WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid-activated protein kinases

  1. Abscisic acid activates a Ca2+-calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase involved in antioxidant defense in maize leaves

    Shucheng Xu

    2010-01-01

     The role of a calcium-dependent and calmodulin(CaM)stimulated protein kinase in abscisic acid(ABA)-induced antioxidant defense was determined in leaves of maize (Zea mays).In-gel kinase assays showed that treatments with ABA or H2O2 induced the activation of a 49-kDa protein kinase and a 52-kDa protein kinase significantly.Furthermore,we showed that the 52-kDa protein kinase has the characteristics of CaM-stimulating activity and is sensitive to calcium-CaM-dependent protein kinase Ⅱ (CaMK Ⅱ)inhibitor KN-93 or CaM antagonist W-7.Treatments with ABA or H2O2 not only induced the acti vation of the 52-kDa protein kinase,but also enhanced the total activities of the antioxidant enzymes,including catalase,ascorbate peroxidase,glutathione reductase,and superoxide dismutase.Such enhancements were blocked by pretreatment with a CaMK inhibitor and a reactive oxygen species(ROS)inhibitor or scavenger.Pretreatment with the CaMK inhibitor also substantially arrested the ABA-induced H2O2 production.Kinase activity enhancements induced by ABA were attenuated by pretreatment with an ROS inhibitor or scavenger.These results suggest that the 52-kDa CaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defense and that cross-talk between CaMK and H2O2 plays a pivotal role in ABA signaling.We infer that CaMK acts both upstream and downstream of H2O2,but mainly acts between ABA and H2O2 in ABA-induced antioxidant-defensive signaling.

  2. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten;

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... enzymes that are unique in exploiting the ATP/GTP-binding Walker motif to catalyze phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues. Characterized for the first time only a decade ago, BY-kinases have now come to the fore. Important regulatory roles have been linked with these enzymes, via their involvement...... in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by...

  3. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA); Davis, Roger (Princeton, MA); Derijard, Benoit (Shrewsbury, MA)

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases.

  6. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly referred to as casein kinase II) is an evolutionary conserved, ubiquitous protein kinase. There are two paralog catalytic subunits, i.e. alpha (A1) and alpha' (A2). The alpha and alpha' subunits are linked to two beta subunits to produce a heterotetrameric structure....... The catalytic alpha subunits are distantly related to the CMGC subfamily of kinases, such as the Cdk kinases. There are some peculiarities associated with protein kinase CK2, which are not found with most other protein kinases: (i) the enzyme is constitutively active, (ii) it can use ATP and GTP and...... specifically target this protein kinase [10]. Since not all the aspects of what has been published on CK2 can be covered in this review, we would like to recommend the following reviews; (i) for general information on CK2 [11-18] and (ii) with a focus on aberrant CK2 [19-22]....

  7. Immunochemical characterization of rat brain protein kinase

    Polyclonal antibodies against rat brain protein kinase C (the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) were raised in goat. These antibodies can neutralize completely the kinase activity in purified enzyme preparation as well as that in the crude homogenate. Immunoblot analysis of the purified and the crude protein kinase C preparations revealed a major immunoreactive band of 80 kDa. The antibodies also recognize the same enzyme from other rat tissues. Neuronal tissues (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, and retina) and lymphoid organs (thymus and spleen) were found to be enriched in protein kinase C, whereas lung, kidney, liver, heart, and skeletal muscle contained relatively low amounts of this kinase. Limited proteolysis of the purified rat brain protein kinase C with trypsin results in an initial degradation of the kinase into two major fragments of 48 and 38 kDa. Both fragments are recognized by the antibodies. However, further digestion of the 48-kDa fragment to 45 kDa and the 38-kDa fragment to 33 kDa causes a loss of the immunoreactivity. Upon incubation of the cerebellar extract with Ca2+, the 48-kDa fragment was also identified as a major proteolytic product of protein kinase C. Proteolytic degradation of protein kinase C converts the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent kinase to an independent form without causing a large impairment of the binding of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. The two major proteolytic fragments were separated by ion exchange chromatography and one of them (45-48 kDa) was identified as a protein kinase and the other (33-38 kDa) as a phorbol ester-binding protein. These results demonstrate that rat brain protein kinase C is composed of two functionally distinct units, namely, a protein kinase and a Ca2+-independent/phospholipid-dependent phorbol ester-binding protein

  8. Protein Kinase A in Cancer

    Antonio Caretta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past, many chromosomal and genetic alterations have been examined as possible causes of cancer. However, some tumors do not display a clear molecular and/or genetic signature. Therefore, other cellular processes may be involved in carcinogenesis. Genetic alterations of proteins involved in signal transduction have been extensively studied, for example oncogenes, while modifications in intracellular compartmentalization of these molecules, or changes in the expression of unmodified genes have received less attention. Yet, epigenetic modulation of second messenger systems can deeply modify cellular functioning and in the end may cause instability of many processes, including cell mitosis. It is important to understand the functional meaning of modifications in second messenger intracellular pathways and unravel the role of downstream proteins in the initiation and growth of tumors. Within this framework, the cAMP system has been examined. cAMP is a second messenger involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. It acts mainly through its binding to cAMP-activated protein kinases (PKA, that were suggested to participate in the onset and progression of various tumors. PKA may represent a biomarker for tumor detection, identification and staging, and may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment of tumors.

  9. Protein Kinase A in Cancer

    Caretta, Antonio; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla, E-mail: carla.mucignat@unipd.it [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 3, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    In the past, many chromosomal and genetic alterations have been examined as possible causes of cancer. However, some tumors do not display a clear molecular and/or genetic signature. Therefore, other cellular processes may be involved in carcinogenesis. Genetic alterations of proteins involved in signal transduction have been extensively studied, for example oncogenes, while modifications in intracellular compartmentalization of these molecules, or changes in the expression of unmodified genes have received less attention. Yet, epigenetic modulation of second messenger systems can deeply modify cellular functioning and in the end may cause instability of many processes, including cell mitosis. It is important to understand the functional meaning of modifications in second messenger intracellular pathways and unravel the role of downstream proteins in the initiation and growth of tumors. Within this framework, the cAMP system has been examined. cAMP is a second messenger involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. It acts mainly through its binding to cAMP-activated protein kinases (PKA), that were suggested to participate in the onset and progression of various tumors. PKA may represent a biomarker for tumor detection, identification and staging, and may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment of tumors.

  10. Protein kinases associated with the yeast phosphoproteome

    Munn Alan L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphorylation is an extremely important mechanism of cellular regulation. A large-scale study of phosphoproteins in a whole-cell lysate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has previously identified 383 phosphorylation sites in 216 peptide sequences. However, the protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of the identified proteins have not previously been assigned. Results We used Predikin in combination with other bioinformatic tools, to predict which of 116 unique protein kinases in yeast phosphorylates each experimentally determined site in the phosphoproteome. The prediction was based on the match between the phosphorylated 7-residue sequence and the predicted substrate specificity of each kinase, with the highest weight applied to the residues or positions that contribute most to the substrate specificity. We estimated the reliability of the predictions by performing a parallel prediction on phosphopeptides for which the kinase has been experimentally determined. Conclusion The results reveal that the functions of the protein kinases and their predicted phosphoprotein substrates are often correlated, for example in endocytosis, cytokinesis, transcription, replication, carbohydrate metabolism and stress response. The predictions link phosphoproteins of unknown function with protein kinases with known functions and vice versa, suggesting functions for the uncharacterized proteins. The study indicates that the phosphoproteins and the associated protein kinases represented in our dataset have housekeeping cellular roles; certain kinases are not represented because they may only be activated during specific cellular responses. Our results demonstrate the utility of our previously reported protein kinase substrate prediction approach (Predikin as a tool for establishing links between kinases and phosphoproteins that can subsequently be tested experimentally.

  11. The mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    Julhash U. KAZI

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family ofserine/threonine protein kinases that plays a central role in transducing extracellular signals into a variety of intracellular responses ranging from cell proliferation to apoptosis.Nine PKC genes have been identified in the human genome,which encode 10 proteins.Each member of this protein kinase family displays distinct biochemical characteristics and is enriched in different cellular and subcellular locations.Activation of PKC has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation.This review summarizes works of the past years in the field of PKC biochemistry that covers regulation and activation mechanism of different PKC isoforms.

  12. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    K Aurelia Ball; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lewinski, Mary K; John Guatelli; Erik Verschueren; Krogan, Nevan J.; Matthew P Jacobson

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichm...

  13. Physiological roles of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-activated p38-regulated/activated protein kinase

    Sergiy; Kostenko; Gianina; Dumitriu; Kari; Jenssen; Lgreid; Ugo; Moens

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases(MAPKs)are a family of proteins that constitute signaling pathways involved in processes that control gene expression,cell division, cell survival,apoptosis,metabolism,differentiation and motility.The MAPK pathways can be divided into conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.The first group converts a signal into a cellular response through a relay of three consecutive phosphorylation events exerted by MAPK kinase kinases,MAPK kinase,and MAPK.Atypical MAPK pathways are not organized into this three-tiered cascade.MAPK that belongs to both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways can phosphorylate both non-protein kinase substrates and other protein kinases.The latter are referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases.This review focuses on one such MAPK-activated protein kinase,MAPK-activated protein kinase 5(MK5)or p38-regulated/activated protein kinase(PRAK).This protein is highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom and seems to be the target of both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.Recent findings on the regulation of the activity and subcellular localization,bona fide interaction partners and physiological roles of MK5/PRAK are discussed.

  14. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  15. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  16. Regulation of the interaction between protein kinase C-related protein kinase 2 (PRK2) and its upstream kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)

    Dettori, Rosalia; Sonzogni, Silvina; Meyer, Lucas;

    2009-01-01

    The members of the AGC kinase family frequently exhibit three conserved phosphorylation sites: the activation loop, the hydrophobic motif (HM), and the zipper (Z)/turn-motif (TM) phosphorylation site. 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) phosphorylates the activation loop of...... numerous AGC kinases, including the protein kinase C-related protein kinases (PRKs). Here we studied the docking interaction between PDK1 and PRK2 and analyzed the mechanisms that regulate this interaction. In vivo labeling of recombinant PRK2 by (32)P(i) revealed phosphorylation at two sites, the...... the mechanism that negatively regulates the docking interaction of PRK2 to the upstream kinase PDK1 is directly linked to the activation mechanism of PRK2 itself. Finally, our results indicate that the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the interaction between PRK2 and PDK1 are specific for PRK2...

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in atherosclerosis

    Dorota Bryk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular signalling cascades, in which MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases intermediate, are responsible for a biological response of a cell to an external stimulus. MAP kinases, which include ERK1/2 (extracellular signalling-regulated kinase, JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p 38 MAPK, regulate the activity of many proteins, enzymes and transcription factors and thus have a wide spectrum of biological effects. Many basic scientific studies have defined numerous details of their pathway organization and activation. There are also more and more studies suggesting that individual MAP kinases probably play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They may mediate inflammatory processes, endothelial cell activation, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and T-lymphocyte differentiation, all of which represent crucial mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The specific inhibition of an activity of the respective MAP kinases may prove a new therapeutic approach to attenuate atherosclerotic plaque formation in the future. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning MAP kinase-dependent cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis.

  18. [Mitogen-activated protein kinases in atherosclerosis].

    Bryk, Dorota; Olejarz, Wioletta; Zapolska-Downar, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades, in which MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases) intermediate, are responsible for a biological response of a cell to an external stimulus. MAP kinases, which include ERK1/2 (extracellular signalling-regulated kinase), JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p 38 MAPK, regulate the activity of many proteins, enzymes and transcription factors and thus have a wide spectrum of biological effects. Many basic scientific studies have defined numerous details of their pathway organization and activation. There are also more and more studies suggesting that individual MAP kinases probably play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They may mediate inflammatory processes, endothelial cell activation, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and T-lymphocyte differentiation, all of which represent crucial mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The specific inhibition of an activity of the respective MAP kinases may prove a new therapeutic approach to attenuate atherosclerotic plaque formation in the future. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning MAP kinase-dependent cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis. PMID:24491891

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  20. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    K Aurelia Ball

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well.

  1. Rational design of protein kinase inhibitors

    Yarmoluk S. M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern methodological approaches to rational design of low molecular weight compounds with specific activity in relation to predetermined biomolecular targets are considered by example of development of high effective protein kinase inhibitors. The application of new computational methods that allow to significantly improve the quality of computational experiments (in, particular, accuracy of low molecular weight compounds activity prediction without increase of computational and time costs are highlighted. The effectiveness of strategy of rational design is demonstrated by examples of several own investigations devoted to development of new inhibitors that are high effective and selective towards protein kinases CK2, FGFR1 and ASK1.

  2. Statistical analysis of protein kinase specificity determinants

    Kreegipuu, Andres; Blom, Nikolaj; Brunak, Søren;

    1998-01-01

    The site and sequence specificity of protein kinase, as well as the role of the secondary structure and surface accessibility of the phosphorylation sites on substrate proteins, was statistically analyzed. The experimental data were collected from the literature and are available on the World Wide...... Web at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/databases/PhosphoBase/. The set of data involved 1008 phosphorylatable sites in 406 proteins, which were phosphorylated by 58 protein kinases. It was found that there exists almost absolute SER/Thr or Tyr specificity, with rare exceptions. The sequence specificity...... determinants were less strict and were located between positions -4 and +4 relative to the phosphorylation site. Secondary structure and surface accessibility predictions revealed that most of the phosphorylation sites were located on the surface of the target proteins....

  3. Problem-Solving Test: "In Vitro" Protein Kinase A Reaction

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by protein kinases is an important mechanism in the regulation of protein activity. Among hundreds of protein kinases present in human cells, PKA, the first kinase discovered, belongs to the most important and best characterized group of these enzymes. The author presents an experiment that analyzes the "in vitro"…

  4. Statistical analysis of protein kinase specificity determinants

    Kreegipuu, Andres; Blom, Nikolaj; Brunak, Søren; Jarv, Jaak

    1998-01-01

    The site and sequence specificity of protein kinase, as well as the role of the secondary structure and surface accessibility of the phosphorylation sites on substrate proteins, was statistically analyzed. The experimental data were collected from the literature and are available on the World Wid...... determinants were less strict and were located between positions -4 and +4 relative to the phosphorylation site. Secondary structure and surface accessibility predictions revealed that most of the phosphorylation sites were located on the surface of the target proteins.......The site and sequence specificity of protein kinase, as well as the role of the secondary structure and surface accessibility of the phosphorylation sites on substrate proteins, was statistically analyzed. The experimental data were collected from the literature and are available on the World Wide...... Web at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/databases/PhosphoBase/. The set of data involved 1008 phosphorylatable sites in 406 proteins, which were phosphorylated by 58 protein kinases. It was found that there exists almost absolute SER/Thr or Tyr specificity, with rare exceptions. The sequence specificity...

  5. A proteomic approach for comprehensively screening substrates of protein kinases such as Rho-kinase.

    Mutsuki Amano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are major components of signal transduction pathways in multiple cellular processes. Kinases directly interact with and phosphorylate downstream substrates, thus modulating their functions. Despite the importance of identifying substrates in order to more fully understand the signaling network of respective kinases, efficient methods to search for substrates remain poorly explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined mass spectrometry and affinity column chromatography of the catalytic domain of protein kinases to screen potential substrates. Using the active catalytic fragment of Rho-kinase/ROCK/ROK as the model bait, we obtained about 300 interacting proteins from the rat brain cytosol fraction, which included the proteins previously reported as Rho-kinase substrates. Several novel interacting proteins, including doublecortin, were phosphorylated by Rho-kinase both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method would enable identification of novel specific substrates for kinases such as Rho-kinase with high sensitivity.

  6. Protein kinase CK2 in health and disease: Protein kinase CK2: from structures to insights

    Niefind, K; Raaf, J; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decade, 40 crystal structures corresponding to protein kinase CK2 (former name 'casein kinase 2'), to its catalytic subunit CK2alpha and to its regulatory subunit CK2beta were published. Together they provide a valuable, yet by far not complete basis to rationalize the biochemical...... critical region of CK2alpha recruitment is pre-formed in the unbound state. In CK2alpha the activation segment - a key element of protein kinase regulation - adapts invariably the typical conformation of the active enzymes. Recent structures of human CK2alpha revealed a surprising plasticity in the ATP...

  7. Oral protein kinase c β inhibition using ruboxistaurin

    Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Vignati, Louis; Sheetz, Matthew J;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy, safety, and causes of vision loss among 813 patients (1,392 eyes) with moderately severe to very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy from the Protein Kinase C β Inhibitor-Diabetic Retinopathy Study and Protein Kinase C β Inhibitor-Diabetic Retinopathy Study 2...... ruboxistaurin (RBX) protein kinase C β inhibitor trials....

  8. Differential phosphorylation of ribosomal acidic proteins from yeast cell by two endogenous protein kinases: casein kinase-2 and 60S kinase

    The native 80S ribosomes isolated from ''Saccharomyces cerevisiae'' (strain W303) cells was phosphorylated by two endogenous protein kinases: multifunctional casein kinase-2 (CK-2) and specific 60S kinase. Three acidic proteins within the 60S ribosomal subunit: YP1β, YP1β' and YP2α are phosphorylated by both kinases. The other two proteins: YP1α and YP2β are predominantly phosphorylated by CK-2 but not by 60S kinase. This was confirmed in the experiment with the recombinant protein, YP2β, as a substrate, which is practically not phosphorylated by specific 60S kinase. These results together with the previous data based on the target amino-acid sequences suggest that, in addition to the multifunctional casein kinase-2 and specific 60S kinase, there exist probably other protein kinase(s) which phosphorylate the ribosomal acidic proteins in the cell. (author). 23 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  9. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Ngo, HT; Pham, Long; Kim, JW;

    2013-01-01

    , approximately 100 cellular proteins were identified as HCV core-interacting partners. Of these candidates, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPKAPK3) was selected for further characterization. MAPKAPK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by stress and growth...... inducers. Binding of HCV core to MAPKAPK3 was confirmed by in vitro pulldown assay and further verified by coimmunoprecipitation assay. HCV core protein interacted with MAPKAPK3 through amino acid residues 41 to 75 of core and the N-terminal half of kinase domain of MAPKAPK3. In addition, both RNA and......Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular proteins for its own propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assays using the HCV core protein as a probe. Of ~9,000 host proteins immobilized in a microarray...

  10. CK2: a protein kinase in need of control

    Guerra, B; Boldyreff, B; Sarno, S;

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a heterotetrameric alpha2beta2 Ser/Thr protein kinase with some features unusual among the eukaryotic protein kinases: (1) CK2 recognizes phosphoacceptor sites specified by several acidic determinants; (2) CK2 can use both ATP and GTP as phosphoryl donors; and (3) the...... response to nucleotide analogs. The increasing knowledge of CK2 structure-function relationships will allow the design of highly selective inhibitors of this pleiotropic kinase with oncogenic potential....

  11. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα. PMID:27151216

  12. Protein kinase A signalling in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and schistosomules.

    Hirst, Natasha L; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A regulates multiple processes in eukaryotes by phosphorylating diverse cellular substrates, including metabolic and signalling enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors. Here we provide insight into protein kinase A signalling in cercariae and 24h in vitro cultured somules of the blood parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, which causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. Functional mapping of activated protein kinase A using anti-phospho protein kinase A antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed activated protein kinase A in the central and peripheral nervous system, oral-tip sensory papillae, oesophagus and excretory system of intact cercariae. Cultured 24h somules, which biologically represent the skin-resident stage of the parasite, exhibited similar activation patterns in oesophageal and nerve tissues but also displayed striking activation at the tegument and activation in a region resembling the germinal 'stem' cell cluster. The adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, stimulated somule protein kinase A activation and produced a hyperkinesia phenotype. The biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine known to be present in skin also induced protein kinase A activation in somules, whereas neuropeptide Y or [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y attenuated protein kinase A activation. However, neuropeptide Y did not block the forskolin-induced somule hyperkinesia. Bioinformatic investigation of potential protein associations revealed 193 medium confidence and 59 high confidence protein kinase A interacting partners in S. mansoni, many of which possess putative protein kinase A phosphorylation sites. These data provide valuable insight into the intricacies of protein kinase A signalling in S. mansoni and a framework for further physiological investigations into the roles of protein kinase A in schistosomes, particularly in the context of interactions between the parasite and the host. PMID:26777870

  13. Distribution of protein kinase Mzeta and the complete protein kinase C isoform family in rat brain

    Naik, M U; Benedikz, Eirikur; Hernandez, I;

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of at least ten isoforms, nine of which are expressed in brain (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, delta, straightepsilon, eta, zeta, iota/lambda). Our previous studies have shown that many of these PKCs participate in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of......, protein kinase Mzeta (PKMzeta). In this study, we used immunoblot and immunocytochemical techniques with isoform-specific antisera to examine the distribution of the complete family of PKC isozymes and PKMzeta in rat brain. Each form of PKC showed a widespread distribution in the brain with a distinct...

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in plants

    Rodriguez, Maria Cristina Suarez; Petersen, Morten; Mundy, John

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have evolved to transduce environmental and developmental signals into adaptive and programmed responses. MAPK cascades relay and amplify signals via three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases leading to the phosphorylation of...... substrate proteins, whose altered activities mediate a wide array of responses, including changes in gene expression. Cascades may share kinase components, but their signaling specificity is maintained by spaciotemporal constraints and dynamic protein-protein interactions and by mechanisms that include...

  15. Photoinduced structural changes to protein kinase A

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The importance of porphyrins in organisms is underscored by the ubiquitous biological and biochemical functions that are mediated by these compounds and by their potential biomedical and biotechnological applications. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is the precursor to heme and has biomedical applications such as its use as a photosensitizer in phototherapy and photodetection of cancer. Among other applications, our group has demonstrated that low-irradiance exposure to laser irradiation of PPIX, Fe-PPIX, or meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) non-covalently docked to a protein causes conformational changes in the polypeptide. Such approach can have remarkable consequences in the study of protein structure/function relationship and can be used to prompt non-native protein properties. Therefore we have investigated protein kinase A (PKA), a more relevant protein model towards the photo-treatment of cancer. PKA's enzymatic functions are regulated by the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate for intracellular signal transduction involved in, among other things, stimulation of transcription, tumorigenesis in Carney complex and migration of breast carcinoma cells. Since phosphorylation is a necessary step in some cancers and inflammatory diseases, inhibiting the protein kinase, and therefore phosphorylation, may serve to treat these diseases. Changes in absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime indicate: 1) both TSPP and PPIX non-covalently bind to PKA where they maintain photoreactivity; 2) absorptive photoproduct formation occurs only when PKA is bound to TSPP and irradiated; and 3) PKA undergoes secondary structural changes after irradiation with either porphyrin bound. These photoinduced changes could affect the protein's enzymatic and signaling capabilities.

  16. Amino Acid Activation of mTORC1 by a PB1-Domain-Driven Kinase Complex Cascade

    Juan F. Linares

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mTORC1 complex is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient availability. The signaling adaptor p62 contributes to mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids and interacts with TRAF6, which is required for the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosome and the subsequent K63 polyubiquitination and activation of mTOR. However, the signal initiating these p62-driven processes was previously unknown. Here, we show that p62 is phosphorylated via a cascade that includes MEK3/6 and p38δ and is driven by the PB1-containing kinase MEKK3. This phosphorylation results in the recruitment of TRAF6 to p62, the ubiquitination and activation of mTOR, and the regulation of autophagy and cell proliferation. Genetic inactivation of MEKK3 or p38δ mimics that of p62 in that it leads to inhibited growth of PTEN-deficient prostate organoids. Analysis of human prostate cancer samples showed upregulation of these three components of the pathway, which correlated with enhanced mTORC1 activation.

  17. Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase-Like Superfamily.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  18. Contractions activate hormone-sensitive lipase in rat muscle by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase

    Donsmark, Morten; Langfort, Jozef; Holm, Cecilia;

    2003-01-01

    contractions. Adrenaline acts via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The signalling mediating the effect of contractions is unknown and was explored in this study. Incubated soleus muscles from 70 g male rats were electrically stimulated to perform repeated tetanic contractions for 5 min. The contraction......-induced activation of HSL was abolished by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I and calphostin C and reduced 50% by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, which also completely blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation. None of the...

  19. Protein kinases are potential targets to treat inflammatory bowel disease

    Lei; Yang; Yutao; Yan

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), the two main forms of which are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s dis-ease. In this article, we will review the mechanisms of involvement of protein kinases in the pathogenesis of and intervention against IBD, in terms of their effects on genetics, microbiota, mucous layer and tight junc-tion, and the potential of protein kinases as therapeutic targets against IBD.

  20. The Roles of Protein Kinases in Learning and Memory

    Giese, Karl Peter; Mizuno, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, more than 250 protein kinases are expressed, but only a few of these kinases are currently known to enable learning and memory. Based on this information it appears that learning and memory-related kinases either impact on synaptic transmission by altering ion channel properties or ion channel density, or regulate…

  1. Interleukin 3-dependent survival by the Akt protein kinase

    Songyang, Zhou; Baltimore, David; Cantley, Lewis C.; Kaplan, David R; Franke, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent survival of hematopoietic cells is known to rely on the activity of multiple signaling pathways, including a pathway leading to activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), and protein kinase Akt is a direct target of PI 3-kinase. We find that Akt kinase activity is rapidly induced by the cytokine IL-3, suggesting a role for Akt in PI 3-kinase-dependent signaling in hematopoetic cells. Dominant-negative mutants of Akt specifically block Akt activation ...

  2. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  3. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID

    Zourelidou, Melina

    2014-06-19

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the-in many cells-asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant.

  4. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  5. The Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinase, CaMKK2, Inhibits Preadipocyte Differentiation

    Lin, Fumin; Ribar, Thomas J.; Means, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    When fed a standard chow diet, CaMKK2 null mice have increased adiposity and larger adipocytes than do wild-type mice, whereas energy balance is unchanged. Here, we show that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) is expressed in preadipocytes, where it functions as an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α kinase. Acute inhibition or deletion of CaMKK2 in preadipocytes enhances their differentiation into mature adipocytes, which can be reversed by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxa...

  6. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  7. Protein phosphatases active on acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylated by casein kinase I, casein kinase II and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    The protein phosphatases in rat liver cytosol, active on rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylated by casein kinase I, casein kinase II and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, have been partially purified by anion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The major phosphatase activities against all three substrates copurify through fractionation and appear to be identical to protein phosphatases 2A1 and 2A2. No unique protein phosphatase active on 32P-ACC phosphorylated by the casein kinases was identified

  8. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  9. On the structural features of the substrates of protein kinase

    Structural integrity of case in and phosvitin as substrates of a mitochondrial protein kinase preparation has been examined with reference to maximal phosphate incorporation with AT32P. These proteins subjected to degradative treatments with trypsin and chymotrypsin gave rise to peptides which could still be phosphorylated by the kinase to the extent of 30.80% as compared to the parent proteins. The more active peptides from both casein and phosvitin contained high proportion of serine residue along with certain other amino acids. The hexosamine content in phosvitin did not determine its function as substrate of protein kinase. (author)

  10. Protein kinase A regulates molecular chaperone transcription and protein aggregation.

    Yue Zhang

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 regulates one of the major pathways of protein quality control and is essential for deterrence of protein-folding disorders, particularly in neuronal cells. However, HSF1 activity declines with age, a change that may open the door to progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We have investigated mechanisms of HSF1 regulation that may become compromised with age. HSF1 binds stably to the catalytic domain of protein kinase A (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on at least one regulatory serine residue (S320. We show here that PKA is essential for effective transcription of HSP genes by HSF1. PKA triggers a cascade involving HSF1 binding to the histone acetylase p300 and positive translation elongation factor 1 (p-TEFb and phosphorylation of the c-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, a key mechanism in the downstream steps of HSF1-mediated transcription. This cascade appears to play a key role in protein quality control in neuronal cells expressing aggregation-prone proteins with long poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts. Such proteins formed inclusion bodies that could be resolved by HSF1 activation during heat shock. Resolution of the inclusions was inhibited by knockdown of HSF1, PKAcα, or the pTEFb component CDK9, indicating a key role for the HSF1-PKA cascade in protein quality control.

  11. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.

  12. Protein kinase C involvement in focal adhesion formation

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1992-01-01

    still to be elucidated. We show here that the kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 reduce focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in response to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner, and that activators of protein kinase C can promote their formation under conditions where they do not normally form...... then treated with kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 for 2h, IRM indicated a reduction in focal adhesion formation at concentrations where protein kinase C (PKC) should be inhibited. In contrast, focal adhesions formed normally at concentrations of these inhibitors where cyclic AMP- or cyclic GMP......-dependent kinases should be inactivated. Inhibition of PKC, but not that of cyclic AMP- or cyclic GMP-dependent kinases, also prevented the formation of stress fibers and induced a dispersal of talin and vinculin, but not integrin beta 1 subunits, from small condensations present at 1h. Consistent with the...

  13. Host Signal Transduction and Protein Kinases Implicated in Legionella Infection

    Hempstead, Andrew D.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of the phosphorylation status of proteins by both kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in cellular signal transduction. Challenge of host cells by Legionella pneumophila manipulates the phosphorylation state of multiple host factors. These changes play roles in bacterial uptake, vacuole modification, cellular survival, and the immune response. In addition to modification by host cell kinases in response to the bacterium, L. pneumophila translocates bacterial kinases int...

  14. Leishmanial protein kinases phosphorylate components of the complement system.

    Hermoso, T; Fishelson, Z; Becker, S I; Hirschberg, K.; Jaffe, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Externally oriented protein kinases are present on the plasma membrane of the human parasite, Leishmania. Since activation of complement plays an important role in the survival of these parasites, we examined the ability of protein kinases from Leishmania major to phosphorylate components of the human complement system. The leishmanial protein kinase-1 (LPK-1) isolated from promastigotes of L. major was able to phosphorylate purified human C3, C5 and C9. Only the alpha-chain of C3 and C5 was ...

  15. RAF protein-serine/threonine kinases: Structure and regulation

    Research highlights: → The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. → RAF kinase inhibitors block MEK activation in cells containing oncogenic B-RAF. → RAF kinase inhibitors can lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity. -- Abstract: A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF are a family of three protein-serine/threonine kinases that participate in the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signal transduction cascade. This cascade participates in the regulation of a large variety of processes including apoptosis, cell cycle progression, differentiation, proliferation, and transformation to the cancerous state. RAS mutations occur in 15-30% of all human cancers, and B-RAF mutations occur in 30-60% of melanomas, 30-50% of thyroid cancers, and 5-20% of colorectal cancers. Activation of the RAF kinases requires their interaction with RAS-GTP along with dephosphorylation and also phosphorylation by SRC family protein-tyrosine kinases and other protein-serine/threonine kinases. The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. RAF kinase inhibitors are effective in blocking MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation in cells containing the oncogenic B-RAF Val600Glu activating mutation. RAF kinase inhibitors lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity in cells containing wild-type B-RAF and wild-type or activated mutant RAS. C-RAF plays a key role in this paradoxical increase in downstream MEK-ERK activation.

  16. Inactivation of a MAPK-like protein kinase and activation of a MBP kinase in germinating barley embryos

    Testerink, C.; Vennik, M.; Kijne, J.W.; Wang, M.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    2000-01-01

    We provide evidence for involvement of two different 45 kDa protein kinases in rehydration and germination of barley embryos. In dry embryos, a myelin basic protein (MBP) phosphorylating kinase was detected, which could be immunoprecipitated with an anti-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) antib

  17. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  18. Side-effects of protein kinase inhibitors on ion channels

    Youn Kyoung Son; Hongzoo Park; Amy L Firth; Won Sun Park

    2013-12-01

    Protein kinases are one of the largest gene families and have regulatory roles in all aspects of eukaryotic cell function. Modulation of protein kinase activity is a desirable therapeutic approach for a number of human diseases associated with aberrant kinase activity, including cancers, arthritis and cardiovascular disorders. Several strategies have been used to develop specific and selective protein kinase modulators, primarily via inhibition of phosphorylation and down-regulation of kinase gene expression. These strategies are effective at regulating intracellular signalling pathways, but are unfortunately associated with several undesirable effects, particularly those that modulate ion channel function. In fact, the side-effects have precluded these inhibitors from being both useful experimental tools and therapeutically viable. This review focuses on the ion channel side-effects of several protein kinase inhibitors and specifically on those modulating K+, Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. It is hoped that the information provided with a detailed summary in this review will assist the future development of novel specific and selective compounds targeting protein kinases both for experimental tools and for therapeutic approaches.

  19. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  20. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  1. Inhibition of protein kinase C intracerebroventricularly attenuates sensitization

    Mrowczynski, Oliver Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Drug relapse, mediated by drug-associated memories, is a major problem associated with addiction. Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of protein kinase enzymes that has been implicated in learning and memory with regards to addiction. This study used a PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine (10nmol), to investigate the effects of blocking PKC throughout the brain on addiction related memories. Cocaine (15mg/kg) induced locomotor sensitization, used to model the transition from casual to compulsive use, ...

