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Sample records for acid-base transporter abundance

  1. Acid-base transport in pancreas-new challenges

    Novak, Ivana; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    to consider in pancreas are the proton pumps (H-K-ATPases), as well as the calcium-activated K and Cl channels, such as K3.1 and TMEM16A/ANO1. Local regulators, such as purinergic signaling, fine-tune, and coordinate pancreatic secretion. Lastly, we speculate whether dys-regulation of acid-base transport...

  2. Acid-base transport in pancreas – new challenges

    Ivana eNovak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Along the gastrointestinal tract a number of epithelia contribute with acid or basic secretions in order to aid digestive processes. The stomach and pancreas are the most extreme examples of acid (H+ and base (HCO3- transporters, respectively. Nevertheless, they share the same challenges of transporting acid and bases across epithelia and effectively regulating their intracellular pH. In this review, we will make use of comparative physiology to enlighten the cellular mechanisms of pancreatic HCO3- and fluid secretion, which is still challenging physiologists. Some of the novel transporters to consider in pancreas are the proton pumps (H+-K+-ATPases, as well as the calcium-activated K+ and Cl- channels, such as KCa3.1 and TMEM16A/ANO1. Local regulators, such as purinergic signalling, fine-tune and coordinate pancreatic secretion. Lastly, we speculate whether dys-regulation of acid-base transport contributes to pancreatic diseases including cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis and cancer.

  3. Acid-base status determines the renal expression of Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport proteins.

    Nijenhuis, T.; Renkema, K.Y.R.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis results in renal Ca2+ and Mg2+ wasting, whereas chronic metabolic alkalosis is known to exert the reverse effects. It was hypothesized that these adaptations are mediated at least in part by the renal Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport proteins. The aim of this study, therefore, was

  4. Transport of stearic acid-based solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) into human epithelial cells.

    Shah, Rohan M; Rajasekaran, Dhivya; Ludford-Menting, Mandy; Eldridge, Daniel S; Palombo, Enzo A; Harding, Ian H

    2016-04-01

    Development of drug delivery systems, as much as the drug molecule itself, is an important consideration for improving drug absorption and bioavailability. The mechanisms by which drug carriers enter target cells can differ depending on their size, surface properties and components. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have gained an increased attention in recent years and are the drug carriers of interest in this paper. They are known to breach the cell-membrane barrier and have been actively sought to transport biomolecules. Previous studies by our group, and also other groups, provided an extensive characterization of SLNs. However, few studies have investigated the uptake of SLNs and these have had limited mechanistic focus. The aim of this work was to investigate the pathway of uptake of SLNs by human epithelial cells i.e., lung A549 and cervical HeLa cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that investigates the cellular uptake of SLNs by human epithelial cells. The mechanism of cellular uptake was deciphered using pharmacologic inhibitors (sucrose, potassium-free buffer, filipin and cytochalasin B). Imaging techniques and flow assisted cell sorting (FACS) were used to assess the cellular uptake of SLNs loaded with rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent probe. This study provided evidence that the cellular uptake of SLNs was energy-dependent, and the endocytosis of SLNs was mainly dependent on clathrin-mediated mechanisms. The establishment of entry mechanism of SLNs is of fundamental importance for future facilitation of SLNs as biological or drug carriers. PMID:26764103

  5. Transport Selectivity of a Diethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate-Based Thymine-imprinted Polymeric Membrane over a Cellulose Support for Nucleic Acid Bases

    QU Xiang-Jin; CHEN Chang-Bao; ZHOU Jie; WU Chun-Hui

    2007-01-01

    The binding mechanism between 9-vinyladenine and pyrimidine base thymine in methanol was studied with UV-visible spectrophotometric method. Based on this study, using thymine as a template molecule, 9-vinyladenine as a novel functional monomer and diethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a new cross-linker, a specific diethylene glycol dimethacrylate-based molecularly imprinted polymeric membrane was prepared over a cellulose support.Then, the resultantly polymeric membrane morphologies were visualized with scanning electron microscopy and its permselectivity was examined using thymine, uracil, cytosine, adenine and guanine as substrates. This result showed that the imprinting polymeric membrane prepared with diethylene glycol dimethacrylate exhibited higher transport capacity for the template molecule thymine and its optimal analog uracil than other nucleic acid bases. The membrane also took on higher permselectivity than the imprinted membrane made with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker. When a mixture including five nucleic acid bases thymine, uracil, cytosine, adenine and guanine passed through the diethylene glycol dimethacrylate-based thymine-imprinted polymeric membrane,recognition of the membrane for the template molecule thymine and its optimal analog uracil was demonstrated. It was predicted that the molecularly imprinted membrane prepared with diethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker might be applicable to thymine assay of absolute hydrolysates of DNA or uracil assay of absolute hydrolysates of RNA in biological samples because of its high selectivity for the template molecule thymine and its optimal analog uracil.

  6. Quantitation of Vacuolar Sugar Transporter Abundance Changes Using QconCAT Synthtetic Peptides

    Pertl-Obermeyer, Heidi; Trentmann, Oliver; Duscha, Kerstin; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of protein abundance changes are important for biological conclusions on protein-related processes such as activity or complex formation. Proteomic analyses in general are almost routine tasks in many laboratories, but a precise and quantitative description of (absolute) protein abundance changes require careful experimental design and precise data quality. Today, a vast choice of metabolic labeling and label-free quantitation protocols are available, but the trade-off between quantitative precision and proteome coverage of quantified proteins including missing value problems remain. Here, we provide an example of a targeted proteomic approach using artificial standard proteins consisting of concatenated peptides of interest (QconCAT) to specifically quantify abiotic stress-induced abundance changes in low abundant vacuolar transporters. An advantage of this approach is the reliable quantitation of alimited set of low-abundant target proteins throughout different conditions. We show that vacuolar ATPase AVP1 and sugar transporters of the ERDL (early responsive to dehydration-like) family and TMT2 (tonoplast monosaccharide transporter 2) showed increased abundance upon salt stress. PMID:27148277

  7. Effects of atmospheric transport on column abundances of nitrogen and chlorine compounds in the arctic stratosphere

    Yatteau, John H.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Lait, Leslie R.; Newman, Paul A.; Torres, Arnold; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Strahan, Susan E.; Chan, K. Roland

    1990-01-01

    In the absence of heterogeneous processes, distributions of NO(y), HNO3, Cl(x) and HCl in the polar winter stratosphere should be determined by transport. A model simulating distributions of these species in the arctic for January and February 1989 is developed using observed fields of potential vorticity and potential temperature. Comparison of model results with column measurements from the DC-8 indicates conversion of NO(x) to HNO3, condensation of HNO3, conversion of HCl to CINO3, and conversion of HCl plus CINO3 to an unmeasured species. Heterogeneous processes strongly affect abundances of NO(y) and Cl(x) species in the winter arctic stratosphere.

  8. Effect of nitrogen intake on nitrogen recycling and urea transporter abundance in lambs.

    Marini, J C; Klein, J D; Sands, J M; Van Amburgh, M E

    2004-04-01

    Urea recycling in ruminants has been studied extensively in the past, but the mechanisms regulating the amount of urea recycled or excreted remain obscure. To elucidate the role of urea transporters (UT) in N recycling, nine Dorset-Finn ewe lambs (20.8 +/- 0.8 kg) were fed diets containing 15.5, 28.4, and 41.3 g of N/kg of DM for 25 d. Nitrogen balance and urea N kinetics were measured during the last 3 d of the period. Animals were then slaughtered and mucosa samples from the rumen, duodenum, ileum, and cecum, as well as kidney medulla and liver, were collected. Increasing N intake tended to increase N balance quadratically (1.5, 5.1, and 4.4 +/- 0.86 g of N/d, P 2.62 mg of urea N/dL, P creatinine excretion (518 +/- 82.4 mg/d; P level of N intake increased linearly the weight of the liver as a proportion of BW (1.73, 1.88, and 2.22 +/- 0.15%, P 0.10) in UT abundance, quantified by densitometry, were found. Ruminal-wall urease activity decreased linearly (P level of N intake. Urease activity in duodenal, ileal, and cecal mucosa did not differ from zero (P > 0.10) in lambs on the high-protein diet. In the present experiment, urea transporter abundance in the kidney medulla and the gastrointestinal tract did not reflect the increase in urea-N reabsorption by the kidney and transferred into the gut. PMID:15080338

  9. Histological characterization of orphan transporter MCT14 (SLC16A14) shows abundant expression in mouse CNS and kidney

    Roshanbin, Sahar; Lindberg, Frida A.; Lekholm, Emilia; Eriksson, Mikaela M.; Perland, Emelie; Åhlund, Johan; Raine, Amanda; Fredriksson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background MCT14 (SLC16A14) is an orphan member of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family, also known as the SLC16 family of secondary active transmembrane transporters. Available expression data for this transporter is limited, and in this paper we aim to characterize MCT14 with respect to tissue distribution and cellular localization in mouse brain. Results Using qPCR, we found that Slc16a14 mRNA was highly abundant in mouse kidney and moderately in central nervous system, testis, ute...

  10. Transport of protonic charge carriers in methyl-sulfonic-acid/water mixtures : a model for lowly hydrated sulfonic acid based ionomers

    Telfah, Ahmad D. S.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells (PEM-FCs) deliver high power density and offer the advantages of low weight and volume, compared to other fuel cell systems. State-of-the-art separator materials in PEM-FCs are sulfonic acid functionalized polymers, like the perfluorinated polymer Nafion. The suitability of proton-conducting materials as separators in a particular fuel-cell application is essentially dependent on its transport properties, durability, and reactivity. Thus, this thesis...

  11. Molten fatty acid based microemulsions.

    Noirjean, Cecile; Testard, Fabienne; Dejugnat, Christophe; Jestin, Jacques; Carriere, David

    2016-06-21

    We show that ternary mixtures of water (polar phase), myristic acid (MA, apolar phase) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, cationic surfactant) studied above the melting point of myristic acid allow the preparation of microemulsions without adding a salt or a co-surfactant. The combination of SANS, SAXS/WAXS, DSC, and phase diagram determination allows a complete characterization of the structures and interactions between components in the molten fatty acid based microemulsions. For the different structures characterized (microemulsion, lamellar or hexagonal phases), a similar thermal behaviour is observed for all ternary MA/CTAB/water monophasic samples and for binary MA/CTAB mixtures without water: crystalline myristic acid melts at 52 °C, and a thermal transition at 70 °C is assigned to the breaking of hydrogen bounds inside the mixed myristic acid/CTAB complex (being the surfactant film in the ternary system). Water determines the film curvature, hence the structures observed at high temperature, but does not influence the thermal behaviour of the ternary system. Myristic acid is partitioned in two "species" that behave independently: pure myristic acid and myristic acid associated with CTAB to form an equimolar complex that plays the role of the surfactant film. We therefore show that myristic acid plays the role of a solvent (oil) and a co-surfactant allowing the fine tuning of the structure of oil and water mixtures. This solvosurfactant behaviour of long chain fatty acid opens the way for new formulations with a complex structure without the addition of any extra compound. PMID:27241163

  12. Abundance and instantaneous transport of Petrolisthes armatus (Gibbes, 1850 planktonic larvae in the Catuama inlet, Northeast Brazil

    Mauro de Melo Júnior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of tidal and diel changes on the exchange of Petrolisthes armatus planktonic larvae was studied at the Catuama inlet, which represents an intermediate system of marine and estuarine environments in the Northeast Brazil. To characterize the larval abundance and vertical distribution, samplings were carried out in August 2001 at neap tide and 3 stations, with 3 hours interval over 24 hours. Samples were taken at three or two depths at each station, with a plankton pump coupled to a 300 µm mesh size net. Petrolisthes armatus zoea I and II showed a mean of 26.3 ± 83.6 and 12 ± 38.8 ind m-3, respectively. During flood tides, the larvae were more concentrated in the midwater and surface, which avoided the transport to internal regions. In contrast, during ebb tides when the larvae were distributed in the three layers, the higher concentrations were found in the bottom, which avoided a major exportation. The diel dynamic of the larval fluxes was characterized by vertical migration behavior associated to the tidal regime, which suggested that the development of this decapod apparently occurs in the inner shelf (instead of the outer shelf off this peculiar ecosystem.A influência dos ciclos de maré e fotoperíodo sobre o fluxo de larvas planctônicas de Petrolisthes armatus foi estudada na barra de Catuama, que representa um ambiente intermediário entre os sistemas marinho e estuarino no nordeste do Brasil. Para caracterizar a abundância e a distribuição vertical das larvas, foram feitas coletas em agosto de 2001, durante a maré de quadratura, em 3 estações fixas e com intervalos de 3 horas, ao longo de um ciclo de 24 horas. Em cada estação, amostras foram coletadas em três ou duas profundidades, com o auxílio de uma bomba de sucção acoplada a uma rede de plâncton com 300 µm de abertura de malha. Os zoés I e II de Petrolisthes armatus apresentaram médias de 26,3 ± 83,6 e 12 ± 38,8 ind m-3, respectivamente. Durante as

  13. Protein abundance of urea transporters and aquaporin 2 change differently in nephrotic pair-fed vs. non-pair-fed rats

    Bou Matar, Raed N.; Malik, Bela; Wang, Xiaonan H.; Martin, Christopher F; Eaton, Douglas C.; Sands, Jeff M.; Klein, Janet D.

    2012-01-01

    Salt and water retention is a hallmark of nephrotic syndrome (NS). In this study, we test for changes in the abundance of urea transporters, aquaporin 2 (AQP2), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 2 (NKCC2), and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), in non-pair-fed and pair-fed nephrotic animals. Doxorubicin-injected male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10) were followed in metabolism cages. Urinary excretion of protein, sodium, and urea was measured periodically. Kidney inner medulla (IM), outer medulla, and cortex tissue...

  14. Hypokalemic paralysis and acid-base balance

    Ivo Casagranda

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of hypokalemic paralysis are reported, presenting to the Emergency Department. The first is a patient with a hypokalemic periodic paralysis with a normal acid-base status, the second is a case of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis of all extremities with a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, the last is a patient with a hypokalemic distal paralysis of right upper arm with metabolic alkalosis. Afterwards some pathophysiologic principles and the clinical aspects of hypokalemia are discussed and an appropriate approach to do in Emergency Department, to identify the hypokalemic paralysis etiologies in the Emergency Department, is presented, beginning from the evaluation of acid-base status.

  15. Jigsaw Cooperative Learning: Acid-Base Theories

    Tarhan, Leman; Sesen, Burcin Acar

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on investigating the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning instruction on first-year undergraduates' understanding of acid-base theories. Undergraduates' opinions about jigsaw cooperative learning instruction were also investigated. The participants of this study were 38 first-year undergraduates in chemistry education…

  16. Influence of trans-Pacific pollution transport on acyl peroxy nitrate abundances and speciation at Mount Bachelor Observatory during INTEX-B

    G. M. Wolfe

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We present month-long observations of speciated acyl peroxy nitrates (APNs, including PAN, PPN, MPAN, APAN, and the sum of PiBN and PnBN, measured at the Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO as part of the INTEX-B collaborative field campaign during spring 2006. APN abundances, measured by thermal dissociation-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (TD-CIMS, are discussed in terms of differing contributions from the boundary layer (BL and the free troposphere (FT and in the context of previous APN measurements in the NE Pacific region. PAN mixing ratios range from 11 to 3955 pptv, with a mean value of 334 pptv for the full measurement period. PPN is linearly correlated with PAN (r2=0.96, with an average abundance of 6.5% relative to PAN; other APNs are generally <1% of PAN. Diurnal cycles and relationships of APNs with ozone reveal a gradient in hydrocarbon chemistry between the BL and the FT. On average, levels of APNs, ozone and PPN/PAN are substantially higher in FT air relative to BL air, suggesting that this site is strongly influenced by distant pollution sources. To estimate the impact of long-range transport of Asian pollution on atmospheric composition at MBO, we perform a detailed analysis utilizing HYSPLIT back trajectories. This analysis suggests that trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution leads to substantial increases in APN and ozone mixing ratios at MBO, especially when transport occurs via the free troposphere. The ensemble of trajectories indicate that Asian-influenced free tropospheric air was sampled in ~16% of our data and contained a median PAN mixing ratio double that of the full dataset.

  17. Influence of trans-Pacific pollution transport on acyl peroxy nitrate abundances and speciation at Mount Bachelor Observatory during INTEX-B

    G. M. Wolfe

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We present month-long observations of speciated acyl peroxy nitrates (APNs, including PAN, PPN, MPAN, APAN, and the sum of PiBN and PnBN, measured at the Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO as part of the INTEX-B collaborative field campaign during spring 2006. APN abundances, measured by thermal dissociation-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (TD-CIMS, are discussed in terms of differing contributions from the boundary layer and the free troposphere and in the context of previous APN measurements in the NE Pacific region. PAN mixing ratios range from 11 to 3955 pptv, with a mean value of 334 pptv for the full measurement period. PPN is linearly correlated with PAN (r2=0.96, with an average abundance of 6.5% relative to PAN; other APNs are generally <1% of PAN. Diurnal cycles and relationships of APNs with ozone reveal a gradient in hydrocarbon chemistry between the boundary layer and the free troposphere. On average, the highest levels of APNs, ozone and PPN/PAN are found in free tropospheric air masses, suggesting that this site is strongly influenced by distant pollution sources. To estimate the impact of long-range transport of Asian pollution on atmospheric composition at MBO, we perform a detailed analysis utilizing HYSPLIT back trajectories. This analysis suggests that trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution leads to substantial increases in APN and ozone mixing ratios at MBO, especially when transport occurs via the free troposphere. The ensemble of trajectories indicate that Asian-influenced free tropospheric air was sampled in ~16% of our data and contained a median PAN mixing ratio double that of the full dataset.

  18. Hypokalemic paralysis and acid-base balance

    Ivo Casagranda; Riccardo Boverio; Andrea Defrancisci; Sara Ferrillo; Francesca Gargiulo

    2006-01-01

    Three cases of hypokalemic paralysis are reported, presenting to the Emergency Department. The first is a patient with a hypokalemic periodic paralysis with a normal acid-base status, the second is a case of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis of all extremities with a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, the last is a patient with a hypokalemic distal paralysis of right upper arm with metabolic alkalosis. Afterwards some pathophysiologic principles and the clinical aspects of hypokalemia are discu...

  19. Abundance of red-listed species in infrastructure habitats – ”responsibility species” as a priority-setting tool for transportation agencies´ conservation action

    Jan-Olof Helldin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Road and railroad verges may contribute to nature conservation by providing habitat for many species, but due to limited resources, there is a need to select the most important road and railroad stretches for adapted management. We explore the responsibility species concept as a tool for the Swedish Transport Administration to make this selection. We propose lists of candidate responsibility species based on relative abundance of conservation priority species in the vicinity of roads and railroads, respectively. Abundance data were derived from crowd-sourced species observations. Species with ≥20% of observations in infrastructure habitats were included as candidate responsibility species. For roads 32 species were included in the list, for railroads seven species, with an overlap of three species between the lists. We analyzed habitat and management requirements of the listed species to try identifying functional groups. Most of the species require open or semi-open habitats, mainly dry grassland or heathland on sandy or limy soil, un-sprayed crop fields, or solitary trees. Host plants or substrates include broom (genus Genista, patches of bare soil, and sun exposed wood. Conservation actions prescribed for the species include, e.g., late or irregular mowing, removal of the field layer, planting of host species, protecting and providing particular substrates, and special protection of certain sites. We argue that road and railroad managers are particularly well suited to conduct most of these actions. We consider the responsibility species concept to be a useful tool for transportation agencies to set priorities for adapted verge management, and the current method to be effective in identifying a first list of candidate species. We discuss the possibility of also identifying responsibility habitats or general management measures based on the results.

  20. Abundance of zinc ions in synaptic terminals of mocha mutant mice: zinc transporter 3 immunohistochemistry and zinc sulphide autometallography.

    Stoltenberg, Meredin; Nejsum, Lene N; Larsen, Agnete; Danscher, Gorm

    2004-02-01

    The mocha mouse is an autosomal recessive pigment mutant on mouse chromosome 10 caused by a deletion in the gene for the delta subunit of the adaptor-like complex AP-3. Based on zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) immunohistochemistry, zinc TSQ fluorescence and a modified Timm method, previous studies found a lack of histochemically-detectable zinc and a substantial reduction in the ZnT3 immunoreactivity. It has, therefore, been suggested that the mocha mouse could serve as a model for studies of the significance of zinc ions in zinc-enriched (ZEN) neurons. We have chosen the mocha-zinc-model in a study of the significance of ZEN neurons in hypoxia-caused damage in mouse brain. In order to establish that the model was either void of zinc ions or had a significantly decreased level of zinc ions in their ZEN terminals, we repeated the studies that had lead to the above assumption, the only methodology difference being that we used the zinc specific Neo-Timm method instead of the Timm method applied in the original study. We found that, although the ZnS autometallography (AMG) technique revealed a reduction in staining intensity as compared to the littermate controls, there were still plenty of zinc ions in the ZEN terminals, in particular visible in telencephalic structures like neocortex and hippocampus. At ultrastructural levels the zinc ions were found in a pool of vesicles of the ZEN terminals as in the control animals, but additionally zinc ions could be traced in ZEN neuronal somata in the neocortex and hippocampus. The mossy fibres in the hippocampus of mocha mice also bind with TSQ, though less than in the controls. We found ZnS AMG grains in ZEN neuronal somata, which were also immunoreactive for ZnT3. Our study confirmed the decreased ZnT3 immunoreactivity in ZEN terminals of the mocha mouse found in the original study. Based on these findings, we suggest that the mocha mouse may not be an ideal model for studies of the histochemically-detectable zinc ion pool of the

  1. Transport of fallout radiocesium in the soil by bioturbation. A random walk model and application to a forest soil with a high abundance of earthworms

    It is well known that bioturbation can contribute significantly to the vertical transport of fallout radionuclides in grassland soils. To examine this effect also for a forest soil, activity-depth profiles of Chernobyl-derived 134Cs from a limed plot (soil, hapludalf under spruce) with a high abundance of earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) in the Olu horizon (thickness=3.5 cm) were evaluated and compared with the corresponding depth profiles from an adjacent control plot. For this purpose, a random-walk based transport model was developed, which considers (1) the presence of an initial activity-depth distribution, (2) the deposition history of radiocesium at the soil surface, (3) individual diffusion/dispersion coefficients and convection rates for the different soil horizons, and (4) mixing by bioturbation within one soil horizon. With this model, the observed 134Cs-depth distribution at the control site (no bioturbation) and at the limed site could be simulated quite satisfactorily. It is shown that the observed, substantial long-term enrichment of 134Cs in the bioturbation horizon can be modeled by an exceptionally effective diffusion process, combined with a partial reflection of the randomly moving particles at the two borders of the bioturbation zone. The present model predicts significantly longer residence times of radiocesium in the organic soil layer of the forest soil than obtained from a first-order compartment model, which does not consider bioturbation explicitly

  2. Physiological roles of acid-base sensors.

    Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential for life. The macromolecules upon which living organisms depend are sensitive to pH changes, and physiological systems use the equilibrium between carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and protons to buffer their pH. Biological processes and environmental insults are constantly challenging an organism's pH; therefore, to maintain a consistent and proper pH, organisms need sensors that measure pH and that elicit appropriate responses. Mammals use multiple sensors for measuring both intracellular and extracellular pH, and although some mammalian pH sensors directly measure protons, it has recently become apparent that many pH-sensing systems measure pH via bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase. PMID:25340964

  3. ACID-BASE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POLYMERS AND FILLERS

    WANG Qingguo; CHEN Fute; HUANG Yuanfu; ZHOU Qingli

    1987-01-01

    Inverse gas chromatography(IGC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were applied to determining the relative acid-base strength of polymers and coupling agents. The acid-base characteristics of fillers such as CaCO3 could be altered by treatment with different coupling agents. It was shown that some mechanical properties of filled polymers were obviously associated with acid-base interactions between polymers and fillers.

  4. Aqueous extracts of Mozambican plants as alternative and environmentally safe acid-base indicators.

    Macuvele, Domingos Lusitaneo Pier; Sithole, Gerre Zebedias Samo; Cesca, Karina; Macuvele, Suzana Lília Pinare; Matsinhe, Jonas Valente

    2016-06-01

    Indicators are substances that change color as the pH of the medium. Many of these substances are dyes of synthetic origin. The mulala plant (Euclea natalensis), which roots are commonly used by rural communities for their oral hygiene, and roseira (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis), an ornamental plant, are abundant in Mozambique. Currently, synthetic acid-base indicators are most commonly used but have environmental implications and, on the other hand, are expensive products, so the demand for natural indicators started. This study investigated the applicability of aqueous extracts of H. rosa-sinensis and E. natalensis as acid-base indicators. Ground on this work, the extracts can be used as acid-base indicators. On the basis of the absorption spectroscopy in both the UV-Vis region and previous studies, it was possible to preliminarily pinpoint anthocyanins and naphthoquinones as responsible for the shifting of colors depending on the pH range of aqueous extracts of H. rosa-sinensis and E. natalensis. These natural indicators are easily accessible, inexpensive, easy to extract, environmentally safe, and locally available. PMID:26936478

  5. Acid-base analysis: a critique of the Stewart and bicarbonate-centered approaches.

    Kurtz, Ira; Kraut, Jeffrey; Ornekian, Vahram; Nguyen, Minhtri K

    2008-05-01

    When approaching the analysis of disorders of acid-base balance, physical chemists, physiologists, and clinicians, tend to focus on different aspects of the relevant phenomenology. The physical chemist focuses on a quantitative understanding of proton hydration and aqueous proton transfer reactions that alter the acidity of a given solution. The physiologist focuses on molecular, cellular, and whole organ transport processes that modulate the acidity of a given body fluid compartment. The clinician emphasizes the diagnosis, clinical causes, and most appropriate treatment of acid-base disturbances. Historically, two different conceptual frameworks have evolved among clinicians and physiologists for interpreting acid-base phenomena. The traditional or bicarbonate-centered framework relies quantitatively on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, whereas the Stewart or strong ion approach utilizes either the original Stewart equation or its simplified version derived by Constable. In this review, the concepts underlying the bicarbonate-centered and Stewart formulations are analyzed in detail, emphasizing the differences in how each approach characterizes acid-base phenomenology at the molecular level, tissue level, and in the clinical realm. A quantitative comparison of the equations that are currently used in the literature to calculate H(+) concentration ([H(+)]) is included to clear up some of the misconceptions that currently exist in this area. Our analysis demonstrates that while the principle of electroneutrality plays a central role in the strong ion formulation, electroneutrality mechanistically does not dictate a specific [H(+)], and the strong ion and bicarbonate-centered approaches are quantitatively identical even in the presence of nonbicarbonate buffers. Finally, our analysis indicates that the bicarbonate-centered approach utilizing the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is a mechanistic formulation that reflects the underlying acid-base phenomenology. PMID

  6. Boronic acid-based autoligation of nucleic acids

    Barbeyron, R.; Vasseur, J.-J.; Smietana, M.;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The development of synthetic systems displaying dynamic and adaptive characteristics is a formidable challenge with wide applications from biotechnology to therapeutics. Recently, we described a dynamic and programmable nucleic acid-based system relying on the formation of reversible...

  7. Teaching acid/base physiology in the laboratory

    Friis, Ulla G; Plovsing, Ronni; Hansen, Klaus;

    2010-01-01

    Acid/base homeostasis is one of the most difficult subdisciplines of physiology for medical students to master. A different approach, where theory and practice are linked, might help students develop a deeper understanding of acid/base homeostasis. We therefore set out to develop a laboratory...... exercise in acid/base physiology that would provide students with unambiguous and reproducible data that clearly would illustrate the theory in practice. The laboratory exercise was developed to include both metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. Data were collected from 56 groups of medical...... students that had participated in this laboratory exercise. The acquired data showed very consistent and solid findings after the development of both metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. All results were consistent with the appropriate diagnosis of the acid/base disorder. Not one single group...

  8. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  9. Acid-Base Behavior in Hydrothermal Processing of Wastes - Final Report

    A major obstacle to development of hydrothermal oxidation technology has been a lack of scientific knowledge of chemistry in hydrothermal solution above 350 C, particularly acid-base behavior, and transport phenomena, which is needed to understand corrosion, metal-ion complexation, and salt precipitation and recovery. Our objective has been to provide this knowledge with in situ UV-visible spectroscopic measurements and fully molecular computer simulation. Our recent development of relatively stable organic UV-visible pH indicators for supercritical water oxidation offers the opportunity to characterize buffers and to monitor acid-base titrations. These results have important implications for understanding reaction pathways and yields for decomposition of wastes in supercritical water

  10. Pattern of acid base abnormalities in critically ill patinets

    To find out the pattern of acid base abnormalities in critically ill patients in a tertiary care health facility. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in the department of pathology, Combined Military Hospital Kharian from January 2013 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty patients suffering from various diseases and presenting with exacerbation of their clinical conditions were studied. These patients were hospitalized and managed in acute care units of the hospital. Arterial blood gases were analysed to detect acid base status and their correlation with their clinical condition. Concomitant analysis of electrolytes was carried out. Tests related to concurrent illnesses e.g. renal and liver function tests, cardiac enzymes and plasma glucose were assayed by routine end point and kinetic methods. Standard reference materials were used to ensure internal quantify control of analyses. Results: Two hundred and fifteen patients out of 250 studied suffered from acid base disorders. Gender distribution showed a higher percentage of male patients and the mean age was 70.5 ± 17.4 years. Double acid base disorders were the commonest disorders (34%) followed by metabolic acidosis (30%). Anion gap was calculated to further stratify metabolic acidosis and cases of diabetic ketoacidosis were the commonest in this category (47%). Other simple acid base disorders were relatively less frequent. Delta bicarbonate was calculated to unmask the superimposition of respiratory alkalosis or acidosis with metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis. Though triple acid base disorders were noted in a small percentage of cases (05%), but were found to be the most complicated and challenging. Mixed acid base disorders were associated with high mortality. Conclusion: A large number of critically ill patients manifested acid base abnormalities over the full spectrum of these disorders. Mixed acid base disorders were

  11. Influence of trans-Pacific pollution transport on acyl peroxy nitrate abundances and speciation at Mount Bachelor Observatory during INTEX-B

    G. M. Wolfe; Thornton, J A; V. F. McNeill; Jaffe, D. A.; Reidmiller, D.; Chand, D.; Smith, J.; P. Swartzendruber; Flocke, F.; Zheng, W.

    2007-01-01

    We present month-long observations of speciated acyl peroxy nitrates (APNs), including PAN, PPN, MPAN, APAN, and the sum of PiBN and PnBN, measured at the Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) as part of the INTEX-B collaborative field campaign during spring 2006. APN abundances, measured by thermal dissociation-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (TD-CIMS), are discussed in terms of differing contributions from the boundary layer (BL) and the free troposphere (FT) and in the c...

  12. Influence of trans-Pacific pollution transport on acyl peroxy nitrate abundances and speciation at Mount Bachelor Observatory during INTEX-B

    G. M. Wolfe; Thornton, J A; V. F. McNeill; Jaffe, D. A.; Reidmiller, D.; Chand, D.; Smith, J.; P. Swartzendruber; Flocke, F.; Zheng, W.

    2007-01-01

    We present month-long observations of speciated acyl peroxy nitrates (APNs), including PAN, PPN, MPAN, APAN, and the sum of PiBN and PnBN, measured at the Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) as part of the INTEX-B collaborative field campaign during spring 2006. APN abundances, measured by thermal dissociation-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (TD-CIMS), are discussed in terms of differing contributions from the boundary layer (BL) and the free troposphere (FT) and in the context of previous...

  13. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  14. Enhanced Acid/Base Catalysis in High Temperature Liquid Water

    Xiu Yang LU; Qi JING; Zhun LI; Lei YUAN; Fei GAO; Xin LIU

    2006-01-01

    Two novel and environmentally benign solvent systems, organic acids-enriched high temperature liquid water (HTLW) and NH3-enriched HTLW, were developed, which can enhance the reaction rate of acid/base-catalyzed organic reactions in HTLW. We investigated the decomposition of fructose in organic acids-enriched HTLW, hydrolysis of cinnamaldehyde and aldol condensation of phenylaldehyde with acetaldehyde in NH3-enriched HTLW. The experimental results demonstrated that organic acids-enriched or NH3-enriched HTLW can greatly accelerate acid/base-catalyzed organic reactions in HTLW.

  15. Acid-base disturbance in patients with cirrhosis

    Henriksen, Jens H; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Acid-base disturbances were investigated in patients with cirrhosis in relation to hemodynamic derangement to analyze the hyperventilatory effects and the metabolic compensation. METHODS: A total of 66 patients with cirrhosis and 44 controls were investigated during a hemodynamic study......, and effects of unidentified ions (all Pacid-base disturbances could not be identified. CONCLUSION: Hypocapnic alkalosis is related to disease severity and hyperdynamic systemic circulation in patients with cirrhosis. The metabolic compensation includes...... alterations in serum albumin and water retention that may result in a delicate acid-base balance in these patients....

  16. Transport

    Transport is one of the major causes of environmental damage in Austria. Energy consumption, pollutants emissions, noise emissions, use of surfaces, sealing of surfaces, dissection of ecosystems and impact on landscape are the most significant environmental impacts caused by it. An overview of the transport development of passengers and freight in Austria is presented. Especially the energy consumption growth, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions by type of transport, and the emissions development (HC, particle and carbon monoxide) of goods and passengers transport are analyzed covering the years 1980 - 1999. The health cost resulting from transport-related air pollution in Austria is given and measures to be taken for an effective control of the transport sector are mentioned. Figs. 8, Table 1. (nevyjel)

  17. Nitrate transport in cucumber leaves is an inducible process involving an increase in plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity and abundance

    Nikolic Miroslav

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms by which nitrate is transported into the roots have been characterized both at physiological and molecular levels. It has been demonstrated that nitrate is taken up in an energy-dependent way by a four-component uptake machinery involving high- and low- affinity transport systems. In contrast very little is known about the physiology of nitrate transport towards different plant tissues and in particular at the leaf level. Results The mechanism of nitrate uptake in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Chinese long plants was studied and compared with that of the root. Net nitrate uptake by roots of nitrate-depleted cucumber plants proved to be substrate-inducible and biphasic showing a saturable kinetics with a clear linear non saturable component at an anion concentration higher than 2 mM. Nitrate uptake by leaf discs of cucumber plants showed some similarities with that operating in the roots (e.g. electrogenic H+ dependence via involvement of proton pump, a certain degree of induction. However, it did not exhibit typical biphasic kinetics and was characterized by a higher Km with values out of the range usually recorded in roots of several different plant species. The quantity and activity of plasma membrane (PM H+-ATPase of the vesicles isolated from leaf tissues of nitrate-treated plants for 12 h (peak of nitrate foliar uptake rate increased with respect to that observed in the vesicles isolated from N-deprived control plants, thus suggesting an involvement of this enzyme in the leaf nitrate uptake process similar to that described in roots. Molecular analyses suggest the involvement of a specific isoform of PM H+-ATPase (CsHA1 and NRT2 transporter (CsNRT2 in root nitrate uptake. At the leaf level, nitrate treatment modulated the expression of CsHA2, highlighting a main putative role of this isogene in the process. Conclusions Obtained results provide for the first time evidence that a saturable

  18. Students' Understanding of Acids/Bases in Organic Chemistry Contexts

    Cartrette, David P.; Mayo, Provi M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding key foundational principles is vital to learning chemistry across different contexts. One such foundational principle is the acid/base behavior of molecules. In the general chemistry sequence, the Bronsted-Lowry theory is stressed, because it lends itself well to studying equilibrium and kinetics. However, the Lewis theory of…

  19. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  20. Nucleic acid-based approaches to STAT inhibition.

    Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2012-10-01

    Silencing of abnormally activated genes can be accomplished in a highly specific manner using nucleic acid based approaches. The focus of this review includes the different nucleic acid based inhibition strategies such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), dominant-negative constructs, G-quartet oligonucleotides and decoy oligonucleotides, their mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these approaches to targeting the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins in cancer. Among the STAT proteins, especially STAT3, followed by STAT5, are the most frequently activated oncogenic STATs, which have emerged as plausible therapeutic cancer targets. Both STAT3 and STAT5 have been shown to regulate numerous oncogenic signaling pathways including proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and migration/invasion. PMID:24058785

  1. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging.

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Veetil, Aneesh T; Jaffrey, Samie R; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-06-01

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid-based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid-based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand. PMID:27294440

  2. A biochemical model for characterising the surface-active phospolipid bilayer of articular cartilage relative to acid-base equilibrium

    Z. Pawlak; J. Kotynska; Figaszewski, Z A; A. Gadomski; A. Gudaniec; A. Oloyede

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper, addresses the question of how changes in acid - base equilibrium influence change in thecharge density of the phospholipid bilayer on articular cartilage surfaces during lubrication.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes onarticular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processestake place. The charge density of the membrane was determined as a funct...

  3. Carbonic anhydrase 5 regulates acid-base homeostasis in zebrafish.

    Ruben Postel

    Full Text Available The regulation of the acid-base balance in cells is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. Disturbed acid-base balance directly affects cellular physiology, which often results in various pathological conditions. In every living organism, the protein family of carbonic anhydrases regulate a broad variety of homeostatic processes. Here we describe the identification, mapping and cloning of a zebrafish carbonic anhydrase 5 (ca5 mutation, collapse of fins (cof, which causes initially a collapse of the medial fins followed by necrosis and rapid degeneration of the embryo. These phenotypical characteristics can be mimicked in wild-type embryos by acetazolamide treatment, suggesting that CA5 activity in zebrafish is essential for a proper development. In addition we show that CA5 regulates acid-base balance during embryonic development, since lowering the pH can compensate for the loss of CA5 activity. Identification of selective modulators of CA5 activity could have a major impact on the development of new therapeutics involved in the treatment of a variety of disorders.

  4. Developing nucleic acid-based electrical detection systems

    Gabig-Ciminska Magdalena

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development of nucleic acid-based detection systems is the main focus of many research groups and high technology companies. The enormous work done in this field is particularly due to the broad versatility and variety of these sensing devices. From optical to electrical systems, from label-dependent to label-free approaches, from single to multi-analyte and array formats, this wide range of possibilities makes the research field very diversified and competitive. New challenges and requirements for an ideal detector suitable for nucleic acid analysis include high sensitivity and high specificity protocol that can be completed in a relatively short time offering at the same time low detection limit. Moreover, systems that can be miniaturized and automated present a significant advantage over conventional technology, especially if detection is needed in the field. Electrical system technology for nucleic acid-based detection is an enabling mode for making miniaturized to micro- and nanometer scale bio-monitoring devices via the fusion of modern micro- and nanofabrication technology and molecular biotechnology. The electrical biosensors that rely on the conversion of the Watson-Crick base-pair recognition event into a useful electrical signal are advancing rapidly, and recently are receiving much attention as a valuable tool for microbial pathogen detection. Pathogens may pose a serious threat to humans, animal and plants, thus their detection and analysis is a significant element of public health. Although different conventional methods for detection of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxins exist and are currently being applied, improvements of molecular-based detection methodologies have changed these traditional detection techniques and introduced a new era of rapid, miniaturized and automated electrical chip detection technologies into pathogen identification sector. In this review some developments and current directions in

  5. Advances in nucleic acid-based diagnostics of bacterial infections

    Barken, Kim Bundvig; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Methods for rapid detection of infectious bacteria and antimicrobial-resistant pathogens have evolved significantly over the last decade. Many of the new procedures are nucleic acid-based and replace conventional diagnostic methods like culturing which is time consuming especially with fastidious...... of these pathogens is important to isolate patients and prevent further spreading of the diseases. Newly developed diagnostic procedures are superior with respect to turnaround time, sensitivity and specificity. Methods like multiplex real time PCR and different array-based technologies offer the possibility...

  6. Syntheses and characterizations of three acid-base supramolecular complexes

    Three acid-base compounds with supramolecular architectures, namely, (1,2-H2bdc)(dmt) (1), (trans-1,4-H2ccdc)0.5(phdat) (2) and (1,3-H2bdc)(phdat) (3) (1,2-H2bdc = 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, trans-1, 4-H2ccdc = trans-1, 4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, 1,3-H2bdc = 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, dmt = 2,4-diamino-6-methyl-s-triazine, phdat = 2,4-diamino-6-phenyl-s-triazine) have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectra, elemental analyses, single-crystal X-ray diffractions and TGA. (author)

  7. Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Fruit Extract as Natural Indicator in Acid-Base Titration

    Manoj A. Suva

    2014-01-01

    In routine experiments synthetic indicators are the choice of acid base titrations. But there are some limitations like environmental pollution, availability and higher cost which leads to search for natural compounds as an acid base indicator was started. The present work highlights theexploit of the methanolic and aqueous extract of the fruit of Opuntia ficus indica plants as a natural acid base indicator in acid base titrations. Opuntia ficus indica plant was identified and fruits were was...

  8. Acid base catalyzed transesterification kinetics of waste cooking oil

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P.; Rajvanshi, Shalini [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2011-01-15

    The present study reports the results of kinetics study of acid base catalyzed two step transesterification process of waste cooking oil, carried out at pre-determined optimum temperature of 65 C and 50 C for esterification and transesterification process respectively under the optimum condition of methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1%(w/w) for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH and 400 rpm of stirring. The optimum temperature was determined based on the yield of ME at different temperature. Simply, the optimum concentration of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH was determined with respect to ME Yield. The results indicated that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order rate reaction with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min{sup -1} and 0.0078 min{sup -1} respectively showing that the former is a slower process than the later. The maximum yield of 21.50% of ME during esterification and 90.6% from transesterification of pretreated WCO has been obtained. This is the first study of its kind which deals with simplified kinetics of two step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried under the above optimum conditions and took about 6 h for complete conversion of TG to ME with least amount of activation energy. Also various parameters related to experiments are optimized with respect to ME yield. (author)

  9. Acid-base actuation of [c2]daisy chains.

    Fang, Lei; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Wu, Jishan; Olson, Mark A; Spruell, Jason M; Trabolsi, Ali; Yang, Ying-Wei; Elhabiri, Mourad; Albrecht-Gary, Anne-Marie; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2009-05-27

    A versatile synthetic strategy, which was conceived and employed to prepare doubly threaded, bistable [c2]daisy chain compounds, is described. Propargyl and 1-pentenyl groups have been grafted onto the stoppers of [c2]daisy chain molecules obtained using a template-directed synthetic protocol. Such [c2]daisy chain molecules undergo reversible extension and contraction upon treatment with acid and base, respectively. The dialkyne-functionalized [c2]daisy chain (AA) was subjected to an [AA+BB] type polymerization with an appropriate diazide (BB) to afford a linear, mechanically interlocked, main-chain polymer. The macromolecular properties of this polymer were characterized by chronocoulometry, size exclusion chromatography, and static light-scattering analysis. The acid-base switching properties of both the monomers and the polymer have been studied in solution, using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrate that the functionalized [c2]daisy chains, along with their polymeric derivatives, undergo quantitative, efficient, and fully reversible switching processes in solution. Kinetics measurements demonstrate that the acid/base-promoted extension/contraction movements of the polymeric [c2]daisy chain are actually faster than those of its monomeric counterpart. These observations open the door to correlated molecular motions and to changes in material properties. PMID:19419175

  10. [Practical approach to complex acid-base disorders using a slide rule].

    Rives, E; Grimaud, D

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosis of mixed acid-base disturbances is often difficult. Nowadays it depends on biochemical and statistical interpretation, coupled with clinical data. The acid-base slide-rule is a useful tool to carry out this five step procedure, which it simplifies, giving rapidly at the patient's bed-side an objective support for the diagnosis of acid-base disturbances. PMID:3777572

  11. Acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion to hexadecane and chloroform

    Bos, R; Busscher, HJ; Geertsema-Doornbusch, GI; Van Der Mei, HC; Mittal, KL

    2000-01-01

    Acid-base interactions play an important role in adhesion, including microbial adhesion to surfaces. Qualitatively acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion can be demonstrated by comparing adhesion to hexadecane (a negatively charged interface in aqueous solutions, unable to exert acid-base inte

  12. Acid-base behavior in hydrothermal processing of wastes. 1998 annual progress report

    'A new technology, hydrothermal oxidation (also called supercritical water oxidation), is being developed to treat high level nuclear wastes. Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen; furthermore, phosphates, alumina sludge, and chromium are solubilized, and the sludge is reconstituted as fine oxide particles. A major obstacle to development of this technology has been a lack of scientific knowledge of chemistry in hydrothermal solution above 350 C, particularly acid-base behavior, and transport phenomena, which is needed to understand corrosion, metal-ion complexation, and salt precipitation and recovery. The objective is to provide this knowledge with in-situ UV-vis spectroscopic measurements and fully molecular computer simulation. A major objective of the experimental studies has been to determine the equilibria for Cr(VI) up to 420 C as this is a key species to be removed from nuclear wastes. A wide range of concentrations of KOH and perchloric acid were utilized to manipulate the acid-base equilibria and to understand the effects of ion solvation and ion pairing. The second system is the equilibria between nitric acid, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, nitrite and nitrate ions and oxygen. For both of these systems, chemical equilibria has not been measured previously in hydrothermal solution at these temperatures. On the theoretical side, the authors have focused on the study of the transport properties of aqueous ions in supercritical water. The motivation for these studies is two fold. First, although transport coefficients are fundamental to solution chemistry reaction rates, the behavior of such transport properties over wide ranges of density and temperature are not well established experimentally, particularly at the densities typically of interest (< 0.5 g/cc). Second, due to practical challenges, ionic association equilibria in SCW is typically accessed via measurements of conductivity followed by analysis through a theoretical model that incorporates ion

  13. Precision Chemical Abundance Measurements

    Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Meléndez, Jorge;

    2012-01-01

    This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate that the ob...

  14. Maximum abundant isotopes correlation

    The neutron excess of the most abundant isotopes of the element shows an overall linear dependence upon the neutron number for nuclei between neutron closed shells. This maximum abundant isotopes correlation supports the arguments for a common history of the elements during nucleosynthesis. (Auth.)

