared with the well-known and commercially available 3-(p-benzylamino-1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine. Tetrazine-containing amino acid showed excellent stability in biological media and might be used for cancer cell labeling. Moreover, the compound remained relatively stable in 50% TFA/DCM with little decomposition after prolonged exposure at room temperature. The compound could be utilized as phenylalanine or tyrosine analogue in peptide modification, and the tetrazine-containing peptide demonstrated more significant biological activity than that of the parent peptide. The combination of tetrazine group and amino acid offered broad development prospects of the bioorthogonal labeling and peptide synthesis.

  16. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  17. Peptide nucleic acid: a new artificial biomacromolecular with great potential applications in molecular biology and biomedicine

    WANG Jin-ke; LU Zu-hong; HE Nong-yue

    2001-01-01

    @@ Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic that was originally developed by Peter E Nielsen in 1991 as a reagent for sequence-specific recognition of double stranded (ds) DNA by a conventional triple helix type principle.

  18. A Novel Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth-stimulating Peptide from Broad Bean (Vicia faba .) Protein Hydrolysates

    Ping Xiao; Yuan Liu; Rizwan-ur-Rehman; Ran Kang; Yanping Wang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, broad bean protein hydrolysates (BPH) produced by alcalase with strong-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was first time reported. In order to obtain the key peptide that have growth-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB), gel filtration chromatography and Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) were applied to isolate and purify the peptides from BPH. Finally, F4-2 elicited the highest activity for LAB, corresponding to amin...

  19. Gamma-aminoadamantane carboxylic acids : orientating building blocks in peptide chemistry

    Wanka, Lukas

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis deals with gamma-aminoadamantane carboxylic acids. Allthough the simplest of these structural analogues of GABA were known for decades, no significant peptide chemistry has been disclosed. Therefore, improved syntheses of these compounds were worked out that allowed for facilitated syntheses of already known as well as new members of gamma-aminoadamantane carboxylic acids. Fmoc-/tert. butyl protective group chemistry was utilized to synthesize peptides incorporating the gam...

  20. Immunogenicity of a synthetic HBsAg peptide: enhancement by conjugation to a fatty acid carrier.

    Hopp, T P

    1984-01-01

    Effective immunization with short polypeptide antigens has typically only been possible when the peptide is conjugated to a large carrier substance, usually a protein. Such immunizations suffer from difficulties in producing conjugates of reliable composition, and from unwanted anti-carrier immune responses. When a chemically synthesized peptide, bearing hepatitis B virus a-determinant specificity, was conjugated to a dipalmityl-lysine moiety, a significant improvement in anti-hepatitis B surface antigen response was obtained, in comparison to the corresponding peptide-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate. Dipalmityl lysyl peptide conjugates are readily made by standard Merrifield synthesis procedures, and are relatively free of byproducts that might cause unwanted immune responses. Gel filtration experiments suggest that the conjugates form large aggregates, possibly micelles, which may play a significant role in the enhancement of the anti-peptide response. These properties suggest that fatty acid conjugation may be a useful procedure for producing chemically synthesized peptide vaccines. PMID:6423970

  1. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature’s most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  2. An amphipathic undecapeptide with all D-amino acids shows promising activity against colistin-resistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii and a dual mode of action

    Oddo, Alberto; Thomsen, Thomas Thyge; Kjelstrup, Susanne;

    2016-01-01

    Multiple strains of Acinetobacter baumannii have developed multidrug resistance (MDR), leaving colistin as the only effective treatment. The cecropin-α-melittin hybrid BP100 (KKLFKKILKYL-NH2) and its analogs have previously shown activity against a wide array of plant and human pathogens. In this...... study, we investigated the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 BP100 analogs (four known and 14 new) against the MDR A. baumannii strain ATCC BAA-1605, as well as against a number of other clinically relevant human pathogens. Selected peptides were further evaluated against strains of A. baumannii...... that acquired resistance to colistin due to mutations of the lpxC, lpxD, pmrA, and pmrB genes. The novel analogue BP214 showed antimicrobial activity at 1 to 2 μM and a hemolytic 50% effective concentration (EC50) of >150 μM. The lower activity of its enantiomer suggests a dual, specific and...

  3. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  4. Endogenous flow of amino acids in the avian ileum as influenced by increasing dietary peptide concentrations.

    Ravindran, Velmurugu; Morel, Patrick C H; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Thomas, Donald V

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish whether feeding broiler chickens with diets containing increasing dietary peptide concentrations would cause increases in ileal endogenous amino acid flow. The flow of N and most amino acids increased quadratically (P < 0.05 to 0.001) with increasing dietary concentrations of peptides. The exceptions were the flow of threonine, serine, glycine, tyrosine and cystine, which increased linearly (P < 0.001) with dietary peptide levels. Another notable exception to the general trend was the flow of proline, which was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in birds fed the protein-free diet. The amino acid profile of endogenous protein, expressed as proportion of crude protein, indicated that the ratios of threonine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, leucine, histidine, arginine and cystine were influenced (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. In general, compared with the protein-free diet, the ratios of threonine and arginine in endogenous protein were lower (P < 0.05) and those of glutamic acid, glycine and histidine were greater (P < 0.05) in diets with high concentrations of peptides. The ratio of proline was found to decrease (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. These changes in the amino acid profile of endogenous protein are probably reflective of changes in the output of one or more of the components of endogenous protein. Overall, the present results demonstrated that increasing dietary peptide concentrations increased the flow of endogenous amino acid flow at the terminal ileum of broiler chickens in a dose-dependent manner and also caused changes in the composition of endogenous protein. The observed changes in endogenous amino flow will influence the maintenance requirements for amino acids and also have implications for the calculation of true digestibility coefficient of feedstuffs. PMID:18662428

  5. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  6. Targeting lipopolyplexes using bifunctional peptides incorporating hydrophobic spacer amino acids: synthesis, transfection, and biophysical studies.

    Pilkington-Miksa, Michael A; Writer, Michele J; Sarkar, Supti; Meng, Qing-Hai; Barker, Suzie E; Shamlou, Parviz Ayazi; Hailes, Helen C; Hart, Stephen L; Tabor, Alethea B

    2007-01-01

    We have developed efficient synthetic routes to two hydrophobic amino acids, suitably protected for solid-phase peptide synthesis, and have successfully synthesized peptides containing these or other hydrophobic amino acids as spacers between a Lys16 moiety and an integrin-targeting motif. These peptides have in turn been used to formulate a range of lipopolyplex vectors with Lipofectin and plasmid DNA. The transfection efficiencies of these vectors and their aggregation behavior in buffers and in serum have been studied. We have shown that vectors containing peptides incorporating long linkers that are entirely hydrophobic are less efficient transfection agents. However, linkers of equivalent length that are in part hydrophobic show improved transfection properties, which is probably due to the improved accessibility of the integrin-binding motif. PMID:17915956

  7. Incorporation of N-amidino-pyroglutamic acid into peptides using intramolecular cyclization of alpha-guanidinoglutaric acid.

    Burov, Sergey; Moskalenko, Yulia; Dorosh, Marina; Shkarubskaya, Zoya; Panarin, Evgeny

    2009-11-01

    N-terminal modification of peptides by unnatural amino acids significantly affects their enzymatic stability, conformational properties and biological activity. Application of N-amidino-amino acids, positively charged under physiological conditions, can change peptide conformation and its affinity to the corresponding receptor. In this article, we describe synthesis of short peptides, containing a new building block-N-amidino-pyroglutamic acid. Although direct guanidinylation of pyroglutamic acid and oxidation of N-amidino-proline using RuO(4) did not produce positive results, N-amidino-Glp-Phe-OH was synthesized on Wang polymer by cyclization of alpha-guanidinoglutaric acid residue. In the course of synthesis, it was found that literature procedure of selective Boc deprotection using TMSOTf/TEA reagent is accompanied by concomitant side reaction of triethylamine alkylation by polymer linker fragment. It should be mentioned that independently from cyclization time and coupling agent (DIC or HCTU), the lactam formation was incomplete. Separation of the cyclic product from the linear precursor was achieved by HPLC in ammonium formate buffer at pH 6. HPLC analysis showed N-amidino-Glp-Phe-OH stability at acidic and physiological pH and fast ring opening in water solution at pH 9. The suggested method of N-amidino-Glp residue formation can be applied in the case of short peptide chains, whereas synthesis of longer ones will require fragment condensation approach. PMID:19739127

  8. DNA-like double helix formed by peptide nucleic acid

    Wittung, P; Nielsen, Peter E.; Buchardt, O; Egholm, M; Nordén, B

    1994-01-01

    Although the importance of the nucleobases in the DNA double helix is well understood, the evolutionary significance of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone and the contribution of this chemical entity to the overall helical structure and stability of the double helix is not so clear. Peptide nucleic...... of double helical DNA-like structures in solution....

  9. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  10. Antibacterial Peptide Nucleic Acid-Antimicrobial Peptide (PNA-AMP) Conjugates

    Hansen, Anna Mette; Bonke, Gitte; Larsen, Camilla Josephine; Yavari, Niloofar; Nielsen, Peter E.; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    )-Tat48-60, BF-2A-RXR, and drosocin-RXR are capable of transporting PNA effectively into E. coli (MICs of 1-4 μM). Importantly, presence of the inner-membrane peptide transporter SbmA was not required for antibacterial activity of PNA-AMP conjugates containing Pep-1-K, KLW-9,13-a, or drosocin-RXR (MICs...

  11. Templated Synthesis of Peptide Nucleic Acids via Sequence-Selective Base-Filling Reactions

    Heemstra, Jennifer M.; Liu, David Ruchien

    2009-01-01

    The templated synthesis of nucleic acids has previously been achieved through the backbone ligation of preformed nucleotide monomers or oligomers. In contrast, here we demonstrate templated nucleic acid synthesis using a base-filling approach in which individual bases are added to abasic sites of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Because nucleobase substrates in this approach are not self-reactive, a base-filling approach may reduce the formation of nontemplated reaction products. Using either re...

  12. Photochemical addition of amino acids and peptides to homopolyribonucleotides of the major DNA bases

    The photochemical quantum yields for addition of glycine and the L-amino acids commonly occurring in proteins to polyadenylic acid, polycytidylic acid, polyguanylic acid and polyribothymidylic acid have been determined in deoxygenated phosphate buffer using a fluorescamine assay technique. Polyadenylic acid was reactive with eleven of the twenty amino acids tested, with phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamine, lysine and asparagine having the highest quantum yields. Polyguanylic acid reacted with sixteen amino acids; phenylalanine, arginine, cysteine, tyrosine, and lysine displayed the largest quantum yields. Polycytidylic acid showed reactivity with fifteen amino acids with lysine, phenylalanine, cysteine, tyrosine and arginine having the greatest quantum yields. Polyribothymidylic acid, reactive with fifteen of nineteen amino acids surveyed, showed the highest quantum yields for cysteine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, lysine and asparagine. None of the polynucleotides were reactive with aspartic acid or glutamic acid. The quantum yields for photoaddition of eighteen dipeptides of the form gycyl X (X being an amino acid), and of L-alanyl-L-tryptophan, L-seryl-L-seryl-L-serine, L-threonyl-L-threonyl-L-threonine, L-cystine-bis-glycine, and Nsup(α)-acetyllysine to polyadenylic acid, polycytidylic acid and polyguanylic acid were measured. All were found to add photochemically to each of these polymers. Polyribothymidylic acid, tested with eleven peptides and with Nsup(α)-acetyllysine, was found to be reactive with all. (author)

  13. A Novel Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth-stimulating Peptide from Broad Bean (Vicia faba . Protein Hydrolysates

    Ping Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, broad bean protein hydrolysates (BPH produced by alcalase with strong-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB was first time reported. In order to obtain the key peptide that have growth-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB, gel filtration chromatography and Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC were applied to isolate and purify the peptides from BPH. Finally, F4-2 elicited the highest activity for LAB, corresponding to amino acid sequence Ser-Ala-Gln (304.10Da was identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS. Thus, this study shows that broad bean peptide is a good source to promote the LAB growth and this function is reported for the first time.

  14. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  15. Detection of target DNA using fluorescent cationic polymer and peptide nucleic acid probes on solid support

    Leclerc Mario

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acids detection using microarrays requires labelling of target nucleic acids with fluorophores or other reporter molecules prior to hybridization. Results Using surface-bound peptide nucleic acids (PNA probes and soluble fluorescent cationic polythiophenes, we show a simple and sensitive electrostatic approach to detect and identify unlabelled target nucleic acid on microarray. Conclusion This simple methodology opens exciting possibilities for applied genetic analysis for the diagnosis of infections, identification of genetic mutations, and forensic inquiries. This electrostatic strategy could also be used with other nucleic acid detection methods such as electrochemistry, silver staining, metallization, quantum dots, or electrochemical dyes.

  16. Co(II) complexes of amino acids and peptides in aqueous solution studied by 170 NMR

    Structural, dynamic and kinetic 170 NMR investigations of the complexation of metal ions with amino acids and peptides were performed in Glicine, proling cyclo(Ala '1'70-Ala), cyclo-(Gly170-Pro) and cyclo(Pro170-Gly). The 170 carboxyl and carbonylsignals of paramagnetic complexes with amino acids were observed and allowed for the determinatio, in several cases, of the stoichiometry of the ocmplexes formed and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing ligand exchange. It was found that the paramagnetic ions bind to the oxygen of the peptide carboxyl group. (H.W.). 25 refs.; 10 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  18. A Study on Anti-oxidative Activity of Soybean Peptides with Linoleic Acid Peroxidation Systems

    2006-01-01

    Soybean bioactive peptides(SBPs) were prepared from the isolated soybean protein by proteolysis with an alkaline protease, alcalase, at 50 ℃ and pH = 8. 0. The dependence of hydrolysis time on hydrolysis degree and molecular weight distribution were examined. The hydrolysate was fractionated on a Sephadex G-25 column and the anti-oxidative activities of the fractions were detected by the method of pyrogallol auto-oxidation. The average chain length of soybean peptides that have anti-oxidative activity was estimated to be about 7. The anti-oxidative properties of the soybean peptide were also studied by using linoleic acid peroxidation systems. The optimal condition of the peroxidation system was set up, Vc/Cu2 + as the inducer at pH = 7.4 and 25 ℃. In addition, soybean peptides show higher antioxidative activity compared with GSH.

  19. Characterization of bioactive RGD peptide immobilized onto poly(acrylic acid) thin films by plasma polymerization

    Seo, Hyun Suk; Ko, Yeong Mu; Shim, Jae Won [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, MRC Center, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yun Kyong; Kook, Joong-Ki [Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong-Lyun [School of Applied Chemical Engineering and Center for Functional Nano Fine Chemicals, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, MRC Center, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    Plasma surface modification can be used to improve the surface properties of commercial pure Ti by creating functional groups to produce bioactive materials with different surface topography. In this study, a titanium surface was modified with acrylic acid (AA) using a plasma treatment and immobilized with bioactive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, which may accelerate the tissue integration of bone implants. Both terminals containing the -NH{sub 2} of RGD peptide sequence and -COOH of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) thin film were combined with a covalent bond in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). The chemical structure and morphology of AA film and RGD immobilized surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All chemical analysis showed full coverage of the Ti substrate with the PAA thin film containing COOH groups and the RGD peptide. The MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on each specimen, and the cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were examined. The surface-immobilized RGD peptide has a significantly increased the ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results suggest that the RGD peptide immobilization on the titanium surface has an effect on osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and potential use in osteo-conductive bone implants.

  20. Characterization of bioactive RGD peptide immobilized onto poly(acrylic acid) thin films by plasma polymerization

    Plasma surface modification can be used to improve the surface properties of commercial pure Ti by creating functional groups to produce bioactive materials with different surface topography. In this study, a titanium surface was modified with acrylic acid (AA) using a plasma treatment and immobilized with bioactive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, which may accelerate the tissue integration of bone implants. Both terminals containing the -NH2 of RGD peptide sequence and -COOH of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) thin film were combined with a covalent bond in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). The chemical structure and morphology of AA film and RGD immobilized surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All chemical analysis showed full coverage of the Ti substrate with the PAA thin film containing COOH groups and the RGD peptide. The MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on each specimen, and the cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were examined. The surface-immobilized RGD peptide has a significantly increased the ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results suggest that the RGD peptide immobilization on the titanium surface has an effect on osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and potential use in osteo-conductive bone implants.

  1. Characterization of bioactive RGD peptide immobilized onto poly(acrylic acid) thin films by plasma polymerization

    Seo, Hyun Suk; Ko, Yeong Mu; Shim, Jae Won; Lim, Yun Kyong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Cho, Dong-Lyun; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2010-11-01

    Plasma surface modification can be used to improve the surface properties of commercial pure Ti by creating functional groups to produce bioactive materials with different surface topography. In this study, a titanium surface was modified with acrylic acid (AA) using a plasma treatment and immobilized with bioactive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, which may accelerate the tissue integration of bone implants. Both terminals containing the -NH2 of RGD peptide sequence and -COOH of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) thin film were combined with a covalent bond in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). The chemical structure and morphology of AA film and RGD immobilized surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All chemical analysis showed full coverage of the Ti substrate with the PAA thin film containing COOH groups and the RGD peptide. The MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on each specimen, and the cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were examined. The surface-immobilized RGD peptide has a significantly increased the ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results suggest that the RGD peptide immobilization on the titanium surface has an effect on osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and potential use in osteo-conductive bone implants.