  2. MBD 4-a potential substrate for protein kinase X

    Ying Lin; Wei Li

    2011-01-01

    Human protein kinase X (PrKX) is an X chromosomeencoded cAMP-dependent protein kinase.PrKX has 50.2%,50.8%,and 44.83% identity with the catalytic,C-subunit of PKAα,PKAβ,and PKAγ,respectively [1].PrKX shares some biochemical characteristics with PKA.Both kinases catalyze phosphorylation of histone H1 and the PKA synthetic septapeptide substrate,referred to as Kemptide (LRRASLG),in vitro.However,the specific activities of PrKX phosphorylation of histone H1 and Kemptide are significantly lower than that of PKA [2,3].

  3. Conservation, variability and the modeling of active protein kinases.

    James D R Knight

    Full Text Available The human proteome is rich with protein kinases, and this richness has made the kinase of crucial importance in initiating and maintaining cell behavior. Elucidating cell signaling networks and manipulating their components to understand and alter behavior require well designed inhibitors. These inhibitors are needed in culture to cause and study network perturbations, and the same compounds can be used as drugs to treat disease. Understanding the structural biology of protein kinases in detail, including their commonalities, differences and modes of substrate interaction, is necessary for designing high quality inhibitors that will be of true use for cell biology and disease therapy. To this end, we here report on a structural analysis of all available active-conformation protein kinases, discussing residue conservation, the novel features of such conservation, unique properties of atypical kinases and variability in the context of substrate binding. We also demonstrate how this information can be used for structure prediction. Our findings will be of use not only in understanding protein kinase function and evolution, but they highlight the flaws inherent in kinase drug design as commonly practiced and dictate an appropriate strategy for the sophisticated design of specific inhibitors for use in the laboratory and disease therapy.

  4. Topology of cAMP dependent protein kinase and A-kinase anchor proteins in mammalian mitochondria

    Nuzzi, R.; Sardanelli, A. M.; Dobrová, Zuzana; Signorile, A.; De Rasmo, D.; Papa, S.

    Milano, 2005, s. 57. ISSN 0021-2938. [SIB 2005. Riccione (IT), 27.09.2005-30.09.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : protein kinase * mammalian mitochondria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  5. A-Raf kinase is a new interacting partner of protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1997-01-01

    In a search for protein kinase CK2 beta subunit binding proteins using the two-hybrid system, more than 1000 positive clones were isolated. Beside clones for the alpha' and beta subunit of CK2, there were clones coding for a so far unknown protein, whose partial cDNA sequence was already deposited...... in the EMBL database under the accession numbers R08806 and Z17360, for the ribosomal protein L5 and for A-Raf kinase. All isolated clones except the one for CK2 beta showed no interaction with the catalytic alpha subunit of CK2. A-Raf kinase is a new interesting partner of CK2 beta. The isolated A...

  6. TPX2 Protein of Arabidopsis Activates Aurora Kinase 1, But Not Aurora Kinase 3 In Vitro

    Tomaštíková, Eva; Demidov, D.; Jeřábková, Hana; Binarová, Pavla; Houben, A.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Petrovská, Beáta

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 6 (2015), s. 1988-1995. ISSN 0735-9640 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28443S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GAP501/12/2333 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Aurora kinase * Targeting protein for Xklp2 * In vitro kinase assay Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.656, year: 2014

  7. Protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation blocks juvenile hormone action.

    Kethidi, Damu R; Li, Yiping; Palli, Subba R

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate a wide variety of developmental and physiological processes in insects. Although the biological actions of JH are well documented, the molecular mechanisms underlying JH action are poorly understood. We studied the molecular basis of JH action using a JH response element (JHRE) identified in the promoter region of JH esterase gene cloned from Choristoneura fumiferana, which is responsive to JH and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). In Drosophila melanogaster L57 cells, the JHRE-regulated reporter gene was induced by JH I, JH III, methoprene, and hydroprene. Nuclear proteins isolated from L57 cells bound to the JHRE and exposure of these proteins to ATP resulted in a reduction in their DNA binding. Either JH III or calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) was able to restore the binding of nuclear proteins to the DNA. In addition, protein kinase C inhibitors increased and protein kinase C activators reduced the binding of nuclear proteins to the JHRE. In transactivation assays, protein kinase C inhibitors induced the luciferase gene placed under the control of a minimal promoter and the JHRE. These data suggest that protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation prevents binding of nuclear proteins to juvenile hormone responsive promoters resulting in suppression of JH action. PMID:16448742

  8. Modulation of the MAP kinase signaling cascade by Raf kinase inhibitory protein

    Nicholas TRAKUL; Marsha R. ROSNER

    2005-01-01

    Proteins like Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) that serve as modulators of signaling pathways, either by promoting or inhibiting the formation of productive signaling complexes through protein-protein interactions, have been demonstrated to play an increasingly important role in a number of cell types and organisms. These proteins have been implicated in development as well as the progression of cancer. RKIP is a particularly interesting regulator, as it is a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed protein that has been shown to play a role in growth and differentiation in a number of organisms and can regulate multiple signaling pathways. RKIP is also the first MAP kinase signaling modulator to be identified as playing a role in cancer metastasis, and identification of the mechanism by which it regulates Raf-1 activation provides new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Plant protein kinase genes induced by drought, high salt and cold stresses

    2000-01-01

    Drought, high salt and cold are three different kinds of environment stresses that severely influence the growth, development and productivity of crops. They all decrease the water state of plant cells, and consequently result in the harm of plant from water deficit. Several genes encoding protein kinases and induced by drought, high salt and low temperature have been isolated from Arabidopsis. These protein kinases include receptor protein kinase (RPK), MAP kinases, ribosomal-protein kinases and transcription-regulation protein kinase. The expression features of these genes and the regulatory roles of these protein kinases in stress response and signal transduction are discussed.

  10. Mitogen activated protein kinases: a role in inflammatory bowel disease?

    Broom, O J; Widjaya, B; Troelsen, J;

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery more than 15 years ago, the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been implicated in an ever-increasingly diverse array of pathways, including inflammatory signalling cascades. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are...... their related signalling proteins in influencing the progression of IBD....

  11. Effect of triiodothyronine on rat liver chromatin protein kinase

    1) Injection of triiodothyronine to rats stimulates protein kinase activity in liver chromatin nonhistone proteins. A significant increase was found after two daily injections. A 4-fold increase was observed with the purified enzyme after eight daily injections of the hormone. No variations were observed in cytosol protein kinase activity. Electrophoretic pattern, effect of heat denaturation, effect of p-hydroxymercuribenzoate seem to indicate that the enzyme present in treated rats is not identical to the enzyme in control animals, which suggests that thyroid hormone has induced nuclear protein kinase. Diiodothyronine, 3, 3', 5'-triiodothyronine have no effect on protein kinase. 2) Chromatin non-histone proteins isolated from rats injected with triiodothyronine incorporated more 32P when incubated with [γ-32P]ATP than the chromatin proteins from untreated rats. Thyroidectomy reduced the in vitro 32P incorporation. It is suggested that some of the biological activity of thyroid hormone could be mediated through its effect on chromatin non-histone proteins. (orig.)

  12. Characterization of pathogenic germline mutations in human Protein Kinases

    Orengo Christine A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Kinases are a superfamily of proteins involved in crucial cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. Accordingly, they play an important role in cancer biology. To contribute to the study of the relation between kinases and disease we compared pathogenic mutations to neutral mutations as an extension to our previous analysis of cancer somatic mutations. First, we analyzed native and mutant proteins in terms of amino acid composition. Secondly, mutations were characterized according to their potential structural effects and finally, we assessed the location of the different classes of polymorphisms with respect to kinase-relevant positions in terms of subfamily specificity, conservation, accessibility and functional sites. Results Pathogenic Protein Kinase mutations perturb essential aspects of protein function, including disruption of substrate binding and/or effector recognition at family-specific positions. Interestingly these mutations in Protein Kinases display a tendency to avoid structurally relevant positions, what represents a significant difference with respect to the average distribution of pathogenic mutations in other protein families. Conclusions Disease-associated mutations display sound differences with respect to neutral mutations: several amino acids are specific of each mutation type, different structural properties characterize each class and the distribution of pathogenic mutations within the consensus structure of the Protein Kinase domain is substantially different to that for non-pathogenic mutations. This preferential distribution confirms previous observations about the functional and structural distribution of the controversial cancer driver and passenger somatic mutations and their use as a proxy for the study of the involvement of somatic mutations in cancer development.

  13. The Snf1 Protein Kinase in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Usaite, Renata

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Snf1 protein kinase is primarily known as a key component of the glucose repression regulatory cascade. The Snf1 kinase is highly conserved among eukaryotes and its mammalian homolog AMPK is responsible for energy homeostasis in cells, organs and whole bodies....... Failure in the AMPK regulatory cascade leads to metabolic disorders, such as obesity or type 2 diabetes. The knowledge about the Snf1 protein kinase remains to be of much interest in studying yeast carbon metabolism and human biology. To investigate the effect of Snf1 kinase and its regulatory subunit Snf...... was the lack of reproducible sampling for proteins with low spectral counts. To reconstruct a regulatory map of the yeast Snf1 protein kinase, I used the abundances of 5716 mRNAs, 2388 proteins, and 44 metabolites measured for the wild-type, Δsnf1, Δsnf4, and Δsnf1Δsnf4 strains. By integrating these...

  14. Stress-induced activation of protein kinase CK2 by direct interaction with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    Sayed, M; Kim, S O; Salh, B S;

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of proteins that are important in cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we demonstrate that the stress signaling agents anisomycin, arsenite, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulate the specific enzyme activity of CK2...

  15. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin;

    2014-01-01

    protein- protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg2 and Lys4 adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine......Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr3 of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date......, histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  16. Purification and characterization of a thylakoid protein kinase

    Control of state transitions in the thylakoid by reversible phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) is modulated by a kinase. The kinase catalyzing this phosphorylation is associated with the thylakoid membrane, and is regulated by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool. The isolation and partial purification from spinach thylakoids of two protein kinases (CPK1, CPK2) of apparent molecular masses 25 kDa and 38 kDa has been reported. Neither enzyme utilizes isolated LHC-II as a substrate. The partial purification of a third protein kinase (LHCK) which can utilize both lysine-rich histones (IIIs and Vs) and isolated LHC-II as substrate has now been purified to homogeneity and characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a 64 kDa peptide. From a comparison of the two isolation procedures we have concluded that CPK1 is indeed a protein kinase, but has a lower specific activity than that of LHCK. 8 refs., 4 figs

  17. Characterization of nuclear protein kinases of Xenopus laevis oocytes

    Xenopus laevis oocytes contain large nuclei (germinal vesicles) that can be isolated in very pure form and which permit the study of enzymatic activities present in these organelles. Incubation of pure oocyte nuclear homogenates with 32P in a buffered solution containing 5 mM MgCl2 results in the phosphorylation of a large number of proteins by endogenous protein kinases. This phosphorylation is not affected by the addition of cyclic nucleotides or calcium ion and calmodulin. On the other hand the nuclear kinases are considerably stimulated by spermine and spermidine and strongly inhibited by heparin (10 μg/ml). Addition of exogenous protein substrates shows that the major oocyte kinases are very active with casein and phosvitin as substrates but do not phosphorylate histones or protamines. DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of the nuclear extract fractionates the casein phosphorylating activity in two main peaks. The first peak is not retained on the column equilibrated with 0.1 M NH2SO4 and uses exclusively ATP as phosphate donor and is insensitive to polyamines or heparin. The second peak which corresponds to 70% of the casein phosphorylation elutes at 0.27 M NH2SO4 and uses both ATP and GTP as phosphate donors and is greatly stimulated by polyamines and completely inhibited by 10 μg/ml heparin. On this evidence the authors conclude that the major protein kinase peak corresponds to casein kinase type II which has been found in mammalian nuclei

  18. Synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate for 60S ribosomal protein kinase from yeast cells

    Grankowski, N; Gasior, E; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic studies on the 60S protein kinase were conducted with synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate. Peptide RRREEESDDD proved to be the best synthetic substrate for this enzyme. The peptide has a sequence of amino acids which most closely resembles the structure of potential...... phosphorylation sites in natural substrates, i.e., acidic ribosomal proteins. The superiority of certain kinetic parameters for 60S kinase obtained with the native whole 80S ribosomes over those of the isolated fraction of acidic ribosomal proteins indicates that the affinity of 60S kinase to the specific protein...

  19. Characterization of a calmodulin binding protein kinase from Arabidopsis thalian

    2003-01-01

    A full-length calmodulin binding protein kinase cDNA, AtCBK1, from Arabidopsis has been isolated by screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library and by 5′-RACE. Northern blot and in situ hybridization indicated that the expression of AtCBK1 was more abundant in the vascular bundles and the meristems than in other tissues. The phylogenetic analyses reveal that AtCBK1 is different from animal CaMKs and it falls into CRK subgroup, indicating that they may come from different ancestors. The result suggests that AtCBK1 encodes a CaM-binding serine/threonine protein kinase.

  20. A Screen for Novel Phosphoinositide 3-kinase Effector Proteins*

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Boisvert, François-Michel; Agacan, Mark; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Gourlay, Robert; Leslie, Nicholas R.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases exert important cellular effects through their two primary lipid products, phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2). As few molecular targets for PtdIns(3,4)P2 have yet been identified, a screen for PI 3-kinase-responsive proteins that is selective for these is described. This features a tertiary approach incorporating a unique, primary recruitment of target proteins in intact cells to membranes selec...

  1. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  2. Cyclophilin represents a novel class of protein kinases

    Cyclophilin (CyP, Mr 17,737, pI 9.6), a highly specific cytosolic receptor for cyclosporin A (CsA) has ser/thr protein kinase activity. Incorporation of 32P into bovine histone H3 (BH3) was catalyzed by major and minor CyP isozymes at the same rate. Salt effects were biphasic with optimal kinase activity between 50-100 mM Na+ or K+. Kinase activity was maximal at 370C, stable for 5 min at 450, labile at 560, optimal between pH 6.8 and 8.0 and had an apparent Km of 20 uM ATP with both isozymes. The specific activity of CyP was 1.0 nmole P/mg protein/min with chicken histone H1 (CH1), 0.2 nmoles P/mg prot/min with BH3 and less than 0.01 nmoles P/mg prot/min with synapsin, casein, phosvitin, and ribosomal protein S6. Cofactors including Mn++, Zn++, Ca++, phosphatidyl serine, diolein and phorbol ester, cAMP, cGMP and Ca++ did not affect basal CyP kinase activity. CsA (3 by 50% but did not inhibit phosphorylation of other histones; 2ug CsA/ml was required to cause 50% inhibition of cAMP and Ca++/CaM dependent kinases. A non-immunosuppressive analog (Me-leu-11-CsA) that does not bind to CyP did not inhibit CH3 phosphorylation. Thus, CyP is a novel protein kinase that mediates immunosuppression by CsA

  3. Substrates of protein kinases involved in cell signal transduction

    In this study substrates for protein-tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C are examined to gain a better understanding of the conditions of their phosphorylation, their functions, and their potential involvement in intracellular signaling pathways. The tissue, cell type, and intracellular distributions of two protein-tyrosine kinase substrates, termed p36 and p81, are determined by immunoblotting of murine tissues, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase staining of frozen rat tissue sections, and biochemical fractionation and indirect immunofluorescence staining of tissue culture cells. Both p36 and p81 are constitutively phosphorylated to low levels in tissue culture cells. In 32P-labeled A431 cells, pp81 contains both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. Following brief epidermal growth factor treatment of A431 cells, pp81 is more heavily phosphorylated on threonine and approximately 10% of p81 molecules become phosphorylated on tyrosine. Treatment of A431 cells with the potent tumor promoter and protein kinase C activator, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), does not alter the phosphorylation state of p81. However, TPA treatment of A431 cells and certain other cell types leads to augmented serine phosphorylation of p36

  4. The Role of Protein Kinase CK2 in Glioblastoma Development

    Ji, Haitao; Lu, Zhimin

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and malignant primary brain tumor in adults, and its response to current therapies is limited. Protein kinase CK2 is overexpressed in GBM and regulates GBM cell survival, proliferation, and migration and brain tumorigenesis. Targeting CK2 for GBM treatment may benefit GBM patients.

  5. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  6. Protein kinase CK2 structure-function relationship

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A;

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 subunits alpha and beta were expressed either separately or together in a bacterial expression system (pT7-7/BL21(DE3)) and purified to homogeneity. After mixing the subunits, a CK2 holoenzyme (alpha 2 beta 2) was spontaneously reconstituted, which displays identical features as...

  7. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  8. Leishmania amazonensis: PKC-like protein kinase modulates the (Na++K+)ATPase activity.

    Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo de; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Lara, Lucienne Silva; Pinheiro, Carla Mônica; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2007-08-01

    The present study aimed to identify the presence of protein kinase C-like (PKC-like) in Leishmania amazonensis and to elucidate its possible role in the modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity. Immunoblotting experiments using antibody against a consensus sequence (Ac 543-549) of rabbit protein kinase C (PKC) revealed the presence of a protein kinase of 80 kDa in L. amazonensis. Measurements of protein kinase activity showed the presence of both (Ca(2+)-dependent) and (Ca(2+)-independent) protein kinase activity in plasma membrane and cytosol. Phorbol ester (PMA) activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase stimulated the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity, while activation of the Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase was inhibitory. Both effects of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase of the plasma membrane were lower than that observed in intact cells. PMA induced the translocation of protein kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane, indicating that the maximal effect of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity depends on the synergistic action of protein kinases from both plasma membrane and cytosol. This is the first demonstration of a protein kinase activated by PMA in L. amazonensis and the first evidence for a possible role in the regulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity in this trypanosomatid. Modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase by protein kinase in a trypanosomatid opens up new possibilities to understand the regulation of ion homeostasis in this parasite. PMID:17475255

  9. Protein inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase interacts with protein kinase A inhibitors.

    Yu, Jianqiang; Yu, Long; Chen, Zheng; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Xiaosong; Wang, Xiang; Ren, Daming; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2002-03-28

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) are important signaling molecules. It is well known that PKA can specifically phosphorylate nNOS. But the underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure. Our data indicate that the protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN) binds to protein kinase A inhibitors (PKIs), which suggests that PKIs, together with PIN, might mediate the phosphorylation of nNOS by PKA. PMID:11978406

  10. Selective Phosphorylation Inhibitor of Delta Protein Kinase C-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Protein-Protein Interactions: Application for Myocardial Injury in Vivo.

    Qvit, Nir; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Sho, Eiketsu; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-22

    Protein kinases regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, metabolism, and cell death. Because the primary sequence and the three-dimensional structure of many kinases are highly similar, the development of selective inhibitors for only one kinase is challenging. Furthermore, many protein kinases are pleiotropic, mediating diverse and sometimes even opposing functions by phosphorylating multiple protein substrates. Here, we set out to develop an inhibitor of a selective protein kinase phosphorylation of only one of its substrates. Focusing on the pleiotropic delta protein kinase C (δPKC), we used a rational approach to identify a distal docking site on δPKC for its substrate, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). We reasoned that an inhibitor of PDK's docking should selectively inhibit the phosphorylation of only PDK without affecting phosphorylation of the other δPKC substrates. Our approach identified a selective inhibitor of PDK docking to δPKC with an in vitro Kd of ∼50 nM and reducing cardiac injury IC50 of ∼5 nM. This inhibitor, which did not affect the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates even at 1 μM, demonstrated that PDK phosphorylation alone is critical for δPKC-mediated injury by heart attack. The approach we describe is likely applicable for the identification of other substrate-specific kinase inhibitors. PMID:27218445

  11. Phosphoproteins and protein kinases of the Golgi apparatus membrane

    Incubation of a highly purified fraction derived from rat liver Golgi apparatus with [gamma-32P]ATP results in phosphorylation of several endogenous phosphoproteins. One phosphoprotein with an apparent Mr of 48,300 is radiolabeled to an apparent extent at least 5-fold higher than any other phosphoprotein as part of either the Golgi apparatus or highly purified rat liver fractions derived from the rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, plasma membrane, coated vesicles, cytosol, and total homogenate. Approximately 70% of the 48.3-kDa phosphoprotein appears to be a specific extrinsic Golgi membrane protein with the phosphorylated amino acid being threonine. The protein kinase which phosphorylates the 48.3-kDa protein is an intrinsic Golgi membrane protein and is dependent on Mg2+, independent of Ca2+, calmodulin, and cAMP, and is inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide. Preliminary evidence suggests that there are also intrinsic membrane protein kinases in the Golgi apparatus which are dependent on Ca2+ and cAMP. The physiological role of the above phosphoproteins and protein kinases is not known

  12. Synapsis of DNA ends by DNA-dependent protein kinase

    DeFazio, Lisa G.; Stansel, Rachel M.; Griffith, Jack D.; Chu, Gilbert

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKCS) is required for a non-homologous end-joining pathway that repairs DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation or V(D)J recombination; however, its role in this pathway has remained obscure. Using a neutravidin pull-down assay, we found that DNA-PKCS mediates formation of a synaptic complex containing two DNA molecules. Furthermore, kinase activity was cooperative with respect to DNA concentration, suggesting that act...

  13. Overinhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Inducing Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    LI Hong-lian; CHEN Juan; LIU Shi-jie; ZHANG Jia-yu; WANG Qun; WANG Jian-zhi

    2005-01-01

    To reveal the relationship between mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and tau phosphorylation, we used different concentration of PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK (MAPK kinase), to treat mice neuroblastma (N2a) cell line for 6 h. It showed that the activity of MAPK decreased in a dose-dependent manner. But Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that just when the cells were treated with 16 μmol/L PD98059, tau was hyperphosphorylated at Ser396/404 and Ser199/202 sites. We obtained the conclusion that overinhibited MAPK induced tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser396/404 and Ser199/202 sites.

  14. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained 32P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a ∼ 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not

  15. Emerging Roles of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    The cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated, when the energy balance of the cell decreases. AMPK has been proposed to regulate multiple metabolic processes. However, much of the evidence for these general effects of AMPK relies on investigations in cell systems or...... exercise appears to inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity by an immediate up-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) protein content. Consequently, this may inhibit glucose oxidation and thereby generate conditions for increased FA oxidation and glycogen resynthesis in skeletal muscle...... importance for prioritising energy dissipation, inhibition of lipid storage pathways and regulation of mitochondrial and metabolic proteins, but this needs further investigations. In addition, we provide evidence that AMPK is regulating autophagic signalling in skeletal muscle. Thus, in skeletal muscle AMPK...

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytes

    Natarajan Palaniappan; S Anbalagan; Sujatha Narayanan

    2012-03-01

    CD44, an adhesion molecule, has been reported to be a binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) in macrophages and it also mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis in vivo. However, the signalling pathways that are involved in M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytic cells are currently unknown. Exposure of THP-1 human monocytes to M. tuberculosis H37Rv and H37Ra induced distinct, time-dependent, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3/6, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinases. The strains also differed in their usage of CD14 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) receptors in mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain induced lower CD44 surface expression and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, whereas H37Ra the reverse. Using highly specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinase, we report that inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinases increases, but that inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase decreases M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in THP-1 human monocytes.

  17. Mitochondrial protein import under kinase surveillance

    Magdalena Opalińska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the simplicity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae,its basic cellular machinery tremendously mirrors that of higher eukaryotic counterparts. Thus, this unicellular organism turned out to be an invaluable model system to study the countless mechanisms that govern life of the cell. Recently, it has also enabled the deciphering of signalling pathways that control flux of mitochondrial proteins to the organelle according to metabolic requirements. For decades mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles that are only partially incorporated into cellular signalling networks. Consequently, only little has been known about the role of reversible phosphorylation as a meaningful mechanism that orchestrates mitochondrial biology accordingly to cellular needs. Therefore, research in this direction has been vastly neglected. However, findings over the past few years have changed this view and new exciting fields in mitochondrial biology have emerged. Here, we summarize recent discoveries in the yeast model system that point towards a vital role of reversible phosphorylation in regulation of mitochondrial protein import.

  18. Identification of a Fungi-Specific Lineage of Protein Kinases Closely Related to Tyrosine Kinases

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Jin, Qiaojun; Liu, Huiquan; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) specifically catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and play essential roles in many cellular processes. Although TKs mainly exist in animals, recent studies revealed that some organisms outside the Opisthokont clade also contain TKs. The fungi, as the sister group to animals, are thought to lack TKs. To better understand the origin and evolution of TKs, it is important to investigate if fungi have TK or TK-related genes. We therefore systematical...

  19. Molecular Physiology of SPAK and OSR1: Two Ste20-Related Protein Kinases Regulating Ion Transport

    Gagnon, Kenneth B; Delpire, Eric

    2012-01-01

    SPAK (Ste20-related proline alanine rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive kinase) are members of the germinal center kinase VI sub-family of the mammalian Ste20 (Sterile20)-related protein kinase family. Although there are 30 enzymes in this protein kinase family, their conservation across the fungi, plant and animal kingdom confirms their evolutionary importance. Already, a large volume of work has accumulated on the tissue distribution, binding partners, signaling cascades, and...

  20. Protein kinase activity associated with the nuclear lamina.

    Dessev, G; Iovcheva, C; Tasheva, B; R. Goldman

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear lamina-enriched fraction from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells contains a tightly bound protein kinase activity, which phosphorylates in vitro the nuclear lamins, a 52-kilodalton protein, and several unknown minor components. The enzyme(s) is thermolabile, independent of Ca2+ and cAMP, and inhibited by quercetin. After treatment with 4 M urea it remains bound to the nuclear lamina in an active state, but it is irreversibly inactivated in 6 M urea. The lamin proteins are phosphorylated on...

  1. Casein kinase I-like protein kinases encoded by YCK1 and YCK2 are required for yeast morphogenesis.

    Robinson, L. C.; Menold, M. M.; Garrett, S.; Culbertson, M R

    1993-01-01

    Casein kinase I is an acidotropic protein kinase class that is widely distributed among eukaryotic cell types. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the casein kinase I isoform encoded by the gene pair YCK1 and YCK2 is a 60- to 62-kDa membrane-associated form. The Yck proteins perform functions essential for growth and division; either alone supports growth, but loss of function of both is lethal. We report here that casein kinase I-like activity is associated with a soluble Yck2-beta-galact...

  2. Regulation of polar auxin transport by protein and lipid kinases.

    Armengot, Laia; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Jaillais, Yvon

    2016-07-01

    The directional transport of auxin, known as polar auxin transport (PAT), allows asymmetric distribution of this hormone in different cells and tissues. This system creates local auxin maxima, minima, and gradients that are instrumental in both organ initiation and shape determination. As such, PAT is crucial for all aspects of plant development but also for environmental interaction, notably in shaping plant architecture to its environment. Cell to cell auxin transport is mediated by a network of auxin carriers that are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Here we review our current knowledge on some aspects of the 'non-genomic' regulation of auxin transport, placing an emphasis on how phosphorylation by protein and lipid kinases controls the polarity, intracellular trafficking, stability, and activity of auxin carriers. We describe the role of several AGC kinases, including PINOID, D6PK, and the blue light photoreceptor phot1, in phosphorylating auxin carriers from the PIN and ABCB families. We also highlight the function of some receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and two-component histidine kinase receptors in PAT, noting that there are probably RLKs involved in co-ordinating auxin distribution yet to be discovered. In addition, we describe the emerging role of phospholipid phosphorylation in polarity establishment and intracellular trafficking of PIN proteins. We outline these various phosphorylation mechanisms in the context of primary and lateral root development, leaf cell shape acquisition, as well as root gravitropism and shoot phototropism. PMID:27242371

  3. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Justin eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554 in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression – including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding and degradation steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes.

  4. Effects of protein kinase C activators and staurosporine on protein kinase activity, cell survival, and proliferation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    Straarup, EM; Schousboe, P; Hansen, HQ;

    1997-01-01

    Autocrine factors prevent cell death in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a unicellular eukaryote, in a chemically defined medium. At certain growth conditions these factors are released at a sufficient concentration by > 500 cells ml-1 to support cell survival and proliferation. The protein...... kinase C activators phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1-oleyl 2-acetate glycerol (OAG) when added to 250 cells ml-1 supported cell survival and proliferation. In the presence of the serine and threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine the cells died both at 250 cells ml-1 in cultures supplemented...... with either PMA or OAG, or at 2,500 cells ml-1. At 500 cells ml-1 PMA induced the in vivo phosphorylation of at least six proteins. The myelin basic protein fragment 4-14 was phosphorylated in vitro in crude extracts of a culture of 250,000 cells ml-1. Both the in vivo and the in vitro phosphorylation...

  5. PKIS: computational identification of protein kinases for experimentally discovered protein phosphorylation sites

    Zou, Liang; Wang, Mang; Shen, Yi; Liao, Jie; Li, Ao; Wang, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic protein phosphorylation is an essential regulatory mechanism in various organisms. In this capacity, it is involved in a multitude of signal transduction pathways. Kinase-specific phosphorylation data lay the foundation for reconstruction of signal transduction networks. For this reason, precise annotation of phosphorylated proteins is the first step toward simulating cell signaling pathways. However, the vast majority of kinase-specific phosphorylation data remain undiscov...

  6. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  7. Compartmentalization Role of A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs in Mediating Protein Kinase A (PKA Signaling and Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy

    Abeer Rababa'h

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs stimulation enhances contractility through protein kinase-A (PKA substrate phosphorylation. This PKA signaling is conferred in part by PKA binding to A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs. AKAPs coordinate multi-protein signaling networks that are targeted to specific intracellular locations, resulting in the localization of enzyme activity and transmitting intracellular actions of neurotransmitters and hormones to its target substrates. In particular, mAKAP (muscle-selective AKAP has been shown to be present on the nuclear envelope of cardiomyocytes with various proteins including: PKA-regulatory subunit (RIIα, phosphodiesterase-4D3, protein phosphatase-2A, and ryanodine receptor (RyR2. Therefore, through the coordination of spatial-temporal signaling of proteins and enzymes, mAKAP controls cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels very tightly and functions as a regulator of PKA-mediated substrate phosphorylation leading to changes in calcium availability and myofilament calcium sensitivity. The goal of this review is to elucidate the critical compartmentalization role of mAKAP in mediating PKA signaling and regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by acting as a scaffolding protein. Based on our literature search and studying the structure–function relationship between AKAP scaffolding protein and its binding partners, we propose possible explanations for the mechanism by which mAKAP promotes cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. Structural and functional diversity in the activity and regulation of DAPK-related protein kinases.

    Temmerman, Koen; Simon, Bertrand; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    Within the large group of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs) of the human kinome, there is a distinct branch of highly related kinases that includes three families: death-associated protein-related kinases, myosin light-chain-related kinases and triple functional domain protein-related kinases. In this review, we refer to these collectively as DMT kinases. There are several functional features that span the three families, such as a broad involvement in apoptotic processes, cytoskeletal association and cellular plasticity. Other CAMKs contain a highly conserved HRD motif, which is a prerequisite for kinase regulation through activation-loop phosphorylation, but in all 16 members of the DMT branch, this is replaced by an HF/LD motif. This DMT kinase signature motif substitutes phosphorylation-dependent active-site interactions with a local hydrophobic core that maintains an active kinase conformation. Only about half of the DMT kinases have an additional autoregulatory domain, C-terminal to the kinase domain that binds calcium/calmodulin in order to regulate kinase activity. Protein substrates have been identified for some of the DMT kinases, but little is known about the mechanism of recognition. Substrate conformation could be an equally important parameter in substrate recognition as specific preferences in sequence position. Taking the data together, this kinase branch encapsulates a treasure trove of features that renders it distinct from many other protein kinases and calls for future research activities in this field. PMID:23745726

  9. Redox Regulation of the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    Yingying Han; Qilong Wang; Ping Song; Yi Zhu; Ming-Hui Zou

    2010-01-01

    Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death. Objectives The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC). Methods Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation. Results In BAEC, Berberine caused a dos...

  10. Comparative analysis of fungal protein kinases and associated domains

    Glaser Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund Yael; Kosti Idit; Horwitz Benjamin A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein phosphorylation is responsible for a large portion of the regulatory functions of eukaryotic cells. Although the list of sequenced genomes of filamentous fungi has grown rapidly, the kinomes of recently sequenced species have not yet been studied in detail. The objective of this study is to apply a comparative analysis of the kinase distribution in different fungal phyla, and to explore its relevance to understanding the evolution of fungi and their taxonomic class...

  11. Comparative analysis of fungal protein kinases and associated domains

    Kosti, Idit; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael; Glaser, Fabian; Horwitz, Benjamin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation is responsible for a large portion of the regulatory functions of eukaryotic cells. Although the list of sequenced genomes of filamentous fungi has grown rapidly, the kinomes of recently sequenced species have not yet been studied in detail. The objective of this study is to apply a comparative analysis of the kinase distribution in different fungal phyla, and to explore its relevance to understanding the evolution of fungi and their taxonomic classification...