  15. Hypoxia and Its Acid-Base Consequences: From Mountains to Malignancy.

    Swenson, Erik R

    2016-01-01

    of small carbon intermediates to supply the many synthetic pathways of proliferative cell growth. In either case, there is expression and upregulation of many genes involved in acid-base homeostasis, in part by HIF-1 signaling. These include a unique isoform of carbonic anhydrase (CA-IX) and numerous membrane acid-base transporters engaged to maintain an optimal intracellular and extracellular pH for maximal growth. Inhibition of these proteins or gene suppression may have important therapeutic application in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27343105

  16. Acid-base behavior in hydrothermal processing of wastes. 1997 annual progress report

    'A major obstacle to the development of hydrothermal technology for treating DOE wastes has been a lack of scientific knowledge of solution chemistry, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. The progress over the last year is highlighted in the following four abstracts from manuscripts which have been submitted to journals. The authors also have made considerable progress on a spectroscopic study of the acid-base equilibria of Cr(VI). They have utilized novel spectroscopic indicators to study acid-base equilibria up to 380 C. Until now, very few systems have been studied at such high temperatures, although this information is vital for hydrothermal processing of wastes. The pH values of aqueous solutions of boric acid and KOH were measured with the optical indicator 2-naphthol at temperatures from 300 to 380 C. The equilibrium constant Kb-l for the reaction B(OH)3 + OH- = B(OH)-4 was determined from the pH measurements and correlated with a modified Born model. The titration curve for the addition of HCl to sodium borate exhibits strong acid-strong base behavior even at 350 C and 24.1 MPa. At these conditions, aqueous solutions of sodium borate buffer the pH at 9.6 t 0.25. submitted to Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. Acetic Acid and HCl Acid-base titrations for the KOH-acetic acid or NH3 -acetic acid systems were monitored with the optical indicator 2-naphthoic acid at 350 C and 34 MPa, and those for the HCl;Cl- system with acridine at 380 C and up to 34 MPa (5,000 psia ). KOH remains a much stronger base than NH,OH at high temperature. From 298 K to the critical temperature of water, the dissociation constant for HCl decreases by 13 orders of magnitude, and thus, the basicity of Cl- becomes significant. Consequently, the addition of NaCl to HCl raises the pH. The pH titration curves may be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the relevant equilibrium constants and Pitzer''s formulation of the Debye- Htickel equation for the activity coefficients.'

  17. Acid-base balance in the developing marsupial: from ectotherm to endotherm.

    Andrewartha, Sarah J; Cummings, Kevin J; Frappell, Peter B

    2014-05-01

    Marsupial joeys are born ectothermic and develop endothermy within their mother's thermally stable pouch. We hypothesized that Tammar wallaby joeys would switch from α-stat to pH-stat regulation during the transition from ectothermy to endothermy. To address this, we compared ventilation (Ve), metabolic rate (Vo2), and variables relevant to blood gas and acid-base regulation and oxygen transport including the ventilatory requirements (Ve/Vo2 and Ve/Vco2), partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2), carbon dioxide (PaCO2), pHa, and oxygen content (CaO2) during progressive hypothermia in ecto- and endothermic Tammar wallabies. We also measured the same variables in the well-studied endotherm, the Sprague-Dawley rat. Hypothermia was induced in unrestrained, unanesthetized joeys and rats by progressively dropping the ambient temperature (Ta). Rats were additionally exposed to helox (80% helium, 20% oxygen) to facilitate heat loss. Respiratory, metabolic, and blood-gas variables were measured over a large body temperature (Tb) range (∼15-16°C in both species). Ectothermic joeys displayed limited thermogenic ability during cooling: after an initial plateau, Vo2 decreased with the progressive drop in Tb. The Tb of endothermic joeys and rats fell despite Vo2 nearly doubling with the initiation of cold stress. In all three groups the changes in Vo2 were met by changes in Ve, resulting in constant Ve/Vo2 and Ve/Vco2, blood gases, and pHa. Thus, although thermogenic capability was nearly absent in ectothermic joeys, blood acid-base regulation was similar to endothermic joeys and rats. This suggests that unlike some reptiles, unanesthetized mammals protect arterial blood pH with changing Tb, irrespective of their thermogenic ability and/or stage of development. PMID:24627357

  18. A biochemical model for characterising the surface-active phospolipid bilayer of articular cartilage relative to acid-base equilibrium

    Z. Pawlak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper, addresses the question of how changes in acid - base equilibrium influence change in thecharge density of the phospholipid bilayer on articular cartilage surfaces during lubrication.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes onarticular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processestake place. The charge density of the membrane was determined as a function of pH and electrolyte concentration fromthe microelectrophoretic method. Liposome membrane was prepared as an aqueous solution of NaCl under variouspH conditions. Microelectrophoresis was used to examine the local acid-base equilibrium of the electrolytes with themembrane surface, which can be considered to model the phospholipids interface in articular cartilage.Findings: The adsorbed ions (H+, OH-, Na+, Cl- which are present in the electrically charged solutions of liposomemembrane comprising phosphatidycholine (PC, were found to exhibit pH-responsive quasi-periodic behavior.Research limitations/implications: We have established that the acid-base dissociation behavior inphospholipid bilayers of articular cartilage is a key to understanding biolubrication processes. For example,previous investigators found that the formation of the multilayer of polyisopeptide/hyaluronic acid depends onsurface properties such as film thickness, surface friction, surface wetability; wetness and swelling behavior.Future work should consider the adsorption of polyelectrolyte ions, e.g., the glycoprotein lubricin and hyaluronan,on the liposome membrane surface in the presence of H+ and OH- ions.Originality/value: A novel model of the joints’ phospholipid bilayers has been created using liposome membraneThis model can be applied in the investigation of polyelectrolyte ions such as lubricin, in articular cartilage. Wehave demonstrated that the acid-base processes on

  19. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of nucleic acid bases

    Alparone, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities of neutral nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, adenine, hypoxanthine and guanine) were determined using Hartree-Fock, correlated MPn (n = 2, 4), CCSD and DFT (B3LYP, B97-1, CAM-B3LYP) methods. The computations were performed in gaseous and aqueous phases for the most stable tautomeric forms. Frequency-dependent second-order hyperpolarizabilities were calculated for the OKE, IDRI, EFISHG and THG nonlinear optical processes at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The results show that the average electronic polarizabilities increase in the order uracil guanine. This order is also maintained for the electronic hyperpolarizabilities, with the inversion between cytosine and thymine. The response electric properties for the tautomers are almost similar to each other, whereas group substitution and solvation effects are much more significant. Among the DFT methods, the long-range corrected CAM-B3LYP functional gives the better performances, reproducing satisfactorily the correlated ab initio (hyper)polarizability data.

  20. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  1. A REVIEW ON ACID BASE STATUS IN DAIRY COWS: IMPLICATIONS OF DIETARY CATION-ANION BALANCE

    D. Afzaal, M. Nisa, M. A. Khan and M. Sarwar

    2004-01-01

    The acid base status of a dairy cow is maintained within a narrow range. The key mechanisms involving blood, cells and lungs, perform this function. Although other minerals have an impact on acid base metabolism, the minerals used in dietary cation-anion balance (DCAB) namely sodium (Na), potassium (K) and chloride (Cl) have the greatest effect. Hence, acid base status implicates other biological functions of dairy cows. Low DCAB prepartum reduces the incidence of milk fever and increases the...

  2. Orion A helium abundance

    The 22.4-GHz (H,He)66-alpha and 36.5-GHz (H,He)56-alpha radio recombination lines have been observed at several Jaffe-Pankonin positions in the central part of the Orion A source. The measured relative abundance of ionized helium increases with distance, averaging 11.6 percent at peripheral points. The observed behavior is interpreted by a blister-type model nebula, which implies that Orion A has a true He abundance of 12 percent, is moving with a radial velocity of 5 km/sec, and is expanding. 18 references

  3. Canonical Pedagogical Content Knowledge by Cores for Teaching Acid-Base Chemistry at High School

    Alvarado, Clara; Cañada, Florentina; Garritz, Andoni; Mellado, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The topic of acid-base chemistry is one of the oldest in general chemistry courses and it has been almost continuously in academic discussion. The central purpose of documenting the knowledge and beliefs of a group of ten Mexican teachers with experience in teaching acid-base chemistry in high school was to know how they design, prepare and…

  4. Mechanisms Regulating Acid-Base Transporter Expression in Breast- and Pancreatic Cancer

    Gorbatenko, Andrej

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women, and the second most frequent cause of death from cancer in women. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest forms of cancer with only a 5% 5-year survival rate. Both types of cancer form solid tumors, characterist...

  5. A pedagogy of abundance

    Weller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The digitisation of content combined with a global network for delivery and an open system for sharing has seen radical changes in many industries. The economic model which has underpinned many content based industries has been based on an assumption of scarcity. With a digital, open, networked approach we are witnessing a shift to abundance of content, and subsequently new economic models are being developed which have this as an assumption. In this article the role of scarcity in developing...

  6. Interstellar Atomic Abundances

    Jenkins, E B

    2003-01-01

    A broad array of interstellar absorption features that appear in the ultraviolet spectra of bright sources allows us to measure the abundances and ionization states of many important heavy elements that exist as free atoms in the interstellar medium. By comparing these abundances with reference values in the Sun, we find that some elements have abundances relative to hydrogen that are approximately consistent with their respective solar values, while others are depleted by factors that range from a few up to around 1000. These depletions are caused by the atoms condensing into solid form onto dust grains. Their strengths are governed by the volatility of compounds that are produced, together with the densities and velocities of the gas clouds. We may characterize the depletion trends in terms of a limited set of parameters; ones derived here are based on measurements of 15 elements toward 144 stars with known values of N(H I) and N(H2). In turn, these parameters may be applied to studies of the production, de...

  7. Abundances in galaxies

    Standard (or mildly inhomogeneous) Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory is well confirmed by abundance measurements of light elements up to 7Li and the resulting upper limit to the number of neutrino families confirmed in accelerator experiments. Extreme inhomogeneous models with a closure density in form of baryons seem to be ruled out and there is no evidence for a cosmic 'floor' to 9Be or heavier elements predicted in some versions of those models. Galaxies show a correlation between luminous mass and abundance of carbon and heavier elements, usually attributed to escape of hot gas from shallow potential wells. Uncertainties include the role of dark matter and biparametric behaviour of ellipticals. Spirals have radial gradients which may arise from a variety of causes. In our own Galaxy one can distinguish three stellar populations - disk, halo and bulge - characterised by differing metallicity distribution functions. Differential abundance effects are found among different elements in stars as a function of metallicity and presumably age, notably in the ratio of oxygen and α-particle elements to iron. These may eventually be exploitable to set a time scale for the formation of the halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  8. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-07-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio [ A/Q] of the ions. Since the Q-values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element-abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller magnetic reconnections, "nanojets", produce suprathermal seed ions, thus averaging over varying abundances, while an impulsive SEP event only samples one local region of abundance variations. Evidence for a reference He/O-abundance ratio of 91, rather than 57, is also found for the hotter plasma. However, while this is similar to the solar-wind abundance of He/O, the solar-wind abundances otherwise provide an unacceptably poor reference for the SEP-abundance enhancements, generating extremely large errors.

  9. A REVIEW ON ACID BASE STATUS IN DAIRY COWS: IMPLICATIONS OF DIETARY CATION-ANION BALANCE

    D. Afzaal, M. Nisa, M. A. Khan and M. Sarwar

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The acid base status of a dairy cow is maintained within a narrow range. The key mechanisms involving blood, cells and lungs, perform this function. Although other minerals have an impact on acid base metabolism, the minerals used in dietary cation-anion balance (DCAB namely sodium (Na, potassium (K and chloride (Cl have the greatest effect. Hence, acid base status implicates other biological functions of dairy cows. Low DCAB prepartum reduces the incidence of milk fever and increases the productivity by simmering down the severity of hypocalcaemia. High DCAB diets have proved to increase dry mater and water intake and production and to mitigate the effects of heat stress.

  10. Recent advances in understanding trans-epithelial acid-base regulation and excretion mechanisms in cephalopods

    Hu, Marian Y.; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved complex sensory systems and an active lifestyle to compete with fish for similar resources in the marine environment. Their highly active lifestyle and their extensive protein metabolism has led to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities enabling these organisms to cope with CO2 induced acid-base disturbances. In convergence to teleost, cephalopods possess an ontogeny-dependent shift in ion-regulatory epithelia with epidermal ionocytes being the major site of embry...

  11. Cleavage of endogenous γENaC and elevated abundance of αENaC are associated with increased Na+ transport in response to apical fluid volume expansion in human H441 airway epithelial cells

    Tan, Chong D.; Selvanathar, Indusha A.; Baines, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    Using human H441 airway epithelial cells cultured at air–liquid interface (ALI), we have uniquely correlated the functional response to apical fluid volume expansion with the abundance and cleavage of endogenous α- and γENaC proteins in the apical membrane. Monolayers cultured at ALI rapidly elevated I sc when inserted into fluid-filled Ussing chambers. The increase in I sc was not significantly augmented by the apical addition of trypsin, and elevation was abolished by the protease inhibitor...

  12. Abundance, Excess, Waste

    Rox De Luca

    2016-02-01

    Her recent work focuses on the concepts of abundance, excess and waste. These concerns translate directly into vibrant and colourful garlands that she constructs from discarded plastics collected on Bondi Beach where she lives. The process of collecting is fastidious, as is the process of sorting and grading the plastics by colour and size. This initial gathering and sorting process is followed by threading the components onto strings of wire. When completed, these assemblages stand in stark contrast to the ease of disposability associated with the materials that arrive on the shoreline as evidence of our collective human neglect and destruction of the environment around us. The contrast is heightened by the fact that the constructed garlands embody the paradoxical beauty of our plastic waste byproducts, while also evoking the ways by which those byproducts similarly accumulate in randomly assorted patterns across the oceans and beaches of the planet.

  13. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    Levshakov, S A; Takahara, F; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  14. Theoretical study of the influence of ribose on the proton transfer phenomenon of nucleic acid bases

    The first comprehensive theoretical study of ribose's effects on the behavior of proton transfer of nucleic acid base is presented. The specific hydrogen bonding of the ribose hydroxyls plays a very important role in the stabilization of the structure of ribonucleoside. Nine stable uridine conformations have been reported. The intermolecular proton transfer of the isolated, monohydrated uridine complexes in three different regions were extensively explored on the basis of density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level. With the introduction of the ribose, not only the structural parameters of the nucleic acid bases changed, but also the energy barriers of the proton transfer process changed. Furthermore, changes of the electron distributions of the molecular orbital of the nucleic acid bases were also analyzed by NBO analysis. Consideration of the ribose's influence represents a much more real situation in the RNA

  15. Effect of acute acid loading on acid-base and calcium metabolism

    Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acid-base and calcium metabolic responses to acute non-carbonic acid loading in idiopathic calcium stone-formers and healthy males using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h ammonium chloride loading studies were performed in 12...... male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone-formers and 12 matched healthy men using a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Arterialized capillary blood, serum and urine were collected hourly for measurement of electrolytes, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and acid-base...... status. Concentrations of non-metabolizable base (NB) and acid (NA) were calculated from measured concentrations of non-metabolizable ions. RESULTS: The extracellular acid-base status in the stone-formers during basal conditions and acid loading was comparable to the levels in the healthy controls...

  16. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Objectives Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. Materials and Methods In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. Results It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Conclusions Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery.

  17. Opuntia ficus indica (L. Fruit Extract as Natural Indicator in Acid-Base Titration

    Manoj A. Suva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In routine experiments synthetic indicators are the choice of acid base titrations. But there are some limitations like environmental pollution, availability and higher cost which leads to search for natural compounds as an acid base indicator was started. The present work highlights theexploit of the methanolic and aqueous extract of the fruit of Opuntia ficus indica plants as a natural acid base indicator in acid base titrations. Opuntia ficus indica plant was identified and fruits were washed and cleaned by distilled water, grinded by a mechanical blender and soaked in 50ml methanol for 48 hours and then triturated in mortal and pestle and the resulting solution were filtered through muslin cloth. The resulted methanolic extract and aqueous extract which was prepared by heating fruits in water for half an hour and filtered used as natural indicator foracidimetry and alkalimetry. For each type of acid base titrations t-value and standard deviation were calculated from results obtained. Natural indicator is easy to prepare, easily available and have no toxic effects and promising results were obtained when it was tested against standard synthetic indicators. Titration shows sharp colour change at the equivalence point. The equivalence points (end points obtained by the fruit extract correlate with the equivalence points obtained by standard indicators. In strong acid and strong base titration, the results obtained in the fruit's extract matched with the results obtained by standard indicator. Hence, natural indicator is found to be a very useful, readily available, nonhazardous, economical, simple to prepare and accurate for the acid-base titrations.

  18. Studies on synthesis and property of novel acid-base proton exchange membranes

    Yong Fang Liang; Hai Yan Pan; Xiu Ling Zhu; Yao Xia Zhang; Xi Gao Jian

    2007-01-01

    Sulfonated poly(phthalazinone)s (SPPENK, SPPESK and SPPBEK) were prepared by direct polymerization reaction from sulfonated monomers. The novel acid-base membranes were composed of sulfonated polymers as the acidic compounds, and polyetherimide (PEI) as the basic compounds, casting from their N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) solution directly onto clean glass plates at 60 ℃ aiming at enhancing membrane toughness and other relative properties. The resulted acid-base composite membranes had excellent resistance to swelling, thermo-stability, hydrolysis resistance and oxidative resistance properties with highly ion-exchange capacity (IEC).

  19. Bifunctional Organic Polymeric Catalysts with a Tunable Acid-Base Distance and Framework Flexibility

    Chen, Huanhui; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Qunlong; Li, Junhui; Yang, Shiqi; Zhu, Zhirong

    2014-09-01

    Acid-base bifunctional organic polymeric catalysts were synthesized with tunable structures. we demonstrated two synthesis approaches for structural fine-tune. In the first case, the framework flexibility was tuned by changing the ratio of rigid blocks to flexible blocks within the polymer framework. In the second case, we precisely adjusted the acid-base distance by distributing basic monomers to be adjacent to acidic monomers, and by changing the chain length of acidic monomers. In a standard test reaction for the aldol condensation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde with acetone, the catalysts showed good reusability upon recycling and maintained relatively high conversion percentage.

  20. Calculating acid-base and oxygenation status during COPD exacerbation using mathematically arterialised venous blood

    Rees, Stephen Edward; Rychwicka-Kielek, Beate A; Andersen, Bjarne F;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background: Repeated arterial puncture is painful. A mathematical method exists for transforming peripheral venous pH, PCO2 and PO2 to arterial eliminating the need for arterial sampling. This study evaluates this method to monitor acid-base and oxygenation during admission for exacerbat......Abstract Background: Repeated arterial puncture is painful. A mathematical method exists for transforming peripheral venous pH, PCO2 and PO2 to arterial eliminating the need for arterial sampling. This study evaluates this method to monitor acid-base and oxygenation during admission...

  1. Acid-base regulation in tadpoles of Rana catesbeiana exposed to environmental hypercapnia

    Busk, Morten; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Jensen, Frank B.

    1997-01-01

    Tadpoles of Rana catesbeiana were exposed to different levels of environmental hypercapnia. The acid-base regulatory response differed from that in adult amphibians in showing a high degree of pH compensation in the extracellular fluid (65-85%) and complete compensation in the intracellular fluid......). It is suggested that the large bicarbonate efflux from the animal is a consequence of the dissolution of CaCO3 stores and the delayed adjustment of bicarbonate-retaining mechanisms. Re-exposure of tadpoles to hypercapnia after 1-3 weeks of normocapnic recovery only affected transepithelial fluxes of acid-base...

  2. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    Carl A. Batt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform.

  3. Solar System Abundances of the Elements

    Lodders, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Representative abundances of the chemical elements for use as a solar abundance standard in astronomical and planetary studies are summarized. Updated abundance tables for solar system abundances based on meteorites and photospheric measurements are presented.

  4. The scaled-charge additive force field for amino acid based ionic liquids

    Fileti, E. E.; Chaban, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) constitute an emerging research field. New ILs involve more and more organic and inorganic ions. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to their evolutional connection to proteins. We report a new non-polarizable force field (FF) for the eight AAILs...

  5. Design, synthesis and structure of new potential electrochemically active boronic acid-based glucose sensors

    Norrild, Jens Chr.; Søtofte, Inger

    2002-01-01

    In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report...

  6. Osmoregulation and acid base regulation of the Asian Horseshoe crab Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda

    Wetter, M.; Cong, N.; Nielsen, Thomas;

    2008-01-01

    to hypercapnia (5% CO2) was partially restored by increased HC = 3-levels in the haemolymph. The degree of compensation did not differ between individuals that had been held at high or low salinity suggesting that the availability of acid-base relevant ions plays a minor role in this response....

  7. Effect of benzoic acid supplementation on acid-base status and mineralmetabolism in catheterized growing pigs

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Fernández, José Adalberto; Sørensen, Kristina Ulrich;

    2010-01-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) in diets for growing pigs results in urinary acidification and reduced ammonia emission. The objective was to study the impact of BA supplementation on the acid-base status and mineral metabolism in pigs. Eight female 50-kg pigs, fitted with a catheter in the abdominal aorta, were...

  8. Determining surface areas of marine alga cells by acid-base titration method.

    Wang, X; Ma, Y; Su, Y

    1997-09-01

    A new method for determining the surface area of living marine alga cells was described. The method uses acid-base titration to measure the surface acid/base amount on the surface of alga cells and uses the BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) equation to estimate the maximum surface acid/base amount, assuming that hydrous cell walls have carbohydrates or other structural compounds which can behave like surface Brönsted acid-base sites due to coordination of environmental H2O molecules. The method was applied to 18 diverse alga species (including 7 diatoms, 2 flagellates, 8 green algae and 1 red alga) maintained in seawater cultures. For the species examined, the surface areas of individual cells ranged from 2.8 x 10(-8) m2 for Nannochloropsis oculata to 690 x 10(-8) m2 for Dunaliella viridis, specific surface areas from 1,030 m2.g-1 for Dunaliella salina to 28,900 m2.g-1 for Pyramidomonas sp. Measurement accuracy was 15.2%. Preliminary studies show that the method may be more promising and accurate than light/electron microscopic measurements for coarse estimation of the surface area of living algae. PMID:9297794

  9. Analysis and Identification of Acid-Base Indicator Dyes by Thin-Layer Chromatography

    Clark, Daniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a very simple and effective technique that is used by chemists by different purposes, including the monitoring of the progress of a reaction. TLC can also be easily used for the analysis and identification of various acid-base indicator dyes.

  10. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  11. Effects of changes in acid base and calcium concentration on fasting serum insulin, proinsulin, and glucose concentrations.

    Smellie, W S; O'Donnell, J; Davidson, H.; Couper, J; Logue, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To test the hypothesis that alterations in acid base or calcium concentration may affect proinsulin processing or the insulin secretion mechanism. METHODS--Changes in proinsulin secretion or cleavage were assessed by measuring serum intact proinsulin and immunoreactive insulin concentrations in three models of acid base and calcium disturbance: (1) subacute changes in acid base status in six volunteers who received oral placebo, ammonium chloride, or sodium bicarbonate for three five da...

  12. Investigation of surfactant mediated acid-base charging of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems.

    Gacek, Matthew M; Berg, John C

    2012-12-21

    The current work examines the role of acid-base properties on particle charging in apolar media. Manipulating the polarity and magnitude of charge in such systems is of growing interest to a number of applications. A major hurdle to the implementation of this technology is that the mechanism(s) of particle charging remain a subject of debate. The authors previously conducted a study of the charging of a series of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems that contained the surfactant AOT. It was observed that there was a correlation between the particle electrophoretic mobility and the acid-base nature of the particle, as characterized by aqueous point of zero charge (PZC) or the isoelectric point (IEP). The current study investigates whether or not a similar correlation is observed with other surfactants, namely, the acidic Span 80 and the basic OLOA 11000. This is accomplished by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of a series of mineral oxides that are dispersed in Isopar-L containing various concentrations of either Span 80 or OLOA 11000. The mineral oxides used have PZC values that cover a wide range of pH, providing a systematic study of how particle and surfactant acid-base properties impact particle charge. It was found that the magnitude and polarity of particle surface charge varied linearly with the particle PZC for both surfactants used. In addition, the point at which the polarity of charge reversed for the basic surfactant OLOA 11000 was shifted to a pH of approximately 8.5, compared to the previous result of about 5 for AOT. This proves that both surfactant and particle acid-base properties are important, and provides support for the theory of acid-base charging in apolar media. PMID:23157688

  13. Characterization of the Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases onto Ferrihydrite via Fourier Transform Infrared and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry.

    Canhisares-Filho, José E; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Santana, Henrique; Urbano, Alexandre; da Costa, Antonio C S; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    Minerals could have played an important role in concentration, protection, and polymerization of biomolecules. Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust, there are few works in the literature that describe the use of iron oxide-hydroxide in prebiotic chemistry experiments. In the present work, the interaction of adenine, thymine, and uracil with ferrihydrite was studied under conditions that resemble those of prebiotic Earth. At acidic pH, anions in artificial seawater decreased the pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc) of ferrihydrite; and at basic pH, cations increased the pHpzc. The adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite followed the order adenine > uracil > thymine. Adenine adsorption peaked at neutral pH; however, for thymine and uracil, adsorption increased with increasing pH. Electrostatic interactions did not appear to play an important role on the adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite. Adenine adsorption onto ferrihydrite was higher in distilled water compared to artificial seawater. After ferrihydrite was mixed with artificial seawaters or nucleic acid bases, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectra did not show any change. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy showed that the interaction of adenine with ferrihydrite was not pH-dependent. In contrast, the interactions of thymine and uracil with ferrihydrite were pH-dependent such that, at basic pH, thymine and uracil lay flat on the surface of ferrihydrite, and at acidic pH, thymine and uracil were perpendicular to the surface. Ferrihydrite adsorbed much more adenine than thymine; thus adenine would have been better protected against degradation by hydrolysis or UV radiation on prebiotic Earth. PMID:26393397

  14. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  15. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  16. Estimating Animal Abundance: Review III

    Schwarz, Carl J; Seber, George A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The literature describing methods for estimating animal abundance and related parameters continues to grow. This paper reviews recent developments in the subject over the past seven years and updates two previous reviews.

  17. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  18. Spectroscopic study on variations in illite surface properties after acid-base titration

    2003-01-01

    FT-IR, Raman microscopy, XRD, 29 Si and 27 Al MAS NMR, were used to investigate changes in surface properties of a natural illitesample after acid-base potentiometric titration. The characteristic XRD lines indicated the presence of surface Al-Si complexes, preferable to Al(OH)3 precipitates. In the microscopic Raman spectra, the vibration peaks of Si-O and Al-O bonds diminished as a result of treatment withacid, then increased after hydroxide back titration. The varied ratio of signal intensity between Ⅳ Al and Ⅵ At species in 27 Al MAS NMRspectra, together with the stable BET surface area after acidimetric titration, suggested that edge faces and basal planes in the layer structure ofillite participated in dissolution of structural components. The combined spectroscopic evidence demonstrated that the reactions between illitesurfaces and acid-leaching silicic acid and aluminum ions should be considered in the model description of surface acid-base properties of theaqueous illite.

  19. Impact of stochastic gas motions on galaxy cluster abundance profiles

    Rebusco, P; Böhringer, H; Forman, W

    2005-01-01

    The impact of stochastic gas motions on the metal distribution in cluster core is evaluated. Peaked abundance profiles are a characteristic feature of clusters with cool cores and abundance peaks are likely associated with the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) which dwell in cluster cores. The width of the abundance peaks is however significantly broader than the BCG light distribution, suggesting that some gas motions are transporting metals originating from within the BCG. Assuming that this process can be treated as diffusive and using the brightest X-ray cluster A426 (Perseus) as an example, we estimate that a diffusion coefficient of the order of $2 10^{29} {\\rm cm^2 s^{-1}}$ is needed to explain the width of the observed abundance profiles. Much lower (higher) diffusion coefficients would result in too peaked (too shallow) profiles. Such diffusion could be produced by stochastic gas motions and our analysis provides constraints on the product of their characteristic velocity and their spatial coherence ...

  20. Hyperventilation and blood acid-base balance in hypercapnia exposed red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    Ern, Rasmus; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Hyperventilation is a common response in fish exposed to elevated water CO2. It is believed to lessen the respiratory acidosis associated with hypercapnia by lowering arterial PCO2, but the contribution of hyperventilation to blood acid-base compensation has yet to be quantified. Hyperventilation may also increase the flux of irons across the gill epithelium and the cost of osmoregulation, owing to the osmo-respiratory compromise. Therefore, hypercapnia exposed fish may increase standard metabolic rate (SMR) leaving less energy for physiological functions such as foraging, migration, growth and reproduction. Here we show that gill ventilation, blood PCO2 and total blood [CO2] increased in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) exposed to 1000 and 5000 µatm water CO2, and that blood PCO2 and total blood [CO2] decrease in fish during hypoxia induced hyperventilation. Based on these results we estimate the ventilatory contributions to total acid-base compensation in 1000 and 5000 µatm water CO2. We find that S. ocellatus only utilize a portion of its ventilatory capacity to reduce the acid-base disturbance in 1000 µatm water CO2. SMR was unaffected by both salinity and hypercapnia exposure indicating that the cost of osmoregulation is small relative to SMR, and that the lack of increased ventilation in 1000 µatm water CO2 despite the capacity to do so is not due to an energetic tradeoff between acid-base balance and osmoregulation. Therefore, while ocean acidification may impact ventilatory parameters, there will be little impact on the overall energy budget of S. ocellatus. PMID:26922790

  1. Determination of low citric acid concentrations in a mixture of weak acid/bases

    Lahav, O.; Shlafman, E.; Cochva, M.

    2005-01-01

    A titration approach was developed to measure low concentrations of citric acid (C6H8O7) in a mixture of other weak acid/ bases. Two methods were tested. The first and more practical method (a 4-point titration procedure) is applicable in conditions where volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are not normally present. The second method (a 5-point titration procedure) was developed for anaerobic environments where VFAs may be encountered. Generally, fairly accurate and repetitive results (precision > 95...

  2. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. PMID:26138135

  3. Real-Time Detection of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Bases via their Negative Differential Conductance Signature

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the real-time detection of the bases of the deoxyribonucleic acid using their signatures in negative differential conductance measurements. The present methods of electronic detection of deoxyribonucleic acid bases are based on a statistical analysis because the electrical currents of the four bases are weak and do not differ significantly from one base to another. In contrast, we analyze a device that combines the accumulated knowledge in nanopore and sc...

  4. Synthesis and Properties of Lactic Acid-based Cross-linked Poly(ester-amide)

    Yue Ying HE; Cong Ming XIAO

    2006-01-01

    A novel lactic acid-based cross-linked poly(ester-amide) (LCPEA) was synthesized. The gel fraction of the LCPEA could be modulated by the reaction conditions and it affected the mechanical and thermal properties of the LCPEA. The tensile strength, elastic modulus and bend strength of the LCPEA of 65% gel fraction were 4.65, 136.55 and 39.63 MPa, respectively. The thermal decomposition temperature (50 wt%) of the LCPEA was around 410 ℃.

  5. Acid-base and electrolyte disorders in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Nikolaos Sotirakopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder in the community. The diabetics may suffer from acid-base and electrolyte disorders due to complications of diabetes mellitus and the medication they receive. In this study, acid-base and electrolyte disorders were evaluated among outpatient diabetics in our hospital. The study consisted of patients with diabetes mellitus who visited the hospital as outpatients between the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006. The patients′ medical history, age and type of diabetes were noted, including whether they were taking diuretics and calcium channel blockers or not. Serum creatinine, proteins, sodium, potassium and chloride and blood gases were measured in all patients. Proteinuria was measured by 24-h urine collection. Two hundred and ten patients were divided in three groups based on the serum creatinine. Group A consisted of 114 patients that had serum creatinine 3.1 mg/dL. Of the 210 patients, 176 had an acid-base disorder. The most common disorder noted in group A was metabolic alkalosis. In groups B and C, the common disorders were metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, and metabolic acidosis, respectively. The most common electrolyte disorders were hypernatremia (especially in groups A and B, hyponatremia (group C and hyperkalemia (especially in groups B and C. It is concluded that: (a in diabetic outpatients, acid-base and electrolyte disorders occurred often even if the renal function is normal, (b the most common disorders are metabolic alkalosis and metabolic acidosis (the frequency increases with the deterioration of the renal function and (c the common electrolyte disorders are hypernatremia and hypokalemia.

  6. Biodiesel Production from Spent Fish Frying Oil Through Acid-Base Catalyzed Transesterification

    Abdalrahman B. Fadhil; Mohammed M. Dheyab; Kareem M. Ahmed; Marwa H. Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel fuels were prepared from a special type of frying oil namely spent fish frying oil through two step transesterification viz. acid-base catalyzed transesterification. Hydrochloric acid and potassium hydroxide with methanol were used for this purpose. The oil was pre-treated with (1.0 wt% HCl) and methanol to reduce free fatty acids content of the oil. Then, conditions of the base catalyzed step such as base concentration, reaction temperature, methanol to oil molar ratio and reaction...

  7. NaVirCept - Nucleic Acid-Based Anti-Viral Project

    Vaccines are generally considered to be the most effective countermeasures to bacterial and viral diseases, however, licensed vaccines against many disease agents are either not available or their efficacies have not been demonstrated. Vaccines are generally agent specific in terms of treatment spectrum and are subject to defeat through natural mutation or through directed efforts. With respect to viral therapeutics, one of the major limitations associated with antiviral drugs is acquired drug resistance caused by antigenic shift or drift. A number of next-generation prophylactic and/or therapeutic measures are on the horizon. Of these, nucleic acid-based drugs are showing great antiviral potential. These drugs elicit long-lasting, broad spectrum protective immune responses, especially to respiratory viral pathogens. The Nucleic Acid-Based Antiviral (NaVirCept) project provides the opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of novel medical countermeasures against military-significant endemic and other viral threat agents. This project expands existing DRDC drug delivery capability development, in the form of proprietary liposome intellectual property, by coupling it with leading-edge nucleic acid-based technology to deliver effective medical countermeasures that will protect deployed personnel and the warfighter against a spectrum of viral disease agents. The technology pathway will offer a means to combat emerging viral diseases or modified threat agents such as the bird flu or reconstructed Spanish flu without going down the laborious, time-consuming and expensive paths to develop countermeasures for each new and/or emerging viral disease organism.(author)

  8. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I., E-mail: igalsz@northwestern.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3100 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  9. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  10. Solar and Stellar Photospheric Abundances

    Prieto, Carlos Allende

    2016-01-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  11. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  12. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  13. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  14. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  15. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  16. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  17. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Lawler, J E; Labby, Z E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf...

  18. Gd Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Den Hartog, E A; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 49 even-parity and 14 odd-parity levels of Gd II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 611 lines of Gd II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Gd II transition probabilities and the first using a high performance Fourier transform spectrometer. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Gd abundance, log epsilon = 1.11 +/- 0.03. Revised Gd abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars CS 22892-052, BD+17 3248, and HD 115444. The resulting Gd/Eu abundance ratios are in very good agreement with the solar-system r-process ratio. We have employed the increasingly accurate stellar abundance determinations, resulting in large part from the more precise laboratory atomic data, to predict directly the Solar System r-process elemental...

  19. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  20. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    Shao, Yanqiu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); College of Chemistry, Mudanjiang Normal University, Mudanjiang 157012 (China); Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  1. Synthesis of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials by oxidation and thermolysis

    Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Zou, Yongcun [State Key Laboratory of Inoranic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistryg, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Shujie; Liu, Heng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst. The obtained sample of SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent catalytic activity in aldol condensation reaction. Research highlights: {yields} Synthesize acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. {yields} Oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. {yields} Exhibit good catalytic performance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. -- Abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. This method was achieved by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and (3-triethoxysilylpropyl) carbamicacid-1-methylcyclohexylester (3TAME) in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), followed by oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron micrographs (TEM) show that the resultant materials keep mesoporous structure. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), back titration, solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR and solid-state {sup 29}Si MAS NMR confirm that the organosiloxanes were condensed as a part of the silica framework. The bifunctional sample (SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}) containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  2. Acid-base thermochemistry of gaseous oxygen and sulfur substituted amino acids (Ser, Thr, Cys, Met)

    Riffet, Vanessa; Frison, Gilles; Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Acid-base thermochemistry of isolated amino acids containing oxygen or sulfur in their side chain (serine, threonine, cysteine and methionine) have been examined by quantum chemical computations. Density functional theory (DFT) was used, with B3LYP, B97-D and M06-2X functionals using the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set for geometry optimizations and the larger 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set for energy computations. Composite methods CBS-QB3, G3B3, G4MP2 and G4 were applied to large sets of neutral, protona...

  3. The role of gelatin in a methacrylic acid based gel dosimeter

    In this work, the dose response of a methacrylic acid based gel dosimeter containing different concentrations of gelatin is examined to clarify the role of gelatin in the polymerization process. Direct temperature monitoring of the gel throughout the irradiation process is adopted as the method. In addition, to investigate the function of gelatin on polymerization, another experiments are performed after replacing gelatin with some acids. From the results, it is concluded that gelatin is an indispensable component in the polymerization reaction which acts as a 'trigger', and that the peptide structure in gelatin also assumes an important role.

  4. Determination of the acidic sites of purified single-walled carbon nanotubes by acid base titration

    Hu, H.; Bhowmik, P.; Zhao, B.; Hamon, M. A.; Itkis, M. E.; Haddon, R. C.

    2001-09-01

    We report the measurement of the acidic sites in three different samples of commercially available full-length purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) - as obtained from CarboLex (CLI), Carbon Solutions (CSI) and Tubes@Rice (TAR) - by simple acid-base titration methods. Titration of the purified SWNTs with NaOH and NaHCO 3 solutions was used to determine the total percentage of acidic sites and carboxylic acid groups, respectively. The total percentage of acidic sites in full length purified SWNTs from TAR, CLI and CSI are about 1-3%.

  5. Has Stewart approach improved our ability to diagnose acid-base disorders in critically ill patients?

    Masevicius, Fabio D; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    The Stewart approach-the application of basic physical-chemical principles of aqueous solutions to blood-is an appealing method for analyzing acid-base disorders. These principles mainly dictate that pH is determined by three independent variables, which change primarily and independently of one other. In blood plasma in vivo these variables are: (1) the PCO2; (2) the strong ion difference (SID)-the difference between the sums of all the strong (i.e., fully dissociated, chemically nonreacting...

  6. Acid-base properties of the surface of InSb-CdTe solid solutions

    Acid-base properties of the surface of solid solutions and binary components of the InSb-CdTe system are studied using IR spectroscopy, conductometric titration, and measuring the pH-isoelectric state upon treating the test samples by evacuation under atmospheric conditions, exposure to gases (NO2, NH3) and γ radiation. The nature, strength, and concentration of acid centers are determined. Variation in the concentration of acid centers is evaluated as a function of the above factors and changes in the composition of the system

  7. FERTILIZATION OF VINE BY A 5-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID-BASED FERTILIZER AND ITS PROFITABILITY

    VLADIMR IMANSK; Otto LOEK

    2013-01-01

    In this work we investigated the effect of different doses of NPKS fertilizer added into the soil for nutrient contents in the soil, as well as the quantity and quality of grapes. During the vegetation of the vine, we tested the 5-aminolevulinic acid-based fertilizer (ALA). We summarize that higher doses of fertilizer added into soil caused higher amounts of available nutrients. During the vegetation of the vine an increase of ALA had a positive effect on the optimal balance of nutrients. Fer...

  8. Relationship of students' conceptual representations and problem-solving abilities in acid-base chemistry

    Powers, Angela R.

    2000-10-01

    This study explored the relationship between secondary chemistry students' conceptual representations of acid-base chemistry, as shown in student-constructed concept maps, and their ability to solve acid-base problems, represented by their score on an 18-item paper and pencil test, the Acid-Base Concept Assessment (ABCA). The ABCA, consisting of both multiple-choice and short-answer items, was originally designed using a question-type by subtopic matrix, validated by a panel of experts, and refined through pilot studies and factor analysis to create the final instrument. The concept map task included a short introduction to concept mapping, a prototype concept map, a practice concept-mapping activity, and the instructions for the acid-base concept map task. The instruments were administered to chemistry students at two high schools; 108 subjects completed both instruments for this study. Factor analysis of ABCA results indicated that the test was unifactorial for these students, despite the intention to create an instrument with multiple "question-type" scales. Concept maps were scored both holistically and by counting valid concepts. The two approaches were highly correlated (r = 0.75). The correlation between ABCA score and concept-map score was 0.29 for holistically-scored concept maps and 0.33 for counted-concept maps. Although both correlations were significant, they accounted for only 8.8 and 10.2% of variance in ABCA scores, respectively. However, when the reliability of the instruments used is considered, more than 20% of the variance in ABCA scores may be explained by concept map scores. MANOVAs for ABCA and concept map scores by instructor, student gender, and year in school showed significant differences for both holistic and counted concept-map scores. Discriminant analysis revealed that the source of these differences was the instruction variable. Significant differences between classes receiving different instruction were found in the frequency of

  9. Quantum chemistry contribution to the understanding of the acid-base phenomena

    The various physical and chemical phenomena involved at the atomic and molecular level of a two material interface, are studied. When intimately in contact, intermolecular range forces are established between their atoms. These forces are divided in two categories: short range and long range forces, and according to the intervention rate, the bonding will be more or less strong. A quantitative approach, in terms of quantum chemistry of the so called acid-base interactions, is proposed and prospects for this approach with the view of enhancing or diminishing the bonding strength between two materials, are discussed

  10. Richness-abundance relationships for zooplankton in ballast water: temperate versus Arctic comparisons

    Chan, F T; Briski, Elizabeta; S. A. Bailey; MacIsaac, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Species richness and abundance are two commonly measured parameters used to characterize invasion risk associated with transport vectors, especially those capable of transferring large species assemblages. Understanding the relationship between these two variables can further improve our ability to predict future invasions by identifying conditions where high-risk (i.e. species-rich or high abundance or both) and low-risk (i.e. species-poor and low abundance) introduction events are expected....

  11. The acid-base and catalytic properties of the surface of ZnSe-CdSe solid solutions

    Acid-base properties of the surface of slid solutions ZnxCd1-xSe and initial binary semiconductor compounds (ZnSe, CdSe) were studied by the method of probe molecules on acid and base centers. Nature of the acid-base centers was ascertained, their strength and quantitative content on the system samples of different composition were evaluated. Acid-base properties were compared with catalytic ones in reference to propanol-2 decomposition. Similarity and difference in acid-base and catalytic properties of the surface of binary semiconductors and solid solutions were pointed out. Specific features of the solid solutions were detected, which are largely pronounced in the course of ascertaining the property-composition dependence

  12. Sm Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Lawler, J E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2005-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 212 odd-parity levels of Sm II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for more than 900 lines of Sm II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Sm II transition probabilities using modern methods. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Sm abundance, log epsilon = 1.00 +/- 0.03, from 26 lines. The spectra of three very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich stars also have been analyzed, employing between 55 and 72 Sm II lines per star. The abundance ratios of Sm relative to other rare earth elements in these stars are in agreement, and are consistent with ratios expected from rapid neutron-capture nucleosynthesis (the r-process).

  13. Abundances in stars with exoplanets

    Israelian, Garik

    2003-01-01

    Extensive spectroscopic studies of stars with and without planets have concluded that stars hosting planets are significantly more metal-rich than those without planets. More subtle trends of different chemical elements begin to appear as the number of detected extrasolar planetary systems continues to grow. I review our current knowledge concerning the observed abundance trends of various chemical elements in stars with exoplanets and their possible implications.

  14. Na(+) dependent acid-base transporters in the choroid plexus; insights from slc4 and slc9 gene deletion studies

    Christensen, Henriette L; Nguyen, An T; Pedersen, Fredrik D;

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is located in the ventricular system of the brain, where it secretes the majority of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system and surrounds the central nervous system. The CPE is a highly vascularized single layer of cuboidal cells with a...

  15. An electron conductive polymer, poly-aniline, in gas separation: optimisation of transport properties by alternated acid-base treatment

    The objective of this research thesis is to study the variation of gas permeation properties of poly-aniline during a doping/de-doping/re-doping cycle, and to study the evolution of the separation power of this polymer. Scanning electronic microscopy is used to study the microstructure and more particularly how the doping agent is distributed within the polymer. Permeabilities, diffusion coefficients, sorption solubilities and interaction energies are measured by using coupled permeation and micro-gravimetry-calorimetry methods. A range of gases (H2, O2, CO2, N2, CH4) is analysed

  16. Oxygen Gas Phase Abundance Revisited

    André, M K; Howk, J C; Ferlet, R; Désert, J M; Hébrard, G; Lacour, S; Lecavelier-des-Etangs, A; Vidal-Madjar, A; Moos, H W

    2003-01-01

    We present new measurements of the interstellar gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines towards 19 early-type galactic stars at an average distance of 2.6 kpc. We derive O {\\small I} column densities from {\\it HST}/STIS observations of the weak 1355 \\AA intersystem transition. We derive total hydrogen column densities [N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] using {\\it HST}/STIS observations of \\lya and {\\it FUSE} observations of molecular hydrogen. The molecular hydrogen content of these sight lines ranges from f(H$_2$) = 2N(H$_2$)/[N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] = 0.03 to 0.47. The average $$ of 6.3$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ mag$^{-1}$ with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance along these sight lines, which probe a wide range of galactic environments in the distant ISM, is 10$^6$ \\oh = $408 \\pm 13$ (1 $\\sigma$ in the mean). %$({\\rm O/H})_{gas} = 408 \\pm 14$(1 $\\sigma$). We see no evidence for decreasing gas-phase oxygen abundance with increasing molecular hydroge...

  17. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of planetary nebulae abundances from ISO measurements. It is shown that these nebulae show abundance gradients (with galactocentric distance), which in the case of neon, argon, sulfur and oxygen (with four exceptions) are the same as HII regions and early type star abundance gradients. The abundance of these elements predicted from these gradients at the distance of the Sun from the center are exactly the solar abundance. Sulfur is the exception to this; the reason for this...

  18. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, Ka, anionic, KAHA-, and cationic, KBHB+, homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, KBHA, constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (KAHA- values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgKBHA reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pKa values

  19. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry.

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti(4+) to form planar p-type [Ti(4+)n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B(3+), Al(3+) and Sn(4+)) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device. PMID:26828848

  20. Site-specific acid-base properties of pholcodine and related compounds.

    Kovács, Z; Hosztafi, S; Noszál, B

    2006-11-01

    The acid-base properties of pholcodine, a cough-depressant agent, and related compounds including metabolites were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations, and are characterised in terms of macroscopic and microscopic protonation constants. New N-methylated derivatives were also synthesized in order to quantitate site- and nucleus-specific protonation shifts and to unravel microscopic acid-base equilibria. The piperidine nitrogen was found to be 38 and 400 times more basic than its morpholine counterpart in pholcodine and norpholcodine, respectively. The protonation data show that the molecule of pholcodine bears an average of positive charge of 1.07 at physiological pH, preventing it from entering the central nervous system, a plausible reason for its lack of analgesic or addictive properties. The protonation constants of pholcodine and its derivatives are interpreted by comparing with related molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The pH-dependent relative concentrations of the variously protonated forms of pholcodine and morphine are depicted in distribution diagrams. PMID:17004059

  1. Manipulation of partially oriented hydroxyapatite building blocks to form flowerlike bundles without acid-base regulation.