  2. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  3. Synthesis of peptides from amino acids and ATP with lysine-rich proteinoid

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the synthesis of peptides from aminoacids and ATP with a lysine-rich protenoid. The latter in aqueous solution catalyzes the formation of peptides from free amino acids and ATP; this catalytic activity is not found in acidic protenoids, even though the latter contain a basic aminoacid. The pH optimum for the synthesis is about 11, but it is appreciable below 8 and above 13. Temperature data indicate an optimum at 20 C or above, with little increase in rate up to 60 C. Pyrophosphate can be used instead of ATP, but the yields are lower. The ATP-aided syntheses of peptides in aqueous solution occur with several types of proteinous aminoacids.

  4. Maximins S, a novel group of antimicrobial peptides from toad Bombina maxima.

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Ji-Hong; Jin, Yang; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2005-02-18

    Amphibian skin secretions are rich in antimicrobial peptides acting as important components of innate defense system against invading microorganisms. A novel type of peptide, designated as maximin S, was deduced by random sequencing of 793 clones from a constructed Bombina maxima skin cDNA library. The putative primary structures of maximin S peptides can be grouped into five species, in which maximin S1 has 14 amino acid residues and the rest of maximin S peptides (S2-S5) all have 18 amino acid residues. Unlike most of the amphibian antimicrobial peptides so far identified, the newly characterized four maximin S precursors are composed of maximin S1 and different combinations of tandem repeated maximin S2-S5 linked by internal peptides. Except maximin S1, the predicted secondary structures of maximin S2-S5 show a similar amphipathic alpha-helical structure. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of partially isolated skin secretions of the toad indicates that most of the deduced maximin S peptides are expressed. Two deduced maximin S peptides (S1, S4) were synthesized and their antimicrobial activities were tested. Maximin S4 only had an antibiotic activity against mycoplasma and had no antibacterial or antifungal activity toward tested strains. Maximin S1 had no activity under the same conditions. PMID:15649437

  5. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  6. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides.

    McMillen, Chelsea L; Wright, Patience M; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26864792

  7. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-02-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  8. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  9. One-pot nanoparticulation of potentially bioactive peptides and gallic acid encapsulation.

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2016-11-01

    Whey protein isolate was hydrolyzed to an in vitro antioxidative hydrolysate, followed by transglutaminase-induced cross-linking and microemulsification in an oil phase. The obtained microemulsion was then dispersed in a gallic acid-rich model wastewater which caused gallic acid transportation into internal nanodroplets. Whey peptides were consequently gelled, yielding nanoparticles. Electrophoresis showed that β-lactoglobulin and low molecular weight peptides were cross-linked by transglutaminase. Protein hydrolysis and subsequent enzymatic cross-linking increased the ζ-potential value. Microscopic investigation indicated that most particles were non-spherical. Non-cross-linked and cross-linked peptides underwent a form of heat-triggered self-assembly in the dry state, while nanoparticles did not show such behavior. Peptide crystallites size was increased by cross-linking and acid-induced particle formation. The latter also caused a reduction in intensity of C-H stretching and C-N bending peaks in infra-red spectrum. Gallic acid release from particles to simulated gastrointestinal fluids was through diffusion from swollen particles, and reached almost 70% release. PMID:27211653

  10. Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria Synthesize Antioxidant Peptides during Sourdough Fermentation of Cereal Flours

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Pinto, Daniela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A pool of selected lactic acid bacteria was used for the sourdough fermentation of various cereal flours with the aim of synthesizing antioxidant peptides. The radical-scavenging activity of water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from sourdoughs was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of chemically acidified doughs. The highest activity was found for whole wheat, spelt, rye, and kamut sourdoughs. Almost the same results were found for the inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation. WSE were su...

  11. Membrane-Bound Basic Peptides Sequester Multivalent (PIP2), but Not Monovalent (PS), Acidic Lipids

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Gambhir, Alok; Hangyás-Mihályné, Gyöngyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Rädler, Joachim; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Several biologically important peripheral (e.g., myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) and integral (e.g., the epidermal growth factor receptor) membrane proteins contain clusters of basic residues that interact with acidic lipids in the plasma membrane. Previous measurements demonstrate that the polyvalent acidic lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is bound electrostatically (i.e., sequestered) by membrane-adsorbed basic peptides corresponding to these clusters. We report he...

  12. Design and Synthesis of Novel Peptide Nucleic Acid Monomers

    白金泉; 李英; 刘克良

    2001-01-01

    All of the four nucleobases in DNA have replaced the 4-hydroxy group of N-[2-(tert-butoxycarbonylaminomethyl)-trams-4-hydroxy]tetrahydropyrrole acetic acid methyl ester with cis-stereochemistry. An efficient route for the synthesis of N-[2-(tert-butoxycarbonylaminomethyl)-trans-4-hydroxy]-tetrahydropyrrole acetic acid methyl ester has been developed.Starting with this intermediate, the protected monmers were synthesized by the Mitsunobu reaction or via its tosylate.

  13. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  14. Question 1: Peptide Nucleic Acids and the Origin and Homochirality of Life

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  15. Purification, structure-function analysis, and molecular characterization of novel linear peptides from scorpion Opisthacanthus madagascariensis.

    Dai, Li; Corzo, Gerardo; Naoki, Hideo; Andriantsiferana, Marta; Nakajima, Terumi

    2002-05-24

    In the previous report [Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 286 (2001) 820], we described a novel short linear peptide, IsCT, with cytolytic activity isolated from the venom of scorpion Opisthacanthus madagascariensis. From the same scorpion venom, we further purified and characterized three short linear peptides named IsCT2, IsCTf, and IsCT2f that shared high homology with IsCT, while with different C-terminal areas between IsCT/IsCT2 and IsCTf/IsCT2f. Structure-activity relationship was analyzed by performing vivo and vitro assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Like IsCT, IsCT2 showed broad activity spectra against microbes (Gram positive and negative bacteria as well as fungi) and relatively weak hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells. It adopts an amphipathic alpha-helical structure in aqueous TFE and is able to disrupt the artificial membrane. However, the other two peptides IsCTf and IsCT2f showed no activity in antimicrobial or hemolytic assay. Furthermore, IsCTf and IsCT2f cannot form amphipathic alpha-helix while demonstrating random coil structure in aqueous TFE, which might result in their lost cytolytic activity. IsCTf and IsCT2f both exist in the crude venom and are proved to be enzymatic products from IsCT and IsCT2. Whether they have some other biological activity is still unclear. In addition, we got the cDNAs encoding the precursors of IsCT and IsCT2. Besides the signal peptide, they still contain an unusual acidic pro-peptide at the C-terminal that was quite different from other known precursors of scorpion venom peptides. The novel structure and biological activity of these peptides proposed them to be a new class in scorpion venom. PMID:12054688

  16. Overexpression of Antimicrobial, Anticancer, and Transmembrane Peptides in Escherichia coli through a Calmodulin-Peptide Fusion System.

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a serious health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of most organisms. A better understanding of their structures and mechanisms of action would lead to the design of more potent and safer AMPs as alternatives for current antibiotics. For detailed investigations, effective recombinant production which allows the facile modification of the amino acid sequence, the introduction of unnatural amino acids, and labeling with stable isotopes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies is desired. Several expression strategies have been introduced in previous reports; however, their effectiveness has been limited to a select few AMPs. Here, we have studied calmodulin (CaM) as a more universal carrier protein to express many types of AMPs in E. coli. We have discovered that the unique architecture of CaM, consisting of two independent target binding domains with malleable methionine-rich interaction surfaces, can accommodate numerous amino acid sequences containing basic and hydrophobic residues. This effectively masks the toxic antimicrobial activities of many amphipathic AMPs and protects them from degradation during expression and purification. Here, we demonstrate the expression of various AMPs using a CaM-fusion expression system, including melittin, fowlicidin-1, tritrpticin, indolicidin, puroindoline A peptide, magainin II F5W, lactoferrampin B, MIP3α51-70, and human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3), the latter requiring three disulfide bonds for proper folding. In addition, our approach was extended to the transmembrane domain of the cell adhesion protein l-selectin. We propose the use of the CaM-fusion system as a universal approach to express many cationic amphipathic peptides that are normally toxic and would kill the bacterial host cells. PMID:27502305

  17. Inspiration from the mirror: D-amino acid containing peptides in biomedical approaches.

    Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2016-06-01

    D-amino acids, the enantiomers of naturally abundant L-amino acids, bear unique stereochemistry properties that lead to the resistance towards most of the endogenous enzymes. Previous works have demonstrated applications of D-amino acids in therapeutic development with the aid of mirror-image phage display and retro-inverso peptide synthesis. In this review, we highlight the recent progress and challenges in the exploration of D-amino acids at the interface of chemistry and life science. First, we will introduce some progress made in traditional application of D-amino acids to enhance biostability of peptide therapeutics. Then, we discuss some works that explore the relatively underexplored interactions between the enzyme and D-amino acids and enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids. To highlight the enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids, we will describe several emerging works on the enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA) and their potential application in selective anti-inflammatory or anticancer therapies. At the end, we briefly mention the challenges and possible future directions. PMID:27159920

  18. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugates as carriers for cellular delivery of antisense oligomers

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the merits of a novel delivery strategy for the antisense oligomers based on cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated to a carrier PNA with sequence complementary to part of the antisense oligomer. The effect of these carrier CPP-PNAs was evaluated by using antisense PNA targeting...... splicing correction of the mutated luciferase gene in the HeLa pLuc705 cell line, reporting cellular (nuclear) uptake of the antisense PNA via luciferase activity measurement. Carrier CPP-PNA constructs were studied in terms of construct modification (with octaarginine and/or decanoic acid) and carrier PNA...... length (to adjust binding affinity). In general, the carrier CPP-PNA constructs including the ones with decanoyl modification provided significant increase of the activity of unmodified antisense PNA as well as of antisense octaarginine-PNA conjugates. Antisense activity, and by inference cellular...

  19. Interaction of actinides with amino acids: from peptides to proteins

    Structural information on complexes of actinides with molecules of biological interest is required to better understand the mechanisms of actinides transport in living organisms, and can contribute to develop new decorporation treatments. Our study is about Th(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV) and uranyl(VI) cations, which have a high affinity for some protein domains, and Fe(III), which is the natural cation of these biological systems. In this work, chelation of actinides has been brought to light with UV-visible-Near Infra Red spectroscopy, NMR, EPR, and ultrafiltration. Determination of the structure of the complexation site has been undertaken with Exafs measurements, and of the tertiary structure of the protein with SANS measurements. The first approach was to describe the interaction modes between actinides and essential chemical functions of proteins. Thus, the Ac-AspAspProAspAsp-NH2 peptide was studied as a possible chelate of actinides. Polynuclear species with μ-oxo or μ-hydroxo bridges were identified. The iron complex is binuclear, and the actinide ones have a higher nuclearity. The second approach was to study a real case of complexation of actinide with a protein: transferrin. Results show that around physiological ph a mononuclear complex is formed with Np(IV) and Pu(IV), while transferrin does not complex Th(IV) in the same conditions. Characteristic distances of M-transferrin complexes (M = Fe, Np, Pu) were determined. Moreover, the protein seems to be in its close conformation with Pu(IV), and in its open form with Np(IV) and UO22+. (author)

  20. The Role of Acidic Residues and of Sodium Ion Adduction on the Gas-Phase H/D Exchange of Peptides and Peptide Dimers

    Jurchen, John C.; Cooper, Russell E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2003-01-01

    Gas-phase H/D exchange is widely used for characterizing the structure of ions. However, many structural parameters that affect the rate of H/D exchange are poorly understood, which complicates the interpretation of experimental data. Here, the effects of sodium ion adduction on the rate of H/D exchange with D2O for a series of peptides and peptide dimers with varying numbers of acidic residues are described. The maximum number of sodium ion adducts that can be accommodated by the peptides an...

  1. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21/degree/K and 9/degree/K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenylalanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritiums are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins

  2. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21 K and 9 K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenyl-alanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritium are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  3. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  4. Heteropoly acids triggered self-assembly of cationic peptides into photo- and electro-chromic gels.

    Li, Jingfang; Xu, Jing; Li, Xiaodong; Gao, Wenmei; Wang, Liyan; Wu, Lixin; Lee, Myongsoo; Li, Wen

    2016-07-01

    A series of cationic peptides with alternating lysines and hydrophobic residues were designed and synthesized. These kinds of short peptides with protonated lysines can complex with anionic heteropoly acids (HPAs) to form a stable gel in water/ethanol mixed solution. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the short peptides adopted a mixed conformation (β-sheet and random-coil) within the gel matrix. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the heteropoly acids, acting as nanosized cross-linkers, first initiated the self-assembly of the cationic peptides into spherical nanostructures. Then these nanospheres accumulated with each other through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to form large sheet-like assemblies, which further interconnected with each other forming continuous 3D network structures. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the structural integrity of the HPAs was maintained during the gelation process. The resultant hybrid gels showed reversible photo- and elecrtro-chromic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the hybrid gels, capable of persistent and reversible changes of their colour, are attributed to the intervalence charge-transfer transition of the HPAs. Reversible information writing and erasing were demonstrated through a repeated photo-lithograph or electric stimuli without significant loss of the gel performance. PMID:27240759

  5. Anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid pretreatment converts insoluble polyglutamine peptides to soluble monomers

    Gunasekhar Burra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data provided in this article are related to the research article entitled “Unaided trifluoroacetic acid pretreatment solubilizes polyglutamine (polyGln peptides and retains their biophysical properties of aggregation” by Burra and Thakur (in press [1]. This research article reports data from size exclusion chromatography (SEC, reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry (MS assays. This data show that trifluoroacetic acid (TFA has the ability to convert insoluble polyGln peptides to soluble monomers. The data also clarify the possibility of trifluoroacetylation modification caused due to TFA. We hope the data presented here will enhance the understanding of polyGln disaggregation and solubilization. For more insightful and useful discussions, see the research article published in Analytical Biochemistry: Methods in the Biological Sciences (Burra and Thakur, in press [1].

  6. DNA-Templated Polymerization of Side-Chain-Functionalized Peptide Nucleic Acid Aldehydes

    Kleiner, Ralph E.; Brudno, Yevgeny; Birnbaum, Michael E.; Liu, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The DNA-templated polymerization of synthetic building blocks provides a potential route to the laboratory evolution of sequence-defined polymers with structures and properties not necessarily limited to those of natural biopolymers. We previously reported the efficient and sequence-specific DNA-templated polymerization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) aldehydes. Here, we report the enzyme-free, DNA-templated polymerization of side-chain-functionalized PNA tetramer and pentamer aldehydes. We obs...

  7. End-labeling of peptide nucleic acid with osmium complex. Voltammetry at carbon and mercury electrodes

    Paleček, Emil; Trefulka, Mojmír; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2009), s. 359-362. ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : peptide nucleic acid end-labeling * osmium tetroxide complexes * electroactive labels Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.243, year: 2009

  8. Determination of acidity constants and ionic mobilities of polyprotic peptide hormones by CZE

    Šolínová, Veronika; Kašička, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 18 (2013), s. 2655-2665. ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acid dissociation constant * gonadotropin-releasing hormones * ionization constant * peptides * pK(a) Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.161, year: 2013

  9. Anti-peptide aptamers recognize amino acid sequence and bind a protein epitope.

    Xu, W; Ellington, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    In vitro selection of nucleic acid binding species (aptamers) is superficially similar to the immune response. Both processes produce biopolymers that can recognize targets with high affinity and specificity. While antibodies are known to recognize the sequence and conformation of protein surface features (epitopes), very little is known about the precise interactions between aptamers and their epitopes. Therefore, aptamers that could recognize a particular epitope, a peptide fragment of huma...

  10. Recognition of Double Stranded RNA by Guanidine-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids (GPNA)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Muse, Oluwatoyosi; Rozners, Eriks

    2011-01-01

    Double helical RNA has become an attractive target for molecular recognition because many non-coding RNAs play important roles in control of gene expression. Recently, we discovered that short peptide nucleic acids (PNA) bind strongly and sequence selectively to a homopurine tract of double helical RNA via triple helix formation. Herein we tested if the molecular recognition of RNA can be enhanced by α-guanidine modification of PNA. Our study was motivated by the discovery of Ly and co-worker...

  11. Well-defined Cationic Shell Crosslinked Nanoparticles for Efficient Delivery of DNA or Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Zhang, Ke; Fang, Huafeng; Gang SHEN; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    This mini-review highlights developments that have been made over the past year to advance the construction of well-defined nanoscale objects to serve as devices for cell transfection. Design of the nanoscale objects originated from biomimicry concepts, using histones as the model, to afford cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like (cSCK) nanoparticles. Packaging and delivery of plasmid DNA, oligonucleotides, and peptide nucleic acids were studied by dynamic light scattering, transmission elect...

  12. Lactic acid bacteria and their antimicrobial peptides : Induction,detection,partial characterization, and potential applications

    Abbas Hilmi, Hanan

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria and their isolated peptide bacteriocins are of value to control pathogens and spoiling microorganisms in foods and feed. Nisin is the only bacteriocin that is commonly accepted as a food preservative and has a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive organisms including spore forming bacteria. In this study nisin induction was studied from two perspectives, induction from inside of the cell and selection of nisin inducible strains with increa...