  12. Protein kinase GCN2 mediates responses to glyphosate in Arabidopsis

    Faus, I.; ZABALZA OSTOS, ANA Mª; Santiago, J.; González Nebauer, Sergio; Royuela, M.; Serrano, R; J Gadea

    2015-01-01

    Background The increased selection pressure of the herbicide glyphosate has played a role in the evolution of glyphosate-resistance in weedy species, an issue that is becoming a threat to global agriculture. The molecular components involved in the cellular toxicity response to this herbicide at the expression level are still unidentified. Results In this study, we identify the protein kinase GCN2 as a cellular component that fosters the action of glyphosate in the model plant Arabidopsis tha...

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in the acute diabetic myocardium

    Strnisková, M.; Barančík, M.; Neckář, Jan; Ravingerová, T.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 249, 1-2 (2003), s. 59-65. ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A069 Grant ostatní: VEGA(SK) 2/2063/22 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : experimental diabetes * ischemia * mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.763, year: 2003

  14. Targeting Protein Kinase C subtypes in pancreatic cancer

    Storz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical studies protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes have been implicated in regulating many aspects of pancreatic cancer development and progression. However, clinical phase I or phase II trials with compounds targeting classical PKC isoforms were not successful. Recent studies implicate that mainly atypical and novel PKC enzymes regulate oncogenic signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer. Members of these two subgroups converge signaling induced by mutant Kras, growth factors and inflammato...

  15. Novel regulation of protein kinase C-η

    Pal, Deepanwita; Outram, Shalini Persaud; Basu, Alakananda

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is the receptor for tumor promoting phorbol esters, which are potent activators of conventional and novel PKCs, but persistent treatment with phorbol esters leads to downregulation of these PKCs. However, PKCη, a novel PKC isozyme, resists downregulation by tumor-promoting phorbol esters, but little is known about how PKCη level is regulated. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play an important role in regulating activity and stability of PKCs. In the present study, ...

  16. Expression of a Gibberellin-Induced Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Protein Kinase in Deepwater Rice and Its Interaction with Kinase-Associated Protein Phosphatase1

    van der Knaap, Esther; Song, Wen-Yuan; Ruan, De-Ling; Sauter, Margret; Ronald, Pamela C.; Kende, Hans

    1999-01-01

    We identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active, autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively. PMID:10364408

  17. Expression of a gibberellin-induced leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase in deepwater rice and its interaction with kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    Knaap, E. van der; Sauter, M.; Kende, H. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). DOE Plant Research Lab.); Song, W.Y.; Ruan, D.L.; Ronald, P.C. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-06-01

    The authors identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively.

  18. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Hai Jiang; Jianchun Wu; Chen He; Wending Yang; Honglin Li

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdkl activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chkl and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  19. Studies on the Differential Specificity of Protein Kinases and Its Applications

    Loog, Mart

    2001-01-01

    Protein kinases are enzymes that catalyse the phosphoryl transfer from the g-phosphate of ATP to acceptor amino acids in proteins. The specificity of selected model protein kinases was studied at three different levels using a) novel bi-substrate-analogue inhibitors, b) synthetic peptide substrates and c) mutated protein substrate analogues. A new class of protein kinase bi-substrate-analogue inhibitors was designed on the basis of adenosine-5’-carboxylic acid derivatives, where a short argi...

  20. A Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-based Approach for Identifying Protein Kinase-Clients and Quantifying Kinase Activity

    The Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes are believed to encode >500 and >1,000 protein kinases, respectively. Despite this abundance, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been described in detail. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been integral to the large-scale mapp...

  1. Genome-wide identification and analysis of expression profiles of maize mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase.

    Xiangpei Kong

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are highly conserved signal transduction model in animals, yeast and plants. Plant MAPK cascades have been implicated in development and stress responses. Although MAPKKKs have been investigated in several plant species including Arabidopsis and rice, no systematic analysis has been conducted in maize. In this study, we performed a bioinformatics analysis of the entire maize genome and identified 74 MAPKKK genes. Phylogenetic analyses of MAPKKKs from maize, rice and Arabidopsis have classified them into three subgroups, which included Raf, ZIK and MEKK. Evolutionary relationships within subfamilies were also supported by exon-intron organizations and the conserved protein motifs. Further expression analysis of the MAPKKKs in microarray databases revealed that MAPKKKs were involved in important signaling pathways in maize different organs and developmental stages. Our genomics analysis of maize MAPKKK genes provides important information for evolutionary and functional characterization of this family in maize.

  2. Benzoselendiazole-based responsive long-lifetime photoluminiscent probes for protein kinases

    Ekambaram, R; Enkvist, E; Manoharan, GB;

    2014-01-01

    Benzoselenadiazole-containing inhibitors of protein kinases were constructed and their capability to emit phosphorescence in the kinase-bound state was established. Labelling of the inhibitors with a red fluorescent dye led to sensitive responsive photoluminescent probes for protein kinase CK2 that...

  3. GTP plus water mimic ATP in the active site of protein kinase CK2

    Niefind, K; Pütter, M; Guerra, B;

    1999-01-01

    The structures of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays complexed with Mg2+ and with analogs of ATP or GTP were determined to 2.2 A resolution. Unlike most other protein kinases, CK2 from various sources shows 'dual-cosubstrate specificity', that is, the ability to efficiently...... target CK2 or other kinases with this property....

  4. Presenilin dependence of phospholipase C and protein kinase C signaling

    Dehvari, Nodi; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Isacsson, Ola;

    2007-01-01

    -stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activity which was gamma-secretase dependent. To further evaluate the dependence of PLC on PSs we measured PLC activity and the activation of variant protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking either PS1, PS2, or both. PLC activity and PKCalpha and......Presenilins (PSs) are involved in processing several proteins such as the amyloid precursor protein (APP), as well as in pathways for cell death and survival. We previously showed that some familial Alzheimer's disease PS mutations cause increased basal and acetylcholine muscarinic receptor...... PKCgamma activations were significantly lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs after PLC stimulation. Protein levels of PKCalpha and PKCgamma were lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs. In contrast, PKCdelta levels were significantly elevated in PS1 and PS2 double knockout as well as in PS1 knockout...

  5. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Genes in Corn Roots

    Takezawa, D.; Patil, S.; Bhatia, A.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding Ca-2(+) - Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs), Corn Root Protein Kinase 1 and 2 (CRPK 1, CRPK 2) were isolated from the root tip library of corn (Zea mays L., cv. Merit) and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of both the clones have features characteristic of plant CDPKS, including all 11 conserved serine/threonine kinase subdomains, a junction domain and a calmodulin-like domain with four Ca-2(+), -binding sites. Northern analysis revealed that CRPKI mRNA is preferentially expressed in roots, especially in the root tip; whereas, the expression of CRPK2 mRNA was very low in all the tissues tested. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that CRPKI mRNA is highly expressed in the root apex, as compared to other parts of the root. Partially purified CDPK from the root tip phosphorylates syntide-2, a common peptide substrate for plant CDPKs, and the phosphorylation was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of Ca-2(+). Our results show that two CDPK isoforms are expressed in corn roots and they may be involved in the Ca-2(+)-dependent signal transduction process.

  6. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK)ζ, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGKζ siRNA transfection decreased H2O2-induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGKζ also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGKζ rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H2O2 treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGKζ, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells

  7. Stimulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of phosphorylase kinase by micromolar concentrations of spermine

    The phosphorylation of phosphorylase kinase by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) is stimulated approximately 2-fold by spermine and spermidine. Half maximal effects were observed at 10 microM and 150 microM of spermine and spermidine, respectively. The phosphorylations of other substrates of A-kinase such as glycogen synthase, histone, and casein are not stimulated by these two polyamines. The rates, but not the final extents, of phosphorylation of both the alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase by A-kinase are stimulated by spermine. The results indicate that spermine and spermidine may play an important role in the activation of glycogenolysis in skeletal muscle

  8. Interactions of protein kinase CK2beta subunit within the holoenzyme and with other proteins

    Kusk, M; Ahmed, R; Thomsen, B;

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous, highly conserved protein kinase with a tetrameric alpha2beta2 structure. For the formation of this tetrameric complex a beta-alpha dimer seems to be a prerequisite. Using the two-hybrid system and a series of CK2beta deletion mutants, we mapped domains involved...... in alpha-beta and beta-beta interactions. We also detected an intramolecular beta interaction within the amino acid stretch 132-165. Using CK2beta as a bait in a two-hybrid library screening several new putative cellular partners have been identified, among them the S6 kinase p90rsk, the putative...... tumor suppressor protein Doc-1, the Fas-associated protein FAF1, the mitochondrial translational initiation factor 2 and propionyl CoA carboxylase beta subunit....

  9. Depletion of WRN protein causes RACK1 to activate several protein kinase C isoforms

    Massip, L; Garand, C; Labbé, A;

    2010-01-01

    show that a knock down of the WRN protein in normal human fibroblasts induces phosphorylation and activation of several protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Using a tandem affinity purification strategy, we found that WRN physically and functionally interacts with receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1...... contrast, different DNA-damaging treatments known to activate PKCs did not induce RACK1/PKCs association in cells. Overall, our results indicate that a depletion of the WRN protein in normal fibroblasts causes the activation of several PKCs through translocation and association of RACK1 with such kinases.......Werner's syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal disease characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies. The protein defective in patients with WS (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription and telomere maintenance. In this study, we...

  10. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  11. Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent protein kinase from skeletal muscle

    Soluble extracts of skeletal muscle from rat, rabbit and hamster when incubated with 0.1 mM [32P]phosphoenolpyruvate give rise to a similar set of phosphoproteins as resolved by SDS-PAGE with Mr 25,000, 35,000, 37,000, 43,000 and 59,000. The phosphorylation of these proteins is neither inhibited by excess ATP nor achieved by incubation with [γ-32P]ATP. Except for the Mr 43,000 phosphoprotein, the phosphorylation of the other proteins dramatically increased in the presence of 0.1 mM CTP. Although phosphatase inhibits such as NaF and PPi were not effective, CTP may act to inhibit phosphatase activity rather than activating a protein kinase. The phosphoamino acids produced in these phosphoproteins were acid stable and only phosphoserine has been routinely identified. Using DEAE-cellulose, CM-Sephadex and Ultrogel AcA44 chromatography, the Mr 37,000 phosphoprotein has been purified from rabbit skeletal muscle to near homogeneity. No physiological role for either the protein kinase or its substrates has yet been found

  12. ABNORMAL PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To survey the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the pathogenesis of several hematopoietic malignancies. Methods: By reviewing the published laboratory and clinical studies on PTK-related oncoproteins and their causative role in some leukemias and lymphomas. Results: Protein tyrosine kinases are key participants in signal transduction pathways that regulate cellular growth, activation and differentiations. Aberrant PTK activity resulting from gene mutation (often accompanying chromosome translocation) plays an etiologic role in several clonal hematopoietic malignancies. For example, the PTK product of the BCR-ABL fusion gene resulting from the t (9; 22) translocation exhibits several fold higher tyrosine kinase activity than the product of the ABL gene. Evidence suggests that the BCR-ABL oncoprotein alone is sufficient to case chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other Ph positive acute leukemia. PTK over-activity resulting from chromosomal translocations creating TEL-ABL, TEL-JAK2 and TEL-PDGFR( fusion proteins plays an important role in the pathogenesis of other types of leukemia. Another example occurs in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Experimental and clinical evidences indicate that translocations involving ALK gene on chromosome 2p23, most commonly resulting in an NPM-ALK fusion oncogene, result in constitutive activation of ALK and cause ALCL. This group of lymphomas is now named ALK positive lymphoma or ALKoma. Conclusion: Genetic lesions creating aberrant fusion proteins that result in excessive PTK activity are increasingly being recognized as central to the pathogenesis of hemotopoietic malignancies. These chimeric PTK molecules represent attractive disease-specific targets against which new classes therapeutic agents are being developed.

  13. Toward the rational design of protein kinase casein kinase-2 inhibitors.

    Sarno, Stefania; Moro, Stefano; Meggio, Flavio; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Dal Ben, Diego; Ghisellini, Paola; Battistutta, Roberto; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2002-01-01

    Casein kinase-2 (CK2) probably is the most pleiotropic member of the protein kinase family, with more than 200 substrates known to date. Unlike the great majority of protein kinases, which are tightly regulated enzymes, CK2 is endowed with high constitutive activity, a feature that is suspected to underlie its oncogenic potential and possible implication in viral infections. This makes CK2 an attractive target for anti-neoplastic and antiviral drugs. Here, we present an overview of our present knowledge about CK2 inhibitors, with special reference to the information drawn from two recently solved crystal structures of CK2alpha in complex with emodin and with 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TBB), this latter being the most specific CK2 inhibitor known to date. A comparison with a series of anthraquinone and xanthenone derivatives highlights the crucial relevance of the hydroxyl group at position 3 for inhibition by emodin, and discloses the possibility of increasing the inhibitory potency by placing an electron withdrawing group at position 5. We also present mutational data corroborating the relevance of two hydrophobic residues unique to CK2, Val66 and Ile174, for the interactions with emodin and TBB, but not with the flavonoid inhibitors quercetin and fisetin. In particular, the CK2alpha mutant V66A displays 27- and 11-fold higher IC(50) values with emodin and TBB, respectively, as compared with the wild-type, while the IC(50) value with quercetin is unchanged. The data presented pave the road toward the rational design of more potent and selective inhibitors of CK2 and the generation of CK2 mutants refractory to inhibition, useful to probe the implication of CK2 in specific cellular functions. PMID:12191608

  14. Modulation of the protein kinase activity of mTOR.

    Lawrence, J C; Lin, T A; McMahon, L P; Choi, K M

    2004-01-01

    mTOR is a founding member of a family of protein kinases having catalytic domains homologous to those in phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase. mTOR participates in the control by insulin of the phosphorylation of lipin, which is required for adipocyte differentiation, and the two translational regulators, p70S6K and PHAS-I. The phosphorylation of mTOR, itself, is stimulated by insulin in Ser2448, a site that is also phosphorylated by protein kinase B (PKB) in vitro and in response to activation of PKB activity in vivo. Ser2448 is located in a short stretch of amino acids not found in the two TOR proteins in yeast. A mutant mTOR lacking this stretch exhibited increased activity, and binding of the antibody, mTAb-1, to this region markedly increased mTOR activity. In contrast, rapamycin-FKBP12 inhibited mTOR activity towards both PHAS-I and p70S6K, although this complex inhibited the phosphorylation of some sites more than that of others. Mutating Ser2035 to Ile in the FKBP12-rapamycin binding domain rendered mTOR resistant to inhibition by rapamycin. Unexpectedly, this mutation markedly decreased the ability of mTOR to phosphorylate certain sites in both PHAS-I and p70S6K. The results support the hypotheses that rapamycin disrupts substrate recognition instead of directly inhibiting phosphotransferase activity and that mTOR activity in cells is controlled by the phosphorylation of an inhibitory regulatory domain containing the mTAb-1 epitope. PMID:14560959

  15. Arabidopsis Yak1 protein (AtYak1) is a dual specificity protein kinase

    Kim, Dongjin

    2015-10-09

    Yak1 is a member of dual-specificity Tyr phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) that are evolutionarily conserved. The downstream targets of Yak1 and their functions are largely unknown. Here, a homologous protein AtYAK1 was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and the phosphoprotein profiles of the wild type and an atyak1 mutant were compared on two-dimensional gel following Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein gel staining. Annexin1, Annexin2 and RBD were phosphorylated at serine/ threonine residues by the AtYak1 kinase. Annexin1, Annexin2 and Annexin4 were also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues. Our study demonstrated that AtYak1 is a dual specificity protein kinase in Arabidopsis that may regulate the phosphorylation status of the annexin family proteins.

  16. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  17. Subtype activation and interaction of protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase controlling receptor expression in cerebral arteries and microvessels after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) still remains elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase C (PKC) subtypes in the pathophysiology of cerebral...... ischemia after SAH in cerebral arteries and microvessels and to examine temporal activation of the kinases. We hypothesize that treatment with a MAPK or PKC inhibitor will prevent the SAH-induced kinase activation in brain vessels. METHODS: SAH was induced by injecting 250 microL blood into the......: Among the 8 investigated PKC isoforms, only PKC delta was activated at 1 hour and at 48 hours, whereas PKC alpha was activated at 48 hours after SAH. For the MAPKs, there was early phosphorylation at 1 hour of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, whereas c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38 showed...

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Regulates Seed Dormancy in Barley.

    Nakamura, Shingo; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Morishige, Hiromi; Kubo, Yuta; Nakamura, Masako; Ichimura, Kazuya; Seo, Shigemi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ando, Tsuyu; Hensel, Goetz; Sameri, Mohammad; Stein, Nils; Sato, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-03-21

    Seed dormancy has fundamental importance in plant survival and crop production; however, the mechanisms regulating dormancy remain unclear [1-3]. Seed dormancy levels generally decrease during domestication to ensure that crops successfully germinate in the field. However, reduction of seed dormancy can cause devastating losses in cereals like wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) due to pre-harvest sprouting, the germination of mature seed (grain) on the mother plant when rain occurs before harvest. Understanding the mechanisms of dormancy can facilitate breeding of crop varieties with the appropriate levels of seed dormancy [4-8]. Barley is a model crop [9, 10] and has two major seed dormancy quantitative trait loci (QTLs), SD1 and SD2, on chromosome 5H [11-19]. We detected a QTL designated Qsd2-AK at SD2 as the single major determinant explaining the difference in seed dormancy between the dormant cultivar "Azumamugi" (Az) and the non-dormant cultivar "Kanto Nakate Gold" (KNG). Using map-based cloning, we identified the causal gene for Qsd2-AK as Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3). The dormant Az allele of MKK3 is recessive; the N260T substitution in this allele decreases MKK3 kinase activity and appears to be causal for Qsd2-AK. The N260T substitution occurred in the immediate ancestor allele of the dormant allele, and the established dormant allele became prevalent in barley cultivars grown in East Asia, where the rainy season and harvest season often overlap. Our findings show fine-tuning of seed dormancy during domestication and provide key information for improving pre-harvest sprouting tolerance in barley and wheat. PMID:26948880

  19. Tissue-dependent regulation of protein tyrosine kinase activity during embryonic development

    1991-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase activity was assayed in a variety of chicken tissues during embryonic development and in the adult. In some tissues protein tyrosine kinase activity decreased during embryonic development; however, in other tissues it remained high throughout development, it contrast to the level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which decreased during development. The highest levels of tyrosine kinase activity were detected in 17-d embryonic brain although only low levels of protei...

  20. ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF NEURONAL CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE DURING NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Neurons display characteristic schedules by which they acquire and lose the neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase-Gr (CaM Kinase-Gr) during differentiation. uch schedules are exemplified by patterns of expression of this kinase in the developing cerebellum and ...

  1. First inactive conformation of CK2 alpha, the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2

    Raaf, Jennifer; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha, catalytic subunit of CK2) attached to a dimer of two noncatalytic subunits (CK2beta, noncatalytic subunit of CK2). CK2alpha belongs to the superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases...

  2. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by LKB1 and CaMKK in adipocytes

    Gormand, Amélie; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer;

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. In adipose tissue, activation of AMPK has been demonstrated in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli. However, the upstream kinase that activates AMPK in adipocytes...

  3. Asymmetric expression of protein kinase CK2 subunits in human kidney tumors

    Stalter, G; Siemer, S; Becht, E; Ziegler, M; Remberger, K; Issinger, O G

    1994-01-01

    of protein kinase CK2 alpha in tumors/normal tissue (T/N) was 1.58 and that of the protein kinase CK2 beta (T/N) was 2.65. The data suggest that the generally described increase in protein kinase CK2 activity in tumor cells may to some extent result from a deregulation in subunit biosynthesis or...... degradation. This at least partly owing to the presence of excess enzymatically active protein kinase alpha-subunit but also to a significantly higher presence of the non-catalytic beta-subunit....

  4. Association of Common Genetic Variants in Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Chinese Han Population

    Ting-Ting Li; Hong Qiao; Hui-Xin Tong; Tian-Wei Zhuang; Tong-Tong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:A study has identified several novel susceptibility variants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4) gene for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) within the German population.Among the variants,five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MAP4K4 (rs1003376,rs11674694,rs2236935,rs2236936,and rs6543087) showed significant association with T2DM or diabetes-related quantitative traits.We aimed to evaluate whether common SNPs in the MAP4K4 gene were associated with T2DM in the Chinese population.Methods:Five candidate SNPs were genotyped in 996 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and in 976 control subjects,using the SNPscanTM method.All subjects were recruited from the Second Affiliated Hospital,Harbin Medical University from October 2010 to September 2013.We evaluated the T2DM risk conferred by individual SNPs and haplotypes using logistic analysis,and the association between the five SNPs and metabolic traits in the subgroups.Results:Of the five variants,SNP rs2236935T/C was significantly associated with T2DM in this study population (odds ratio =1.293;95% confidence interval:1.034-1.619,P =0.025).In addition,among the controls,rs 1003376 was significantly associated with an increased body mass index (P =0.045) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (P =0.037).Conclusions:MAP4K4 gene is associated with T2DM in a Chinese Han population,and MAP4K4 gene variants may contribute to the risk toward the development of T2DM.

  5. Induction and phosphorylation of protein kinase C-α and mitogen-activated protein kinase by hypoxia and by radiation in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    Protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase are protein-serine/threonine kinases which are important regulators of diverse cellular processes including metabolism, proliferation and differentiation. This study shows that both hypoxia and X irradiation of serum-deprived Chinese hamster V79 cells cause the induction and phosphorylation of the PKC-α isoform. The increased induction and phosphorylation of PKC occur mainly in the nuclear fraction. Unlike the PKC activator TPA, neither hypoxic nor radiation stress causes translocation of PKC-α from the cytosol to the membrane. The induction of PKC-α by hypoxia is accompanied by an increased expression of MAP kinase but, in contrast, this does not occur when PKC-α is induced by radiation. Radiation, like TPA, causes a complete redistribution of MAP kinase from the cytosol to the nucleus. 28 refs., 7 figs

  6. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase is not involved in hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase activation by neuroglucopenia.

    Junji Kawashima

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia and neuroglucopenia stimulate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity in the hypothalamus and this plays an important role in the counterregulatory responses, i.e. increased food intake and secretion of glucagon, corticosterone and catecholamines. Several upstream kinases that activate AMPK have been identified including Ca(2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK, which is highly expressed in neurons. However, the involvement of CaMKK in neuroglucopenia-induced activation of AMPK in the hypothalamus has not been tested. To determine whether neuroglucopenia-induced AMPK activation is mediated by CaMKK, we tested whether STO-609 (STO, a CaMKK inhibitor, would block the effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG-induced neuroglucopenia both ex vivo on brain sections and in vivo. Preincubation of rat brain sections with STO blocked KCl-induced α1 and α2-AMPK activation but did not affect AMPK activation by 2DG in the medio-basal hypothalamus. To confirm these findings in vivo, STO was pre-administrated intracerebroventricularly (ICV in rats 30 min before 2DG ICV injection (40 µmol to induce neuroglucopenia. 2DG-induced neuroglucopenia lead to a significant increase in glycemia and food intake compared to saline-injected control rats. ICV pre-administration of STO (5, 20 or 50 nmol did not affect 2DG-induced hyperglycemia and food intake. Importantly, activation of hypothalamic α1 and α2-AMPK by 2DG was not affected by ICV pre-administration of STO. In conclusion, activation of hypothalamic AMPK by 2DG-induced neuroglucopenia is not mediated by CaMKK.

  7. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  8. Effect of protein kinase inhibitors on protein phosphorylation and germination of aerial spores from Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Palecková, P; Kontrová, F; Kofronová, O; Bobek, J; Benada, O; Mikulík, K

    2007-01-01

    In vitro phosphorylation reaction using extracts prepared from cells in the exponential phase of growth and aerial spores of Streptomyces coelicolor displayed the presence of multiply phosphorylated proteins. Effect of protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) (geldanamycin, wortmannin, apigenin, genistein, roscovitine, methyl 2,5-dihydroxycinnamate, rapamycin, staurosporine) was determined on protein phosphorylation and on germination of spores. The in vitro experiments showed differences in phosphoprotein pattern due to the presence of PKIs. Cultivation of aerial spores with PKIs led to a significant delay in germ tube emergence and filament formation. However, none of the tested PKIs completely blocked the germination process. These results indicate that protein kinases of spores form complex networks sharing common modulating site that plays an important role in proper timing of early developmental events. PMID:17702458

  9. Telencephalin protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis by activating the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    Heping Yang; Dapeng Wu; Xiaojie Zhang; Xiang Wang; Yi Peng; Zhiping Hu

    2012-01-01

    Telencephalin is a neural glycoprotein that reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid beta protein in the human neural tumor cell line PAJU.In this study,we examined the role of the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway in this process.Western blot analysis demonstrated that telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B were not expressed in PAJU cells transfected with empty plasmid,while they were expressed in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid.After treatment with 1.0 nM amyloid beta protein 42,expression of telencephalin and phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B in the transfected cells gradually diminished,while levels of phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin increased.In addition,the high levels of telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B expression in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid could be suppressed by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002.These findings indicate that telencephalin activates the ezrin/radixin/moesin family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis.

  10. Conformational Dependence of a Protein Kinase Phosphate Transfer Reaction

    Henkelman, Graeme; Tung, Chang-Shung; Fenimore,, P W; McMahon, Benjamin H

    2004-01-01

    Atomic motions and energetics for a phosphate transfer reaction catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are calculated by plane-wave density functional theory, starting from structures of proteins crystallized in both the reactant conformation (RC) and the transition-state conformation (TC). In the TC, we calculate that the reactants and products are nearly isoenergetic with a 0.2 eV barrier; while phosphate transfer is unfavorable by over 1.2 eV in the RC, with an even higher barrier. With the protein in the TC, the motions involved in reaction are small, with only P$_\\gamma$ and the catalytic proton moving more than 0.5 \\AA. Examination of the structures reveals that in the RC the active site cleft is not completely closed and there is insufficient space for the phosphorylated serine residue in the product state. Together, these observations imply that the phosphate transfer reaction occurs rapidly and reversibly in a particular conformation of the protein, and that the reaction can be gated by...

  11. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg2+ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg2+ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Elevated Aurora Kinase A Protein Expression in Diabetic Skin Tissue

    Cho, Moon Kyun; An, Je Min; Kang, Sang Gue

    2014-01-01

    Background Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A) plays an important role in the regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis. Dysregulated Aurora-A leads to mitotic faults and results in pathological conditions. No studies on Aurora-A expression in human diabetic skin tissue have been reported. In light of this, we explored the expression of Aurora-A in human diabetic skin tissue. Methods Aurora-A protein was evaluated by western blotting in 6 human diabetic skin tissue and 6 normal skin specimens. Results Increased expression of Aurora-A protein was detected in all diabetic skin tissue samples in both western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. However, in the case of the normal skin tissue, no bands of Aurora-A protein were detected in either the western blotting analysis or the immunohistochemical staining. Conclusions Thus far, there have been no studies on the expression of Aurora-A in diabetic skin tissue. However, we believe that oxidative DNA damage related to the expression of Aurora-A protein and Aurora-A could be involved inhuman diabetic skin tissue. PMID:24511492

  13. Phosphorylation of TCF Proteins by Homeodomain-interacting Protein Kinase 2*

    Hikasa, Hiroki; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt pathways play essential roles in cell proliferation, morphogenesis, and cell fate specification during embryonic development. According to the consensus view, the Wnt pathway prevents the degradation of the key signaling component β-catenin by the protein complex containing the negative regulators Axin and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Stabilized β-catenin associates with TCF proteins and enters the nucleus to promote target gene expression. This study examines the involvement of HIP...

  14. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as ...

  15. Multistep Phosphorelay Proteins Transmit Oxidative Stress Signals to the Fission Yeast Stress-activated Protein Kinase

    Nguyen, Aaron Ngocky; Lee, Albert; Place, Warren; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2000-01-01

    In response to oxidative stress, eukaryotic cells induce transcription of genes required for detoxification of oxidants. Here we present evidence that oxidative stress stimuli are transmitted by a multistep phosphorelay system to the Spc1/Sty1 stress-activated protein kinase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The fission yeast mpr1+ gene encodes a novel protein with a histidine-containing phosphotransfer domain homologous to the budding yeast Ypd1. Spc1 activation upon oxidative ...

  16. Identifying Human Kinase-Specific Protein Phosphorylation Sites by Integrating Heterogeneous Information from Various Sources

    Li, Tingting; Du, Pufeng; Xu, Nanfang

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an important type of protein post-translational modification. Identification of possible phosphorylation sites of a protein is important for understanding its functions. Unbiased screening for phosphorylation sites by in vitro or in vivo experiments is time consuming and expensive; in silico prediction can provide functional candidates and help narrow down the experimental efforts. Most of the existing prediction algorithms take only the polypeptide sequence around the phosphorylation sites into consideration. However, protein phosphorylation is a very complex biological process in vivo. The polypeptide sequences around the potential sites are not sufficient to determine the phosphorylation status of those residues. In the current work, we integrated various data sources such as protein functional domains, protein subcellular location and protein-protein interactions, along with the polypeptide sequences to predict protein phosphorylation sites. The heterogeneous information significantly boosted the prediction accuracy for some kinase families. To demonstrate potential application of our method, we scanned a set of human proteins and predicted putative phosphorylation sites for Cyclin-dependent kinases, Casein kinase 2, Glycogen synthase kinase 3, Mitogen-activated protein kinases, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C families (avaiable at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/huphospho). The predicted phosphorylation sites can serve as candidates for further experimental validation. Our strategy may also be applicable for the in silico identification of other post-translational modification substrates. PMID:21085571

  17. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  18. Contraction-associated translocation of protein kinase C in rat skeletal muscle

    Richter, Erik; Cleland, P J; Rattigan, S;

    1987-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve of the anaesthetized rat in vivo led to a time-dependent translocation of protein kinase C from the muscle cytosol to the particulate fraction. Maximum activity of protein kinase C in the particulate fraction occurred after 2 min of intermittent short...... tetanic contractions of the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus muscle group and coincided with the loss of activity from the cytosol. Translocation of protein kinase C may imply a role for this kinase in contraction-initiated changes in muscle metabolism....

  19. Involvement of protein kinases on the upregulation of endothelin receptors in rat basilar and mesenteric arteries

    Jamali, Roya; Edvinsson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    protein kinases (c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK], protein kinase C [PKC], and extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK1/2]) in ET(B) receptor upregulation after organ culture. Rat basilar and mesenteric arteries were incubated for 24 hrs in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with or without the PKC...... were determined with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cellular localization and protein level of ET(B) receptors were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The PKC and ERK1/2 inhibitors attenuated the contraction induced by S6c in the basilar arteries more than in the mesenteric arteries...

  20. Modulation of human checkpoint kinase Chk1 by the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Wang, Jean Y J

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in various aspects of cellular regulation. The regulatory beta-subunit of CK2 exerts a central role not only in mediating formation of tetrameric CK2 complexes but also as a docking partner for several protein kinases. In this study......, CK2beta is found to interact with the human cell cycle checkpoint kinase Chk1. The Chk1-interacting region of CK2beta is localized at the C-terminus and the complex between CK2beta and Chk1 is devoid of the catalytic CK2alpha-subunit. The interaction between CK2beta and Chk1 leads to an increase in...... the Cdc25C phosphorylation activity of Chk1. The screening of several cell lines has revealed that the association between CK2beta and Chk1 also occurs in vivo at a different degree. Collectively, these studies confirm the implication of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 in cell cycle...

  1. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N;

    2000-01-01

    ), protein kinase C (PKC), and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This was done using a coculture system consisting of PC12-E2 cells grown on fibroblasts, with or without NCAM expression, allowing NCAM-NCAM interactions resulting in neurite outgrowth. PC12-E2 cells were transiently......The signal transduction pathways associated with neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-induced neuritogenesis are only partially characterized. We here demonstrate that NCAM-induced neurite outgrowth depends on activation of p59(fyn), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma...... transfected with expression plasmids encoding constitutively active forms of Ras, Raf, MAP kinase kinases MEK1 and 2, dominant negative forms of Ras and Raf, and the FAK-related nonkinase. Alternatively, PC12-E2 cells were submitted to treatment with antibodies to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor...

  2. Oscillatory change of SR-protein kinase activities during oocyte maturation meiosis in fish

    杨仲安; 曹丹; 桂建芳

    2000-01-01

    The SR-protein kinase activity was analyzed and the cytological changes were observed during oocyte maturation in bisexual transparent color crucian carp ( Carassius auratus color variety). The results revealed that the SR-protein kinase activity was sensitive to the artificially induced spawning hormones, and the change of oscillatory activity was similar to that of the maturation-promoting factor (MPF) kinase that regulates meiotic cell cycle in fish.

  3. Sensory Protein Kinase Signaling in Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae: Host Location and Invasion

    Ressurreição, Margarida; Kirk, Ruth S; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Page, Nigel M.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni cercariae display specific behavioral responses to abiotic/biotic stimuli enabling them to locate and infect the definitive human host. Here we report the effect of such stimulants on signaling pathways of cercariae in relation to host finding and invasion. Cercariae exposed to various light/temperature regimens displayed modulated protein kinase C (PKC), extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activities, with distin...