    Wen, Zhenliang; Wang, Zihao; Chen, Jingdi; Zhong, Shengnan; Hu, Yimin; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-06-01

    The application of hydroxyapatite (HAP) in different fields depends greatly on its morphology, composition and structure. Besides, the main inorganic building blocks of human bones and teeth are also HAP. Therefore, accurate shape and aggregation control and of hydroxyapatite particles will be of great interest. Herein, oriented bundles of flowerlike HAP nanorods were successfully prepared through hydrothermal treatment without acid-base regulation, with the mono-alkyl phosphate (MAP) and sodium citrate as surfactant and chelating agent, respectively. The prepared samples were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and zeta potential, the pH value and conductivity value of suspension were characterized by pH meter and conductivity measurement. The results showed that the MAP and citrate play an important role in assembly of HAP nanorods without acid-base regulation. Citrate calcium complex could decompose slowly and release citrate ions at hydrothermal conditions. Besides, the further decomposition of citrate ions could release aconitic acid as the reaction time prolongs. Moreover, the possible scheme for the formation process was discussed in detail. PMID:26930036

  2. The generalized Lewis acid-base titration of palladium and niobium

    The high thermodynamic stability of alloys composed of platinum group metals and group IVB and VB metals has been explained by an electronic interaction analogous to the Lewis acid-base concept for nontransition elements. The analogy is further demonstrated by the titration of palladium by addition of niobium. The activity of niobium in solid palladium was measured as a function of concentration by solid-state galvanic cells and study of the ternary oxide phase diagram. The galvanic cells were of the Pt/NbO2, Nb2O4.8/YDT/NbOy, Nb(Pd)/Pt where the solid electrolyte is yttria-doped thoria (YDT). Ternary phase diagrams for the Pd-Nb-O and Rh-Nb-O systems were obtained by characterizing samples equilibrated at 10000C. The phase relationships found in the ternary diagrams were also used to derive thermochemical data for the alloys. Thermochemical quantities for other acid-base stabilized alloys such as Nb-Rh, Ti-Pd, and Ti-Rh were also measured

  3. Activities of Heterogeneous Acid-Base Catalysts for Fragrances Synthesis: A Review

    Hartati Hartati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews various types of heterogeneous acid-base catalysts for fragrances preparation. Catalytic activities of various types of heterogeneous acid and base catalysts in fragrances preparation, i.e. non-zeolitic, zeolitic, and mesoporous molecular sieves have been reported. Generally, heterogeneous acid catalysts are commonly used in fragrance synthesis as compared to heterogeneous base catalysts. Heteropoly acids and hydrotalcites type catalysts are widely used as heterogeneous acid and base catalysts, respectively. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 20th January 2013; Revised: 31st March 2013; Accepted: 1st April 2013[How to Cite: Hartati, H., Santoso, M., Triwahyono, S., Prasetyoko, D. (2013. Activities of Heterogeneous Acid-Base Catalysts for Fragrances Synthesis: A Review. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (1: 14-33. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4394.14-33][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4394.14-33] | View in  |

  4. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João Paulo T.; Gomes, Frederico P.; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B. V.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  5. A study on the role of gelatin in methacrylic-acid-based gel dosimeters

    In radiotherapy treatment, polymer gel dosimetry can be used for verifying three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions. Gelatin is generally used as a gelling agent in the dosimeters. In this paper, another role of gelatin in a methacrylic-acid-based gel dosimeter (MAGAT) is investigated. Temperature increases due to exothermic polymerization in the irradiated gel are measured directly. Dose-R2 responses are also obtained using MRI. It is shown that no appreciable increases in either temperature or R2 are observed in MAGAT dosimeters made without gelatin, and that significant temperature and R2 increases are observed when very low gelatin concentrations are used. These results indicate that gelatin is an important enabler for radiation-induced free-radical polymerization in methacrylic-acid-based gels. When gelatin is replaced by amino acids, changes in temperature are observed, along with small changes in R2. The resulting dosimeter solutions remain transparent because the polymer does not precipitate as it does in regular MAGAT dosimeters containing gelatin. When the amino acids are replaced by acids without amino groups, no temperature or R2 changes are observed, indicating that no polymer forms. These results show that amino groups (and possibly other functional groups) on the gelatin catalyze the radiation-induced free-radical polymerization that occurs in MAGAT dosimeters.

  6. Fractionating vacuum thermal deposition of polyaniline films. Effect of post-deposition acid-base treatment

    Nekrasov, A.A. (Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii Prospect 31, Moscow 117071 (Russian Federation)); Ivanov, V.F. (Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii Prospect 31, Moscow 117071 (Russian Federation)); Gribkova, O.L. (Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii Prospect 31, Moscow 117071 (Russian Federation)); Vannikov, A.V. (Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii Prospect 31, Moscow 117071 (Russian Federation))

    1994-07-15

    Vacuum thermal evaporation of a single portion of chemically synthesized polyaniline (PAN) base powder was performed step-by-step within four temperature intervals in the 240-450 C range. The vapour was deposited on quartz and SnO[sub 2]-glass substrates, each fraction being deposited on a separate substrate. The samples obtained were subjected to cyclic contrast acid-base treatment, and UV-Vis spectra of the fractions after each treatment cycle were registered. The spectra of the as-deposited fractions appear to have little in common with conventional PAN spectra. The appearance of absorption bands essential for conventional PAN spectra is found to occur for some of the fractions only after the above treatment. This is apparently due to recombination of PAN oligomer radical fragments, formed in the course of the evaporation, resulting in restoration of PAN macromolecule structure. The recombination may be intensified by conformational changes during the acid-base treatment. Cyclic voltammetry curves for the most PAN-like fractions resemble the ones for conventional PAN. ((orig.))

  7. [The favorable effect of humic acid based complex micro-element preparations in cadmium exposure].

    Hudák, A; Náray, M; Nagy, I; Molnár, M; Gömöry, I; Ungváry, G

    1997-06-01

    The authors have studied the effect of consumption of a humic acid based complex microelement preparation (potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, copper, vanadium, cobalt, molibden, selenium bound to humic acids) for six weeks (10 ml daily) on the biological exposure indices (blood and urine cadmium levels) and clinical laboratory parameters (liver and kidney tests, blood picture) of men (n = 18; 39.7 +/- 10.4 years of age;) working in cadmium exposure for 8.3 +/- 5.0 years. The initial mean blood and urine cadmium levels of the non-smoking subjects was twice higher than that of the non-smoking male controls living in the same urban area (n = 35), and significantly correlated with the length of exposure. Their mean serum alanin-aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl-transferase, creatinine, uric acid and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase levels were significantly higher than that of the controls. After the six-week treatment blood cadmium level, activity of serum alanin-aminotransferase, serum uric acid and urinary protein concentrations decreased significantly, the abnormal serum iron levels normalized. According to this results, the absorption of cadmium decreased on the effect of the complex microelement supplementation and the adverse laboratory changes attributable partly to cadmium exposure improved. Therefore humic acid based complex microelement supplementation is recommended as an effective tool for prevention and health protection in occupational cadmium exposure as well as for smokers known to be considerably burdened by cadmium. PMID:9254361

  8. CHARGE DEVELOPMENT AND ACID-BASE CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL AND COMPOST HUMIC ACIDS

    P. A. CAMPITELLI

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous works, the acid-base properties, charging behavior and chemical heterogeneity of humic substances have been studied using different mathematical equations to fit the experimental data. The objective of this research is to study the charge behavior, acid-base properties and analyze the chemical heterogeneity of humic acids (HA extracted from soil and composted municipal solid waste by potentiometric titrations. The humic acids extracted from compost have some characteristics and behavior similar to those obtained from soil. The negative charge development of HA extracted from composted material are lower than those extracted from soil and increase as ionic strength increase. The amount of carboxylic groups is lower in compost HA than in soil HA The heterogeneity of HA extracted from compost is higher than those extracted from soil. As the time of composting period increase the humification processes that take place trends to produce compost HA that has similar characteristics to soil HA. We suggest that HA extracted from composted material are macromolecules "like soil humic acids", i.e. "humiclike fraction"

  9. Acid-based hydrolysis processes for ethanol from lignocellulosic materials: A review

    Keikhosro Karimi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is nowadays one of the main actors in the fuel market. It is currently produced from sugars and starchy materials, but lignocelluloses can be expected to be major feedstocks for ethanol production in the future. Two processes are being developed in parallel for conversion of lignocelluloses to ethanol, “acid-based” and “enzyme-based” processes. The current article is dedicated to review of progress in the “acid-based-hydrolysis” process. This process was used industrially in the 1940s, during wartime, but was not economically competitive afterward. However, intensive research and development on its technology during the last three decades, in addition to the expanding ethanol market, may revive the process in large scale once again. In this paper the ethanol market, the composition of lignocellulosic materials, concentrated- and dilute-acid pretreatment and hydrolysis, plug-flow, percolation, counter-current and shrinking-bed hydrolysis reactors, fermentation of hexoses and pentoses, effects of fermentation inhibitors, downstream processing, wastewater treatment, analytical methods used, and the current commercial status of the acid-based ethanol processes are reviewed.

  10. Novel sulfonated poly (ether ether keton)/polyetherimide acid-base blend membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications

    Highlights: • SPEEK/PEI acid-base blend membranes are prepared for VRB applications. • The acid-base blend membranes have much lower vanadium ion permeability. • The energy efficiency of SPEEK/PEI maintain around 86.9% after 50 cycles. - Abstract: Novel acid-base blend membranes composed of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyetherimide (PEI) were prepared for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). The blend membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The ion exchange capacity (IEC), proton conductivity, water uptake, vanadium ion permeability and mechanical properties were measured. As a result, the acid-base blend membranes exhibit higher water uptake, IEC and lower vanadium ion permeability compared to Nafion117 membranes and all these properties decrease with the increase of PEI. In VRB single cell test, the VRB with blend membranes shows lower charge capacity loss, higher coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) than Nafion117 membrane. Furthermore, the acid-base blend membranes present stable performance up to 50 cycles with no significant decline in CE and EE. All experimental results indicate that the SPEEK/PEI (S/P) acid-base blend membranes show promising prospects for VRB

  11. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    Plez, B.; Hill, V.; Cayrel, R.; Spite, M.; Barbuy, B.; Beers, T.C.; Bonifacio, P.; Primas, F.; Nordström, B.

    2004-01-01

    stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data......stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data...

  12. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    Mann Matthias

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the abundance of molecular components is an important prerequisite for building quantitative predictive models of cellular behavior. Proteins are central components of these models, since they carry out most of the fundamental processes in the cell. Thus far, protein concentrations have been difficult to measure on a large scale, but proteomic technologies have now advanced to a stage where this information becomes readily accessible. Results Here, we describe an experimental scheme to maximize the coverage of proteins identified by mass spectrometry of a complex biological sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed emPAI approach which takes into account the number of sequenced peptides per protein. The values of abundance are within a broad range and accurately reflect independently measured copy numbers per cell. As expected, the most abundant proteins were those involved in protein synthesis, most notably ribosomal proteins. Proteins involved in energy metabolism as well as those with binding function were also found in high copy number while proteins annotated with the terms metabolism, transcription, transport, and cellular organization were rare. The barrel-sandwich fold was found to be the structural fold with the highest abundance. Highly abundant proteins are predicted to be less prone to aggregation based on their length, pI values, and occurrence patterns of hydrophobic stretches. We also find that abundant proteins tend to be predominantly essential. Additionally we observe a significant correlation between protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work

  13. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    Reames, Donald V

    2016-01-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio A/Q of the ions. Since the Q values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller mag...

  14. Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of mineral-based alkaline bottled water

    Heil Daniel P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study sought to determine whether the consumption of a mineral-rich alkalizing (AK bottled water could improve both acid-base balance and hydration status in young healthy adults under free-living conditions. The AK water contains a naturally high mineral content along with Alka-PlexLiquid™, a dissolved supplement that increases the mineral content and gives the water an alkalizing pH of 10.0. Methods Thirty-eight subjects were matched by gender and self-reported physical activity (SRPA, hrs/week and then split into Control (12 women, 7 men; Mean +/- SD: 23 +/- 2 yrs; 7.2 +/- 3.6 hrs/week SRPA and Experimental (13 women, 6 men; 22 +/- 2 yrs; 6.4 +/- 4.0 hrs/week SRPA groups. The Control group consumed non-mineralized placebo bottled water over a 4-week period while the Experimental group consumed the placebo water during the 1st and 4th weeks and the AK water during the middle 2-week treatment period. Fingertip blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected three times each week for subsequent measures of blood and urine osmolality and pH, as well as total urine volume. Dependent variables were analyzed using multivariate repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc focused on evaluating changes over time within Control and Experimental groups (alpha = 0.05. Results There were no significant changes in any of the dependent variables for the Control group. The Experimental group, however, showed significant increases in both the blood and urine pH (6.23 to 7.07 and 7.52 to 7.69, respectively, a decreased blood and increased urine osmolality, and a decreased urine output (2.51 to 2.05 L/day, all during the second week of the treatment period (P Conclusions Consumption of AK water was associated with improved acid-base balance (i.e., an alkalization of the blood and urine and hydration status when consumed under free-living conditions. In contrast, subjects who consumed the placebo bottled water showed no changes over the

  15. The abundance threshold for plague as a critical percolation phenomenon

    Davis, S; Trapman, P; Leirs, H;

    2008-01-01

    is a percolation threshold, which arises from the difference in scale between the movements that transport infectious fleas between family groups and the vast size of contiguous landscapes colonized by gerbils. Conventional theory predicts that abundance thresholds for the spread of infectious......-appraisal of other invasion thresholds, such as those for epidemic viral infections in African lions (Panthera leo), and of other disease systems such as bovine tuberculosis (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) in badgers (Meles meles)....

  16. Applications of abundance data and requirements for cosmochemical modeling

    Busemann, H.; Binns, W. R.; Chiappini, C.; Gloeckler, G.; Hoppe, P.; Kirilova, Donka; Leske, R. A.; Manuel, O. K.; Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.)

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of the universe from Big Bang to its present state requires an understanding of the evolution of the abundances of the elements and isotopes in galaxies, stars, the interstellar medium, the Sun and the heliosphere, planets and meteorites. Processes that change the state of the universe include Big Bang nucleosynthesis, star formation and stellar nucleosynthesis, galactic chemical evolution, propagation of cosmic rays, spallation, ionization and particle transport of interstellar material, formation of the solar system, solar wind emission and its fractionation (FIP/FIT effect), mixing processes in stellar interiors, condensation of material and subsequent geochemical fractionation. Here, we attempt to compile some major issues in cosmochemistry that can be addressed with a better knowledge of the respective element or isotope abundances. Present and future missions such as Genesis, Stardust, Interstellar Pathfinder, and Interstellar Probe, improvements of remote sensing instrumentation and experiments on extraterrestrial material such as meteorites, presolar grains, and lunar or returned planetary or cometary samples will result in an improved database of elemental and isotopic abundances. This includes the primordial abundances of D, 3He, 4He, and 7Li, abundances of the heavier elements in stars and galaxies, the composition of the interstellar medium, solar wind and comets as well as the (highly) volatile elements in the solar system such as helium, nitrogen, oxygen or xenon.

  17. Effect of disjunct size distributions on foraminiferal species abundance determinations

    Martin, R.E.; Liddell, W.D.

    1988-02-01

    Studies of foraminiferal distribution and abundance have typically employed a procedure (standard method) that entails counting approximately 300 specimens from a size range greater than some specified minimum (commonly 63 or 125 ..mu..m). This method fails to take into account that foraminifera may be found only within certain size fractions, either because of species specific size ranges or taphonomic processes (sorting, transport, abrasion). Use of a modified counting procedure (sieve method) takes into account foraminiferal size distributions. The sieve method uses counts of up to 300 specimens in each sand-size fraction (0.125-0.25, 0.25-0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2 mm) of each sample. Counts are then totaled for each sample (up to 1200 specimens per site) and used in determination of species abundances for each site. The sieve method has been of considerable utility in recognition of a foraminiferal bathymetric zonation preserved in sediment assemblages from fringing reef environments at Discovery Bay, north Jamaica. Well-documented reef zones (based on corals and physiography) are clearly defined in Q-mode cluster analysis (UPGMA) of species abundances determined using the sieve method. In contrast, individual fore reef zones are not recognized in cluster analysis of foraminiferal species abundances based on the standard method, nor by cluster analysis of species abundances within individual size fractions.

  18. Enabling the Tablet Product Development of 5-Fluorocytosine by Conjugate Acid Base Cocrystals.

    Perumalla, Sathyanarayana R; Paul, Shubhajit; Sun, Changquan C

    2016-06-01

    5-Fluorocytosine (FC) is a high-dose antifungal drug that challenges the development of a tablet product due to poor solid-state stability and tabletability. Using 2 pharmaceutically acceptable conjugate acid base (CAB) cocrystals of FC with HCl and acesulfame, we have developed commercially viable high loading FC tablets. The tablets were prepared by direct compression using nano-coated microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH105 as a tablet binder, which provided both excellent tabletability and good flowability. Commercial manufacturability of formulations based on both CAB cocrystals was verified on a compaction simulator. The results from an expedited friability study were used to set the compaction force, which yielded tablets with sufficient mechanical strength and rapid tablet disintegration. This work demonstrates the potential value of CAB cocrystals in drug product development. PMID:27238493

  19. Unimolecular half-adders and half-subtractors based on acid-base reaction

    Wei JIANG; Hengyi ZHANG; Yu LIU

    2009-01-01

    According to the structural analysis of reported mole-cular processors with acids and bases as inputs, we proposed a general method for constructing molecular half-adders and/or half-subtractors based on acid-base reaction. The method is preliminarily supported by four molecular processors (8-hydroxyquinoline, 4-hydroxypyridine, 4-aminophenol and 5-amino-1-naphthol) capable of the elementary addition and/or subtraction algebraic operations. Noticeably, 8-hydroxyquinoline can mimic the functions of three logic devices, i.e. half-adder, half-subtractor and digital comparator, by the use of superposition and reconfi-guration. The method described in this paper may be useful not only for designing new unimolecular arithmetical processors with the same inputs and outputs as standard devices for the construction of future molecular computers, but it can also help us disclose the simplest molecules and biomolecules with computational properties concealed around us.

  20. Role of acid-base interactions in synthesis of cordierite from talc and sillimanite group minerals

    Avvakumov E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that the mechanical activation of mixtures of sillimanite group minerals with talc and silica additives in grinding-activating devices with periodic and flow action provides significant acceleration of their interaction with formation of cordierite at the subsequent high-temperature treatment. It is shown that the output of cordierite depends on nature of mineral: in mixture with a sillimanite it is considerably higher, than with an andalusite and kyanite, while the rate of mullitization of these minerals has opposite character. It means that the formation of mullite during heat treatment is not a limiting step in synthesis of cordierite. It is shown that the rate of reaction is determined by the difference in the acid-base properties of these minerals, which depend on the coordination of aluminum cations by oxygen ions, different for each of the modifications.

  1. Laser restoring the glass surface treated with acid-based paint

    Strusevich, Anastasia V.; Poltaev, Yuriy A.; Sinev, Dmitrii A.

    2013-11-01

    The modern city facilities are often being attacked by graffiti artists, and increasingly vandals leave "tags" using paints, which compound based on acids, hydrofluoric or acetic commonly. These paints not only ink the surface, but also increase the surface roughness, and such impact can not be corrected by conventional cleaning. Thus, it was requested to develop technology that would not only clean the surface, but also to restore its structure by smoothing out irregularities and roughness formed after exposure in acid. In this work we investigated the effect of restoring the surface of the glass, spoiled by acid-based paint and then treated with CO2-laser. During the experiments, it was found that it is real to create the single-step laser surface restoring technology.

  2. Some comments upon acid-base balance in teleost fishes and its relationship to environmental temperature

    Houston, A.H.

    1971-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that acid-base regulation in mammalian species is directed toward stabilization of body fluid pH, whereas among the poikilotherms control centers upon the maintenance of relative alkalinity. Consequently, given the known relationship between temperature and the dissociation constant of water reductions in mammalian body temperature should be accompanied by decreases in the OH/sup -//H/sup +/ ratio while, under similar circumstances, the pH of the poikilothermic tetrapods, extension of the concept of relative alkalinity regulation to teleost fishes is not wholly consistent with the data presently available. Recorded blood and plasma pH values for teleost fishes are generally below those reported for amphibians and reptiles, tending to fall within or below the levels observed in mammals under comparable thermal conditions. Moreover, they seemingly display little tendency to vary in an inverse fashion wth temperature.

  3. Identification and Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Based Inhibitors of Replication Protein A.

    Patrone, James D; Pelz, Nicholas F; Bates, Brittney S; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, Demarco V; Kuznetsov, Alexey G; Browning, Carrie F; Feldkamp, Michael D; Frank, Andreas O; Gilston, Benjamin A; Olejniczak, Edward T; Rossanese, Olivia W; Waterson, Alex G; Chazin, Walter J; Fesik, Stephen W

    2016-04-19

    Replication protein A (RPA) is an essential single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein that initiates the DNA damage response pathway through protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediated by its 70N domain. The identification and use of chemical probes that can specifically disrupt these interactions is important for validating RPA as a cancer target. A high-throughput screen (HTS) to identify new chemical entities was conducted, and 90 hit compounds were identified. From these initial hits, an anthranilic acid based series was optimized by using a structure-guided iterative medicinal chemistry approach to yield a cell-penetrant compound that binds to RPA70N with an affinity of 812 nm. This compound, 2-(3- (N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)sulfamoyl)-4-methylbenzamido)benzoic acid (20 c), is capable of inhibiting PPIs mediated by this domain. PMID:26748787

  4. Thermodynamics of several lewis-acid-base stabilized transition metal alloys

    Gibson, John K.; Brewer, Leo; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1984-11-01

    High-temperature (1425 to 2750 K) thermodynamic activities of one or both components of twenty-five binary alloys of a group IVB-VIB element (Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, or W) with a platinum group element (Ru, Os, Ir, Pd, Pt, or Au) have been determined by equilibrating the alloy with the appropriate carbide and graphite, equilibrating with the nitride and nitrogen gas, or measuring the partial vapor pressure(s) thermogravimetrically or mass spectrometrically. The extraordinary stability of this class of transition metal alloy is attributed to a generalized Lewis-acid-base interaction involving valence d electrons, and the results of these investigations are interpreted within the context of this effect. Among the conclusions made are that a non-spherically-symmetrical crystal field significantly reduces the bonding effectiveness of certain valence d orbitals; the effect of the extent of derealization of these orbitals is also considered.

  5. Chemical composition and the acid-base properties of the InSb-ZnSe surface

    Acid-base properties and chemical composition of the surface of solid solutions and binary compounds of the system InSb-ZnSe powders and films 0.25-0.35 μm thick were studied using a complex of physicochemical methods. It was ascertained that the initial surface features largely acid properties with transition to low-basic ones in the series InSb → (InSb)x(ZnSe)1-x → ZnSe. There are two types of acid centers on the surface: the Lewis (electron-accepted) and Broensted ones (adsorbed water molecules and OH- groups). After thermal vacuum treatment the surface composition was similar to stoichiometric one

  6. Neural networks applied to determine the thermophysical properties of amino acid based ionic liquids.

    Cancilla, John C; Perez, Ana; Wierzchoś, Kacper; Torrecilla, José S

    2016-03-01

    A series of models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been designed to estimate the thermophysical properties of different amino acid-based ionic liquids (AAILs). Three different databases of AAILs were modeled using these algorithms with the goal set to estimate the density, viscosity, refractive index, ionic conductivity, and thermal expansion coefficient, and requiring only data regarding temperature and electronic polarizability of the chemicals. Additionally, a global model was designed combining all of the databases to determine the robustness of the method. In general, the results were successful, reaching mean prediction errors below 1% in many cases, as well as a statistically reliable and accurate global model. Attaining these successful models is a relevant fact as AAILs are novel biodegradable and biocompatible compounds which may soon make their way into the health sector forming a part of useful biomedical applications. Therefore, understanding the behavior and being able to estimate their thermophysical properties becomes crucial. PMID:26899458

  7. Study on acid- base disturbance in patients with posttraumatic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the classification and incidence of acid-base disturbance (ABD) in the patients with post-traumatic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Methods: A total of 119 patients with MODS were examined with arterial blood gas analysis and serum electrolytes detection for 675 times in this study. Results: Different types of ABD existed in 647 times out of 675 times (95.9%) of blood-gas analyses. There were 270 times (41.7%) of simple ABD, 271 times (41.9%) of double ABD and 106 times (16.4%) of triple ABD. Among which, 404 times (62.4%) were in respiratory alkalosis (RAL), 332 times (51.3%) in metabolic acidosis (MA), 227 times (35.1% ) in metabolic alkalosis (MAL) and 167 times (25.8%) in respiratory acidosis (RA). In this study, 79 cases (66.4%) out of 119cases with MODS died from these kinds of ABD. Conclusions: It suggests that in the early stage of MODS, RAL with or without hypoxemia may exist, and later on, MA or even triple ABD may occur. In order to detect and correct the primary disorders as early as possible, it is important to keep the balance of hydrolyte. The treatment of primary diseases is also important.Disorders of acid-base balance were corrected according to pH standard values, anion gap (AG) and the potential [HCO3- ] were also calculated simultaneously. When pH was more than 7.50 or lower than 7.20, it is necessary to give drugs of acidity or alkalinity to the patients with ABD to maintain pH value within a normal range.

  8. CHENGDU, the Land of Abundance

    2009-01-01

    @@ Chengdu is also one of the most important economic centers,transportation and communication hubs in the southwestern China.According to the 2007 Public Appraisal for Best Chinese Cities for Investment,Chengdu was chosen as one of the top ten cities to invest in,out of a total of 280 urban centers.

  9. A note on the abundance conjecture

    Dorsch, Tobias; Lazić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We prove that the abundance conjecture for non-uniruled klt pairs in dimension $n$ implies the abundance conjecture for uniruled klt pairs in dimension $n$, assuming the Minimal Model Program in lower dimensions.

  10. Solar System chemical abundances corrected for systematics

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    The relative chemical abundances between CI meteorites and the solar photosphere exhibit a significant trend with condensation temperature. A trend with condensation temperature is also seen when the solar photospheric abundances are compared to those of nearby solar twins. We use both these trends to determine the alteration of the elemental abundances of the meteorties and the photosphere by fractionation and calculate a new set of primordial Solar System abundances.

  11. Controlled synthesis of multi-morphology Te crystals by a convenient Lewis acid/base-assisted solvothermal method

    This paper reports on the controlled growth of multi-morphology Te crystals by a convenient Lewis acid/base-assisted solvothermal method for the first time. The morphological transformation from one-dimension (1D) nanostructures to 2D hierarchical flowerlike microarchitecture has been observed. The nanorods and nanowires with a well-defined crystallographical structure and the hierarchical flowers microarchitecture were obtained by changing the Lewis acids/bases. Lewis acids/bases were found to be crucial for the formation of the products by not only acting as the pH regulator but also as the shape controller, owing to their hydrolysis in the solvent to in situ form H+/OH− and hydrates. The results suggest that this should be an effective approach to the control the growth of t-Te crystals with interesting multiple morphologies, which are of interest for both theoretical investigations and practical applications.

  12. Analysis of the low-pressure plasma pretreated polymer surface in terms of acid-base approach

    Kraus, Eduard; Orf, Lukas; Baudrit, Benjamin; Heidemeyer, Peter; Bastian, Martin; Bonenberger, Ramona; Starostina, Irina; Stoyanov, Oleg

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the use of a modern wetting method for determining the acid-base properties of treated polymer surfaces for different plastics and adhesives. The effect of the surface treatment with low pressure plasma was evaluated from the viewpoint of acid-base approach with plastics polyoxymethylene (POM) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK). The correlations between the acid-base properties and the identified mechanical tensile strengths of adhesive bonded joints were evaluated and discussed. In the investigated range the determination coefficients for POM and PEEK were calculated to R2 = 0.93 and R2 = 0.97, respectively. These relatively high determination coefficients showed a good correlation between the mechanical strength and the acidity parameter ΔDshort for use in bonding technology for surface pretreatment of polymers with LPP.

  13. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy for the Management of Acid-Base and Electrolyte Imbalances in Acute Kidney Injury.

    Yessayan, Lenar; Yee, Jerry; Frinak, Stan; Szamosfalvi, Balazs

    2016-05-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is used to manage electrolyte and acid-base imbalances in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Although a standard solution and prescription is acceptable in most clinical circumstances, specific disorders may require a tailored approach such as adjusting fluid composition, regulating CRRT dose, and using separate intravenous infusions to mitigate and correct these disturbances. Errors in fluid prescription, compounding, or delivery can be rapidly fatal. This article provides an overview of the principles of acid-base and electrolyte management using CRRT. PMID:27113697

  14. Correlating multidimensional fetal heart rate variability analysis with acid-base balance at birth

    Fetal monitoring during labour currently fails to accurately detect acidemia. We developed a method to assess the multidimensional properties of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) from trans-abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) during labour. We aimed to assess this novel bioinformatics approach for correlation between fHRV and neonatal pH or base excess (BE) at birth. We enrolled a prospective pilot cohort of uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at 38–42 weeks’ gestation in Milan, Italy, and Liverpool, UK. Fetal monitoring was performed by standard cardiotocography. Simultaneously, with fECG (high sampling frequency) was recorded. To ensure clinician blinding, fECG information was not displayed. Data from the last 60 min preceding onset of second-stage labour were analyzed using clinically validated continuous individualized multiorgan variability analysis (CIMVA) software in 5 min overlapping windows. CIMVA allows simultaneous calculation of 101 fHRV measures across five fHRV signal analysis domains. We validated our mathematical prediction model internally with 80:20 cross-validation split, comparing results to cord pH and BE at birth. The cohort consisted of 60 women with neonatal pH values at birth ranging from 7.44 to 6.99 and BE from −0.3 to −18.7 mmol L−1. Our model predicted pH from 30 fHRV measures (R2 = 0.90, P < 0.001) and BE from 21 fHRV measures (R2 = 0.77, P < 0.001). Novel bioinformatics approach (CIMVA) applied to fHRV derived from trans-abdominal fECG during labor correlated well with acid-base balance at birth. Further refinement and validation in larger cohorts are needed. These new measurements of fHRV might offer a new opportunity to predict fetal acid-base balance at birth. (fast track communication)

  15. α-Gel formation by amino acid-based gemini surfactants.

    Sakai, Kenichi; Ohno, Kiyomi; Nomura, Kazuyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Kazutami; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2014-07-01

    Ternary mixtures being composed of surfactant, long-chain alcohol, and water sometimes form a highly viscous lamellar gel with a hexagonal packing arrangement of their crystalline hydrocarbon chains. This molecular assembly is called "α-crystalline phase" or "α-gel". In this study, we have characterized α-gels formed by the ternary mixtures of amino acid-based gemini surfactants, 1-hexadecanol (C16OH), and water. The surfactants used in this study were synthesized by reacting dodecanoylglutamic acid anhydride with alkyl diamines and abbreviated as 12-GsG-12 (s: the spacer chain length of 2, 5, and 8 methylene units). An amino acid-based monomeric surfactant, dodecanoylglutamic acid (12-Glu), was also used for comparison. At a fixed water concentration the melting point of the α-gel increased with increasing C16OH concentration, and then attained a saturation level at the critical mole ratio of 12-GsG-12/C16OH = 1/2 under the normalization by the number of hydrocarbon chains of the surfactants. This indicates that, to obtain the saturated α-gel, a lesser amount of C16OH is required for the gemini surfactants than for the monomeric one (the critical mole ratio of 12-Glu/C16OH = 1/3). Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements demonstrated an increase in the long-range d-spacing of the saturated α-gels in the order 12-Glu gemini surfactant systems, the decreased spacer chain length resulted in the increased maximum viscosity and elastic modulus of the saturated α-gels at a given water concentration. This is caused by the decreased amount of excess water being present outside the α-gel structure (or the increased amount of water incorporated between the surfactant-alcohol bilayers). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report focusing on the formation of α-gel in gemini surfactant systems. PMID:24912111

  16. Comparative bioavailability studies of citric acid and malonic acid based aspirin effervescent tablets

    Anju Gauniya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present investigation is aimed at comparing the pharmacokinetic profile (Bioavailability of aspirin in tablet formulations, which were prepared by using different effervescent excipients such as citric acid and malonic acid. Materials and Methods: The relative bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of citric acid based aspirin effervescent tablet (Product A and malonic acid based aspirin effervescent tablet (Product B formulations were evaluated for an in-vitro dissolution study and in-vivo bioavailability study, in 10 normal healthy rabbits. The study utilized a randomized, crossover design with a one-week washout period between doses. Blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours following a 100 mg/kg dose. Plasma samples were assayed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. T max , C max , AUC 0-24 , AUC 0- ∞, MRT, K a, and relative bioavailability were estimated using the traditional pharmacokinetic methods and were compared by using the paired t-test. Result: In the present study, Products A and B showed their T max , C max , AUC 0-24 , AUC 0- ∞, MRT, and K a values as 2.5 h, 2589 ± 54.79 ng/ml, 9623 ± 112.87 ng.h/ml, 9586 ± 126.22 ng.h/ml, 3.6 ± 0.10 h, and 0.3698 ± 0.003 h -1 for Product A and 3.0 h, 2054 ± 55.79 ng/ml, 9637 ± 132.87 ng.h/ml, 9870 ± 129.22 ng.h/ml, 4.76 ± 0.10 h, and 0.3812 ± 0.002 h -1 for Product B, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the paired t-test of pharmacokinetics data showed that there was no significant difference between Products A and B. From both the in vitro dissolution studies and in vivo bioavailability studies it was concluded that products A and B had similar bioavailability.

  17. Surface abundances of ON stars

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  18. The role of an ancestral hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated K+ channel in branchial acid-base regulation in the green crab, Carcinus maenas.

    Fehsenfeld, Sandra; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2016-03-15

    Numerous electrophysiological studies on branchial K(+) transport in brachyuran crabs have established an important role for potassium channels in osmoregulatory ion uptake and ammonia excretion in the gill epithelium of decapod crustaceans. However, hardly anything is known of the actual nature of these channels in crustaceans. In the present study, the identification of a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel (HCN) in the transcriptome of the green crab Carcinus maenas and subsequent performance of quantitative real-time PCR revealed the ubiquitous expression of this channel in this species. Even though mRNA expression levels in the cerebral ganglion were found to be approximately 10 times higher compared with all other tissues, posterior gills still expressed significant levels of HCN, indicating an important role for this transporter in branchial ion regulation. The relatively unspecific K(+)-channel inhibitor Ba(2+), as well as the HCN-specific blocker ZD7288, as applied in gill perfusion experiments and electrophysiological studies employing the split gill lamellae revealed the presence of at least two different K(+)/NH4 (+)-transporting structures in the branchial epithelium of C. maenas. Furthermore, HCN mRNA levels in posterior gill 7 decreased significantly in response to the respiratory or metabolic acidosis that was induced by acclimation of green crabs to high environmental PCO2  and ammonia, respectively. Consequently, the present study provides first evidence that HCN-promoted NH4 (+) epithelial transport is involved in both branchial acid-base and ammonia regulation in an invertebrate. PMID:26787479

  19. Origin of Cosmic Chemical Abundances

    Maio, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e$^-$, H, H$^+$, H$^-$, He, He$^+$, He$^{++}$, D, D$^+$, H$_2$, H$_2^+$, HD, HeH$^+$), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers at redshift $z\\gtrsim 2$. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below $\\sim 10^4\\,\\rm K$, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/...

  20. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  1. Historical perspective on the role of the kidney in acid-base regulation.

    Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J

    2009-01-01

    Early observations on the acidity of normal urine by J. B. von Helmont (1527-1644) and on urine content of sulfate, phosphate and carbonate by J. J. Berzelius (1779-1848), followed by the studies of Bence Jones (1813-1878) on the connection between food, nutrition and urine acidity, pointed to the role of the kidney in regulation of acid-base status in humans and animals. The next important steps in this field of science were studies by F. Walter (1877) on decreased "alkali" in blood and increased ammonia in the urine of dogs after infusion into their blood of hydrochloric acid, and the observations of B. Naunyn (1939-1925) and O. Minkowski (1853-1931) on the presence of beta-hydroxybutyric acid in urine and on increased ammonia excretion in urine from patients with diabetic coma. Also it was found that patients with uremia had decreased titratable "alkali' in blood (R. von Jaksch 1855-1947) and reduced ability to excrete ammonia (W. W. Palmer and L. J. Henderson 1915). Finally, studies by R. F. Pitts (1908-1977) defined the role of the kidney in reabsorption of bicarbonate in the tubules and linked hydrogen secretion to sodium excretion in the urine. PMID:20013742

  2. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid base neutralization reactions

    Chen, Huabing; Wan, Jiangling; Wang, Yirui; Mou, Dongsheng; Liu, Hongbin; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2008-09-01

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  3. Seawater salinity and blood acid-base balance in the lugworm, Arenicola marina (L.).

    Toulmond, A; Jouin, C

    1992-03-01

    The kinetics of variations in the blood acid base balance (ABB) were investigated in a moderately euryhaline osmoconformer, the lugworm Arenicola marina (L.), exposed to natural and experimental hypo- or hyperosmotic shocks. In natural as well as in experimental conditions, a hyposmotic shock induced a transient and essentially metabolic acidosis, probably linked to the ionic readjustments following the shock, which was rapidly overridden by a metabolic alkalosis. In field conditions, a new ABB equilibrium was then attained, the metabolic alkalosis being neutralized by the respiratory and metabolic acidosis occurring normally in the lugworm during low tide. Conversely, in the normoxic conditions of our laboratory experiments, a new ABB equilibrium was never reached. Under experimental conditions, a hyperosmotic shock always induced a respiratory and metabolic acidosis. In the field, this phenomenon must occur at the beginning of high tide and must help to restore normal blood ABB in lugworms submitted to a moderate hyposmotic shock during low tide. All the observed blood ABB variations reveal the complex intracellular processes through which the lugworm submitted to moderate osmotic shocks tentatively regulates, sometimes without any real success, its osmoticity and volume. Obviously, complementary physical, physiological and behavioral mechanisms allow the lugworm to live in sediments washed by almost fresh water during a 7-8 h 'low tide'. PMID:1604064

  4. Stearic acid based oleogels: a study on the molecular, thermal and mechanical properties.

    Sagiri, S S; Singh, Vinay K; Pal, K; Banerjee, I; Basak, Piyali

    2015-03-01

    Stearic acid and its derivatives have been used as gelators in food and pharmaceutical gel formulations. However, the mechanism pertaining to the stearic acid based gelation has not been deciphered yet. Keeping that in mind, we investigated the role of stearic acid on physic-chemical properties of oleogel. For this purpose, two different oil (sesame oil and soy bean oil) formulations/oleogels were prepared. In depth analysis of gel kinetics, gel microstructure, molecular interactions, thermal and mechanical behaviors of the oleogels were done. The properties of the oleogels were dependent on the type of the vegetable oil used and the concentration of the stearic acid. Avrami analysis of DSC thermograms indicated that heterogeneous nucleation was coupled with the one-dimensional growth of gelator fibers as the key phenomenon in the formation of oleogels. Viscoelastic and pseudoplastic nature of the oleogels was analyzed in-depth by fitting the stress relaxation data in modified Peleg's model and rheological studies, respectively. Textural studies have revealed that the coexistence of hydrogen bond dissipation and formation of new bonds is possible under stress conditions in the physical oleogels. PMID:25579972

  5. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Electrolytes and Acid-Base Disorders.

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cell-phone app containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for theClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrologyreaders. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:26825098

  6. Lipoamino acid-based micelles as promising delivery vehicles for monomeric amphotericin B.

    Serafim, Cláudia; Ferreira, Inês; Rijo, Patrícia; Pinheiro, Lídia; Faustino, Célia; Calado, António; Garcia-Rio, Luis

    2016-01-30

    Lipoamino acid-based micelles have been developed as delivery vehicles for the hydrophobic drug amphotericin B (AmB). The micellar solubilisation of AmB by a gemini lipoamino acid (LAA) derived from cysteine and its equimolar mixtures with the bile salts sodium cholate (NaC) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), as well as the aggregation sate of the drug in the micellar systems, was studied under biomimetic conditions (phosphate buffered-saline, pH 7.4) using UV-vis spectroscopy. Pure surfactant systems and equimolar mixtures were characterized by tensiometry and important parameters were determined, such as critical micelle concentration (CMC), surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γmax), and minimum area occupied per molecule at the water/air interface (Amin). Rheological behaviour from viscosity measurements at different shear rates was also addressed. Solubilisation capacity was quantified in terms of molar solubilisation ratio (χ), micelle-water partition coefficient (KM) and Gibbs energy of solubilisation (ΔGs°). Formulations of AmB in micellar media were compared in terms of drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, aggregation state of AmB and in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The LAA-containing micellar systems solubilise AmB in its monomeric and less toxic form and exhibit in vitro antifungal activity comparable to that of the commercial formulation Fungizone. PMID:26617315

  7. First-principles study of physisorption of nucleic acid bases on small-diameter carbon nanotubes

    We report the results of our first-principles study based on density functional theory on the interaction of the nucleic acid base molecules adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), thymine (T), and uracil (U), with a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). Specifically, the focus is on the physisorption of base molecules on the outer wall of a (5, 0) metallic CNT possessing one of the smallest diameters possible. Compared to the case for CNTs with large diameters, the physisorption energy is found to be reduced in the high-curvature case. The base molecules exhibit significantly different interaction strengths and the calculated binding energies follow the hierarchy G>A>T>C>U, which appears to be independent of the tube curvature. The stabilizing factor in the interaction between the base molecule and CNT is dominated by the molecular polarizability that allows a weakly attractive dispersion force to be induced between them. The present study provides an improved understanding of the role of the base sequence in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) in their interactions with carbon nanotubes of varying diameters

  8. New URJC-1 Material with Remarkable Stability and Acid-Base Catalytic Properties

    Pedro Leo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging new metal-organic structures with tunable physicochemical properties is an exciting research field for diverse applications. In this work, a novel metal-organic framework Cu(HIT(DMF0.5, named URJC-1, with a three-dimensional non-interpenetrated utp topological network, has been synthesized. This material exhibits a microporous structure with unsaturated copper centers and imidazole–tetrazole linkages that provide accessible Lewis acid/base sites. These features make URJC-1 an exceptional candidate for catalytic application in acid and base reactions of interest in fine chemistry. The URJC-1 material also displays a noteworthy thermal and chemical stability in different organic solvents of different polarity and boiling water. Its catalytic activity was evaluated in acid-catalyzed Friedel–Crafts acylation of anisole with acetyl chloride and base-catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with malononitrile. In both cases, URJC-1 material showed very good performance, better than other metal organic frameworks and conventional catalysts. In addition, a remarkable structural stability was proven after several consecutive reaction cycles.

  9. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here

  10. Oleic acid based heterolipid synthesis, characterization and application in self-microemulsifying drug delivery system.

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Akamanchi, Krishnacharya G

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing demand for lipids owing to their use in formulating lipid based drug delivery systems of poorly soluble drugs. The present work discusses the synthesis, characterization of oleic acid based heterolipid and its use as oil in the development of self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for parenteral delivery. Synthesis was carried out by Michael addition of tert-butyl acrylate to 3-amino-1-propanol to obtain di-tert-butyl aminopropanol derivative. Reaction of this di-tert-butyl aminopropanol derivative with oleoyl chloride using p-dimethylaminopyridine as a coupling agent gave the desired heterolipid. It was characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and MS to confirm the structure. It did not exhibit any measurable cytotoxicity, even up to 80μg/ml concentration. Application in parenteral drug delivery was explored using furosemide (FUR), a BCS class IV drug, as a model. FUR showed three times greater solubility in the heterolipid as compared to oleic acid. SMEDDSs were developed using heterolipid as oily phase, Solutol HS 15(®) as surfactant and ethanol as a co-surfactant. Developed SMEDDS could form spontaneous microemulsion on addition to various aqueous phases with mean globule size <70nm without any phase separation or drug precipitation even after 24h, and exhibited negligible hemolytic potential. PMID:22266534

  11. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    Hu, Ting-Chou [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Korczyńska, Justyna [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Smith, David K. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Brzozowski, Andrzej Marek, E-mail: marek@ysbl.york.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-01

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here.

  12. Kidney injury, fluid, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities in alcoholics

    Adebayo Adewale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21 st century, alcoholism and the consequences of ethyl alcohol abuse are major public health concerns in the United States, affecting approximately 14 million people. Pertinent to the global impact of alcoholism is the World Health Organisation estimate that 140 million people worldwide suffer from alcohol dependence. Alcoholism and alcohol abuse are the third leading causes of preventable death in the United States. Alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse cost the United State an estimated US$220 billion in 2005, eclipsing the expense associated with cancer (US$196 billion or obesity (US$133 billion. Orally ingested ethyl alcohol is absorbed rapidly without chemical change from the stomach and intestine, reaching maximum blood concentration in about an hour. Alcohol crosses capillary membranes by simple diffusion, affecting almost every organ system in the body by impacting a wide range of cellular functions. Alcohol causes metabolic derangements either directly, via its chemical by-product or secondarily through alcohol-induced disorders. Many of these alcohol-related metabolic disturbances are increased in severity by the malnutrition that is common in those with chronic alcoholism. This review focuses on the acute and chronic injurious consequences of alcohol ingestion on the kidney, as well as the fluid, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities associated with acute and chronic ingestion of alcohol.

  13. FERTILIZATION OF VINE BY A 5-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID-BASED FERTILIZER AND ITS PROFITABILITY

    VLADIMR IMANSK

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated the effect of different doses of NPKS fertilizer added into the soil for nutrient contents in the soil, as well as the quantity and quality of grapes. During the vegetation of the vine, we tested the 5-aminolevulinic acid-based fertilizer (ALA. We summarize that higher doses of fertilizer added into soil caused higher amounts of available nutrients. During the vegetation of the vine an increase of ALA had a positive effect on the optimal balance of nutrients. Fertilization also increased the grape-vine yield, with the strongest effect (by 68% observed due to the application of ALA during the vegetation period of the vine. Added fertilizers had a statistically significant influence on decreased sugar concentration in the grape-vine however the addition of fertilizer into the soil, mainly the application of ALA during vegetation of the vine (by 57% had a positive effect on increase of the total content of sugar in the grape-vine, produced on 1 hectare. The year had a significant influence on the economical evaluation.

  14. Biodiesel Production from Spent Fish Frying Oil Through Acid-Base Catalyzed Transesterification

    Abdalrahman B. Fadhil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel fuels were prepared from a special type of frying oil namely spent fish frying oil through two step transesterification viz. acid-base catalyzed transesterification. Hydrochloric acid and potassium hydroxide with methanol were used for this purpose. The oil was pre-treated with (1.0 wt% HCl and methanol to reduce free fatty acids content of the oil. Then, conditions of the base catalyzed step such as base concentration, reaction temperature, methanol to oil molar ratio and reaction time were optimized. The study raveled that, 0.50% KOH w/w of oil; a 6:1 methanol to oil molar ratio; a reaction temperature of 60°C and a duration of 1h were the optimal conditions because they resulted in high biodiesel yield. Fuel properties of the products were assessed and found better than those of the parent oil. Furthermore, they met the specified limits according to the ASTM standards. Thin layer chromatography was used as a simple technique to monitor the transesterification of the oil. Blending of the optimal biodiesel sample with petro diesel using specified volume percentages was done as well. The results indicated that biodiesel had slight effect on the values of the assessed properties.

  15. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases, Ribose, and Phosphate by Some Clay Minerals

    Hideo Hashizume

    2015-01-01

    Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate ...