  13. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Watts, Richard E.; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2008-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid (“imino acid”), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala...

  14. DESIGN AND SYNTHESIS OF 4-[2’-(5’- NITRO] IMIDAZOLYL BENZOYL (N-METHYL AMINO ACIDS AND PEPTIDES

    PARAMITA DAS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, a wide variety of bioactive peptides have been discovered. Condensation of heterocyclic moieties viz nicotinic acid, thiazole coumarin, quinolin, furan, imidazole etc. with amino acids and peptides resulted in compounds with potent biological activities. Many of the heterocyclic found to exhibit antifungal, antibacterial, cytotoxic, antineoplastic, insectisidal, antiinflammatory, anthelmintic, tyrosinase inhibitory and melanin production inhibitory activities. Metronidazole, serconidazole, flucanazole are well known marketed drugs. Introduction of D-amino acids and N-methylation of amino acids like tyrosine, valine, alanine etc enhanced antimicrobial activity. Hence an attempt is made towards the synthesis of 5-nitroimidazolyl-benzoic acid derivative of N-methylamino acids and peptide using solution phase technique of peptide synthesis. The method includes the introduction of tert-butyloxy carboxyl group (Boc to amino acids to protect the amino group forming Boc-amino acids .The protection of carboxyl group was done by converting the amino acids into corresponding methyl ester. The protected amino acids were coupled using diisopropylcarbodimide and triethylamine to get protected dipeptides. N-methylation was done by treating with methyl iodide and sodium hydride. The ester group was then removed by lithium hydroxide. The Boc(N-methyldipetide were coupled to amino acids or Boc(Nmethyl dipeptide were coupled to 4-[2-(5-nitroimidazoly]benzoic acids.

  15. Amino acid absorption and homeostasis in mice lacking the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1.

    Nässl, Anna-Maria; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Fenselau, Henning; Marth, Mena Katharina; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore

    2011-07-01

    The intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 mediates the uptake of di- and tripeptides derived from dietary protein breakdown into epithelial cells. Whereas the transporter appears to be essential to compensate for the reduced amino acid delivery in patients with mutations in amino acid transporter genes, such as in cystinuria or Hartnup disease, its physiological role in overall amino acid absorption is still not known. To assess the quantitative importance of PEPT1 in overall amino acid absorption and metabolism, PEPT1-deficient mice were studied by using brush border membrane vesicles, everted gut sacs, and Ussing chambers, as well as by transcriptome and proteome analysis of intestinal tissue samples. Neither gene expression nor proteome profiling nor functional analysis revealed evidence for any compensatory changes in the levels and/or function of transporters for free amino acids in the intestine. However, most plasma amino acid levels were increased in Pept1(-/-) compared with Pept1(+/+) animals, suggesting that amino acid handling is altered. Plasma appearance rates of (15)N-labeled amino acids determined after intragastric administration of a low dose of protein remained unchanged, whereas administration of a large protein load via gavage revealed marked differences in plasma appearance of selected amino acids. PEPT1 seems, therefore, important for overall amino acid absorption only after high dietary protein intake when amino acid transport processes are saturated and PEPT1 can provide additional absorption capacity. Since renal amino acid excretion remained unchanged, elevated basal concentrations of plasma amino acids in PEPT1-deficient animals seem to arise mainly from alterations in hepatic amino acid metabolism. PMID:21350187

  16. Ghrelin-like peptide with fatty acid modification and O-glycosylation in the red stingray, Dasyatis akajei

    Uchiyama Minoru; Matsuda Kouhei; Ishiguro Koutaro; Kodama Shiho; Kaiya Hiroyuki; Miyazato Mikiya; Kangawa Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Ghrelin (GRLN) is now known to be an appetite-stimulating and growth hormone (GH)-releasing peptide that is predominantly synthesized and secreted from the stomachs of various vertebrate species from fish to mammals. Here, we report a GRLN-like peptide (GRLN-LP) in a cartilaginous fish, the red stingray, Dasyatis akajei. Results The purified peptide contains 16 amino acids (GVSFHPQPRS10TSKPSA), and the serine residue at position 3 is modified by n-octanoic acid. The modifi...

  17. Derivation of an amino acid similarity matrix for peptide:MHC binding and its application as a Bayesian prior

    Sette Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts in peptide:MHC binding studies are often able to estimate the impact of a single residue substitution based on a heuristic understanding of amino acid similarity in an experimental context. Our aim is to quantify this measure of similarity to improve peptide:MHC binding prediction methods. This should help compensate for holes and bias in the sequence space coverage of existing peptide binding datasets. Results Here, a novel amino acid similarity matrix (PMBEC is directly derived from the binding affinity data of combinatorial peptide mixtures. Like BLOSUM62, this matrix captures well-known physicochemical properties of amino acid residues. However, PMBEC differs markedly from existing matrices in cases where residue substitution involves a reversal of electrostatic charge. To demonstrate its usefulness, we have developed a new peptide:MHC class I binding prediction method, using the matrix as a Bayesian prior. We show that the new method can compensate for missing information on specific residues in the training data. We also carried out a large-scale benchmark, and its results indicate that prediction performance of the new method is comparable to that of the best neural network based approaches for peptide:MHC class I binding. Conclusion A novel amino acid similarity matrix has been derived for peptide:MHC binding interactions. One prominent feature of the matrix is that it disfavors substitution of residues with opposite charges. Given that the matrix was derived from experimentally determined peptide:MHC binding affinity measurements, this feature is likely shared by all peptide:protein interactions. In addition, we have demonstrated the usefulness of the matrix as a Bayesian prior in an improved scoring-matrix based peptide:MHC class I prediction method. A software implementation of the method is available at: http://www.mhc-pathway.net/smmpmbec.

  18. Effect of amino acid substitution in the hydrophobic face of amphiphilic peptides on membrane curvature and perturbation: N-terminal helix derived from adenovirus internal protein VI as a model.

    Murayama, Tomo; Pujals, Sílvia; Hirose, Hisaaki; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Futaki, Shiroh

    2016-11-01

    The N-terminal amphipathic helical segment of adenovirus internal protein VI (AdVpVI) plays a critical role in viral infection. Here, we report that the peptide segment corresponding to AdVpVI (positions 33-55) can induce positive membrane curvature together with membrane perturbation. The enhanced perturbation ability of the peptide was observed for membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids. Based on the liposome leakage assay, substitution of leucine at position 40 to other aliphatic (isoleucine) and aromatic (phenylalanine and tryptophan) residues yielded a similar degree of membrane perturbation by the peptides, which was considerably diminished by the substitution to glutamine. Further studies using the wild-type AdVpVI (33-55) (WT) and phenylalanine-substituted peptides (L40F) demonstrated that both peptides have positive membrane-curvature-inducing ability. These peptides showed higher binding affinity to 50-nm large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) than to 200-nm LUVs. However, no enhanced perturbation by these peptides was observed for 50-nm LUVs compared to 200-nm LUVs, suggesting that both the original membrane curvature and the additional strain due to peptide insertion affect the membrane perturbation ability of these peptides. In the case of L40F, this peptide rather had a lower membrane perturbation ability for 50-nm LUVs than for 200-nm LUVs, which can be attributed to possible shallower binding of L40F on membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 430-439, 2016. PMID:27271816

  19. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation.

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Watts, Richard E; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid ("imino acid"), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3-6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNA(Phe) depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNA(Pro) isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the "tRNA abundance" hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  20. Orientation of the peptide formation of N-phosphoryl amino acids in solution

    2002-01-01

    The peptide formation of N-phosphoryl aminoacids with amino acids proceeds in aqueous solution withoutany coupling reagents. After being separated in sephadex gelcolumn, the phosphoryl dipeptides were analyzed by theelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESIMS/MS). The result demonstrates that phosphoryl dipeptides were detected in all the reaction systems. It is found that theformation of N-phosphoryl dipeptides is oriented: theN-terminal amino acid residues of the N-phosphoryl dipep-tides are from N-phosphoryl amino acids, and the peptideelongation happened at the C-terminal. Only (-dipeptide, no(-dipeptide, is formed in the N-phosphoryl dipeptides,showing that ?-carboxylic group is activated selectively byN-phosphorylation. Theoretical calculation shows that the peptide formation of N-phosphoryl amino acids might hap-pen through a penta-coordinate carboxylic-phosphoric in-termediate in solution. These results might give some clues tothe study on the origin of proteins and protein biosynthesis.

  1. Electrostatic Binding and Hydrophobic Collapse of Peptide-Nucleic Acid Aggregates Quantified Using Force Spectroscopy

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Loreno, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramon; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide which contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interact...

  2. Formation of peptides from amino acids by single or multiple additions of ATP to suspensions of nucleoproteinoid microparticles

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of peptides from individual amino acids or pairs of amino acids and ATP in the presence of catalysis by nucleoproteinoid microparticles is investigated. Experiments were performed with suspensions formed from the condensation of lysine-rich and acidic proteinoids with polyadenylic acid, to which were added glycine, phenylalanine, proline, lysine or glycine-phenylalanine mixtures, and ATP either at once or serially. Peptide yields are found to be greatest for equal amounts of acidic and basic proteinoids. The addition of imidazole is found to alter the preference of glycine-phenylalanine mixtures to form mixed heteropeptides rather than homopeptides. A rapid ATP decay in the peptide synthesis reaction is observed, and a greater yield is obtained for repeated small additions than for a single addition of ATP. The experimental system has properties similar to modern cells, and represents an organizational unit ready for the evolution of associated biochemical pathways.

  3. Peptides released from acid goat whey by a yeast-lactobacillus association isolated from cheese microflora.

    Didelot, Sandrine; Bordenave-Juchereau, Stephanie; Rosenfeld, Eric; Piot, Jean-Marie; Sannier, Frederic

    2006-05-01

    Seven lactobacilli and a variety of microflora extracted from twenty five commercial cheeses were grown on unsupplemented acid goat whey and screened for their capacity to hydrolyse whey proteins [alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-la) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg)] and to generate peptides. Fermentations were performed aerobically or anaerobically at 37 degrees C using crude or pre-heated whey (10 min at 65, 75 or 85 degrees C). Under aerobic conditions, growth of lactobacilli was poor and protein hydrolysis did not occur. Anaerobic conditions slightly increased lactobacilli growth but neither beta-lg hydrolysis nor peptide generation were observed. More than 50% of alpha-la was digested into a truncated form of alpha-la (+/- 12 kDa) in crude whey and whey pre-heated at 65 degrees C. Twenty-five microflora extracted from raw milk cheeses were screened for their proteolytic activities on acid goat whey under the conditions previously described. Eight of them were able to hydrolyse up to 50% of alpha-la mainly during aerobic growth on crude or pre-heated whey. The corresponding hydrolysates were enriched in peptides. The hydrolysate involving microflora extracted from Comté cheese after or at 18 months ripening was the only one to exhibit hydrolysis of both alpha-la and beta-lg. Microbiological analysis showed that microorganisms originating from Comté cheese and capable of growth on unsupplemented whey consisted of Candida parapsilosis and Lactobacillus paracasei. Fermentation kinetic profiles suggested that peptides were released from alpha-la hydrolysis. The co-culture of both microorganisms was required for alpha-la hydrolysis that occurred concomitantly with the pH decrease. During whey fermentation, Cand. parapsilosis excrete at least one protease responsible for alpha-la hydrolysis, and Lb. paracasei is responsible for medium acidification that is required for protease activation. PMID:16476172

  4. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  5. Interaction study of amino acids and the peptide aspartame with lanthanide (III) ions

    The interactions between the Nd(III) ion with the amino acids L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-histidine and the peptide aspartame in aqueous solution were studied. The study was conducted by means of electronic spectroscopy with the Judd-Ofelt formalism for transition intensity parameters calculations. Several coordination compounds involving Nd(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) and the ligands L-histidine and aspartame were synthesized and characterized in the solid state. Mixed compounds involving Eu(III) and Tb(III) with the same ligands were synthesized and characterized also. The characterization were achieved by chemical analysis, melting points, vibrational spectroscopy (IR) and powder X-ray diffractometry. (author)

  6. Templated synthesis of peptide nucleic acids via sequence-selective base-filling reactions.

    Heemstra, Jennifer M; Liu, David R

    2009-08-19

    The templated synthesis of nucleic acids has previously been achieved through the backbone ligation of preformed nucleotide monomers or oligomers. In contrast, here we demonstrate templated nucleic acid synthesis using a base-filling approach in which individual bases are added to abasic sites of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Because nucleobase substrates in this approach are not self-reactive, a base-filling approach may reduce the formation of nontemplated reaction products. Using either reductive amination or amine acylation chemistries, we observed efficient and selective addition of each of the four nucleobases to an abasic site in the middle of the PNA strand. We also describe the addition of single nucleobases to the end of a PNA strand through base filling, as well as the tandem addition of two bases to the middle of the PNA strand. These findings represent an experimental foundation for nonenzymatic information transfer through base filling. PMID:19722647

  7. Role of SbmA in the Uptake of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-Peptide Conjugates in E. coli

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    -peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to...

  8. The chain length of biologically produced (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acid affects biological activity and structure of anti-cancer peptides.

    Szwej, Emilia; Devocelle, Marc; Kenny, Shane; Guzik, Maciej; O'Connor, Stephen; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Radivojevic, Jelena; Maslak, Veselin; Byrne, Annete T; Gallagher, William M; Zulian, Qun Ren; Zinn, Manfred; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2015-06-20

    Conjugation of DP18L peptide with (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, derived from the biopolymer polyhydroxyalkanoate, enhances its anti-cancer activity (O'Connor et al., 2013. Biomaterials 34, 2710-2718). However, it is unknown if other (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acids (R3HAs) can enhance peptide activity, if chain length affects enhancement, and what effect R3HAs have on peptide structure. Here we show that the degree of enhancement of peptide (DP18L) anti-cancer activity by R3HAs is carbon chain length dependent. In all but one example the R3HA conjugated peptides were more active against cancer cells than the unconjugated peptides. However, R3HAs with 9 and 10 carbons were most effective at improving DP18L activity. DP18L peptide variant DP17L, missing a hydrophobic amino acid (leucine residue 4) exhibited lower efficacy against MiaPaCa cells. Circular dichroism analysis showed DP17L had a lower alpha helix content and the conjugation of any R3HA ((R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid to (R)-3-hydroxydodecanoic acid) to DP17L returned the helix content back to levels of DP18L. However (R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic did not enhance the anti-cancer activity of DP17L and at least 7 carbons were needed in the R3HA to enhance activity of D17L. DP17L needs a longer chain R3HA to achieve the same activity as DP18L conjugated to an R3HA. As a first step to assess the synthetic potential of polyhydroxyalkanoate derived R3HAs, (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid was synthetically converted to (±)3-chlorodecanoic acid, which when conjugated to DP18L improved its antiproliferative activity against MiaPaCa cells. PMID:25820126

  9. Aliphatic acid-conjugated antimicrobial peptides--potential agents with anti-tumor, multidrug resistance-reversing activity and enhanced stability.

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Wang, Xuekun; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-07-28

    Compared with traditional therapeutics, antimicrobial peptides as novel anti-tumor agents have prominent advantages of higher specificity and circumvention of multi-drug resistance. In a previous study, we found that B1, an antimicrobial peptide derived from Cathelicidin-BF15, presented specific anti-tumor activity against several tumor cells. Since aliphatic chain-conjugated peptides have shown ameliorative activity and stability, we conjugated aliphatic acids with different lengths to the amino terminal of B1. All the conjugated peptides exhibited improved anti-tumor activity over B1. Further investigations revealed that the peptides were capable of disrupting the cell membrane, stimulating cytochrome c release into the cytosol, which results in apoptosis. The peptides also acted against multidrug resistant cells and had multidrug resistance-reversing effects. Additionally, conjugation of aliphatic acid enhanced the peptide stability in plasma. In summary, aliphatic acid-modified peptides might be promising anti-tumor agents in the future. PMID:26083110

  10. Transit peptides of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins share a common amino acid framework.

    Karlin-Neumann, G A; Tobin, E M

    1986-01-01

    We have identified three major blocks of amino acid homology shared by the transit peptides of two nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins, the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein (LHCP) II of the thylakoid membrane and the small subunit (SSU) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) of the stroma. These previously unrecognized homology blocks lie at the beginning, middle and end of both transit sequences, and are separated by differing lengths of unshared (interblock) s...

  11. Peptide nucleic acid-anthraquinone conjugates: strand invasion and photoinduced cleavage of duplex DNA.

    Armitage, B.; T. Koch; Frydenlund, H; Orum, H; Batz, H G; Schuster, G B

    1997-01-01

    A bis-peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-anthraquinone imide (AQI) conjugate has been synthesized and shown to form strand invasion complexes with a duplex DNA target. The two arms of the bis-PNA each consist of five consecutive thymine residues and are linked by a flexible, hydrophilic spacer. Probing with potassium permanganate reveals that the bis-PNA complexes to duplex DNA at A5.T5sites with local displacement of the T5DNA strand. The 5 bp sequence targeted by the PNA is the shortest strand inva...

  12. Convenient and scalable synthesis of fmoc-protected Peptide nucleic Acid backbone.

    Feagin, Trevor A; Shah, Nirmal I; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  13. Convenient and Scalable Synthesis of Fmoc-Protected Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    Feagin, Trevor A.; Shah, Nirmal I.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this mo...