  4. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cardiac tissues.

    Page, C; Doubell, A F

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has recently emerged as a prominent role player in intracellular signalling in the ventricular myocyte with attention being focussed on its possible role in the development of ventricular hypertrophy. It is becoming clear that MAPK is also active in other cells of cardiac origin such as cardiac fibroblasts and possible functions of this signalling pathway in the heart have yet to be explored. In this report the mammalian MAPK pathway is briefly outlined, before reviewing current knowledge of the MAPK pathway in cardiac tissue (ventricular myocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiac fibroblasts). New data is also presented on the presence and activity of MAPK in two additional cardiac celltypes namely atrial myocytes and vascular endothelial cells from the coronary microcirculation. PMID:8739228

  5. HPLC-DAD protein kinase inhibitor analysis in human serum.

    Dziadosz, Marek; Lessig, Rüdiger; Bartels, Heidemarie

    2012-04-15

    We here describe an HPLC-DAD method to analyse different protein kinase inhibitors. Potential applications of this method are pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring. Optimised chromatography conditions resulted in a very good separation of seven inhibitors (vatalanib, bosutinib, canertinib, tandutinib, pazopanib, dasatinib - internal standard and erlotinib). The good sensitivity makes this method competitive with LC/MS/MS. The separation was performed with a Lichrospher 100-5 RP8, 250 mm × 4 mm column maintained at 30 ± 1 °C, and with a mobile phase of 0.05 M H(3)PO(4)/KH(2)PO(4) (pH=2.3)-acetonitrile (7:3, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. A simple and fast sample preparation sequence with liquid-liquid extraction led to good recoveries (73-90%) of all analytes. The recovery hardly reached 50% only for pazopanib. This method can also be used for targeted protein kinase inhibitor quantification. A perfect linearity in the validated range (20-10,000 ng/mL) and an LOQ of 20 ng/mL were achieved. The relative standard deviations and accuracies of all examined drug concentrations gave values much lower than 15% both for between- and within-batch calculations. All analysed PKIs were stable for 6 months in a 1mg/mL dimethyl sulfoxide stock solution. Vatalanib, bosutinib and erlotinib were also stable in human serum in the whole examined concentration range. PMID:22425385

  6. Comparison of Peptide Array Substrate Phosphorylation of c-Raf and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 8

    Parikh, Kaushal; Diks, Sander H.; Tuynman, Jurriaan H. B.; Verhaar, Auke; Lowenberg, Mark; Hommes, Daan W.; Joore, Jos; Pandey, Akhilesh; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2009-01-01

    Kinases are pivotal regulators of cellular physiology. The human genome contains more than 500 putative kinases, which exert their action via the phosphorylation of specific substrates. The determinants of this specificity are still only partly understood and as a consequence it is difficult to pred

  7. Structures of Rhodopsin Kinase in Different Ligand States Reveal Key Elements Involved in G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase Activation

    Singh, Puja; Wang, Benlian; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2008-10-08

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated heptahelical receptors, leading to their uncoupling from G proteins. Here we report six crystal structures of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1), revealing not only three distinct nucleotide-binding states of a GRK but also two key structural elements believed to be involved in the recognition of activated GPCRs. The first is the C-terminal extension of the kinase domain, which was observed in all nucleotide-bound GRK1 structures. The second is residues 5-30 of the N terminus, observed in one of the GRK1{center_dot}(Mg{sup 2+}){sub 2} {center_dot}ATP structures. The N terminus was also clearly phosphorylated, leading to the identification of two novel phosphorylation sites by mass spectral analysis. Co-localization of the N terminus and the C-terminal extension near the hinge of the kinase domain suggests that activated GPCRs stimulate kinase activity by binding to this region to facilitate full closure of the kinase domain.

  8. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  9. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    Stephen R Spindler

    Full Text Available Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR, Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT, the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and protein kinase C (PKC. If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  10. Protein kinase CK2 and its role in cellular proliferation, development and pathology

    Guerra, B; Issinger, O G

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a pleiotropic, ubiquitous and constitutively active protein kinase that can use both ATP and GTP as phosphoryl donors with specificity for serine/threonine residues in the vicinity of acidic amino acids. Recent results show that the enzyme is involved in transcription, signa...

  11. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  12. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes. PMID:27408918

  13. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction. PMID:27056740

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module. PMID:23221999

  15. p21WAF1/CIP1 interacts with protein kinase CK2

    Götz, C; Wagner, P; Issinger, O G;

    1996-01-01

    p21WAF1/CIP1 which belongs to a class of regulatory proteins that interact with cyclin dependent kinases is a potent inhibitor of these kinases. The inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinases induces an arrest of cells in the G phase of the cell cycle. In addition p21WAF1/CIP1 associates with PCNA...... and inhibits DNA replication. Here, we show that p21WAF1/CIP1 binds to the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 but not to the catalytic alpha-subunit. Binding of p21WAF1/CIP1 down regulates the kinase activity of CK2 with respect to the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of CK2, casein and...... the C-terminus of p53. This study demonstrates a new binding partner for the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 which regulates the activity of the holoenzyme....

  16. Multiple implications of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 in human cancer

    Keum-Jin; Yang; Jongsun; Park

    2010-01-01

    3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a central mediator of cellular signaling between phosphoinositide-3 kinase and various intracellular serine/threonine kinases,including protein kinase B,p70 ribosomal S6 kinase,serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase,and protein kinase C.PDK1 activates members of the AGC family of protein kinases by phosphorylating serine/threonine residues in the activation loop.Here,we review the regulatory mechanisms of PDK1 and its roles in cancer.PDK1 is activated by autophosphorylation in the activation loop and other serine residues,as well as by phosphorylation of Tyr-9 and Tyr-373/376.Src appears to recognize PDK1 following tyrosine phosphorylation.The role of heat shock protein 90 in regulating PDK1 stability and PDK1-Src complex formation are also discussed.Furthermore,we summarize the subcellular distribution of PDK1.Finally,an important role for PDK1 in cancer chemotherapy is proposed.In conclusion,a better understanding of its molecular regulatory mechanisms in various signaling pathways will help to explain how PDK1 acts as an oncogenic kinase in various cancers,and will contribute to the development of novel cancer chemotherapies.

  17. Detection of protein kinase activity by renaturation in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels

    The authors have developed a procedure for identifying protein kinase activity in protein samples following electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Proteins are allowed to renature directly in the gel by removal of detergent. The gel is then incubated with [γ-32P]ATP to allow renatured protein kinases to autophosphorylate or to phosphorylate various substrates which can be incorporated into the gel. The positions of the radiolabeled proteins can then be detected by autoradiography. With this technique, using purified catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, enzyme concentrations as low as 0.01 μg can be detected on gels containing 1.0 mg/ml casein. The procedure is also applicable for the determination of active subunits of multisubunit protein kinases. For example, when the two subunits of casein kinase II are separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and allowed to renature, only the larger α subunit shows activity. This procedure can also be used to detect and distinguish kinases present in heterogeneous mixtures. Starting with a particulate fraction from LSTRA, a murine T cell lymphoma, several distinct enzymes were detected, including a 30,000 Dalton protein with protein-tyrosine kinase activity. This same enzyme has also been detected in T lymphocytes and other T lymphoid cell lines

  18. Transcriptional regulation by protein kinase A in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Guanggan Hu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A defect in the PKA1 gene encoding the catalytic subunit of cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA is known to reduce capsule size and attenuate virulence in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Conversely, loss of the PKA regulatory subunit encoded by pkr1 results in overproduction of capsule and hypervirulence. We compared the transcriptomes between the pka1 and pkr1 mutants and a wild-type strain, and found that PKA influences transcript levels for genes involved in cell wall synthesis, transport functions such as iron uptake, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and glycolysis. Among the myriad of transcriptional changes in the mutants, we also identified differential expression of ribosomal protein genes, genes encoding stress and chaperone functions, and genes for secretory pathway components and phospholipid synthesis. The transcriptional influence of PKA on these functions was reminiscent of the linkage between transcription, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional analyses confirmed that the PKA mutants have a differential response to temperature stress, caffeine, and lithium, and that secretion inhibitors block capsule production. Importantly, we also found that lithium treatment limits capsule size, thus reinforcing potential connections between this virulence trait and inositol and phospholipid metabolism. In addition, deletion of a PKA-regulated gene, OVA1, revealed an epistatic relationship with pka1 in the control of capsule size and melanin formation. OVA1 encodes a putative phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that appears to negatively influence capsule production and melanin accumulation. Overall, these findings support a role for PKA in regulating the delivery of virulence factors such as the capsular polysaccharide to the cell surface and serve to highlight the importance of secretion and phospholipid metabolism as potential

  19. Cell-Free Expression of Protein Kinase A for Rapid Activity Assays

    Leippe, Donna M.; Kate Qin Zhao; Kevin Hsiao; Slater, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein analysis often calls for lengthy, laborious in vivo protein expression and purification, and can be complicated by the lack of stability of the purified protein. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a simplified procedure for functional protein analysis on magnetic particles using cell-free protein synthesis of the catalytic subunit of human cAMP-dependent protein kinase as a HaloTag® fusion protein. The cell-free protein synthesis systems provide quick access t...

  20. Shrimp arginine kinase being a binding protein of WSSV envelope protein VP31

    Ma, Cuiyan; Gao, Qiang; Liang, Yan; Li, Chen; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Viral entry into the host is the earliest stage of infection in the viral life cycle in which attachment proteins play a key role. VP31 (WSV340/WSSV396), an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide domain known as a cellular attachment site. At present, the process of VP31 interacting with shrimp host cells has not been explored. Therefore, the VP31 gene was cloned into pET30a (+), expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 and purified with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Four gill cellular proteins of shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were pulled down by an affinity column coupled with recombinant VP31 (rVP31), and the amino acid sequences were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Hemocyanin, beta-actin, arginine kinase (AK), and an unknown protein were suggested as the putative VP31 receptor proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that AK is the predominant binding protein of VP31. An i n vitro binding activity experiment indicated that recombinant AK's (rAK) binding activity with rVP31 is comparable to that with the same amount of WSSV. These results suggested that AK, as a member of the phosphagen kinase family, plays a role in WSSV infection. This is the first evidence showing that AK is a binding protein of VP31. Further studies on this topic will elucidate WSSV infection mechanism in the future.

  1. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like Function Is Shared by the Beta- and Gamma- Subset of the Conserved Herpesvirus Protein Kinases

    Kuny, Chad V.; Karen Chinchilla; Culbertson, Michael R.; Kalejta, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    The UL97 protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, or HHV-5 (human herpesvirus 5)), is a kinase that phosphorylates the cellular retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor and lamin A/C proteins that are also substrates of cellular cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). A functional complementation assay has further shown that UL97 has authentic Cdk-like activity. The other seven human herpesviruses each encode a kinase with sequence and positional homology to UL97. These UL97-homologous proteins have been...

  2. Protein kinase C is essential for viability of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Penn, Tina J; Wood, Mark E; Soanes, Darren M; Csukai, Michael; Corran, Andrew John; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2015-10-01

    Protein kinase C constitutes a family of serine-threonine kinases found in all eukaryotes and implicated in a wide range of cellular functions, including regulation of cell growth, cellular differentiation and immunity. Here, we present three independent lines of evidence which indicate that protein kinase C is essential for viability of Magnaporthe oryzae. First, all attempts to generate a target deletion of PKC1, the single copy protein kinase C-encoding gene, proved unsuccessful. Secondly, conditional gene silencing of PKC1 by RNA interference led to severely reduced growth of the fungus, which was reversed by targeted deletion of the Dicer2-encoding gene, MDL2. Finally, selective kinase inhibition of protein kinase C by targeted allelic replacement with an analogue-sensitive PKC1(AS) allele led to specific loss of fungal viability in the presence of the PP1 inhibitor. Global transcriptional profiling following selective PKC inhibition identified significant changes in gene expression associated with cell wall re-modelling, autophagy, signal transduction and secondary metabolism. When considered together, these results suggest protein kinase C is essential for growth and development of M. oryzae with extensive downstream targets in addition to the cell integrity pathway. Targeting protein kinase C signalling may therefore prove an effective means of controlling rice blast disease. PMID:26192090

  3. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol 32P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the α subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn2+ or Ni2+ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn2+ or Ni2+ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni2+ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn2+. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni2+ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca2+

  4. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases control expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)

    Theilade, Juliane; Lerche Hansen, Jakob; Haunsø, Stig;

    2002-01-01

    the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade to regulate GRK2 cellular levels. ERK activation by receptor stimulation elevated endogenous GRK2 while antagonist treatment decreased cellular GRK2. Activating ERK by overexpressing constitutive active MEK-1 or Ras elevated GRK2 protein levels while blocking...

  5. Mutational Analysis of Glycogen Synthase KinaseProtein Kinase Together with Kinome-Wide Binding and Stability Studies Suggests Context-Dependent Recognition of Kinases by the Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90.

    Jin, Jing; Tian, Ruijun; Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Yue; Williton, Kelly; Taylor, Lorne; Savitski, Mikhail M; Bantscheff, Marcus; Woodgett, James R; Pawson, Tony; Colwill, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and cell division cycle 37 (CDC37) chaperones are key regulators of protein kinase folding and maturation. Recent evidence suggests that thermodynamic properties of kinases, rather than primary sequences, are recognized by the chaperones. In concordance, we observed a striking difference in HSP90 binding between wild-type (WT) and kinase-dead (KD) glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) forms. Using model cell lines stably expressing these two GSK3β forms, we observed no interaction between WT GSK3β and HSP90, in stark contrast to KD GSK3β forming a stable complex with HSP90 at a 1:1 ratio. In a survey of 91 ectopically expressed kinases in DLD-1 cells, we compared two parameters to measure HSP90 dependency: static binding and kinase stability following HSP90 inhibition. We observed no correlation between HSP90 binding and reduced stability of a kinase after pharmacological inhibition of HSP90. We expanded our stability study to >50 endogenous kinases across four cell lines and demonstrated that HSP90 dependency is context dependent. These observations suggest that HSP90 binds to its kinase client in a particular conformation that we hypothesize to be associated with the nucleotide-processing cycle. Lastly, we performed proteomics profiling of kinases and phosphopeptides in DLD-1 cells to globally define the impact of HSP90 inhibition on the kinome. PMID:26755559

  6. Interaction of connexin43 and protein kinase C-delta during FGF2 signaling

    Stains Joseph P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently demonstrated that modulation of the gap junction protein, connexin43, can affect the response of osteoblasts to fibroblast growth factor 2 in a protein kinase C-delta-dependent manner. Others have shown that the C-terminal tail of connexin43 serves as a docking platform for signaling complexes. It is unknown whether protein kinase C-delta can physically interact with connexin43. Results In the present study, we investigate by immunofluorescent co-detection and biochemical examination the interaction between Cx43 and protein kinase C-delta. We establish that protein kinase C-delta physically interacts with connexin43 during fibroblast growth factor 2 signaling, and that protein kinase C delta preferentially co-precipitates phosphorylated connexin43. Further, we show by pull down assay that protein kinase C-delta associates with the C-terminal tail of connexin43. Conclusions Connexin43 can serve as a direct docking platform for the recruitment of protein kinase C-delta in order to affect fibroblast growth factor 2 signaling in osteoblasts. These data expand the list of signal molecules that assemble on the connexin43 C-terminal tail and provide a critical context to understand how gap junctions modify signal transduction cascades in order to impact cell function.

  7. Inhibition of nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity by in vitro phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2. Differential phosphorylation of NDP kinases in HeLa cells in culture

    Biondi, R M; Engel, M; Sauane, M;

    1996-01-01

    Although a number of nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) have been reported to act as inhibitors of metastasis or as a transcription factor in mammals, it is not known whether these functions are linked to their enzymatic activity or how this protein is regulated. In this report, we show that ...... on histidine residues, however, only the B isoform appeared to be serine phosphorylated....

  8. Targeting Protein Kinase C Downstream of Growth Factor and Adhesion Signalling

    Dowling, Catríona M., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie; Kiely, Patrick A., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie [Department of Life Sciences, Materials and Surface Science Institute and Stokes Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland); Health Research Institute (HRI), University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    The signaling outputs of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, G-protein coupled receptors and integrins converge to mediate key cell process such as cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion and cell proliferation. Once activated by their ligands, these cell surface proteins recruit and direct a diverse range of proteins to disseminate the appropriate response downstream of the specific environmental cues. One of the key groups of proteins required to regulate these activities is the family of serine/threonine intracellular kinases called Protein Kinase Cs. The activity and subcellular location of PKCs are mediated by a series of tightly regulated events and is dependent on several posttranslational modifications and the availability of second messengers. Protein Kinase Cs exhibit both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects making them an interesting target for anti-cancer treatment.

  9. Mixed - Lineage Protein kinases (MLKs) in inflammation, metabolism, and other disease states.

    Craige, Siobhan M; Reif, Michaella M; Kant, Shashi

    2016-09-01

    Mixed lineage kinases, or MLKs, are members of the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) family, which were originally identified among the activators of the major stress-dependent mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), JNK and p38. During stress, the activation of JNK and p38 kinases targets several essential downstream substrates that react in a specific manner to the unique stressor and thus determine the fate of the cell in response to a particular challenge. Recently, the MLK family was identified as a specific modulator of JNK and p38 signaling in metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the MLK family of kinases appears to be involved in a very wide spectrum of disorders. This review discusses the newly identified functions of MLKs in multiple diseases including metabolic disorders, inflammation, cancer, and neurological diseases. PMID:27259981

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in plants under abiotic stress.

    Sinha, Alok Krishna; Jaggi, Monika; Raghuram, Badmi; Tuteja, Narendra

    2011-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is evolutionarily conserved signal transduction module involved in transducing extracellular signals to the nucleus for appropriate cellular adjustment. This cascade consists essentially of three components, a MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK), a MAPK kinase (MAPKK) and a MAPK connected to each other by the event of phosphorylation. These kinases play various roles in intra- and extra-cellular signaling in plants by transferring the information from sensors to responses. Signaling through MAP kinase cascade can lead to cellular responses including cell division, differentiation as well as responses to various stresses. MAPK signaling has also been associated with hormonal responses. In plants, MAP kinases are represented by multigene families and are involved in efficient transmission of specific stimuli and also involved in the regulation of the antioxidant defense system in response to stress signaling. In the current review we summarize and investigate the participation of MAPKs as possible mediators of various abiotic stresses in plants. PMID:21512321

  11. Molecular physiology of SPAK and OSR1: two Ste20-related protein kinases regulating ion transport.

    Gagnon, Kenneth B; Delpire, Eric

    2012-10-01

    SPAK (Ste20-related proline alanine rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive kinase) are members of the germinal center kinase VI subfamily of the mammalian Ste20 (Sterile20)-related protein kinase family. Although there are 30 enzymes in this protein kinase family, their conservation across the fungi, plant, and animal kingdom confirms their evolutionary importance. Already, a large volume of work has accumulated on the tissue distribution, binding partners, signaling cascades, and physiological roles of mammalian SPAK and OSR1 in multiple organ systems. After reviewing this basic information, we will examine newer studies that demonstrate the pathophysiological consequences to SPAK and/or OSR1 disruption, discuss the development and analysis of genetically engineered mouse models, and address the possible role these serine/threonine kinases might have in cancer proliferation and migration. PMID:23073627

  12. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: poten...le Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflam

  13. Expression of a gibberellin-induced leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase in deepwater rice and its interaction with kinase-associated protein phosphatase.

    van der Knaap, E.; Song, W. Y.; Ruan, D L; Sauter, M.; Ronald, P C; Kende, H.

    1999-01-01

    We identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active, autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of ...

  14. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; UMEDA, MASAHIRO; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain...

  15. The specific cGMP-dependent protein kinase substrate stop protein, is phosphorylated in nerve terminals

    Full text: cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) plays a key role to transducing cGMP action such as neurotransmission, learning and memory and neuronal differentiation. PKG achieves its function by phosphorylating its substrates. Despite its apparent importance, however, remarkably few specific PKG substrates in nerve terminals have been identified. We have demonstrated that there are more than 10 specific PKG substrates in nerve terminals (synaptosomes) of rat brain. Among them, we purified a 130 kDa (P130) protein and identified it as STOP (stable tubule-only polypeptide) protein by protein micro-sequencing. STOP binds to cold stable microtubules and prevents them from disassembly. STOP was phosphorylated by PKG on a serine residue in vitro but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase or protein kinase C. The phosphorylation of STOP by PKG only occurred at lower Mg2+ concentration (1 mM) and not at 3 or 10 mM. STOP was also phosphorylated in living nerve terminals, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, from 32Pi-labeled synaptosomes using a synthetic peptide antibody we raised against rat brain STOP. The 32Pi-labeled STOP from synaptosomes comigrated on SDS gels with purified STOP phosphorylated by PKG in vitro. Studies of the possible effect of cGMP analogues or nitric oxide donor on STOP phosphorylation and neurotransmission are underway. STOP represents the third identified nerve terminal PKG substrates (after G-substrate and DARPP-32) and hence may impact on our understanding of the role of cGMP signalling in neuronal function. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  16. Inhibition of cGMP-dependent protein kinase by (Rp)-guanosine 3',5'-monophosphorothioates.

    Butt, E; van Bemmelen, M; Fischer, L; Walter, U; Jastorff, B

    1990-04-01

    The activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP-dependent protein kinase by the diastereomers of guanosine 3',5'-monophosphorothioate, (Sp)-cGMPS and (Rp)-cGMPS, and 8-chloroguanosine 3',5'-monophosphorothioate, (Sp)-8-Cl-cGMPS and (Rp)-8-Cl-cGMPS, was investigated using the peptide Kemptide as substrate. The (Sp)-diastereomers, which have an axial exocyclic sulfur atom, bound to the cGMP-dependent protein kinase and stimulated its phosphotransferase activity. In contrast, the (Rp)-isomers, which have an equatorial exocyclic sulfur atom, bound to the enzyme without stimulation of its activity. (Rp)-cGMPS and (Rp)-8-Cl-cGMPS antagonized the activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase with a Ki of 20 microM and 1.5 microM, respectively. (Rp)-cGMPS also antagonized the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase with a Ki of 20 microM. In contrast, (Rp)-8-cGMPS ws a weak inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase with a Ki of 100 microM. (Rp)-8-Cl-cGMPS appears to be a rather selective inhibitor of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase and may be a useful tool for studying the role of cGMP in broken and intact cell systems. PMID:2158906

  17. Purification, renaturation, and reconstituted protein kinase activity of the Sendai virus large (L) protein: L protein phosphorylates the NP and P proteins in vitro.

    Einberger, H; Mertz, R; Hofschneider, P H; Neubert, W J

    1990-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized Sendai virus large (L) protein was highly purified by a one-step procedure, using hydroxylapatite column chromatography. Monoclonal antibodies addressed to the carboxyl-terminal amino acid sequence of the L protein were used for monitoring L protein during purification. By removing sodium dodecyl sulfate from purified L protein, a protein kinase activity was successfully renatured. P and NP proteins served as its substrates. After immunoprecipitation with an...

  18. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  19. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    Simarro, Maria [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kedersha, Nancy [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A. [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhee, Kirsten [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Benarafa, Charaf [Theodor Kocher Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Orduna, Anonio [Unidad de Investigacion, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Anderson, Paul, E-mail: panderson@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  20. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    Research highlights: → Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. → The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. → Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  1. A phosphoserine-regulated docking site in the protein kinase RSK2 that recruits and activates PDK1

    Frödin, Morten; Jensen, Claus J.; Merienne, Karine; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2000-01-01

    The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) is a growth factor-stimulated protein kinase with two kinase domains. The C-terminal kinase of RSK2 is activated by ERK-type MAP kinases, leading to autophosphorylation of RSK2 at Ser386 in a hydrophobic motif. The N-terminal kinase is activated by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) through phosphorylation of Ser227, and phosphorylates the substrates of RSK. Here, we identify Ser386 in the hydrophobic motif of RSK2 as a phosphorylation...

  2. Redox regulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Yingying Han

    Full Text Available Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death.The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC.Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation.In BAEC, Berberine caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79, a well characterized downstream target of AMPK. Concomitantly, Berberine increased peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant formed by simultaneous generation of superoxide and nitric oxide. Pre-incubation of BAEC with anti-oxidants markedly attenuated Berberine-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK and ACC. Consistently, adenoviral expression of superoxide dismutase and pretreatment of L-N(G-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a non-selective NOS inhibitor blunted Berberine-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Furthermore, mitochondria-targeted tempol (mito-tempol pretreatment or expression of uncoupling protein attenuated AMPK activation caused by Berberine. Depletion of mitochondria abolished the effects of Berberine on AMPK in EC. Finally, Berberine significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser307 and gene silencing of LKB1 attenuated Berberine-enhanced AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation in BAEC.Our results suggest that mitochondria-derived superoxide anions and peroxynitrite are required for Berberine-induced AMPK activation in endothelial cells.

  3. Protein kinase A binds and activates heat shock factor 1.

    Ayesha Murshid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible transcription factors are regulated through batteries of posttranslational modifications that couple their activity to inducing stimuli. We have studied such regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, a key protein in control of the heat shock response, and a participant in carcinogenisis, neurological health and aging. As the mechanisms involved in the intracellular regulation of HSF1 in good health and its dysregulation in disease are still incomplete we are investigating the role of posttranslational modifications in such regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a proteomic study of HSF1 binding partners, we have discovered its association with the pleiotropic protein kinase A (PKA. HSF1 binds avidly to the catalytic subunit of PKA, (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on a novel serine phosphorylation site within its central regulatory domain (serine 320 or S320, both in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular PKAcα levels and phosphorylation of HSF1 at S320 were both required for HSF1 to be localized to the nucleus, bind to response elements in the promoter of an HSF1 target gene (hsp70.1 and activate hsp70.1 after stress. Reduction in PKAcα levels by small hairpin RNA led to HSF1 exclusion from the nucleus, its exodus from the hsp70.1 promoter and decreased hsp70.1 transcription. Likewise, null mutation of HSF1 at S320 by alanine substitution for serine led to an HSF1 species excluded from the nucleus and deficient in hsp70.1 activation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings of PKA regulation of HSF1 through S320 phosphorylation add to our knowledge of the signaling networks converging on this factor and may contribute to elucidating its complex roles in the stress response and understanding HSF1 dysregulation in disease.

  4. Exploring the function of protein kinases in schistosomes: perspectives from the laboratory and from comparative genomics

    Anthony John Walker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic protein kinases are well conserved through evolution. The genome of Schistosoma mansoni, which causes intestinal schistosomiasis, encodes over 250 putative protein kinases with all of the main eukaryotic groups represented. However, unraveling functional roles for these kinases is a considerable endeavour, particularly as protein kinases regulate multiple and sometimes overlapping cell and tissue functions in organisms. In this article, elucidating protein kinase signal transduction and function in schistosomes is considered from the perspective of the state-of-the-art methodologies used and comparative organismal biology, with a focus on current advances and future directions. Using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a comparator we predict roles for various schistosome protein kinases in processes vital for host invasion and successful parasitism such as sensory behaviour, growth and development. It is anticipated that the characterization of schistosome protein kinases in the context of parasite function will catalyze cutting edge research into host-parasite interactions and will reveal new targets for developing drug interventions against human schistosomiasis.

  5. Characterization of the endogenous protein kinase activity of the hepatitis B virus.

    Kann, M; Thomssen, R; Köchel, H G; Gerlich, W H

    1993-01-01

    During the assembly of the nucleocapsid of the hepatitis B virus a protein kinase, probably of cellular origin, is encapsidated. This enzyme phosphorylates serine residue(s) localized within the lumen of the particle. By using purified, liver-derived core particles, we characterized the protein kinase activity in the presence of different ions and inhibitors. Controls were performed with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) and recombinant core particles. We showed that the endogenous protein kinase of the core particles was not inhibited by H89, a specific inhibitor of PKA. Staurosporine, a selective inhibitor of PKC inhibited the endogenous kinase activity only within the first minutes of the reaction. In contrast, quercetine, a selective inhibitor of the protein kinase M (PKM) did not inhibit during the first minutes but inhibited efficiently during later phases of incubation. PKM represents an enzymatically active proteolytic fragment of PKC. These results suggest that PKC is encapsidated into human core particles and is converted to PKM during the in vitro reaction. This conclusion implies the association of a protease activity localized with the HBV nucleocapsid inside liver-derived core particles. PMID:8260877

  6. Quinalizarin as a potent, selective and cell-permeable inhibitor of protein kinase CK2.

    Cozza, Giorgio; Mazzorana, Marco; Papinutto, Elena; Bain, Jenny; Elliott, Matthew; di Maira, Giovanni; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Pagano, Mario A; Sarno, Stefania; Ruzzene, Maria; Battistutta, Roberto; Meggio, Flavio; Moro, Stefano; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2009-08-01

    Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone) is a moderately potent and poorly selective inhibitor of protein kinase CK2, one of the most pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinases, implicated in neoplasia and in other global diseases. By virtual screening of the MMS (Molecular Modeling Section) database, we have now identified quinalizarin (1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone) as an inhibitor of CK2 that is more potent and selective than emodin. CK2 inhibition by quinalizarin is competitive with respect to ATP, with a Ki value of approx. 50 nM. Tested at 1 microM concentration on a panel of 75 protein kinases, quinalizarin drastically inhibits only CK2, with a promiscuity score (11.1), which is the lowest ever reported so far for a CK2 inhibitor. Especially remarkable is the ability of quinalizarin to discriminate between CK2 and a number of kinases, notably DYRK1a (dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and -regulated kinase), PIM (provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukaemia virus) 1, 2 and 3, HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2), MNK1 [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-interacting kinase 1], ERK8 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 8) and PKD1 (protein kinase D 1), which conversely tend to be inhibited as drastically as CK2 by commercially available CK2 inhibitors. The determination of the crystal structure of a complex between quinalizarin and CK2alpha subunit highlights the relevance of polar interactions in stabilizing the binding, an unusual characteristic for a CK2 inhibitor, and disclose other structural features which may account for the narrow selectivity of this compound. Tested on Jurkat cells, quinalizarin proved able to inhibit endogenous CK2 and to induce apoptosis more efficiently than the commonly used CK2 inhibitors TBB (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole) and DMAT (2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole). PMID:19432557

  7. The Sensitivity of Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation to Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis and Kinases: Computational Analysis

    Zhang, Yili; Smolen, Paul; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Memory consolidation and reconsolidation require kinase activation and protein synthesis. Blocking either process during or shortly after training or recall disrupts memory stabilization, which suggests the existence of a critical time window during which these processes are necessary. Using a computational model of kinase synthesis and…

  8. Structure of protein kinase CK2: dimerization of the human beta-subunit

    Boldyreff, B; Mietens, U; Issinger, O G

    1996-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been shown to be elevated in all so far investigated solid tumors and its catalytic subunit has been shown to serve as an oncogene product. CK2 is a heterotetrameric serine-threonine kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory beta...

  9. Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins

    Han, B; Poppinga, W J; Schmidt, M

    2015-01-01

    Cell division relies on coordinated regulation of the cell cycle. A process including a well-defined series of strictly regulated molecular mechanisms involving cyclin-dependent kinases, retinoblastoma protein, and polo-like kinases. Dysfunctions in cell cycle regulation are associated with disease

  10. Expression and phosphorylation state analysis of intracellular protein kinases using Multi-PK antibody and Phos-tag SDS-PAGE

    Yasunori Sugiyama; Syouichi Katayama; Isamu Kameshita; Keiko Morisawa; Takuma Higuchi; Hiroshi Todaka; Eiji Kinoshita; Emiko Kinoshita-Kikuta; Tohru Koike; Taketoshi Taniguchi; Shuji Sakamoto

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase expression and activity play important roles in diverse cellular functions through regulation of phosphorylation signaling. The most commonly used tools for detecting the protein kinase are protein kinase-specific antibodies, and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies were used for detecting activated protein kinase. Using these antibodies, only one kinase was analyzed at a time, however, a method for analyzing the expression and activation of a panel of protein kinases in ce...