  16. C-3-symmetric, amino acid based organogelators and thickeners : a systematic study of structure-property relations

    de Loos, Maaike; van Esch, Jan H.; Kellogg, Richard M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2007-01-01

    A class of C-3-symmetric amino acid based organogelators and thickeners featuring a rigid core have been developed. Structural variation yielded a number of compounds, the aggregation behaviour and resulting aggregates and gels of which were studied by FTIR spectroscopy, dropping ball measurements,

  17. Development and Evaluation of a Multimedia e-Learning Resource for Electrolyte and Acid-Base Disorders

    Davids, Mogamat Razeen; Chikte, Usuf M. E.; Halperin, Mitchell L.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the development and evaluation of a Web-based application that provides instruction and hands-on practice in managing electrolyte and acid-base disorders. Our teaching approach, which focuses on concepts rather than details, encourages quantitative analysis and a logical problem-solving approach. Identifying any dangers to…

  18. The Sulfur Abundance Anomaly in Planetary Nebulae

    Henry, R B C; Kwitter, K B; Milingo, M B

    2006-01-01

    The failure of S and O abundances in most planetary nebulae to display the same strong direct correlation that is observed in extragalactic H II regions represents one of the most perplexing problems in the area of PN abundances today. Galactic chemical evolution models as well as large amounts of observational evidence from H II region studies support the contention that cosmic abundances of alpha elements such as O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar increase together in lockstep. Yet abundance results from the Henry, Kwitter, & Balick (2004) database show a strong tendency for most PNe to have S abundances that are significantly less than expected from the observed level of O. One reasonable hypothesis for the sulfur anomaly is the past failure to properly measure the abundances of unseen ionization stages above S^+2. Future observations with Spitzer will allow us to test this hypothesis.

  19. Oxygen abundances in nearby dwarf irregular galaxies

    Oxygen abundances are obtained by optical spectrophotometry of H II regions in seven nearby dwarf irregular galaxies. All of these yield oxygen abundances of less than 1/10 of the solar value, and most are in the range of 3-5 percent of the solar value. This suggests that observations of nearby dwarf galaxies may provide an effective means for studying the chemical evolution of low-mass galaxies and, possibly, the primordial helium abundance. A strong correlation is found between the oxygen abundances and absolute magnitudes for nearby irregular galaxies. This correlation will be useful for estimating abundances of irregular galaxies without observable H II regions, and possibly as a distance indicator for irregular galaxies with known abundances. It is inferred from this relationship that infall is no more important in irregular galaxies with extremely large H I halos than in typical irregular galaxies. 72 refs

  20. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  1. Correlation between the acid-base properties of the La2O3 catalyst and its methane reactivity.

    Chu, Changqing; Zhao, Yonghui; Li, Shenggang; Sun, Yuhan

    2016-06-28

    Density functional theory and coupled cluster theory calculations were carried out to study the effects of the acid-base properties of the La2O3 catalyst on its catalytic activity in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) reaction. The La(3+)-O(2-) pair site for CH4 activation is considered as a Lewis acid-Brönsted base pair. Using the Lewis acidity and the Brönsted basicity in the fluoride affinity and proton affinity scales as quantitative measures of the acid-base properties, the energy barrier for CH4 activation at the pair site can be linearly correlated with these acid-base properties. The pair site consisting of a strong Lewis acid La(3+) site and a strong Brönsted base O(2-) site is the most reactive for CH4 activation. In addition, the basicity of the La2O3 catalyst was traditionally measured by temperature-programmed desorption of CO2, but the CO2 chemisorption energy is better regarded as a combined measure of the acid-base properties of the pair site. A linear relationship of superior quality was found between the energy barrier for CH4 activation and the CO2 chemisorption energy, and the pair site favorable for CO2 chemisorption is also more reactive for CH4 activation, leading to the conflicting role of the "basicity" of the La2O3 catalyst in the OCM reaction. The necessity for very high reaction temperatures in the OCM reaction is rationalized by the requirement for the recovery of the most reactive acid-base pair site, which unfortunately also reacts most readily with the byproduct CO2 to form the very stable CO3(2-) species. PMID:27265027

  2. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide va...

  3. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks

    Pellet, Jérôme; Bried, Jason T.; Parietti, David; Gander, Antoine; Heer, Patrick O.; Cherix, Daniel; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly...

  4. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  5. Correlating multidimensional fetal heart rate variability analysis with acid-base balance at birth.

    Frasch, Martin G; Xu, Yawen; Stampalija, Tamara; Durosier, Lucien D; Herry, Christophe; Wang, Xiaogang; Casati, Daniela; Seely, Andrew Je; Alfirevic, Zarko; Gao, Xin; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    Fetal monitoring during labour currently fails to accurately detect acidemia. We developed a method to assess the multidimensional properties of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) from trans-abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) during labour. We aimed to assess this novel bioinformatics approach for correlation between fHRV and neonatal pH or base excess (BE) at birth.We enrolled a prospective pilot cohort of uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at 38-42 weeks' gestation in Milan, Italy, and Liverpool, UK. Fetal monitoring was performed by standard cardiotocography. Simultaneously, with fECG (high sampling frequency) was recorded. To ensure clinician blinding, fECG information was not displayed. Data from the last 60 min preceding onset of second-stage labour were analyzed using clinically validated continuous individualized multiorgan variability analysis (CIMVA) software in 5 min overlapping windows. CIMVA allows simultaneous calculation of 101 fHRV measures across five fHRV signal analysis domains. We validated our mathematical prediction model internally with 80:20 cross-validation split, comparing results to cord pH and BE at birth.The cohort consisted of 60 women with neonatal pH values at birth ranging from 7.44 to 6.99 and BE from -0.3 to -18.7 mmol L(-1). Our model predicted pH from 30 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.90, P base balance at birth. Further refinement and validation in larger cohorts are needed. These new measurements of fHRV might offer a new opportunity to predict fetal acid-base balance at birth. PMID:25407948

  6. Amino acid-based surfactants – do they deserve more attention?

    Bordes, Romain; Holmberg, Krister

    2015-08-01

    The 20 standard amino acids (together with a few more that are not used in the biosynthesis of proteins) constitute a versatile tool box for synthesis of surfactants. Anionic, cationic and zwitterionic amphiphiles can be prepared and surfactants with several functional groups can be obtained by the proper choice of starting amino acid. This review gives examples of procedures used for preparation and discusses important physicochemical properties of the amphiphiles and how these can be taken advantage of for various applications. Micelles with a chiral surface can be obtained by self-assembly of enantiomerically pure surfactants and such supramolecular chirality can be utilized for asymmetric organic synthesis and for preparation of mesoporous materials with chiral pores. Surfactants based on amino acids with two carboxyl groups are effective chelating agents and can be used as collectors in mineral ore flotation. A surfactant based on cysteine readily oxidizes into the corresponding cystine compound, which can be regarded as a gemini surfactant. The facile and reversible cysteine-cystine transformation has been taken advantage of in the design of a switchable surfactant. A very attractive aspect of surfactants based on amino acids is that the polar head-group is entirely natural and that the linkage to the hydrophobic tail, which is often an ester or an amide bond, is easily cleaved. The rate of degradation can be tailored by the structure of the amphiphile. The ester linkage in betaine ester surfactants is particularly susceptible to alkaline hydrolysis and this surfactant type can be used as a biocide with short-lived action. This paper is not intended as a full review on the topic. Instead it highlights concepts that are unique to amino acid-based surfactants and that we believe can have practical implications. PMID:25846628

  7. Acid-base controllable recognition properties of a highly versatile calix[6]crypturea.

    Ménand, Mickaël; Jabin, Ivan

    2010-02-15

    Versatile concave receptors with binding properties that can be controlled by external stimuli are rare. Herein, we report on a calix[6]crypturea (1) that features two different binding sites in close proximity, that is, a tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (tren)-based tris-ureido cap that provides convergent hydrogen-bond-donor sites and a hydrophobic cavity suitable for the inclusion of organic guests. The binding properties of this heteroditopic receptor have been evaluated by NMR spectroscopic studies. Compound 1 behaves as a remarkably versatile host that strongly binds neutral molecules, anions, or contact ion pairs. Within each family of guests, compound 1 is able to discriminate between different guests with a high degree of selectivity. Indeed, neutral molecules that possess hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor groups, chloride anions, and linear ammonium ions associated to F(-) or Cl(-) are particularly well recognized. In comparison with all the related receptors, compound 1 displays several unique features: 1) charged or neutral species are also recognized in polar or protic solvents, 2) thanks to the flexibility of the calixarene structure, induced-fit processes allow the binding of large, biologically relevant ammonium salts such as neurotransmitters, and 3) the protonation of the basic cap leads to a positively charged receptor, 1.H(+), which is reluctant to host anions and in which host properties are now governed by strong charge-dipole interactions with the guests. In other words, compound 1 presents an acid-base controllable tris-ureido recognition site protected by a hydrophobic corridor that can select guests through induced-fit processes. Thus, its versatile host properties can be allosterically controlled by protonation and selective guest-switching processes are possible. To illustrate all these remarkable features, a sophisticated three-pole supramolecular switch, based on the interconversion of host-guest systems displaying either charged or neutral

  8. The application of hydrogen-palladium electrode for potentiometric acid-base determinations in tetrahydrofuran

    Jokić Anja B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of the hydrogen-palladium electrode (H2/Pd as the indicator electrode for the determination of relative acidity scale (Es, mV of tetrahydrofuran (THF and the potentiometric titrations of acids in this solvent was investigated. The relative acidity scale tetrahydrofuran was determined from the difference half-neutralization potentials of perchloric acid and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH, which were measured by using both H2/Pd-SCE and glass-SCE electrode pairs. The experimentally obtained value of Es scale THF with a H2/Pd-SCE electrode pair was 1155 mV, and those obtained with glass-SCE electrode pair 880 mV. By using a H2/Pd indicator electrode, the individual acids (benzoic acid, palmitic acid, maleic acid, acetyl acetone, α-naphthol and two component acid mixtures (benzoic acid + α-naphthol, palmitic acid + α-naphthol, maleic acid + α-naphthol and maleic acid + ftalic acid were titrated with a standard solution of TBAH. In addition, sodium methylate and potassium hydroxide proved to be very suitable titrating agents for titrating of the individual acids and the acids in mixtures, respectively. The relative error of the determination of acids in mixture was less than 3%. The results are in agreement with those obtained by a conventional glass electrode. The advantages of H2/Pd electrode over a glass electrode in potentiometric acid-base determinations in tetrahydrofuran lie in the following: this electrode gives wider relative acidity scale THF, higher the potential jumps at the titration end-point and relatively fast response time; furthermore, it is very durable, simple to prepare and can be used in the titrations of small volumes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br.172051

  9. [Materno-fetal acid-base equilibrium evaluation in parturients submitted to ketamine anesthesia (author's transl)].

    Mauad Filho, F; Meirelles, R S

    1975-01-01

    In the present work ketamine was used as anesthetic during the labor in order to evaluate the effect of this anesthetic on the binominal fetus-mother. Two groups of parturients and their fetuses, were studied: 1) The experimental group, with 22 parturients and their fetuses submitted to ketamine anesthesia during the labord, and 2) The control group, with 20 parturients and their fetuses without any analgesic treatment during the labor. In 20 cases of the experimental group the anesthetic was injected during the delivery labor and the other two just before it. It were evaluated in the mother's blood the biochemical parameters of the acid-base balance and others collateral effects of the anesthesia; on the fetus's side the same parameters also and the cardiac frequency. The newborn were evaluated by Apgar Score during the first and fifth minutes of life. The incidence of the spontaneous delivery in the experimental group, was 78%; in 22% of these patients the forceps of relief was used. In 22 cases in which Ketamine was applied it were observed, the following events: elevation of the blood pressure (50%), perineum rigidness (18%), dreams and or hallucinations (18%), increase of the cardiac frequency (9%), apneia (4%) and nausea (4%). It was also observed an increase of uterine tonus an abolishment of abdominal press during the delivery labor, studied through the uterine electromyography register. It was noted after the Ketamine application a fall in the pH of the maternal peripherical venous blood, fetal skull blood and the pH of the blood of the umbilical vein. 22% of the newborns, from the experimental group, presented a depression in the first minute of life (Apgar less than or equals to 6). The pCO2 values in the blood of the umbilical artery were higher in the experimental group than in the control one. PMID:1241148

  10. Observational effects of magnetism in O stars: surface nitrogen abundances

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouret, J. -C.; collaboration, the MiMeS

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star tau Sco. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the sample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at C...

  11. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  12. Taking species abundance distributions beyond individuals

    Morlon, Helene; White, Ethan P.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Green, Jessica L.; Ostling, Annette; Alonso, David; Enquist, Brian J.; He, Fangliang; Hurlbert, Allen; Magurran, Anne E.; Maurer, Brian A.; McGill, Brian J.; Olff, Han; Storch, David; Zillio, Tommaso; Chave, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    The species abundance distribution (SAD) is one of the few universal patterns in ecology. Research on this fundamental distribution has primarily focused on the study of numerical counts, irrespective of the traits of individuals. Here we show that considering a set of Generalized Species Abundance

  13. Methanol abundance in low mass protostars

    Maret, S

    2004-01-01

    Methanol lines observations of a sample of low mass Class 0 protostars are presented. Using a 1D radiative transfer model, I show that several protostars have large abundance jumps in the inner hot and dense region of envelopes, probably because of thermal grain mantle evaporation. These abundances are compared with a grain surface chemistry model.

  14. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  15. Exploring the Potential of Nucleic Acid Bases in Organic Light Emitting Diodes.

    Gomez, Eliot F; Venkatraman, Vishak; Grote, James G; Steckl, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring biomolecules have increasingly found applications in organic electronics as a low cost, performance-enhancing, environmentally safe alternative. Previous devices, which incorporated DNA in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), resulted in significant improvements in performance. In this work, nucleobases (NBs), constituents of DNA and RNA polymers, are investigated for integration into OLEDs. NB small molecules form excellent thin films by low-temperature evaporation, enabling seamless integration into vacuum deposited OLED fabrication. Thin film properties of adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T), and uracil (U) are investigated. Next, their incorporation as electron-blocking (EBL) and hole-blocking layers (HBL) in phosphorescent OLEDs is explored. NBs affect OLED performance through charge transport control, following their electron affinity trend: G transport. C, T, and U have higher electron affinities (2.6-3.0 eV), transporting electrons and blocking hole transport. A-EBL-based OLEDs achieve current and external quantum efficiencies of 52 cd A(-1) and 14.3%, a ca. 50% performance increase over the baseline device with conventional EBL. The combination of enhanced performance, wide diversity of material properties, simplicity of use, and reduced cost indicate the promise of nucleobases for future OLED development. PMID:25503083

  16. Metabolic fate of poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid-based curcumin nanoparticles following oral administration

    Harigae T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Harigae,1 Kiyotaka Nakagawa,1 Taiki Miyazawa,2 Nao Inoue,3 Fumiko Kimura,1 Ikuo Ikeda,3 Teruo Miyazawa4,5 1Food and Biodynamic Chemistry Laboratory, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; 2Vascular Biology Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA; 3Laboratory of Food and Biomolecular Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, 4Food and Biotechnology Innovation Project, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, 5Food and Health Science Research Unit, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan Purpose: Curcumin (CUR, the main polyphenol in turmeric, is poorly absorbed and rapidly metabolized following oral administration, which severely curtails its bioavailability. Poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid-based CUR nanoparticles (CUR-NP have recently been suggested to improve CUR bioavailability, but this has not been fully verified. Specifically, no data are available about curcumin glucuronide (CURG, the major metabolite of CUR found in the plasma following oral administration of CUR-NP. Herein, we investigated the absorption and metabolism of CUR-NP and evaluated whether CUR-NP improves CUR bioavailability.Methods: Following oral administration of CUR-NP in rats, we analyzed the plasma and organ distribution of CUR and its metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. To elucidate the mechanism of increased intestinal absorption of CUR-NP, we prepared mixed micelles comprised of phosphatidylcholine and bile salts and examined the micellar solubility of CUR-NP. Additionally, we investigated the cellular incorporation of the resultant micelles into differentiated Caco-2 human intestinal cells.Results: Following in vivo administration of CUR-NP, CUR was effectively absorbed and present mainly as CURG in the plasma which contained significant amounts of the metabolite compared with

  17. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  18. Acid-base thermochemistry of gaseous oxygen and sulfur substituted amino acids (Ser, Thr, Cys, Met).

    Riffet, Vanessa; Frison, Gilles; Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Acid-base thermochemistry of isolated amino acids containing oxygen or sulfur in their side chain (serine, threonine, cysteine and methionine) have been examined by quantum chemical computations. Density functional theory (DFT) was used, with B3LYP, B97-D and M06-2X functionals using the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set for geometry optimizations and the larger 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set for energy computations. Composite methods CBS-QB3, G3B3, G4MP2 and G4 were applied to large sets of neutral, protonated and deprotonated conformers. Conformational analysis of these species, based on chemical approach and AMOEBA force field calculations, has been used to identify the lowest energy conformers and to estimate the population of conformers expected to be present at thermal equilibrium at 298 K. It is observed that G4, G4MP2, G3B3, CBS-QB3 composite methods and M06-2X DFT lead to similar conformer energies. Thermochemical parameters have been computed using either the most stable conformers or equilibrium populations of conformers. Comparison of experimental and theoretical proton affinities and Δ(acid)H shows that the G4 method provides the better agreement with deviations of less than 1.5 kJ mol(-1). From this point of view, a set of evaluated thermochemical quantities for serine, threonine, cysteine and methionine may be proposed: PA = 912, 919, 903, 938; GB = 878, 886, 870, 899; Δ(acid)H = 1393, 1391, 1396, 1411; Δ(acid)G = 1363, 1362, 1367, 1382 kJ mol(-1). This study also confirms that a non-negligible ΔpS° is associated with protonation of methionine and that the most acidic hydrogen of cysteine in the gas phase is that of the SH group. In several instances new conformers were identified thus suggesting a re-examination of several IRMPD spectra. PMID:21947236

  19. Metabolic fate of poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based curcumin nanoparticles following oral administration

    Harigae, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Taiki; Inoue, Nao; Kimura, Fumiko; Ikeda, Ikuo; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Curcumin (CUR), the main polyphenol in turmeric, is poorly absorbed and rapidly metabolized following oral administration, which severely curtails its bioavailability. Poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based CUR nanoparticles (CUR-NP) have recently been suggested to improve CUR bioavailability, but this has not been fully verified. Specifically, no data are available about curcumin glucuronide (CURG), the major metabolite of CUR found in the plasma following oral administration of CUR-NP. Herein, we investigated the absorption and metabolism of CUR-NP and evaluated whether CUR-NP improves CUR bioavailability. Methods Following oral administration of CUR-NP in rats, we analyzed the plasma and organ distribution of CUR and its metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. To elucidate the mechanism of increased intestinal absorption of CUR-NP, we prepared mixed micelles comprised of phosphatidylcholine and bile salts and examined the micellar solubility of CUR-NP. Additionally, we investigated the cellular incorporation of the resultant micelles into differentiated Caco-2 human intestinal cells. Results Following in vivo administration of CUR-NP, CUR was effectively absorbed and present mainly as CURG in the plasma which contained significant amounts of the metabolite compared with other organs. Thus, CUR-NP increased intestinal absorption of CUR rather than decreasing metabolic degradation and conversion to other metabolites. In vitro, CUR encapsulated in CUR-NP was solubilized in mixed micelles; however, whether the micelles contained CUR or CUR-NP had little influence on cellular uptake efficiency. Therefore, we suggest that the high solubilization capacity of CUR-NP in mixed micelles, rather than cellular uptake efficiency, explains the high intestinal absorption of CUR-NP in vivo. Conclusion These findings provide a better understanding of the bioavailability of CUR and CUR-NP following oral administration. To improve

  20. Correlation of acid-base properties of substituted polystyrene-azo-pyrocatechol and characteristics of their chelates with zirconium

    Acid-base and complexing properties of new synthesized polymeric chelate-forming sorbents (PCS) - substituents of polystyrene-azo-pyrocatechol - are investigated and quantitative correlations between pKOH of functional analytical group (FAG) of sorbent and Hammet constants for para-substituent and ΔpKOH-ΔpK50 correlations of zirconium chelate-forming and pKOH-lgKstb (Kstb - constant of stability of PCS complexes with zirconium) of polychelates to study regularities of effect of peculiarities of structure and acid-base properties of FAG on parameters of zirconium chemical sorption. Established correlations make it possible to predict quantitative physicochemical parameters of sorbents and zirconium chemisorption process with the aim of directed synthesis and application of PCS in concentrating processes

  1. Acid-base properties and chemical composition of the surface of the InSb-ZnTe system

    The acid-base properties and chemical composition of the surface of solid solutions and binary components of the InSb-ZnTe system were studied by the hydrolytic adsorption, nonaqueous conductometric titration, mechanochemistry, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry methods. The strength, nature, and concentration of acid centers were determined. Changes in the concentration of acid centers caused by surface exposure to CO and changes in the composition of the system were also studied. The mechanism of acid-base interactions was established. The chemical composition of the surface of system components exposed to air included adsorbed H2O molecules, OH- groups, hydrocarbon and oxo carbon compounds, and the products of surface atom oxidation. After thermal treatment in a vacuum, the composition of the surface approached the stoichiometric composition

  2. A clinical study to assess the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based procedure for treatment of premature ejaculation

    Littara, A; Palmieri, B.; Rottigni, V; Iannitti, T

    2013-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is a sexual debilitating condition affecting a large number of men worldwide and leading to important dysfunctions influencing the patients' affective and emotional life. Hyaluronic acid is a natural and safe compound that has been widely used not only in the aesthetic medicine clinic, but also for treatment of osteoarthritis. The present study shows the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based procedure for treatment of premature ejaculation. A hundred and ten male pati...

  3. Mechanical Behavior and Thermal Stability of Acid-Base Phosphate Cements and Composites Fabricated at Ambient Temperature

    Colorado, Henry A.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents the study of the mechanical behavior and thermal stability of acid-base phosphate cements (PCs) and composites fabricated at ambient temperature. These materials are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). Among other advantages of using PCs when compared with traditional cements are the better mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength), lower density, ultra-fast (controllable) setting time, controllable pH, and an environmentally ...

  4. Acid-base and copper-binding properties of three organic matter fractions isolated from a forest floor soil solution

    van Schaik, Joris W. J.; Kleja, Dan B.; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2010-01-01

    Vast amounts of knowledge about the proton- and metal-binding properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters have been obtained in studies on isolated humic and fulvic (hydrophobic) acids. Although macromolecular hydrophilic acids normally make up about one-third of DOM, their proton- and metal-binding properties are poorly known. Here, we investigated the acid-base and Cu-binding properties of the hydrophobic (fulvic) acid fraction and two hydrophilic fractions isolated from ...

  5. A different point of view: a continuous tracing of acid-base titration with fiber-optic sensor

    YALTKAYA, Şerafettin; KENDİR, Esra

    2013-01-01

    Our main aim was to investigate variations in the refractive index of a solution during chemical reaction. The variation of refractive index was measured through the entire acid--base titration process, especially near the equivalence point. To determine the equivalence point, the conductivity of the solution and the refractive index were measured simultaneously. In this preliminary study, sodium hydroxide and hydrochloric acid were used as the base and the acid solution, respective...

  6. Effect of intercalation of (HBO2)n and mechanochemical treatment on acid-base properties of kaolinite

    The effect of intercalation of (HBO2)n in kaolinite and mechanochemical treatment of mixtures of mineral with H3BO3 on acid-base properties of kaolinite surface was studied by potentiometric titration. It was found that intercalation of the mineral as well as mechanochemical treatment of the mixture depressed the acidity of the kaolinite surface, specifically at their combined effect. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Mixed acid-base disorders, hydroelectrolyte imbalance and lactate production in hypercapnic respiratory failure: the role of noninvasive ventilation.

    Claudio Terzano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypercapnic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD exacerbation in patients with comorbidities and multidrug therapy is complicated by mixed acid-base, hydro-electrolyte and lactate disorders. Aim of this study was to determine the relationships of these disorders with the requirement for and duration of noninvasive ventilation (NIV when treating hypercapnic respiratory failure. METHODS: Sixty-seven consecutive patients who were hospitalized for hypercapnic COPD exacerbation had their clinical condition, respiratory function, blood chemistry, arterial blood gases, blood lactate and volemic state assessed. Heart and respiratory rates, pH, PaO(2 and PaCO(2 and blood lactate were checked at the 1st, 2nd, 6th and 24th hours after starting NIV. RESULTS: Nine patients were transferred to the intensive care unit. NIV was performed in 11/17 (64.7% mixed respiratory acidosis-metabolic alkalosis, 10/36 (27.8% respiratory acidosis and 3/5 (60% mixed respiratory-metabolic acidosis patients (p = 0.026, with durations of 45.1 ± 9.8, 36.2 ± 8.9 and 53.3 ± 4.1 hours, respectively (p = 0.016. The duration of ventilation was associated with higher blood lactate (p<0.001, lower pH (p = 0.016, lower serum sodium (p = 0.014 and lower chloride (p = 0.038. Hyponatremia without hypervolemic hypochloremia occurred in 11 respiratory acidosis patients. Hypovolemic hyponatremia with hypochloremia and hypokalemia occurred in 10 mixed respiratory acidosis-metabolic alkalosis patients, and euvolemic hypochloremia occurred in the other 7 patients with this mixed acid-base disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Mixed acid-base and lactate disorders during hypercapnic COPD exacerbations predict the need for and longer duration of NIV. The combination of mixed acid-base disorders and hydro-electrolyte disturbances should be further investigated.

  8. Investigation of thermal and viscoelastic properties of polymers relevant to hot melt extrusion - III: Polymethacrylates and polymethacrylic acid based polymers.

    Tapan Parikh; Simerdeep Singh Gupta; Anuprabha Meena; Serajuddin, Abu T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Polymers are a major part of final medicinal drug products prepared by hot melt extrusion (HME). Therefore it is necessary to understand their behavior when subjected to heat and mechanical stresses during the development of the HME processes. The aim of this work was to generate a database of the physicochemical properties for polymethacrylates and polymethacrylic acid based polymers relevant to HME. All six polymers tested were amorphous and had < 2% moisture. In differential scanning calo...

  9. Feline hepatic biotransformation and transport mechanisms

    van Beusekom, C.D. van

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic biotransformation and drug transport mechanisms vary significantly between species. While these processes that determine largely the kinetic behavior of drugs have been studied abundantly in dogs, corresponding investigations in cats are hardly available, despite the increasing role of cats

  10. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases, Ribose, and Phosphate by Some Clay Minerals

    Hideo Hashizume

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate how clays might catalyze the formation of nucleosides, nucleotides and polynucleotides in the “RNA world”. The adsorption of purines, pyrimidines and nucleosides from aqueous solution to clay minerals is affected by suspension pH. With montmorillonite, adsorption is also influenced by the nature of the exchangeable cations. Here, we review the interactions of some clay minerals with RNA components.

  11. Noninvasive nucleic acid-based approaches to monitor placental health and predict pregnancy-related complications.

    Manokhina, Irina; Wilson, Samantha L; Robinson, Wendy P

    2015-10-01

    During pregnancy, the placenta releases a variety of nucleic acids (including deoxyribonucleic acid, messenger ribonucleic acid, or microribonucleic acids) either as a result of cell turnover or as an active messaging system between the placenta and cells in the maternal body. The profile of released nucleic acids changes with the gestational age and has been associated with maternal and fetal parameters. It also can directly reflect pathological changes in the placenta. Nucleic acids may therefore provide a rich source of novel biomarkers for the prediction of pregnancy complications. However, their utility in the clinical setting depends, first, on overcoming some technical considerations in their quantification, and, second, on developing a better understanding of the factors that influence their function and abundance. PMID:26428499

  12. Recent developments in nucleic acid based techniques for use in rumen manipulation

    Christopher McSweeney

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid-based techniques which can be used to characterise complex microbial communities without incubation are now being employed regularly in ruminant nutrition studies. Conventional culture-based methods for enumerating rumen microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, protozoa, and fungi have been superseded and are now used mainly to obtain pure isolates of novel organisms and reference strains that are required for the development and validation of the nucleic acid approaches. These reference strains are also essential for physiological studies of the lifestyle of the organisms as well as sources of genomic DNA and RNA that can be analysed for functional gene activity. The foundation of the molecular ecology techniques is 16S/18S rDNA sequence analysis which has provided a phylogenetically based classification scheme for enumeration and identification of microbial community members. The use of this marker gene in assays involving the use of single nucleic acid probes or primer sets is rapidly evolving to high throughput approaches such as microarray analysis and new generation sequencing technologies. While these analyses are very informative for determining the composition of the microbial community and monitoring changes in population size, they can only infer function based on these observations. The focus of nucleic acid research is now shifting to the functional analysis of the ecosystem which involves the measurement of functional genes and their expression in the predominant or specific members of the rumen microbial community. Functional gene studies are less developed than 16S rDNA-based analysis of community structure. Also for gene expression studies there are inherent problems involved in extracting high quality RNA from digesta, and priming cDNA synthesis from bacterial mRNA. This paper reviews nucleic acid based molecular methods which have recently been developed for studying the structure and function of rumen microbial

  13. Lab-on-a-Drone: Toward Pinpoint Deployment of Smartphone-Enabled Nucleic Acid-Based Diagnostics for Mobile Health Care

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a portable biochemical analysis platform for rapid field deployment of nucleic acid-based diagnostics using consumer-class quadcopter drones. This approach exploits the ability to isothermally perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a single heater, enabling the system to be operated using standard 5 V USB sources that power mobile devices (via battery, solar, or hand crank action). Time-resolved fluorescence detection and quantification is achieved using a smartphone camera and integrated image analysis app. Standard sample preparation is enabled by leveraging the drone’s motors as centrifuges via 3D printed snap-on attachments. These advancements make it possible to build a complete DNA/RNA analysis system at a cost of ∼$50 ($US). Our instrument is rugged and versatile, enabling pinpoint deployment of sophisticated diagnostics to distributed field sites. This capability is demonstrated by successful in-flight replication of Staphylococcus aureus and λ-phage DNA targets in under 20 min. The ability to perform rapid in-flight assays with smartphone connectivity eliminates delays between sample collection and analysis so that test results can be delivered in minutes, suggesting new possibilities for drone-based systems to function in broader and more sophisticated roles beyond cargo transport and imaging. PMID:26898247

  14. Lab-on-a-Drone: Toward Pinpoint Deployment of Smartphone-Enabled Nucleic Acid-Based Diagnostics for Mobile Health Care.

    Priye, Aashish; Wong, Season; Bi, Yuanpeng; Carpio, Miguel; Chang, Jamison; Coen, Mauricio; Cope, Danielle; Harris, Jacob; Johnson, James; Keller, Alexandra; Lim, Richard; Lu, Stanley; Millard, Alex; Pangelinan, Adriano; Patel, Neal; Smith, Luke; Chan, Kamfai; Ugaz, Victor M

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a portable biochemical analysis platform for rapid field deployment of nucleic acid-based diagnostics using consumer-class quadcopter drones. This approach exploits the ability to isothermally perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a single heater, enabling the system to be operated using standard 5 V USB sources that power mobile devices (via battery, solar, or hand crank action). Time-resolved fluorescence detection and quantification is achieved using a smartphone camera and integrated image analysis app. Standard sample preparation is enabled by leveraging the drone's motors as centrifuges via 3D printed snap-on attachments. These advancements make it possible to build a complete DNA/RNA analysis system at a cost of ∼$50 ($US). Our instrument is rugged and versatile, enabling pinpoint deployment of sophisticated diagnostics to distributed field sites. This capability is demonstrated by successful in-flight replication of Staphylococcus aureus and λ-phage DNA targets in under 20 min. The ability to perform rapid in-flight assays with smartphone connectivity eliminates delays between sample collection and analysis so that test results can be delivered in minutes, suggesting new possibilities for drone-based systems to function in broader and more sophisticated roles beyond cargo transport and imaging. PMID:26898247

  15. Development of the high-temperature, solid-state, electromotive force technique to study the thermodynamics of Lewis-acid-base transition metal alloys

    The basic principles of the Engel-Brewer theory of metals are summarized and illustrated. Definitions of words used to describe its fundamentals are clarified. The theory predicts the extreme stability of the Lewis-acid-base alloys. The thermodynamics of such alloys may be obtained through the use of oxide-electrolyte, electrochemical cells. Experimental techniques associated with the use of these cells are explained in detail. Much attention is given to the preparation and processing of the materials required. A selective review of the cell literature demonstrates frequent difficulty in obtaining accurate thermodynamic data. In an attempt to correct this situation, as well as to correct problems discovered in this work, the physical processes which create the cell emf are clearly identified. The fundamental understanding afforded by the resulting cell model implies the procedures used to both discover and eliminate errors. Those due to concentration overpotentials, reactive impurities in the gas phase, and interfacial reactions are carefully analyzed. The procedures used to test for and attain equilibrium in an alloy-oxide, powder compact are supported through identification of the transport processes that mediate equilibration

  16. Silicon abundances in population I giants

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Silicon to carbon abundance ratios for population I giants were determined from emission lines originating in the transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae. For effective temperatures larger than 6200 K we find a group of stars with increased silicon to carbon but normal nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios. These stars are presumably descendents from Ap stars with increased surface silicon to carbon abundance ratios. For G stars this anomaly disappears as is to be expected due to the increased depth of the convection zone and therefore deeper mixing which dilutes the surface overabundances. The disappearance of the abundance anomalies proves that the anomalous abundances observed for the F giants are indeed only a surface phenomenon. It also proves that the same holds for their progenitors, the Ap and Am stars, as has been generally believed. Unexplained is the increased silicon to carbon abundance ratio observed for several stars cooler than 5100 L. RS CVn and related stars do not show this increased abundance ratio. There are also some giants which appear to be enriched in carbon, perhaps due to a helium flash with some mixing if the star is a clump star.

  17. Gallic acid-based indanone derivative interacts synergistically with tetracycline by inhibiting efflux pump in multidrug resistant E. coli.

    Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Tiwari, Nimisha; Singh, Aastha; Kumar, Akhil; Roy, Sudeep; Negi, Arvind Singh; Pal, Anirban; Chanda, Debabrata; Sharma, Ashok; Darokar, Mahendra P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to study the synergy potential of gallic acid-based derivatives in combination with conventional antibiotics using multidrug resistant cultures of Escherichia coli. Gallic acid-based derivatives significantly reduced the MIC of tetracycline against multidrug resistant clinical isolate of E. coli. The best representative, 3-(3',4,'5'-trimethoxyphenyl)-4,5,6-trimethoxyindanone-1, an indanone derivative of gallic acid, was observed to inhibit ethidium bromide efflux and ATPase which was also supported by in silico docking. This derivative extended the post-antibiotic effect and decreased the mutation prevention concentration of tetracycline. This derivative in combination with TET was able to reduce the concentration of TNFα up to 18-fold in Swiss albino mice. This derivative was nontoxic and well tolerated up to 300 mg/kg dose in subacute oral toxicity study in mice. This is the first report of gallic acid-based indanone derivative as drug resistance reversal agent acting through ATP-dependent efflux pump inhibition. PMID:26658982

  18. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  19. CUMULATIVE OXYGEN ABUNDANCES OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Studying the global evolution of spiral galaxies requires determining their overall chemical compositions. However, since spirals tend to possess gradients in their chemical compositions, determining their overall chemical abundances poses a challenge. In this study, the framework for a newly proposed method for determining the overall oxygen abundance of a disk is established. By separately integrating the absolute amounts of hydrogen and oxygen out to large radii, the cumulative oxygen abundance is shown to approach an asymptotic value. In this manner, a reliable account of the overall chemical state of a disk is revealed.

  20. Lithium Abundance of Metal-poor Stars

    Hua-Wei Zhang; Gang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra have been obtained for 32 metal-poor stars. The equivalent widths of Li λ6708A were measured and the lithium abundances were derived. The average lithium abundance of 21 stars on the lithium plateau is 2.33±0.02 dex. The Lithium plateau exhibits a marginal trend along metallicity, dA(Li)/d[Fe/H] = 0.12±0.06, and no clear trend with the effective temperature. The trend indicates that the abundance of lithium plateau may not be primordial and that a part of the lithium was produced in Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE).

  1. Study of the primordial lithium abundance

    2011-01-01

    Lithium isotopes have attracted an intense interest because the abundance of both 6Li and 6Li from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the puzzles in nuclear astrophysics. Many investigations of both astrophysical observation and nucleosynthesis calculation have been carried out to solve the puzzle, but it is not solved yet. Several nuclear reactions involving lithium have been indirectly measured at China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing. The Standard BBN (SBBN) network calculations are then performed to investigate the primordial Lithium abundance. The result shows that these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the SBBN abundances of 6Li and 7Li.

  2. Abundance analysis of HD 22920 spectra

    Khalack, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The new spectropolarimetric observations of HD 22920 with ESPaDOnS at CFHT reveal a strong variability of its spectral line profiles with the phase of stellar rotation. We have obtained Teff = 13640 K, logg=3.72 for this star from the best fit of its nine Balmer line profiles. The respective model of stellar atmosphere was calculated to perform abundance analysis of HD 22920 using the spectra obtained for three different phases of stellar rotation. We have found that silicon and chromium abundances appear to be vertically stratified in the atmosphere of HD 22920. Meanwhile, silicon shows hints for a possible variability of vertical abundance stratification with rotational phase.

  3. Lewis Acid-Base Adduct Approach for High Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Kim, Hui-Seon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-02-16

    Since the first report on the long-term durable 9.7% solid-state perovskite solar cell employing methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3), mesoporous TiO2, and 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis[N,N-di(4-methoxyphenyl)amino]-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) in 2012, following the seed technologies on perovskite-sensitized liquid junction solar cells in 2009 and 2011, a surge of interest has been focused on perovskite solar cells due to superb photovoltaic performance and extremely facile fabrication processes. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells reached 21% in a very short period of time. Such an unprecedentedly high photovoltaic performance is due to the intrinsic optoelectronic property of organolead iodide perovskite material. Moreover, a high dielectric constant, sub-millimeter scale carrier diffusion length, an underlying ferroelectric property, and ion migration behavior can make organolead halide perovskites suitable for multifunctionality. Thus, besides solar cell applications, perovskite material has recently been applied to a variety fields of materials science such as photodetectors, light emitting diodes, lasing, X-ray imaging, resistive memory, and water splitting. Regardless of application areas, the growth of a well-defined perovskite layer with high crystallinity is essential for effective utilization of its excellent physicochemical properties. Therefore, an effective methodology for preparation of high quality perovskite layers is required. In this Account, an effective methodology for production of high quality perovskite layers is described, which is the Lewis acid-base adduct approach. In the solution process to form the perovskite layer, the key chemicals of CH3NH3I (or HC(NH2)2I) and PbI2 are used by dissolving them in polar aprotic solvents. Since polar aprotic solvents bear oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen, they can act as a Lewis base. In addition, the main group compound PbI2 is known to be a Lewis acid. Thus, PbI2 has a chance

  4. Iron abundance in the atmosphere of Arcturus

    Sheminova, V A

    2015-01-01

    Abundance of iron in the atmosphere of Arcturus has been determined from the profiles or regions of the profiles of the weak lines sensitive to iron abundance. The selected lines of Fe I and Fe II were synthesized with the MARCS theoretical models of the atmosphere. From the observed profiles of lines available with a high spectral resolution in the atlas by Hinkle and Wallace (2005), the values of the iron abundance $A = 6.95 \\pm 0.03$ and the radial-tangential macroturbulent velocity $5.6 \\pm 0.2$ km/s were obtained for Arcturus. The same physical quantities were found for the Sun as a star; they are $7.42 \\pm 0.02$ and $3.4 \\pm 0.3$ km/s, respectively. For Arcturus, the iron abundance relative to the solar one was determined with the differential method as [Fe/H] $=-0.48 \\pm 0.02$.

  5. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    Yang, G C; Spite, M; Chen, Y Q; Zhao, G; Zhang, B; Liu, G Q; Liu, Y J; Liu, N; Deng, L C; Spite, F; Hill, V; Zhang, C X

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures, surface gravities, metallicity and microturbulent velocity) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their light elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-ca...

  6. SWFSC/MMTD: Vaquita Abundance Survey 1997

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1997, the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) conducted a survey designed to estimate the abundance of vaquita, the Gulf of California harbor porpoise...

  7. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    California Department of Resources — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  8. Testing Relationships between Energy and Vertebrate Abundance

    Understanding what drives variation in the abundance of organisms is fundamental to evolutionary ecology and wildlife management. Yet despite its importance, there is still great uncertainty about the main factors influencing variation in vertebrate abundance across taxa. We believe valuable knowledge and increased predictive power could be gained by taking into account both the intrinsic factors of species and the extrinsic factors related to environmental surroundings in the commonly cited RQ model, which provides a simple conceptual framework valid at both the interspecific and the intraspecific scales. Approaches comparing studies undertaken at different spatial and taxonomic scales could be key to our ability to better predict abundance, and thanks to the increased availability of population size data, global geographic datasets, and improved comparative methods, there might be unprecedented opportunities to (1) gain a greater understanding of vertebrate abundance patterns and (2) test existing theories on free-ranging animals.

  9. Primordial Deuterium Abundance and Cosmic Baryon Density

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of cosmic abundances of the light elements with the density of baryonic stars and gas in the universe today provides a critical test of big bang theory and a powerful probe of the nature of dark matter. A new technique allows determination of cosmic deuterium abundances in quasar absorption clouds at large redshift, allowing a new test of big bang homogeneity in diverse, very distant systems. The first results of these studies are summarized, along with their implications. The ...

  10. Unprecedented accurate abundances: signatures of other Earths?

    Melendez, J.; Asplund, M.; Gustafsson, B.; Yong, D.; Ramirez, I.

    2009-01-01

    For more than 140 years the chemical composition of our Sun has been considered typical of solar-type stars. Our highly differential elemental abundance analysis of unprecedented accuracy (~0.01 dex) of the Sun relative to solar twins, shows that the Sun has a peculiar chemical composition with a ~20% depletion of refractory elements relative to the volatile elements in comparison with solar twins. The abundance differences correlate strongly with the condensation temperatures of the elements...

  11. Estimating whale abundance using sparse hydrophone arrays

    Harris, Danielle Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring has been used to investigate many aspects of marine mammal ecology, although methods to estimate absolute abundance and density using acoustic data have only been developed in recent years. The instrument configuration in an acoustic survey determines which abundance estimation methods can be used. Sparsely distributed arrays of instruments are useful because wide geographic areas can be covered. However, instrument spacing in sparse arrays is such that the same...

  12. Spatial scaling of species abundance distributions

    Borda-de-Água, Luís; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Pereira, Henrique M

    2012-01-01

    Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Ecography © 2012 Nordic Society Oikos. Species abundance distributions are an essential tool in describing the biodiversity of ecological communities. We now know that their shape changes as a function of the size of area sampled. Here we analyze the scaling properties of species abundance distributions by using the moments of the logarithmically transformed number of individuals. We find that the moments as a function of area size are well fitted by power law...

  13. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    Magurran, A.E; Henderson, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in l...

  14. Solar Models with New Low Metal Abundances

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the photospheric abundances of the Sun had been revised several times by many observers. The standard solar models constructed with the new low-metal abundances disagree with helioseismic results and detected neutrino fluxes. The solar model problem has puzzled some stellar physicists for more than 10 years. Rotation, enhanced diffusion, convection overshoot, and magnetic fields are used to reconcile the new abundances with helioseismology. The too low helium subsurface abundance in enhanced diffusion models can be improved by the mixing caused by rotation and magnetic fields. The problem of the depth of the convective zone in rotating models can be resolved by convection overshoot. Consequently, the Asplund–Grevesse–Sauval rotation model including overshooting (AGSR) reproduces the seismically inferred sound-speed and density profiles and the convection zone depth as well as the Grevesse & Sauval model computed before. But this model fails to reproduce the surface helium abundance, which is 0.2393 (2.6σ away from the seismic value), and neutrino fluxes. The magnetic model called AGSM keeps the agreement of the AGSR and improves the prediction of the surface helium abundance. The observed separation ratios r02 and r13 are reasonably reproduced by AGSM. Moreover, neutrino fluxes calculated by this model are not far from the detected neutrino fluxes and the predictions of previous works.

  15. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  16. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  17. Modelling Void Abundance in Modified Gravity

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F

    2016-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f(R) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surv...

  18. Response of radioactive trace metals to acid-base titrations in controlled experimental ecosystems

    Radiotracer experiments were carried out in 20 enclosures located in two lakes at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario, to study pathways of trace metal removal from the water column of shallow lakes. Two removal mechanisms were characterized: (1) sorption to and subsequent transport with falling particles and (2) direct adsorption to surface sediments. Our approach was to measure independently the kinetics of radiotracer sorption, fluxes and concentrations for particles, particle settling velocities, and the equivalent stagnant boundary film. Our radiotracer results enabled us to test the sensitivity of the tracer removal rates on these rate-determining processes using a numerical transport model. Acid titrations of whole ecosystems revealed that some trace metals (e.g. Mn, Co and Zn) can diffuse back to the water column as the pH is lowered from 6.5 to 4,8 after 18 d, while others remain tightly bound, (e.g. Sn, Fe, Se, Cr, Ag, and Hg isotopes). Subsequent CaCO3 additions to bring back the pH to its original value restored the initial removal conditions for acid-sensitive radiotracers, indicating that the pH sensitivity is reversible. Transport parameters for particle-related pathways or diffusive pathways across the sediment-water interface obtained from our enclosure experiments were used to predict the removal rats of particle-reactive 60Co and the diffusive pathway tracer 134Cs observed in earlier experiments where radiotracers were added to whole lakes or to larger enclosures. (Author) (19 refs., 9 tabs., 11 figs.)

  19. Group-scale asymmetric abundance structures in the NGC 533 group

    By performing a two dimensional spectral analysis on the galaxy group NGC 533 with high-quality Chandra data, we find that the metal abundance distribution in this group is anisotropic. In the area around 2.5' from the center, we find two concentrations of high abundance structures, in which the abundances are significantly higher than their surrounding regions at the 90% confidence level. We find that the total iron mass in these two regions agrees with the iron mass synthesized in the central dominant galaxy in 0.12+0.08−0.03 Gyr. The double-sided configuration of the high abundance structure, together with the point-like radio emission in the center suggests that the abundance structures could have been transported from the center to their present positions by active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We further calculate the energy required for transport, and find that it could have been supplied during an AGN period. However, considering that this group is reported to have experienced a recent merger, the possibility that this merger is responsible for the abundance structures still cannot be excluded. (research papers)

  20. ADVANCEMENT OF NUCLEIC ACID-BASED TOOLS FOR MONITORING IN SITU REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION

    Vangelas, K; ELIZABETH EDWARDS, E; FRANK LOFFLER, F; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-11-17

    Regulatory protocols generally recognize that destructive processes are the most effective mechanisms that support natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents. In many cases, these destructive processes will be biological processes and, for chlorinated compounds, will often be reductive processes that occur under anaerobic conditions. The existing EPA guidance (EPA, 1998) provides a list of parameters that provide indirect evidence of reductive dechlorination processes. In an effort to gather direct evidence of these processes, scientists have identified key microorganisms and are currently developing tools to measure the abundance and activity of these organisms in subsurface systems. Drs. Edwards and Luffler are two recognized leaders in this field. The research described herein continues their development efforts to provide a suite of tools to enable direct measures of biological processes related to the reductive dechlorination of TCE and PCE. This study investigated the strengths and weaknesses of the 16S rRNA gene-based approach to characterizing the natural attenuation capabilities in samples. The results suggested that an approach based solely on 16S rRNA may not provide sufficient information to document the natural attenuation capabilities in a system because it does not distinguish between strains of organisms that have different biodegradation capabilities. The results of the investigations provided evidence that tools focusing on relevant enzymes for functionally desired characteristics may be useful adjuncts to the 16SrRNA methods.