  14. Topical Delivery of Hyaluronic Acid into Skin using SPACE-peptide Carriers

    Chen, Ming; Gupta, Vivek; Anselmo, Aaron C.; Muraski, John A.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Topical penetration of macromolecules into skin is limited by their low permeability. Here, we report the use of a skin penetrating peptide, SPACE peptide, to enhance topical delivery of a macromolecule, hyaluronic acid (HA, MW: 200–325 kDa). The peptide was conjugated to phospholipids and used to prepare an ethosomal carrier system (~110 nm diameter), encapsulating HA. The SPACE-ethosomal system (SES) enhanced HA penetration into porcine skin in vitro by 7.8+/−1.1-fold compared to PBS. The system also enhanced penetration of HA in human skin in vitro, penetrating deep into the epidermis and dermis in skin of both species. In vivo experiments performed using SKH1 hairless mice also confirmed increased dermal penetration of HA using the delivery system; a 5-fold enhancement in penetration was found compared to PBS control. Concentrations of HA in skin were about 1000-fold higher than those in blood; confirming the localized nature of HA delivery into skin. The SPACE-ethosomal delivery system provides a formulation for topical delivery of macromolecules that are otherwise difficult to deliver into skin. PMID:24129342

  15. Reaction of the hydrated electron with amino acids, peptides, and proteins in aqueous solutions

    Faraggi, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus); Bettelheim, A.

    1977-08-01

    The reaction rate constants of e/sup -//sub aq/ with glycyl-histidine (Gly-His) and ..beta..-alanylhistidine (Carnosine, ..beta..-Ala-His) were determined and compared to those of ..beta..-alanylalanine (..beta..-Ala-Ala), alanyl-alanine ((Ala)/sub 2/), and histidine (His). The rate constants were found to be pH dependent. Below the pK value of the imidazole ring, the rate constants of the histidyl peptides are similar to that of His. This indicates that the main site of the e/sup -//sub aq/ reaction is the protonated ring. Above this pK value the pH dependent rate constants were less in the His amino acids than in the His peptides. This difference was attributed to the presence of the carbonyl grup in the peptides. This group, which is known to react quite rapidly with e/sup -//sub aq/, exhibits its presence when the imidazole ring loses its reactivity after deprotonation. The difference in reactivity toward e/sup -//sub aq/ between the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. His peptides is explained by the relative position of the protonated amino groups with respect to the carbonyl groups. A similar difference was also found in (Ala)/sub 2/ and ..beta..-Ala-Ala. The transient absorption spectra resulting from the reaction of e/sup -//sub aq/ with the His peptides were recorded and examined with respect to peptide concentration and pH dependence. Here again, at pH values below the pK of the imidazole, the transient absorption spectra are similar to that of histidine. In alkaline solutions, however, proper experimental conditions could be attained only for Gly-His. In His and ..beta..-Ala-His the interference of the OH radical reaction was observed. In Gly/sup -/His it was found that the band characterizing the imidazole transient (lambda/sub max/ = 360 nm) disappears with a simultaneous appearance of a band at lambda/sub max/ similarly ordered 410 nm.

  16. Development of a method for environmentally friendly chemical peptide synthesis in water using water-dispersible amino acid nanoparticles

    Fukumori Yoshinobu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to the vast importance of peptides in biological processes, there is an escalating need for synthetic peptides to be used in a wide variety of applications. However, the consumption of organic solvent is extremely large in chemical peptide syntheses because of the multiple condensation steps in organic solvents. That is, the current synthesis method is not environmentally friendly. From the viewpoint of green sustainable chemistry, we focused on developing an organic solvent-free synthetic method using water, an environmentally friendly solvent. Here we described in-water synthesis technology using water-dispersible protected amino acids.

  17. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  18. Preparation of surfactant-stabilized gold nanoparticle-peptide nucleic acid conjugates

    Duy, Janice, E-mail: janice.duy@umit.maine.ed [University of Maine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (United States); Connell, Laurie B. [University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences (United States); Eck, Wolfgang [University of Heidelberg, Applied Physical Chemistry (Germany); Collins, Scott D. [University of Maine, Department of Chemistry (United States); Smith, Rosemary L. [University of Maine, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A simple, two-step method of producing stable and functional peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-conjugated gold nanoparticles using a surfactant stabilization step is presented. PNA are DNA analogs with superior chemical stability and target discrimination, but their use in metallic nanoparticle systems has been limited by the difficulty of producing stable colloids of nanoparticle-PNA conjugates. In this work, the nonionic surfactant Tween 20 (polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate) was used to sterically shield gold surfaces prior to the addition of thiolated PNA, producing conjugates which remain dispersed in solution and retain the ability to hybridize to complementary nucleic acid sequences. The conjugates were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. PNA attachment to gold nanoparticles was confirmed with an enzyme-linked immunoassay, while the ability of nanoparticle-bound PNA to hybridize to its complement was demonstrated using labeled DNA.

  19. Summarization on the synthesis and radionuclide-labeling of peptide nucleic acid for an oligonucleotide analogue

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is one kind of antisense nucleic acid compounds and an oligonucleotide analogue that binds strongly to DNA and RNA in a sequence specific manner, has its unique advantages in the field of molecular diagnostics and treatment of diseases. Now, people gradually attach more importance to PNA. To optimize the application of PNA in genetic re- search and therapy, a great number of backbone modifications on the newly- type structures of PNA were synthesized to improve its physicochemical proper- ties, such as hybridization speciality, solubility in biofluid, or cell permeability. The modified PNA labeled with radionuclides, which can obtain the aim at specific target and minimal non-target trauma, has important role in research and application of tumorous genitherapy. Here a review on the basic synthesis idea and several primary synthetic methods of PNA analogs was given, and also correlative studies and expectation on the compounds belonging to PNA series labeled with radionuclides were included. (authors)

  20. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  1. Comparison between Procalcitonin, Brain Natriuretic Peptide, and Uric Acid in Children with Cardiomyopathy and Controls

    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was performed to determine the level of procalcitonin, Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP, and uric acid in children with cardiomyopathy in comparison with controls and the association with echocardiographic findings. Methods. The levels of BNP, procalcitonin, and serum uric acid were measured and the amounts of biomarkers compared with echocardiographic findings. Results. In this study mean age of participants was the same (p=0.321. The majority of echocardiographic indices in left and right heart have different means in case and controls (p<0.05. Means of BNP, procalcitonin, and uric acid were 213.814 ± 309.601, 9.326 ± 3.881, and 6.846 ± 1.814 for case group and 2.76 ± 1.013, 1.851 ± 1.466, and 3.317 ± 0.924 for control (p<0.001, respectively. In the patients group there was relationship of Ross classification with BNP (χ2 = 15.845, p<0.05 and with age (χ2 = 8.946, p<0.05. For uric acid and procalcitonin no significant relationships were observed. Conclusions. procalcitonin, uric acid, and BNP had significant relationship with many echocardiographic findings in participants. For patients, procalcitonin did not show correlation. The severity of illness based on the Ross classification showed significant correlation with BNP level and age in patients.

  2. Ascorbic acid stabilization of Re-188- and I-131-radiolabeled peptides for radiotherapy

    Re-188 labeled RC-160 [ cyclic NH2-(D)-Phe-Cys-Tyr-(D)-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Trp-NH2 ] cyclic NH is a radiolabeled somatostatin analog which is being explored for its potential as a local/regionally administered radiotherapeutic agent targeting somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors. The stability of 188Re-RC-160 towards radiolytic effects is a prerequisite for the success of such an approach. High radiation flux was found to result in radiolysis of the peptide, but addition of ascorbic acid to preparations of RC-160 and also somatostatin-14 was found to stabilize these peptides minimizing these radiolytic effects. Subsequent to ascorbic acid stabilization, 188Re-RC-160 was determined in vitro and in vivo to bind to somatostatin-receptor-positive cells (NCI-H69 human small cell lung carcinoma) but not to receptor-negative cells (Raji, Burkitt's lymphoma). The comparative binding of Re-188 labeled RC-160 or CTOP [ cyclic NH2-(D)-Phe-CysTyr-(D)-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-ol], a μ-opiod-receptor antagonist used as a negative control compound, was also determined in vitro and in vivo using NCI-H69 cells as targets. 188Re-RC-160 demonstrated a higher amount of net binding in vitro and in vivo compared to 188ReCTOP. (orig.)

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Peptides from Fermented Milk with Mix Culture of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Yeast

    Yun Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the production of antioxidant peptides during milk fermentation with co-culture of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB and yeast. Five LAB strains, previously screened with higher hydrolysis activity and Debaryomyces hansenii H2 which isolated from Tibet kefir were used in the study. The peptides separated from fermented milk were analysed antioxidant activity with DPPH radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging, chelation of metal ions and reducing power assays. The growth of Streptococcus. thermophilus Lactobacillus. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Lactococcus. lactis was enhanced with co-cultures and L. acidophilus was inhibited in co-culture with yeast. In co-culture with yeast, a significant decrease of the acidity was observed among all the fermentation and the pH reached higher values than in single LAB cultures. Except for L.delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, there was no significant difference of protein hydrolysis with other test LAB strains between co-culture and single culture. The co-incubation of LAB with the yeast developed a stronger antioxidant activity in DPPH radical and hydroxyl radical scavenging and no significant (p>0.05 difference in chelation of metal ions. The reducing power of L.delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and L. helveticus in co-culture was significant higher than those of single culture.

  4. Ascorbic acid stabilization of Re-188- and I-131-radiolabeled peptides for radiotherapy

    Guhlke, S.; Sartor, J.; Bender, H.; Biersack, H.J. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Zamora, P.O. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine]|[RhoMed Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), TN (United States). Nuclear Medicine Group; Rhodes, B.A. [RhoMed Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Re-188 labeled RC-160 [ cyclic NH{sub 2}-(D)-Phe-Cys-Tyr-(D)-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Trp-NH{sub 2} ] cyclic NH is a radiolabeled somatostatin analog which is being explored for its potential as a local/regionally administered radiotherapeutic agent targeting somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors. The stability of {sup 188}Re-RC-160 towards radiolytic effects is a prerequisite for the success of such an approach. High radiation flux was found to result in radiolysis of the peptide, but addition of ascorbic acid to preparations of RC-160 and also somatostatin-14 was found to stabilize these peptides minimizing these radiolytic effects. Subsequent to ascorbic acid stabilization, {sup 188}Re-RC-160 was determined in vitro and in vivo to bind to somatostatin-receptor-positive cells (NCI-H69 human small cell lung carcinoma) but not to receptor-negative cells (Raji, Burkitt`s lymphoma). The comparative binding of Re-188 labeled RC-160 or CTOP [ cyclic NH{sub 2}-(D)-Phe-CysTyr-(D)-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-ol], a {mu}-opiod-receptor antagonist used as a negative control compound, was also determined in vitro and in vivo using NCI-H69 cells as targets. {sup 188}Re-RC-160 demonstrated a higher amount of net binding in vitro and in vivo compared to {sup 188}ReCTOP. (orig.)

  5. New Descriptors of Amino Acids and Its Applications to Peptide Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship

    SHU Mao; HUO Dan-Qun; MEI Hua; LIANG Gui-Zhao; ZHANG Mei; LI Zhi-Liang

    2008-01-01

    A new set of descriptors, HSEHPCSV (component score vector of hydrophobic, steric, and electronic properties together with hydrogen bonding contributions), were derived from principal component analyses of 95 physicochemical variables of 20 natural amino acids separately according to different kinds of properties described, namely, hydrophobic, steric, and electronic properties as well as hydrogen bonding contributions. HSEHPCSV scales were then employed to express structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, bitter tasting thresholds and bactericidal 18 peptide, and to construct QSAR models based on partial least square (PLS). The results obtained are as follows: the multiple correlation coefficient (R2cum) of 0.846, 0.917 and 0.993, leave-one-out cross validated Q2cum of 0.835, 0.865 and 0.899, and root-mean-square error for estimated error (RMSEE) of 0.396, 0.187and 0.22, respectively. Satisfactory results showed that, as new amino acid scales, data of HSEHPCSV may be a useful structural expression methodology for the studies on peptide QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) due to many advantages such as plentiful structural information, definite physical and chemical meaning and easy interpretation.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides as Mediators of Innate Immunity in Teleosts.

    Katzenback, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been identified throughout the metazoa suggesting their evolutionarily conserved nature and their presence in teleosts is no exception. AMPs are short (18-46 amino acids), usually cationic, amphipathic peptides. While AMPs are diverse in amino acid sequence, with no two AMPs being identical, they collectively appear to have conserved functions in the innate immunity of animals towards the pathogens they encounter in their environment. Fish AMPs are upregulated in response to pathogens and appear to have direct broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity towards both human and fish pathogens. However, an emerging role for AMPs as immunomodulatory molecules has become apparent-the ability of AMPs to activate the innate immune system sheds light onto the multifaceted capacity of these small peptides to combat pathogens through direct and indirect means. Herein, this review focuses on the role of teleost AMPs as modulators of the innate immune system and their regulation in response to pathogens or other exogenous molecules. The capacity to regulate AMP expression by exogenous factors may prove useful in modulating AMP expression in fish to prevent disease, particularly in aquaculture settings where crowded conditions and environmental stress pre-dispose these fish to infection. PMID:26426065

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides as Mediators of Innate Immunity in Teleosts

    Barbara A. Katzenback

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been identified throughout the metazoa suggesting their evolutionarily conserved nature and their presence in teleosts is no exception. AMPs are short (18–46 amino acids, usually cationic, amphipathic peptides. While AMPs are diverse in amino acid sequence, with no two AMPs being identical, they collectively appear to have conserved functions in the innate immunity of animals towards the pathogens they encounter in their environment. Fish AMPs are upregulated in response to pathogens and appear to have direct broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity towards both human and fish pathogens. However, an emerging role for AMPs as immunomodulatory molecules has become apparent—the ability of AMPs to activate the innate immune system sheds light onto the multifaceted capacity of these small peptides to combat pathogens through direct and indirect means. Herein, this review focuses on the role of teleost AMPs as modulators of the innate immune system and their regulation in response to pathogens or other exogenous molecules. The capacity to regulate AMP expression by exogenous factors may prove useful in modulating AMP expression in fish to prevent disease, particularly in aquaculture settings where crowded conditions and environmental stress pre-dispose these fish to infection.

  8. Characterisation of Anti-Apoptotic Signalling Pathways in Hepatocytes activated by alpha-Lipoic Acid and Atrial Natriuretic Peptide

    Kulhanek-Heinze, Stefanie

    2004-01-01

    Both, the R-enantiomer of the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (R-LA) and the hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are known to exert potent hepatoprotective action. The present work characterises alpha-lipoic acid- and ANP-mediated signal transduction pathways involved in the regulation of apoptotic cell death in two different models: primary hepatocytes and ischemic isolated perfused rat livers. alpha-lipoic acid was shown to protect isolated hepatocytes from TNF-alpha-/ActinomycinD-in...

  9. Conformations of helical Aib peptides containing a pair of L-amino acid and D-amino acid.

    Demizu, Yosuke; Yabuki, Yu-U; Doi, Mitsunobu; Sato, Yukiko; Tanaka, Masakazu; Kurihara, Masaaki

    2012-07-01

    A pair of L-leucine (L-Leu) and D-leucine (D-Leu) was incorporated into a-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) peptide segments. Thedominant conformations of four hexapeptides, Boc-L-Leu-Aib-Aib-Aib-Aib-L-Leu-OMe (1a), Boc-D-Leu-Aib-Aib-Aib-Aib-L-Leu-OMe(1b), Boc-Aib-Aib-L-Leu-L-Leu-Aib-Aib-OMe (2a), and Boc-Aib-Aib-D-Leu-L-Leu-Aib-Aib-OMe (2b), were investigated by IR,¹H NMR, CD spectra, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. All peptides 1a,b and 2a,b formed 3₁₀-helical structures in solution. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that right-handed (P) 3₁₀-helices were present in 1a and 1b and a mixture of right-handed(P) and left-handed (M) 3₁₀-helices was present in 2b in their crystalline states. PMID:22619002

  10. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    This project was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the hydration behaviors of gas phase ions from solutions containing amino acids and peptides. In order to characterize their hydration behavior, the molecules of interest in solutions were first converted into gas phase ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). The completely desolvated ions were then deliberately dispersed into an inert bath gas, usually nitrogen, containing accurately known concentrations of solvent vapor. The resulting mixtures of ions and bath gas were subsequently passed into a vacuum chamber by way of an adiabatic supersonic free jet expansion. The cooling during that expansion caused solvation of the ions, the extent of which was determined by a quadrupole mass analyzer. Mass analysis of the solute ions in the absence of vapor showed peaks with the mass to charge ratios corresponding to the desolvated ions. On the other hand, mass spectrometric analyses of ions in the presence of solvent vapor showed sequences of peaks corresponding to the solvated ions with varying numbers of water molecules. The extent of the ion solvation was controlled by varying the concentration of solvent vapor in the bath gas. Two different scales were proposed for the evaluation of the relative affinities of amino acids for water molecules. One was based primarily on the assumption that the affinities of amino acids for water molecules are directly proportional to their gas phase solvation rate constants ( k). An alternative approach produced an affinity scale based on the extent of ion hydration occurred during the free jet expansion. It was found that the addition of a polar solvent vapor to the bath gas at low concentrations substantially enhanced the production of the bare solute ions from the evaporating charged droplets. This remarkable result not only provided a means to increase the ion production and thus detection sensitivity of mass spectrometric analyses, but also yielded important information

  11. Self-assembly of short peptides composed of only aliphatic amino acids and a combination of aromatic and aliphatic amino acids.