  11. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J. (Abbott)

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  12. Identification of casein kinase 1, casein kinase 2, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in Trypanosoma evansi

    José Manuel Galán-Caridad

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi contains protein kinases capable of phosphorylating endogenous substrates with apparent molecular masses in the range between 20 and 205 kDa. The major phosphopolypeptide band, pp55, was predominantly localized in the particulate fraction. Anti-alpha and anti-beta tubulin monoclonal antibodies recognized pp55 by Western blot analyses, suggesting that this band corresponds to phosphorylated tubulin. Inhibition experiments in the presence of emodin, heparin, and 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate indicated that the parasite tubulin kinase was a casein kinase 2 (CK2-like activity. GTP, which can be utilized instead of ATP by CK2, stimulated rather than inactivated the phosphorylation of tubulin in the parasite homogenate and particulate fraction. However, GTP inhibited the cytosolic CK2 responsible for phosphorylating soluble tubulin and other soluble substrates. Casein and two selective peptide substrates, P1 (RRKDLHDDEEDEAMSITA for casein kinase (CK1 and P2 (RRRADDSDDDDD for CK2, were recognized as substrates in T. evansi. While the enzymes present in the soluble fraction predominantly phosphorylated P1, P2 was preferentially labeled in the particulate fractions. These results demonstrated the existence of CK1-like and CK2-like activities primarily located in the parasite cytosolic and membranous fractions, respectively. Histone II-A and kemptide (LRRASVA also behaved as suitable substrates, implying the existence of other Ser/Thr kinases in T. evansi. Cyclic AMP only increased the phosphorylation of histone II-A and kemptide in the cytosol, demonstrating the existence of soluble cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in T. evansi. However, no endogenous substrates for this enzyme were identified in this fraction. Further evidences were obtained by using PKI (6-22, a reported inhibitor of the catalytic subunit of mammalian cAMP-dependent protein kinases, which specifically hindered the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of histone II

  13. Anti-proliferative effects of protein kinase C inhibitors in human keratinocytes.

    Hegemann, L; Bonnekoh, B; van Rooijen, L A; Mahrle, G

    1992-07-01

    Various lines of evidence indicate that protein kinase C, a key enzyme in transmembraneous signal transduction, is involved in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation. In the present study we have investigated the effects of various structurally unrelated protein kinase C inhibitors on the proliferation of HaCa T cells, a non-tumorigenic human keratinocyte cell line. All protein kinase C inhibitors dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation as assessed by the incorporation of radioactively labelled thymidine and amino acids as well as the increase in total protein content in keratinocytes. The potencies of the drugs to inhibit cell proliferation were strongly correlated to their inhibitory potency on purified protein kinase C, displaying a correlation coefficient of 0.97. Methotrexate, an anti-proliferative drug, was found not to inhibit protein kinase C. Therefore, our data provide evidence that protein kinase C is crucially involved in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation but is not the only target of anti-proliferative drug action. PMID:1390454

  14. THE EFFECTS OF HUMAN CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN AND TYROSINE PROTEIN KINASE ON THE GROWTHOF HYBRIDOMA CELLS

    HANShou-Wei; LIUShah-Ling; CAOZe-Yi; CHENMan-Ling

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the production and development of receptor monoclonal antibodies (McAB) have been attentively studied. Wc observed the effects of human ehorionicgonadotropin (HCG) and tyrosinc protein kinase (TPK) on the growth of two hybridoma

  15. INHIBITION OF IL-6-INDUCED STAT3 ACTIVATION IN MYELOMA CELLS BY PROTEIN KINASE A

    宋伦; 黎燕; 沈倍奋

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the regulation effect of protein kinase A on IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in myeloma cells. Methods: Two human myeloma cell lines-Sko-007 and U266 were pretreated with Forskolin, a protein kinase A antagonist, and then stimulated by IL-6. The activation state of STAT3 in these two cells were examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results: Although PKA pathway itself doesn't participate in IL-6 signal transduction in Sko-007 and U266 cells, activation of protein kinase A can inhibit IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in these two cell lines. Conclusion: There exists an inhibitory effect of protein kinase A on STAT3 activation in human myeloma cells treated by IL-6.

  16. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and its role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy 1.

    Kaliman, Perla; Llagostera, Esther

    2008-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is an autosomal, dominant inherited, neuromuscular disorder. The DM1 mutation consists in the expansion of an unstable CTG-repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a gene encoding DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase). Clinical expression of DM1 is variable, presenting a progressive muscular dystrophy that affects distal muscles more than proximal and is associated with the inability to relax muscles appropriately (myotonia), cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, testicular atrophy and insulin resistance. DMPK is a Ser/Thr protein kinase homologous to the p21-activated kinases MRCK and ROCK/rho-kinase/ROK. The most abundant isoform of DMPK is an 80 kDa protein mainly expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM1, as revealed by gene target studies. Here we review current understanding of the structural, functional and pathophysiological characteristics of DMPK. PMID:18583094

  17. Crystallographic characterization of a multidomain histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component regulatory system

    Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    The multidomain cytoplasmic portion of the histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component signal transduction system has been crystallized and X-ray data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution.

  18. Glc7/Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulatory Subunits Can Oppose the Ipl1/Aurora Protein Kinase by Redistributing Glc7

    Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Kotwaliwale, Chitra V.; Tatsutani, Sean Y.; Breed, Christopher A.; Biggins, Sue

    2006-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation depends on the opposing activities of the budding yeast Glc7/PP1 protein phosphatase and Ipl1/Aurora protein kinase. We explored the relationship between Glc7 and Ipl1 and found that the phosphorylation of the Ipl1 substrate, Dam1, was altered by decreased Glc7 activity, whereas Ipl1 levels, localization, and kinase activity were not. These data strongly suggest that Glc7 ensures accurate chromosome segregation by dephosphorylating Ipl1 targets rather than regu...

  19. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  20. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  1. Fas-associated factor 1 interacts with protein kinase CK2 in vivo upon apoptosis induction

    Guerra, B; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    2001-01-01

    We show here that in several different cell lines protein kinase CK2 and Fas-associated factor 1 (FAF1) exist together in a complex which is stable to high monovalent salt concentration. The CK2/FAF1 complex formation is significantly increased after induction of apoptosis with various DNA damaging...... view that protein kinase CK2 plays an important role in certain steps of apoptosis....

  2. Protein kinase C is involved in regulation of Ca2+ channels in plasmalemma of Nitella syncarpa.

    Zherelova, O M

    1989-01-01

    Ca2+ current recordings have been made on Nitella syncarpa cells using the intracellular perfusion and the voltage-clamp technique. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), a substance capable of activating protein kinase C from plasmalemma of Nitella cells, modulates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Polymixin B, inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks the Nitella plasmalemma Ca2+ channels; the rate of channel blockage depends on the concentration and exposure time of the substance. PMID:2536617

  3. Kinase-specific prediction of protein phosphorylation sites

    Miller, Martin Lee; Blom, Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    As extensive mass spectrometry-based mapping of the phosphoproteome progresses, computational analysis of phosphorylation-dependent signaling becomes increasingly important. The linear sequence motifs that surround phosphorylated residues have successfully been used to characterize kinase...

  4. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  5. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D-mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein.

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  6. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates apoptosis by stabilizing the BH3-only protein Bim

    Moujalled, Diane; Weston, Ross; Anderton, Holly; Ninnis, Robert; Goel, Pranay; Coley, Andrew; Huang, David CS; Wu, Li; Strasser, Andreas; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the proapoptotic BH-3 only protein Bim usually leads to Bim degradation by the proteasome. Here, the authors show that phosphorylation of Bim by the cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) instead leads to Bim protein stabilization and to apoptosis.

  7. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  8. Crystal structure of a C-terminal deletion mutant of human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit

    Ermakova, Inessa; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly called: casein kinase 2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two separate catalytic chains (CK2alpha) and a stable dimer of two non-catalytic subunits (CK2beta). CK2alpha is a highly conserved member of the superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases. The crystal s...

  9. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins from rabbit reticulocytes by a ribosome-associated casein kinase

    Issinger, O G

    1977-01-01

    Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  10. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  11. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases.

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-03-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis, since the onset of meiosis and spermiogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular, at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin-binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  12. Subcellular distribution of a membrane-bound calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase

    Incubation of subcellular fractions isolated from rat cerebral cortex with [gamma-32P]ATP results in the phosphorylation of a number of proteins including two with apparent molecular weights of approximately 50,000 and 60,000 daltons. These phosphoproteins were shown to be the autophosphorylated subunits of a calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase by a number of physicochemical criteria, including their mobility on non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis, their phosphopeptide profiles and phosphorylation characteristics. When a crude membrane fraction obtained following osmotic lysis of a P2 fraction was labeled and subsequently fractionated on sucrose density gradients, approximately 80% of the autophosphorylated kinase was associated with fractions enriched in synaptic plasma membranes. Other substrates of calmodulin kinase(s) were similarly distributed. Detergent extraction of synaptic plasma membranes to produce synaptic junctions and post-synaptic densities indicated that the majority of the autophosphorylated kinase was solubilized, apparently as a holoenzyme. The major post synaptic density protein (mPSDp) was not readily extracted by detergents and was largely unlabeled under the conditions used for phosphorylation, and yet this protein is structurally closely related to the kinase subunit. It is possible that this lack of labeling is due to the mPSDp being attached to the PSD in a different way or being present there in a different isoenzymic form from that of the readily autophosphorylated enzyme subunit. Thus, the data suggest that, in vitro at least, a number of pools of calmodulin kinase exist in neuronal membranes

  13. Three-Dimentional Structures of Autophosphorylation Complexes in Crystals of Protein Kinases

    Dumbrack, Roland

    2016-01-26

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Several autophosphorylation complexes have been identified in crystals of protein kinases, with a known serine, threonine, or tyrosine autophosphorylation site of one kinase monomer sitting in the active site of another monomer of the same protein in the crystal. We utilized a structural bioinformatics method to identify all such autophosphorylation complexes in X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by generating all unique kinase/kinase interfaces within and between asymmetric units of each crystal and measuring the distance between the hydroxyl oxygen of potential autophosphorylation sites and the oxygen atoms of the active site aspartic acid residue side chain. We have identified 15 unique autophosphorylation complexes in the PDB, of which 5 complexes have not previously been described in the relevant publications on the crystal structures (N-terminal juxtamembrane regions of CSF1R and EPHA2, activation loop tyrosines of LCK and IGF1R, and a serine in a nuclear localization signal region of CLK2. Mutation of residues in the autophosphorylation complex interface of LCK either severely impaired autophosphorylation or increased it. Taking the autophosphorylation complexes as a whole and comparing them with peptide-substrate/kinase complexes, we observe a number of important features among them. The novel and previously observed autophosphorylation sites are conserved in many kinases, indicating that by homology we can extend the relevance of these complexes to many other clinically relevant drug targets.

  14. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Li, H.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase activity in nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum, L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.3 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified 80,000-fold by salt fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography, after which it has a high specific activity of about 100 picomoles per minute per microgram in the presence of Ca2+ and reaches half-maximal activation at about 3 x 10(-7) molar free Ca2+, without calmodulin. It is a monomer with a molecular weight near 90,000. It can efficiently use histone III-S, ribosomal S6 protein, and casein as artificial substrates, but it phosphorylates phosvitin only weakly. Its Ca(2+)-dependent kinase activity is half-maximally inhibited by 0.1 millimolar chlorpromazine, by 35 nanomolar K-252a and by 7 nanomolar staurosporine. It is insensitive to sphingosine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, and to basic polypeptides that block other Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. It is not stimulated by exogenous phospholipids or fatty acids. In intact isolated pea nuclei it preferentially phosphorylates several chromatin-associated proteins, with the most phosphorylated protein band being near the same molecular weight (43,000) as a nuclear protein substrate whose phosphorylation has been reported to be stimulated by phytochrome in a calcium-dependent fashion.

  15. Characterization of a tomato protein kinase gene induced by infection by Potato spindle tuber viroid.

    Hammond, R W; Zhao, Y

    2000-09-01

    Viroids--covalently closed, circular RNA molecules in the size range of 250 to 450 nucleotides-are the smallest known infectious agents and cause a number of diseases of crop plants. Viroids do not encode proteins and replicate within the nucleus without a helper virus. In many cases, viroid infection results in symptoms of stunting, epinasty, and vein clearing. In our study of the molecular basis of the response of tomato cv. Rutgers to infection by Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), we have identified a specific protein kinase gene, pkv, that is transcriptionally activated in plants infected with either the intermediate or severe strain of PSTVd, at a lower level in plants inoculated with a mild strain, and not detectable in mock-inoculated plants. A full-length copy of the gene encoding the 55-kDa PKV (protein kinase viroid)-induced protein has been isolated and sequence analysis revealed significant homologies to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases. Although the sequence motifs in the catalytic domain suggest that it is a serine/threonine protein kinase, the recombinant PKV protein autophosphorylates in vitro on serine and tyrosine residues, suggesting that it is a putative member of the class of dual-specificity protein kinases. PMID:10975647

  16. Inhibition of WNT Signaling by G Protein-Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Kinase 2 (GRK2)

    WANG, LIMING; Gesty-Palmer, Diane; Fields, Timothy A.; Spurney, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of Wnt signaling pathways causes release and stabilization of the transcription regulator β-catenin from a destruction complex composed of axin and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein (canonical signaling pathway). Assembly of this complex is facilitated by a protein-protein interaction between APC and a regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain in axin. Because G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) has a RGS domain that is closely related to the RGS domain in axi...

  17. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  18. Protein kinase inhibitors in plants of the myrtaceae, proteaceae, and leguminosae.

    Larkin, M; Brazier, J; Ternai, B; Polya, G M

    1993-12-01

    Methanolic extracts of leaves, flowers, stems, bark, and other parts of representative plants of the Myrtaceae, specifically of the EUCALYPTUS, MELALEUCA, THRYPTOMENA, CALLISTOMEN, ACMENA, AND ANGOPHORA genera, variously contain high levels of inhibitors of plant Ca (2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and of Ca (2+)-calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). In terms of the protein kinase inhibition unit (PKIU), defined as the amount in the standard protein kinase assays causing 50% inhibition of protein kinase activity, these inhibitor levels ranged from the non-detectable to 179,000 PKIU (gram fresh weight) (-1) [(g FW) (-1)] and there was no consistent pattern of inhibitor distribution. A variety of other plants tested had low or non-detectable levels of CDPK and MLCK inhibitors. Plants of the EUCALYPTUS, MELALEUCA, ANGOPHORA, and GREVILLEA genera contained inhibitors of the catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAK), inhibitor levels ranging from 20,000 to 9,600,000 PKIU (g FW) (-1). In general, cAK inhibitor levels found in the Myrtaceae were mostly much higher than levels of CDPK and MLCK inhibitors and reversed phase HPLC of such plant extracts revealed a multiplicity of components associated with cAK inhibitory activity. These IN VITRO screening procedures enable rapid detection and quantitation of levels of bioactive plant defence compounds with medicinal potential. PMID:17230363

  19. The Raine syndrome protein FAM20C is a Golgi kinase that phosphorylates bio-mineralization proteins.

    Hiroyuki O Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Raine syndrome is caused by mutations in FAM20C, which had been reported to encode a secreted component of bone and teeth. We found that FAM20C encodes a Golgi-localized protein kinase, distantly related to the Golgi-localized kinase Four-jointed. Drosophila also encode a Golgi-localized protein kinase closely related to FAM20C. We show that FAM20C can phosphorylate secreted phosphoproteins, including both Casein and members of the SIBLING protein family, which modulate biomineralization, and we find that FAM20C phosphorylates a biologically active peptide at amino acids essential for inhibition of biomineralization. We also identify autophosphorylation of FAM20C, and characterize parameters of FAM20C's kinase activity, including its Km, pH and cation dependence, and substrate specificity. The biochemical properties of FAM20C match those of an enzymatic activity known as Golgi casein kinase. Introduction of point mutations identified in Raine syndrome patients into recombinant FAM20C impairs its normal localization and kinase activity. Our results identify FAM20C as a kinase for secreted phosphoproteins and establish a biochemical basis for Raine syndrome.

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 mediates resistance to Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in Human hepatobiliary Cancer cells

    Nguyen Ho-Bouldoires, Thang Huong; Clapéron, Audrey; Mergey, Martine; Wendum, Dominique; Desbois-Mouthon, Christèle; Tahraoui, Sylvana; Fartoux, Laetitia; Chettouh, Hamza; Merabtene, Fatiha; Scatton, Olivier; Gaestel, Matthias; Praz, Françoise; Housset, Chantal; Fouassier, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of liver cancer are characterized by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS-induced oxidative stress impairs cell proliferation and ultimately leads to cell death. Although liver cancer cells are especially resistant to oxidative stress, mechanisms of such resistance remain understudied. We identified the MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2)/Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) signaling pathway mediating defenses against oxidative stress. Besides to ...

  1. Neuron Membrane Trafficking and Protein Kinases Involved in Autism and ADHD

    Yasuko Kitagishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-enriched multi-domain scaffolding protein, neurobeachin has been identified as a candidate gene for autism patients. Mutations in the synaptic adhesion protein cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1 are also associated with autism spectrum disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder of uncertain molecular origin. Potential roles of neurobeachin and CADM1 have been suggested to a function of vesicle transport in endosomal trafficking. It seems that protein kinase B (AKT and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA have key roles in the neuron membrane trafficking involved in the pathogenesis of autism. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is documented to dopaminergic insufficiencies, which is attributed to synaptic dysfunction of dopamine transporter (DAT. AKT is also essential for the DAT cell-surface redistribution. In the present paper, we summarize and discuss the importance of several protein kinases that regulate the membrane trafficking involved in autism and ADHD, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  2. The role of Protein Kinase Cη in T cell biology

    Nicholas R.J. Gascoigne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase Cη (PKCη is a member of the novel PKC subfamily, which also includes δ, ε, and θ isoforms. Compared to the other novel PKCs, the function of PKCη in the immune system is largely unknown. Several studies have started to reveal the role of PKCη, particularly in T cells. PKCη is highly expressed in T cells, and is upregulated during thymocyte positive selection. Interestingly, like the θ isoform, PKCη is also recruited to the immunological synapse that is formed between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. However, unlike PKCθ, which becomes concentrated to the central region of the synapse, PKCη remains in a diffuse pattern over the whole area of the synapse, suggesting distinctive roles of these two isoforms in signal transduction. Although PKCη is dispensable for thymocyte development, further analysis of PKCη− or PKCθ−deficient and double knockout mice revealed the redundancy of these two isoforms in thymocyte development. In contrast, PKCη rather than PKCθ, plays an important role for T cell homeostatic proliferation, which requires recognition of self-antigen. Another piece of evidence demonstrating that PKCη and PKCθ have isoform specific as well as redundant roles come from the analysis of CD4 to CD8 T cell ratios in the periphery of these knockout mice. Deficiency in PKCη or PKCθ had opposing effects as PKCη knockout mice had a higher ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells compared to that of wild-type mice, whereas PKCθ-deficient mice had a lower ratio. Biochemical studies showed that calcium flux and NFκB translocation is impaired in PKCη-deficient T cells upon TCR crosslinking stimulation, a character shared with PKCθ-deficient T cells. However, unlike the case with PKCθ, the mechanistic study of PKCη is at early stage and the signaling pathways involving PKCη, at least in T cells, are essentially unknown. In this review, we will cover the topics mentioned above as well as provide some

  3. Signal transduction protein array analysis links LRRK2 to Ste20 kinases and PKC zeta that modulate neuronal plasticity.

    Susanne Zach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dominant mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease, however, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Several in vitro studies have shown that the most frequent mutation, LRRK2(G2019S, increases kinase activity and impairs neuronal survival. LRRK2 has been linked to the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family and the receptor-interacting protein kinases based on sequence similarity within the kinase domain and in vitro substrate phosphorylation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify the kinase signaling pathways wherein LRRK2 may be active. By incubation of protein microarrays containing 260 signal transduction proteins we detected four arrayed Ste20 serine/threonine kinase family members (TAOK3, STK3, STK24, STK25 as novel LRRK2 substrates and LRRK2 interacting proteins, respectively. Moreover, we found that protein kinase C (PKC zeta binds and phosphorylates LRRK2 both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ste20 kinases and PKC zeta contribute to neuronal Tau phosphorylation, neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity under physiological conditions. Our data suggest that these kinases may also be involved in synaptic dysfunction and neurite fragmentation in transgenic mice and in human PD patients carrying toxic gain-of-function LRRK2 mutations.

  4. WNK1: analysis of protein kinase structure, downstream targets, and potential roles in hypertension

    Bing-e XU; Byung-Hoon LEE; Xiaoshan MIN; Lisa LENERTZ; Charles J HEISE; Steve STIPPEC; Elizabeth J GOLDSMITH; Melanie H. COBB

    2005-01-01

    The WNK kinases are a recently discovered family of serine-threonine kinases that have been shown to play an essential role in the regulation of electrolyte homeostasis. Intronic deletions in the WNK1 gene result in its overexpression and lead to pseudohypoaldosteronism type Ⅱ, a disease with salt-sensitive hypertension and hyperkalemia. This review focuses on the recent evidence elucidating the structure of the kinase domain of WNK1 and functions of these kinases in normal and disease physiology. Their functions have implications for understanding the biochemical mechanism that could lead to the retention or insertion of proteins in the plasma membrane. The WNK kinases may be able to influence ion homeostasis through its effects on synaptotagmin function.

  5. Redundant role of protein kinase C delta and epsilon during mouse embryonic development.

    Sergio Carracedo

    Full Text Available Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon are mediators of important cellular events, such as cell proliferation, migration or apoptosis. The formation of blood vessels, i.e., vasculo- and angiogenesis, is a process where these isoforms have also been shown to participate. However, mice deficient in either Protein Kinase C delta or epsilon are viable and therefore their individual contribution to the formation of the vasculature appeared so far dispensable. In this study, we show that double null mutation of Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon causes embryonic lethality at approximately E9.5. At this stage, whole mount staining of the endothelial marker CD31 in double null embryos revealed defective blood vessel formation. Moreover, culture of double deficient mouse allantois showed impaired endothelial cell organization, and analyses of double deficient embryo sections showed dilated vessels, decreased endothelial-specific adherent junctions, and decreased contact of endothelial cells with mural cells. Protein kinase C delta and epsilon also appeared essential for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, since α-smooth muscle actin, a classical marker for vascular smooth muscle cells, was almost undetectable in double deficient embryonic aorta at E9.5. Subsequent qPCR analyses showed decreased VE-cadherin, Vegfr2, Cd31, Cdh2, Ets1, and Fli-1, among other angiogenesis related transcripts in double deficient embryos. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time an in vivo redundant role between members of the novel Protein Kinase C subfamily that allows for mutual compensation during mouse embryonic development, with vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as an obvious common function of these two Protein Kinase Cs. Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon might therefore be useful targets for inhibiting vasculo- and/or angiogenesis.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent apoptosis in norcan-tharidin-treated A375-S2 cells is proceeded by the activation of protein kinase C

    AN Wei-wei; WANG Min-wei; Tashiro Shin-ichi; Onodera Satoshi; Ikejima Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Background We have reported that norcantharidin (NCTD) induces human melanoma A375-S2 cell apoptosis and that the activation of caspase and the mitochondrial pathway are involved in the apoptotic process. This study aimed at investigating the roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase C (PKC) in A375-S2 cell apoptosis induced by NCTD. Methods We assessed the effects of NCTD on cell growth inhibition using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-dipheyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, DNA fragmentation (DNA agarose gel electrophoresis), and MAPK protein levels (Western blot analysis) in A375-S2 cells. Photomicroscopic data were also collected.Results The NCTD inhibitory effect on A375-S2 cells was partially reversed by MAPK and PKC inhibitors. The expression of phosphorylated JNK and p38 also increased after the treatment with NCTD, and inhibitors of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 (SP600125 and SB203580, respectively) had significant inhibitory effects on the upregulation of phosphorylated JNK and p38 expression. Simultaneously, the PKC inhibitor staurosporine blocked the upregulation of phosphorylated JNK and phosphorylated p38, but had little effect on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) expression. Conclusion These results suggest that the activation of JNK and p38 MAPK promotes the process of NCTD-induced A375-S2 cell apoptosis and that PKC plays an important regulation role in the activation of MAPKs.

  7. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  8. A computational workflow for the design of irreversible inhibitors of protein kinases.

    Del Rio, Alberto; Sgobba, Miriam; Parenti, Marco Daniele; Degliesposti, Gianluca; Forestiero, Rosetta; Percivalle, Claudia; Conte, Pier Franco; Freccero, Mauro; Rastelli, Giulio

    2010-03-01

    Design of irreversible inhibitors is an emerging and relatively less explored strategy for the design of protein kinase inhibitors. In this paper, we present a computational workflow that was specifically conceived to assist such design. The workflow takes the form of a multi-step procedure that includes: the creation of a database of already known reversible inhibitors of protein kinases, the selection of the most promising scaffolds that bind one or more desired kinase templates, the modification of the scaffolds by introduction of chemically reactive groups (suitable cysteine traps) and the final evaluation of the reversible and irreversible protein-ligand complexes with molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy predictions. Most of these steps were automated. In order to prove that this is viable, the workflow was tested on a database of known inhibitors of ERK2, a protein kinase possessing a cysteine in the ATP site. The modeled ERK2-ligand complexes and the values of the estimated binding free energies of the putative ligands provide useful indicators of their aptitude to bind reversibly and irreversibly to the protein kinase. Moreover, the computational data are used to rank the ligands according to their computed binding free energies and their ability to bind specific protein residues in the reversible and irreversible complexes, thereby providing a useful decision-making tool for each step of the design. In this work we present the overall procedure and the first proof of concept results. PMID:20306284

  9. Juvenile hormone diol kinase, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Li, Sheng; Zhang, Qi-Rui; Xu, Wei-Hua; Schooley, David A

    2005-11-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) diol kinase (JHDK) is an important enzyme involved in the JH degradation pathway. Bombyx mori (Bommo)-JHDK cDNA (637bp) contains an open reading frame encoding a 183-amino acid protein, which reveals a high degree of identity to the two previously reported JHDKs. JHDK is similar to GTP-binding proteins with three conserved sequence elements involved in purine nucleotide binding, contains eight alpha-helices and three EF-hand motifs, and resembles the three-dimensional model of 2SCP and some other calcium-binding proteins. The Bommo-JHDK gene has only a single copy in the silkworm haploid genome, contains only one exon, and its 5'-upstream sequence does not have a JH response element. Although Bommo-JHDK is highly expressed in the gut of the silkworm, its mRNA expression remains at a constant level during larval development suggesting this enzyme is constitutive and not regulated by JH, at least at the transcriptional level. Recombinant Bommo-JHDK catalyzed the conversion of 10S-JH diol into JH diol phosphate, confirming its enzymatic function. Recombinant enzyme formed a dimer and had biochemical characteristics similar to other JHDKs. Bommo-JHDK, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, provides unique insights on how JH levels are regulated in the silkworm. PMID:16203205

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine-phosphorylated protein substrates of oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases.

    Kanner, S B; Reynolds, A B; Vines, R R; Parsons, J T

    1990-01-01

    Cellular transformation by oncogenic retroviruses encoding protein tyrosine kinases coincides with the tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of multiple protein substrates. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein of 120 kDa, p120, correlated with src transformation in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Additionally, we previously identified two phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins, p130 and p110, that formed stable complexes with activated variants of pp60src, the ...

  11. Computational Simulations to Predict Creatine Kinase-Associated Factors: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies of Brain and Muscle Types of Creatine Kinases

    Wei-Jiang Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Creatine kinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.2 is related to several skin diseases such as psoriasis and dermatomyositis. CK is important in skin energy homeostasis because it catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group from MgATP to creatine. In this study, we predicted CK binding proteins via the use of bioinformatic tools such as protein-protein interaction (PPI mappings and suggest the putative hub proteins for CK interactions. We obtained 123 proteins for brain type CK and 85 proteins for muscle type CK in the interaction networks. Among them, several hub proteins such as NFKB1, FHL2, MYOC, and ASB9 were predicted. Determination of the binding factors of CK can further promote our understanding of the roles of CK in physiological conditions.

  12. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  13. GPCR kinase 2 interacting protein 1 (GIT1) regulates osteoclast function and bone mass

    Menon, Prashanthi; Yin, Guoyong; Smolock, Elaine M.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Yan, Chen; Berk, Bradford C.

    2010-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 interacting protein-1 (GIT1) is a scaffold protein expressed in various cell types including neurons, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. The GIT1 knockout (KO) mouse has a pulmonary phenotype due to impaired endothelial function. Because GIT1 is tyrosine phosphorylated by Src kinase, we anticipated that GIT1 KO should have a bone phenotype similar to Src KO. Microcomputed tomography of the long bones revealed that GIT1 KO mice have a 2.3-f...

  14. Identification of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase in bovine and human follicular fluids.

    Yang, L S; Kadam, A L; Koide, S S

    1993-11-01

    A soluble protein kinase (PK) was purified from bovine and human follicular fluids (FF) by ultrafiltration through a PM-10 membrane followed by chromatography on heparin-agarose, DEAE-cellulose and cellulose phosphate columns. The PK phosphorylated calf thymus histones and endogenous FF proteins having estimated Mrs of 40, 62, 128 and 180 KD. cAMP enhanced PK activity; whereas protein kinase A (PKA)-inhibitor peptide blocked the activity. The present findings suggest that the enzyme is a cAMP-dependent PK. PMID:8118427

  15. Identification of a protein kinase activity in purified foot- and-mouth disease virus.

    Grubman, M J; Baxt, B; La Torre, J L; Bachrach, H L

    1981-01-01

    Purified preparations of foot-and-mouth disease virus types A, O, and C contain a protein kinase activity which can transfer the gamma phosphate of [32P]ATP to virion structural proteins VP2 and VP3 and exogenous acceptor proteins. Utilizing protamine sulfate as an acceptor, the kinase activity can be demonstrated in disrupted virus but not in intact virus. The enzyme is heat labile with optimal activity at pH 7 or greater. Serine residues of protamine sulfate were identified as the amino aci...

  16. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8

  17. The endogenous inhibitor of protein kinase-C in the rat ovary is a protein phosphatase.

    Eyster, K M; Waller, M S; Miller, T L; Miller, C J; Johnson, M J; Persing, J S

    1993-09-01

    Calcium- and lipid-dependent protein kinase (PKC) activity in the ovary of the pseudopregnant rat is masked by an endogenous inhibitor of PKC. These studies were undertaken to examine the mechanism of action of the endogenous inhibitor of PKC in the rat ovary. The addition of the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin-A (0.09 nM), microcystin-LR (6.4 nM), and okadaic acid (10 nM) resulted in the loss of PKC inhibitory activity and an increase in basal PKC activity in rat ovarian cytosol. In phosphatase assays, significant dephosphorylation of histone-III-S or myelin basic protein that had been phosphorylated by PKC occurred within 4 min after the addition of ovarian cytosol from the pseudopregnant rat. This dephosphorylation was prevented from the pseudopregnant rat. This dephosphorylation was prevented by the addition of calyculin-A (0.73 nM) and was removed by fractionation of ovarian cytosol on diethylaminoethyl cellulose. No inhibition of PKC activity was observed when the PKC-specific peptides AcMBP-(4-14) and [Ser25]PKC-(19-31) were used as the substrate for phosphorylation. In addition, rat ovarian cytosol did not exhibit phosphatase activity when the peptide AcMBP-(4-14) was used as the substrate. Addition of ovarian cytosol resulted in dephosphorylation of phosphorylase-alpha phosphorylated by phosphorylase kinase, but not dephosphorylation of histone-II-A or histone-VIII-S phosphorylated by PKA. The data suggest that the endogenous inhibitor of PKC in the rat ovary is a protein phosphatase. PMID:7689949

  18. Defective insulin response of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in insulin-resistant humans.

    Kida, Y; Nyomba, B L; Bogardus, C; Mott, D M

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity in human muscle correlates with insulin-mediated glucose disposal and is reduced in insulin-resistant subjects. Inhibition of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) is considered as a possible mechanism of insulin action for glycogen synthase activation. In this study, we investigated the time course of insulin action on human muscle A-kinase activity during a 2-h insulin infusion in 13 insulin-sensitive (group S) and 7 insulin-resista...

  19. Activation of tracheal smooth muscle contraction: synergism between Ca2+ and activators of protein kinase C.

    Park, S.; Rasmussen, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of divalent ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin), Ca2+ channel agonist (BAY K 8644), and protein kinase C (C-kinase) activators [phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), mezerein] on bovine tracheal smooth muscle contraction were investigated. A23187 (5 microM) and ionomycin (0.5 microM) produced a prompt but transient contraction. C-kinase activators either produced no effect--e.g., PMA at 200 nM--or produced a rise in tension that was slow in onset but then gradually increased--e.g.,...

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence.

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-04-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 (K48M) ) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5-3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 (K48M) under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 (K48M) mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 (K48M) , mpk6, and PTP1 (S7AS8A) under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  1. Role of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle

    Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.

    2008-01-01

    5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is recognized as an important intracellular energy sensor, shutting down energy-consuming processes and turning on energy-generating processes. Discovery of target proteins of AMPK has dramatically increased in the past 10 years. Historically, AMPK was first...

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A;

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameters...

  3. A placental polypeptide activator of a membranous protein kinase and its relation to histone 1.

    Abdel-Ghany, M; Riegler, C; Racker, E

    1984-01-01

    Crude transforming growth factor preparations of placenta contain a polypeptide that is required for the activity of a protein kinase that has been purified from plasma membrane preparations of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The kinase activator has been separated from transforming growth factor beta by reversed-phase HPLC and affinity chromatography. Like the transforming growth factor, it is heat stable and trypsin labile, but it is not inactivated by dithiothreitol. In sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  4. Targeting G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in Heart Failure

    Brinks, Henriette; Koch, Walter J

    2010-01-01

    In the human body, over 1000 different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate a broad spectrum of extracellular signals at the plasma membrane, transmitting vital physiological features such as pain, sight, smell, inflammation, heart rate and contractility of muscle cells. Signaling through these receptors is primarily controlled and regulated by a group of kinases, the GPCR kinases (GRKs), of which only seven are known and thus, interference with these common downstream GPCR regulators ...