  1. Humic acids-based hierarchical porous carbons as high-rate performance electrodes for symmetric supercapacitors.

    Qiao, Zhi-jun; Chen, Ming-ming; Wang, Cheng-yang; Yuan, Yun-cai

    2014-07-01

    Two kinds of hierarchical porous carbons (HPCs) with specific surface areas of 2000 m(2)g(-1) were synthesized using leonardite humic acids (LHA) or biotechnology humic acids (BHA) precursors via a KOH activation process. Humic acids have a high content of oxygen-containing groups which enabled them to dissolve in aqueous KOH and facilitated the homogeneous KOH activation. The LHA-based HPC is made up of abundant micro-, meso-, and macropores and in 6M KOH it has a specific capacitance of 178 F g(-1) at 100 Ag(-1) and its capacitance retention on going from 0.05 to 100 A g(-1) is 64%. In contrast, the BHA-based HPC exhibits a lower capacitance retention of 54% and a specific capacitance of 157 F g(-1) at 100 A g(-1) which is due to the excessive micropores in the BHA-HPC. Moreover, LHA-HPC is produced in a higher yield than BHA-HPC (51 vs. 17 wt%). PMID:24851713

  2. Ethanesulfonic acid-based esterification of industrial acidic crude palm oil for biodiesel production.

    Hayyan, Adeeb; Mjalli, Farouq S; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Hayyan, Maan; AlNashef, Inas M; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M; Al-Saadi, Mohammed A

    2011-10-01

    An industrial grade acidic crude palm oil (ACPO) pre-treatment process was carried out using ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) as a catalyst in the esterification reaction. ESA was used in different dosages to reduce free fatty acid (FFA) to a minimum level for the second stage of biodiesel production via alkaline transesterification reaction. Different process operating conditions were optimized such as ESA dosage (0.25-3.5% wt/wt), methanol to ACPO molar ratio (1:1-20:1), reaction temperature (40-70 °C), and reaction time (3-150 min). This study revealed the potential use of abundant quantities of ACPO from oil palm mills for biodiesel production. The lab scale results showed the effectiveness of the pre-treatment process using ESA catalyst. Three consecutive catalyst recycling runs were achieved without significant degradation in its performance. Second and third reuse runs needed more reaction time to achieve the target level of FFA content. Esterification and transesterification using ESA and KOH respectively is proposed for biodiesel industrial scale production. The produced biodiesel meets the international standards specifications for biodiesel fuel (EN 14214 and ASTM D6751). PMID:21855329

  3. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  4. Linking species abundance distributions in numerical abundance and biomass through simple assumptions about community structure

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E

    2010-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) are widely used as a tool for summarizing ecological communities but may have different shapes, depending on the currency used to measure species importance. We develop a simple plotting method that links SADs in the alternative currencies of numerical abundance and biomass and is underpinned by testable predictions about how organisms occupy physical space. When log numerical abundance is plotted against log biomass, the species lie within an approximat...

  5. Exercise training of late-pregnant and nonpregnant dairy cows affects physical fitness and acid-base homeostasis.

    Davidson, J A; Beede, D K

    2009-02-01

    The objective was to determine if exercise training improves physical fitness of nonlactating, late-pregnant and nonpregnant multiparous Holstein cows and alters acid-base homeostasis during an exercise test on a treadmill. Twenty-six pairs (each pair having 1 late-pregnant and 1 nonpregnant) of cows were assigned to treatments of exercise training or no exercise. Exercise training was walking (1.25 to 1.5 h at 3.25 km/h) every other day in an outdoor mechanical walker for 70 d. Cows completed treadmill exercise tests on d 0, 30, and 60 of the experiment or about d 70, 40, and 10 before expected parturition of the pregnant cow of each pair. On d 0, physical fitness was similar among all cows based on durations of treadmill tests, heart rates, and acid-base measurements at given workloads (21.1 +/- 0.6 min; 144 +/- 2.2 beats per min; plasma lactate 3.1 +/- 1.9 mmol/L; and venous blood pH 7.44 +/- 0.0035, respectively). After 60 d of training, exercised cows walked longer during treadmill exercise tests compared with nonexercised cows (23.7 vs. 18.3 +/- 0.85 min, respectively), indicating greater physical fitness (pooled across pregnancy status). Heart rates and plasma lactate concentrations at given workloads were less (144 vs. 156 +/- 2.7 beats per min; and 1.4 vs. 3.2 +/- 0.24 mmol/L for exercised compared with nonexercised cows, respectively). Additionally, exercised cows more effectively maintained acid-base homeostasis during treadmill tests compared with nonexercised cows. Metabolic, endocrine, and nutritional demands associated with late pregnancy did not affect responses differently to exercise training for late-pregnant compared with nonpregnant cows. Overall, exercise training of late-pregnant and nonpregnant cows for 60 d improved physical fitness. PMID:19164665

  6. Single Sodium Pyruvate Ingestion Modifies Blood Acid-Base Status and Post-Exercise Lactate Concentration in Humans

    Robert A. Olek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of a single sodium pyruvate ingestion on a blood acid-base status and exercise metabolism markers. Nine active, but non-specifically trained, male subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. One hour prior to the exercise, subjects ingested either 0.1 g·kg−1 of body mass of a sodium pyruvate or placebo. The capillary blood samples were obtained at rest, 60 min after ingestion, and then three and 15 min after completing the workout protocol to analyze acid-base status and lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glucose concentrations. The pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation and the heart rate were measured during the exercise at a constant power output, corresponding to ~90% O2max. The blood pH, bicarbonate and the base excess were significantly higher after sodium pyruvate ingestion than in the placebo trial. The blood lactate concentration was not different after the ingestion, but the post-exercise was significantly higher in the pyruvate trial (12.9 ± 0.9 mM than in the placebo trial (10.6 ± 0.3 mM, p < 0.05 and remained elevated (nonsignificant after 15 min of recovery. The blood pyruvate, alanine and glucose concentrations, as well as the overall pulmonary gas exchange during the exercise were not affected by the pyruvate ingestion. In conclusion, the sodium pyruvate ingestion one hour before workout modified the blood acid-base status and the lactate production during the exercise.

  7. Influence of different storage times and temperatures on blood gas and acid-base balance in ovine venous blood

    H.A. Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effects of storage temperature and time on blood gas and acid-base balance of ovine venous blood. Ten clinically healthy sheep were used in this study. A total number of 30 blood samples, were divided into three different groups, and were stored in a refrigerator adjusted to +4 ºC (Group I, n = 10, at RT of about 22-25 ºC (Group II, n = 10 and in an incubator adjusted to 37 ºC (Group III, n = 10 for up to 48 h. Blood samples were analysed for blood gas and acid-base indices at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of storage. In comparison to the baseline value (0, there were significant decreases of blood pH of samples stored at RT and in the incubator after 1 h (p<0.05, the pH value of refrigerated blood samples exhibited insignificant changes during the study (p<0.05. Mean values of pCO2 showed a significant increase in Group I and Group III after 1 h then a progressive decrease after 12 h in all Groups. Mean pO2 values were significantly higher for Group I after 2 h and for Groups II and III after 1 h (p<0.05. In general, base excess decreased significantly for all the groups during the study especially in Groups II and III. In comparison with baseline values, in all groups, bicarbonate (HCO3 increased between 1 h and 6 h (p<0.05, and later decreased at the end of the study (p<0.05. In conclusion, status of acid-base indices of the samples stored at refrigerator and RT were found within normal reference range and it may be of clinical diagnostic use for up to 6 h.

  8. Regular Patterns for Proteome-Wide Distribution of Protein Abundance across Species

    Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Wu, Songfeng; Zhu, Yunping; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Pengyuan; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2012-01-01

    A proteome of the bio-entity, including cell, tissue, organ, and organism, consists of proteins of diverse abundance. The principle that determines the abundance of different proteins in a proteome is of fundamental significance for an understanding of the building blocks of the bio-entity. Here, we report three regular patterns in the proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species such as human, mouse, fly, worm, yeast, and bacteria: in most cases, protein abundance is positively correlated with the protein's origination time or sequence conservation during evolution; it is negatively correlated with the protein's domain number and positively correlated with domain coverage in protein structure, and the correlations became stronger during the course of evolution; protein abundance can be further stratified by the function of the protein, whereby proteins that act on material conversion and transportation (mass category) are more abundant than those that act on information modulation (information category). Thus, protein abundance is intrinsically related to the protein's inherent characters of evolution, structure, and function. PMID:22427835

  9. Regular patterns for proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species.

    Fan Zhong

    Full Text Available A proteome of the bio-entity, including cell, tissue, organ, and organism, consists of proteins of diverse abundance. The principle that determines the abundance of different proteins in a proteome is of fundamental significance for an understanding of the building blocks of the bio-entity. Here, we report three regular patterns in the proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species such as human, mouse, fly, worm, yeast, and bacteria: in most cases, protein abundance is positively correlated with the protein's origination time or sequence conservation during evolution; it is negatively correlated with the protein's domain number and positively correlated with domain coverage in protein structure, and the correlations became stronger during the course of evolution; protein abundance can be further stratified by the function of the protein, whereby proteins that act on material conversion and transportation (mass category are more abundant than those that act on information modulation (information category. Thus, protein abundance is intrinsically related to the protein's inherent characters of evolution, structure, and function.

  10. Good abundances from bad spectra; 1, techniques

    Bryn, J; Wyse, R F G; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F G

    1995-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract true iron abundances and surface gravities from spectra of the type provided by the multiple-object fibre-fed spectroscopic radial-velocity surveys underway with 2dF, HYDRA, NESSIE, and the forthcoming Sloan survey. Our method is optimised for low S/N, intermediate resolution blue spectra of G stars. Spectroscopic indices sensitive to iron abundance and gravity are defined from a set of narrow (few Angstrom) wavelength intervals, and calibrated using synthetic spectra. We have also defined a single abundance indicator which is able to provide useful iron abundance information from spectra having S/N ratios as low as 10 per Angstrom. The theoretical basis and calibration using synthetic spectra are described in this paper. The empirical calibration of these techniques by application to observational data is described in Jones, Wyse and Gilmore (PASP July 1995). The technique provides precise iron abundances, with zero-point correct to \\sim 0.1 dex, and is reliable, with ...

  11. Oxygen abundance maps of CALIFA galaxies

    Zinchenko, I A; Grebel, E K; Sanchez, S F; Vilchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    We construct maps of the oxygen abundance distribution across the disks of 88 galaxies using CALIFA data release 2 (DR2) spectra. The position of the center of a galaxy (coordinates on the plate) were also taken from the CALIFA DR2. The galaxy inclination, the position angle of the major axis, and the optical radius were determined from the analysis of the surface brightnesses in the SDSS $g$ and $r$ bands of the photometric maps of SDSS data release 9. We explore the global azimuthal abundance asymmetry in the disks of the CALIFA galaxies and the presence of a break in the radial oxygen abundance distribution. We found that there is no significant global azimuthal asymmetry for our sample of galaxies, i.e., the asymmetry is small, usually lower than 0.05 dex. The scatter in oxygen abundances around the abundance gradient has a comparable value, $\\lesssim 0.05$ dex. A significant (possibly dominant) fraction of the asymmetry can be attributed to the uncertainties in the geometrical parameters of these galaxie...

  12. Abundances of Molecular Species in Barnard 68

    Francesco, J D; Welch, W J; Bergin, E A; Francesco, James Di; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Welch, William J.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2002-01-01

    Abundances for 5 molecules (C18O, CS, NH3, H2CO, and C3H2) and 1 molecular ion (N2H+) and upper limits for the abundances of 1 molecule (13CO) and 1 molecular ion (HCO+) are derived for gas within the Bok globule Barnard 68 (B68). The abundances were determined using our own BIMA millimeter interferometer data and single-dish data gathered from the literature, in conjunction with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Since B68 is the only starless core to have its density structure strongly constrained via extinction mapping, a major uncertainty has been removed from these determinations. All abundances for B68 are lower than those derived for translucent and cold dense clouds, but perhaps only significantly for N2H+, NH3, and C3H2. Depletion of CS toward the extinction peak of B68 is hinted at by the large offset between the extinction peak and the position of maximum CS line brightness. Abundances derived here for C18O and N2H+ are consistent with other, recently determined values at positions observed in...

  13. Yarrowia lipolytica as an oleaginous cell factory platform for the production of fatty acid-based biofuel and bioproducts

    Ali eAbghari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s biotechnologists seek new biocatalysts to meet the growing demand for the bioproducts. This review critically evaluates the potential use of Y. lipolytica as an oleaginous cell factory platform. This yeast has undergone extensive modifications for converting a wide range of hydrophobic and hydrophilic biomass, including alkane, oil, glycerol and sugars to fatty acid-based products. This article highlights challenges in the development of this platform and provides an overview of strategies to enhance its potential in the sustainable production of biodiesel, functional dietary lipid compounds and other value-added oleochemical compounds. Future applications of the recombinant Y. lipolytica platform are also discussed.

  14. An exploratory study into students' conceptual understanding of acid/base principles associated with chemical buffer systems

    MacGowan, Catherine Elizabeth

    The overall objective of this research project was to provide an insight into students' conceptual understanding of acid/base principles as it relates to the comprehension and correct application of scientific concepts during a problem-solving activity. The difficulties experienced learning science and in developing appropriate problem-solving strategies most likely are predetermined by students' existing conceptual and procedural knowledge constructs; with the assimilation of newly acquired knowledge hindering or aiding the learning process. Learning chemistry requires a restructuring of content knowledge which will allow the individual to assemble and to integrate his/her own perception of science with instructional knowledge. The epistemology of constructivism, the theoretical grounding for this research project, recognizes the student's role as an active participant in the learning process. The study's design was exploratory in nature and descriptive in design. The problem-solving activity, the preparation of a chemical buffer solution at pH of 9, was selected and modified to reflect and meet the study's objective. Qualitative research methods (i.e., think aloud protocols, retrospective interviews, survey questionnaires such as the Scale of Intellectual Development (SID), and archival data sources) were used in the collection and assessment of data. Given its constructivist grounding, simplicity, and interpretative view of knowledge acquisition and learning of collegiate aged individuals, the Perry Intellectual and Ethical Development Model (1970) was chosen as the applied model for evaluation student cognition. The study's participants were twelve traditional college age students from a small, private liberal arts college. All participants volunteered for the project and had completed or were completing a general college chemistry course at the time of the project. Upon analysis of the data the following observations and results were noted: (1) students

  15. Effect of modification with scandium oxide on the hydroxyl coating and acid-base properties of the zirconium dioxide surface

    Physicochemical properties of Sc2O3 - ZrO2 system surface were studied by the method of IR spectroscopy, surface properties of the samples prepared by coprecipitation and by impregnation method were compared. Influence of scandium oxide concentration as a modifying component on hydroxylic coating and acid-base properties of zirconium dioxide surface was ascertained. It is shown that zirconium dioxide modification by scandium does not give rise to the appearance of new types of Lewis acid centers. Modifying effect of scandium was compared to that of yttrium and lanthanum

  16. The Importance of the Ionic Product for Water to Understand the Physiology of the Acid-Base Balance in Humans

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Natalia Carneiro-Freire; Cristóbal Donapetry-García; Eva Rañal-Muíño; Yosua López-Pereiro

    2014-01-01

    Human plasma is an aqueous solution that has to abide by chemical rules such as the principle of electrical neutrality and the constancy of the ionic product for water. These rules define the acid-base balance in the human body. According to the electroneutrality principle, plasma has to be electrically neutral and the sum of its cations equals the sum of its anions. In addition, the ionic product for water has to be constant. Therefore, the plasma concentration of hydrogen ions depends on th...

  17. Transport policy

    1980-01-01

    Transport is a fundamental component of all modern economies. Transport Policy presents a wide ranging collection of previously published articles which aim to provide the reader with an understanding of the main elements of transport policy.

  18. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community.

  19. Estimating the relationship between abundance and distribution

    Rindorf, Anna; Lewy, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies investigate the relationship between abundance and distribution using indices reflecting one of the three aspects of distribution: proportion of area occupied, aggregation, and geographical range. Using simulations and analytical derivations, we examine whether these indices...... based on Euclidean distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution. Only the proportion of structurally empty areas, Lloyds index, and indices of the distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution are unbiased at all levels of abundance. The remaining indices generate...... relationships between abundance and distribution even in cases where no underlying relationships exists, although the problem decreases for measures derived from Lorenz curves when samples contain more than four individuals on average. To illustrate the problem, the indices are applied to juvenile North Sea cod...

  20. Unprecedented accurate abundances: signatures of other Earths?

    Melendez, J; Gustafsson, B; Yong, D; Ramírez, I

    2009-01-01

    For more than 140 years the chemical composition of our Sun has been considered typical of solar-type stars. Our highly differential elemental abundance analysis of unprecedented accuracy (~0.01 dex) of the Sun relative to solar twins, shows that the Sun has a peculiar chemical composition with a ~20% depletion of refractory elements relative to the volatile elements in comparison with solar twins. The abundance differences correlate strongly with the condensation temperatures of the elements. A similar study of solar analogs from planet surveys shows that this peculiarity also holds in comparisons with solar analogs known to have close-in giant planets while the majority of solar analogs without detected giant planets show the solar abundance pattern. The peculiarities in the solar chemical composition can be explained as signatures of the formation of terrestrial planets like our own Earth.

  1. Radiation Transport

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  2. Hyaluronic acid based hydrogel system for soft tissue regeneration and drug delivery

    Jha, Amit Kumar

    We have developed hyaluronic acid (HA)-based, biomimetic hydrogel matrices that are hierarchically structured, mechanically robust and biologically active. Specifically, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) with controlled sizes, defined porosity, and improved stability were synthesized using different inverse emulsion systems and crosslinking chemistries. The resultant particles either contained residual functional groups or were rendered reactive by subsequent chemical modifications. HA-based doubly crosslinked networks (DXNs) were synthesized via covalent crosslinking of HA HGPs with soluble HA macromers carrying mutually reactive functional groups. These hybrid matrices are hierarchical in nature, consisting of densely crosslinked HGPs integrated in a loosely connected secondary matrix. Their mechanical properties and degradation kinetics can be readily tuned by varying the particle size, functional group density, intra- and interparticle crosslinking. To improve the biological functions of HA HGPs, perlecan domain I (PlnDI), a basement membrane proteoglycan that has strong affinity for various heparin binding growth factors (HBGFs), was successfully conjugated to the particles through the core protein via a flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. The immobilized PlnDI maintains its ability to bind bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2) and modulates its in vitro release. A similar, sustained release of BMP-2 was achieved by encapsulating BMP-2-loaded HGPs within a photocrosslinked HA matrix. When encapsulated in HA DXNs, primary bovine chondrocytes were able to maintain their phenotype, proliferate readily and produce abundant glycosaminoglycan. Finally, cell-adhesive HA DXNs were fabricated by encapsulating gelatin-decorated HA HGPs in a secondary HA matrix. Human MSCs were shown to adhere to the composite matrix through the focal adhesion sites clustered on particle surface. The cell-adhesive composite matrices supported hMSC proliferation and migration into

  3. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    Krugler, J. A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5×106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by mass to range from 0.9 to 1.1 M⊙. They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H]=-0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and the Gecko spectrograph on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis and were analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, metallicity, and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to decrease linearly with metallicity down to [Fe/H]˜-4.0 with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread ˜1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K.

  4. Separate Determination of Borohydride, Borate, Hydroxide, and Carbonate in the Borohydride Fuel Cell by Acid-Base and Iodometric Potentiometric Titration

    Churikov, A. V.; S. L. Shmakov; Romanova, V. O.; Zapsis, K. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Ivanishchev, A. V.; Churikov, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    A methodology for quantitative chemical analysis of the complex “borohydride-borate-hydroxide-carbonate-water” mixtures used as fuel in the borohydride fuel cell was developed and optimized. The methodology includes the combined usage of the acid-base and iodometric titration methods. The acid-base titration method, which simultaneously uses the technique of differentiation and computer simulation of titration curves, allows one to determine the contents of hydroxide (alkali), carbonate, and ...

  5. Metal Abundances in Hot DO White Dwarfs

    Werner, K; Ringat, E; Kruk, J W

    2012-01-01

    The relatively high abundance of carbon in the hot DO white dwarf RE0503-289 indicates that it is a descendant of a PG1159 star. This is corroborated by the recent detection of the extremely high abundances of trans-Fe elements which stem from s-process nucleosynthesis in the precursor AGB star, dredged up by a late He-shell flash and possibly amplified by radiative levitation. On the other hand, the hottest known DO white dwarf, KPD0005+5106, cannot have evolved from a PG1159 star but represents a distinct He-rich evolutionary sequence that possibly originates from a binary white dwarf merger.

  6. Structure and Order of Phosphonic Acid-Based Self-Assembled Based Self-Assembled

    Dubey, M.; Weidner, T; Gamble, L; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on oxide surfaces have recently seen increased use in electrical and biological sensor applications. The reliability and reproducibility of these sensors require good molecular organization in these SAMs. In this regard, packing, order, and alignment in the SAMs is important, as it influences the electron transport measurements. In this study, we examine the order of hydroxyl- and methyl-terminated phosphonate films deposited onto silicon oxide surfaces by the tethering by aggregation and growth method using complementary, state-of-art surface characterization tools. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy are used to study the order of the phosphonate SAMs in vacuum and under aqueous conditions, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry results show that these samples form chemically intact monolayer phosphonate films. NEXAFS and SFG spectroscopy showed that molecular order exists in the octadecylphosphonic acid and 11-hydroxyundecylphosphonic acid SAMs. The chain tilt angles in these SAMs were approximately 37{sup o} and 45{sup o}, respectively.

  7. Acid base status in swamp buffaloes (Bubalus Bubalis fed rice straw and concentrate with addition of sodium

    G Joseph

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the addition of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 on acid-base status in swamp buffaloes, Three fistulated buffaloes were each introduced to dietary treatment control diett (50% rice straw + 50% concentrate, control + \\0% NaHCO3 and diet control + 10% Na2CO3 in two times Latin Square Design. The diets contained 9,7% crude protein and 53% TDN to achieve maintenance requirements of the animals. Parameters measured include (l Fed consumption, water consumption and urine volume. (2 pH in rumen fluid, saliva, bLood and urine, (3 natrium mineral content in rumen fluid, saliva, blood and urine. The results of the experiment showed higher pH in the rumen fluid, saliva, blood and urine of buffaloes due to supplementation of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3, Water consumption and urine volume was significanly increased as the effect of Na supplement. The acid-base status of buffaloes was apparently normal in all animals.

  8. Studies of Modification of Zeolite by Tandem Acid-Base Treatments and its Adsorptions Performance Towards Thorium

    G. Nurliati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical zeolite was prepared from natural zeolite using tandem acid-base treatments and applied as adsorbent for Th(IV removal. Natural zeolite occurred naturally as microporous material. It was modified using two familiar methods simultaneously, dealumination and desilication techniques, to change its micropore size into hierarchical pores.. Extensive characterization of both natural and modified zeolites were conducted using XRD, BET, SEM-EDS, and AAS. XRD Patterns of raw, pre-treated , and acid-base tandem modified zeolites show that the modification process has not changed the crystal properties of this material. However, the Si/Al ratio is increased from 6.688 to 11.401 for Na-zeolite (NaZ and modified zeolite, ZA2B respectively. The surface area is increased from 125.4 m2/g (NaZ to 216.8 m2/g (ZA2B, indicative of the creation of mesopore in addition to naturally micropore structure. The application of these zeolite materials as adsorbent were carried out using solution of 50 ppm Th4+measured using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The UV-Vis result shows that the modified zeolite (ca. 10 mg has higher adsorption capacity than natural zeolite. The adsorption process does not fit into Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm and the adsorption capacity of this material increase from 909 mg/g to 2000 mg/g for NaZ and ZA2B respectively.

  9. Vanadium oxides supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors: the effect of acid base properties on the oxidation of isopropanol

    Vanadium oxide supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors was studied in the oxidation of isopropanol. Hydrotalcites with different y = Mg/Al ratios were synthesized by the method of coprecipitation nitrates of Mg and Al cations with K2CO3 as precipitant. The decomposition of these hydrotalcite precursors at 450 deg C yielded homogeneous MgyAlOx mixed oxides that contain the Al+3 cations totally incorporated into the MgO framework. The materials were characterized by chemical analysis, BET superficial area, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and the reaction of isopropanol, a probe molecule used to evaluate the acid-base properties. The results of TPR showed that the reducibility of V+5 decreased with the increase in magnesium loading in catalysts. The X-ray diffraction patterns of Al-rich hydrotalcite precursors showed the presence of crystalline phases of brucite and gibbsite. It was shown that chemical composition, texture, acid-base properties of the active sites and also Mg/Al ratio strongly affect the formation of the products in the oxidation of isopropanol. The Al-rich catalysts were much more active than the Mg-rich ones, converting isopropanol mainly to propylene. (author)

  10. Vanadium oxides supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors: the effect of acid-base properties on the oxidation of isopropanol

    D. M. Meira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium oxide supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors was studied in the oxidation of isopropanol. Hydrotalcites with different y = Mg/Al ratios were synthesized by the method of coprecipitation nitrates of Mg and Al cations with K2CO3 as precipitant. The decomposition of these hydrotalcite precursors at 450°C yielded homogeneous MgyAlOx mixed oxides that contain the Al+3 cations totally incorporated into the MgO framework. The materials were characterized by chemical analysis, BET superficial area, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR and the reaction of isopropanol, a probe molecule used to evaluate the acid-base properties. The results of TPR showed that the reducibility of V+5 decreased with the increase in magnesium loading in catalysts. The X-ray diffraction patterns of Al-rich hydrotalcite precursors showed the presence of crystalline phases of brucite and gibbsite. It was shown that chemical composition, texture, acid-base properties of the active sites and also Mg/Al ratio strongly affect the formation of the products in the oxidation of isopropanol. The Al-rich catalysts were much more active than the Mg-rich ones, converting isopropanol mainly to propylene.

  11. Acid-base equilibrium in aqueous solutions of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid as studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Gryff-Keller, A.; Kraska-Dziadecka, A.

    2011-12-01

    13C NMR spectra of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid in aqueous solutions of various acidities and for various solute concentrations have been recorded and interpreted. The spectra recorded at pH = 2 and below contain the signals of the neutral solute molecule exclusively, while the ones recorded at pH = 7 and above only the signals of the appropriate anion, which has been confirmed by theoretical GIAO-DFT calculations. The signals in the spectra recorded for solutions of pH acid-base equilibrium. The kinetic data determined this way have been used to clarify the mechanisms of these processes. The numerical analysis has shown that under the investigated conditions deprotonation of the neutral solute molecules undergoes not only via a simple transfer of the C-H proton to water molecules but also through a process with participation of the barbiturate anions. Moreover, the importance of tautomerism, or association, or both these phenomena for the kinetics of the acid-base transformations in the investigated system has been shown. Qualitatively similar changes of 13C NMR spectra with the solution pH variation have been observed for the parent barbituric acid.

  12. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride on performance, rate and variation in feed intake, and acid-base balance in feedlot cattle.

    Abney, C S; Vasconcelos, J T; McMeniman, J P; Keyser, S A; Wilson, K R; Vogel, G J; Galyean, M L

    2007-11-01

    Two experiments evaluated effects of ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) on performance, intake patterns, and acid-base balance of feedlot cattle. In Exp. 1, 360 crossbred steers (Brangus, British, and British x Continental breeding; initial BW = 545 kg) were used in a study with a 3 x 3 factorial design to study the effects of dose [0, 100, or 200 mg/(steer x d) of RAC] and duration (28, 35, or 42 d) of feeding of RAC in a randomized complete block design (9 treatments, 8 pens/treatment). No dose x duration interactions were detected (P > 0.10). As RAC dose increased, final BW (FBW; P = 0.01), ADG (P 0.10) in feedlot performance, urine pH, blood gas measurements, or variation in intake patterns between RAC and control cattle, but steers fed RAC had increased (P = 0.04) LM area, decreased (P = 0.03) yield grade, and increased (P < 0.10) time to consume 50 and 75% of daily intake relative to control steers. Our results suggest that feeding RAC for 35 d at 200 mg/(steer x d) provided optimal performance, and no effects on acid-base balance or variation in intake patterns of finishing steers were noted with RAC fed at 200 mg/(steer x d) over a 30-d period. PMID:17609477

  13. Chemical composition and acid-base properties of the surface of GaAs-CdS solid solutions

    Chemical composition and acid-base properties of the surfaces of GaAs-CdS solid solutions and the constituent binary compounds exposed to air, vacuum, CO, and NH3 were analyzed using mass spectrometry, IR spectrometry, isoelectric-point pH (pHiso) analysis, and mechanochemical methods. Powders and films were prepared from the solid solutions by isothermal diffusion and discrete vacuum evaporation, respectively. XRD and Raman analysis revealed that a solid solution has a sphalerite or wurtzite structure, depending on its composition. The initial surface of all the systems studied exhibited acidic properties: the pH value ranged from 4.9 to 6.45. The surfaces contained Lewis (electron accepting) and Bronsted (adsorbed H2O and CO2 molecules, OH- groups) sites. The acidity of the surface increased upon treatment with CO and decreased upon treatment with NH3. For all types of treatment, the concentration dependence of the acid-base properties of the surface exhibited an extremum. The strongest acidic sites were revealed on the surface of the (GaAs)0.95 (CdS)0.05 solid solution. The adsorption activity of this solution, a promising material for manufacturing gas sensors, was evaluated

  14. Spontaneous formation of biocompatible vesicles in aqueous mixtures of amino acid-based cationic surfactants and SDS/SDBS.

    Shome, Anshupriya; Kar, Tanmoy; Das, Prasanta K

    2011-02-01

    The spontaneous formation of vesicles by six amino acid-based cationic surfactants and two anionic surfactants (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) is reported. The head-group structure of the cationic surfactants is minutely altered to understand their effect on vesicle formation. To establish the regulatory role of the aromatic group in self-aggregation, both aliphatic and aromatic side-chain-substituted amino acid-based cationic surfactants are used. The presence of aromaticity in any one of the constituents favors the formation of vesicles by cationic/anionic surfactant mixtures. The formation of vesicles is primarily dependent on the balance between the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of both cationic and anionic surfactants. Vesicle formation is characterized by surface tension, fluorescence anisotropy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and phase diagrams. These vesicles are thermally stable up to 65 °C, determined by temperature-dependent fluorescence anisotropy. According to the MTT assay, these catanionic vesicles are nontoxic to NIH3T3 cells, thus indicating their wider applicability as delivery vehicles to cells. Among the six cationic surfactants examined, tryptophan- and tyrosine-based surfactants have the ability to reduce HAuCl(4) to gold nanoparticles (GNPs), which is utilized to obtain in-situ-synthesized GNPs entrapped in vesicles without the need for any external reducing agent. PMID:21275029

  15. Dentin bonding performance using Weibull statistics and evaluation of acid-base resistant zone formation of recently introduced adhesives.

    Guan, Rui; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Matsui, Naoko; Sato, Takaaki; Burrow, Michael F; Palamara, Joseph; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    Dentin bonding durability of recently introduced dental adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond 2 (SE2), Optibond XTR (XTR), and Scotchbond Universal (SBU) was investigated using Weibull analysis as well as analysis of the micromorphological features of the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) created for the adhesives. The bonding procedures of SBU were divided into three subgroups: self-etch (SBS), phosphoric acid (PA) etching on moist (SBM) or dry dentin (SBD). All groups were thermocycled for 0, 5,000 and 10,000 cycles followed by microtensile bond strength testing. Acid-base challenge was undertaken before SEM and TEM observations of the adhesive interface. The etch-and-rinse method with SBU (SBM and SBD) created inferior interfaces on the dentin surface which resulted in reduced bond durability. ABRZ formation was detected with the self-etch adhesive systems; SE2, XTR and SBS. In the PA etching protocols of SBM and SBD, a thick hybrid layer but no ABRZ was detected, which might affect dentin bond durability. PMID:27335136

  16. Chamber transport

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  17. [Acid-base status in newborn calves during the first days of life considering different states of vitality].

    Herfen, K; Bostedt, H

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the differentiations of the acid-base status in bovine neonates during the first 96 hours of life. Due to the short intervals in the taking of blood samples, noticeable fluctuations in the acid-base status during the first minutes and hours of life of newborn calves were documented. Altogether, 25 matures and eutrophe calves of the DSB, DRB and DFV breeds were provided by the clinic for this study. Apart from an immediate post natum clinical interpretation of the vital signs in the neonates-using the APGAR-score-the pH value, current Base Excess and the CO2 pressure were simultaneously ascertained. Further continuous evaluation of the acid-base status was subsequently followed in the first phase of adaptation. For that alone, twelve blood samples were taken from the vena jugularis within the first 60 minutes after parturition. Until the end of the examination period on the fourth day of life, the tests amounted to 26 measurements altogether per experimentee. Due to the concrete results ascertained from the initial clinical and laboratory observations, the experimentees could be divided into distinct classes of vitality. The acid-base status of all the calves deteriorated during the first minutes of life, indicating that the pH value and Base Excess fall clearly under the initial level in all aspects of vitality directly post natum. On average the minimum pH values are reached between the third and 15th minute of life and remain between 0.019 and 0.096 below the initial values during this period. A varying rapid increase of the pH value follows, together with a balancing out of the Base difference. Despite isolated individual variations as the acid-base status develops, the lowering of the pH values in the first minutes of life is assessed as being a normal biological phenomenon. Deviations from this occur rarely (8%) and do not conform to the norm. The pH value stabilization in connection with this crucial early postnatal phase

  18. Non-Salmonid Abundance - Line Features [ds186

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. The "Other Fish" category contains data collected...

  19. Respiratory plasticity is insufficient to alleviate blood acid-base disturbances after acclimation to ocean acidification in the estuarine red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    Esbaugh, Andrew J; Ern, Rasmus; Nordi, Wiolene M; Johnson, Abbey S

    2016-01-01

    The changes in ocean chemistry stemming from anthropogenic CO2 release--termed ocean acidification (OA)--are predicted to have wide-ranging effects on fish and ultimately threaten global populations. The ability of fish to adapt to environmental change is currently unknown, but phenotypic plasticity has been highlighted as a crucial factor in determining species resilience. Here we show that red drum, a long-lived estuarine-dependent fish species native to the Gulf of Mexico, exhibit respiratory plasticity that increases CO2 excretion capacity when acclimated to OA conditions. Specifically, fish exposed to 14 days of 1000 µatm CO2 had a 32% reduction in branchial diffusion distance and increased expression of two putative CO2 channel proteins--rhag and rhcg1. No changes were observed in the erythrocyte CO2 transport pathways. Surprisingly, no significant changes in blood chemistry were observed between acclimated and acutely challenged animals; however, a non-significant 30 % drop in the magnitude of plasma C(CO2) elevation was observed. Reduced diffusion distance also comes with the cost of increased diffusive water loss, which would require greater osmoregulatory investment by the animal. OA exposure induced increased gill Na(+), K(+) ATPase activity and intestinal nkcc2 expression, supporting both the presumed osmotic stress and increased osmoregulatory investment. However, no differences in standard metabolic rate, maximum metabolic rate or aerobic scope were detected between control and OA acclimated individuals. Similarly, no differences in critical swim speed were detected between groups, suggesting the energetic cost related to respiratory plasticity is negligible against background metabolism. The current study demonstrated that red drum exhibit respiratory plasticity with only mild physiological trade-offs; however, this plasticity is insufficient to fully offset the OA-induced acid-base disturbance and as such is unlikely to impact species resilience

  20. Cosmic rays interactions and the abundances of the chemical elements

    Our Galaxy is the largest nuclear interaction experiment which we know, because of the interaction between cosmic ray particles and the interstellar material. Cosmic rays are particles, which have been accelerated in the Galaxy or in extragalactic space. Cosmic rays come as protons, electrons, heavier nuclei, and their antiparticles. Up to energies up to some tens of TeV of particle energy it is possible to derive chemical abundances of cosmic rays. It has been proposed that cosmic ray particles can be attributed to three main sites of origin and acceleration, a) supernova shocks in the interstellar medium, b) supernova shocks in a stellar wind of the predecessor star, and c) powerful radio galaxies. This proposal leads to quantitative tests, which are encouraging so far. Quantitative models for transport and interaction appear to be consistent with the data. Li, Be, B are secondary in cosmic rays, as are many of the odd-Z elements, as well as the sub-Fe elements. At very low energies, cosmic ray particles are subject to ionization losses, which produce a steep low energy cutoff; all particles below the cutoff are moved into the thermal material population, and the particles above it remain as cosmic rays. This then changes the chemical abundances in the interstellar medium, and is a dominant process for many isotopes of Li, Be, B. With a quantitative theory for the origin of cosmic rays proposed, it appears worthwhile to search for yet better spallation cross sections, especially near threshold. With such an improved set of cross sections, the theory of the interstellar medium and its chemical abundances, both in thermal and in energetic particles, could be taken a large step forward. (author)

  1. North Sea Elasmobranchs: distribution, abundance and biodiversity

    Daan, N.; Heessen, H.J.L.; Hofstede, ter R.

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from various international and national surveys, an overview is given of the fine-scale distribution (resolution of 20¿longitude * 10¿ latitude; ¿ 10*10 nm) and trends in abundance of elasmobranch species reported from the North Sea. Presence-absence maps are produced based on 4 survey

  2. Heavy element abundances and massive star formation

    Wang, Boqi; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) remains a great challenge in astronomy. In the solar neighborhood, the IMF is reasonable well determined for stellar masses from about 0.1 to 60 solar mass. However, outside the solar neighborhood, the IMF is poorly known. Among those frequently discussed arguments favoring a different IMF outside the solar neighborhood are the estimated time to consume the remaining gas in spiral galaxies, and the high rate of forming massive stars in starburst galaxies. An interesting question then is whether there may be an independent way of testing possible variations in the IMF. Indeed, the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are mostly synthesized in massive stars, so increasing, or decreasing, the fraction of massive stars naturally leads to a variation in the heavy element yield, and thus, the metallicity. The observed abundance should severely constrain any deviations of the IMF from the locally determined IMF. We focus on element oxygen, which is the most abundant heavy element in the interstellar medium. Oxygen is ejected only by massive stars that can become Type 1 supernovae, and the oxygen abundance is, therefore, a sensitive function of the fraction of massive stars in the IMF. Adopting oxygen enables us to avoid uncertainties in Type 1 supernovae. We use the nucleosynthesis results to calculate the oxygen yield for given IMF. We then calculate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium assuming instantaneous recycling of oxygen.

  3. The Galactic Thick Disk Stellar Abundances

    Prochaska, J X; Carney, B W; McWilliam, A; Wolfe, A M; Prochaska, Jason X.; Naumov, Sergei O.; Carney, Bruce W.; William, Andrew Mc; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2000-01-01

    We present first results from a program to measure the chemical abundances of a large (N>30) sample of thick disk stars with the principal goal of investigating the formation history of the Galactic thick disk. Our analysis confirms previous studies of O and Mg in the thick disk stars which reported enhancements in excess of the thin disk population. Furthermore, the observations of Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, Co, V, Zn, Al, and Eu all argue that the thick disk population has a distinct chemical history from the thin disk. With the exception of V and Co, the thick disk abundance patterns match or tend towards the values observed for halo stars with [Fe/H]~-1. This suggests that the thick disk stars had a chemical enrichment history similar to the metal-rich halo stars. With the possible exception of Si, the thick disk abundance patterns are in excellent agreement with the chemical abundances observed in the metal-poor bulge stars suggesting the two populations formed from the same gas reservoir at a common epoch. We disc...

  4. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  5. Will Abundant Natural Gas Solve Climate Change?

    McJeon, H. C.; Edmonds, J.; Bauer, N.; Leon, C.; Fisher, B.; Flannery, B.; Hilaire, J.; Krey, V.; Marangoni, G.; Mi, R.; Riahi, K.; Rogner, H.; Tavoni, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid deployment of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies enabled the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. Global deployment of these advanced gas production technologies could bring large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources to the energy system. It has been hoped that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which in turn could reduce climate forcing. Other researchers countered that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. In this study, we employ five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models (IAMs) of energy-economy-climate systems to assess the full impact of abundant gas on climate change. The models show large additional natural gas consumption up to +170% by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2% to +11%), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3% to +7%) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that while globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy market equilibrium, it will not significantly mitigate climate change on its own in the absence of climate policies.

  6. Abundance of Terrestrial Planets by Microlensing

    Yock, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Terrestrial planets may be detected using the gravitational microlensing technique. This was demonstrated in the high magnification event MACHO-98-BLG-35. Observing strategies aimed at measuring the abundance of terrestrial planets are discussed, using both existing telescopes and planned telescopes.

  7. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Shields, J. C.; Constantin, A.; Heidt, J.; Jaeger, K.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Wagner, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time...

  8. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Silva, J. V. Sales

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, alpha-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of alpha-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anti-correlated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90% of the barium stars belong to the thin disk population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an AGB star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  9. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  10. Stream salamander species richness and abundance in relation to environmental factors in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    Grant, E.H.C.; Jung, R.E.; Rice, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    Stream salamanders are sensitive to acid mine drainage and may be sensitive to acidification and low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of a watershed. Streams in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, are subject to episodic acidification from precipitation events. We surveyed 25 m by 2 m transects located on the stream bank adjacent to the water channel in Shenandoah National Park for salamanders using a stratified random sampling design based on elevation, aspect and bedrock geology. We investigated the relationships of four species (Eurycea bislineata, Desmognathus fuscus, D. monticola and Gyrinophilus porphyriticus) to habitat and water quality variables. We did not find overwhelming evidence that stream salamanders are affected by the acid-base status of streams in Shenandoah National Park. Desmognathus fuscus and D. monticola abundance was greater both in streams that had a higher potential to neutralize acidification, and in higher elevation (>700 m) streams. Neither abundance of E. bislineata nor species richness were related to any of the habitat variables. Our sampling method preferentially detected the adult age class of the study species and did not allow us to estimate population sizes. We suggest that continued monitoring of stream salamander populations in SNP will determine the effects of stream acidification on these taxa.

  11. Sustainable Transportation

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg;

    2014-01-01

    that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the...... transportation sector’s significant contribution to global challenges such as climate change, it is often said that sustainable development cannot be achieved without sustainable transportation....

  12. Relative abundance determinations in extremely metal poor giants. II. Transition probabilities and the abundance determinations

    The abundances of Fe and other elements are determined for a star of intermediate metallicity and for nine extremely metal poor stars, including two members of the globular cluster M92 and CD -38 deg 245. The accuracy of the transition probabilities for Fe I and other elements is evaluated. The distribution of the abundances of other elements with respect to Fe is the same for most of the cases studied. Manganese is the only element that shows a different relative abundance in an extremely metal poor star. 120 refs

  13. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  14. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  15. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  16. Acid-base equilibrium during capnoretroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy in patients with end-stage renal failure: a preliminary report.

    Demian, A D; Esmail, O M; Atallah, M M

    2000-04-01

    We have studied the acid-base equilibrium in 12 patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) during capnoretroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy. Bupivacaine (12 mL, 0.375%) and morphine (2mg) were given in the lumbar epidural space, and fentanyl (0.5 microg kg(-1)) and midazolam (50 microg kg(-1)) were given intravenously. Anaesthesia was induced by thiopental, maintained with halothane carried by oxygen enriched air (inspired oxygen fraction = 0.35), and ventilation was achieved with a tidal volume of 10 mL kg(-1) at a rate of 12 min(-1). This procedure resulted in a mild degree of respiratory acidosis that was cleared within 60 min. We conclude that capnoretroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy can be performed in patients with end-stage renal failure with minimal transient respiratory acidosis that can be avoided by increased ventilation. PMID:10866009

  17. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO32- and DCCM/SeO32- complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation.

  18. Small-Nucleic-Acid-Based Therapeutic Strategy Targeting the Transcription Factors Regulating the Vascular Inflammation, Remodeling and Fibrosis in Atherosclerosis

    Sung Won Youn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis arises when injury to the arterial wall induces an inflammatory cascade that is sustained by a complex network of cytokines, together with accumulation of lipids and fibrous material. Inflammatory cascades involve leukocyte adherence and chemotaxis, which are coordinated by the local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines. Transcription factors are critical to the integration of the various steps of the cascade response to mediators of vascular injury, and are induced in a stimulus-dependent and cell-type-specific manner. Several small-nucleic-acid-based therapeutic strategies have recently been developed to target transcription factors: antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, RNA interference, microRNA, and decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of these particular targeted therapeutic strategies, toward regulation of the vascular inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis associated with atherosclerosis.

  19. Physisorption of Nucleic Acid Bases on Boron Nitride Nanotubes: A new class of Hybrid Nano-Bio Materials

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Scheicher, Ralph H; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases, adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U) on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G>A~C~T~U implying that the interaction strength of the (high-curvature) BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from a stronger hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and BNNT, since the charge transfer involved in the physisorption process is insignificant. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of the next generation sensing devices.

  20. Physisorption of Nucleic Acid Bases on Boron Nitride Nanotubes: A new class of Hybrid Nano-Bio Materials

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S.; Scheicher, Ralph; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases, adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U) on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G>A C T U implying that the interaction strength of the (high-curvature) BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from a stronger hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and BNNT, since the charge transfer involved in the physisorption process is insignificant. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of the next generation sensing devices.

  1. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO32− and DCCM/SeO32− complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation. PMID:26635113

  2. Fabrication of Amino Acid Based Silver Nanocomposite Hydrogels from PVA-Poly(Acrylamide-co-Acryloyl phenylalanine) and Their Antimicrobial Studies

    Cha, Hyeongrae; Babu, V. Ramesh; Rao, K. S. V. Krishna; Kim, Yonghyun; Mei, Surong; Lee, Yongill; Joo, Woo Hong [Changwon National Univ., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    New silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-loaded amino acid based hydrogels were synthesized successfully from poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(acryl amide-co-acryloyl phenyl alanine) (PAA) by redox polymerization. The formation of AgNP in hydrogels was confirmed by using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer and XRD. The structure and morphology of silver nanocomposite hydrogels were studied by using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which demonstrated scattered nanoparticles, ca. 10-20 nm. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed large differences of weight loss (i. e., 48%) between the prestine hydrogel and silver nanocomposite. The antibacterial studies of AgNP-loaded PAA (Ag-PAA) hydrogels was evaluated against Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) bacteria. These Ag-PAA hydrogels showed significant activities against all the test bacteria. Newly developed hydrogels could be used for medical applications, such as artificial burn dressings.