    Subbalakshmi, Chilukuri; Manorama, Sunkara V; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2012-05-01

    The morphology of structures formed by the self-assembly of short N-terminal t-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) and C-terminal methyl ester (OMe) protected and Boc-deprotected hydrophobic peptide esters was investigated. We have observed that Boc-protected peptide esters composed of either only aliphatic hydrophobic amino acids or aliphatic hydrophobic amino acids in combination with aromatic amino acids, formed highly organized structures, when dried from methanol solutions. Transmission and scanning electron microscopic images of the peptides Boc-Ile-Ile-OMe, Boc-Phe-Phe-Phe-Ile-Ile-OMe and Boc-Trp-Ile-Ile-OMe showed nanotubular structures. Removal of the Boc group resulted in disruption of the ability to form tubular structures though spherical aggregates were formed. Both Boc-Leu-Ile-Ile-OMe and H-Leu-Ile-Ile-OMe formed only spherical nanostructures. Dynamic light scattering studies showed that aggregates of varying dimensions were present in solution suggesting that self-assembly into ordered structures is facilitated by aggregation in solution. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy data show that although all four of the protected peptides adopt well-defined tertiary structures, upon removal of the Boc group, only H-Phe-Phe-Phe-Ile-Ile-OMe had the ability to adopt β-structure. Our results indicate that hydrophobic interaction is a very important determinant for self-assembly and presence of charged and aromatic amino acids in a peptide is not necessary for self-assembly. PMID:22431418

  12. Absorption of Amino Acids and Peptides in a Child with a Variant of Hartnup Disease and Coexistent Coeliac Disease

    Tarlow, M. J.; Seakins, J. W. T.; Lloyd, June K.; Matthews, D. M.; Cheng, B.; Thomas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    A child with a variant of Hartnup disease and co-existent coeliac disease is described. Oral tolerance tests with L-histidine, L-tyrosine, and glycyl-L-tyrosine, and in vitro uptake studies on a small intestinal biopsy with L-histidine and glycyl-L-histidine, showed impaired absorption of the free amino acids, and showed that absorption of tyrosine and mucosal uptake of histidine was better from the dipeptides than from the free amino acids. This supports the hypothesis that the intestinal mucosa can take up small peptides intact, and that the peptide uptake mechanism is not involved in the intestinal defect of Hartnup disease. PMID:5086513

  13. Detection and identification of lactic acid bacteria in milk and industrial starter culture with fluorescently labeled rRNA-targeted peptide nucleic acid probes

    Matte-Tailliez, Oriane; Quénée, Pascal; ÇIBIK, Recep; Van Opstal, Jacques; Dessevre, Fabrice; Firmesse, Olivier; Tailliez, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Détection et identification des bactéries lactiques dans le lait et les levains industriels par des sondes "peptide nucleic acids " fluorescentes ciblant l'ARNr. Une méthode rapide et simple pour détecter et identifier les bactéries lactiques en croissance, au niveau cellulaire, dans le lait ou les levains industriels a été développée. Elle repose sur la technique d'hybridation de sondes fluorescentes à l'ARN ribosomique présent dans les cellules entières. Les "peptide nucleic acids " (PNA), ...

  14. Composition of free and peptide-bound amino acids in beef chuck, loin, and round cuts.

    Wu, G; Cross, H R; Gehring, K B; Savell, J W; Arnold, A N; McNeill, S H

    2016-06-01

    Meat is a food for humans. However, beef consumption in the United States has steadily declined by >14% over the past decade due to a variety of factors, including insufficient knowledge of animal protein. This study quantified all proteinogenic AA as well as nutritionally and physiologically significant nonproteinogenic AA and small peptides in beef cuts from 3 subprimals (chuck, round, and loin). Beef carcasses ( = 10) were selected at 3 commercial packing plants in the United States. Retail-cut samples were analyzed for the nitrogenous substances after acid, alkaline, or enzymatic hydrolysis and after deproteinization. In these chuck, round, and loin cuts, total amounts of glutamate (free plus peptide bound) were the highest (69-75 mg/g dry weight) followed by lysine, leucine, arginine, and glutamine in descending order. This is the first study to determine aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine in meat proteins of any animal species. In all the beef samples evaluated, glutamine was the most abundant free AA (4.0-5.7 mg/g dry weight) followed by taurine, alanine, glutamate, and β-alanine. Additionally, samples from all beef cuts had high concentrations of anserine, carnosine, and glutathione, which were 2.8 to 3.7, 15.2 to 24.2, and 0.68 to 0.79 mg/g dry weight, respectively. Beef top loin steaks appear to provide higher protein nutrition values than top round steaks and under blade roasts, but all are excellent sources of proteinogenic AA as well as antioxidant AA and peptides to improve human growth, development, and health. Our findings may help guide future decisions regarding human and animal nutrition. PMID:27285936

  15. Effect of the amino acid composition of cyclic peptides on their self-assembly in lipid bilayers.

    Danial, Maarten; Perrier, Sébastien; Jolliffe, Katrina A

    2015-02-28

    The effect of amino acid composition on the formation of transmembrane channels in lipid bilayers upon self-assembly of alt-(L,D)-α-cyclic octapeptides has been investigated. Cyclic peptides comprising D-leucine, alternating with different combinations of L-azidolysine, L-lysine(Alloc), L-lysine and L-tryptophan were synthesized and the size of pores formed via self-assembly of these molecules in lipid bilayers was elucidated using large unilamellar vesicle fluorescence assays and dynamic light scattering. Pore formation was examined in large unilamellar vesicles made up of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine or Escherichia coli total lipid extract. From these analyses, we have established that cyclic peptides with charged side chains form large pores while those with neutral side chains form unimeric pores. Furthermore, the cyclic peptides that consist of non-symmetric amino acid configurations possess a higher membrane activity than the cyclic peptides with a symmetric amino acid configuration. In addition, we have found that peptide amphiphilicity plays a vital role in selective partitioning between bilayers that consist of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and those comprised of E. coli total lipid extract. These results suggest that selective transbilayer channel formation via self-assembly may be a viable alternative for many applications that currently use more expensive, multistep synthesis methods. PMID:25566760

  16. Pipa carvalhoi skin secretion profiling: absence of peptides and identification of kynurenic acid as the major constitutive component.

    Mariano, Douglas Oscar Ceolin; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko; Jared, Carlos; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    The presence of peptides has been identified in all African pipid genera; nevertheless, little is known about skin secretion of South American frog genus Pipa. Skin secretion from captive and wild Pipa carvalhoi were obtained in the presence or absence of norepinephrine stimulation. The <10 kDa fraction was analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, searching for peptides. Chromatographic profiles show the presence of a major component in this secretion, regardless of the stimulation method (norepinephrine or mechanical stimulation) and the origin of the animal (captivity or wild), as well as in the absence of any stimulus. The general mass distribution profile in P. carvalhoi skin secretion shows numerous components below 800 Da. Moreover, no peptide could be identified, regardless of the chromatographic approach. The major component was purified and identified as kynurenic acid, an L-tryptophan derivative. P. carvalhoi does not secrete peptides as toxins in its skin. In addition, we here report that kynurenic acid is the main component of P. carvalhoi skin secretion. Although no biological activity was associated with kynurenic acid, we propose that this molecule is a pheromone that signals the presence of a co-specific in the shady environment in which this animal lives. In this study we demonstrate the absence of peptidic toxins in the skin secretion of P. carvalhoi, a break of paradigm in the pipid family. PMID:25181950

  17. Ghrelin-like peptide with fatty acid modification and O-glycosylation in the red stingray, Dasyatis akajei

    Uchiyama Minoru

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghrelin (GRLN is now known to be an appetite-stimulating and growth hormone (GH-releasing peptide that is predominantly synthesized and secreted from the stomachs of various vertebrate species from fish to mammals. Here, we report a GRLN-like peptide (GRLN-LP in a cartilaginous fish, the red stingray, Dasyatis akajei. Results The purified peptide contains 16 amino acids (GVSFHPQPRS10TSKPSA, and the serine residue at position 3 is modified by n-octanoic acid. The modification is the characteristic of GRLN. The six N-terminal amino acid residues (GVSFHP were identical to another elasmobranch shark GRLN-LP that was recently identified although it had low identity with other GRLN peptides. Therefore, we designated this peptide stingray GRLN-LP. Uniquely, stingray GRLN-LP was O-glycosylated with mucin-type glycan chains [N-acetyl hexosamine (HexNAc3 hexose(Hex2] at threonine at position 11 (Thr-11 or both serine at position 10 (Ser-10 and Thr-11. Removal of the glycan structure by O-glycanase made the in vitro activity of stingray GRLN-LP decreased when it was evaluated by the increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations using a rat GHS-R1a-expressing cell line, suggesting that the glycan structure plays an important role for maintaining the activity of stingray GRLN-LP. Conclusions This study reveals the structural diversity of GRLN and GRLN-LP in vertebrates.

  18. Anti-biofilm activity of ultrashort cinnamic acid peptide derivatives against medical device-related pathogens.

    Laverty, Garry; McCloskey, Alice P; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-10-01

    The threat of antimicrobial resistance has placed increasing emphasis on the development of innovative approaches to eradicate multidrug-resistant pathogens. Biofilm-forming microorganisms, for example, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are responsible for increased incidence of biomaterial infection, extended hospital stays and patient morbidity and mortality. This paper highlights the potential of ultrashort tetra-peptide conjugated to hydrophobic cinnamic acid derivatives. These peptidomimetic molecules demonstrate selective and highly potent activity against resistant biofilm forms of Gram-positive medical device-related pathogens. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)propionic)-Orn-Orn-Trp-Trp-NH2 displays particular promise with minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 125 µg/ml against methicillin sensitive (ATCC 29213) and resistant (ATCC 43300) S. aureus and activity shown against biofilm forms of Escherichia coli (MBEC: 1000 µg/ml). Kill kinetics confirms complete eradication of established 24-h biofilms at MBEC with 6-h exposure. Reduced cell cytotoxicity, relative to Gram-positive pathogens, was proven via tissue culture (HaCaT) and haemolysis assays (equine erythrocytes). Existing in nature as part of the immune response, antimicrobial peptides display great promise for exploitation by the pharmaceutical industry in order to increase the library of available therapeutic molecules. Ultrashort variants are particularly promising for translation as clinical therapeutics as they are more cost-effective, easier to synthesise and can be tailored to specific functional requirements based on the primary sequence allowing factors such as spectrum of activity to be varied. PMID:26310860

  19. D-amino acid residue in a defensin-like peptide from platypus venom: effect on structure and chromatographic properties.

    Torres, Allan M; Tsampazi, Chryssanthi; Geraghty, Dominic P; Bansal, Paramjit S; Alewood, Paul F; Kuchel, Philip W

    2005-10-15

    The recent discovery that the natriuretic peptide OvCNPb (Ornithorhynchus venom C-type natriuretic peptide B) from platypus (Ornithorynchus anatinus) venom contains a D-amino acid residue suggested that other D-amino-acid-containing peptides might be present in the venom. In the present study, we show that DLP-2 (defensin-like peptide-2), a 42-amino-acid residue polypeptide in the platypus venom, also contains a D-amino acid residue, D-methionine, at position 2, while DLP-4, which has an identical amino acid sequence, has all amino acids in the L-form. These findings were supported further by the detection of isomerase activity in the platypus gland venom extract that converts DLP-4 into DLP-2. In the light of this new information, the tertiary structure of DLP-2 was recalculated using a new structural template with D-Met2. The structure of DLP-4 was also determined in order to evaluate the effect of a D-amino acid at position 2 on the structure and possibly to explain the large retention time difference observed for the two molecules in reverse-phase HPLC. The solution structures of the DLP-2 and DLP-4 are very similar to each other and to the earlier reported structure of DLP-2, which assumed that all amino acids were in the L-form. Our results suggest that the incorporation of the D-amino acid at position 2 has minimal effect on the overall fold in solution. PMID:16033333

  20. Sequence-selective targeting of duplex DNA by peptide nucleic acids

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    nucleic acid (PNA) can recognize duplex DNA with high sequence specificity and affinity in triplex, duplex and double-duplex invasive modes or non-invasive triplex modes. Novel PNA modification has improved the affinity for DNA recognition via duplex invasion, double-duplex invasion and triplex......Sequence-selective gene targeting constitutes an attractive drug-discovery approach for genetic therapy, with the aim of reducing or enhancing the activity of specific genes at the transcriptional level, or as part of a methodology for targeted gene repair. The pseudopeptide DNA mimic peptide...... recognition considerably. Such modifications have also resulted in new approaches to targeted gene repair and sequence-selective double-strand cleavage of genomic DNA....

  1. Plasmid DNA delivery by arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides containing unnatural amino acids.

    Kato, Takuma; Yamashita, Hiroko; Misawa, Takashi; Nishida, Koyo; Kurihara, Masaaki; Tanaka, Masakazu; Demizu, Yosuke; Oba, Makoto

    2016-06-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been developed as drug, protein, and gene delivery tools. In the present study, arginine (Arg)-rich CPPs containing unnatural amino acids were designed to deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA). The transfection ability of one of the Arg-rich CPPs examined here was more effective than that of the Arg nonapeptide, which is the most frequently used CPP. The transfection efficiencies of Arg-rich CPPs increased with longer post-incubation times and were significantly higher at 48-h and 72-h post-incubation than that of the commercially available transfection reagent TurboFect. These Arg-rich CPPs were complexed with pDNA for a long time in cells and effectively escaped from the late endosomes/lysosomes into the cytoplasm. These results will be helpful for designing novel CPPs for pDNA delivery. PMID:27132868

  2. Targeted gene correction using psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin conjugates of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA)

    Birkedal, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Gene correction activation effects of a small series of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA) covalently conjugated to the DNA interacting ligands psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin targeted proximal to a stop codon mutation in an EGFP reporter gene were studied. A 15-mer homopyrimidine....... Consistent with the extract experiments, treatment with adduct forming PNA conjugates (psoralen and chlorambucil) resulted in a decrease in background correction frequencies in transiently transfected cells, whereas unmodified PNA or the PNA-camptothecin conjugate had little or no effect. These results...... suggest that simple triplex forming PNAs have little effect on proximal gene correctional events whereas PNA conjugates capable of forming DNA adducts and interstrand crosslinks are strong inhibitors. Most interestingly the PNA conjugated to the topoisomerase inhibitor, camptothecin enhanced repair in...

  3. Tetrakis-acridinyl peptide: Distance dependence of photoinduced electron transfer in deoxyribonucleic acid assemblies

    The distance dependence of photoinduced electron transfer in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) duplex was investigated using the 'TAP cassette' systems of the general formula (AT)6A nXA9-n (X denote guanine (G) or cytosine (C)). The tetrakis-9-acridinyl peptide (TAP) binds tightly with (AT)6 duplex region showing strong fluorescence that was not quenched by the A nXA9-n single-stranded region. Quenching was observed after duplex formation with the complementary T9-nXT n strand (G-C pairing), showing clear dependence on the distance between the TAP and a guanine. An extremely low β value of 0.22 was obtained in our electron transfer (ET) system that suggests exceptional good mediation of ET process. Experiments with G-mismatches showed negligible quenching for systems with guanine separated by more than one AT base pair that indicated rather inefficient ET process for duplexes containing disrupted π-electronic system

  4. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    Ipharraguerre, Ignacio R; Tedó, Gemma; Menoyo, David; de Diego Cabero, Nuria; Holst, Jens Juul; Nofrarías, Miquel; Mereu, Alessandro; Burrin, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve...

  5. A bottom-up approach to build the hyperpolarizability of peptides and proteins from their amino acids.

    Duboisset, Julien; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Benichou, Emmanuel; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Lascoux, Noelle; Jonin, Christian; Hache, François; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2013-08-29

    We experimentally demonstrate that some peptides and proteins lend themselves to an elementary analysis where their first hyperpolarizability can be decomposed into the coherent superposition of the first hyperpolarizability of their elementary units. We then show that those elementary units can be associated with the amino acids themselves in the case of nonaromatic amino acids and nonresonant second harmonic generation. As a case study, this work investigates the experimentally determined first hyperpolarizability of rat tail Type I collagen and compares it to that of the shorter peptide [(PPG)10]3, where P and G are the one-letter code for Proline and Glycine, respectively, and that of the triamino acid peptides PPG and GGG. An absolute value of (0.16 ± 0.01) × 10(-30) esu for the first hyperpolarizability of nonaromatic amino acids is then obtained by using the newly defined 0.087 × 10(-30) esu reference value for water. By using a collagen like model, the microscopic hyperpolarizability along the peptide bond can be evaluated at (0.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-30) esu. PMID:23879840

  6. Alanine Esters of Enterococcal Lipoteichoic Acid Play a Role in Biofilm Formation and Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides

    Fabretti, Francesca; Theilacker, Christian; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Kaczynski, Zbigniew; Kropec, Andrea; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is among the predominant causes of nosocomial infections. Surface molecules like d-alanine lipoteichoic acid (LTA) perform several functions in gram-positive bacteria, such as maintenance of cationic homeostasis and modulation of autolytic activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of d-alanine esters of teichoic acids on biofilm production and adhesion, autolysis, antimicrobial peptide sensitivity, and opsonic killing. A deletion mutant of the d...