  5. Fructose-bisphosphatase as a substrate of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Hosey, M M; Marcus, F

    1981-01-01

    We have tested rat liver fructose-bisphosphatase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate 1-phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.11) and three other gluconeogenic fructose-bisphosphatases as substrates for the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. In contrast to the rat liver enzyme, homogeneous preparations of mouse liver, rabbit liver, and pig kidney fructose-bisphosphatase could not be phosphorylated by the kinase. Comparative sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the ...

  6. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase in regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism

    Anna Dziewulska; Paweł Dobrzyń; Agnieszka Dobrzyń

    2010-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic enzyme that is activated in response to increasing AMP level. Regulation of AMPK activity in skeletal muscle is coordinated by contraction and phosphorylation by upstream kinases and a growing number of hormones and cytokines. Once activated, AMPK turns on catabolic, ATP-generating pathways, and turns off ATP-consuming metabolic processes such as biosynthesis and proliferation. Activation of AMPK promotes gl...

  7. Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins

    Han, B.; Poppinga, W J; Schmidt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division relies on coordinated regulation of the cell cycle. A process including a well-defined series of strictly regulated molecular mechanisms involving cyclin-dependent kinases, retinoblastoma protein, and polo-like kinases. Dysfunctions in cell cycle regulation are associated with disease such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Compartmentalization of cellular signaling is a common strategy used to ensure the accuracy and efficiency of cellular responses. Compartmentalizati...

  8. Scaffold Proteins Regulating Extracellular Regulated Kinase Function in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Disease

    Liang, Yan; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway is a central downstream signaling pathway that is activated in cardiac muscle cells during mechanical and agonist-mediated hypertrophy. Studies in genetic mouse models deficient in ERK-associated MAPK components pathway have further reinforced a direct role for this pathway in stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and disease. However, more recent studies have highlighted that these signaling pathways...

  9. Identification of nuclear protein targets for six leukemogenic tyrosine kinases governed by post-translational regulation.

    Andrew Pierce

    Full Text Available Mutated tyrosine kinases are associated with a number of different haematological malignancies including myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. The potential commonalities in the action of six of these leukemogenic proteins on nuclear proteins were investigated using systematic proteomic analysis. The effects on over 3600 nuclear proteins and 1500 phosphopeptide sites were relatively quantified in seven isogenic cell lines. The effects of the kinases were diverse although some commonalities were found. Comparison of the nuclear proteomic data with transcriptome data and cytoplasmic proteomic data indicated that the major changes are due to post-translational mechanisms rather than changes in mRNA or protein distribution. Analysis of the promoter regions of genes whose protein levels changed in response to the kinases showed the most common binding site found was that for NFκB whilst other sites such as those for the glucocorticoid receptor were also found. Glucocorticoid receptor levels and phosphorylation were decreased by all 6 PTKs. Whilst Glucocorticoid receptor action can potentiate NFκB action those proteins where genes have NFκB binding sites were in often regulated post-translationally. However all 6 PTKs showed evidence of NFkB pathway modulation via activation via altered IkB and NFKB levels. Validation of a common change was also undertaken with PMS2, a DNA mismatch repair protein. PMS2 nuclear levels were decreased in response to the expression of all 6 kinases, with no concomitant change in mRNA level or cytosolic protein level. Response to thioguanine, that requires the mismatch repair pathway, was modulated by all 6 oncogenic kinases. In summary common targets for 6 oncogenic PTKs have been found that are regulated by post-translational mechanisms. They represent potential new avenues for therapies but also demonstrate the post-translational regulation is a key target of leukaemogenic kinases.

  10. Analysis on sliding helices and strands in protein structural comparisons: A case study with protein kinases

    V S Gowri; K Anamika; S Gore; N Srinivasan

    2007-08-01

    Protein structural alignments are generally considered as ‘golden standard’ for the alignment at the level of amino acid residues. In this study we have compared the quality of pairwise and multiple structural alignments of about 5900 homologous proteins from 718 families of known 3-D structures. We observe shifts in the alignment of regular secondary structural elements (helices and strands) between pairwise and multiple structural alignments. The differences between pairwise and multiple structural alignments within helical and -strand regions often correspond to 4 and 2 residue positions respectively. Such shifts correspond approximately to “one turn” of these regular secondary structures. We have performed manual analysis explicitly on the family of protein kinases. We note shifts of one or two turns in helix-helix alignments obtained using pairwise and multiple structural alignments. Investigations on the quality of the equivalent helix-helix, strand-strand pairs in terms of their residue side-chain accessibilities have been made. Our results indicate that the quality of the pairwise alignments is comparable to that of the multiple structural alignments and, in fact, is often better. We propose that pairwise alignment of protein structures should also be used in formulation of methods for structure prediction and evolutionary analysis.

  11. Changes of epidermal cell morphology and keratin expression induced by inhibitors of protein kinase C.

    Hegemann, L; Wevers, A; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G

    1992-03-01

    Several lines of evidence show protein kinase C as being involved in various regulatory processes in keratinocyte biology, e.g. proliferation and differentiation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of three different inhibitors of protein kinase C, staurosporine, CP 46'665-1, and tiflucarbine, on cell morphology and keratin expression in a non-tumorigenic human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT cells). Staurosporine, being the most potent inhibitor of protein kinase C activity in vitro, and CP 46'665-1 induced morphological transformation to a fibroblast-like cell shape. In contrast, no changes in cell morphology were observed after exposure to tiflucarbine. The investigation of keratin expression in HaCaT cells grown in the presence of the different compounds revealed the following changes: After 72 h of cultivation, keratins 8 and 18 were still expressed in treated cells, whereas expression of keratin 13 was decreased as compared to control cells. Immunoblotting to detect vimentin demonstrated its absence in treated and control cells. Since tiflucarbine is known as a dual protein kinase C/calmodulin inhibitor whereas staurosporine and CP 46'665-1 do not antagonize calmodulin function, it might be possible that not only protein kinase C but also calmodulin is involved in the process leading to the morphological changes. PMID:1376142

  12. Inhibition of protein kinase C induces differentiation in Neuro-2a cells

    1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, induced neuritogenesis in Neuro-2a cells, whereas N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA 1004), which inhibits more efficiently cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, did not. The effect, noticeable after 3 hr, was maximum (13-fold increase at 500 μM H7) between 1 and 3 days and was maintained over 2 months. In controls, 90% of the cells were undifferentiated, whereas after 3 hr with 500 μM H7 only 25% of the cells remained undifferentiated. DNA synthesis decreased as the number of differentiated cells increased. Differentiation is also functional since acetylcholinesterase activity increased ∼7-fold after 48 hr with 500 μM H7. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a specific activator of protein kinase C, prevented or reversed the induction of neuritogenesis and the inhibition of DNA synthesis by H7. There is a good correlation between the level of protein kinase C and the percentage of differentiated cells. The results indicate that protein kinase C may play a key role in the control of differentiation of neural cells. Some possible clinical implications are briefly discussed

  13. Inhibition of protein kinase C induces differentiation in Neuro-2a cells.

    Miñana, M D; Felipo, V; Grisolía, S

    1990-01-01

    1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, induced neuritogenesis in Neuro-2a cells, whereas N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA 1004), which inhibits more efficiently cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, did not. The effect, noticeable after 3 hr, was maximum (13-fold increase at 500 microM H7) between 1 and 3 days and was maintained over 2 months. In controls, 90% of the cells were undifferentiated, whereas after 3 hr with 500 microM H7 only 25% of the cells remained undifferentiated. DNA synthesis decreased as the number of differentiated cells increased. Differentiation is also functional since acetylcholinesterase activity increased approximately 7-fold after 48 hr with 500 microM H7. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a specific activator of protein kinase C, prevented or reversed the induction of neuritogenesis and the inhibition of DNA synthesis by H7. There is a good correlation between the level of protein kinase C and the percentage of differentiated cells. The results indicate that protein kinase C may play a key role in the control of differentiation of neural cells. Some possible clinical implications are briefly discussed. Images PMID:1693437

  14. Inhibition of protein kinase C induces differentiation in Neuro-2a cells

    Minana, M.D.; Felipo, V.; Grisolia, S. (Instituto de Investigaciones Citologicas de la Caja de Ahorros de Valencia (Spain))

    1990-06-01

    1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, induced neuritogenesis in Neuro-2a cells, whereas N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA 1004), which inhibits more efficiently cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, did not. The effect, noticeable after 3 hr, was maximum (13-fold increase at 500 {mu}M H7) between 1 and 3 days and was maintained over 2 months. In controls, 90% of the cells were undifferentiated, whereas after 3 hr with 500 {mu}M H7 only 25% of the cells remained undifferentiated. DNA synthesis decreased as the number of differentiated cells increased. Differentiation is also functional since acetylcholinesterase activity increased {approx}7-fold after 48 hr with 500 {mu}M H7. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a specific activator of protein kinase C, prevented or reversed the induction of neuritogenesis and the inhibition of DNA synthesis by H7. There is a good correlation between the level of protein kinase C and the percentage of differentiated cells. The results indicate that protein kinase C may play a key role in the control of differentiation of neural cells. Some possible clinical implications are briefly discussed.

  15. Phorbol ester binding and protein kinase C activity in normal and transformed human keratinocytes

    Normal keratinocytes, SV40-transformed keratinocytes (SVK14), and various squamous carcinoma cell (SCC) lines have been used as an in vitro model system to study the properties of phorbol ester receptor and protein kinase C expression during keratinocyte differentiation. The cell lines used exhibit a decreasing capacity to differentiate; moreover, all cell lines respond to a low external Ca2+ concentration by a decreased capacity to differentiate. Normal keratinocytes exhibited the highest number of phorbol ester receptors as compared to the other cell lines, while each individual cell line exhibited a higher number of phorbol ester receptors during growth under normal Ca2+ conditions as compared to cells grown under low Ca2+ conditions. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) demonstrated only small variations in the various cell lines. These studies revealed differences between protein kinase C properties from the two cell lines grown under normal and low Ca2+ conditions. The differences included the effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the redistribution pattern of protein kinase C between the cytoplasmic and particulate fractions as well as the activating effect of diolein in vitro on protein kinase C activity. These observations demonstrate that the functional protein kinase C activity of keratinocytes is determined by various endogenous and exogenous activators and that these activators are modulated differently in various cell lines, under various growth conditions (low Ca2+ versus normal Ca2+)

  16. Repertoire of Protein Kinases Encoded in the Genome of Takifugu rubripes

    R. Rakshambikai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Takifugu rubripes is teleost fish widely used in comparative genomics to understand the human system better due to its similarities both in number of genes and structure of genes. In this work we survey the fugu genome, and, using sensitive computational approaches, we identify the repertoire of putative protein kinases and classify them into groups and subfamilies. The fugu genome encodes 519 protein kinase-like sequences and this number of putative protein kinases is comparable closely to that of human. However, in spite of its similarities to human kinases at the group level, there are differences at the subfamily level as noted in the case of KIS and DYRK subfamilies which contribute to differences which are specific to the adaptation of the organism. Also, certain unique domain combination of galectin domain and YkA domain suggests alternate mechanisms for immune response and binding to lipoproteins. Lastly, an overall similarity with the MAPK pathway of humans suggests its importance to understand signaling mechanisms in humans. Overall the fugu serves as a good model organism to understand roles of human kinases as far as kinases such as LRRK and IRAK and their associated pathways are concerned.

  17. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 by anthraquinone-related compounds. A structural insight.

    De Moliner, Erika; Moro, Stefano; Sarno, Stefania; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Battistutta, Roberto

    2003-01-17

    Protein kinases play key roles in signal transduction and therefore are among the most attractive targets for drug design. The pharmacological aptitude of protein kinase inhibitors is highlighted by the observation that various diseases with special reference to cancer are because of the abnormal expression/activity of individual kinases. The resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the target kinase in complex with inhibitors is often the starting point for the rational design of this kind of drugs, some of which are already in advanced clinical trial or even in clinical practice. Here we present and discuss three new crystal structures of ATP site-directed inhibitors in complex with "casein kinase-2" (CK2), a constitutively active protein kinase implicated in a variety of cellular functions and misfunctions. With the help of theoretical calculations, we disclose some key features underlying the inhibitory efficiency of anthraquinone derivatives, outlining three different binding modes into the active site. In particular, we show that a nitro group in a hydroxyanthraquinone scaffold decreases the inhibitory constants K(i) because of electron-withdrawing and resonance effects that enhance the polarization of hydroxylic substituents in paraposition. PMID:12419810

  18. wKinMut: An integrated tool for the analysis and interpretation of mutations in human protein kinases

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Vazquez, Miguel; del Pozo, Angela;

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein kinases are involved in relevant physiological functions and a broad number of mutations in this superfamily have been reported in the literature to affect protein function and stability. Unfortunately, the exploration of the consequences on the phenotypes of each individual mu...... kinase subfamily specificity from S3Det. This predictor yields interesting results that compare favourably with other methods in the field when applied to protein kinases....

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in brain is dependent on method of sacrifice and tissue preparation

    Scharf, Matthew T.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Naidoo, Nirinjini; O'Callaghan, James P.; Pack, Allan I.

    2007-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase is activated when the catalytic α subunit is phosphorylated on Thr172 and therefore, phosphorylation of the α subunit is used as a measure of activation. However, measurement of α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in vivo can be technically challenging. To determine the most accurate method for measuring α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in the mouse brain, we compared different methods of sacrifice and tissue preparation. We found that fre...

  20. Lack of the Mitochondrial Protein Acylglycerol Kinase Causes Sengers Syndrome

    Mayr, Johannes A.; Haack, Tobias B.; Graf, Elisabeth; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Wieland, Thomas; Haberberger, Birgit; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Kirschner, Janbernd; Steinmann, Beat; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Moroni, Isabella; Lamantea, Eleonora; Zeviani, Massimo; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Smeitink, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Exome sequencing of an individual with congenital cataracts, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, and lactic acidosis, all typical symptoms of Sengers syndrome, discovered two nonsense mutations in the gene encoding mitochondrial acylglycerol kinase (AGK). Mutation screening of AGK in further individuals with congenital cataracts and cardiomyopathy identified numerous loss-of-function mutations in an additional eight families, confirming the causal nature of AGK deficiency in Senge...

  1. Expression patterns of protein kinase D 3 during mouse development

    Lutz Sylke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PKD family of serine/threonine kinases comprises a single member in Drosophila (dPKD, two isoforms in C. elegans (DKF-1 and 2 and three members, PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3 in mammals. PKD1 and PKD2 have been the focus of most studies up to date, which implicate these enzymes in very diverse cellular functions, including Golgi organization and plasma membrane directed transport, immune responses, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Concerning PKD3, a role in the formation of vesicular transport carriers at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and in basal glucose transport has been inferred from in vitro studies. So far, however, the physiological functions of the kinase during development remain unknown. Results We have examined the expression pattern of PKD3 during the development of mouse embryos by immunohistochemistry. Using a PKD3 specific antibody we demonstrate that the kinase is differentially expressed during organogenesis. In the developing heart a strong PKD3 expression is constantly detected from E10 to E16.5. From E12.5 on PKD3 is increasingly expressed in neuronal as well as in the supporting connective tissue and in skeletal muscles. Conclusion The data presented support an important role for PKD3 during development of these tissues.

  2. N,N-Dimethylsphingosine is a potent competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase but not of protein kinase C: modulation of cellular levels of sphingosine 1-phosphate and ceramide.

    Edsall, L C; Van Brocklyn, J R; Cuvillier, O; Kleuser, B; Spiegel, S

    1998-09-15

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP), a lipid second messenger formed by the action of sphingosine kinase, has been implicated in regulating diverse biological processes, including growth, survival, and differentiation. N,N-Dimethylsphingosine (DMS) inhibits sphingosine kinase and has been used to investigate the biological roles of SPP; however, little is known of the mechanism of inhibition of sphingosine kinase by DMS. In addition, DMS has been shown to inhibit protein kinase C in vitro. Here we report that DMS is a competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase from U937 monoblastic leukemia cells, Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, and PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. DMS decreases basal levels of SPP and prevents increases in SPP in response to physiological stimuli known to activate sphingosine kinase. DMS also effectively increases cellular levels of ceramide in a variety of cell types, and resetting of the ceramide/SPP rheostat may account for the pro-apoptotic effects of DMS. Moreover, DMS, at concentrations which effectively inhibit sphingosine kinase, has no effect on protein kinase C activity or its membrane translocation. Thus, DMS acts as a specific competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase in diverse cell types and is a useful tool to elucidate the role of SPP as an intracellular second messenger. PMID:9737868

  3. Protein kinase A phosphorylates retinal phosducin on serine 73 in situ

    Lee, R.H.; Brown, B.M.; Lolley, R.N. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-09-15

    Photoreceptors of vertebrate retinas contain a 33,000-dalton phosphoprotein, phosducin, which complexes with the beta, gamma subunits of the photoreceptor G-protein (guanine nucleotide-binding protein), transducin. In situ, the retinal content of phosphorylated phosducin is modulated by light in conjunction with light-triggered changes in intracellular cyclic nucleotide concentration. In vitro, phosducin is phosphorylated by either exogenous or endogenous protein kinase A. 32P-Labeled rat retina phosducin was isolated by immunoprecipitation either after phosphorylation by protein kinase A in the presence of (gamma-32P)ATP or after incubation of retinas in darkness with 32Pi. In either case, phosphoamino acid analysis showed that greater than 98% of 32P was linked to serine, with less than 2% to threonine. Two-dimensional peptide mapping showed that (32P)phosphoserine was associated with the same characteristic set of tryptic peptides. Furthermore, Cleveland peptide analysis using four different proteases showed that either sample exhibited identical patterns of phosphopeptides which were characteristic of the protease used. Identical phosphopeptide maps were also obtained from 32P-labeled bovine retina phosducin, indicating that the serine phosphorylation site for protein kinase A is conserved between rat and bovine. Edman degradation of phosphopeptides derived from 32P-labeled bovine phosducin showed that radioactive phosphate was incorporated into serine residue 73 which is located within a consensus phosphorylation sequence for protein kinase A (-R-K-M-S73(P)-). These observations are uniformly in agreement with protein kinase A being the endogenous kinase that phosphorylates phosducin in vivo.

  4. Protein kinase A phosphorylates retinal phosducin on serine 73 in situ

    Photoreceptors of vertebrate retinas contain a 33,000-dalton phosphoprotein, phosducin, which complexes with the beta, gamma subunits of the photoreceptor G-protein (guanine nucleotide-binding protein), transducin. In situ, the retinal content of phosphorylated phosducin is modulated by light in conjunction with light-triggered changes in intracellular cyclic nucleotide concentration. In vitro, phosducin is phosphorylated by either exogenous or endogenous protein kinase A. 32P-Labeled rat retina phosducin was isolated by immunoprecipitation either after phosphorylation by protein kinase A in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP or after incubation of retinas in darkness with 32Pi. In either case, phosphoamino acid analysis showed that greater than 98% of 32P was linked to serine, with less than 2% to threonine. Two-dimensional peptide mapping showed that [32P]phosphoserine was associated with the same characteristic set of tryptic peptides. Furthermore, Cleveland peptide analysis using four different proteases showed that either sample exhibited identical patterns of phosphopeptides which were characteristic of the protease used. Identical phosphopeptide maps were also obtained from 32P-labeled bovine retina phosducin, indicating that the serine phosphorylation site for protein kinase A is conserved between rat and bovine. Edman degradation of phosphopeptides derived from 32P-labeled bovine phosducin showed that radioactive phosphate was incorporated into serine residue 73 which is located within a consensus phosphorylation sequence for protein kinase A (-R-K-M-S73(P)-). These observations are uniformly in agreement with protein kinase A being the endogenous kinase that phosphorylates phosducin in vivo

  5. Involvement of protein kinase C activation in L-leucine-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in l6 myotubes.

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Morisaki, Naoko; Kitahara, Yoshiro; Miura, Atsuhito; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2003-11-01

    Effects of leucine and related compounds on protein synthesis were studied in L6 myotubes. The incorporation of [(3)H]tyrosine into cellular protein was measured as an index of protein synthesis. In leucine-depleted L6 myotubes, leucine and its keto acid, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), stimulated protein synthesis, while D-leucine did not. Mepacrine, an inhibitor of both phospholipases A(2) and C, canceled stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis. Neither indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, nor caffeic acid, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, diminished their stimulatory actions, suggesting no involvement of arachidonic acid metabolism. Conversely, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methylglycerol, an inhibitor of proteinkinase C, significantly canceled the stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting an involvement of phosphatidylinositol degradation and activation of protein kinase C. L-Leucine caused a rapid activation of protein kinase C in both cytosol and membrane fractions of the cells. These results strongly suggest that both L-leucine and KIC stimulate protein synthesis in L6 myotubes through activation of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. PMID:19003213

  6. SOCS proteins in regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Kabir, Nuzhat N.; Flores Morales, Amilcar;

    2014-01-01

    signaling mediated by RTKs must be tightly regulated by interacting proteins including protein-tyrosine phosphatases and ubiquitin ligases. The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family proteins are well-known negative regulators of cytokine receptors signaling consisting of eight structurally similar...... proteins, SOCS1-7, and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS). A key feature of this family of proteins is the presence of an SH2 domain and a SOCS box. Recent studies suggest that SOCS proteins also play a role in RTK signaling. Activation of RTK results in transcriptional activation of SOCS......-encoding genes. These proteins associate with RTKs through their SH2 domains and subsequently recruit the E3 ubiquitin machinery through the SOCS box, and thereby limit receptor stability by inducing ubiquitination. In a similar fashion, SOCS proteins negatively regulate mitogenic signaling by RTKs. It is also...

  7. Loss of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP3K4 reveals a requirement for MAPK signalling in mouse sex determination.

    Debora Bogani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination in mammals is controlled by the presence or absence of the Y-linked gene SRY. In the developing male (XY gonad, sex-determining region of the Y (SRY protein acts to up-regulate expression of the related gene, SOX9, a transcriptional regulator that in turn initiates a downstream pathway of testis development, whilst also suppressing ovary development. Despite the requirement for a number of transcription factors and secreted signalling molecules in sex determination, intracellular signalling components functioning in this process have not been defined. Here we report a role for the phylogenetically ancient mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling pathway in mouse sex determination. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified the recessive boygirl (byg mutation. On the C57BL/6J background, embryos homozygous for byg exhibit consistent XY gonadal sex reversal. The byg mutation is an A to T transversion causing a premature stop codon in the gene encoding MAP3K4 (also known as MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase. Analysis of XY byg/byg gonads at 11.5 d post coitum reveals a growth deficit and a failure to support mesonephric cell migration, both early cellular processes normally associated with testis development. Expression analysis of mutant XY gonads at the same stage also reveals a dramatic reduction in Sox9 and, crucially, Sry at the transcript and protein levels. Moreover, we describe experiments showing the presence of activated MKK4, a direct target of MAP3K4, and activated p38 in the coelomic region of the XY gonad at 11.5 d post coitum, establishing a link between MAPK signalling in proliferating gonadal somatic cells and regulation of Sry expression. Finally, we provide evidence that haploinsufficiency for Map3k4 accounts for T-associated sex reversal (Tas. These data demonstrate that MAP3K4-dependent signalling events are required for normal expression of Sry during testis development, and

  8. The role of p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase signaling in the differentiation and apoptosis of immortalized neural stem cells

    The two distinct members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase, play an important role in central nervous system (CNS) development and differentiation. However, their role and functions are not completely understood in CNS. To facilitate in vitro study, we have established an immortal stem cell line using SV40 from fetal rat embryonic day 17. In these cells, MAP kinase inhibitors (SP600125, SB202190, and PD98059) were treated for 1, 24, 48, and 72 h to examine the roles of protein kinases. Early inhibition of JNK did not alter phenotypic or morphological changes of immortalized cells, however overexpression of Bax and decrease of phosphorylated AKT was observed. The prolonged inhibition of JNK induced polyploidization of immortalized cells, and resulted in differentiation and inhibition of cell proliferation. Moreover, JNK and p38 MAP kinase but not ERK1/2 was activated, and p21, p53, and Bax were overexpressed by prolonged inhibition of JNK. These results indicate that JNK and p38 MAP kinase could play dual roles on cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, this established cell line could facilitate study of the role of JNK and p38 MAP kinase on CNS development or differentiation/apoptosis

  9. Regulation of Lymphoid Enhancer Factor 1/T-Cell Factor by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Related Nemo-Like Kinase-Dependent Phosphorylation in Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    Ishitani, Tohru; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2003-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway regulates many developmental processes by modulating gene expression. Wnt signaling induces the stabilization of cytosolic β-catenin, which then associates with lymphoid enhancer factor and T-cell factor (LEF-1/TCF) to form a transcription complex that activates Wnt target genes. Previously, we have shown that a specific mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway involving the MAP kinase kinase kinase TAK1 and MAP kinase-related Nemo-like kinase (NLK) s...

  10. AMP-activated protein kinase and ATP-citrate lyase are two distinct molecular targets for ETC-1002, a novel small molecule regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

    Pinkosky, Stephen L; Filippov, Sergey; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Bradshaw, Cheryl D; Hurley, Timothy R; Cramer, Clay T; Spahr, Mark A; Brant, Ashley F; Houghton, Jacob L; Baker, Chris; Naples, Mark; Adeli, Khosrow; Newton, Roger S

    2013-01-01

    ETC-1002 (8-hydroxy-2,2,14,14-tetramethylpentadecanedioic acid) is a novel investigational drug being developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardio-metabolic risk factors. The hypolipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and glucose-lowering properties of ETC-1002, characterized in preclinical disease models, are believed to be due to dual inhibition of sterol and fatty acid synthesis and enhanced mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. However, the molecular mechanism(s) mediating these activities remained undefined. Studies described here show that ETC-1002 free acid activates AMP-activated protein kinase in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase β-independent and liver kinase β 1-dependent manner, without detectable changes in adenylate energy charge. Furthermore, ETC-1002 is shown to rapidly form a CoA thioester in liver, which directly inhibits ATP-citrate lyase. These distinct molecular mechanisms are complementary in their beneficial effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with these mechanisms, ETC-1002 treatment reduced circulating proatherogenic lipoproteins, hepatic lipids, and body weight in a hamster model of hyperlipidemia, and it reduced body weight and improved glycemic control in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. ETC-1002 offers promise as a novel therapeutic approach to improve multiple risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome and benefit patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:23118444

  11. Effect of protein kinase inhibitors on primary antibody induction in tissue cultures.

    Sterzl, J; Milerová, J; Votruba, J; Sterzl, I

    1998-10-01

    The effects of protein-kinase-inhibitors (PKIs) on protein kinase C (PKCs) i.e., staurosporin, calphostin C, H-7, H-8, H-9, on phosphatidyl inositol 3-proteinkinase (PI3-K) i.e., wortmannin, and on protein tyrosine kinase (PTKs) i.e., genistein, herbimycin A, sanguinarin, lavendustin A and B were tested on the induction phase of the primary Ab-response in vitro. The inhibitory action of PKIs was the highest with herbimycin A, sanguinarin, H-9 and wortmannin. Although wortmannin inhibits the function of T-lymphocytes (Taub et al., 1997, Shi et al., 1997), we believe that this communication is the first report of PKIs immunosuppressive action on the inductive steps of Ab-formation. PMID:9839662

  12. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) influences androgen receptor (AR) function in prostate cancer cells

    Protein kinase D1 (PKD1), founding member of PKD protein family, is down-regulated in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). We demonstrate that PKD1 and androgen receptor (AR) are present as a protein complex in PCa cells. PKD1 is associated with a transcriptional complex which contains AR and promoter sequence of the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) gene. Ectopic expression of wild type PKD1 and the kinase dead mutant PKD1 (K628W) attenuated the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR in prostate cancer cells and yeast cells indicating that PKD1 can affect AR transcription activity, whereas knocking down PKD1 enhanced the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR. Co-expression of kinase dead mutant with AR significantly inhibited androgen-mediated cell proliferation in both LNCaP and DU145 PC cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that PKD1 can influence AR function in PCa cells

  13. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    Juan A. González-Vera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes.

  14. Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase from Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 607.

    Sharma, S; Giri, S; Khuller, G K

    1998-06-01

    A soluble Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase has been partially purified (approximately 400 fold) from Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 607 using several purification steps like ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-60%), Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration, DEAE-cellulose and finally calmodulin-agarose affinity chromatography. On SDS-PAGE, this enzyme preparation showed a major protein band of molecular mass 35 kD and its activity was dependent on calcium, calmodulin and ATP when measured under saturating histone IIs (exogenous substrate) concentration. Phosphorylation of histone IIs was inhibited by W-7 (calmodulin inhibitor) and KN-62 (CaM-kinase inhibitor) with IC50 of 1.5 and 0.25 microm respectively, but was not affected by inhibitors of PKA (Sigma P5015) and PKC (H-7). All these results confirm that purified enzyme is Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase of M. smegmatis. The protein kinase of M. smegmatis demonstrated a narrow substrate specificity for both exogenous as well as endogenous substrates. These results suggest that purified CaM-kinase must be involved in regulating specific function(s) in this organism. PMID:9655195

  15. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  16. Antipeptide antibody that specifically inhibits insulin receptor autophosphorylation and protein kinase activity

    Two site-specific antibodies that immunoprecipitate the human insulin receptor have been prepared by immunizing rabbits with chemically synthesized peptides derived from the cDNA-predicted amino acid sequence of the β subunit of the proreceptor. Antibodies to the carboxyl terminus (AbP5) and to a domain around tyrosine-960 (AbP4) specifically recognize the β subunit of the receptor on immunoblots. Both antibodies immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin-receptor complexes and the autophosphorylated receptor. Although neither antibody inhibited insulin binding to the receptor, both insulin-dependent autophosphorylation and exogenous substrate phosphorylation were inhibited by AbP4. Inhibition by AbP4 was dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor; it was not detected when the receptor was autophosphorylated prior to addition of AbP4. AbP4 did not inhibit activity of the related epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor tyrosine protein kinase nor did it inhibit the activity of cAMP-dependent kinase or protein kinase C. The observation that an antibody directed to residues 952-967 of the proreceptor neutralizes the protein kinase activity of the β subunit suggest that this region may play a critical role in the function of the hormone-dependent, protein tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor

  17. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinases mediate calcium-induced slow motility of mammalian outer hair cells.

    Puschner, B; Schacht, J

    1997-08-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells in vitro respond to elevation of intracellular calcium with slow shape changes over seconds to minutes ('slow motility'). This process is blocked by general calmodulin antagonists suggesting the participation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent enzymatic reactions. The present study proposes a mechanism for these reactions. Length changes of outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea were induced by exposure to the calcium ionophore ionomycin. ATP levels remained unaffected by this treatment ruling out depletion of ATP (by activation of calcium-dependent ATPases) as a cause of the observed shape changes. Involvement of protein kinases was suggested by the inhibition of shape changes by K252a, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinase activity. Furthermore, the inhibitors ML-7 and ML-9 blocked the shape changes at concentrations compatible with inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). KN-62, an inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), also attenuated the length changes. Inhibitors with selectivity for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases (H-89, staurosporine) were tested to assess potential additional contributions by such enzymes. The dose dependence of their action supported the notion that the most likely mechanism of slow motility involves phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by MLCK or CaMKII or both. PMID:9282907

  18. G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is a novel regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in heart

    Pang, Jinjiang; Xu, Xiangbin; Getman, Michael R.; Shi, Xi; Belmonte, Stephen L.; Michaloski, Heidi; Mohan, Amy; Blaxall, Burns C.; Berk, Bradford C.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-kinase interacting protein-1 (GIT1) is a multi-function scaffold protein. However, little is known about its physiological role in the heart. Here we sought to identify the cardiac function of GIT1. Global GIT1 knockout (KO) mice were generated and exhibited significant cardiac hypertrophy that progressed to heart failure. Electron microscopy revealed that the hearts of GIT1 KO mice demonstrated significant morphological abnormities in mitochondria, including...

  19. Syk Kinase-Coupled C-type Lectin Receptors Engage Protein Kinase C-δ to Elicit Card9 Adaptor-Mediated Innate Immunity

    Strasser, Dominikus; Neumann, Konstantin; Bergmann, Hanna; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Guler, Reto; Rojowska, Anna; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Brombacher, Frank; Urlaub, Henning; Baier, Gottfried; Brown, Gordon D.; Leitges, Michael; Ruland, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Summary C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) that couple with the kinase Syk are major pattern recognition receptors for the activation of innate immunity and host defense. CLRs recognize fungi and other forms of microbial or sterile danger, and they induce inflammatory responses through the adaptor protein Card9. The mechanisms relaying CLR proximal signals to the core Card9 module are unknown. Here we demonstrated that protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) was activated upon Dectin-1-Syk signaling, mediated ...