  3. The primordial deuterium abundance problems and prospects

    Levshakov, S A; Kegel, W H; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Takahara, Fumio; Kegel, Wilhelm H.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of extragalactic deuterium abundance is discussed using two examples of `low' and `high' D/H measurements. We show that the discordance of these two types of D abundances may be a consequence of the spatial correlations in the stochastic velocity field. Within the framework of the generalized procedure (accounting for such effects) one finds good agreement between different observations and the theoretical predictions for standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN). In particular, we show that the deuterium absorption seen at z = 2.504 toward Q1009+2956 and the H+D Ly-alpha profile observed at z = 0.701 toward Q1718+4807 are compatible with D/H $\\sim 4.1 - 4.6\\times10^{-5}$. This result supports SBBN and, thus, no inhomogeneity is needed. The problem of precise D/H measurements is discussed.

  4. The evolution of abundances in the galaxy

    This very brief review of the evolution of the abundances in our Galaxy first recalls the main observational facts regarding such abundances which have to be taken into account by any model of chemical evolution of our Galaxy. After having defined what are the crucial parameters which define such models, the emphasis is made on two approaches: the first analyzed by Vangioni--Flam and Audouze, 1988, and Andreani et al., 1988, in which the rate of star formation is bimodal i.e., is allowed to vary with time, and the second favoured by Matteucci and Francois, 1989, who invoke a multizone galactic model with infall (inflow) of external gas into the galactic disk. A list of problems to be considered in future work is finally proposed

  5. Helium abundance in the Orion A source

    The H, He 66α (22.4 GHz) and H, He 56α (36.5 GHz) recombination line observations were made at several positions of the central region of Orion A (R ∼ 3'). The observed relative helium abundance y' is found to increase with the angular distance from the nebular centre and to amount the mean value of 11.6% at the peripherycal positions. The comparison with the results of low frequency observations (H, He 109α, ν ∼ 5.0 GHz) shows that measurements towards the centre (y'=8-9%) is in agreement with the low frequency measurements of y', however y' at the peripherycal positions are higher than that at low frequency. The nebula model of a ''blister'' type is constructed to explain such behaviour. The conclusions are made that the actual helium abundance y in Orion A is ∼ 12%, the Orion Nebula expands and its radial velocity is ∼ 5 km/s

  6. Elemental Abundances in PG1159 Stars

    Werner, K; Reiff, E; Kruk, J W

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric elemental abundances of these stars allow to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted elemental abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. PG1159 stars appear to be the direct progeny of [WC] stars.

  7. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Aver, Erik; Porter, R L; Skillman, Evan D

    2013-01-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, & Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y_p. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increase...

  8. Abundances in the diffuse interstellar medium

    The wealth of interstellar absorption line data obtained with the Copernicus and IUE satellites has opened up a new era in studies of the interstellar gas. It is now well established that certain elements, generally those with high condensation temperatures, are substantially under-abundant in the gas-phase relative to total solar or cosmic abundances. This depletion of elements is due to the existence of solid material in the form of dust grains in the interstellar medium. Surprisingly, however, recent surveys indicate that even volatile elements such as Zn and S are significantly depleted in many sight lines. Developments in this field which have been made possible by the large base of UV interstellar absorption line data built up over recent years are reviewed and the implications of the results for our understanding of the physical processes governing depletion are discussed. (author)

  9. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species......Detritivorous macrofauna species co-ingest large quantities of microorganisms some of which survive the gut passage. Denitrifying bacteria, in particular, become metabolically induced by anoxic conditions, nitrate, and labile organic compounds in the gut of invertebrates. A striking consequence...... that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  10. Attenuation of species abundance distributions by sampling.

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Darnell, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying biodiversity aspects such as species presence/ absence, richness and abundance is an important challenge to answer scientific and resource management questions. In practice, biodiversity can only be assessed from biological material taken by surveys, a difficult task given limited time and resources. A type of random sampling, or often called sub-sampling, is a commonly used technique to reduce the amount of time and effort for investigating large quantities of biological samples. However, it is not immediately clear how (sub-)sampling affects the estimate of biodiversity aspects from a quantitative perspective. This paper specifies the effect of (sub-)sampling as attenuation of the species abundance distribution (SAD), and articulates how the sampling bias is induced to the SAD by random sampling. The framework presented also reveals some confusion in previous theoretical studies. PMID:26064626

  11. Development of an optimized hyaluronic acid-based lipidic nanoemulsion co-encapsulating two polyphenols for nose to brain delivery.

    Nasr, Maha

    2016-05-01

    The development of mucoadhesive lipidic nanoemulsion based on hyaluronic acid, co-encapsulating two polyphenols (resveratrol and curcumin) for the transnasal treatment of neurodegenerative diseases was attempted in the current manuscript. Nanoemulsions were prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method, and were characterized for their particle size, zeta potential, mucoadhesive strength and morphology. The selected formula was tested for its antioxidant potential, in vitro and ex vivo release of the two polyphenols, safety on nasal mucosa and in vivo quantification of the two drugs in rat brains. Its stability was tested by monitoring the change in particle size, zeta potential, drugs' content and antioxidant potential upon storage for 3 months. The optimized hyaluronic acid based nanoemulsion formula displayed a particle size of 115.2 ± 0.15 and a zeta potential of -23.9 ± 1.7. The formula displayed a spherical morphology and significantly higher mucoadhesive strength compared to its non mucoadhesive counterpart. In addition, the nanoemulsion was able to preserve the antioxidant ability of the two polyphenols and protect them from degradation. Diffusion controlled release of the two drugs was achievable till 6 hours, with an ex vivo flux across sheep nasal mucosa of 2.86 and 2.09 µg/cm(2)hr for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively. Moreover, the mucoadhesive nanoemulsion was safe on nasal mucosa and managed to increase the amounts of the two polypehnols in the brain (about 7 and 9 folds increase in AUC0-7 h for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively). Hyaluronic acid based lipidic nanoemulsion proved itself as a successful carrier enhancing the solubility, stability and brain targetability of polyphenols. PMID:26401600

  12. Effect of high sodium intake during 14 days of bed-rest on acid-base balance

    Frings, P.; Baecker, N.; Heer, M.

    Lowering mechanical load like in microgravity is the dominant stimulus leading to bone loss However high dietary sodium intake is also considered as a risk factor for osteoporosis and thereby might exacerbate the microgravity induced bone loss In a metabolic balance non bed-rest study we have recently shown that a very high sodium intake leads to an increased bone resorption most likely because of a mild metabolic acidosis Frings et al FASEB J 19 5 A1345 2005 To test if mild metabolic acidosis also occurs during immobilization we examined the effect of increased dietary sodium on bone metabolism and acid-base balance in eight healthy male test subjects mean age 26 25 pm 3 49 years body weight 77 98 pm 4 34 kg in our metabolic ward during a 14-day head-down tilt HDT bed-rest study The study was designed as a randomized crossover study with two study periods Each period was divided into three parts 4 ambulatory days with 200 mmol sodium intake 14 days of bed-rest with either 550 mmol or 50 mmol sodium intake and 3 recovery days with 200 mmol sodium intake The sodium intake was altered by variations in dietary sodium chloride content Blood pH P CO2 and P O2 were analyzed in fasting morning fingertip blood samples several times during the entire study Bicarbonate HCO 3 - and base excess BE were calculated according to the Henderson-Hasselbach equation Preliminary results in the acid-base balance from the first study period 4 subjects with 550 mmol and 4 subjects with 50 mmol sodium intake strongly

  13. Acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterial with large surface area: Preparation, characterization, and adsorption properties for cationic and anionic compounds

    Nanostructured carbonaceous materials are extremely important in the nano field, yet developing simple, mild, and “green” methods that can make such materials possess large surface area and rich functional groups on their surfaces still remains a considerable challenge. Herein, a one-pot and environment-friendly method, i.e., thermal treatment (180 °C; 18 h) of water mixed with glucose and chitosan (CTS), has been proposed. The resultant carbonaceous nanomaterials were characterized by field emitting scanning electron microscope, N2 adsorption/desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. It was found that, in contrast to the conventional hydrothermally carbonized product from pure glucose, with low surface area (9.3 m2 g−1) and pore volume (0.016 cm3 g−1), the CTS-added carbonaceous products showed satisfactory textural parameters (surface area and pore volume up to 254 m2 g−1 and 0.701 cm3 g−1, respectively). Moreover, it was also interestingly found that these CTS-added carbonaceous products possessed both acidic (–COOH) and basic (–NH2) groups on their surfaces. Taking the advantages of large surface area and –COOH/–NH2 bifunctional surface, the carbonaceous nanomaterials exhibited excellent performance for adsorptions of cationic compound (i.e., methylene blue) at pH 10 and anionic compound (i.e., acid red 18) at pH 2, respectively. This work not only provides a simple and green route to prepare acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterials with large surface area but also well demonstrates their potential for application in adsorption. - Highlights: • A simple and green method was proposed to prepare carbon nanomaterials. • The carbon product showed acid/base bifunctional surface with large surface area. • The carbon material could efficiently adsorb both cationic and anionic compounds

  14. A one-step colorimetric acid-base titration sensor using a complementary color changing coordination system.

    Cho, Hui Hun; Kim, Si Hyun; Heo, Jun Hyuk; Moon, Young Eel; Choi, Young Hun; Lim, Dong Cheol; Han, Kwon-Hoon; Lee, Jung Heon

    2016-06-21

    We report the development of a colorimetric sensor that allows for the quantitative measurement of the acid content via acid-base titration in a single-step. In order to create the sensor, we used a cobalt coordination system (Co-complex sensor) that changes from greenish blue colored Co(H2O)4(OH)2 to pink colored Co(H2O)6(2+) after neutralization. Greenish blue and pink are two complementary colors with a strong contrast. As a certain amount of acid is introduced to the Co-complex sensor, a portion of greenish blue colored Co(H2O)4(OH)2 changes to pink colored Co(H2O)6(2+), producing a different color. As the ratio of greenish blue and pink in the Co-complex sensor is determined by the amount of neutralization reaction occurring between Co(H2O)4(OH)2 and an acid, the sensor produced a spectrum of green, yellow green, brown, orange, and pink colors depending on the acid content. In contrast, the color change appeared only beyond the end point for normal acid-base titration. When we mixed this Co-complex sensor with different concentrations of citric acid, tartaric acid, and malic acid, three representative organic acids in fruits, we observed distinct color changes for each sample. This color change could also be observed in real fruit juice. When we treated the Co-complex sensor with real tangerine juice, it generated diverse colors depending on the concentration of citric acid in each sample. These results provide a new angle on simple but quantitative measurements of analytes for on-site usage in various applications, such as in food, farms, and the drug industry. PMID:27143645

  15. Effects of humic acid-based buffer + cation on chemical characteristics of saline soils and maize growth

    W. Mindari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Humic acid is believed to maintain the stability of the soil reaction, adsorption / fixation / chelate of cation, thereby increasing the availability of water and plant nutrients. On the other hand, the dynamics of saline soil cation is strongly influenced by the change of seasons that disrupt water and plant nutrients uptake. This experiment was aimed to examine the characteristics of the humic acid from compost, coal, and peat and its function in the adsorption of K+ and NH4+ cations, thus increasing the availability of nutrients and of maize growth. Eighteen treatments consisted of three humic acid sources (compost, peat and coal, two cation additives (K+ and NH4+, and three doses of humic acid-based buffer (10, 20, and 30 g / 3kg, were arranged in a factorial completely randomized with three replicates. The treatments were evaluated against changes in pH, electric conductivity (EC, cation exchange capacity (CEC, chlorophyll content, plant dry weight and plant height. The results showed that the addition of K+ and NH4+ affected pH, CEC, K+, NH4+, and water content of the buffer. Application of humic acid-based buffer significantly decreased soil pH from > 7 to about 6.3, decreased soil EC to 0.9 mS / cm, and increased exchangeable Na from 0.40 to 0.56 me / 100g soil, Ca from 15.57 to 20.21 me/100 g soil, Mg from 1.76 to 6.52 me/100 g soil, and K from 0.05-0.51 me / 100g soil. Plant growth (plant height, chlorophyll content, leaf area, and stem weight at 35 days after planting increased with increasing dose of humic acid. The dose of 2.0g peat humic acid + NH4+ / 3 kg of soil or 30g peat humic acid + K+ / 3 kg of oil gave the best results of maize growth.

  16. Effect of dietary potassium and anionic salts on acid-base and mineral status in periparturient cows.

    Rérat, M; Schlegel, P

    2014-06-01

    Dry cow diets based on grassland forage from intensive production contain high amounts of K and could be responsible for a reduced ability to maintain Ca homoeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine whether a moderate anionic salt supplementation to a forage-based pre-calving diet with varying native K content affects the mineral and acid-base status in transition cows. Twenty-four dry and pregnant Holstein cows, without antecedent episodes of clinical hypocalcemia, were assigned to two diets during the last 4 weeks before estimated calving date. Twelve cows were fed a hay-based diet low in K (18 g K/kg DM), and 12, a hay-based diet high in K (35 g K/kg DM). Within each diet, six cows received anionic salts during the last 2 weeks before the estimated calving day. After calving, all cows received the high K diet ad libitum. Blood samples were taken daily from day 11 pre-partum to day 5 post-partum. Urine samples were taken on days 7 and 2 pre-partum and on day 2 post-partum. The anionic salt did not alter feed intake during the pre-partum period. Serum Ca was not influenced by the dietary treatments. Feeding pre-partum diets with low K concentrations induced a reduced metabolic alkalotic charge, as indicated by reduced pre-partum urinary base-acid quotient. Transition cows fed the low K diet including anionic salts induced a mild metabolic acidosis before calving, as indicated by higher urinary Ca, lower urinary pH and net acid-base excretion. Although serum Ca during the post-partum period was not affected by dietary treatment, feeding a low K diet moderately supplemented with anionic salts to reach a dietary cation-anion difference close to zero permitted to obtain a metabolic response in periparturient cows without altering the dry matter intake. PMID:23796109

  17. Embryonic common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) preferentially regulate intracellular tissue pH during acid-base challenges.

    Shartau, Ryan B; Crossley, Dane A; Kohl, Zachary F; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-07-01

    The nests of embryonic turtles naturally experience elevated CO2 (hypercarbia), which leads to increased blood PCO2  and a respiratory acidosis, resulting in reduced blood pH [extracellular pH (pHe)]. Some fishes preferentially regulate tissue pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] against changes in pHe; this has been proposed to be associated with exceptional CO2 tolerance and has never been identified in amniotes. As embryonic turtles may be CO2 tolerant based on nesting strategy, we hypothesized that they preferentially regulate pHi, conferring tolerance to severe acute acid-base challenges. This hypothesis was tested by investigating pH regulation in common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) reared in normoxia then exposed to hypercarbia (13 kPa PCO2 ) for 1 h at three developmental ages: 70% and 90% of incubation, and yearlings. Hypercarbia reduced pHe but not pHi, at all developmental ages. At 70% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.324 pH units while pHi of brain, white muscle and lung increased; heart, liver and kidney pHi remained unchanged. At 90% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.352 pH units but heart pHi increased with no change in pHi of other tissues. Yearlings exhibited a pHe reduction of 0.235 pH units but had no changes in pHi of any tissues. The results indicate common snapping turtles preferentially regulate pHi during development, but the degree of response is reduced throughout development. This is the first time preferential pHi regulation has been identified in an amniote. These findings may provide insight into the evolution of acid-base homeostasis during development of amniotes, and vertebrates in general. PMID:27091863

  18. Abundances in Damped Ly-alpha Galaxies

    Molaro, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Damped Ly_alpha galaxies provide a sample of young galaxies where chemical abundances can be derived throughout the whole universe with an accuracy comparable to that for the local universe. Despite a large spread in redshift, HI column density and metallicity, DLA galaxies show a remarkable uniformity in the elemental ratios rather suggestive of similar chemical evolution if not of an unique population. These galaxies are characterized by a moderate, if any, enhancement of alpha-elements ove...

  19. Natural Resource Abundance and Human Capital Accumulation

    Jean-Philippe C. Stijns

    2001-01-01

    This study examines indicators of human capital accumulation together with data for natural resource abundance and rents in a panel of 102 countries running from 1970 to 1999. Mineral wealth makes a positive and marked difference on human capital accumulation. Matching on observables reveals that cross-country results are not driven by a third factor such as overall economic development. Political stability does seem to affect both human capital accumulation and subsoil wealth, but not enough...

  20. Chemical Abundance Inhomogeneities in Globular Cluster Stars

    Cohen, Judith G.

    2004-01-01

    It is now clear that abundance variations from star-to-star among the light elements, particularly C, N, O, Na and Al, are ubiquitous within galactic globular clusters; they appear seen whenever data of high quality is obtained for a sufficiently large sample of stars within such a cluster. The correlations and anti-correlations among these elements and the range of variation of each element appear to be independent of stellar evolutionary state, with the exception that enhanced depletion of ...

  1. Chemical Abundances and Milky Way Formation

    Gilmore, Gerry; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2004-01-01

    Stellar chemical element ratios have well-defined systematic trends as a function of abundance, with an excellent correlation of these trends with stellar populations defined kinematically. This is remarkable, and has significant implications for Galactic evolution. The source function, the stellar Initial Mass Function, must be nearly invariant with time, place and metallicity. Each forming star must see a well-mixed mass-averaged IMF yield, implying low star formation rates, with most star ...

  2. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    de Castro, D B; Roig, F; Jilinski, E; Drake, N A; Chavero, C; Silva, J V Sales

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, $alpha$-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code {\\sc moog}. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of $alpha$-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heav...

  3. Water Abundance in Molecular Cloud Cores

    Snell, R L; Ashby, M L N; Bergin, E A; Chin, G; Erickson, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Harwit, M; Kleiner, S C; Koch, D G; Neufeld, D A; Patten, B M; Plume, R; Schieder, R; Stauffer, J R; Tolls, V; Wang, Z; Winnewisser, G; Zhang, Y F; Melnick, G J

    2000-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) observations of the 1_{10}-1_{01} transition of ortho-water at 557 GHz toward 12 molecular cloud cores. The water emission was detected in NGC 7538, Rho Oph A, NGC 2024, CRL 2591, W3, W3(OH), Mon R2, and W33, and was not detected in TMC-1, L134N, and B335. We also present a small map of the water emission in S140. Observations of the H_2^{18}O line were obtained toward S140 and NGC 7538, but no emission was detected. The abundance of ortho-water relative to H_2 in the giant molecular cloud cores was found to vary between 6x10^{-10} and 1x10^{-8}. Five of the cloud cores in our sample have previous water detections; however, in all cases the emission is thought to arise from hot cores with small angular extents. The water abundance estimated for the hot core gas is at least 100 times larger than in the gas probed by SWAS. The most stringent upper limit on the ortho-water abundance in dark clouds is provided in TMC-1, where the 3-sigma upper limit on the ...

  4. Abundances In Very Metal Poor Dwarf Stars

    Cohen, J G; McWilliam, A; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Wasserburg, G J; Ivans, I I; Dehn, M; Karlsson, T; Melendez, J; Cohen, Judith G.; Christlieb, Norbert; William, Andrew Mc; Shectman, Steve; Thompson, Ian; Ivans, Inese; Dehn, Matthias; Karlsson, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the detailed composition of 28 extremely metal-poor dwarfs, 22 of which are from the Hamburg/ESO Survey, based on Keck Echelle spectra. Our sample has a median [Fe/H] of -2.7 dex, extends to -3.5 dex, and is somewhat less metal-poor than was expected from [Fe/H](HK,HES) determined from low resolution spectra. Our analysis supports the existence of a sharp decline in the distribution of halo stars with metallicity below [Fe/H] = -3.0 dex. So far no additional turnoff stars with [Fe/H]}<-3.5 have been identified in our follow up efforts. For the best observed elements between Mg and Ni, we find that the abundance ratios appear to have reached a plateau, i.e. [X/Fe] is approximately constant as a function of [Fe/H], except for Cr, Mn and Co, which show trends of abundance ratios varying with [Fe/H]. These abundance ratios at low metallicity correspond approximately to the yield expected from Type II SN with a narrow range in mass and explosion parameters; high mass Type II SN progenitors are requir...

  5. Abundances in Stars with Debris Disks

    Ritchey, Adam M; Stone, Myra; Wallerstein, George

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a detailed chemical abundance analysis for a sample of solar-type stars known to exhibit excess infrared emission associated with dusty debris disks. Our sample of 28 stars was selected based on results from the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Spitzer Legacy Program, for the purpose of investigating whether the stellar atmospheres have been polluted with planetary material, which could indicate that the metallicity enhancement in stars with planets is due to metal-rich infall in the later stages of star and planet formation. The preliminary results presented here consist of precise abundances for 15 elements (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, and Ni) for half of the stars in our sample. We find that none of the stars investigated so far exhibit the expected trend of increasing elemental abundance with increasing condensation temperature, which would result from the stars having accreted planetary debris. Rather, the slopes of linear least...

  6. CH abundance gradient in TMC-1

    Suutarinen, Aleksi; Harju, Jorma; Heikkilä, Arto; Hotzel, Stephan; Juvela, Mika; Millar, Tom J; Walsh, Catherina; Wouterloot, Jan Gerard Amos

    2011-01-01

    We observed the 9-cm Lambda-doubling lines of CH along the dense filament of TMC-1. The CH column densities were compared with the total H2 column densities derived using the 2MASS NIR data and previously published SCUBA maps and with OH column densities derived using previous observations with Effelsberg. We also modelled the chemical evolution of TMC-1 adopting physical conditions typical of dark clouds using the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry gas-phase reaction network to aid the interpretation of the observed OH/CH abundance ratios. The CH column density has a clear peak in the vicinity of the cyanopolyyne maximum of TMC-1. The fractional CH abundance relative to H2 increases steadily from the northwestern end of the filament where it lies around 1.0e-8, to the southeast where it reaches a value of 2.0e-8. The OH and CH column densities are well correlated, and we obtained OH/CH abundance ratios of ~ 16 - 20. These values are clearly larger than what has been measured recently in diffuse interstellar g...

  7. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance.

    Craig J Mageean

    Full Text Available Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data.

  8. Aerial survey estimates of fallow deer abundance

    Gogan, Peter J.; Gates, Natalie B.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Pettit, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the distribution and abundance of an ungulate species is essential prior to establishing and implementing a management program. We used ground surveys to determine distribution and ground and aerial surveys and individually marked deer to estimate the abundance of fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-coastal California. Fallow deer had limited distribution and heterogeneous densities. Estimated post-rut densities across 4 annual surveys ranged from a low of 1.4 (SE=0.2) deer/km2 to a high of 3.3 (se=0.5) deer/km2 in a low density stratum and from 49.0 (SE=8.3) deer/km2 to 111.6 deer/km2 in a high density stratum. Sightability was positively influenced by the presence of white color-phase deer in a group and group size, and varied between airial and ground-based observers and by density strata. Our findings underscore the utility of double-observer surveys and aerial surveys with individually marked deer, both incorporating covariates to model sightability, to estimate deer abundance.

  9. Principal Component Analysis on Chemical Abundances Spaces

    Ting, Y S; Kobayashi, C; De Silva, G M; Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2011-01-01

    [Shortened] In preparation for the HERMES chemical tagging survey of about a million Galactic FGK stars, we estimate the number of independent dimensions of the space defined by the stellar chemical element abundances [X/Fe]. [...] We explore abundances in several environments, including solar neighbourhood thin/thick disk stars, halo metal-poor stars, globular clusters, open clusters, the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. [...] We find that, especially at low metallicity, the production of r-process elements is likely to be associated with the production of alpha-elements. This may support the core-collapse supernovae as the r-process site. We also verify the over-abundances of light s-process elements at low metallicity, and find that the relative contribution decreases at higher metallicity, which suggests that this lighter elements primary process may be associated with massive stars. [...] Our analysis reveals two types of core-collapse supernovae: one produces mainly alpha-e...

  10. Environmental factors shaping ungulate abundances in Poland.

    Borowik, Tomasz; Cornulier, Thomas; Jędrzejewska, Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    Population densities of large herbivores are determined by the diverse effects of density-dependent and independent environmental factors. In this study, we used the official 1998-2003 inventory data on ungulate numbers from 462 forest districts and 23 national parks across Poland to determine the roles of various environmental factors in shaping country-wide spatial patterns of ungulate abundances. Spatially explicit generalized additive mixed models showed that different sets of environmental variables explained 39 to 50 % of the variation in red deer Cervus elaphus, wild boar Sus scrofa, and roe deer Capreolus capreolus abundances. For all of the studied species, low forest cover and the mean January temperature were the most important factors limiting their numbers. Woodland cover above 40-50 % held the highest densities for these species. Wild boar and roe deer were more numerous in deciduous or mixed woodlands within a matrix of arable land. Furthermore, we found significant positive effects of marshes and water bodies on wild boar abundances. A juxtaposition of obtained results with ongoing environmental changes (global warming, increase in forest cover) may indicate future growth in ungulate distributions and numbers. PMID:24244044

  11. The shape of terrestrial abundance distributions.

    Alroy, John

    2015-09-01

    Ecologists widely accept that the distribution of abundances in most communities is fairly flat but heavily dominated by a few species. The reason for this is that species abundances are thought to follow certain theoretical distributions that predict such a pattern. However, previous studies have focused on either a few theoretical distributions or a few empirical distributions. I illustrate abundance patterns in 1055 samples of trees, bats, small terrestrial mammals, birds, lizards, frogs, ants, dung beetles, butterflies, and odonates. Five existing theoretical distributions make inaccurate predictions about the frequencies of the most common species and of the average species, and most of them fit the overall patterns poorly, according to the maximum likelihood-related Kullback-Leibler divergence statistic. Instead, the data support a low-dominance distribution here called the "double geometric." Depending on the value of its two governing parameters, it may resemble either the geometric series distribution or the lognormal series distribution. However, unlike any other model, it assumes both that richness is finite and that species compete unequally for resources in a two-dimensional niche landscape, which implies that niche breadths are variable and that trait distributions are neither arrayed along a single dimension nor randomly associated. The hypothesis that niche space is multidimensional helps to explain how numerous species can coexist despite interacting strongly. PMID:26601249

  12. Distribution and Abundance of Mars' Atmospheric Argon

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Nelli, Steven; Murphy, Jim; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Janes, K. D.; Crombie, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    One and one half Mars years (MY 26 and 27) of atmospheric Argon measurements are described and studied in the context of understanding how Argon, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. Argon data are from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the suite of three instruments comprising the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). A comprehensive data analysis including gamma-ray production and attenuation by the atmosphere is included. Of particular interest is the enhanced abundance of Ar over the observed Ar abundance at lower latitudes at south (up to a factor of 10) and north (up to a factor of 4) polar regions during winter. Calibration of the measurements to actual Ar abundance is possible because GS measurements cover the same latitude and season as measurements made by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) on Viking Landers 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2). [2].

  13. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  14. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Yp. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Yp. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Yp = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Yp = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination

  15. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  16. Galactic abundance gradients from Cepheids : On the iron abundance gradient around 10-12 kpc

    Lemasle, B.; Francois, P.; Piersimoni, A.; Pedicelli, S.; Bono, G.; Laney, C. D.; Primas, F.; Romaniello, M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Classical Cepheids can be adopted to trace the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk since their distances can be estimated with very high accuracy. Aims: Homogeneous iron abundance measurements for 33 Galactic Cepheids located in the outer disk together with accurate distance determinations based on near-infrared photometry are adopted to constrain the Galactic iron gradient beyond 10 kpc. Methods: Iron abundances were determined using high resolution Cepheid spectra collected wit...

  17. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  18. Transport: Introduction

    Lewis, William; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1992-01-01

    Space transportation requirements for the NASA baseline scenario for future space missions are discussed. Spacecraft/propulsion technologies required for surface-to-orbit, orbit-to-orbit, and surface (lunar) transportation are addressed.

  19. Neurotransmitter transporters

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M;

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters to be...

  20. Abundance anomalies in tidal disruption events

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    The ˜10 per cent of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than M* ≳ M⊙ should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ˜25 per cent on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high-density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main-sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle - stars with M* ≳ M⊙ quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low-mass stars evolve slowly and high-mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to ˜1-2 M⊙ stars disrupted on the main sequence. Like helium, portions of the debris will show still larger changes in C and N, and the anomalies decline as the star leaves the main sequence. The enhanced [N/C] abundance ratio of these TDEs provides the first natural explanation for the rare, nitrogen-rich quasars and may also explain the strong nitrogen emission seen in ultraviolet spectra of ASASSN-14li.

  1. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Aver, Erik [Department of Physics, Gonzaga University, 502 E Boone Ave, Spokane, WA, 99258 (United States); Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455 (United States); Porter, R.L., E-mail: aver@gonzaga.edu, E-mail: olive@umn.edu, E-mail: ryanlporter@gmail.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  2. Abundances of refractory elements in quasars

    New observations of iron, silicon, aluminum, magnesium, and carbon lines in quasars are presented. From comparison of these and previous observations with theoretical models, it is found that the gas-phase abundances of these refractory elements cannot be much less than solar, and in particular that they do not show the order of magnitude depletions that are found in planetary nebulae and the interstellar medium. Because of this lack of depletion of refractory elements it is argued that the broad emission-line clouds are probably deviod of dust

  3. North Sea Elasmobranchs: distribution, abundance and biodiversity

    Daan, N.; Heessen, H.J.L.; Hofstede, ter, AHM Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from various international and national surveys, an overview is given of the fine-scale distribution (resolution of 20¿longitude * 10¿ latitude; ¿ 10*10 nm) and trends in abundance of elasmobranch species reported from the North Sea. Presence-absence maps are produced based on 4 surveys, which help to delineate distribution limits of the less common species, while maps in terms of catch rates (International Bottom Trawl Survey data only) are given for the seven most common shark...

  4. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of ...

  5. Detecting significant changes in protein abundance

    Kai Kammers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We review and demonstrate how an empirical Bayes method, shrinking a protein's sample variance towards a pooled estimate, leads to far more powerful and stable inference to detect significant changes in protein abundance compared to ordinary t-tests. Using examples from isobaric mass labelled proteomic experiments we show how to analyze data from multiple experiments simultaneously, and discuss the effects of missing data on the inference. We also present easy to use open source software for normalization of mass spectrometry data and inference based on moderated test statistics.

  6. Abundance and diversity of marine microbial eukaryotes

    Pernice, Massimo Ciro

    2014-01-01

    [EN]Microeukaryotes are important ecological players in any kind of ecosystem, most notably in the ocean, and it is therefore essential to collect information about their abundance and diversity. To achieve this general goal this thesis was structured in two parts. The first part represents an effort to define our “diversity unit” from studies based on the well-known cloning and Sanger sequencing approach. Basically, we wanted to establish a solid baseline for the second part of the thesis. W...

  7. Non-additive effects of genotypic diversity increase floral abundance and abundance of floral visitors.

    Mark A Genung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1 plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2 plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  8. Metal Abundances of KISS Galaxies. V. Nebular Abundances of Fifteen Intermediate Luminosity Star-Forming Galaxies

    Hirschauer, Alec S; Bresolin, Fabio; Saviane, Ivo; Yegorova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    We present high S/N spectroscopy of 15 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) cataloged in the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS), selected for their possession of high equivalent width [O III] lines. The primary goal of this study was to attempt to derive direct-method ($T_e$) abundances for use in constraining the upper-metallicity branch of the $R_{23}$ relation. The spectra cover the full optical region from [O II]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}3726,3729 to [S III]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}9069,9531 and include the measurement of [O III]{\\lambda}4363 in 13 objects. From these spectra, we determine abundance ratios of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon. We find these galaxies to predominantly possess oxygen abundances in the range of 8.0 $\\lesssim$ 12+log(O/H) $\\lesssim$ 8.3. We present a comparison of direct-method abundances with empirical SEL techniques, revealing several discrepancies. We also present a comparison of direct-method oxygen abundance calculations using electron temperatures determined from e...

  9. Metal effect on the supramolecular structure, photophysics, and acid-base character of trinuclear pyrazolato coinage metal complexes.

    Omary, Mohammad A; Rawashdeh-Omary, Manal A; Gonser, M W Alexander; Elbjeirami, Oussama; Grimes, Tom; Cundari, Thomas R; Diyabalanage, Himashinie V K; Gamage, Chammi S Palehepitiya; Dias, H V Rasika

    2005-11-14

    Varying the coinage metal in cyclic trinuclear pyrazolate complexes is found to significantly affect the solid-state packing, photophysics, and acid-base properties. The three isoleptic compounds used in this study are [[3,5-(CF3)2Pz]M]3 with M = Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., Cu3, Ag3, and Au3, respectively). They form isomorphous crystals and exist as trimers featuring nine-membered M3N6 rings with linear two-coordinate metal sites. On the basis of the M-N distances, the covalent radii of two-coordinate Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(I) were estimated as 1.11, 1.34, and 1.25 angstroms, respectively. The cyclic [[3,5-(CF3)2Pz]M]3 complexes pack as infinite chains of trimers with a greater number of pairwise intertrimer M...M interactions upon proceeding to heavier coinage metals. However, the intertrimer distances are conspicuously short in Ag3 (3.204 angstroms) versus Au3 (3.885 angstroms) or Cu3 (3.813 angstroms) despite the significantly larger covalent radius of Ag(I). Remarkable luminescence properties are found for the three M3 complexes, as manifested by the appearance of multiple unstructured phosphorescence bands whose colors and lifetimes change qualitatively upon varying the coinage metal and temperature. The multiple emissions are assigned to different phosphorescent excimeric states that exhibit enhanced M...M bonding relative to the ground state. The startling luminescence thermochromic changes in crystals of each compound are related to relaxation between the different phosphorescent excimers. The trend in the lowest energy phosphorescence band follows the relative triplet energy of the three M(I) atomic ions. DFT calculations indicate that [[3,5-(R)2Pz]M]3 trimers with R = H or Me are bases with the relative basicity order Ag < Cu < Au while fluorination (R = CF3) renders even the Au trimer acidic. These predictions were substantiated experimentally by the isolation of the first acid-base adduct, [[Au3]2:toluene]infinity, in which a trinuclear Au(I) complex acts as

  10. Acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterial with large surface area: Preparation, characterization, and adsorption properties for cationic and anionic compounds

    Li, Kai; Ma, Chun–Fang; Ling, Yuan; Li, Meng [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Qiang, E-mail: gaoqiang@cug.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nano-Geo Materials of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Luo, Wen–Jun, E-mail: heartnohome@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Nanostructured carbonaceous materials are extremely important in the nano field, yet developing simple, mild, and “green” methods that can make such materials possess large surface area and rich functional groups on their surfaces still remains a considerable challenge. Herein, a one-pot and environment-friendly method, i.e., thermal treatment (180 °C; 18 h) of water mixed with glucose and chitosan (CTS), has been proposed. The resultant carbonaceous nanomaterials were characterized by field emitting scanning electron microscope, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. It was found that, in contrast to the conventional hydrothermally carbonized product from pure glucose, with low surface area (9.3 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and pore volume (0.016 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}), the CTS-added carbonaceous products showed satisfactory textural parameters (surface area and pore volume up to 254 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 0.701 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively). Moreover, it was also interestingly found that these CTS-added carbonaceous products possessed both acidic (–COOH) and basic (–NH{sub 2}) groups on their surfaces. Taking the advantages of large surface area and –COOH/–NH{sub 2} bifunctional surface, the carbonaceous nanomaterials exhibited excellent performance for adsorptions of cationic compound (i.e., methylene blue) at pH 10 and anionic compound (i.e., acid red 18) at pH 2, respectively. This work not only provides a simple and green route to prepare acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterials with large surface area but also well demonstrates their potential for application in adsorption. - Highlights: • A simple and green method was proposed to prepare carbon nanomaterials. • The carbon product showed acid/base bifunctional surface with large surface area. • The carbon material could efficiently adsorb both cationic and anionic compounds.

  11. Beryllium Abundances of Solar-Analog Stars

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Ando, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    An extensive beryllium abundance analysis was conducted for 118 solar analogs (along with 87 FGK standard stars) by applying the spectrum synthesis technique to the near-UV region comprising the Be II line at 3131.066 A, in an attempt to investigate whether Be suffers any depletion such as the case of Li showing a large diversity. We found that, while most of these Sun-like stars are superficially similar in terms of their A(Be) (Be abundances) around the solar value within ~ +/- 0.2dex, 4 out of 118 samples turned out strikingly Be-deficient (by more than ~2 dex) and these 4 stars belong to the group of lowest v_e sin i (projected rotation velocity). Moreover, even for the other majority showing an apparent similarity in Be, we can recognize a tendency that A(Be) gradually increases with an increase in v_e sin i. These observational facts suggest that any solar analog star (including the Sun) generally suffers some kind of Be depletion during their lives, where the rotational velocity (or the angular momentu...

  12. Fluorine Abundances in the Milky Way Bulge

    Cunha, K; Gibson, B K

    2008-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) abundances are derived in a sample of 6 bulge red giants in Baade's Window. These giants span a factor of 10 in metallicity and this is the first study to define the behavior of 19F with metallicity in the bulge. The bulge results show an increase in F/O with increasing oxygen. This trend overlaps what is found in the disk at comparable metallicities, with the most oxygen-rich bulge target extending the disk trend. The increase in F/O in the disk arises from 19F synthesis in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars through stellar winds. The lack of an s-process enhancement in the most fluorine-rich bulge giant in this study, suggests that WR stars represented a larger contribution than AGB stars to 19F production in the bulge when compared to the disk. If this result for fluorine is combined with the previously published overall decline in the O/Mg abundance ratios in metal-rich bulge stars, it suggests that WR winds played a role in shaping chemical evolut...

  13. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  14. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    Kochanek, C S

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle -- stars more massive than the Sun quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low mass stars evolve slowly and high mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to 1-2Msun stars disr...

  15. Element Abundances through the Cosmic Ages

    Pettini, M

    2003-01-01

    The horizon for studies of element abundances has expanded dramatically in the last ten years. Once the domain of astronomers concerned chiefly with stars and nearby galaxies, this field has now become a key component of observational cosmology, as technological advances have made it possible to measure the abundances of several chemical elements in a variety of environments at redshifts up to z = 4, when the universe was in its infancy. In this series of lectures I summarise current knowledge on the chemical make-up of distant galaxies observed directly in their starlight, and of interstellar and intergalactic gas seen in absorption against the spectra of bright background sources. The picture which is emerging is one where the universe at z = 3 already included many of the constituents of today's galaxies-even at these early times we see evidence for Population I and II stars, while the `smoking gun' for Population III objects may be hidden in the chemical composition of the lowest density regions of the in...

  16. Automatic abundance analysis of high resolution spectra

    Bonifacio, P; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Caffau, Elisabetta

    2003-01-01

    We describe an automatic procedure for determining abundances from high resolution spectra. Such procedures are becoming increasingly important as large amounts of data are delivered from 8m telescopes and their high-multiplexing fiber facilities, such as FLAMES on ESO-VLT. The present procedure is specifically targeted for the analysis of spectra of giants in the Sgr dSph; however, the procedure may be, in principle, tailored to analyse stars of any type. Emphasis is placed on the algorithms and on the stability of the method; the external accuracy rests, ultimately, on the reliability of the theoretical models (model-atmospheres, synthetic spectra) used to interpret the data. Comparison of the results of the procedure with the results of a traditional analysis for 12 Sgr giants shows that abundances accurate at the level of 0.2 dex, comparable with that of traditional analysis of the same spectra, may be derived in a fast and efficient way. Such automatic procedures are not meant to replace the traditional ...

  17. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  18. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    Santos, N C; Israelian, G; Mayor, M; Rebolo, R; García-Gíl, A; Pérez de Taoro, M R; Randich, S

    2002-01-01

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be deple...

  19. Sodium-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    Boron WF

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Together, the Na(+-coupled HCO(3(- transporters and the AE family of anion exchangers (i.e., Cl-HCO3 exchangers comprise the bicarbonate transporter (BT superfamily. Virtually all BTs are important for the regulation of intracellular pH (pH(i in cells throughout the body. Specific BTs also play roles in cell-volume regulation, as well as for the transport of salt and/or acid-base equivalents across many epithelia. Electrogenic Na/HCO3 cotransporters (NBCe's play key roles in HCO(3(- reabsorption by the renal proximal tubule, and HCO(3(- secretion by the pancreatic duct. Electroneutral NBC's (NBCn's regulate pH(i in vascular smooth muscle and are present in/near axons in the brain. Finally, the Na(+-driven Cl-HCO3 exchanger (NDCBE's appear to be the major pH(i regulators in CNS neurons. A characteristic of most, but not all, BT's is that they are inhibited rather effectively by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-4,4'-disulfonate (DIDS.

  20. Kinetics and mechanisms of the acid-base reaction between NH$_3$ and HCOOH in interstellar ice analogs

    Bergner, Jennifer B; Rajappan, Mahesh; Fayolle, Edith C

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules (COMs) are commonly observed during star formation, and are proposed to form through radical chemistry in icy grain mantles. Reactions between ions and neutral molecules in ices may provide an alternative cold channel to complexity, as ion-neutral reactions are thought to have low or even no energy barriers. Here we present a study of a the kinetics and mechanisms of a potential ion-generating acid-base reaction between NH$_{3}$ and HCOOH to form the salt NH$_{4}^{+}$HCOO$^{-}$. We observe salt growth at temperatures as low as 15K, indicating that this reaction is feasible in cold environments. The kinetics of salt growth are best fit by a two-step model involving a slow "pre-reaction" step followed by a fast reaction step. The reaction energy barrier is determined to be 70 $\\pm$ 30K with a pre-exponential factor 1.4 $\\pm$ 0.4 x 10$^{-3}$ s$^{-1}$. The pre-reaction rate varies under different experimental conditions and likely represents a combination of diffusion and or...

  1. Novel pH-sensitive polysialic acid based polymeric micelles for triggered intracellular release of hydrophobic drug.

    Zhang, Wuxia; Dong, Dongqi; Li, Peng; Wang, Dongdong; Mu, Haibo; Niu, Hong; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-03-30

    Polysialic acid (PSA), a non-immunogenic and biodegradable natural polymer, is prone to hydrolysis under endo-lysosomal pH conditions. Here, we synthesized an intracellular pH-sensitive polysialic acid-ursolic acid conjugate by a condensation reaction. To further test the drug loading capability, we prepared paclitaxel-loaded polysialic acid-based amphiphilic copolymer micelle (PTX-loaded-PSAU) by a nanoprecipitation method. Results showed PTX-loaded-PSAU exhibited well-defined spherical shape and homogeneous distribution. The drug-loading was 4.5% with an entrapment efficiency of 67.5%. PTX released from PTX-loaded-PSAU was 15% and 42% in 72 h under simulated physiological condition (pH 7.4) and mild acidic conditions (pH 5.0), respectively. In addition, In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that PTX-loaded-PSAU retained anti-tumor (SGC-7901) activity with a cell viability of 53.8% following 72 h incubation, indicating PTX-loaded-PSAU could efficiently release PTX into the tumor cells. These results indicated that the pH-responsive biodegradable PTX-loaded-PSAU possess superior extracellular stability and intracellular drug release ability. PMID:26794949

  2. The Importance of the Ionic Product for Water to Understand the Physiology of the Acid-Base Balance in Humans

    María M. Adeva-Andany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human plasma is an aqueous solution that has to abide by chemical rules such as the principle of electrical neutrality and the constancy of the ionic product for water. These rules define the acid-base balance in the human body. According to the electroneutrality principle, plasma has to be electrically neutral and the sum of its cations equals the sum of its anions. In addition, the ionic product for water has to be constant. Therefore, the plasma concentration of hydrogen ions depends on the plasma ionic composition. Variations in the concentration of plasma ions that alter the relative proportion of anions and cations predictably lead to a change in the plasma concentration of hydrogen ions by driving adaptive adjustments in water ionization that allow plasma electroneutrality while maintaining constant the ionic product for water. The accumulation of plasma anions out of proportion of cations induces an electrical imbalance compensated by a fall of hydroxide ions that brings about a rise in hydrogen ions (acidosis. By contrast, the deficiency of chloride relative to sodium generates plasma alkalosis by increasing hydroxide ions. The adjustment of plasma bicarbonate concentration to these changes is an important compensatory mechanism that protects plasma pH from severe deviations.

  3. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision. PMID:25406110

  4. Questioning As a Pedagogical Tool for Eliciting Student Generated Questions During the Teaching of Acid-base Equilibria

    Ayoade Ejiwale Okanlawon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, teachers simply taught problem-solving by explaining the worked-out examples taken from textbooks and students were expected to listen quietly, copy the solution to the problem, and then work independently at their desks. But a large body of research notes that guiding students to develop a solution pathway with questioning is more effective than simply explaining the sequence of steps to solve the problem. Students involved in question- and-answer sessions are more attentive than those who listen passively to teacher explanations and they are more likely to generate questions. The questions students ask during a lesson perform a number of important functions, including providing the teacher with valuable information about students’ understanding and misunderstanding, fostering self-regulation, inviting classroom discussions and aiding comprehension of contents presented. The skill of posing questions during classroom instruction is often under-valued and under taught in today’s classrooms. To encourage students to ask quality and thought provoking questions related to the contents taught, explicit instruction is required. This paper, therefore, qualitatively reports factors that foster student generated questions during the problem-solving instruction involving acid-base titration problem.

  5. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid-base neutralization reactions

    Chen Huabing; Wan Jiangling; Wang Yirui; Mou Dongsheng; Liu Hongbin; Xu Huibi; Yang Xiangliang [College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)], E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2008-09-17

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  6. Ocean acidification increases copper toxicity differentially in two key marine invertebrates with distinct acid-base responses.

    Lewis, Ceri; Ellis, Robert P; Vernon, Emily; Elliot, Katie; Newbatt, Sam; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is expected to indirectly impact biota living in contaminated coastal environments by altering the bioavailability and potentially toxicity of many pH-sensitive metals. Here, we show that OA (pH 7.71; pCO2 1480 μatm) significantly increases the toxicity responses to a global coastal contaminant (copper ~0.1 μM) in two keystone benthic species; mussels (Mytilus edulis) and purple sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus). Mussels showed an extracellular acidosis in response to OA and copper individually which was enhanced during combined exposure. In contrast, urchins maintained extracellular fluid pH under OA by accumulating bicarbonate but exhibited a slight alkalosis in response to copper either alone or with OA. Importantly, copper-induced damage to DNA and lipids was significantly greater under OA compared to control conditions (pH 8.14; pCO2 470 μatm) for both species. However, this increase in DNA-damage was four times lower in urchins than mussels, suggesting that internal acid-base regulation in urchins may substantially moderate the magnitude of this OA-induced copper toxicity effect. Thus, changes in metal toxicity under OA may not purely be driven by metal speciation in seawater and may be far more diverse than either single-stressor or single-species studies indicate. This has important implications for future environmental management strategies. PMID:26899803

  7. Study of acid-base properties in various water-salt and water-organic solvent mixtures

    Acid-base reactions have been studied in water-salt mixtures and water organic solvent-mixtures. It has been possible to find some relations between the displacement of the equilibria and the numerical value of water activity in the mixture. First have been studied some equilibria H+ + B ↔ HB+ in salt-water mixtures and found a relation between the pKA value, the solubility of the base and water activity. The reaction HO- + H+ ↔ H2O has been investigated and a relation been found between pKi values, water activity and the molar concentration of the salt in the mixture. This relation is the same for every mixture. Then the same reactions have been studied in organic solvent-water mixtures and a relation found in the first part of the work have been used with success. So it has been possible to explain easily some properties of organic water-mixture as the shape of the curves of the Hammett acidity function Ho. (authors)

  8. Dry period cooling ameliorates physiological variables and blood acid base balance, improving milk production in murrah buffaloes

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of evaporative cooling during late gestation on physiological responses, blood gas and acid base balance and subsequent milk production of Murrah buffaloes. To investigate this study sixteen healthy pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes (second to fourth parity) at sixty days prepartum were selected in the months of May to June and divided into two groups of eight animals each. One group of buffaloes (Cooled/CL) was managed under fan and mist cooling system during dry period. Group second buffaloes (Noncooled/NCL) remained as control without provision of cooling during dry period. The physiological responses viz. Rectal temperature (RT), Respiratory rate (RR) and Pulse rate were significantly ( P group 2, with the provision of cooling. Skin surface temperature at thorax was significantly lower in cooled group relative to noncooled group. Blood pH and pO2 were significantly ( P group as compared to the cooled group. pCO2, TCO2, HCO3, SBC, base excess in extracellular fluid (BEecf), base excess in blood (BEb), PCV and Hb were significantly ( P group as compared to noncooled group. DMI was significantly ( P group of Murrah buffaloes.