  7. Role of amphipathic helix of a herpesviral protein in membrane deformation and T cell receptor downregulation.

    Chan-Ki Min

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that function as platforms for signal transduction and membrane trafficking. Tyrosine kinase interacting protein (Tip of T lymphotropic Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS is targeted to lipid rafts in T cells and downregulates TCR and CD4 surface expression. Here, we report that the membrane-proximal amphipathic helix preceding Tip's transmembrane (TM domain mediates lipid raft localization and membrane deformation. In turn, this motif directs Tip's lysosomal trafficking and selective TCR downregulation. The amphipathic helix binds to the negatively charged lipids and induces liposome tubulation, the TM domain mediates oligomerization, and cooperation of the membrane-proximal helix with the TM domain is sufficient for localization to lipid rafts and lysosomal compartments, especially the mutivesicular bodies. These findings suggest that the membrane-proximal amphipathic helix and TM domain provide HVS Tip with the unique ability to deform the cellular membranes in lipid rafts and to downregulate TCRs potentially through MVB formation.

  8. Isolation, Characterization, and Synthesis of the Barrettides: Disulfide-Containing Peptides from the Marine Sponge Geodia barretti.

    Carstens, Bodil B; Rosengren, K Johan; Gunasekera, Sunithi; Schempp, Stefanie; Bohlin, Lars; Dahlström, Mia; Clark, Richard J; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-08-28

    Two disulfide-containing peptides, barrettides A (1) and B (2), from the cold-water marine sponge Geodia barretti are described. Those 31 amino acid residue long peptides were sequenced using mass spectrometry methods and structurally characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The structure of 1 was confirmed by total synthesis using the solid-phase peptide synthesis approach that was developed. The two peptides were found to differ only at a single position in their sequence. The three-dimensional structure of 1 revealed that these peptides possess a unique fold consisting of a long β-hairpin structure that is cross-braced by two disulfide bonds in a ladder-like arrangement. The peptides are amphipathic in nature with the hydrophobic and charged residues clustered on separate faces of the molecule. The barrettides were found not to inhibit the growth of either Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus but displayed antifouling activity against barnacle larvae (Balanus improvisus) without lethal effects in the concentrations tested. PMID:26222779

  9. Enzymatic recycling of ascorbic acid from dehydroascorbic acid by glutathione-like peptides in the extracellular loops of aminergic G-protein coupled receptors.

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Fewins, Jenna; Rhinesmith, Tyler; Koch, Ariana; Dillon, Patrick F

    2016-07-01

    The intracellular recycling of ascorbic acid from dehydroascorbic acid by the glutathione-glutathione reductase system has been well-characterized. We propose that extracellular recycling of ascorbic acid is performed in a similar manner by cysteine-rich, glutathione-like regions of the first and second extracellular loops of some aminergic receptors including adrenergic, histaminergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Previous research in our laboratory demonstrated that ascorbic acid binds to these receptors at a site on their first or second extracellular loops, significantly enhancing ligand activity, and apparently recycling hundreds of times their own concentration of ascorbate in an enzymatic fashion. In this study, we have synthesized 25 peptides from the first and second extracellular loops of aminergic and insulin receptors and compared them directly to glutathione for their ability to prevent the oxidation of ascorbate and to regenerate ascorbate from dehydroascorbic acid. Peptide sequences that mimic glutathione in containing a cysteine and a glutamic acid-like amino acid also mimic glutathione activity in effects and in kinetics. Some (but not all) peptide sequences that contain one or more methionines instead of cysteine can significantly retard the oxidation of ascorbic acid but do not recycle it from dehydroascorbate into ascorbate. Peptides lacking both cysteines and methionines uniformly failed to alter significantly ascorbate or dehydroascorbate oxidation or reduction. We believe that this is the first proof that receptors may carry out both ligand binding and enzymatic activity extracellularly. Our results suggest the existence of a previously unknown extracellular system for recycling ascorbate. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26749062

  10. Combinatorial assembly of simple and complex D-lysergic acid alkaloid peptide classes in the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea.

    Ortel, Ingo; Keller, Ullrich

    2009-03-13

    The ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea produces both ergopeptines and simple d-lysergic acid alkylamides. In the ergopeptines, such as ergotamine, d-lysergic acid is linked to a bicyclic tripeptide in amide-like fashion, whereas in the d-lysergylalkanolamides it is linked to an amino alcohol derived from alanine. We show here that these compound classes are synthesized by a set of three non-ribosomal lysergyl peptide synthetases (LPSs), which interact in a combinatorial fashion for synthesis of the relevant product. The trimodular LPS1 assembles with LPS2, the d-lysergic acid recruiting module, to synthesize the d-lysergyltripeptide precursors of ergopeptines from d-lysergic acid and the three amino acids of the peptide chain. Alternatively, LPS2 can assemble with a distinct monomodular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) subunit (ergometrine synthetase) to synthesize the d-lysergic acid alkanolamide ergometrine from d-lysergic acid and alanine. The synthesis proceeds via covalently bound d-lysergyl alanine and release of dipeptide as alcohol with consumption of NADPH. Enzymatic and immunochemical analyses showed that ergometrine synthetase is most probably the enzyme LPS3 whose gene had been identified previously as part of the ergot alkaloid biosynthesis gene cluster in C. purpurea. Inspections of all LPS sequences showed no recognizable peptide linkers for their protein-protein interactions as in NRPS subunits of bacteria. Instead, they all carry conserved N-terminal domains (C0-domains) with similarity to the C-terminal halves of NRPS condensation domains pointing to an alternative mechanism of subunit-subunit interactions in fungal NRPS systems. Phylogenetic analysis of LPS modules and the C0-domains suggests that these enzyme systems most probably evolved by module duplications and rearrangements from a bimodular ancestor. PMID:19139103

  11. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling.

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic 'fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore. PMID:24705512

  12. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label

    Nattawut Yotapan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA–DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes.

  13. Oostatic peptides containing d-amino acids: synthesis, oostatic activity, degradation, accumulation in ovaries and NMR study

    Hlaváček, Jan; Tykva, Richard; Holík, Josef; Bennettová, Blanka; Buděšínský, Miloš; Vlasáková, Věra; Černý, Bohuslav; Slaninová, Jiřina

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 1715-1725. ISSN 0939-4451 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1272 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : D-amino acids * oostatic peptide synthesis * H-3 labeling * oostatic activity in Neobellieria bullata * H-3 incorporation * Peptide degradation * NMR study Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2012

  14. Whey peptide-based enteral diet attenuated elastase-induced emphysema with increase in short chain fatty acids in mice

    Tomoda, Koichi; Kubo, Kaoru; Dairiki, Kazuo; Yamaji, Taketo; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Nishii, Yasue; Nakamura, Atsuhiro; Yoshikawa, Masanori; Hamada, Kaoru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammation is present in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A whey peptide-based enteral diet reduce inflammation in patients with COPD, but its effect on COPD development has not been determined. On the other hand, it is known that short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are produced by micro-flora in the gut, attenuates bronchial asthma in mice model. Methods Mice with elastase-induced emphysema were fed with 1 of 3 diets (control diet, whey peptide-based ent...

  15. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  16. Structural and dynamic evolution of the amphipathic N-terminus diversifies enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12.

    Jiang, Xukai; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2016-08-21

    Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying protein thermostability is central to the process of efficiently engineering thermostable cellulases, which can provide potential advantages in accelerating the conversion of biomass into clean biofuels. Here, we explored the general factors that diversify enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GH12) using comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to a bioinformatics approach. The results indicated that protein stability is not equally distributed over the whole structure: the N-terminus is the most thermal-sensitive region of the enzymes with a β-sandwich architecture and it tends to lose its secondary structure during the course of protein unfolding. Furthermore, we found that the total interaction energy within the N-terminus is appreciably correlated with enzyme thermostability. Interestingly, the internal interactions within the N-terminus are organized in a special amphipathic pattern in which a hydrophobic packing cluster and a hydrogen bonding cluster lie at the two ends of the N-terminus. Finally, bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the amphipathic pattern is highly conserved in GH12 and besides that, the evolution of the amino acids in the N-terminal region is an inherent mechanism underlying the diversity of enzyme thermostability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the N-terminus is generally the structure that determines enzyme thermostability in GH12, and thereby it is also an ideal engineering target. The dynameomics study of a protein family can give a general view of protein functions, which will offer a wide range of applications in future protein engineering. PMID:27425569

  17. Rational Development of a Cytotoxic Peptide to Trigger Cell Death

    Boohaker, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Ge; Lee, Michael W; Nemec, Kathleen N.; Santra, Santimukul; Perez, J Manuel; Khaled, Annette R.

    2012-01-01

    Defects in the apoptotic machinery can contribute to tumor formation and resistance to treatment, creating a need to identify new agents that kill cancer cells by alternative mechanisms. To this end, we examined the cytotoxic properties of a novel peptide, CT20p, derived from the C-terminal, alpha-9 helix of Bax, an amphipathic domain with putative membrane binding properties. Like many anti-microbial peptides, CT20p contains clusters of hydrophobic and cationic residues that could enable the...

  18. Development of Novel Radiogallium-Labeled Bone Imaging Agents Using Oligo-Aspartic Acid Peptides as Carriers

    Kazuma Ogawa; Atsushi Ishizaki; Kenichiro Takai; Yoji Kitamura; Tatsuto Kiwada; Kazuhiro Shiba; Akira Odani

    2013-01-01

    (68)Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min, a generator-produced nuclide) has great potential as a radionuclide for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Because poly-glutamic and poly-aspartic acids have high affinity for hydroxyapatite, to develop new bone targeting (68)Ga-labeled bone imaging agents for PET, we used 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) as a chelating site and conjugated aspartic acid peptides of varying lengths. Subsequently, we compared Ga complexes, Ga-DOTA...

  19. Development of Novel Radiogallium-Labeled Bone Imaging Agents Using Oligo-Aspartic Acid Peptides as Carriers

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Takai, Kenichiro; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    68Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min, a generator-produced nuclide) has great potential as a radionuclide for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Because poly-glutamic and poly-aspartic acids have high affinity for hydroxyapatite, to develop new bone targeting 68Ga-labeled bone imaging agents for PET, we used 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) as a chelating site and conjugated aspartic acid peptides of varying lengths. Subsequently, we compared Ga complexes, Ga-DOTA-(As...

  20. Effect of hydrocarbon stapling on the properties of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of hymenoptera

    Chapuis, Hubert Jean; Slaninová, Jiřina; Bednárová, Lucie; Monincová, Lenka; Buděšínský, Miloš; Čeřovský, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2012), s. 2047-2058. ISSN 0939-4451 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * stapled peptides * amphipathic helix * CD spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2012

  1. Effects of the substitution of amino acid residues, through chemical synthesis, on the conformation and activity of antimicrobial peptides

    Regina C. Adão

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides make up an assorted group of molecules which contain from 12 to 50 amino acid residues and which may be produced by microorganisms, plants and animals. From the discovery that these biomolecules are lethal to bacteria, inhibiting the pathogenic organism’s growth, and are also related to innate and adapted defense mechanisms, the investigation of such molecules came to be an emergent research field, in which more than 1800 antimicrobial peptides have so far been discovered throughout the last three decades. These molecules are potential representatives of a new generation of antibiotic agents and the main motivation for such use is their activity against a wide variety of pathogens, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi and viruses. An important class of comprising some of these peptides may be found in anurans, from which it has been isolated, a considerable number of antimicrobial peptides with diverse sequences and structures, including linear and dimeric ones. In this work monomeric chains (CH1 e CH2 of the heterodimeric antimicrobial peptide distinctin (isolated in 1999 from Phyllomedusa distincta anurans, as well as its mutated monomers (CH1-S and CH2-S and the heterodimer itself were synthesized. The distinctin is the peptide with two chains of different sequences (Table 1 bound each other by disulfide bond from the cystein residues constituting the heterodimer. To investigate the effects on the biological activity by amino acids substitution at normal distinctin CH1 and CH2 chains, both were synthesized as well as their similar chains (CH1-S and CH2-S in which the cystein (Fig.1 a residues of each chain were changed by serin residues (Fig. 1 b. The new chains were named mutants. The synthesis was carried out in solid phase, using Fmoc strategy. The heterodimer distinctin was obtained from CH1 and CH2 chains coupling through cystein residues air oxidation. The results from HPLC

  2. An equation to estimate the difference between theoretically predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed molecular weights for an acidic peptide.

    Guan, Yihong; Zhu, Qinfang; Huang, Delai; Zhao, Shuyi; Jan Lo, Li; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of a protein can be predicted based on its amino acids (AA) composition. However, in many cases a non-chemically modified protein shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW larger than its predicted size. Some reports linked this fact to high content of acidic AA in the protein. However, the exact relationship between the acidic AA composition and the SDS PAGE-displayed MW is not established. Zebrafish nucleolar protein Def is composed of 753 AA and shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW approximately 13 kDa larger than its predicted MW. The first 188 AA in Def is defined by a glutamate-rich region containing ~35.6% of acidic AA. In this report, we analyzed the relationship between the SDS PAGE-displayed MW of thirteen peptides derived from Def and the AA composition in each peptide. We found that the difference between the predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed MW showed a linear correlation with the percentage of acidic AA that fits the equation y = 276.5x - 31.33 (x represents the percentage of acidic AA, 11.4% ≤ x ≤ 51.1%; y represents the average ΔMW per AA). We demonstrated that this equation could be applied to predict the SDS PAGE-displayed MW for thirteen different natural acidic proteins. PMID:26311515

  3. Purification of Peptide Components including Melittin from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Young Chon Choi; Ki Rok, Kwon; Suk Ho, Choi

    2006-01-01

    Objectives : This study was conducted to carry out Purification of Melittin and other peptide components from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Methods : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-50 column in 0.05M ammonium acetate buffer. Results : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration...

  4. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:26394062

  5. Peptide nucleic acids arrest the growth of gastric cancer cells SGC7901

    王宽; 张岂凡; 王锡山; 薛英威; 庞达; 傅松滨

    2004-01-01

    Background Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has many characteristics useful in molecular biology. This paper described an effective way to raise the cell ingestion rate of PNA so as to kill gastric cancer cells.Methods Heteroduplexes of PNAs and oligonucleotides, wrapped by Lipofectamine 2000, were used to infect SGC7901 cells. The inhibitive effect of heteroduplexes was evaluated by analyzing cell clone forming and cell growth rate. Telomerase activity of SGC7901 cells was detected by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) and silver staining assay.Results PNAs showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The percentage of proliferation inhibition was 99.4% after 7 days; the rate of cloning inhibition was 98.2% after 8 days;whereas for oligonucleotide groups, at the same concentration, the percentages were 50. 1% and 67. 5% respectively. Antisense PNA-DNA-Lipofectamine 2000 group (AP-D-L group) exhibited significantly different percentages from the control groups (P<0.05). The test result indicated that telomerase activity of the AP-D-L group was inhibited (P<0.05). At the same time, the impact on cell morphology was observed.Conclusions The results showed that PNAs are potent antisense reagents. The telomeraseassociated therapies are very promising for the treatment of malignant tumours.

  6. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    António Machado

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI, from 64.3 to 95.0% and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%], demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis.

  7. Isodesmic reaction for accurate theoretical pKa calculations of amino acids and peptides.

    Sastre, S; Casasnovas, R; Muñoz, F; Frau, J

    2016-04-20

    Theoretical and quantitative prediction of pKa values at low computational cost is a current challenge in computational chemistry. We report that the isodesmic reaction scheme provides semi-quantitative predictions (i.e. mean absolute errors of 0.5-1.0 pKa unit) for the pKa1 (α-carboxyl), pKa2 (α-amino) and pKa3 (sidechain groups) of a broad set of amino acids and peptides. This method fills the gaps of thermodynamic cycles for the computational pKa calculation of molecules that are unstable in the gas phase or undergo proton transfer reactions or large conformational changes from solution to the gas phase. We also report the key criteria to choose a reference species to make accurate predictions. This method is computationally inexpensive and makes use of standard density functional theory (DFT) and continuum solvent models. It is also conceptually simple and easy to use for researchers not specialized in theoretical chemistry methods. PMID:27052591

  8. Boswellic acids target the human immune system-modulating antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Henkel, Arne; Tausch, Lars; Pillong, Max; Jauch, Johann; Karas, Michael; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is the sole member of the human cathelicidin family with immune system-modulating properties and roles in autoimmune disease development. Small molecules able to interact with LL-37 and to modulate its functions have not been described yet. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids that are bioactive principles of frankincense extracts used as anti-inflammatory remedies. Although various anti-inflammatory modes of action have been proposed for BAs, the pharmacological profile of these compounds is still incompletely understood. Here, we describe the identification of human LL-37 as functional target of BAs. In unbiased target fishing experiments using immobilized BAs as bait and human neutrophils as target source, LL-37 was identified as binding partner assisted by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Thermal stability experiments using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm direct interaction between BAs and LL-37. Of interest, this binding of BAs resulted in an inhibition of the functionality of LL-37. Thus, the LPS-neutralizing properties of isolated LL-37 were inhibited by 3-O-acetyl-β-BA (Aβ-BA) and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-BA (AKβ-BA) in a cell-free limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with EC50=0.2 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Also, LL-37 activity was inhibited by these BAs in LL-37-enriched supernatants of stimulated neutrophils or human plasma derived from stimulated human whole blood. Together, we reveal BAs as inhibitors of LL-37, which might be a relevant mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of BAs and suggests BAs as suitable chemical tools or potential agents for intervention with LL-37 and related disorders. PMID:26361729

  9. Viroporin potential of the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP domains of the HIV-1 gp41 protein

    Garry Robert F

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms by which HIV-1 mediates reductions in CD4+ cell levels in infected persons are being intensely investigated, and have broad implications for AIDS drug and vaccine development. Virally induced changes in membrane ionic permeability induced by lytic viruses of many families contribute to cytopathogenesis. HIV-1 induces disturbances in plasma membrane ion transport. The carboxyl terminus of TM (gp41 contains potential amphipathic α-helical motifs identified through their structural similarities to naturally occurring cytolytic peptides. These sequences have been dubbed lentiviral lytic peptides (LLP -1, -2, and -3. Results Peptides corresponding to the LLP domains (from a clade B virus partition into lipid membranes, fold into α-helices and disrupt model membrane permeability. A peptide corresponding to the LLP-1 domain of a clade D HIV-1 virus, LLP-1D displayed similar activity to the LLP-1 domain of the clade B virus in all assays, despite a lack of amino acid sequence identity. Conclusion These results suggest that the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 Env proteins may form an ion channel, or viroporin. Increased understanding of the function of LLP domains and their role in the viral replication cycle could allow for the development of novel HIV drugs.