  20. 4-hydroxy-2, 3-nonenal activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in rat pancreatic stellate cells

    Kazuhiro Kikuta; Atsushi Masamune; Masahiro Satoh; Noriaki Suzuki; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis,where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. 4-hydroxy2,3-nonenal (HNE) is generated endogenously during the process of lipid peroxidation, and has been accepted as a mediator of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of HNE on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cellular functions in PSCs.METHODS: PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats after perfusion with collagenase P, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. PSCs were treated with physiologically relevant and non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 5 μmol/L)of HNE. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay.Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. Production of type Ⅰ collagen and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.The effect of HNE on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed.RESULTS: HNE activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor κB. In addition, HNE activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. HNE increased type Ⅰ collagen production through the activation of p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. HNE did not alter the proliferation,or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. HNE did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype.CONCLUSION: Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and altered cell functions such as collagen production by HNE may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade Required for Regulation of Development and Secondary Metabolism in Neurospora crassa▿

    Park, Gyungsoon; Pan, Songqin; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2008-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades are composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In this study, we characterize components of a MAPK cascade in Neurospora crassa (mik-1, MAPKKK; mek-1, MAPKK; and mak-1, MAPK) homologous to that controlling cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth of basal hyphae is significantly reduced in mik-1, mek-1, and mak-1 deletion mutants on solid medium. All three mutants formed short aerial hy...

  2. Phosphorylation of the fused protein kinase in response to signaling from hedgehog.

    Thérond, P P; Knight, J. D.; Kornberg, T. B.; Bishop, J M

    1996-01-01

    The hedgehog gene (hh) of Drosophila melanogaster exerts both short- and long-range effects on cell patterning during development. The product of hedgehog is a secreted protein that apparently acts by triggering an intra-cellular signaling pathway, but little is known about the details of that pathway. The Drosophila gene fused (fu) encodes a serine/threonine-protein kinase that genetic experiments have implicated in signaling initiated by hedgehog. Here we report that the fused protein is ph...

  3. Activation of multifunctional calcium/calmodullin dependent protein kinase and phosphorylation of MAP-2 in GH3 cells

    Jefferson, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The author utilized the pituitary-derived cell line, GH3, as a model system for studying the in situ regulation of multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase). The author partially purified a Ca{sup 2+}/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from GH3 cells and demonstrated that it is similar in biochemical properties to neuronal CaM kinase. Autophosphorylation at the autonomy site converts the kinase into a Ca{sup 2+}-independent enzyme. Regulation of CaM kinase in situ was examined by high K{sup +} depolarization of ({sup 32}P)Pi-labeled H3 cells followed by immunoprecipitation and trypic phosphopeptide mapping. The enzyme displayed a Ca{sup 2+} dependent increase in phosphorylation of the autonomy site. Accordingly, this led to a considerable increase in the Ca{sup 2+}-independent or autonomous activity of the enzyme. Thus, activation of CaM kinase by Ca{sup 2}/calmodulin and the subsequent formation of a Ca{sup 2+}-independent species, previously established in vitro, occur after Ca{sup 2+} influx in situ. In a parallel study the author tested whether microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), an in vitro substrate of CaM kinase, is phosphorylated by CaM kinase in GH3 cells. MAP-2 phosphorylation is enhanced by depolarization with high K{sup +} at sites characteristic of those recognized by CaM kinase and distinct from those phosphorylated by cAMP kinase or protein kinase C. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) increased Ca{sup 2+} via the phosphatidyl inositol signaling pathway but neither stimulated autophosphorylation of CaM kinase nor increased phosphorylation of the CaM kinase array of sites on MAP-2. TRH does increase MAP-2 phosphorylation but at sites which closely match those stimulated by phorbol esters that activate protein kinase C.

  4. Activation of multifunctional calcium/calmodullin dependent protein kinase and phosphorylation of MAP-2 in GH3 cells

    The author utilized the pituitary-derived cell line, GH3, as a model system for studying the in situ regulation of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase). The author partially purified a Ca2+/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from GH3 cells and demonstrated that it is similar in biochemical properties to neuronal CaM kinase. Autophosphorylation at the autonomy site converts the kinase into a Ca2+-independent enzyme. Regulation of CaM kinase in situ was examined by high K+ depolarization of [32P]Pi-labeled H3 cells followed by immunoprecipitation and trypic phosphopeptide mapping. The enzyme displayed a Ca2+ dependent increase in phosphorylation of the autonomy site. Accordingly, this led to a considerable increase in the Ca2+-independent or autonomous activity of the enzyme. Thus, activation of CaM kinase by Ca2/calmodulin and the subsequent formation of a Ca2+-independent species, previously established in vitro, occur after Ca2+ influx in situ. In a parallel study the author tested whether microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), an in vitro substrate of CaM kinase, is phosphorylated by CaM kinase in GH3 cells. MAP-2 phosphorylation is enhanced by depolarization with high K+ at sites characteristic of those recognized by CaM kinase and distinct from those phosphorylated by cAMP kinase or protein kinase C. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) increased Ca2+ via the phosphatidyl inositol signaling pathway but neither stimulated autophosphorylation of CaM kinase nor increased phosphorylation of the CaM kinase array of sites on MAP-2. TRH does increase MAP-2 phosphorylation but at sites which closely match those stimulated by phorbol esters that activate protein kinase C

  5. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  6. Activation of NMDA receptors leads to phosphorylation of TRPV1 S800 by protein kinase C and A-Kinase anchoring protein 150 in rat trigeminal ganglia

    Lee, Jongseok; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y.

    2012-01-01

    A-Kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150) is required for the phosphorylation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) by PKA or PKC in sensory neurons and, hence, affects TRPV1-dependent hyperalgesia under pathological conditions. Recently, we showed that the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors sensitizes TRPV1 by enhancing serine phosphorylation through PKC in trigeminal nociceptors. In this study, we extended this observation by investigati...

  7. The role of protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinases 3/1 and 14 in regulation of meiotic resumption of pig cumulus-oocyte complexes

    Procházka, Radek; Blaha, Milan; Němcová, Lucie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, supplement 1 (2012), s. 1245-1246. ISSN 1355-4786. [28th Annual Meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. 01.07.2012-04.07.2012, Istanbul] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/0593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : protein kinase A * pig oocyte Subject RIV: ED - Physiology http://www.eshre.eu/page.aspx/11

  8. Identification of sites phosphorylated by the vaccinia virus B1R kinase in viral protein H5R

    Hardie Grahame

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus gene B1R encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. In vitro this protein kinase phosphorylates ribosomal proteins Sa and S2 and vaccinia virus protein H5R, proteins that become phosphorylated during infection. Nothing is known about the sites phosphorylated on these proteins or the general substrate specificity of the kinase. The work described is the first to address these questions. Results Vaccinia virus protein H5R was phosphorylated by the B1R protein kinase in vitro, digested with V8 protease, and phosphopeptides separated by HPLC. The N-terminal sequence of one radioactively labelled phosphopeptide was determined and found to correspond to residues 81-87 of the protein, with Thr-84 and Thr-85 being phosphorylated. A synthetic peptide based on this region of the protein was shown to be a substrate for the B1R protein kinase, and the extent of phosphorylation was substantially decreased if either Thr residue was replaced by an Ala. Conclusions We have identified the first phosphorylation site for the vaccinia virus B1R protein kinase. This gives important information about the substrate-specificity of the enzyme, which differs from that of other known protein kinases. It remains to be seen whether the same site is phosphorylated in vivo.

  9. Interpretation of the consequences of mutations in protein kinases: combined use of bioinformatics and text mining

    Jose M.G. Izarzugaza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases play a crucial role in a plethora of significant physiological functions and a number of mutations in this superfamily have been reported in the literature to disrupt protein structure and/or function.Computational and experimental research aims to discover the mechanistic connection between mutations in protein kinases and disease with the final aim of predicting the consequences of mutations on protein function and the subsequent phenotypic alterations.In this chapter, we will review the possibilities and limitations of current computational methods for the prediction of the pathogenicity of mutations in the protein kinase superfamily. In particular we will focus in the problem of benchmarking the predictions with independent gold-standard datasets. We will propose a pipeline for the curation of mutations automatically extracted from the literature. Since many of these mutations are not included in the databases that are commonly used to train the computational methods to predict the pathogenicity of protein kinase mutations we propose them to build a valuable gold-standard dataset in the benchmarking of a number of these predictors.Finally, we will discuss how text mining approaches constitute a powerful tool for the interpretation of the consequences of mutations in the context of personalized/stratified medicine.

  10. Influence of berberine on protein tyrosine kinase of erythrocyte insulin receptors from type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Xianglei Deng; Xinrong Li; Chenggong Tian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Bererine has been used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese traditional medicine because of its hypoglycemic effect. In this report, we compared the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activities of erythrocyte insulin receptors from type 2 diabetes mellitus with or without stimulation by berberine in vitro. Methods: Preparations containing insulin receptors were obtained from soluble human erythrocytes, and the insulin receptors were partially purified by affinity chromatography. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured by the exogenous substrate phosphorylation. Results: Both the membrane tyrosine kinase activity and the purified receptor tyrosine kinase activity from diabetics decreased significantly compared with those of normal individuals (reduced by 67.4 % and 47.2 %, respectively).After incubation with berberine, there is a statistical difference in the activity of membrane tyrosine kinase for diabetic patients (a 150% increase). Bererine had no effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of purified insulin receptors. Conclusion: We concluded from these results that berberine was able to improve the insulin sensitivity by increasing the protein tyrosine kinase activity of membrane-bound insulin receptors from type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity

    Xiaorong Yang; Ping Sun; Huaping Qin; Rui Wang; Ye Wang; Ruihong Shi; Xin Zhao; Ce Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are involved in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, a systematic observation or analysis of the role of these various MAPK pathways in excitotoxicity processes does not exist. The present study further evaluated the role and contribution of three MAPK pathways extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK in an NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity model using MAPK-specific inhibitor. Results demonstrated that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 and/or p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 inhibited NMDA-induced reduction in cell viability, as well as reduced NMDA-induced lactate dehydrogenase leakage and reactive oxygen species production. However, PD98059, an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, did not influence this model. Results demonstrated an involvement of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity in cortical neurons.

  12. Protein kinase that phosphorylates light-harvesting complex is autophosphorylated and is associated with photosystem II

    Thylakoid membranes were phosphorylated with [γ-32P]ATP and extracted with octyl glucoside and cholate. Among the radiolabeled phosphoproteins in the extract was a previously characterized protein kinase of 64-kDa apparent mass. The ability of this enzyme to undergo autophosphorylation in situ was used to monitor its distribution in the membrane. Fractionation studies showed that the kinase is confined to granal regions of the thylakoid, where it appears to be associated with the light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex of photosystem II. The kinetics of kinase autophosphorylation were investigated both in situ and in extracted, purified enzyme. In the membrane, autophosphorylation saturated within 20-30 min and was reversed with a half-time of 7-8 min upon removal of ATP or oxidative inactivation of the kinase; the accompanying dephosphorylation of light-harvesting complex was slower and kinetically complex. Fluoride (10 mM) inhibited these dephosphorylations. Autophosphorylation of the isolated kinase was independent of enzyme concentration, indicative of an intramolecular mechanism. A maximum of one serine residue per mole of kinase was esterified. Autophosphorylation was more rapid in the presence of histone IIIs, an exogenous substrate. Dephosphorylation of the isolated enzyme was not observed

  13. Hippocampal activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase,protein kinase B,and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in a chronic stress rat model of depression

    Wei Dai; Weidong Li; Jun Lu; Yingge A; Ya Tu

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that vaned stress stimuli activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK),protein kinase B(Akt),and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase(p38)signal transduction pathway,and also regulate various apoptotic cascades.JNK and p38 promote apoptosis,but Akt protects against apoptosis,in hippocampal neurons.However,changes in the transduction pathway in different regions of brain tissues in a chronic stress rat model of depression remain poorly understood.Results from this study showed that JNK phosphorylation levels were significantly greater in the stress group hippocampus compared with the control group(P 0.05).These results suggested that the JNK signal pathway is activated by JNK phosphorylation and participates in pathophysiological changes in rat models of depression.

  14. ATP analog-sensitive Pat1 protein kinase for synchronous fission yeast meiosis at physiological temperature

    Cipak, Lubos; Hyppa, Randy; Smith, Gerald; Gregan, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    To study meiosis, synchronous cultures are often indispensable, especially for physical analyses of DNA and proteins. A temperature-sensitive allele of the Pat1 protein kinase (pat1-114) has been widely used to induce synchronous meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, but pat1-114-induced meiosis differs from wild-type meiosis, and some of these abnormalities might be due to higher temperature needed to inactivate the Pat1 kinase. Here, we report an ATP analog-sensitive allel...

  15. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    Weterings, Eric; Verkaik, Nicole; Brüggenwirth, Hennie; Gent, Dik; Hoeijmakers, Jan

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks the action of exonucleases and ligases. The DNA termini become accessible after autophosphorylation of DNA-PK(CS), which we demonstrate to require synapsis of DNA ends. Interestingly, the presence...

  16. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    2003-01-01

    DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PKCS) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks the action of exonucleases and ligases. The DNA termini become accessible after autophosphorylation of DNA-PKCS, which we demonstrate to require synapsis of DNA ends. Interestingly, the presence of DNA-PK preve...

  17. Inhibition of protein kinase C induces differentiation in Neuro-2a cells.

    Miñana, M D; Felipo, V.; Grisolía, S

    1990-01-01

    1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, induced neuritogenesis in Neuro-2a cells, whereas N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA 1004), which inhibits more efficiently cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, did not. The effect, noticeable after 3 hr, was maximum (13-fold increase at 500 microM H7) between 1 and 3 days and was maintained over 2 months. In controls, 90% of the cells were undifferentiated, whereas after 3 hr wit...

  18. Purification and characterization of the protein kinase eEF-2 isolated from rat liver cells

    The elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) protein kinase was isolated from rat liver cells, purified and partly characterized. It was found that the enzyme exists in an inactive form in the homogenate of rat liver. The active fraction of kinase eEF-2 was obtained after removal of the inhibitory substance by hydroxyapatite column chromatography. The purified enzyme is an electrophoretically homogeneous protein with relative molecular mass of approximately 90000 and isoelectric point, pI=5.9. The enzyme specifically phosphorylates the elongation factor eEF-2 in the presence of calmodulin and Ca2+. (author). 15 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  19. Damage-induced DNA replication stalling relies on MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 activity

    Kopper, F.; Bierwirth, C.; Schon, M.;

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage can obstruct replication forks, resulting in replicative stress. By siRNA screening, we identified kinases involved in the accumulation of phosphohistone 2AX (gamma H2AX) upon UV irradiation-induced replication stress. Surprisingly, the strongest reduction of phosphohistone 2AX followed...... replication impaired by gemcitabine or by Chk1 inhibition. This rescue strictly depended on transiesion DNA polymerases. In conclusion, instead of being an unavoidable consequence of DNA damage, alterations of replication speed and origin firing depend on MK2-mediated signaling....... knockdown of the MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a kinase currently implicated in p38 stress signaling and G2 arrest. Depletion or inhibition of MK2 also protected cells from DNA damage-induced cell death, and mice deficient for MK2 displayed decreased apoptosis in the skin upon UV irradiation...

  20. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of GLPG0259, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 5 (MAPKAPK5) Inhibitor, Given as Single and Multiple Doses to Healthy Male Subjects

    Namour, Florence; Vanhoutte, Frédéric P.; Beetens, Johan; Blockhuys, Stan; Weer, Marc De; Wigerinck, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives GLPG0259 is a small-molecule inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 5 (MAPKAPK5), a kinase enzyme that plays a role in important inflammatory pathways. The main objectives of the phase I clinical studies in early development were to characterize the pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and safety of GLPG0259 in healthy subjects, including the development of a solid dosage form (free-base pellets and fumarate salt capsules) and the potential...

  1. High-throughput kinase assays with protein substrates using fluorescent polymer superquenching

    Weatherford Wendy

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening is used by the pharmaceutical industry for identifying lead compounds that interact with targets of pharmacological interest. Because of the key role that aberrant regulation of protein phosphorylation plays in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension, kinases have become one of the main drug targets. With the exception of antibody-based assays, methods to screen for specific kinase activity are generally restricted to the use of small synthetic peptides as substrates. However, the use of natural protein substrates has the advantage that potential inhibitors can be detected that affect enzyme activity by binding to a site other than the catalytic site. We have previously reported a non-radioactive and non-antibody-based fluorescence quench assay for detection of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation using synthetic peptide substrates. The aim of this work is to develop an assay for detection of phosphorylation of chemically unmodified proteins based on this polymer superquenching platform. Results Using a modified QTL Lightspeed™ assay, phosphorylation of native protein was quantified by the interaction of the phosphorylated proteins with metal-ion coordinating groups co-located with fluorescent polymer deposited onto microspheres. The binding of phospho-protein inhibits a dye-labeled "tracer" peptide from associating to the phosphate-binding sites present on the fluorescent microspheres. The resulting inhibition of quench generates a "turn on" assay, in which the signal correlates with the phosphorylation of the substrate. The assay was tested on three different proteins: Myelin Basic Protein (MBP, Histone H1 and Phosphorylated heat- and acid-stable protein (PHAS-1. Phosphorylation of the proteins was detected by Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα and by the Interleukin -1 Receptor-associated Kinase 4 (IRAK4. Enzyme inhibition yielded IC50 values that were comparable to those obtained using

  2. Involvement of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase signalling pathway in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii

    Robert-Gangneux F.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about signalling in Toxoplasma gondii, but it is likely that protein kinases might play a key role in the parasite proliferation, differentiation and probably invasion. We previously characterized Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinases in T. gondii lysates. In this study, cultured cells were tested for their susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection after tachyzoite pretreatment with drugs interfering with AMP kinase activation pathways. Protein kinases inhibitors, i.e. genistein, R031-8220 and PD098059, reduced tachyzoite infectivity by 38 ± 4.5 %, 85.5 ± 9 % and 56 ± 10 %, respectively. Conversely, protein kinases activators, i.e. bombesin and PMA, markedly increased infectivity (by 202 ± 37 % and 258 ± 14 %, respectively. These results suggest that signalling pathways involving PKC and AAAP kinases play a role in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma.

  3. Identification and analysis of a novel protein-tyrosine kinase from bovine thymus

    Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    A cytosolic protein-tyrosine kinase has been identified and purified to near homogeneity from calf thymus by using the phosphorylation of the tyrosine-containing peptide angiotensin I as an assay. Specific peptide phosphorylating activity was enhanced by carrying out the assay at high ionic strength (2M NaCl). The inclusion of NaCl at this concentration acts to stimulate endogenous protein-tyrosine kinase activity while simultaneously inhibiting other endogenous kinases. The purification procedure involved extraction of the enzyme from calf-thymus and sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-cellulose, heparin-agarose, casein-sepharose, butylagarose, and Sephadex G-75. Analysis of the most highly purified preparations by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single Coomassie blue-stained band of 41 KDa. This molecular weight was consistent with results obtained from gel filtration, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. The enzyme has also been found to catalyze an autophosphorylation reaction. Incubation of the enzyme with Mn/sup 2 +/ and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP led to its modification on a tyrosine residue. Phosphopeptide mapping experiments indicated that the 41 KDa kinase was distinct from p56, the major membrane-associated protein-tyrosine kinase in T lymphocytes.

  4. Evolutionary paths of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA catalytic subunits.

    Kristoffer Søberg

    Full Text Available 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA has served as a prototype for the large family of protein kinases that are crucially important for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. The PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the two genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood and characterized human kinases. Here we have studied the evolution of this gene family in chordates, arthropods, mollusks and other animals employing probabilistic methods and show that Cα and Cβ arose by duplication of an ancestral PKA catalytic subunit in a common ancestor of vertebrates. The two genes have subsequently been duplicated in teleost fishes. The evolution of the PRKACG retroposon in simians was also investigated. Although the degree of sequence conservation in the PKA Cα/Cβ kinase family is exceptionally high, a small set of signature residues defining Cα and Cβ subfamilies were identified. These conserved residues might be important for functions that are unique to the Cα or Cβ clades. This study also provides a good example of a seemingly simple phylogenetic problem which, due to a very high degree of sequence conservation and corresponding weak phylogenetic signals, combined with problematic nonphylogenetic signals, is nontrivial for state-of-the-art probabilistic phylogenetic methods.

  5. Identification and analysis of a novel protein-tyrosine kinase from bovine thymus

    A cytosolic protein-tyrosine kinase has been identified and purified to near homogeneity from calf thymus by using the phosphorylation of the tyrosine-containing peptide angiotensin I as an assay. Specific peptide phosphorylating activity was enhanced by carrying out the assay at high ionic strength (2M NaCl). The inclusion of NaCl at this concentration acts to stimulate endogenous protein-tyrosine kinase activity while simultaneously inhibiting other endogenous kinases. The purification procedure involved extraction of the enzyme from calf-thymus and sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-cellulose, heparin-agarose, casein-sepharose, butylagarose, and Sephadex G-75. Analysis of the most highly purified preparations by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single Coomassie blue-stained band of 41 KDa. This molecular weight was consistent with results obtained from gel filtration, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. The enzyme has also been found to catalyze an autophosphorylation reaction. Incubation of the enzyme with Mn2+ and [γ-32P]ATP led to its modification on a tyrosine residue. Phosphopeptide mapping experiments indicated that the 41 KDa kinase was distinct from p56, the major membrane-associated protein-tyrosine kinase in T lymphocytes

  6. Cloning and expression of catalytic domain of Abl protein tyrosine kinase gene in E. coli

    2001-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and are involved in signal transduction. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases to intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflamma tory responses and diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases or the signaling pathways of PTKs activation could be assumed as the potential candidate for drug development. On this assumption, we cloned and expressed the Abl PTK gene in E. coli, and purified the PTK, which was used to screen the PTK inhibitors from the extracts of Chinese herbs. The catalytic domain sequence of PTK gene was amplified by PCR us ing the cDNA of abl from Abelson murine leukemia virus as template. The amplified fragment was then cloned into the GST-tagged expression vector pGEX2T. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into host cell E. coli DH5α and was induced to express PTK protein. The expression of the protein was detected using SDS-PAGE. The result showed that a specific protein was induced to express after 12 min induction, and reached peak level about 40% of the host total pro tein after 4 h induction. The molecular weight of the fusion protein was about 58 kD. The purified GST-PTK fusion pro tein presented higher activity for tyrosine phosphorylation.

  7. Short-term regulation of NHE3 by EGF and protein kinase C but not protein kinase A involves vesicle trafficking in epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

    Donowitz, M; Janecki, A; Akhter, S; Cavet, M E; Sanchez, F; Lamprecht, G; Zizak, M; Kwon, W L; Khurana, S; Yun, C H; Tse, C M

    2000-01-01

    NHE3 is an intestinal epithelial isoform Na+/H+ exchanger that is present in the brush border of small intestinal, colonic, and gallbladder Na(+)-absorbing epithelial cells. NHE3 is acutely up- and downregulated in response to some G protein-linked receptors, tyrosine kinase receptors, and protein kinases when studied in intact ileum, when stably expressed in PS120 fibroblasts, and in the few studies reported in the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. In most cases this is due to changes in Vmax of NHE3, although in response to cAMP and squalamine there are also changes in the K'(H+)i of the exchanger. The mechanism of the Vmax regulation as shown by cell surface biotinylation and confocal microscopy in Caco-2 cells and biotinylation in PS120 cells involves changes in the amount of NHE3 on the plasma membrane. In addition, in some cases there are also changes in turnover number of the exchanger. In some cases, the change in amount of NHE3 in the plasma membrane is associated with a change in the amount of plasma membrane. A combination of biochemical studies and transport/inhibitor studies in intact ileum and Caco-2 cells demonstrated that the increase in brush border Na+/H+ exchange caused by acute exposure to EGF was mediated by PI 3-kinase. PI 3-kinase was also involved in FGF stimulation of NHE3 expressed in fibroblasts. Thus, NHE3 is another example of a transport protein that is acutely regulated in part by changing the amount of the transporter on the plasma membrane by a process that appears to involve vesicle trafficking and also to involve changes in turnover number. PMID:11193592

  8. Stimulation of IGF-binding protein-1 secretion by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Lewitt, M S

    2001-04-20

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) is stimulated during intensive exercise and in catabolic conditions to very high concentrations, which are not completely explained by known regulators such as insulin and glucocorticoids. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important signaling system in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, in regulating IGFBP-1 was studied in H4-II-E rat hepatoma cells. Arsenic(III) oxide and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside (AICAR) were used as activators. AICAR (150 microM) stimulated IGFBP-1 secretion twofold during a 5-h incubation (P = 0.002). Insulin (100 ng/ml) inhibited IGFBP-1 by 80% (P < 0.001), but this was completely abolished in the presence of 150 microM AICAR. The effect of dexamethasone in stimulating IGFBP-1 threefold was additive to the effect of AICAR (P < 0.001) and, in the presence of AICAR, was incompletely inhibited by insulin. In conclusion AMPK is identified as a novel regulatory pathway for IGFBP-1, stimulating secretion and blocking the inhibitory effect of insulin. PMID:11302732

  9. Complex regulation of CREB-binding protein by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2

    Kovács, Krisztián A.

    2015-11-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are transcriptional coactivators involved in numerous biological processes that affect cell growth, transformation, differentiation, and development. In this study, we provide evidence of the involvement of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) in the regulation of CBP activity. We show that HIPK2 interacts with and phosphorylates several regions of CBP. We demonstrate that serines 2361, 2363, 2371, 2376, and 2381 are responsible for the HIPK2-induced mobility shift of CBP C-terminal activation domain. Moreover, we show that HIPK2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional activity of CBP. However, our data suggest that HIPK2 activates CBP mainly by counteracting the repressive action of cell cycle regulatory domain 1 (CRD1), located between amino acids 977 and 1076, independently of CBP phosphorylation. Our findings thus highlight a complex regulation of CBP activity by HIPK2, which might be relevant for the control of specific sets of target genes involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Systematic discovery of linear binding motifs targeting an ancient protein interaction surface on MAP kinases.

    Zeke, András; Bastys, Tomas; Alexa, Anita; Garai, Ágnes; Mészáros, Bálint; Kirsch, Klára; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Kalinina, Olga V; Reményi, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are broadly used regulators of cellular signaling. However, how these enzymes can be involved in such a broad spectrum of physiological functions is not understood. Systematic discovery of MAPK networks both experimentally and in silico has been hindered because MAPKs bind to other proteins with low affinity and mostly in less-characterized disordered regions. We used a structurally consistent model on kinase-docking motif interactions to facilitate the discovery of short functional sites in the structurally flexible and functionally under-explored part of the human proteome and applied experimental tools specifically tailored to detect low-affinity protein-protein interactions for their validation in vitro and in cell-based assays. The combined computational and experimental approach enabled the identification of many novel MAPK-docking motifs that were elusive for other large-scale protein-protein interaction screens. The analysis produced an extensive list of independently evolved linear binding motifs from a functionally diverse set of proteins. These all target, with characteristic binding specificity, an ancient protein interaction surface on evolutionarily related but physiologically clearly distinct three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38). This inventory of human protein kinase binding sites was compared with that of other organisms to examine how kinase-mediated partnerships evolved over time. The analysis suggests that most human MAPK-binding motifs are surprisingly new evolutionarily inventions and newly found links highlight (previously hidden) roles of MAPKs. We propose that short MAPK-binding stretches are created in disordered protein segments through a variety of ways and they represent a major resource for ancient signaling enzymes to acquire new regulatory roles. PMID:26538579

  11. Identification, expression and interaction analyses of calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK) genes in canola (Brassica napus L.)

    Zhang, Hanfeng; Liu, Wu-Zhen; Zhang, Yupeng; Deng, Min; Niu, Fangfang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Boya; Liang, Wanwan; Deyholos, Michael K.; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil-producing crops in China and worldwide. The yield and quality of canola is frequently threatened by environmental stresses including drought, cold and high salinity. Calcium is a well-known ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger in plants. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are Ser/Thr protein kinases found only in plants and some protozoans. CPKs are Ca2+ sensors that have both Ca2+ sensing function and kinase...

  12. Role of the Mixed-Lineage Protein Kinase Pathway in the Metabolic Stress Response to Obesity

    Shashi Kant

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Saturated free fatty acid (FFA is implicated in the metabolic response to obesity. In vitro studies indicate that FFA signaling may be mediated by the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK pathway that activates cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK. Here, we examined the role of the MLK pathway in vivo using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. The ubiquitously expressed MLK2 and MLK3 protein kinases have partially redundant functions. We therefore compared wild-type and compound mutant mice that lack expression of MLK2 and MLK3. MLK deficiency protected mice against high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance and obesity. Reduced JNK activation and increased energy expenditure contribute to the metabolic effects of MLK deficiency. These data confirm that the MLK pathway plays a critical role in the metabolic response to obesity.

  13. Benzofuran Small Molecules as Potential Inhibitors of Human Protein Kinases. A Review.

    Kwiecień, Halina; Goszczyńska, Agata; Rokosz, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are known to regulate the majority of human cellular processes such as communication, division, metabolism, survival and apoptosis therefore they can be promising targets in cancer diseases, viral infection and in other disorders. Small molecules acting as selective human protein kinase inhibitors are very attractive pharmacological targets. This review presents a number of examples of biologically active natural and synthetic benzo[b]furans and their derivatives, such as benzo[b]furan-2- and 3-ones, benzo[b]furan-2- and 3-carboxylic acids, as well as benzo[c]furans as potential inhibitors of various human protein kinases. The pathways of function and implication of the inhibitors in cancer and other diseases are discussed. PMID:26648467

  14. In vitro and in vivo assays of protein kinase CK2 activity.

    Prudent, Renaud; Sautel, Céline F; Moucadel, Virginie; Laudet, Béatrice; Filhol, Odile; Cochet, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly casein kinase 2) is recognized as a central component in the control of the cellular homeostasis; however, much remains unknown regarding its regulation and its implication in cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Moreover, study of CK2 function and regulation in a cellular context is complicated by the dynamic multisubunit architecture of this protein kinase. Although a number of robust techniques are available to assay CK2 activity in vitro, there is a demand for sensitive and specific assays to evaluate its activity in living cells. We hereby provide a detailed description of several assays for monitoring the CK2 activity and its subunit interaction in living cells. The guidelines presented herein should enable researchers in the field to establish strategies for cellular screenings of CK2 inhibitors. PMID:21050938

  15. A Placental Polypeptide Activator of a Membranous Protein Kinase and Its Relation to Histone 1

    Abdel-Ghany, M.; Riegler, C.; Racker, E.

    1984-12-01

    Crude transforming growth factor preparations of placenta contain a polypeptide that is required for the activity of a protein kinase that has been purified from plasma membrane preparations of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The kinase activator has been separated from transforming growth factor β by reversed-phase HPLC and affinity chromatography. Like the transforming growth factor, it is heat stable and trypsin labile, but it is not inactivated by dithiothreitol. In sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the purified preparation shows a major double band at about 31,000 daltons. Comparisons of electrophoretic mobility, protein kinase stimulatory activity, and cross-reactivity with an antibody against histone 1 suggest that the placental activator is identical with histone 1.

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in the porcine retinal arteries and neuroretina following retinal ischemia-reperfusion

    Gesslein, Bodil; Håkansson, Gisela; Carpio, Ronald;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in the expression of intracellular signal-transduction pathways, specifically mitogen-activated protein kinases, following retinal ischemia-reperfusion.......The aim of the present study was to examine changes in the expression of intracellular signal-transduction pathways, specifically mitogen-activated protein kinases, following retinal ischemia-reperfusion....

  17. DMPD: Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 14643884 Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated diso...g) (.html) (.csml) Show Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated diso...l inflammation andimmune-mediated disorders. Authors Aksoy E, Goldman M, Willems F. Publication Int J Bioche

  18. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Research highlights: → Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. → The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. → Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. → PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  19. Protein implicated in nonsyndromic mental retardation regulates protein kinase A (PKA) activity

    Al-Tawashi, Azza

    2012-02-28

    Mutation of the coiled-coil and C2 domain-containing 1A (CC2D1A) gene, which encodes a C2 domain and DM14 domain-containing protein, has been linked to severe autosomal recessive nonsyndromic mental retardation. Using a mouse model that produces a truncated form of CC2D1A that lacks the C2 domain and three of the four DM14 domains, we show that CC2D1A is important for neuronal differentiation and brain development. CC2D1A mutant neurons are hypersensitive to stress and have a reduced capacitytoformdendritesandsynapsesinculture. Atthebiochemical level,CC2D1Atransduces signals to the cyclic adenosine 3?,5?-monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway during neuronal cell differentiation. PKA activity is compromised, and the translocation of its catalytic subunit to the nucleus is also defective in CC2D1A mutant cells. Consistently, phosphorylation of the PKA target cAMP-responsive element-binding protein, at serine 133, is nearly abolished in CC2D1A mutant cells. The defects in cAMP/PKA signaling were observed in fibroblast, macrophage, and neuronal primary cells derived from the CC2D1A KO mice. CC2D1A associates with the cAMP-PKA complex following forskolin treatment and accumulates in vesicles or on the plasma membrane in wild-type cells, suggesting that CC2D1A may recruit the PKA complex to the membrane to facilitate signal transduction. Together, our data show that CC2D1A is an important regulator of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which may be the underlying cause for impaired mental function in nonsyndromic mental retardation patients with CC2D1A mutation. 2012 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Evidence that phytochrome functions as a protein kinase in plant light signalling.