  9. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  10. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  11. Cation transfer across a hydrogel/organic phase: Effect of cation size, hydrophobicity and acid-base properties

    Juarez, Ana V. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, IMBIV, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Yudi, Lidia M. [Departamento de Fisico Quimica, INFIQC, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Alvarez Igarzabal, Cecilia [Departamento de Quimica Organica, IMBIV, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Strumia, Miriam C., E-mail: mcs@fcq.unc.edu.a [Departamento de Quimica Organica, IMBIV, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-02-28

    The transfers of tetraethylammonium (TEA{sup +}) and protonated triflupromazine (HTFP{sup +}) through a hydrogel/liquid interface (g/o) and a liquid/liquid interface (w/o) were compared using cyclic voltammetry. After the two phases were put in contact, the behavior of each molecule was analyzed at different pH values and at different time points. The gel induces hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with TEA{sup +} and HTFP{sup +}, shifting the peak potentials to more positive values. The diffusion coefficients, D, in both phases (g and w) at different pH values were calculated. In the case of TEA{sup +}, the D value remains constant in both systems. However, the D value of HTFP{sup +} is lower in the gel phase than in the liquid phase. HTFP{sup +} is transferred from the aqueous phase to the organic phase via a direct mechanism that involves coupled acid-base and partition processes. At the g/o interface, the coupled chemical reactions of HTFP{sup +} were inhibited by the drug/gel interaction. The results demonstrate that the g/o system could be used as a model to study the controlled release of charged drugs.

  12. Effects of fatty acid activation on photosynthetic production of fatty acid-based biofuels in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    Gao Qianqian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide to drop in fuel molecules in a single biological system can be achieved from fatty acid-based biofuels such as fatty alcohols and alkanes. These molecules have similar properties to fossil fuels but can be produced by photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Results Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strains containing either overexpression or deletion of the slr1609 gene, which encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AAS, have been constructed. The complete segregation and deletion in all mutant strains was confirmed by PCR analysis. Blocking fatty acid activation by deleting slr1609 gene in wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 led to a doubling of the amount of free fatty acids and a decrease of alkane production by up to 90 percent. Overexpression of slr1609 gene in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 had no effect on the production of either free fatty acids or alkanes. Overexpression or deletion of slr1609 gene in the Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strain with the capability of making fatty alcohols by genetically introducing fatty acyl-CoA reductase respectively enhanced or reduced fatty alcohol production by 60 percent. Conclusions Fatty acid activation functionalized by the slr1609 gene is metabolically crucial for biosynthesis of fatty acid derivatives in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. It is necessary but not sufficient for efficient production of alkanes. Fatty alcohol production can be significantly improved by the overexpression of slr1609 gene.

  13. Electronic absorption study on acid-base equilibria for some pyrimidine derivatives containing semi- and thiosemicarbazone moiety

    Kılıç, H.

    2010-02-01

    The UV-vis spectra of recently synthesized 5-benzoyl-1-(methylphenylmethyleneamino)-4-phenyl-1H-pyrimidine-2-one, ( I), and 5-benzoyl-1-(methylphenylmethyleneamino)-4-phenyl-1H-pyrimidine-2-thione, ( II) were studied in aqueous methanol (5%, v/v methanol). The nature of the electronic transitions and the roles of carbonyl oxygen of I and thiocarbonyl sulfur of II on the behavior of UV-vis spectra were discussed. Acid-base equilibria of the compounds against varying pH and p Ka values related equilibria were determined at an ionic strength of 0.10 M by using the Henderson-Haselbalch equation. The mean acidity constants for the protonated forms of the compounds were determined as p Ka1 = 5.121, p Ka2 = 7.929 and p Ka3 = 11.130 for I and p Ka1 = 4.684, p Ka2 = 7.245 and p Ka3 = 10.630 for II. The preferred dissociation mechanisms were discussed based on UV-vis data and a mechanism was proposed for each compound.

  14. Dry period cooling ameliorates physiological variables and blood acid base balance, improving milk production in murrah buffaloes

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of evaporative cooling during late gestation on physiological responses, blood gas and acid base balance and subsequent milk production of Murrah buffaloes. To investigate this study sixteen healthy pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes (second to fourth parity) at sixty days prepartum were selected in the months of May to June and divided into two groups of eight animals each. One group of buffaloes (Cooled/CL) was managed under fan and mist cooling system during dry period. Group second buffaloes (Noncooled/NCL) remained as control without provision of cooling during dry period. The physiological responses viz. Rectal temperature (RT), Respiratory rate (RR) and Pulse rate were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in group 2, with the provision of cooling. Skin surface temperature at thorax was significantly lower in cooled group relative to noncooled group. Blood pH and pO2 were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in heat stressed group as compared to the cooled group. pCO2, TCO2, HCO3, SBC, base excess in extracellular fluid (BEecf), base excess in blood (BEb), PCV and Hb were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled group as compared to noncooled group. DMI was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals. Milk yield, FCM, fat yield, lactose yield and total solid yield was significantly higher ( P < 0.05) in cooled group of Murrah buffaloes.

  15. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid-base neutralization reactions

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries

  16. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  17. The effect of oral sodium acetate administration on plasma acetate concentration and acid-base state in horses

    Lindinger Michael I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Sodium acetate (NaAcetate has received some attention as an alkalinizing agent and possible alternative energy source for the horse, however the effects of oral administration remain largely unknown. The present study used the physicochemical approach to characterize the changes in acid-base status occurring after oral NaAcetate/acetic acid (NAA administration in horses. Methods Jugular venous blood was sampled from 9 exercise-conditioned horses on 2 separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competition exercise test (CET designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of 3-day event. Immediately after the CETs horses were allowed water ad libitum and either: 1 8 L of a hypertonic NaAcetate/acetic acid solution via nasogastric tube followed by a typical hay/grain meal (NAA trial; or 2 a hay/grain meal alone (Control trial. Results Oral NAA resulted in a profound plasma alkalosis marked by decreased plasma [H+] and increased plasma [TCO2] and [HCO3-] compared to Control. The primary contributor to the plasma alkalosis was an increased [SID], as a result of increased plasma [Na+] and decreased plasma [Cl-]. An increased [Atot], due to increased [PP] and a sustained increase in plasma [acetate], contributed a minor acidifying effect. Conclusion It is concluded that oral NaAcetate could be used as both an alkalinizing agent and an alternative energy source in the horse.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of elastomeric scaffolds comprised of a citric acid-based polyester/hydroxyapatite microcomposite

    Highlights: • Porous scaffolds were prepared from polymer/hydroxyapatite (POC/HA) composite. • The pore size was designed to be uniform for all POC/HA composite scaffolds. • Compression strength and modulus are dependent on HA concentration within composite. - Abstract: In this paper we describe an effective technical route for the production of porous scaffolds from microcomposite material consistent of citric acid-based polyester elastomer and hydroxyapatite microparticles with potential use in tissue engineering applications. Fabricated scaffolds were characterized by field emission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and mechanical tests. We demonstrate that the chemical composition, scaffold morphology, mechanical integrity and porosity of the produced microcomposite scaffolds are strongly affected by variation of the initial hydroxyapatite concentration in the mineral-polymer mixture during the fabrication process. This polyester/mineral scaffold exhibits versatility in compression modulus and strength in the range of 21.72–33.25 KPa and 49.92–101.48 KPa respectively, corresponding to the hydroxyapatite concentration in the composite (10–30 wt.%)

  19. Contributions of separate reactions to the acid-base buffering of soils in brook floodplains (Central Forest State Reserve)

    Sokolova, T. A.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Rusakova, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    The acid-base buffering of gleyic gray-humus soils developed in brook floodplains and undisturbed southern-taiga landscapes has been characterized by the continuous potentiometric titration of soil water suspensions. During the interaction with an acid, the major amount of protons (>80%) is consumed for the displacement of exchangeable bases and the dissolution of Ca oxalates. In the O and AY horizons, Mn compounds make the major contribution (2-15%) to the acid buffering. The buffer reactions with the participation of Al compounds make up from 0.5 to 1-2% of the total buffering capacity, and the protonation of the surface OH groups of kaolinite consumes 2-3% of the total buffering capacity. The deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of Fe hydroxides (9-43%), the deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of illite crystals (3-19%), and the dissolution of unidentified aluminosilicates (9-14%) are the most significant buffer reactions whose contributions have been quantified during the interaction with a base. The contribution of the deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of kaolinite particles is lower (1-5%) because of the small specific surface area of this mineral, and that of the dissolution of Fe compounds is insignificant. In the AY horizon, the acid and base buffering of soil in the rhizosphere is higher than beyond the rhizosphere because of the higher contents of organic matter and nonsilicate Fe and Al compounds.

  20. Coupled Cluster Evaluation of the Stability of Atmospheric Acid-Base Clusters with up to 10 Molecules.

    Myllys, Nanna; Elm, Jonas; Halonen, Roope; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the utilization of the domain local pair natural orbital coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method for calculating binding energies of atmospherical molecular clusters. Applied to small complexes of atmospherical relevance we find that the DLPNO method significantly reduces the scatter in the binding energy, which is commonly present in DFT calculations. For medium sized clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and bases the DLPNO method yields a systematic underestimation of the binding energy compared to canonical coupled cluster results. The errors in the DFT binding energies appear to be more random, while the systematic nature of the DLPNO results allows the establishment of a scaling factor, to better mimic the canonical coupled cluster calculations. Based on the trends identified for the small and medium sized systems, we further extend the application of the DLPNO method to large acid - base clusters consisting of up to 10 molecules, which have previously been out of reach with accurate coupled cluster methods. Using the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code (ACDC) we compare the sulfuric acid dimer formation based on the new DLPNO binding energies with previously published RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z results. We also compare the simulated sulfuric acid dimer concentration as a function of the base concentration with measurement data from the CLOUD chamber and flow tube experiments. The DLPNO method, even after scaling, underpredicts the dimer concentration significantly. Reasons for this are discussed. PMID:26771121

  1. Geostatistical Analysis of Spatial Variability of Mineral Abundance and Kd in Frenchman Flat, NTS, Alluvium

    Carle, S F; Zavarin, M; Pawloski, G A

    2002-11-01

    LLNL hydrologic source term modeling at the Cambric site (Pawloski et al., 2000) showed that retardation of radionuclide transport is sensitive to the distribution and amount of radionuclide sorbing minerals. While all mineralogic information available near the Cambric site was used in these early simulations (11 mineral abundance analyses from UE-5n and 9 from RNM-l), these older data sets were qualitative in nature, with detection limits too high to accurately measure many of the important radionuclide sorbing minerals (e.g. iron oxide). Also, the sparse nature of the mineral abundance data permitted only a hypothetical description of the spatial distribution of radionuclide sorbing minerals. Yet, the modeling results predicted that the spatial distribution of sorbing minerals would strongly affect radionuclide transport. Clearly, additional data are needed to improve understanding of mineral abundances and their spatial distributions if model predictions in Frenchman Flat are to be defensible. This report evaluates new high-resolution quantitative X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) data on mineral distributions and their abundances from core samples recently collected from drill hole ER-5-4. The total of 94 samples from ER-5-4 were collected at various spacings to enable evaluation of spatial variability at a variety of spatial scales as small as 0.3 meters and up to hundreds of meters. Additional XRD analyses obtained from drillholes UE-Sn, ER-5-3, and U-11g-1 are used to augment evaluation of vertical spatial variability and permit some evaluation of lateral spatial variability. A total of 163 samples are evaluated. The overall goal of this study is to understand and characterize the spatial variation of sorbing minerals in Frenchman Flat alluvium using geostatistical techniques, with consideration for the potential impact on reactive transport of radionuclides. To achieve this goal requires an effort to ensure that plausible geostatistical models are used to

  2. Acoplamiento de modelos de transporte de solutos y de modelos de reacciones químicas

    Samper, J.; Ayora, C.

    1993-01-01

    During subsurface transport, reactive solutes are subject to a variety of hydrodynamic and chemical processes. The major hydrodynamic processes include advection and convection, dispersion and diffusion. The key chemical processes are complexation including hydrolysis and acid-base reactions, dissolution-precipitation, reduction-oxidation, adsorption and ion exchange. The combined effects of all these processes on solute transport must satisfy the principie of conservation of mass. The statem...

  3. TEA: A Code for Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. (1958) and Eriksson (1971). It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method o...

  4. Sediment Transport

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2...

  5. A Comparative Study of the Effects of a Concept Mapping Enhanced Laboratory Experience on Turkish High School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Chemistry

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    The research reported here consists of the introduction of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities combined with concept mapping. The purpose of this intervention was to enhance student understanding of acid-base chemistry for tenth grade students' from two classes in a Turkish high school. An additional aim was to enhance…

  6. An Introduction to Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares: Spectrophotometric Study of the Acid-Base Equilibria of 8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-Sulfonic Acid

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Amigo, Jose Manuel; Coello, Jordi; Maspoch, Santiago

    2007-01-01

    A spectrophotometric study of the acid-base equilibria of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid to describe the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares algorithm (MCR-ALS) is described. The algorithm provides a lot of information and hence is of great importance for the chemometrics research.

  7. The Effect of Level of Information as Presented by Different Technologies on Students' Understanding of Acid, Base, and pH Concepts.

    Nakhleh, Mary B.; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    Within high school chemistry the topic of acids, bases, and pH is particularly challenging because robust understanding of the topic depends heavily on the student possessing deep concepts of atoms, molecules, ions, and chemical reactions. Since knowledge is acquired and stored in a dynamic structure, it was investigated in this study how…

  8. Involvement of placental/umbilical cord blood acid-base status and gas values on the radiosensitivity of human fetal/neonatal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Arterial cord blood (CB) acid-base status and gas values, such as pH, PCO2, PO2, HCO3- and base excess, provide useful information on the fetal and neonatal condition. However, it remains unknown whether these values affect the radiosensitivity of fetal/neonatal hematopoiesis. The present study evaluated the relationship between arterial CB acid-base status, gas values, and the radiosensitivity of CB hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). A total of 25 CB units were collected. The arterial CB acid-base status and gas values were measured within 30 min of delivery. The CD34+ HSPCs obtained from CB were exposed to 2 Gy X-irradiation, and then assayed for colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage, burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E), and colony-forming unit-granulocyte erythroid, macrophage and megakaryocyte cells. Acid-base status and gas values for PCO2 and HCO3- showed a statistically significant negative correlation with the surviving fraction of BFU-E. In addition, a significant positive correlation was observed between gestational age and PCO2. Moreover, the surviving fraction of BFU-E showed a significant negative correlation with gestational age. Thus, HSPCs obtained from CB with high PCO2/HCO3- levels were sensitive to X-irradiation, which suggests that the status of arterial PCO2/HCO3- influences the radiosensitivity of fetal/neonatal hematopoiesis, especially erythropoiesis. (author)

  9. Forms and genesis of species abundance distributions

    Evans O. Ochiaga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Species abundance distribution (SAD is one of the most important metrics in community ecology. SAD curves take a hollow or hyperbolic shape in a histogram plot with many rare species and only a few common species. In general, the shape of SAD is largely log-normally distributed, although the mechanism behind this particular SAD shape still remains elusive. Here, we aim to review four major parametric forms of SAD and three contending mechanisms that could potentially explain this highly skewed form of SAD. The parametric forms reviewed here include log series, negative binomial, lognormal and geometric distributions. The mechanisms reviewed here include the maximum entropy theory of ecology, neutral theory and the theory of proportionate effect.

  10. $^{7}$Li abundances in halo stars testing stellar evolution models and the primordial $^{7}$Li abundance

    Chaboyer, B; Brian Chaboyer

    1994-01-01

    A large number of stellar evolution models with [Fe/H] = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial .sup(7)Li abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of Li abundances in extremely metal poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models do a good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than 5600 K. They predict a primordial ^7Li abundance of log N(Li) = 2.24\\pm 0.03. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the .sup(7)Li destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of .sup(7)Li from the surface of the star. The [Fe/H] = -2.3 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rot...

  11. Dynamical implications of Jupiter's tropospheric ammonia abundance

    Showman, Adam P.; de Pater, Imke

    2005-03-01

    Groundbased radio observations indicate that Jupiter's ammonia is globally depleted from 0.6 bars to at least 4-6 bars relative to the deep abundance of ˜3 times solar, a fact that has so far defied explanation. The observations also indicate that (i) the depletion is greater in belts than zones, and (ii) the greatest depletion occurs within Jupiter's local 5-μm hot spots, which have recently been detected at radio wavelengths. Here, we first show that both the global depletion and its belt-zone variation can be explained by a simple model for the interaction of moist convection with Jupiter's cloud-layer circulation. If the global depletion is dynamical in origin, then important endmember models for the belt-zone circulation can be ruled out. Next, we show that the radio observations of Jupiter's 5-μm hot spots imply that the equatorial wave inferred to cause hot spots induces vertical parcel oscillation of a factor of ˜2 in pressure near the 2-bar level, which places important constraints on hot-spot dynamics. Finally, using spatially resolved radio maps, we demonstrate that low-latitude features exceeding ˜4000 km diameter, such as the equatorial plumes and large vortices, are also depleted in ammonia from 0.6 bars to at least 2 bars relative to the deep abundance of 3 times solar. If any low-latitude features exist that contain 3-times-solar ammonia up to the 0.6-bar ammonia condensation level, they must have diameters less than ˜4000 km.

  12. Abundant thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel

    It has long been known that thorium-232 is a fertile radioactive material that can produce energy in nuclear reactors for conversion to electricity. Thorium-232 is well suited to a variety of reactor types including molten fluoride salt designs, heavy water CANDU configurations, and helium-cooled TRISO-fueled systems. Among contentious commercial nuclear power issues are the questions of what to do with long-lived radioactive waste and how to minimize weapon proliferation dangers. The substitution of thorium for uranium as fuel in nuclear reactors has significant potential for minimizing both problems. Thorium is three times more abundant in nature than uranium. Whereas uranium has to be imported, there is enough thorium in the United States alone to provide adequate grid power for many centuries. A well-designed thorium reactor could produce electricity less expensively than a next-generation coal-fired plant or a current-generation uranium-fueled nuclear reactor. Importantly, thorium reactors produce substantially less long-lived radioactive waste than uranium reactors. Thorium-fueled reactors with molten salt configurations and very high temperature thorium-based TRISO-fueled reactors are both recommended for priority Generation IV funding in the 2030 time frame. - Highlights: • Thorium is an abundant nuclear fuel that is well suited to three advanced reactor configurations. • Important thorium reactor configurations include molten salt, CANDU, and TRISO systems. • Thorium has important nuclear waste disposal advantages relative to pressurized water reactors. • Thorium as a nuclear fuel has important advantages relative to weapon non-proliferation

  13. Could the acid-base status of Antarctic sea urchins indicate a better-than-expected resilience to near-future ocean acidification?

    Collard, Marie; De Ridder, Chantal; David, Bruno; Dehairs, Frank; Dubois, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration alters the chemistry of the oceans towards more acidic conditions. Polar oceans are particularly affected due to their low temperature, low carbonate content and mixing patterns, for instance upwellings. Calcifying organisms are expected to be highly impacted by the decrease in the oceans' pH and carbonate ions concentration. In particular, sea urchins, members of the phylum Echinodermata, are hypothesized to be at risk due to their high-magnesium calcite skeleton. However, tolerance to ocean acidification in metazoans is first linked to acid-base regulation capacities of the extracellular fluids. No information on this is available to date for Antarctic echinoderms and inference from temperate and tropical studies needs support. In this study, we investigated the acid-base status of 9 species of sea urchins (3 cidaroids, 2 regular euechinoids and 4 irregular echinoids). It appears that Antarctic regular euechinoids seem equipped with similar acid-base regulation systems as tropical and temperate regular euechinoids but could rely on more passive ion transfer systems, minimizing energy requirements. Cidaroids have an acid-base status similar to that of tropical cidaroids. Therefore Antarctic cidaroids will most probably not be affected by decreasing seawater pH, the pH drop linked to ocean acidification being negligible in comparison of the naturally low pH of the coelomic fluid. Irregular echinoids might not suffer from reduced seawater pH if acidosis of the coelomic fluid pH does not occur but more data on their acid-base regulation are needed. Combining these results with the resilience of Antarctic sea urchin larvae strongly suggests that these organisms might not be the expected victims of ocean acidification. However, data on the impact of other global stressors such as temperature and of the combination of the different stressors needs to be acquired to assess the sensitivity of these organisms to global

  14. Maritime Transport

    Veenstra, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    This important volume brings together an authoritative selection of the leading papers on the subject of maritime transport. With a new introductory essay by the editors, the collection provides a thorough examination of the topics associated with this area, including maritime economics, transport law and policy.

  15. Observational effects of magnetism in O stars: surface nitrogen abundances

    Martins, F; Wade, G A; Donati, J -F; Bouret, J -C

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star tau Sco. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the sample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Theta1 Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the on...

  16. Meridional circulation and the lithium abundance gap in F stars

    The effect of meridional circulation on the time evolution of superficial abundances of helium, lithium, and beryllium in F stars is calculated in detail. It is shown that, as long as the presence of convection zones is assumed not to modify global meridional circulation patterns, the maximum equatorial rotational velocity allowing the settling of Li and He decreases rapidly with T(eff), going from 50 km/s at 7250 K to only 5 km/s at 6400 K. It is also shown that, for stars of the age of the Hyades with T(eff) less than 7000 K and rotational velocities larger than about 25 km/s, meridional circulation is rapid enough to bring to the surface matter that originally was deep enough to have been depleted of its Li through nuclear burning. Observational tests are suggested to distinguish between this scenario and the gravitational settling model or turbulent diffusion model. It is shown how the Li/Be ratio varies in the presence of transport by meridional circulation. 48 references

  17. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.;

    2008-01-01

    sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed em...... between protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion: Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work represent the most complete study of protein abundance in a bacterial cell so far. We show significant associations between the abundance of a protein and its...

  18. Neutron transport

    This bibliographical note presents a reference book which addresses the study of neutron transport in matter, the study of conditions for a chain reaction and the study of modifications of matter composition due to nuclear reactions. This book presents the main nuclear data, their measurement, assessment and processing, and the spallation. It proposes an overview of methods applied for the study of neutron transport: basic equations and their derived forms, deterministic methods and Monte Carlo method of resolution of the Boltzmann equation, methods of resolution of generalized Bateman equations, methods of time resolution of space kinetics coupled equations. It presents the main calculation codes, discusses the qualification and experimental aspects, and gives an overview of neutron transport applications: neutron transport calculation of reactors, neutron transport coupled with other disciplines, physics of fuel cycle, criticality

  19. Acid-base and ionic fluxes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during exposure to chloramine-T

    Powell, M.D.; Perry, S.F. [Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The effects of chloramine-T and its degradation products, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and para-toluenesulphonamide (pTSA), on whole body acid-base and branchial and renal ion (Na{sup +}and Cl{sup -}) fluxes were examined in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Exposure to chloramine-T (3.5 h, 18 mg l{sup -1}) resulted in increases in plasma total CO{sub 2} but no coincident rise in P{sub a}CO{sub 2} or reduction in blood pH. Exposure of fish to 2, 9 or 18 mg l{sup -1} chloramine-T (3.5 h duration) resulted in a reduction in net acid uptake suggesting the development of a metabolic alkalosis. Exposure to the chloramine-T breakdown product pTSA (dissolved in DMSO) resulted in increased net acid uptake (decreased acid excretion) suggesting a metabolic acidosis. Whole body ion fluxes demonstrated increases in the losses of both Na{sup +}and Cl{sup -} with chloramine-T, NaOCl and pTSA. However, the effect of DMSO alone could not be isolated. Confirmatory studies using fish in which the urinary bladder (to allow collection of urine) and dorsal aorta (to allow injection of [{sup 14}C]polyethylene glycol 4000 ([{sup 14}C]PEG), an extracellular fluid marker) were catheterised, revealed that changes in whole body ion fluxes during chloramine-T exposure could not be explained by increased renal efflux through urine flow, glomerular filtration or renal clearance. Branchial effluxes of [{sup 14}C]PEG were not significantly affected by chloramine-T exposure suggesting that the changes in whole body ionic fluxes were caused by transcellular rather than paracellular processes. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Site and chirality selective chemical modifications of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) via Lewis acid-base interactions.

    Sundaram, Rajashabala; Scheiner, Steve; Roy, Ajit K; Kar, Tapas

    2015-02-01

    The pristine BNNTs contain both Lewis acid (boron) and Lewis base (nitrogen) centers at their surface. Interactions of ammonia and borane molecules, representatives of Lewis base and acid as adsorbates respectively, with matching sites at the surface of BNNTs, have been explored in the present DFT study. Adsorption energies suggest stronger chemisorption (about 15-20 kcal mol(-1)) of borane than ammonia (about 5-10 kcal mol(-1)) in both armchair (4,4) and zigzag (8,0) variants of the tube. NH3 favors (8,0) over the (4,4) tube, whereas BH3 exhibits the opposite preference, indicating some chirality dependence on acid-base interactions. A new feature of bonding is found in BH3/AlH3-BNNTs (at the edge site) complexes, where one hydrogen of the guest molecule is involved in three-center two-electron bonding, in addition to dative covalent bond (N: → B). This interaction causes a reversal of electron flow from borane/alane to BNNT, making the tube an electron acceptor, suggesting tailoring of electronic properties could be possible by varying strength of incoming Lewis acids. On the contrary, BNNTs always behave as electron acceptor in ammonia complexes. IR, XPS and NMR spectra show some characteristic features of complexes and can help experimentalists to identify not only structures of such complexes but also the location of the guest molecules and design second functionalizations. Interaction with several other neutral BF3, BCl3, BH2CH3 and ionic CH3(+) acids as well as amino group (CH3NH2 and NH2COOH) were also studied. The strongest interaction (>100 kcal mol(-1)) is found in BNNT-CH3(+) complexes and H-bonds are the only source of stability of NH2COOH-BNNT complexes. PMID:25559141

  1. Acid-base pH curves in vitro with mixtures of pure cultures of human oral microorganisms.

    Wijeyeweera, R L; Kleinberg, I

    1989-01-01

    Pure cultures of microorganisms commonly found in supragingival plaque were incubated alone and in combinations to determine the bacterial contribution to the pH-fall-pH-rise that is the central characteristic of the Stephan-curve pH change seen in plaque in vivo after brief exposure to a sugar solution. To avoid the complicating conditions of saliva flow and plaque diffusion, experiments were done with bacterial suspensions in incubations in vitro. In an initial experimental series where each microorganism was incubated only with glucose, all but a few produced the initial pH fall. Some also showed a subsequent small, sharp rise in the pH which then quickly levelled off; this was due to metabolism of endogenous substrate accumulated by most microorganisms during their growth in culture. When arginolytic and non-arginolytic bacteria were each then incubated with both glucose and arginine present (the glucose substrate to stimulate a pH fall and the arginine to stimulate a pH rise), the non-arginolytic gave a progressively more acidic pH response with progressive increase in the cell concentration, whereas the arginolytic bacteria produced a much smaller and variable pH decrease with similar cell concentration increase. Mixing pure cultures of either arginolytic or non-arginolytic bacteria gave acid-base pH responses similar to those of their respective pure cultures, whereas mixing arginolytic with non-arginolytic bacteria resulted in an approximate averaging of their different curves. The organisms present in highest proportion in a mixture had the greatest effects. The outcome of mixing the most numerous streptococcal and actinomyces species found normally in supragingival plaque indicated that the well-established difference in the acidity level of the Stephan pH response of caries-active and caries-inactive plaques could be due to differences in the proportions of their arginolytic and non-arginolytic members. PMID:2675801

  2. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    Cowan, J J; Sneden, C; Den Hartog, E A; Collier, J L; Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; Collier, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingl...

  3. Abundance of sardine fish species in Bangladesh

    Roy Bikram Jit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted during January, 2012 to December 2012 in the sardine fisheries which is occurred both in artisanal and industrial fishing sector in the marine water of the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. During this study period the total landing amounts by weight of sardines were 7352.99 MT, among these 23.76% (1747.22 MT was exploited by the artisanal mechanized boats and 76.24% (5605.77 MT captured through different industrial fishing trawlers and contributed 17.51% of the total marine fish production by commercial fish trawlers during the study period. 4 sardine species have been recorded from our marine territory. Among them, 2 sardine species are highly abundant, Sardinella fimbriata total production volumes was 5495.79 MT (74.74% contributed 1747.22MT (31.79% from the artisanal and 3748.57MT (68.21% from the industrial sector and Dussumieria acuta production amounts was 1857.20MT (25.26% contributed only from the industrial fishing sector.Species wise contribution shows that S. fimbriata contributed 100% in the artisanal sector and in the industrial fishing S. fimbriata contributed 66.87% and D. acuta contributed the rest 33.13%. The distribution of the S. fimbriata is within 10-20 meters depth and abundance was observed in the southern part of the South patches and South of south patches (N: 210.09// -22, E: 920.04/-07 to N: 200.45/-25, E: 920.18/-56 and 10-50m depth in onshore and off shore areas in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point -N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57. The distribution of the D. acuta is within 40-60 m. depth and abundance was observed in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground areas (Kohinoor point - N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57 and south-west to south-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point- N: 200-17/.29, E: 900.15/.21 to N: 200.29/.56, E: 910.24/.22 in the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. The peak capture season of

  4. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins in legumes

    Marina eBattaglia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirms the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions.

  5. Radiogenic lead-208 abundance 88.34 %

    Brazil has a long tradition in thorium technology, from the monazite ores mining until the production of the nuclear grade thorium compounds. Early in 1969 the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN) designed a project for a pilot plant installation to purify the thorium compounds, based on the solvent extraction technique. Thorium compounds used came from monazite's industrialization. During the course of the operation of this plant, a crude sludge were formed containing thorium not extracted and the whole rare earths, plus minor impurities like sodium, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, iron, silicon, phosphate and the thorium daughters were accumulated. Included is the radiogenic lead-208. This sludge, hereafter named 'RETOTER', was treated with hydrochloric acid and the lead was separated and recovered by anion exchange technology. The lead-208 was analyzed by mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS) technique. The lead-208 abundance measure was 88.34%, this allowed the calculation of the thermal neutron capture cross section of σ0γ = 14,6 +/- 0.7 mb, considerably lower than the σ0γ = 174.2 +/- 0.7 mb value of the natural lead. (author)

  6. Comparing halo bias from abundance and clustering

    Hoffmann, Kai; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    We model the abundance of haloes in the $\\sim(3 \\ \\text{Gpc}/h)^3$ volume of the MICE Grand Challenge simulation by fitting the universal mass function with an improved Jack-Knife error covariance estimator that matches theory predictions. We present unifying relations between different fitting models and new predictions for linear ($b_1$) and non-linear ($c_2$ and $c_3$) halo clustering bias. Different mass function fits show strong variations in their overall poor performance when including the low mass range ($M_h \\lesssim 3 \\ 10^{12} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$) in the analysis, which indicates noisy friends-of-friends halo detection given the MICE resolution ($m_p \\simeq 3 \\ 10^{10} \\ M_{\\odot}$/h). Together with fits from the literature we find an overall variance in the amplitudes of around $10%$ in the low mass and up to $50%$ in the high mass (galaxy cluster) range ($M_h > 10^{14} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$). These variations propagate into a $10%$ change in $b_1$ predictions and a $50%$ change in $c_2$ or $c_3$. Despite the...

  7. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  8. Non-Additive Effects of Genotypic Diversity Increase Floral Abundance and Abundance of Floral Visitors

    Mark A Genung; Jean-Philippe Lessard; Claire B Brown; Bunn, Windy A.; Cregger, Melissa A.; W M Nicholas Reynolds; Emmi Felker-Quinn; Stevenson, Mary L.; Hartley, Amanda S.; Gregory M. Crutsinger; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of dist...

  9. Lithium abundances and extra mixing processes in evolved stars of M67

    Martins, B L Canto; Palacios, A; de Laverny, P; Richard, O; Melo, C H F; Nascimento, J D do; De Medeiros, J R; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015015

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We present a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of evolved stars in M67 (turn-off, subgiant and giant stars) in order to bring observational constraints to evolutionary models taking into account non-standard transport processes. Methods. We determined the stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]), microturbulent and rotational velocities and, Lithium abundances (ALi) for 27 evolved stars of M67 with the spectral synthesis method based on MARCS model atmospheres. We also computed non-standard stellar evolution models, taking into account atomic diffusion and rotation-induced transport of angular momentum and chemicals that were compared with this set of homogeneous data. Results. The lithium abundances that we derive for the 27 stars in our sample follow a clear evolutionary pattern ranging from the turn-off to the Red Giant Branch. Our abundance determination confirms the well known decrease of lithium content for evolved stars. For the first time, we provide a consistent interpretation of both the surf...

  10. Abundance models improve spatial and temporal prioritization of conservation resources.

    Johnston, Alison; Fink, Daniel; Reynolds, Mark D; Hochachka, Wesley M; Sullivan, Brian L; Bruns, Nicholas E; Hallstein, Eric; Merrifield, Matt S; Matsumoto, Sandi; Kelling, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Conservation prioritization requires knowledge about organism distribution and density. This information is often inferred from models that estimate the probability of species occurrence rather than from models that estimate species abundance, because abundance data are harder to obtain and model. However, occurrence and abundance may not display similar patterns and therefore development of robust, scalable, abundance models is critical to ensuring that scarce conservation resources are applied where they can have the greatest benefits. Motivated by a dynamic land conservation program, we develop and assess a general method for modeling relative abundance using citizen science monitoring data. Weekly estimates of relative abundance and occurrence were compared for prioritizing times and locations of conservation actions for migratory waterbird species in California, USA. We found that abundance estimates consistently provided better rankings of observed counts than occurrence estimates. Additionally, the relationship between abundance and occurrence was nonlinear and varied by species and season. Across species, locations prioritized by occurrence models had only 10-58% overlap with locations prioritized by abundance models, highlighting that occurrence models will not typically identify the locations of highest abundance that are vital for conservation of populations. PMID:26591443

  11. Permafrost thaw and intense thermokarst activity decreases abundance of stream benthic macroinvertebrates.

    Chin, Krista S; Lento, Jennifer; Culp, Joseph M; Lacelle, Denis; Kokelj, Steven V

    2016-08-01

    Intensification of permafrost thaw has increased the frequency and magnitude of large permafrost slope disturbances (mega slumps) in glaciated terrain of northwestern Canada. Individual thermokarst disturbances up to 40 ha in area have made large volumes of previously frozen sediments available for leaching and transport to adjacent streams, significantly increasing sediment and solute loads in these systems. To test the effects of this climate-sensitive disturbance regime on the ecology of Arctic streams, we explored the relationship between physical and chemical variables and benthic macroinvertebrate communities in disturbed and undisturbed stream reaches in the Peel Plateau, Northwest Territories, Canada. Highly disturbed and undisturbed stream reaches differed with respect to taxonomic composition and invertebrate abundance. Minimally disturbed reaches were not differentiated by these variables but rather were distributed along a disturbance gradient between highly disturbed and undisturbed sites. In particular, there was evidence of a strong negative relationship between macroinvertebrate abundance and total suspended solids, and a positive relationship between abundance and the distance from the disturbance. Increases in both sediments and nutrients appear to be the proximate cause of community differences in highly disturbed streams. Declines in macroinvertebrate abundance in response to slump activity have implications for the food webs of these systems, potentially leading to negative impacts on higher trophic levels, such as fish. Furthermore, the disturbance impacts on stream health can be expected to intensify as climate change increases the frequency and magnitude of thermokarst. PMID:26766394

  12. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    Ian M. Thornell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4, Na-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2, electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2, and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE, as well as a borate transporter (BTR1. These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO3– either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO3– transporter contributes to a cell’s ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s (e.g., Na+ or Cl–. In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both classical and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family.

  13. Transport service

    C. Cerruti / FI

    2006-01-01

    A large number of pallet-crates (panières grillagées), which are used for transporting equipment and for removals, have been dispatched to various locations around the CERN site. We kindly request all users who may have such crates in their possession and no longer need them to make the necessary arrangements (EDH request to the Transport Group) to return them to Building 133, as we currently have no more in stock. Claude CERRUTI / FI-PI

  14. Public transport

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Public transport plays an essential role in enabling people from low income and other disadvantaged groups to access employment and services. It also contributes to the development of social networks and social capital, by helping people to visit friends and relatives and take part in community and other social activities. Public policy makers have begun to recognise that adequate public transport provision can play an important role in reducing social exclusion. [Taken from introductory p...

  15. RF transport

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems.

  16. Mechanical Behavior and Thermal Stability of Acid-Base Phosphate Cements and Composites Fabricated at Ambient Temperature

    Colorado Lopera, Henry Alonso

    This dissertation presents the study of the mechanical behavior and thermal stability of acid-base phosphate cements (PCs) and composites fabricated at ambient temperature. These materials are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). Among other advantages of using PCs when compared with traditional cements are the better mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength), lower density, ultra-fast (controllable) setting time, controllable pH, and an environmentally benign process. Several PCs based on wollastonite and calcium and alumino phosphates after thermal exposure up to 1000°C have been investigated. First, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of wollastonite-based PC (Wo-PC) exposed to temperatures up to 1000°C in air environment were studied. The effects of processing conditions on the curing and shrinkage of the wollastonite-based PC were studied. The chemical reactions and phase transformations during the fabrication and during the thermal exposure are analyzed in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA Then, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of glass, carbon and basalt fiber reinforced Wo-PC composites, were studied using SEM, XRD, TGA. The flexural strength and Weibull statistics were analyzed. A significant strength degradation in the composites were found after the thermal exposure at elevated temperatures due to the interdifusion and chemical reactions across the fibers and the matrix at temperatures over 600°C. To overcome this barrier, we have developed a new PC based on calcium and alumino-phosphates (Ca-Al PCs). The Ca-Al PCs were studied in detail using SEM, XRD, TGA, curing, shrinkage, Weibull statistics, and compression tests. Our study has confirmed that this new composite material is chemically and mechanically stable at temperatures up to 1000°C. Moreover, the compression strength increases after exposure to 1000

  17. Ion and acid-base balance in three species of Amazonian fish during gradual acidification of extremely soft water.

    Wilson, R W; Wood, C M; Gonzalez, R J; Patrick, M L; Bergman, H L; Narahara, A; Val, A L

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity to acid water was assessed in three species of Amazonian fish that encounter naturally acidic blackwaters to differing degrees in the wild: tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), matrincha (Brycon erythropterum), and tamoatá (Hoplosternum littorale), in decreasing order of occurrence in blackwater. Fish were exposed to a graded reduction in water pH, from pH 6 to 5 to 4 to 3.5, followed by return to pH 6. Fish were exposed to each new pH for 24 h. During these exposures, net transfers of ions (Na+, K+, Cl-, and Ca2+) and acid-base equivalents to and from the external water were used as physiological indicators of acid tolerance. Exposure to pH 5 had a minimal effect on net ion fluxes. Significant net losses of all ions (except Ca2+) were recorded in all three species during the first few hours of exposure to pH 4. However, ion balance was usually restored within 18 h at pH 4. Exposure to pH 3.5 caused even greater ion losses in all three species and proved to be acutely lethal to tamoatá. Matrincha sustained irreversible physiological damage at pH 3.5, as ion fluxes did not recover following return to pH 6 and there was some mortality. Tambaqui suffered the least ionoregulatory disturbances at pH 3.5 and was the only species to make a full recovery on return to pH 6. In all species, there was a tendency for ammonia excretion to increase at low water pH, but even at pH 3.5, there was no significant net uptake of acid from the water. Overall, there was a strong relationship between the magnitude of ionic disturbances and the lethality of exposure to low pH. The relative insensitivity of the ionoregulatory system of tambaqui to low pH indicates that this is a feature of fish native to blackwater systems rather than one that is common to all Amazon fish. PMID:10222322

  18. Acid-base equilibria and dynamics in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles: geminate recombination and effect of charge stabilization.

    Freitas, Adilson A; Paulo, Luisa; Maçanita, Antonio L; Quina, Frank H

    2006-09-12

    The synthetic flavylium salt 4-carboxy-7-hydroxy-4'-methoxyflavylium chloride (CHMF) exhibits two acid-base equilibria in the range of pH 1-8 in both aqueous and micellar sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. The values of pK(a1) and pK(a2) for the cation-zwitterion (AH(2)(+) Z + H(+)) and the zwitterion-base (Z A(-) + H(+)) equilibria increase from 0.73 and 4.84 in water to 2.77 and 5.64 in SDS micelles, respectively. The kinetic study of the Z A(-) + H(+) ground-state reactions in SDS points to the diffusion-controlled protonation of A(-) in the aqueous phase (k(p2w) = 4.2 x 10(10) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and in the micelle (k(p2m) = 2.3 x 10(11) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)). The deprotonation rate of Z did not significantly change upon going from water (k(d2) = 6.3 x 10(5) s(-)(1)) to SDS (k(d2) = 5.2 x 10(5) s(-)(1)), in contrast with the behavior of ordinary cationic flavylium salts, for which k(d2) strongly decreases in SDS micelles. These results suggest that deprotonation of the zwitterionic acid is not substantially perturbed by the micellar charge. Electronic excitation of the Z form of CHMF induces fast adiabatic deprotonation of the hydroxyl group of Z() (2.9 x 10(10) s(-)(1) in water and 8.4 x 10(9) s(-)(1) in 0.1 M SDS), followed by geminate recombination on the picosecond time scale. Interestingly, while recombination in water (k(rec) = 1.7 x 10(9) s(-)(1)) occurs preferentially at the carboxylate group, at the SDS micelle surface, recombination (k(rec) = 9.2 x 10(9) s(-)(1)) occurs at the hydroxyl group. The important conclusion is that proton mobility at the SDS micelle surface is substantially reduced with respect to the mobility in water, which implies that geminate recombination should be a general phenomenon in SDS micelles. PMID:16952232

  19. Reanalysis of the interstellar CH abundance

    A detailed investigation of the term structure of the X2II, A2Δ, B2Σ-, and C2Σ+ systems of CH is presented, as well as a discussion of a number of errors that have been found with respect to the historical analysis of the interstellar CH abundance. The primary cause for these errors is the neglect of the Λ doubling of the ground state. The effects of including this splitting are the following: (1) the oscillator strength doubles for each line arising from the ground state of the B-X and C-X electronic systems; (2) the 4300, 3886, and 3143 A lines each consist of a blend of two lines separated by 1.43, 1.28, and 2.17 km s-1, respectively; (3) the line at 3886 A arises solely from the upper half of the Λ doublet, and the lines at 3890 and 3878 A arise from the lower half of the Λ doublet; (4) the line at 3143 A arises solely from the lower half of the Λ doublet, and the lines at 3146 and 3137 A arise from the upper half of the Λ doublet; (5) the excitation temperature (a measure of the relative level population) of the ground-state Λ doublet has been calculated for the interstellar CH along the line of sight toward four stars (zeta Per, zeta Oph, X Per, and chi Oph) using published equivalent withs. The excitation temperature appears to be less than zero toward X Per and zeta Per, indicating that the population of the ground-state Λ doublet is inverted. The level populations along other lines of sight are known to be inverted from observations of the radio CH lines; this is the first detection of a radio maser by optical methods

  20. Cosmological implications of two conflicting deuterium abundances

    Constraints on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and on cosmological parameters from conflicting deuterium observations in different high redshift QSO systems are discussed. The high deuterium observations by Carswell et al., Songaila et al., and Rugers and Hogan are consistent with 4He and 7Li observations and standard BBN (Nν =3) and allows Nν≤3.6 at 95% C.L., but are inconsistent with local observations of D and 3He in the context of conventional theories of stellar and galactic evolution. In contrast, the low deuterium observations by Tytler, Fan, and Burles and Burles and Tytler are consistent with the constraints from local galactic observations, but require Nν=1.9±0.3 at 68% C.L., excluding standard BBN at 99.9% C.L., unless the systematic uncertainties in the 4He observations have been underestimated by a large amount. The high and low primordial deuterium abundances imply, respectively, ΩBh2=0.005 endash 0.01 and ΩBh2=0.02 endash 0.03 at 95% C.L. When combined with the high baryon fraction inferred from x-ray observations of rich clusters, the corresponding total mass densities (for 50≤H0≤90) are ΩM=0.05 endash 0.20 and ΩM=0.2 endash 0.7, respectively (95% C.L.). The range of ΩM corresponding to high D is in conflict with dynamical constraints (Ωm≥0.2 endash 0.3) and with the shape parameter constraint (Γ=ΩMh=0.25±0.05) from large scale structure formation in CDM and ΛCDM models. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. Testing spherical evolution for modelling void abundances

    Achitouv, Ixandra; Neyrinck, Mark; Paranjape, Aseem

    2015-08-01

    We compare analytical predictions of void volume functions to those measured from N-body simulations, detecting voids with the ZOBOV void finder. We push to very small, non-linear voids, below few Mpc radius, by considering the unsampled dark matter density field. We also study the case where voids are identified using haloes. We develop analytical formula for the void abundance of both the excursion set approach and the peaks formalism. These formulas are valid for random walks smoothed with a top-hat filter in real space, with a large class of realistic barrier models. We test the extent to which the spherical evolution approximation, which forms the basis of the analytical predictions, models the highly aspherical voids that occur in the cosmic web, and are found by a watershed-based algorithm such as ZOBOV. We show that the volume function returned by ZOBOV is quite sensitive to the choice of treatment of subvoids, a fact that has not been appreciated previously. For reasonable choices of subvoid exclusion, we find that the Lagrangian density δv of the ZOBOV voids - which is predicted to be a constant δv ≈ -2.7 in the spherical evolution model - is different from the predicted value, showing substantial scatter and scale dependence. This result applies to voids identified at z = 0 with effective radius between 1 and 10 h-1 Mpc. Our analytical approximations are flexible enough to give a good description of the resulting volume function; however, this happens for choices of parameter values that are different from those suggested by the spherical evolution assumption. We conclude that analytical models for voids must move away from the spherical approximation in order to be applied successfully to observations, and we discuss some possible ways forward.