  10. Helleborus purpurascens—Amino Acid and Peptide Analysis Linked to the Chemical and Antiproliferative Properties of the Extracted Compounds

    Adina-Elena Segneanu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong drive worldwide to discover and exploit the therapeutic potential of a large variety of plants. In this work, an alcoholic extract of Helleborus purpurascens (family Ranunculaceae was investigated for the identification of amino acids and peptides with putative antiproliferative effects. In our work, a separation strategy was developed using solvents of different polarity in order to obtain active compounds. Biochemical components were characterized through spectroscopic (mass spectroscopy and chromatographic techniques (RP-HPLC and GC-MS. The biological activity of the obtained fractions was investigated in terms of their antiproliferative effects on HeLa cells. Through this study, we report an efficient separation of bioactive compounds (amino acids and peptides from a plant extract dependent on solvent polarity, affording fractions with unaffected antiproliferative activities. Moreover, the two biologically tested fractions exerted a major antiproliferative effect, thereby suggesting potential anticancer therapeutic activity.

  11. Synthesis and Analytics of Rigidified Peptide Architectures: Neuropeptide Y Dipeptide Scan, Ring-Chain-Equilibria of Iminopeptides, Thiazole Amino Acids for Thiopeptide Antibiotics

    Enck, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The architectures (three-dimensional shapes) of peptides determine their respective biological functions. Therefore, the correct alignment of functionalities in a structure by constraining the flexibility is a key process in evolution as well as in medicinal chemistry in order to increase binding affinity and selectivity. The rigidification of a peptide chain can have local effects (incorporation of the amino acid proline) or it ...

  12. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and pathogenic toxins. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized

  13. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized

  14. The radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasised. (author)

  15. Candida species and antimicrobial peptides from the venom of different wild bees

    Slaninová, Jiřina; Borovičková, Lenka; Putnová, H.; Monincová, Lenka; Fučík, Vladimír; Čeřovský, Václav

    Praha : Institut of organic Chemistry and Biochemistry ASCR, 2009 - (Slaninová, J.), s. 113-117 ISBN 978-80-86241-31-9. - (Collection Symposium Series. 11). [Biologically Active Peptides. Conference /11./. Praha (CZ), 22.04.2009-24.04.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * alpha-helical amphipathic peptides * Candida species * fungicidal activity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Core–Shell Nanoparticle-Based Peptide Therapeutics and Combined Hyperthermia for Enhanced Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    Shah, Birju P.; Pasquale, Nicholas; De, Gejing; Tan, Tao; Ma, Jianjie; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria-targeting peptides have garnered immense interest as potential chemotherapeutics in recent years. However, there is a clear need to develop strategies to overcome the critical limitations of peptides, such as poor solubility and the lack of target specificity, which impede their clinical applications. To this end, we report magnetic core–shell nanoparticle (MCNP)-mediated delivery of a mitochondria-targeting pro-apoptotic amphipathic tail-anchoring peptide (ATAP) to malignant bra...

  17. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe, kit and procedure for specific detection of Helicobacter pylori and applications thereof

    Azevedo, N. F.; N. Guimarães; Figueiredo, C.; Keevil, C. W.; Vieira, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The current invention relates to the development of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for the specific detection of Helicobacter pylori. These probes are used in a process based on molecular biology techniques, namely the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and can be applied in a variety of samples such as biopsies, blood, air, food, water and other environmental samples. Due to the physical and chemical characteristics inherent to their structure, these probes are able to provide a ...

  18. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable ...

  19. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH. PMID:23391931

  20. Using Triple Helix Forming Peptide Nucleic Acids for Sequence-selective Recognition of Double-stranded RNA

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; Cheruiyot, Samwel K.; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in regulation of gene expression. Specific recognition and inhibition of these biologically important RNAs that form complex double-helical structures will be highly useful for fundamental studies in biology and practical applications in medicine. This protocol describes a strategy developed in our laboratory for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using triple helix forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that bind in the major grov...

  1. Design of stable antimicrobial peptides through hydrocarbon stapling

    Chapuis, Hubert Jean; Slaninová, Jiřina; Monincová, Lenka; Bednárová, Lucie; Čeřovský, Václav

    Praha: Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry AS CR, v. v. i, 2011 - (Slaninová, J.), s. 19-21. (Collection Symposium Series. 13). ISBN 978-80-86241-44-9. [Biologically Active Peptides /12./. Praha (CZ), 27.04.2011-29.04.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : amphipathic alpha-helices * antimicrobial peptides * peptide synthesis * ring closing metathesis ( RCM ) * peptide stapling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  2. Enrichment of ACE inhibitory peptides in navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) using lactic acid bacteria.

    Rui, Xin; Wen, Delan; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiaohong; Jiang, Mei; Dong, Mingsheng

    2015-02-01

    The present study was conducted to explore a novel strategy to enhance angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of navy bean by preparation of navy bean milk (NBM) which was then subjected to fermentation of four lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains, namely, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus helveticus MB2-1, Lactobacillus plantarum B1-6, and Lactobacillus plantarum 70810. With the exception of L. helveticus MB2-1, the other three selected strains had good growth performances in NBM with viable counts increased to log 8.30-8.39 cfu ml(-1) during 6 h of fermentation, and thus were selected for the following investigations. Protein contents of NBM significantly reduced when treated with L. bulgaricus and L. plantarum B1-6, and the electrophoresis patterns showed the preferable proteins for LAB strains to hydrolyze were α- and β-type phaseolins, whereas γ-type phaseolin was resistant to hydrolysis. RP-HPLC analysis demonstrated all fermented NBM had higher intensities of peaks with retention times between 2.5 and 3.5 min indicative of formation of small peptides. All fermented NBM showed higher ACE inhibitory activity compared to the unfermented ones, for which 2 h, 3 h, and 5 h were found to be the optimum fermentation periods for respectively L. plantarum 70810, L. plantarum B1-6 and L. bulgaricus, with IC50 values of 109 ± 5.1, 108 ± 1.1, and 101 ± 2.2 μg protein ml(-1). The subsequent in vitro gastrointestinal simulation afforded all fermented extracts reduced IC50 values and the extracts fermented by L. plantarum B1-6 exerted the lowest IC50 value of 21 ± 2.1 μg protein ml(-1). The research has broadened our knowledge bases on the effect of LAB fermentation on the degradation of navy bean proteins and the capacity to release ACE inhibitory peptides. The approach was promising to obtain probiotic products with potential to serve as functional ingredients targeting hypertension. PMID:25536445

  3. Molecular mechanism of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of peptide bonds using a model compound.

    Pan, Bin; Ricci, Margaret S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2010-04-01

    The stability of peptide bonds is a critical aspect of biological chemistry and therapeutic protein applications. Recent studies found elevated nonenzymatic hydrolysis in the hinge region of antibody molecules, but no mechanism was identified. As a first step in providing a mechanistic interpretation, this computational study examines the rate-determining step of the hydrolytic reaction of a peptide bond under acidic pH by a path sampling technique using a model compound N-MAA. Most previous computational studies did not include explicit water molecules, whose effects are significant in solution chemistry, nor did they provide a dynamic picture for the reaction process in aqueous conditions. Because no single trajectory can be used to describe the reaction dynamics due to fluctuations at finite temperatures, a variant version of the transition path sampling technique, the aimless shooting algorithm, was used to sample dynamic trajectories and to generate an ensemble of transition trajectories according to their statistical weights in the trajectory space. Each trajectory was computed as the time evolution of the molecular system using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics technique. The likelihood maximization procedure and its modification were used in extracting dynamically relevant degrees of freedom in the system, and approximations of the reaction coordinate were compared. Its low log-likelihood score and poor p(B) histogram indicate that the C-O distance previously assumed as the reaction coordinate for the rate-determining step is inadequate in describing the dynamics of the reaction. More than one order parameter in a candidate set including millions of geometric quantities was required to produce a convergent reaction coordinate model; its involvement of many degrees of freedom suggests that this hydrolytic reaction step is very complex. In addition to affecting atoms directly involved in bond-making and -breaking processes, the water network also has

  4. Antioxidative Peptides Derived from Enzyme Hydrolysis of Bone Collagen after Microwave Assisted Acid Pre-Treatment and Nitrogen Protection

    Jin Sun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the preparation method of antioxidant peptides by enzymatic hydrolysis of bone collagen after microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection. Phosphoric acid showed the highest ability of hydrolysis among the four other acids tested (hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and/or citric acid. The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH was 9.5% using 4 mol/L phosphoric acid with a ratio of 1:6 under a microwave intensity of 510 W for 240 s. Neutral proteinase gave higher DH among the four protease tested (Acid protease, neutral protease, Alcalase and papain, with an optimum condition of: (1 ratio of enzyme and substrate, 4760 U/g; (2 concentration of substrate, 4%; (3 reaction temperature, 55 °C and (4 pH 7.0. At 4 h, DH increased significantly (P < 0.01 under nitrogen protection compared with normal microwave assisted acid pre-treatment hydrolysis conditions. The antioxidant ability of the hydrolysate increased and reached its maximum value at 3 h; however DH decreased dramatically after 3 h. Microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection could be a quick preparatory method for hydrolyzing bone collagen.

  5. Cationic cell-penetrating peptides induce ceramide formation via acid sphingomyelinase: implications for uptake.

    Verdurmen, W.P.R.; Thanos, M.; Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Gulbins, E.; Brock, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are receiving increasing attention as molecular transporters of membrane-impermeable molecules. Import of cationic CPP occurs both via endocytosis and - at higher peptide concentrations - in an endocytosis-independent manner via localized regions of the plasm

  6. THE APPLICATION OF PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID PROBES FOR RAPID DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF EUBACTERIA, STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN RECREATIONAL BEACHES OF S. FLORIDA. (R828830)

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, S...

  7. Folic acid-tethered Pep-1 peptide-conjugated liposomal nanocarrier for enhanced intracellular drug delivery to cancer cells: conformational characterization and in vitro cellular uptake evaluation

    Kang MJ; Park SH; Kang MH; Park MJ; Choi YW

    2013-01-01

    Myung Joo Kang, Sang Han Park, Mean Hyung Kang, Min Jung Park, Young Wook Choi College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea Background: A novel dual ligand–modified liposome, folic acid-tethered Pep-1 peptide-conjugated liposomal nanocarrier (FP-Lipo), was designed to overcome the nonselectivity of conventional penetrating peptide-tagged nanoparticulates and to provide the advantage of selective targeting of the folic acid receptor, which is frequently overexpressed on ep...

  8. Critical Evaluation and Compilation of Physicochemical Determinants and Membrane Interactions of MMGP1 Antifungal Peptide.

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Pooja, Sharma; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-05-01

    A growing issue of pathogen resistance to antibiotics has fostered the development of innovative approaches for novel drug development. Here, we report the physicochemical and biological properties of an antifungal peptide, MMGP1, based on computational analysis. Computation of physicochemical properties has revealed that the natural biological activities of MMGP1 are coordinated by its intrinsic properties such as net positive charge (+5.04), amphipathicity, high hydrophobicity, low hydrophobic moment, and higher isoelectric point (11.915). Prediction of aggregation hot spots in MMGP1 had revealed the presence of potentially aggregation-prone segments that can nucleate in vivo aggregation (on the membrane), whereas no aggregating regions were predicted for in vitro aggregation (in solutions) of MMGP1. This ability of MMGP1 to form oligomeric aggregates on membrane further substantiates its direct-cell penetrating potency. Monte Carlo simulation of the interactions of MMGP1 in the aqueous phase and different membrane environments revealed that increasing the proportion of acidic lipids on membrane had led to increase in the peptide helicity. Furthermore, the peptide adopts energetically favorable transmembrane configuration, by inserting peptide loop and helix termini into the membrane containing >60% of anionic lipids. The charged lipid-based insertion of MMGP1 into membrane might be responsible for the selectivity of peptide toward fungal cells. Additionally, MMGP1 possessed DNA-binding property. Computational docking has identified DNA-binding residues (TRP3, SER4, MET7, ARG8, PHE10, ALA11, GLY20, THR21, ARG22, MET23, TRP34, and LYS36) in MMGP1 crucial for its DNA-binding property. Furthermore, computational mutation analysis revealed that aromatic amino acids are crucial for in vivo aggregation, membrane insertion, and DNA-binding property of MMGP1. These data provide new insight into the molecular determinants of MMGP1 antifungal activity and also serves as

  9. Novel approaches to tumor imaging in mice: pre targeting with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid

    Full text.Since targeting of tumour by conventional methods is not consistently favorable, we have considered pre targeting with separate administrations of anti tumour antibody and radiolabel. As an alternative to streptavidin and biotin for this application, we earlier considered single stranded peptide nucleic acid (PNA) bound to an irrelevant protein administered first and allowed to diffuse non specifically into tumour. This was followed later by the administration of 99 m Tc labeled complementary PNA. We now report on the first studies with PNA conjugated anti tumour antibody to allow specific binding. PNA was conjugated to the NRLU-10 IgG antibody while the complementary PNA (amine derivatized) was labeled with ((m Tc using MAG3. LS174T tumour-bearing nude mice received IV 200 ug of the PNA-antibody conjugate and 20 h later, received IV 100 ug (130 uCl) of 99m Tc- complementary PNA. Animals were imaged and sacrificed 5 h later. Because of rapid clearance, at sacrifice all tissue levels of 99 m Tc were low, the highest being kidneys at about 4%ID/gm. Tumour uptake was 0.55%ID/gm for the study animals vs. 0. 13 for controls and tumour/muscle ratios were 9.8 vs. 3.6 respectively. These values represent a 2.5-fold improvement in localization over the nonspecific study. The whole body images also reflected the superior targeting of study vs. control animals. We conclude that single-stranded PNAs should be a useful alternative to streptavidin and biotin for pre targeting studies

  10. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Nanogels Produced by Microfluidics-Facilitated Self-Assembly Improves the Safety Profile of the Cationic Host Defense Peptide Novicidin

    Water, Jorrit J; Kim, YongTae; Maltesen, Morten J;

    2015-01-01

    have hampered their commercial development. To overcome these challenges a novel nanogel-based drug delivery system was designed. METHOD: The peptide novicidin was self-assembled with an octenyl succinic anhydride-modified analogue of hyaluronic acid, and this formulation was optimized using a...... peptide loading of 36 ± 4%. The nanogels exhibited good colloidal stability under different ionic strength conditions and allowed complete release of the peptide over 14 days. Furthermore, self-assembly of novicidin with hyaluronic acid into nanogels significantly improved the safety profile at least five...

  11. 2D-Qsar for 450 types of amino acid induction peptides with a novel substructure pair descriptor having wider scope

    Osoda Tsutomu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR analysis of peptides is helpful for designing various types of drugs such as kinase inhibitor or antigen. Capturing various properties of peptides is essential for analyzing two-dimensional QSAR. A descriptor of peptides is an important element for capturing properties. The atom pair holographic (APH code is designed for the description of peptides and it represents peptides as the combination of thirty-six types of key atoms and their intermediate binding between two key atoms. Results The substructure pair descriptor (SPAD represents peptides as the combination of forty-nine types of key substructures and the sequence of amino acid residues between two substructures. The size of the key substructures is larger and the length of the sequence is longer than traditional descriptors. Similarity searches on C5a inhibitor data set and kinase inhibitor data set showed that order of inhibitors become three times higher by representing peptides with SPAD, respectively. Comparing scope of each descriptor shows that SPAD captures different properties from APH. Conclusion QSAR/QSPR for peptides is helpful for designing various types of drugs such as kinase inhibitor and antigen. SPAD is a novel and powerful descriptor for various types of peptides. Accuracy of QSAR/QSPR becomes higher by describing peptides with SPAD.