  2. Nitrogen abundances in damped Lyalpha absorbers

    Zafar, T.; Centurión, M.; Molaro, P.; Péroux, C.; D'Odorico, V.; Vladilo, G.

    Nitrogen is thought to have both primary and secondary origins depending on whether the seed carbon and oxygen are produced by the star itself (primary) or already present in the interstellar medium (secondary) from which star forms. Damped Lyalpha (DLA) and sub-DLA systems with typical metallicities of -3.0≲ Z/Z⊙ ≲ -0.5 are excellent tools to study nitrogen production. We made a search for nitrogen in the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) advanced data products (EUADP) database. In the EUADP database, we find 10 new measurements and 9 upper limits of nitrogen. We further compiled DLA/sub-DLA data from the literature with estimates available of nitrogen and alpha -elements. This yields a total of 98 systems, i.e. the largest nitrogen abundance sample investigated so far. In agreement with previous studies, we indeed find a bimodal [N/alpha ] behaviour: three-quarter systems show a mean value of [N/alpha ] =-0.87 with a scatter of 0.21 dex and one-quarter shows ratios clustered at [N/alpha ] = -1.43 with a lower dispersion of 0.13 dex. The high [N/alpha ] group is consistent with the blue compact dwarves and dwarf irregular galaxies, suggesting primary nitrogen production. The low [N/alpha ] group is the lowest ever observed in any astrophysical site and probably provides an evidence of the primary production by fast rotating massive stars in young sites. Moreover, we find a transition between the two [N/alpha ] groups around [N/H] ≃-2.5. The transition is not abrupt and there are a few systems lying in the transition region. Additional observations of DLAs/sub-DLAs below [N/H] <-2.5 would provide more clues.

  3. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid-base state at 5,260 m in high-altitude Bolivians and acclimatized lowlanders

    Wagner, Hans Peter; Araoz, Mauricio; Boushel, Robert Christopher;

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary gas exchange and acid-base state were compared in nine Danish lowlanders (L) acclimatized to 5,260 m for 9 wk and seven native Bolivian residents (N) of La Paz (altitude 3,600-4,100 m) brought acutely to this altitude. We evaluated normalcy of arterial pH and assessed pulmonary gas...... exchange and acid-base balance at rest and during peak exercise when breathing room air and 55% O2. Despite 9 wk at 5,260 m and considerable renal bicarbonate excretion (arterial plasma HCO3- concentration = 15.1 meq/l), resting arterial pH in L was 7.48 +/- 0.007 (significantly greater than 7...

  4. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  5. Larval fish abundance and physical forcing in the Gulf of Alaska, 1981-2003

    Doyle, Miriam J.; Picquelle, Susan J.; Mier, Kathryn L.; Spillane, Michael C.; Bond, Nicholas A.

    2009-03-01

    The present study investigates ecological patterns and relationships to environmental variables among a time-series of larval fish species abundance from late spring surveys (1981-2003) in the northwest Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Links between interannual variation in species abundance and the physical environment were explored using generalized additive modeling (GAM). Trends in larval abundance and connections with physical variables displayed patterns that indicate unique and complex responses among species to environmental forcing during the larval period. In particular, the observed patterns suggest that ontogenetic-specific responses, representing sub-intervals of early life, are important. In addition, a notable degree of synchrony in larval abundance trends, and similarity in links with physical variables, were observed among species with common early life history patterns. The deepwater spawners, northern lampfish, arrowtooth flounder, and Pacific halibut, were most abundant in the study area during the 1990s, in association with enhanced wind-driven onshore and alongshore transport. Years of high abundance for Pacific cod, walleye pollock, and northern rock sole were associated with cooler winters and enhanced alongshore winds during spring. High larval abundance for spring-summer spawning rockfish species and southern rock sole seemed to be favored by warmer spring temperatures later in the time-series. This apparent exposure-response coupling seems to be connected to both local-scale and basin-scale environmental signals, to varying degrees depending on specific early life history characteristics. Understanding such ecological connections contributes to the evaluation of vulnerability and resilience among GOA species’ early life history patterns to fluctuating climate and oceanographic conditions. This investigation also provides crucial information for the identification of “environmental indicators” that may have a broad-spectrum effect on multiple

  6. Shallow extra mixing in solar twins inferred from Be abundances

    Maia, M Tucci; Castro, M; Asplund, M; Ramírez, I; Monroe, T R; Nascimento, J D do; Yong, D

    2015-01-01

    Lithium and beryllium are destroyed at different temperatures in stellar interiors. As such, their relative abundances offer excellent probes of the nature and extent of mixing processes within and below the convection zone. We determine Be abundances for a sample of eight solar twins for which Li abundances have previously been determined. The analyzed solar twins span a very wide range of age, 0.5-8.2 Gyr, which enables us to study secular evolution of Li and Be depletion. We gathered high-quality UVES/VLT spectra and obtained Be abundances by spectral synthesis of the Be II 313 nm doublet. The derived beryllium abundances exhibit no significant variation with age. The more fragile Li, however, exhibits a monotonically decreasing abundance with increasing age. Therefore, relatively shallow extra mixing below the convection zone is necessary to simultaneously account for the observed Li and Be behavior in the Sun and solar twins.

  7. Radial molecular abundances and gas cooling in starless cores

    Sipilä, O

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to simulate radial profiles of molecular abundances and the gas temperature in cold and heavily shielded starless cores by combining chemical and radiative transfer models. Methods: A determination of the dust temperature in a modified Bonnor-Ebert sphere is used to calculate initial radial molecular abundance profiles. The abundances of selected cooling molecules corresponding to two different core ages are then extracted to determine the gas temperature at two time steps. The calculation is repeated in an iterative process yielding molecular abundances consistent with the gas temperature. Line emission profiles for selected substances are calculated using simulated abundance profiles. Results: The gas temperature is a function of time; the gas heats up as the core gets older because the cooling molecules are depleted onto grain surfaces. The contributions of the various cooling molecules to the total cooling power change with time. Radial chemical abundance profiles are non-trivial: different s...

  8. TEA: A Code for Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, M Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. (1958) and Eriksson (1971). It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp (1999), the free thermochemical equilibrium code CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications), and the example given by White et al. (1958). Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is ...

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Properties of Acid-Base Indicator of Rose (Rosa setigera), Allamanda (Allamanda cathartica), and Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) Flowers

    Okoduwa, Stanley I. R.; Mbora, Lovina O.; Matthew E. Adu; Adeyi, Ameh A.

    2015-01-01

    The need to develop effective alternative for synthetic indicators is the demand of present-day chemistry. The acid-base indicator properties of Rose (Rosa setigera), Allamanda (Allamanda cathartica), and Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) flowers were examined. Colour pigments were extracted from the flowers via cold and solvent extraction using soxhlet extractor. The pH value of the extracts with wavelengths of absorption was determined using ultraviolet spectrophotometer. From the results o...

  10. CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC POLYMERS ⅩⅩⅢ SYNTHESIS AND ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF POLYPHOSPHATES CONTAINING BOTH NUCLEIC ACID BASE AND PHOSPHONOACETIC ACID ETHYL ESTER

    ZHUO Renxi; LIU Zhenghua; LI Li

    1989-01-01

    Eight new polyphosphates containing both nucleic acid base and phosphonoacetic acid ethyl ester were synthesized by the polycondensation of P, P- dichloride of phosphonoacetic acid ethyl ester with 1, 3-dihydroxyalkyl - 5 - fluorouracil, 1,3 - dihydroxyalkyl - uracil and 1, 3 - dihydroxyalkylthymine. These polyphosphates were tested against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma in mice. Polymer Ⅱa and Ⅱc exhibited excellent antitumor activity. Ⅱc also showed lower toxicity.

  11. Blood acid-base balance as a function of water oxygenation: a study at two different ambient CO2 levels in the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    Truchot, J P; Toulmond, A; Dejours, P

    1980-07-01

    In the unanesthetized dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures and concentrations in inspired and expired water and the acid-base balance of arterial blood, pHa and PcCO2, were determined. Each dogfish was exposed to waters differing in oxygenation and in CO2 levels, which was controlled with a pH-CO2-stat device, for successive 2- to 3-h periods. The four ambient conditions were: normoxia-normocapnia (inspired PO2, PIO2 ca 160 Torr; PICO2 ca 0.3 Torr), hyperoxia-normocapnia (PIO2 ca 730 Torr), hyperoxia-hypercapnia (PICO2 ca 1.0 Torr); normoxia-hypercapnia. At both low and high ambient CO2, the inspired-expired O2 and CO2 concentration differences increased in hyperoxia. Ventilation was depressed, and concomitantly, PACO2 increased and the arterial plasma pH decreased. The hypercapnic acidosis was rapidly but only partially compensated by an increase of the plasma bicarbonate concentration. Due to the buffer action of carbonate in sea water, low and high ambient CO2 levels corresponded respectively to high and low values of the CO2 capacitance coefficient, betaWCO2. At both ambient oxygenation levels, the expired-inspired PCO2 difference was greater at low than at high betaWCO2. At a given ambient CO2 level, expired PCO2, PECO2, wash higher in hyperoxia than in normoxia; an effect more marked at low than at high betaWCO2. Thus, the water capacitance coeffcient betaWCO2 is an important factor determining PECO2 values and probably arterial blood acid-base balance. As a general conclusion, the acid-base balance of the arterial blood in the dogfish is very much dependent on the conditions of the oxygenation and acid-base balance of the ambient water which consequently should be carefully controlled. PMID:6771856

  12. Key Roles of Lewis Acid-base Pairs on ZnxZryOz in Direct Ethanol/Acetone to Isobutene Conversion

    Sun, Junming; Baylon, Rebecca A.; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Martin, Kevin J.; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-20

    The effects of surface acidity on the cascade ethanol-to-isobutene conversion were studied using ZnxZryOz catalysts. The ethanol-to-isobutene reaction was found to be limited by the secondary reaction of the key intermediate, acetone, namely the acetone-to-isobutene reaction. Although the catalysts with coexisting Brønsted acidity could catalyze the rate-limiting acetone-to-isobutene reaction, the presence of Brønsted acidity is also detrimental. First, secondary isobutene isomerization is favored, producing a mixture of butene isomers. Second, undesired polymerization and coke formation prevail, leading to rapid catalyst deactivation. Most importantly, both steady-state and kinetic reaction studies as well as FTIR analysis of adsorbed acetone-d6 and D2O unambiguously showed that a highly active and selective nature of balanced Lewis acid-base pairs was masked by the coexisting Brønsted acidity in the aldolization and self-deoxygenation of acetone to isobutene. As a result, ZnxZryOz catalysts with only Lewis acid-base pairs were discovered, on which nearly a theoretical selectivity to isobutene (~88.9%) was successfully achieved, which has never been reported before. Moreover, the absence of Brønsted acidity in such ZnxZryOz catalysts also eliminates the side isobutene isomerization and undesired polymerization/coke reactions, resulting in the production of high purity isobutene with significantly improved catalyst stability (< 2% activity loss after 200 h time-on-stream). This work not only demonstrates a balanced Lewis acid-base pair for the highly active and selective cascade ethanol-to-isobutene reaction, but also sheds light on the rational design of selective and robust acid-base catalyst for C-C coupling via aldolization reaction.

  13. Acid-base and biochemical stabilization and quality of recovery in male cats with urethral obstruction and anesthetized with propofol or a combination of ketamine and diazepam

    Freitas, Gabrielle C.; Monteiro Carvalho Mori da Cunha, Marina G.; Gomes, Kleber; Monteiro Carvalho Mori da Cunha, João P.; Togni, Monique; Pippi, Ney L.; Carregaro, Adriano B

    2012-01-01

    This study compared acid-base and biochemical changes and quality of recovery in male cats with experimentally induced urethral obstruction and anesthetized with either propofol or a combination of ketamine and diazepam for urethral catheterization. Ten male cats with urethral obstruction were enrolled for urethral catheterization and anesthetized with either ketamine-diazepam (KD) or propofol (P). Lactated Ringer’s solution was administered by intravenous (IV) beginning 15 min before and con...

  14. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of hydroxamic acid-based molecular probes for in vivo imaging of histone deacetylase (HDAC) in brain

    Hooker, Jacob M.; Wang, Changning; Eessalu, Thomas E; Barth, Vanessa N.; Mitch, Charles H.; Wagner, Florence F.; Hong, Yijia; Neelamegam, Ramesh; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Holson, Edward B.; Haggarty, Stephen John

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxamic acid-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are a class of molecules with therapeutic potential currently reflected in the use of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). HDACis may have utility beyond cancer therapy, as preclinical studies have ascribed HDAC inhibition as beneficial in areas such as heart disease, diabetes, depression, neurodegeneration, and other disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). However, l...

  15. AcuaIntrusion Transport

    Boluda Botella, Nuria; Pedraza Berenguer, Ricardo; Gomis Yagües, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    El programa ACUAINTRUSION TRANSPORT permite modelizar procesos de transporte unidimensional en medios porosos. ACUAINTRUSION TRANSPORT permits to model one-dimensional transport processes in porous media.

  16. Radial molecular abundances and gas cooling in starless cores

    Sipilä, O.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to simulate radial profiles of molecular abundances and the gas temperature in cold and heavily shielded starless cores by combining chemical and radiative transfer models. Methods: A determination of the dust temperature in a modified Bonnor-Ebert sphere is used to calculate initial radial molecular abundance profiles. The abundances of selected cooling molecules corresponding to two different core ages are then extracted to determine the gas temperature at two time steps. The c...

  17. Abundance and Diversity of Viruses in Six Delaware Soils

    Williamson, Kurt E.; Radosevich, Mark; Wommack, K. Eric

    2005-01-01

    The importance of viruses in marine microbial ecology has been established over the past decade. Specifically, viruses influence bacterial abundance and community composition through lysis and alter bacterial genetic diversity through transduction and lysogenic conversion. By contrast, the abundance and distribution of viruses in soils are almost completely unknown. This study describes the abundance and diversity of autochthonous viruses in six Delaware soils: two agricultural soils, two coa...

  18. A Data-intensive Assessment of the Species Abundance Distribution

    Baldridge, Elita

    2013-01-01

    The hollow curve species abundance distribution describes the pattern of large numbers of rare species and a small number of common species in a community. The species abundance distribution is one of the most ubiquitous patterns in nature and many models have been proposed to explain the mechanisms that generate this pattern. While there have been numerous comparisons of species abundance distribution models, most of these comparisons only use a small subset of available models, focus on a s...

  19. Occupancy, spatial variance, and the abundance of species

    He, F.; Gaston, K J

    2003-01-01

    A notable and consistent ecological observation known for a long time is that spatial variance in the abundance of a species increases with its mean abundance and that this relationship typically conforms well to a simple power law (Taylor 1961). Indeed, such models can be used at a spectrum of spatial scales to describe spatial variance in the abundance of a single species at different times or in different regions and of different species across the same set of areas (Tayl...

  20. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological nic...

  1. Positive Interspecific Relationship between Temporal Occurrence and Abundance in Insects

    Scrosati, Ricardo A; Ruth D Patten; Lauff, Randolph F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most studied macroecological patterns is the interspecific abundance-occupancy relationship, which relates species distribution and abundance across space. Interspecific relationships between temporal distribution and abundance, however, remain largely unexplored. Using data for a natural assemblage of tabanid flies measured daily during spring and summer in Nova Scotia, we found that temporal occurrence (proportion of sampling dates in which a species occurred in an experimental t...

  2. Hydrostatic gas distributions: global estimates of temperature and abundance

    Ciotti, L.; Pellegrini, S

    2008-01-01

    Estimating the temperature and metal abundance of the intracluster and the intragroup media is crucial to determine their global metal content and to determine fundamental cosmological parameters. When a spatially resolved temperature or abundance profile cannot be recovered from observations (e.g., for distant objects), or deprojection is difficult (e.g., due to a significant non-spherical shape), only global average temperature and abundance are derived. After introducing a general techniqu...

  3. Cross-Scale Interactions and the Distribution-Abundance Relationship

    Werner, Earl E.; Davis, Christopher J.; Skelly, David K.; Relyea, Rick A.; Benard, Michael F.; McCauley, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive interspecific relationships between local abundance and extent of regional distribution are among the most ubiquitous patterns in ecology. Although multiple hypotheses have been proposed, the mechanisms underlying distribution-abundance (d-a) relationships remain poorly understood. We examined the intra- and interspecific distribution-abundance relationships for a metacommunity of 13 amphibian species sampled for 15 consecutive years. Mean density of larvae in occupied ponds was posi...

  4. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3‑. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater.

  5. Properties investigation of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/polyacrylonitrile acid-base blend membrane for vanadium redox flow battery application.

    Li, Zhaohua; Dai, Wenjing; Yu, Lihong; Liu, Le; Xi, Jingyu; Qiu, Xinping; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-12

    Acid-base blend membrane prepared from sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was detailedly evaluated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application. SPEEK/PAN blend membrane exhibited dense and homogeneous cross-section morphology as scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy images show. The acid-base interaction of ionic cross-linking and hydrogen bonding between SPEEK and PAN could effectively reduce water uptake, swelling ratio, and vanadium ion permeability, and improve the performance and stability of blend membrane. Because of the good balance of proton conductivity and vanadium ion permeability, blend membrane with 20 wt % PAN (S/PAN-20%) showed higher Coulombic efficiency (96.2% vs 91.1%) and energy efficiency (83.5% vs 78.4%) than Nafion 117 membrane at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) when they were used in VRFB single cell. Besides, S/PAN-20% membrane kept a stable performance during 150 cycles at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) in the cycle life test. Hence the SPEEK/PAN acid-base blend membrane could be used as promising candidate for VRFB application. PMID:25315399

  6. Zero balance ultrafiltration (Z-BUF) in blood-primed CRRT circuits achieves electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis prior to patient connection.

    Hackbarth, Richard M; Eding, Dawn; Gianoli Smith, Carla; Koch, Ada; Sanfilippo, Dominic J; Bunchman, Timothy E

    2005-09-01

    Infants requiring CRRT present a unique challenge due to the large circuit volume to blood volume ratio. Blood priming is often used, but some patients can become unstable during the initiation of CRRT due to electrolyte and acid-base imbalance. We postulated that using Z-BUF we could normalize electrolytes and improve the acid base status of the prime prior to patient connection. To test this we set up a circuit using the Baxter BM-25 CRRT pump, a polysulfone or AN-69 membrane, and a three-way stopcock. The circuit was primed with a 60/40 mix of expired autologous donor pRBCs and 5% albumin. The modalities of CVVH, CVVHD, and CVVHDF were compared for relative efficacy. Electrolytes, lactate, pH, cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, bradykinin, and IL-6) were measured. Plasma hemoglobin levels were also measured before and after the Z-BUF procedure. Bradykinin production and elimination in AN-69 membrane circuits were assessed. All lab values equilibrated by 35 minutes. All CRRT modalities were equally efficacious for Z-BUF. Cytokine production or significant hemolysis was not found. In addition, no bradykinin accumulation occurred in AN-69 membrane-containing circuits. We conclude that Z-BUF is a simple and effective way to normalize electrolyte and acid-base status in the CRRT circuit when blood priming is required. PMID:15947984

  7. Modelling occurrence and abundance of species when detection is imperfect

    Royle, J. Andrew; Nichols, J.D.; Kery, M.

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between species abundance and occupancy are of considerable interest in metapopulation biology and in macroecology. Such relationships may be described concisely using probability models that characterize variation in abundance of a species. However, estimation of the parameters of these models in most ecological problems is impaired by imperfect detection. When organisms are detected imperfectly, observed counts are biased estimates of true abundance, and this induces bias in stated occupancy or occurrence probability. In this paper we consider a class of models that enable estimation of abundance/occupancy relationships from counts of organisms that result from surveys in which detection is imperfect. Under such models, parameter estimation and inference are based on conventional likelihood methods. We provide an application of these models to geographically extensive breeding bird survey data in which alternative models of abundance are considered that include factors that influence variation in abundance and detectability. Using these models, we produce estimates of abundance and occupancy maps that honor important sources of spatial variation in avian abundance and provide clearly interpretable characterizations of abundance and occupancy adjusted for imperfect detection.

  8. Parent Stars of Extrasolar Planets. IX. Lithium Abundances

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    We compare the Li abundances of a sample of stars with planets discovered with the Doppler method to a sample of stars without detected planets. We prepared the samples by combining the Li abundances reported in several recent studies in a consistent way. Our results confirm recent claims that the Li abundances of stars with planets are smaller than those of stars without planets near the solar temperature. We also find that the vsini and $R^{'}_{\\rm HK}$ anomalies correlate with the Li abund...

  9. Abundances of the heavy elements in the Magellanic Clouds. I. Metal abundances of F-type supergiants

    Metal abundances of eight F-type supergiants in each of the Magellanic Clouds were determined using the results of high-resolution spectroscopy analysis of these stars, together with new Stromgren uvby and Cousins (1980) BVRI photometry. It was found that the mean Fe abundance (Fe/H) for the SMC is -0.65 + or - 0.2 dex, and the mean Fe abundance for the LMC is -0.30 + or - 0.2 dex. The abundances of stars in both the SMC and LMC appear relatively uniform, and the abundances of the elements relative to Fe are very similar in both Magellanic Clouds and in Canopus (the carbon-to-iron abundances are the same for all three). It was also found that Nd and Sm are overabundant in both clouds, supporting the trends found by Spite et al. (1988) for the three SMC stars they studied. 140 refs

  10. Observational Effects of Magnetism in O Stars: Surface Nitrogen Abundances

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J. F.; Bouret, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star Tau Sco.. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. Methods. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the ample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. Results. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the one with the weakest magnetic field, possibly of dynamo origin. It might be a star having experienced strong magnetic braking under the condition of solid body rotation, but its rotational velocity is still relatively large. The five stars with high N content were probably slow rotators on the zero age main sequence, but they have surface N/H typical of normal O stars, indicating that the presence of a (probably fossil) magnetic field leads to extra enrichment. These stars may have a strong differential rotation inducing shear mixing. Our results shOuld be viewed as a basis on which new theoretical simulations can rely to better understand the effect of magnetism on the evolution of massive stars.

  11. An abundant dysfunctional apolipoprotein A1 in human atheroma.

    Huang, Ying; DiDonato, Joseph A; Levison, Bruce S; Schmitt, Dave; Li, Lin; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer; Kim, Timothy; Gerstenecker, Gary S; Gu, Xiaodong; Kadiyala, Chandra S; Wang, Zeneng; Culley, Miranda K; Hazen, Jennie E; Didonato, Anthony J; Fu, Xiaoming; Berisha, Stela Z; Peng, Daoquan; Nguyen, Truc T; Liang, Shaohong; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Cho, Leslie; Plow, Edward F; Fox, Paul L; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W H Wilson; Parks, John S; Fisher, Edward A; Smith, Jonathan D; Hazen, Stanley L

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and their major structural protein, apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), recovered from human atheroma are dysfunctional and are extensively oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO). In vitro oxidation of either apoA1 or HDL particles by MPO impairs their cholesterol acceptor function. Here, using phage display affinity maturation, we developed a high-affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes both apoA1 and HDL that have been modified by the MPO-H2O2-Cl(-) system. An oxindolyl alanine (2-OH-Trp) moiety at Trp72 of apoA1 is the immunogenic epitope. Mutagenesis studies confirmed a critical role for apoA1 Trp72 in MPO-mediated inhibition of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity of apoA1 in vitro and in vivo. ApoA1 containing a 2-OH-Trp72 group (oxTrp72-apoA1) is in low abundance within the circulation but accounts for 20% of the apoA1 in atherosclerosis-laden arteries. OxTrp72-apoA1 recovered from human atheroma or plasma is lipid poor, virtually devoid of cholesterol acceptor activity and demonstrated both a potent proinflammatory activity on endothelial cells and an impaired HDL biogenesis activity in vivo. Elevated oxTrp72-apoA1 levels in subjects presenting to a cardiology clinic (n = 627) were associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Circulating oxTrp72-apoA1 levels may serve as a way to monitor a proatherogenic process in the artery wall. PMID:24464187

  12. Sustainable Transport

    Webber, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    I assume we’ll want to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it to be effective and desirable, and of course, only if we think we can afford to sustain it. Over time, we’ve abandoned any number of modes that failed those tests — horsecars, trolleycars, and pullmancars, among others; and we’ve kept those that passed the tests — most notably motorcars, airplanes, and ships. In retrospect, it seems we’ve been pretty draconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in the market p...

  13. Transcript Abundance Explains mRNA Mobility Data in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Calderwood, Alexander; Kopriva, Stanislav; Morris, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Recently, a large population of mRNA was shown to be able to travel between plant organs via sieve elements as a putative long-distance signaling molecule. However, a mechanistic basis by which transcripts are selected for transport has not yet been identified. Here, we show that experimental mRNA mobility data in Arabidopsis can be explained by transcript abundance and half-life. This suggests that the majority of identified mobile transcripts can be accounted for by non-sequence-specific movement of mRNA from companion cells into sieve elements. PMID:26952566

  14. Moist convection and the vertical structure and water abundance of Jupiter's atmosphere

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Mcgrattan, Kevin B.

    1990-01-01

    The cumulative effects of an ensemble of moist convective plumes on a conditionally unstable atmosphere are predicted by a model of moist convection on Jupiter in which the heating/cooling and drying/moistening of the environment occur through (1) compensating subsidence, (2) detrainment of updraft air at cloud tops, and (3) the evaporation and melting of falling condensate. Parahydrogen is transported as a passive tracer. Pure moist convective, mixed moist-dry convective, and primarily dry convective regimes are possible, depending on the assumed deep-water abundance, efficiency of condensate evaporation, and initial temperature profile.

  15. Sediment composition influences spatial variation in the abundance of human pathogen indicator bacteria within an estuarine environment.

    Perkins, Tracy L; Clements, Katie; Baas, Jaco H; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; Malham, Shelagh K; McDonald, James E

    2014-01-01

    Faecal contamination of estuarine and coastal waters can pose a risk to human health, particularly in areas used for shellfish production or recreation. Routine microbiological water quality testing highlights areas of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) contamination within the water column, but fails to consider the abundance of FIB in sediments, which under certain hydrodynamic conditions can become resuspended. Sediments can enhance the survival of FIB in estuarine environments, but the influence of sediment composition on the ecology and abundance of FIB is poorly understood. To determine the relationship between sediment composition (grain size and organic matter) and the abundance of pathogen indicator bacteria (PIB), sediments were collected from four transverse transects of the Conwy estuary, UK. The abundance of culturable Escherichia coli, total coliforms, enterococci, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Vibrio spp. in sediments was determined in relation to sediment grain size, organic matter content, salinity, depth and temperature. Sediments that contained higher proportions of silt and/or clay and associated organic matter content showed significant positive correlations with the abundance of PIB. Furthermore, the abundance of each bacterial group was positively correlated with the presence of all other groups enumerated. Campylobacter spp. were not isolated from estuarine sediments. Comparisons of the number of culturable E. coli, total coliforms and Vibrio spp. in sediments and the water column revealed that their abundance was 281, 433 and 58-fold greater in sediments (colony forming units (CFU)/100g) when compared with the water column (CFU/100ml), respectively. These data provide important insights into sediment compositions that promote the abundance of PIB in estuarine environments, with important implications for the modelling and prediction of public health risk based on sediment resuspension and transport. PMID:25397595

  16. The end of abundance. Economic solutions to water scarcity

    Zetland, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    In a past of abundance, we had clean water to meet our demands for showers, pools, farms and rivers. Our laws and customs did not need to regulate or ration demand. Over time, our demand has grown, and scarcity has replaced abundance. We don't have as much clean water as we want. We can respond to t

  17. Elemental abundances of the B6 IV star Xi Octantis

    Adelman, Saul J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    An elemental abundance study used AAT echelle spectrograms of the ultrasharp-lined, superficially normal B6 IV star Xi Octantis. The derived abundances fall within the trends of values derived for normal B main-sequence band stars. On average, they are 0.28 dex less than solar.

  18. Variation in rank abundance replicate samples and impact of clustering

    Neuteboom, J.H.; Struik, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Calculating a single-sample rank abundance curve by using the negative-binomial distribution provides a way to investigate the variability within rank abundance replicate samples and yields a measure of the degree of heterogeneity of the sampled community. The calculation of the single-sample rank a

  19. A protocol for sampling vascular epiphyte richness and abundance

    J.H.D. Wolf; S.R. Gradstein; N.M. Nadkarni

    2009-01-01

    The sampling of epiphytes is fraught with methodological difficulties. We present a protocol to sample and analyse vascular epiphyte richness and abundance in forests of different structure (SVERA). Epiphyte abundance is estimated as biomass by recording the number of plant components in a range of

  20. The implicit assumption of symmetry and the species abundance distribution

    Alonso, David; Ostling, Annette; Etienne, Rampal S.

    2008-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) have played a historical role in the development of community ecology. They summarize information about the number and the relative abundance of the species encountered in a sample from a given community. For years ecologists have developed theory to characteri

  1. Travel and transport

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  2. Preclinical characterization of {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys, a new amino acid-based PET tracer

    Denoyer, Delphine; Kirby, Laura [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapeutics Laboratory, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Translational Research Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Waldeck, Kelly [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Translational Research Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Roselt, Peter; Neels, Oliver C. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapeutics Laboratory, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Bourdier, Thomas [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department PET and Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Shepherd, Rachael; Katsifis, Andrew [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO LifeSciences, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapeutics Laboratory, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Translational Research Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2012-04-15

    The imaging potential of a new {sup 18}F-labelled methionine derivative, S-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl)-d-homocysteine ({sup 18}F-D-FPHCys), and its selectivity for amino acid transporter subtypes were investigated in vitro and by imaging of human tumour xenografts. Expression of members of the system L (LAT isoforms 1-4 and 4F2hc) and ASCT (ASCT isoforms 1 and 2) amino acid transporter subclasses were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR in four human tumour models, including A431 squamous cell carcinoma, PC3 prostate cancer, and Colo 205 and HT-29 colorectal cancer lines. The first investigations for the characterization of {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys were in vitro uptake studies by comparing it with [1-{sup 14}C]-l-methionine ({sup 14}C-MET) and in vivo by PET imaging. In addition, the specific involvement of LAT1 transporters in {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys accumulation was tested by silencing LAT1 mRNA transcription with siRNAs. To determine the proliferative activity in tumour xenografts ex vivo, Ki-67 staining was used as a biomarker. A431 cells showed the highest {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys uptake in vitro and in vivo followed by Colo 205, PC3 and HT-29. A similar pattern of retention was observed with {sup 14}C-MET. {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys retention was strongly correlated with LAT1 expression both in vitro (R {sup 2} = 0.85) and in vivo (R{sup 2} = 0.99). Downregulation of LAT1 by siRNA inhibited {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys uptake, demonstrating a clear dependence on this transporter for tumour uptake. Furthermore, {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys accumulation mirrored cellular proliferation. The favourable properties of {sup 18}F-D-FPHCys make this tracer a promising imaging probe for detection of tumours as well as for the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of tumour growth. (orig.)

  3. Transport fuel

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar;

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...

  4. Transport modeling

    R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ There has been remarkable progress during the past decade in understanding and modeling turbulent transport in tokamaks. With some exceptions the progress is derived from the huge increases in computational power and the ability to simulate tokamak turbulence with ever more fundamental and physically realistic dynamical equations, e.g.

  5. Optimal transport

    Eckmann, B

    2008-01-01

    At the close of the 1980s, the independent contributions of Yann Brenier, Mike Cullen and John Mather launched a revolution in the venerable field of optimal transport founded by G Monge in the 18th century, which has made breathtaking forays into various other domains of mathematics ever since. The author presents a broad overview of this area.

  6. Abundance Survey of M and K Dwarf Stars

    Woolf, Vincent M. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98133 (United States); Wallerstein, George [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98133 (United States)

    2005-07-25

    We report the measurement of chemical abundances in 35 low-mass main sequence (M and K dwarf) stars. We have measured the abundance of 12 elements in Kapteyn's Star, a nearby halo M subdwarf. The abundances indicate an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.98, which is about 0.5 dex smaller than that measured in the only previous published measurement using atomic absorption lines. We have measured Fe and Ti abundances in 35 M and K dwarfs with -2.39 [Fe/H] +0.21 using atomic absorption lines, mostly in the 8000A <{lambda} < 8850A range. These will be used to calibrate photometric and low-resolution spectrum metallicity indices for low mass dwarfs, which will make metallicity estimates for these stars more certain. We also describe some difficulties encountered which are not normally necessary to consider when studying warmer stars.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  8. Europium Isotopic Abundances in Very Metal-poor Stars

    Sneden, C; Lawler, J E; Burles, S M; Beers, T C; Fuller, G M; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Burles, Scott; Beers, Timothy C.; Fuller, George M.

    2002-01-01

    Europium isotopic abundance fractions are reported for the very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich giant stars CS 22892-052, HD 115444, and BD +17 3248. The abundance fractions, derived from analysis of several strong Eu II lines appearing in high-resolution spectra of these stars, are in excellent agreement with each other and with their values in the Solar System: fraction(\\iso{Eu}{151}) ~= fraction(\\iso{Eu}{153}) ~= 0.5. Detailed abundance studies of very metal-poor stars have previously shown that the total elemental abundances of stable atoms with atomic numbers z >= 56 typically match very closely those of a scaled solar-system r-process abundance distribution. The present results for the first time extend this agreement to the isotopic level.

  9. The lithium abundances of a large sample of red giants

    The lithium abundances for 378 G/K giants are derived with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium correction considered. Among these are 23 stars that host planetary systems. The lithium abundance is investigated, as a function of metallicity, effective temperature, and rotational velocity, as well as the impact of a giant planet on G/K giants. The results show that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. The lithium abundance has no correlation with rotational velocity at v sin i < 10 km s–1. Giants with planets present lower lithium abundance and slow rotational velocity (v sin i < 4 km s–1). Our sample includes three Li-rich G/K giants, 36 Li-normal stars, and 339 Li-depleted stars. The fraction of Li-rich stars in this sample agrees with the general rate of less than 1% in the literature, and the stars that show normal amounts of Li are supposed to possess the same abundance at the current interstellar medium. For the Li-depleted giants, Li-deficiency may have already taken place at the main sequence stage for many intermediate mass (1.5-5 M ☉) G/K giants. Finally, we present the lithium abundance and kinematic parameters for an enlarged sample of 565 giants using a compilation of the literature, and confirm that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. With the enlarged sample, we investigate the differences between the lithium abundance in thin-/thick-disk giants, which indicate that the lithium abundance in thick-disk giants is more depleted than that in thin-disk giants.

  10. Carbon and nitrogen abundance variations in globular cluster red giants

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2008-06-01

    This dissertation describes investigations into two of the persistent questions of elemental abundances in Galactic globular clusters: the phenomenon of deep mixing, observed through the progressive depletion of surface carbon abundance as stars evolve along the red giant branch, and abundance bimodality, a phenomenon observed only in globular clusters, in which a subset of stars in a given globular cluster have a distinctive pattern of elemental enhancements and depletions relative to the Solar pattern. The first chapter gives an introduction to the history of globular cluster abundance studies, with particular focus on low-resolution spectroscopy. For both deep mixing and abundance bimodality, the leading theoretical models and the data which support and challenge them are laid out. Each section ends with a description of presently-unanswered questions; these are the motivation for the various projects contained in this dissertation. The second chapter describes the use of molecular handstrengths for determining elemental abundances from low-resolution spectra, and introduces a new CH bandstrength index that is designed to be sensitive to carbon abundance and insensitive to nitrogen abundance in Pop. II red giants over a wide range of metallicity. Various CH indices defined elsewhere in the literature are also discussed, and are shown to have comparable accuracy to the new index only over a limited range of stellar properties. Carbon abundances determined using the new CH index are compared to literature abundances for a few stars, and general concordance with published abundances is found. The third chapter contains a large-scale application of the new CH index: a survey of present-day carbon abundances and calculated carbon depletion rates in bright red giants belonging to eleven Galactic globular clusters spanning the full metallicity range of halo globular clusters. Targets were selected with similar evolutionary states, were observed with one instrument on

  11. Unexpectedly higher metazoan meiofauna abundances in the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench compared to the adjacent abyssal plains

    Schmidt, Christina; Martínez Arbizu, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    We studied meiofauna standing stocks and community structure in the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and its adjacent abyssal plains in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. In general, the Nematoda were dominant (93%) followed by the Copepoda (4%). Nematode abundances ranged from 87% to 96%; those of copepods from 2% to 7%. The most diverse deployment yielded 17 taxa: Acari, Amphipoda, Annelida, Bivalvia, Coelenterata, Copepoda, Cumacea, Gastrotricha, Isopoda, Kinorhyncha, Loricifera, Nematoda, Ostracoda, Priapulida, Tanaidacea, Tantulocarida, and Tardigrada. Nauplii were also present. Generally, the trench slope and the southernmost deployments had the highest abundances (850-1392 individuals/cm2). The results of non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated that these deployments were similar to each other in meiofauna community structure. The southernmost deployments were located in a zone of higher particulate organic carbon (POC) flux (g Corg m-2 yr-1), whereas the trench slope should have low POC flux due to depth attenuation. Also, POC and abundance were significantly correlated in the abyssal plains. This correlation may explain the higher abundances at the southernmost deployments. Lateral transport was also assumed to explain high meiofauna abundances on the trench slope. Abundances were generally higher than expected from model results. ANOSIM revealed significant differences between the trench slope and the northern abyssal plains, between the central abyssal plains and the trench slope, between the trench slope and the southern abyssal plains, between the central and the southern abyssal plains, and between the central and northern deployments. The northern and southern abyssal plains did not differ significantly. In addition, a U-test revealed highly significant differences between the trench-slope and abyssal deployments. The taxa inhabited mostly the upper 0-3 cm of the sediment layer (Nematoda 80-90%; Copepoda 88-100%). The trench-slope and abyssal did not differ

  12. Reducing N2O Emission from a Domestic-Strength Nitrifying Culture by Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment.

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-07-19

    An increase of nitrite in the domestic-strength range is generally recognized to stimulate nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). It was found in this study, however, that N2O emission from a mainstream nitritation system (cyclic nitrite = 25-45 mg of N/L) that was established by free nitrous acid (FNA)-based sludge treatment was not higher but much lower than that from the initial nitrifying system with full conversion of NH4(+)-N to NO3(-)-N. Under dissolved oxygen (DO) levels of 2.5-3.0 mg/L, N2O emission from the nitritation stage was 76% lower than that from the initial stage. Even when the DO level was reduced to 0.3-0.8 mg/L, N2O emission from the nitritation stage was still 40% lower. An investigation of the mechanism showed that FNA treatment caused a shift of the stimulation threshold of nitrite on N2O emission. At the nitritation stage, the maximal N2O emission factor occurred at ∼16 mg of N/(L of nitrite). However, it increased with increasing nitrite in the range of 0-56 mg of N/L at the initial stage. FNA treatment decreased the biomass-specific N2O production rate, suggesting that the enzymes relevant to nitrifier denitrification were inhibited. Microbial analysis revealed that FNA treatment decreased the microbial community diversity but increased the abundances of AOB and denitrifiers. PMID:27294698

  13. Abundance Inequality in Freshwater Communities Has an Ecological Origin.

    Passy, Sophia I

    2016-04-01

    The hollow-shaped species abundance distribution (SAD) and its allied rank abundance distribution (RAD)-showing that abundance is unevenly distributed among species-are some of the most studied patterns in ecology. To explain the nature of abundance inequality, I developed a novel framework identifying environmental favorability, which controls the balance between reproduction and immigration, as the ultimate source and species stress tolerance as a proximate factor. Thus, under harsh conditions, only a few tolerant species can reproduce, while some sensitive species can be present in low numbers due to chance immigration. This would lead to high abundance inequality between the two groups of species. Under benign conditions, both groups can reproduce and give rise to higher abundance equality. To test these ideas, I examined the variability in the parameters of a Poisson lognormal fit of the SAD and a square root fit of the RAD in diatom and fish communities across US streams. Indeed, as environmental favorability increased, more sensitive forms were able to establish large populations, diminishing the abundance disparity between locally common and rare species. Finally, it was demonstrated that in diatoms, the RAD belonged to the same family of relationships as those of population density with body size and regional distribution. PMID:27028078

  14. Abundance analysis of the outer halo globular cluster Palomar 14

    Caliskan, S; Grebel, K E

    2011-01-01

    We determine the elemental abundances of nine red giant stars belonging to Palomar 14 (Pal 14). Pal 14 is an outer halo globular cluster (GC) at a distance of \\sim 70 kpc. Our abundance analysis is based on high-resolution spectra and one-dimensional stellar model atmospheres.We derived the abundances for the iron peak elements Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, the {\\alpha}-elements O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, the light odd element Na, and the neutron-capture elements Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Dy, and Cu. Our data do not permit us to investigate light element (i.e., O to Mg) abundance variations. The neutron-capture elements show an r-process signature. We compare our measurements with the abundance ratios of inner and other outer halo GCs, halo field stars, GCs of recognized extragalactic origin, and stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). The abundance pattern of Pal 14 is almost identical to those of Pal 3 and Pal 4, the next distant members of the outer halo GC population after Pal 14. The abundance pattern of Pal 14 is...

  15. Beryllium Abundances in Stars of One-Solar-Mass

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant

    2008-01-01

    We have determined Be abundances in 50 F and G dwarfs in the mass range of 0.9 $\\leq$ M$_\\odot$ $\\leq$ 1.1 as determined by Lambert & Reddy. The effective temperatures are 5600 to 6400 K and metallicities from $-$0.65 to +0.11. The spectra were taken primarily with Keck I + HIRES. The Be abundances were found via spectral synthesis of Be II lines near 3130 \\AA. The Be abundances were investigated as a function of age, temperature, metallicity and Li abundance in this narrow mass range. Even though our stars are similar in mass, they show a range in Be abundances of a factor of $>$40. We find that [Be/Fe] has no dependence on temperature, but does show a spread of a factor of 6 at a given temperature. The reality of the spread is shown by two identical stars which differ from each other by a factor of two only in their abundances of Li and Be. Our thin-disk-star sample fits the trend between Be abundance and [Fe/H] found for halo and thick disk stars, extending it to about 4 orders of magnitude in the two ...

  16. Seasonal Abundance of Aphids and Aphidophagous Insects in Pecan

    Ghulam Abbas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal occurrence of aphids and aphidophagous insects was monitored for six years (2006–2011 from full leaf expansion in May to leaf fall in October in “Desirable” variety pecan trees that were not treated with insecticides. Aphid outbreaks occurred two times per season, once in the spring and again in the late summer. Yellow pecan and blackmargined aphids exceeded the recommended treatment thresholds one time and black pecan aphids exceeded the recommended treatment levels three times over the six seasons. Increases in aphidophagous insect abundance coincided with aphid outbreaks in five of the six seasons. Among aphidophagous insects Harmonia axyridis and Olla v-nigrum were frequently collected in both the tree canopy and at the ground level, whereas, Coccinella septempunctata, Hippodamia convergens were rarely found in the tree canopy and commonly found at the ground level. Green lacewing abundance was higher in the ground level than in the tree canopy. Brown lacewings were more abundant in the tree canopy than at the ground level. Dolichopodid and syrphid fly abundance, at the ground level increased during peak aphid abundance in the tree canopy. Application of an aqueous solution of fermenting molasses to the pecan foliage during an aphid outbreak significantly increased the abundance of ladybeetles and lacewings and significantly reduced the abundance of yellow pecan, blackmargined and black pecan aphids.

  17. Metal abundance range in the Draco dwarf galaxy

    The multichannel scanner of the Hale telescope was used to measure the spectral flux distributions of 23 red giants in the Draco system over the range lambda lambda 3240 to 7620. The memberships of these stars in Draco were checked by use of the spectral scans, and for 17 of them the observations are of sufficient quality that estimates of metal abundance can be made. The scans of the Draco stars resemble in every way the scans of red giants in globular clusters. Large differences are seen among the scans of the Draco stars, which are due to a range in Fe/H. The distribution over metal abundance was found from the abundance estimates; its half-width corresponds to an abundance range of a factor of 2.7. The mean metal abundance [Fe/H] = -1.86 +- 0.09, which is larger than the abundance of M92. This result does not support the previous claims that Draco is more metal poor than the most metal-deficient globular clusters. The implications of these results for the interpetations of Draco's color--magnitude diagram and variable star population are discussed. The chemical evolution of Draco was modeled with simple models that assume mass loss and prompt initial enrichment. These models provide adequate fits to the observed abundance distribution, and suggest that the proto-Draco was initially approx. 100 times more massive than Draco is today. 10 figures, 2 tables

  18. Geographical Range and Local Abundance of Tree Species in China

    Ren, Haibao; Condit, Richard; Chen, Bin; Mi, Xiangcheng; Cao, Min; Ye, Wanhui; Hao, Zhanqing; Ma, Keping

    2013-01-01

    Most studies on the geographical distribution of species have utilized a few well-known taxa in Europe and North America, with little research in China and its wide range of climate and forest types. We assembled large datasets to quantify the geographic ranges of tree species in China and to test several biogeographic hypotheses: 1) whether locally abundant species tend to be geographically widespread; 2) whether species are more abundant towards their range-centers; and 3) how abundances are correlated between sites. Local abundances of 651 species were derived from four tree plots of 20–25 ha where all individuals ≥1 cm in stem diameter were mapped and identified taxonomically. Range sizes of these species across China were then estimated from over 460,000 geo-referenced records; a Bayesian approach was used, allowing careful measures of error of each range estimate. The log-transformed range sizes had a bell-shaped distribution with a median of 703,000 km2, and >90% of 651 species had ranges >105 km2. There was no relationship between local abundance and range size, and no evidence for species being more abundant towards their range-centers. Finally, species’ abundances were positively correlated between sites. The widespread nature of most tree species in China suggests few are vulnerable to global extinction, and there is no indication of the double-peril that would result if rare species also had narrow ranges. PMID:24130772

  19. Geographical range and local abundance of tree species in China.

    Haibao Ren

    Full Text Available Most studies on the geographical distribution of species have utilized a few well-known taxa in Europe and North America, with little research in China and its wide range of climate and forest types. We assembled large datasets to quantify the geographic ranges of tree species in China and to test several biogeographic hypotheses: 1 whether locally abundant species tend to be geographically widespread; 2 whether species are more abundant towards their range-centers; and 3 how abundances are correlated between sites. Local abundances of 651 species were derived from four tree plots of 20-25 ha where all individuals ≥1 cm in stem diameter were mapped and identified taxonomically. Range sizes of these species across China were then estimated from over 460,000 geo-referenced records; a Bayesian approach was used, allowing careful measures of error of each range estimate. The log-transformed range sizes had a bell-shaped distribution with a median of 703,000 km(2, and >90% of 651 species had ranges >10(5 km(2. There was no relationship between local abundance and range size, and no evidence for species being more abundant towards their range-centers. Finally, species' abundances were positively correlated between sites. The widespread nature of most tree species in China suggests few are vulnerable to global extinction, and there is no indication of the double-peril that would result if rare species also had narrow ranges.

  20. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-01

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.