  12. Permeation of membranes by the neutral form of amino acids and peptides: relevance to the origin of peptide translocation

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The flux of amino acids and other nutrient solutes such as phosphate across lipid bilayers (liposomes) is 10(5) slower than facilitated inward transport across biological membranes. This suggest that primitive cells lacking highly evolved transport systems would have difficulty transporting sufficient nutrients for cell growth to occur. There are two possible ways by which early life may have overcome this difficulty: (1) The membranes of the earliest cellular life-forms may have been intrinsically more permeable to solutes; or (2) some transport mechanism may have been available to facilitate transbilayer movement of solutes essential for cell survival and growth prior to the evolution of membrane transport proteins. Translocation of neutral species represents one such mechanism. The neutral forms of amino acids modified by methylation (creating protonated weak bases) permeate membranes up to 10(10) times faster than charged forms. This increased permeability when coupled to a transmembrane pH gradient can result in significantly increased rates of net unidirectional transport. Such pH gradients can be generated in vesicles used to model protocells that preceded and were presumably ancestral to early forms of life. This transport mechanism may still play a role in some protein translocation processes (e.g. for certain signal sequences, toxins and thylakoid proteins) in vivo.

  13. Similar peptides from two beta cell autoantigens, proinsulin and glutamic acid decarboxylase, stimulate T cells of individuals at risk for insulin-dependent diabetes.

    Rudy, G; N. Stone; Harrison, L C; Colman, P. G.; McNair, P; Brusic, V.; French, M. B.; Honeyman, M. C.; Tait, B.; Lew, A M

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin (1) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) (2) are both autoantigens in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), but no molecular mechanism has been proposed for their association. We have identified a 13 amino acid peptide of proinsulin (amino acids 24-36) that bears marked similarity to a peptide of GAD65 (amino acids 506-518) (G. Rudy, unpublished). In order to test the hypothesis that this region of similarity is implicated in the pathogenesis of IDDM, we assayed T c...

  14. Antimicrobial peptide, hdMolluscidin, purified from the gill of the abalone, Haliotis discus.

    Seo, Jung-Kil; Go, Hye-Jin; Kim, Chan-Hee; Nam, Bo-Hye; Park, Nam Gyu

    2016-05-01

    A 4.7 kDa antimicrobial peptide was purified from the acidified gill extract of the Abalone, Haliotis discus, by cation-exchange and C18 reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Comparison of the amino acid sequences and molecular weight of this peptide with those of other known antimicrobial peptides revealed that this antimicrobial peptide have high sequence homology with that of cgMolluscidin and was designated hdMolluscidin. hdMolluscidin is composed of 46 amino acid residues containing several dibasic residue repeats like KK or K-R. hdMolluscidin showed potent antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive bacteria including Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus (minimal effective concentrations [MECs]; 0.8-19.0 μg/mL) and Gram-negative bacteria including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, Shigella flexneri, and Vibrio parahemolyticus ([MECs]; 1.0-4.0 μg/mL) without hemolytic activity. However, hdMolluscidin did not show any significant activity against Candida albicans. The secondary structural prediction suggested that hdMolluscidin might not form an ordered or an amphipathic structure. hdMolluscidin did not show membrane permeabilization or leakage ability. The full-length hdMolluscidin cDNA contained 566-bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 63-bp, a 3'-UTR of 359-bp, and an open reading frame of 144-bp encoding 47 amino acids (containing Met). cDNA study of hdMolluscidin suggests that it is expressed as a mature peptide. Our results indicate that hdMolluscidin could relate to the innate immune defenses in abalone and it may not act directly on bacterial membrane. PMID:27033467

  15. Amphipathic DNA polymers exhibit antiviral activity against systemic Murine Cytomegalovirus infection

    Juteau Jean-Marc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorothioated oligonucleotides (PS-ONs have a sequence-independent, broad spectrum antiviral activity as amphipathic polymers (APs and exhibit potent in vitro antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of herpesviruses: HSV-1, HSV-2, HCMV, VZV, EBV, and HHV-6A/B, and in vivo activity in a murine microbiocide model of genital HSV-2 infection. The activity of these agents against animal cytomegalovirus (CMV infections in vitro and in vivo was therefore investigated. Results In vitro, a 40 mer degenerate AP (REP 9 inhibited both murine CMV (MCMV and guinea pig CMV (GPCMV with an IC50 of 0.045 μM and 0.16 μM, respectively, and a 40 mer poly C AP (REP 9C inhibited MCMV with an IC50 of 0.05 μM. Addition of REP 9 to plaque assays during the first two hours of infection inhibited 78% of plaque formation whereas addition of REP 9 after 10 hours of infection did not significantly reduce the number of plaques, indicating that REP 9 antiviral activity against MCMV occurs at early times after infection. In a murine model of CMV infection, systemic treatment for 5 days significantly reduced virus replication in the spleens and livers of infected mice compared to saline-treated control mice. REP 9 and REP 9C were administered intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days at 10 mg/kg, starting 2 days prior to MCMV infection. Splenomegaly was observed in infected mice treated with REP 9 but not in control mice or in REP 9 treated, uninfected mice, consistent with mild CpG-like activity. When REP 9C (which lacks CpG motifs was compared to REP 9, it exhibited comparable antiviral activity as REP 9 but was not associated with splenomegaly. This suggests that the direct antiviral activity of APs is the predominant therapeutic mechanism in vivo. Moreover, REP 9C, which is acid stable, was effective when administered orally in combination with known permeation enhancers. Conclusion These studies indicate that APs exhibit potent, well tolerated

  16. Nasal delivery of peptides using powder carriers based on starch/poly(acrylic acid)

    Pringels, E

    2006-01-01

    As peptides are not suitable for oral administration, they are generally administered parenterally. Due to the disadvantages associated with parenteral delivery alternative routes of administration (buccal, nasal, pulmonal, ocular, transdermal, rectal and vaginal route) have been investigated. In the present work, the nasal route was selected as an alternative route for peptide delivery. Despite the advantages related to nasal administration, the bioavailability remains low. In Chapter 1 the ...

  17. A mathematically defined motif for the radial distribution of charged residues on apolipoprotein amphipathic alpha helixes.

    Hazelrig, J B; Jones, M. K.; Segrest, J P

    1993-01-01

    Multiple amphipathic alpha-helical candidate domains have been identified in exchangeable apolipoproteins by sequence analysis and indirect experimental evidence. The distribution of charged residues can differ within and between these apolipoproteins. Segrest et al. (Segrest, J. P., H. DeLoof, J. G. Dohlman, C. G. Brouillette, and G. M. Anantharamaiah. 1990. Proteins. 8:103-117.) argued that these differences are correlated with lipid affinity. A mathematically defined motif for the particul...

  18. An amphipathic motif at the transmembrane-cytoplasmic junction prevents autonomous activation of the thrombopoietin receptor.

    Staerk, Judith; Lacout, Catherine; Sato, Takeshi; Smith, Steven O.; Vainchenker, William; Constantinescu, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding to the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is thought to impose a dimeric receptor conformation(s) leading to hematopoietic stem cell renewal, megakaryocyte differentiation, and platelet formation. Unlike other cytokine receptors, such as the erythropoietin receptor, TpoR contains an amphipathic KWQFP motif at the junction between the transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic domains. We show here that a mutant TpoR (delta5TpoR), where this sequence was deleted, is constitutively active. I...

  19. Purification and characterisation of a glutamic acid-containing peptide with calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate.

    Huang, Shun-Li; Zhao, Li-Na; Cai, Xixi; Wang, Shao-Yun; Huang, Yi-Fan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2015-02-01

    The bioavailability of dietary ionised calcium is affected by intestinal basic environment. Calcium-binding peptides can form complexes with calcium to improve its absorption and bioavailability. The aim of this study was focused on isolation and characterisation of a calcium-binding peptide from whey protein hydrolysates. Whey protein was hydrolysed using Flavourzyme and Protamex with substrate to enzyme ratio of 25:1 (w/w) at 49 °C for 7 h. The calcium-binding peptide was isolated by DEAE anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A purified peptide of molecular mass 204 Da with strong calcium binding ability was identified on chromatography/electrospray ionisation (LC/ESI) tandem mass spectrum to be Glu-Gly (EG) after analysis and alignment in database. The calcium binding capacity of EG reached 67·81 μg/mg, and the amount increased by 95% compared with whey protein hydrolysate complex. The UV and infrared spectrometer analysis demonstrated that the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of glutamic acid. In addition, the amino group and peptide amino are also the related groups in the interaction between EG and calcium ion. Meanwhile, the sequestered calcium percentage experiment has proved that EG-Ca is significantly more stable than CaCl2 in human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. The findings suggest that the purified dipeptide has the potential to be used as ion-binding ingredient in dietary supplements. PMID:25592629

  20. D-Amino acid residue in the C-type natriuretic peptide from the venom of the mammal, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, the Australian platypus.

    Torres, Allan M; Menz, Ian; Alewood, Paul F; Bansal, Paramjit; Lahnstein, Jelle; Gallagher, Clifford H; Kuchel, Philip W

    2002-07-31

    The C-type natriuretic peptide from the platypus venom (OvCNP) exists in two forms, OvCNPa and OvCNPb, whose amino acid sequences are identical. Through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, and peptidase digestion studies, we discovered that OvCNPb incorporates a D-amino acid at position 2 in the primary structure. Peptides containing a D-amino acid have been found in lower forms of organism, but this report is the first for a D-amino acid in a biologically active peptide from a mammal. The result implies the existence of a specific isomerase in the platypus that converts an L-amino acid residue in the protein to the D-configuration. PMID:12135762

  1. Effect of D-amino acids at Asp23 and Ser26 residues on the conformational preference of Aβ20-29 peptides

    The effects of D-amino acids at Asp23 and Ser26 residues on the conformational preference of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide fragment (Aβ20-29) have been studied using different spectroscopic techniques, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), vibrational absorption, and electronic circular dichroism. To study the structure of the Aβ20-29, [D-Asp23]Aβ20-29, and [D-Ser26]Aβ20-29 peptides under different conditions, the spectra were measured in 10 mM acetate buffer (pH 3) and in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE). The spectroscopic results indicated that at pH 3, Aβ20-29 peptide takes random coil with β-turn structure, while [D-Ser26]Aβ20-29 peptide adopts significant amount of polyproline II (PPII) type structure along with β-turn contribution and D-Asp-substituted peptide ([D-Asp23]Aβ20-29) adopts predominantly PPII type structure. The increased propensity for PPII conformation upon D-amino acid substitution, in acidic medium, has important biological implications. In TFE, Aβ20-29, [D-Asp23]Aβ20-29, and [D-Ser26]Aβ20-29 peptides adopt 310-helix, α-helix, and random coil with some β-turn structures, respectively. The VCD data obtained for the Aβ peptide films suggested that the secondary structures for the peptide films are not the same as those for corresponding solution and are also different among the Aβ peptides studied here. This observation suggests that dehydration can have a significant influence on the structural preferences of these peptides

  2. Interaction of Peptide Transporter 1 With D-Glucose and L-Glutamic Acid; Possible Involvement of Taste Receptors.

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohmachi, Taichi; Ichiba, Kiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Tomono, Takumi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Idota, Yoko; Hatano, Yasuko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of sweet and umami (savory) tastants on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CEX), a substrate of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1, SLC15A1) in rats. After oral administration of glucose or mannitol to rats, CEX was administered together with a second dose of glucose or mannitol. Western blot analysis indicated that expression of PEPT1 in rat jejunum membrane was decreased by glucose, compared to mannitol. Furthermore, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of orally administered CEX was reduced by glucose compared to mannitol. The effect of glucose was diminished by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. We also found that Cmax of orally administered CEX was reduced by treatment with L-glutamic acid, compared to D-glutamic acid. Thus, excessive intake of glucose and L-glutamic acid may impair oral absorption of PEPT1 substrates. PMID:26852864

  3. Microwave-assisted reaction of peptide formation by amino acid with phosphate: Exploration of the most possible channels for the origin of life

    HU Rong; TIAN Jinping; YIN Yingwu

    2006-01-01

    Microwave-assisted reaction of peptide formation by amino acids with phosphate was studied. The results showed that the products were a mixture of peptides containing dipeptide, octapeptides and cyclic peptides, which could be obtained in a short time. Polyphosphate was also produced synchronously by the intermolecular condensation of phosphate. The polymerization degree reached 99% (pyrophosphate 64%, trimetaphosphate 35%) after 2 h at 200℃ under microwave irradiation. The intermediates of the mixed anhydrides formed by the intermolecular condensation of phosphates and glycin were determined by ESI-MS. Peptides were also produced by the reaction of amino acids with trimetaphosphate in aqueous solution. The conversion degree of valine reached 46.5% even at room temperature. The cyclic process of peptide formation and phosphate polymerization, regeneration and utilization in amino acids-phosphate system under microwave irradiation was detected and proved. Peptides could be continually formed only by inputting energy into this system. The above recycle may be the most possible process for primitive peptide formation in the origin of life.

  4. Structural features of peptoid-peptide hybrids in lipid-water interfaces

    Uggerhøj, Lars Erik; Munk, Jens K; Hansen, Paul R;

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of peptoid monomers into antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) increases their proteolytic resistance, but introduces conformational flexibility (reduced hydrogen bonding ability and cis/trans isomerism). We here use NMR spectroscopy to answer how the insertion of a peptoid monomer influenc...... interaction of the amphipathic helices flanking the peptoid monomer and the side chain properties of the peptoid and its preceding residue....

  5. Transgenic tobacco expressing a modified spider peptide inhibits the growth of plant pathogens and insect larvae

    The gene encoding lycotoxin I, an amphipathic pore-forming peptide, was modified to increase oral toxicity to insects. One of the most active modified genes was then constitutively expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and transformants were evaluated for insect and disease resistance. Pathogenic...

  6. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  7. Role of Side Chains in β-Sheet Self-Assembly into Peptide Fibrils. IR and VCD Spectroscopic Studies of Glutamic Acid-Containing Peptides.

    Tobias, Fernando; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2016-05-10

    Poly(glutamic acid) at low pH self-assembles after incubation at higher temperature into fibrils composed of antiparallel sheets that are stacked in a β2-type structure whose amide carbonyls have bifurcated H-bonds involving the side chains from the next sheet. Oligomers of Glu can also form such structures, and isotope labeling has provided insight into their out-of-register antiparallel structure [ Biomacromolecules 2013 , 14 , 3880 - 3891 ]. In this paper we report IR and VCD spectra and transmission electron micrograph (TEM) images for a series of alternately sequenced oligomers, Lys-(Aaa-Glu)5-Lys-NH2, where Aaa was varied over a variety of polar, aliphatic, or aromatic residues. Their spectral and TEM data show that these oligopeptides self-assemble into different structures, both local and morphological, that are dependent on both the nature of the Aaa side chains and growth conditions employed. Such alternate peptides substituted with small or polar residues, Ala and Thr, do not yield fibrils; but with β-branched aliphatic residues, Val and Ile, that could potentially pack with Glu side chains, these oligopeptides do show evidence of β2-stacking. By contrast, for Leu, with longer side chains, only β1-stacking is seen while with even larger Phe side chains, either β-form can be detected separately, depending on preparation conditions. These structures are dependent on high temperature incubation after reducing the pH and in some cases after sonication of initial fibril forms and reincubation. Some of these fibrillar peptides, but not all, show enhanced VCD, which can offer evidence for formation of long, multistrand, often twisted structures. Substitution of Glu with residues having selected side chains yields a variety of morphologies, leading to both β1- and β2-structures, that overall suggests two different packing modes for the hydrophobic side chains depending on size and type. PMID:27099990

  8. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    Holinga IV, George Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  9. The Spider Venom Peptide Lycosin-II Has Potent Antimicrobial Activity against Clinically Isolated Bacteria

    Yongjun Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been accepted as excellent candidates for developing novel antibiotics against drug-resistant bacteria. Recent studies indicate that spider venoms are the source for the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we isolated and characterized an antibacterial peptide named lycosin-II from the venom of the spider Lycosa singoriensis. It contains 21 amino acid residue lacking cysteine residues and forms a typical linear amphipathic and cationic α-helical conformation. Lycosin-II displays potent bacteriostatic effect on the tested drug-resistant bacterial strains isolated from hospital patients, including multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, which has presented a huge challenge for the infection therapy. The inhibitory ability of lycosin-II might derive from its binding to cell membrane, because Mg2+ could compete with the binding sites to reduce the bacteriostatic potency of lycosin-II. Our data suggest that lycosin-II might be a lead in the development of novel antibiotics for curing drug-resistant bacterial infections.

  10. T-scale as a novel vector of topological descriptors for amino acids and its application in QSARs of peptides

    Tian, Feifei; Zhou, Peng; Li, Zhiliang

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, a new topological descriptor T-scale is derived from principal component analysis (PCA) on the collected 67 kinds of structural and topological variables of 135 amino acids. Applying T-scale to three peptide panels as 58 angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, 20 thromboplastin inhibitors (TI) and 28 bovine lactoferricin-(17-31)-pentadecapeptides (LFB), the resulting QSAR models, constructed by partial least squares (PLS), are all superior to reference reports, with correlative coefficient r2 and cross-validated q2 of 0.845, 0.786; 0.996, 0.782 (0.988, 0.961); 0.760, 0.627, respectively.