    Shin, Ah-Young; Han, Yun-Jeong; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Soo Young; Nguyen, Thai Son; Son, Minky; Lee, Keun Woo; Shen, Yu; Song, Pill-Soon; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that plant phytochromes are autophosphorylating serine/threonine kinases. However, the biochemical properties and functional roles of putative phytochrome kinase activity in plant light signalling are largely unknown. Here, we describe the biochemical and functional characterization of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsphyA) as a potential protein kinase. We provide evidence that phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) are phosphorylated by phytochromes in vitro. Domain mapping of AsphyA shows that the photosensory core region consisting of PAS-GAF-PHY domains in the N-terminal is required for the observed kinase activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing mutant versions of AsphyA, which display reduced activity in in vitro kinase assays, show hyposensitive responses to far-red light. Further analysis reveals that far-red light-induced phosphorylation and degradation of PIF3 are significantly reduced in these transgenic plants. Collectively, these results suggest a positive relationship between phytochrome kinase activity and photoresponses in plants. PMID:27173885

  1. Transient upregulation of protein kinase C in pressure-overloaded neonatal rat myocardium

    Hamplová, B.; Novák, F.; Kolář, František; Nováková, O.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2010), s. 25-33. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : protein kinase C * cardiac development * pressure overload Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  2. Peptide phosphorylation by calcium-dependent protein kinase from maize seedlings.

    Loog, M; Toomik, R; Sak, K; Muszynska, G; Järv, J; Ek, P

    2000-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK-1) was purified from maize seedlings, and its substrate specificity studied using a set of synthetic peptides derived from the phosphorylatable sequence RVLSRLHS15VRER of maize sucrose synthase 2. The decapeptide LARLHSVRER was found to be efficiently phosphorylated as a minimal substrate. The same set of peptides were found to be phosphorylated by mammalian protein kinase Cbeta (PKC), but showed low reactivity with protein kinase A (PKA). Proceeding from the sequence LARLHSVRER, a series of cellulose-membrane-attached peptides of systematically modified structure was synthesised. These peptides had hydrophobic (Ala, Leu) and ionic (Arg, Glu) amino acids substituted in each position. The phosphorylation of these substrates by CDPK-1 was measured and the substrate specificity of the maize protein kinase characterised by the consensus sequence motif A/L-5X-4R-3X-2X-1SX+1R+2Z+3R+4, where X denotes a position with no strict amino acid requirements and Z a position strictly not tolerating arginine compared with the other three varied amino acids. This motif had a characteristic sequence element RZR at positions +2 to +4 and closely resembled the primary structure of the sucrose synthase phosphorylation site. The sequence surrounding the phosphorylatable serine in this consensus motif was similar to the analogous sequence K/RXXS/TXK/R proposed for mammalian PKC, but different from the consensus motif RRXS/TX for PKA. PMID:10632703

  3. A comparison of protein kinases inhibitor screening methods using both enzymatic activity and binding affinity determination

    Rudolf, Amalie Frederikke; Skovgaard, Tine; Knapp, Stefan; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Berthelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Binding assays are increasingly used as a screening method for protein kinase inhibitors; however, as yet only a weak correlation with enzymatic activity-based assays has been demonstrated. We show that the correlation between the two types of assays can be improved using more precise screening...

  4. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of crystals of human protein kinase CK2

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I;

    2000-01-01

    The heterotetrameric recombinant holoenzyme of human protein kinase CK2 was purified to homogeneity. It degraded spontaneously to a stable and fully active state in which the catalytic subunit was about 5 kDa smaller than the wild type. The degraded enzyme was crystallized using polyethylene glycol...

  5. Synthesis of Benzofuran Analogue of Go6976, an Isoform Selective Protein Kinase C Inhibitor

    MA, Da-Wei; ZHANG, Xin-Rong; WU, Shi-Hui; TAO, Feng-Gang

    2001-01-01

    Based on the structure of Go6976, a known isoform-selective protein kinase C inhibitor, a benzofuran analogue (1) was designed. This analogue was synthesized by coupling of benzofuran 3-acetic acid and 8-oxo-tryptamine and subsequent intramolecular Dieckmann condensation, alkylation, oxidative photocyclization and cyanation reaction of mesylate.

  6. Mapping the residues of protein kinase CK2 alpha subunit responsible for responsiveness to polyanionic inhibitors

    Vaglio, P; Sarno, S; Marin, O;

    1996-01-01

    The quadruple mutation of the whole basic cluster, K74KKK77 conserved in the catalytic subunits of protein kinase CK2 and implicated in substrate recognition, not only abolishes inhibition by heparin but even induces with some peptide substrates an up to 5-fold stimulation by heparin in the 0...

  7. Mapping the residues of protein kinase CK2 implicated in substrate recognition

    Sarno, S; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O;

    1995-01-01

    Six mutants of protein kinase CK2 alpha subunit in which basic residues have been mutated into alanines were assayed for their capability to phosphorylate the peptide RRRADDSDDDDD. Two mutants (R228A and R278K279R280A) behaved more or less as alpha wild type and one (H160,166A) was nearly inactive...

  8. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  9. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Is Activated as a Consequence of Lipolysis in the Adipocyte

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated in adipocytes during exercise and other states in which lipolysis is stimulated. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect and its physiological relevance are unclear. To examine these questions, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with agents...

  10. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 activity during meiosis resumption in mammals

    Procházka, Radek; Blaha, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2015), s. 495-502. ISSN 0916-8818 R&D Projects: GA MZe(CZ) QJ1510138 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cumulus oocyte complexes * meiosis resumption * mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 (MAPK3/1) Subject RIV: GI - Animal Husbandry ; Breeding Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2014

  11. H pylori stimulates proliferation of gastric cancer cells through activating mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade

    Yong-Chang Chen; Ying Wang; Jing-Yan Li; Wen-Rong Xu; You-Li Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanism by which H pylori causes activation of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: A VacA (+) and CagA (+) standard Hpyloriline NCTC 11637 and a human gastric adenocarcinoma derived gastric epithelial cell line BGC-823 were applied in the study. MTT assay and 3H-TdR incorporation test were used to detect the proliferation of BGC-823 cells and Western blotting was used to detect the activity and existence of related proteins.RESULTS: Incubation with Hpylori extract increased the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, reflected by both live cell number and DNA synthesis rate. The activity of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal transduction cascade increased within 20 min after incubation with Hpylori extract and appeared to be a sustained event. MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059abolished the action of H pylori extract on both ERK activity and cell proliferation. Incubation with H pyloriextract increased c-Fos expression and SRE-dependentgene expression. H pylori extract caused phosphorylation of several proteins including a protein with molecular size of 97.4 kDa and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibited the activation of ERK and the proliferation of cells caused by H pylori extract.CONCLUSION: Biologically active elements in H pylori extract cause proliferation of gastric epithelial cells through activating tyrosine kinase and ERK signal transduction cascade.

  12. ABERRANT PROMOTER HYPERMETHYLATION OF DEATH ASSOCIATED PROTEIN KINASE (DAPK) IN EPITHELIAL OVARIAN CARCINOMA

    Ramesh; Shalini. N.; Sandeep Kumar; Premalata; Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to assess the promoter hypermethylation status of the apoptotic gene Death Associated Protein Kinase (DAPK) in epithelial ovarian cancer and its association with various clinicopathological parameters. METHODS: 110 epithelial ovarian cancers samples were assessed to study the hypermethylation by nested and Methylatio...

  13. Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP regulates cell division in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Nováková, Linda; Bezoušková, Silvia; Pompach, Petr; Branny, Pavel

    Bratislava : Československá spoločnosť mikrobiologická, 2010. s. 196-196. ISBN 970-80-970477-8-8 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : protein kinase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  14. Purification and characterization of recombinant protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays expressed in Escherichia coli

    Riera, Marta; Pages, Montserrat; Issinger, Olaf Georg;

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant protein kinase subunits rmCK2alpha-1 and rmCK2beta-1 from Zea mays were expressed separately in Escherichia coli and assembled to a fully active tetrameric holoenzyme complex in vitro. The obtained maize holoenzyme was purified to homogeneity, biochemically characterized, and compared...

  15. Association between mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 20 case-control studies.

    Qiaoli Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs profiles can be used as diagnostic markers for human cancers. The associations between mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1 SNPs rs889312 A>C, rs16886165 T>G and breast cancer risk have been widely evaluated, but the results were inconsistent. To derive a conclusive assessment of the associations, we performed a meta-analysis by combining data from all eligible case-control studies up to date. METHODS: By searching PubMed, ISI web of knowledge, Embase and Cochrane databases, we identified all eligible studies published before September 2013. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to assess the strength of associations in fixed-effect or random-effect model. False-positive report probability (FPRP was calculated to confirm the significance of the results. RESULTS: A total of 59670 cases in 20 case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for SNPs rs889312 and rs16886165 polymorphisms with a per-allele OR of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.09-1.13 and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.09-1.20 respectively. For rs889312, in subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significant associations were identified in Europeans and Asians, but not in Africans. When stratified by estrogen receptor (ER expression status, rs889312 was associated with both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. Results from the FPRP analyses were consistent with and supportive to the above results. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis suggests that rs889312-C allele and rs16886165-G allele might be risk factors for breast cancer, especially in Europeans and Asians.

  16. Regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface expression by protein kinase C epsilon

    Sundberg, Christina; Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Kveiborg, Marie;

    2004-01-01

    constitutively active protein. However, little is known about the regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface translocation. Here, we used human RD rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which express ADAM12 at the cell surface, in a temporal pattern. We report that protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon induces ADAM12 translocation to the cell......The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family consists of multidomain cell-surface proteins that have a major impact on cell behavior. These transmembrane-anchored proteins are synthesized as proforms that have (from the N terminus): a prodomain; a metalloprotease-, disintegrin......-immunoprecipitated from membrane-enriched fractions of PMA-treated cells, 3) RD cells transfected with EGFP-tagged, myristoylated PKCepsilon expressed more ADAM12 at the cell surface than did non-transfected cells, and 4) RD cells transfected with a kinase-inactive PKCepsilon mutant did not exhibit ADAM12 cell...

  17. Protein kinase Cbeta mediates hepatic induction of sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c by insulin

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Inoue, Noriyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Ishigaki, Naomi; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yahagi, Naoya; Gotoda, Takanari; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a transcription factor that controls lipogenesis in the liver. Hepatic SREBP-1c is nutritionally regulated, and its sustained activation causes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Although regulation of SREBP-1c is known to occur at the transcriptional level, the precise mechanism by which insulin signaling activates SREBP-1c promoter remains to be elucidated. Here we show that protein kinase C beta (PKCbeta) is a key mediator o...

  18. Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP Enhances Long-Term Memory Formation Independent of Protein Kinase A

    Ma, Nan; Abel, Ted; Hernandez, Pepe J.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that cAMP signaling within neurons plays a major role in the formation of long-term memories--signaling thought to proceed through protein kinase A (PKA). However, here we show that exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) is able to enhance the formation of long-term memory in the hippocampus and appears to do so…

  19. Development of Novel In Vivo Chemical Probes to Address CNS Protein Kinase Involvement in Synaptic Dysfunction.

    D Martin Watterson

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine protein kinases are critical to CNS function, yet there is a dearth of highly selective, CNS-active kinase inhibitors for in vivo investigations. Further, prevailing assumptions raise concerns about whether single kinase inhibitors can show in vivo efficacy for CNS pathologies, and debates over viable approaches to the development of safe and efficacious kinase inhibitors are unsettled. It is critical, therefore, that these scientific challenges be addressed in order to test hypotheses about protein kinases in neuropathology progression and the potential for in vivo modulation of their catalytic activity. Identification of molecular targets whose in vivo modulation can attenuate synaptic dysfunction would provide a foundation for future disease-modifying therapeutic development as well as insight into cellular mechanisms. Clinical and preclinical studies suggest a critical link between synaptic dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and the activation of p38αMAPK mediated signaling cascades. Activation in both neurons and glia also offers the unusual potential to generate enhanced responses through targeting a single kinase in two distinct cell types involved in pathology progression. However, target validation has been limited by lack of highly selective inhibitors amenable to in vivo use in the CNS. Therefore, we employed high-resolution co-crystallography and pharmacoinformatics to design and develop a novel synthetic, active site targeted, CNS-active, p38αMAPK inhibitor (MW108. Selectivity was demonstrated by large-scale kinome screens, functional GPCR agonist and antagonist analyses of off-target potential, and evaluation of cellular target engagement. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrated that MW108 ameliorates beta-amyloid induced synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. A serendipitous discovery during co-crystallographic analyses revised prevailing models about active site targeting of inhibitors, providing insights

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization in epithelial cells

    Miranda, Lisa; Carpentier, Sarah; Platek, Anna; Hussain, Nusrat; Gueuning, Marie-Agnes; Vertommen, Didier; Ozkan, Yurda; Sid, Brice; Hue, Louis; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Rider, Mark H. [de Duve Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Horman, Sandrine, E-mail: sandrine.horman@uclouvain.be [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research - Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-06-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a known regulator of cellular and systemic energy balance, is now recognized to control cell division, cell polarity and cell migration, all of which depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we report the effects of A769662, a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on cytoskeletal organization and signalling in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We show that AMPK activation induced shortening or radiation of stress fibers, uncoupling from paxillin and predominance of cortical F-actin. In parallel, Rho-kinase downstream targets, namely myosin regulatory light chain and cofilin, were phosphorylated. These effects resembled the morphological changes in MDCK cells exposed to hyperosmotic shock, which led to Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK activation via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-{beta}(CaMKK{beta}), a known upstream kinase of AMPK. Indeed, hypertonicity-induced AMPK activation was markedly reduced by the STO-609 CaMKK{beta} inhibitor, as was the increase in MLC and cofilin phosphorylation. We suggest that AMPK links osmotic stress to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Pharmacological Analyses of Protein Kinases Regulating Egg Maturation in Marine Nemertean Worms: A Review and Comparison with Mammalian Eggs

    Alicia Marquardt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For development to proceed normally, animal eggs must undergo a maturation process that ultimately depends on phosphorylations of key regulatory proteins. To analyze the kinases that mediate these phosphorylations, eggs of marine nemertean worms have been treated with pharmacological modulators of intracellular signaling pathways and subsequently probed with immunoblots employing phospho-specific antibodies. This article both reviews such analyses and compares them with those conducted on mammals, while focusing on how egg maturation in nemerteans is affected by signaling pathways involving cAMP, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Src-family kinases, protein kinase C isotypes, AMP-activated kinase, and the Cdc2 kinase of maturation-promoting factor.

  2. ArhGAP9, a novel MAP kinase docking protein, inhibits Erk and p38 activation through WW domain binding

    2007-01-01

    We have identified human ArhGAP9 as a novel MAP kinase docking protein that interacts with Erk2 and p38α through complementarily charged residues in the WW domain of ArhGAP9 and the CD domains of Erk2 and p38α. This interaction sequesters the MAP kinases in their inactive states through displacement of MAP kinase kinases targeting the same sites. While over-expression of wild type ArhGAP9 caused MAP kinase activation by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to be suppressed and preserve...

  3. Molecular cloning of a rat testis form of the inhibitor protein of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Van Patten, S M; Ng, D C; Th'ng, J P; Angelos, K L; Smith, A.J.; Walsh, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The form of inhibitor protein of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKI) that has been most thoroughly studied is a protein purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Beale et al. previously isolated a species of PKI from rat testis that appeared from its amino acid composition to be quite distinct from the rabbit skeletal muscle protein [Beale, E. G., Dedman, J. R. & Means, A. R. (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 6322-6327]. The amino acid sequence of a form of rat testis PKI has now been determined bot...

  4. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein Mediates TRPV1 Thermal Hyperalgesia through PKA Phosphorylation of TRPV1

    Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B.; Fehrenbacher, Jill C.; Henry, Michael; Akopian, Armen N.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    Certain phosphorylation events are tightly controlled by scaffolding proteins such as A-Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP). On nociceptive terminals, phosphorylation of transient receptor potential channel type 1 (TRPV1) results in the sensitization to many different stimuli, contributing to the development of hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the functional involvement of AKAP150 in mediating sensitization of TRPV1, and found that AKAP150 is co-expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG) ne...

  5. Phospholipase D1 Mediates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling for Glucose Uptake

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Park, Ji-Man; Yea, Kyungmoo; Kim, Hyun Wook; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose homeostasis is maintained by a balance between hepatic glucose production and peripheral glucose utilization. In skeletal muscle cells, glucose utilization is primarily regulated by glucose uptake. Deprivation of cellular energy induces the activation of regulatory proteins and thus glucose uptake. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is known to play a significant role in the regulation of energy balances. However, the mechanisms related to the AMPK-mediated control of gluc...

  6. Mechanisms of regulation and function of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases

    Wen Yang; Shi-Hai Xia

    2006-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) interact with the agonist-activated form of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) to affect receptor phosphorylation and to initiate profound impairment of receptor signaling,or desensitization. GPCR forms the largest family of cell surface receptors, and defects in GRK function have the potential consequence to affect GPCR-stimulated biological responses in many pathological situations.

  7. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase alpha1 Dependent Signaling in Renal Tissue Fibrosis

    Mia, Sobuj

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a common hallmark of chronic kidney disease caused by diabetes, hypertension, ischemia, renal injury and obstructive uropathy. The hetereotrimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) consists of three subunits (α, β, γ) and is a master sensor of cellular energy status. Activation of AMPK contributes to monocyte-fibroblast transition and production of matrix protein even though accumulating evidence suggests that activated AMPK inhibits tissue fibrosis, which may...

  8. Diacylglycerol kinase theta and zeta isoforms: regulation of activity, protein binding partners and physiological functions

    Los, Alrik Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) yielding phosphatidic acid (PA). In this thesis, we investigated which structural domains of DGKtheta are required for DGK activity. Furthermore, we showed that DGKzeta binds to and is activated by the Retinoblastoma tumour suppressor protein (pRB) and the pRB-related proteins p107 and p130, key regulators of the cell-cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. The interaction between pRB and DGKzeta is regulated ...

  9. Phospholipase D1 Mediates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling for Glucose Uptake

    Jong Hyun Kim; Ji-Man Park; Kyungmoo Yea; Hyun Wook Kim; Pann-Ghill Suh; Sung Ho Ryu

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucose homeostasis is maintained by a balance between hepatic glucose production and peripheral glucose utilization. In skeletal muscle cells, glucose utilization is primarily regulated by glucose uptake. Deprivation of cellular energy induces the activation of regulatory proteins and thus glucose uptake. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is known to play a significant role in the regulation of energy balances. However, the mechanisms related to the AMPK-mediated control of glu...

  10. Further characterization of a protein kinase from foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Grubman, M J

    1982-01-01

    Acid disruption of foot-and-mouth disease virus released a protein kinase activity that sedimented at less than 7S. This enzyme was separated into three peaks of activity by ion-exchange and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Analysis of the various enzyme fractions by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining revealed that one of the fractions lacked the major virion structural proteins, but still contained two or three other polypeptides. This enzyme phosphorylated mainly one prot...

  11. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII e...

  12. Death-associated Protein Kinase Mediated Cell Death Modulated by Interaction with DANGER

    Kang, Bingnan N.; Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Saleem, Sofiyan; Patterson, Randen L.; Hester, Lynda; Doré, Sylvain; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a key player in multiple cell death signaling pathways. We report that DAPK is regulated by DANGER, a partial MAB-21-domain containing protein. DANGER binds directly to DAPK and inhibits DAPK catalytic activity. DANGER-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts and neurons exhibit greater DAPK activity and increased sensitivity to cell death stimuli than do wild-type control cells. In addition, DANGER-deficient mice manifest more severe brain damage after ...

  13. Determinants of Cell-to-Cell Variability in Protein Kinase Signaling

    Matthias Jeschke; Stephan Baumgärtner; Stefan Legewie

    2013-01-01

    Cells reliably sense environmental changes despite internal and external fluctuations, but the mechanisms underlying robustness remain unclear. We analyzed how fluctuations in signaling protein concentrations give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling using analytical theory and numerical simulations. We characterized the dose-response behavior of signaling cascades by calculating the stimulus level at which a pathway responds ('pathway sensitivity') and the maximal act...

  14. Insulin-induced decrease in protein phosphorylation in rat adipocytes not explained by decreased A-kinase activity

    In isolated rat adipocytes, insulin inhibits lipolysis to a greater extent than would be predicted by the decrease in (-/+)cAMP activity ratio of cAMP-dependent protein kinase [A-kinase], from which it was speculated that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. They have examined the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins under conditions of varying A-kinase activities in the presence and absence of insulin. Protein phosphorylation was determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of extracts from 32P-loaded cells; glycerol and A-kinase activity ratios were measured in the cytosolic extracts from control, non-radioactive cells. Increased protein phosphorylation in general occurred over the same range of A-kinase activity ratios, 0.1-0.3, associated with increased glycerol release. The insulin-induced decrease in lipolysis was associated with a decrease in the 32P content of several proteins, an effect not explained by the modest reduction in A-kinase activity by insulin. This effect of insulin on protein phosphorylation was lost as the A-kinase activity ratios exceeded 0.5. The results suggest that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of those adipocyte proteins which are subject to phosphorylation by A-kinase

  15. Insulin-induced decrease in protein phosphorylation in rat adipocytes not explained by decreased A-kinase activity

    Egan, J.J.; Greenberg, A.S.; Chang, M.K.; Londos, C.

    1987-05-01

    In isolated rat adipocytes, insulin inhibits lipolysis to a greater extent than would be predicted by the decrease in (-/+)cAMP activity ratio of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase), from which it was speculated that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. They have examined the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins under conditions of varying A-kinase activities in the presence and absence of insulin. Protein phosphorylation was determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of extracts from /sup 32/P-loaded cells; glycerol and A-kinase activity ratios were measured in the cytosolic extracts from control, non-radioactive cells. Increased protein phosphorylation in general occurred over the same range of A-kinase activity ratios, 0.1-0.3, associated with increased glycerol release. The insulin-induced decrease in lipolysis was associated with a decrease in the /sup 32/P content of several proteins, an effect not explained by the modest reduction in A-kinase activity by insulin. This effect of insulin on protein phosphorylation was lost as the A-kinase activity ratios exceeded 0.5. The results suggest that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of those adipocyte proteins which are subject to phosphorylation by A-kinase.

  16. Opportunities to Target Specific Contractile Abnormalities with Smooth Muscle Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    Annegret Ulke-Lemée

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle is a major component of most hollow organ systems (e.g., airways, vasculature, bladder and gut/gastrointestine; therefore, the coordinated regulation of contraction is a key property of smooth muscle. When smooth muscle functions normally, it contributes to general health and wellness, but its dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK is central to calcium-independent, actomyosin-mediated contractile force generation in the vasculature, thereby playing a role in smooth muscle contraction, cell motility and adhesion. Recent evidence supports an important role for ROCK in the increased vasoconstriction and remodeling observed in various models of hypertension. This review will provide a commentary on the development of specific ROCK inhibitors and their clinical application. Fasudil will be discussed as an example of bench-to-bedside development of a clinical therapeutic that is used to treat conditions of vascular hypercontractility. Due to the wide spectrum of biological processes regulated by ROCK, many additional clinical indications might also benefit from ROCK inhibition. Apart from the importance of ROCK in smooth muscle contraction, a variety of other protein kinases are known to play similar roles in regulating contractile force. The zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK and integrin-linked kinase (ILK are two well-described regulators of contraction. The relative contribution of each kinase to contraction depends on the muscle bed as well as hormonal and neuronal stimulation. Unfortunately, specific inhibitors for ZIPK and ILK are still in the development phase, but the success of fasudil suggests that inhibitors for these other kinases may also have valuable clinical applications. Notably, the directed inhibition of ZIPK with a pseudosubstrate molecule shows unexpected effects on the contractility of gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

  17. Chapter Three - Ubiquitination and Protein Turnover of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in GPCR Signaling and Cellular Regulation.

    Penela, P

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for regulating a wide variety of physiological processes, and distinct mechanisms for GPCR inactivation exist to guarantee correct receptor functionality. One of the widely used mechanisms is receptor phosphorylation by specific G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), leading to uncoupling from G proteins (desensitization) and receptor internalization. GRKs and β-arrestins also participate in the assembly of receptor-associated multimolecular complexes, thus initiating alternative G-protein-independent signaling events. In addition, the abundant GRK2 kinase has diverse "effector" functions in cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolism homeostasis by means of the phosphorylation or interaction with non-GPCR partners. Altered expression of GRKs (particularly of GRK2 and GRK5) occurs during pathological conditions characterized by impaired GPCR signaling including inflammatory syndromes, cardiovascular disease, and tumor contexts. It is increasingly appreciated that different pathways governing GRK protein stability play a role in the modulation of kinase levels in normal and pathological conditions. Thus, enhanced GRK2 degradation by the proteasome pathway occurs upon GPCR stimulation, what allows cellular adaptation to chronic stimulation in a physiological setting. β-arrestins participate in this process by facilitating GRK2 phosphorylation by different kinases and by recruiting diverse E3 ubiquitin ligase to the receptor complex. Different proteolytic systems (ubiquitin-proteasome, calpains), chaperone activities and signaling pathways influence the stability of GRKs in different ways, thus endowing specificity to GPCR regulation as protein turnover of GRKs can be differentially affected. Therefore, modulation of protein stability of GRKs emerges as a versatile mechanism for feedback regulation of GPCR signaling and basic cellular processes. PMID:27378756

  18. Linked decreases in Liver Kinase B1 and AMP-activated protein kinase activity modulate matrix catabolic responses to biomechanical injury in chondrocytes

    Petursson, Freyr; Husa, Matt; June, Ron; Lotz, Martin; Terkeltaub, Robert; Liu-Bryan, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) maintains cultured chondrocyte matrix homeostasis in response to inflammatory cytokines. AMPK activity is decreased in human knee osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is one of the upstream activators of AMPK. Hence, we examined the relationship between LKB1 and AMPK activity in OA and aging cartilages, and in chondrocytes subjected to inflammatory cytokine treatment and biomechanical compression injury, and p...

  19. Molecular mechanism by which AMP-activated protein kinase activation promotes glycogen accumulation in muscle

    Hunter, Roger W; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE During energy stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) promotes glucose transport and glycolysis for ATP production, while it is thought to inhibit anabolic glycogen synthesis by suppressing the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) to maintain the energy balance in muscle. Paradoxically...... transgenic mice overexpressing a kinase dead (KD) AMPK were incubated with glucose tracers and the AMPK-activating compound 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) ex vivo. GS activity and glucose uptake and utilization (glycolysis and glycogen synthesis) were assessed. RESULTS Even though...

  20. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase (Mkp)-1 Protects Mice against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatic Injury

    Wancket, Lyn M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Rogers, Lynette K.; Liu, Yusen

    2012-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation promotes hepatocyte death during acetaminophen overdose, a common cause of drug-induced liver failure. While mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (Mkp)-1 is a critical negative regulator of JNK MAPK, little is known about the role of Mkp-1 during hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the role of Mkp-1 during acute acetaminophen toxicity. Mkp-1+/+ and Mkp-1−/− mice were dosed ip with vehicle or acetaminophen at 300 mg/kg (for mechan...

  1. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L;

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  2. Role of p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase in Mediating Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    李艳波; 邓华聪; 郑丹; 李呼伦

    2004-01-01

    @@ p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK)is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. p38MAPK pathway is one of the most widely studied signaling pathways involved in the transduction of intracellular signals including survival, growth,differentiation and death.

  3. 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 as an emerging target in the management of breast cancer

    It should be noted that 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) is a protein encoded by the PDPK1 gene, which plays a key role in the signaling pathways activated by several growth factors and hormones. PDK1 is a crucial kinase that functions downstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation and activates members of the AGC family of protein kinases, such as protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC), p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases, and serum glucocorticoid-dependent kinase, by phosphorylating serine/threonine residues in the activation loop. AGC kinases are known to play crucial roles in regulating physiological processes relevant to metabolism, growth, proliferation, and survival. Changes in the expression and activity of PDK1 and several AGC kinases have been linked to human diseases including cancer. Recent data have revealed that the alteration of PDK1 is a critical component of oncogenic phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in breast cancer, suggesting that inhibition of PDK1 can inhibit breast cancer progression. Indeed, PDK1 is highly expressed in a majority of human breast cancer cell lines and both PDK1 protein and messenger ribonucleic acid are overexpressed in a majority of human breast cancers. Furthermore, overexpression of PDK1 is sufficient to transform mammary epithelial cells. PDK1 plays an essential role in regulating cell migration, especially in the context of phosphatase and tensin homologue deficiency. More importantly, downregulation of PDK1 levels inhibits migration and experimental metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Thus, targeting PDK1 may be a valuable anticancer strategy that may improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic strategies in breast cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the evidence that has been reported to support the idea that PDK1 may be a key target in breast cancer management

  4. Protein kinase CK2 interacts with Chk2 and phosphorylates Mre11 on serine 649

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 protein complex has been known to be involved in a variety of DNA metabolic events that involve DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The phosphorylation of Mre11 is increased in response to ionizing radiation, which suggests that phosphorylation of Mre11 may be an important regulatory mechanism of this complex. Mre11-phosphorylating kinase activities were observed in Chk2 immunoprecipitates and HeLa nuclear extracts. Through the tandem affinity tagging system and conventional chromatography, this kinase was purified and identified as protein kinase CK2. CK2 phosphorylates Mre11 in vitro. In vitro kinase assay with a series of truncated Mre11 proteins as substrates for CK2 and site-directed mutagenesis showed that serine 649 of Mre11 is mainly phosphorylated by CK2 in vitro. In vivo labeling and phosphopeptide mapping analysis revealed that this phosphorylation occurs in vivo. These data implicate CK2 as a potential upstream regulator of Mre11 function

  5. Solid-phase tyrosine-specific protein kinase assay in multiwell substrate-immobilized polyacrylamide gel

    Since tyrosine-specific protein kinase (TPK) is much less abundant than Ser/Thr-specific kinases in cells, determination of TPK activity in crude cell extracts or column chromatography eluates has been difficult. This is compounded by the absence of a rapid, economical method for the separation of high endogenous protein phosphorylation background from exogenously added tyrosine-containing substrates. We have developed a new solid-phase assay, which provides high sensitivity and efficiency at a low cost for assaying the TPK activity of crude enzyme preparations. This assay utilizes immobilized tyrosine-containing synthetic polymers such as (Glu:Tyr, 4:1)n in polyacrylamide gels. The kinase reaction is started by adding crude enzyme solutions and [tau-32P]ATP-metal ion mixtures into microtiter-size wells made in the gels. After the phosphorylation reaction, the reaction mixtures are removed and the gels are prewashed in water followed by electrophoresis to completely remove free radioactive ATP. 32P incorporation into the immobilized TPK-specific substrate can be detected by autoradiography and quantitated by cutting the gel pieces and counting them with a liquid scintillation counter. The simple, rapid method should facilitate screening of TPK inhibitors and activators as well as examining the substrate specificity of TPKs. Other enzymes, including Ser/Thr-specific protein kinases, can also be analyzed by this technique

  6. Raf kinase inhibitory protein: a signal transduction modulator and metastasis suppressor

    Alexey E Granovsky; Marsha Rich Rosner

    2008-01-01

    Cells have a multitude of controls to maintain their integrity and prevent random switching from one biological state to another. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein (PEBP) family, is representative of a new class of modulators of signaling cascades that function to maintain the "yin yang" or balance of biological systems. RKIP inhibits MAP kinase (Raf-MEK-ERK), G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase and NFkB signaling cascades. Because RKIP targets different kinases dependent upon its state of phosphorylation, RKIP also acts to integrate crosstalk initiated by multiple environmental stimuli. Loss or depletion of RKIP results in disruption of the normal cellular stasis and can lead to chromosomal abnormalities and disease states such as cancer. Since RKIP and the PEBP family have been reviewed previously, the goal of this analysis is to provide an update and highlight some of the unique features of RKIP that make it a critical player in the regulation of cellular signaling processes.

  7. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  8. 2,5-hexanedione (HD) treatment alters calmodulin, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and protein kinase C in rats' nerve tissues

    Calcium-dependent mechanisms, particularly those mediated by Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), have been implicated in neurotoxicant-induced neuropathy. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms exist in 2,5-hexanedione (HD)-induced neuropathy. For that, we investigated the changes of CaM, CaMKII, protein kinase C (PKC) and polymerization ratios (PRs) of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H in cerebral cortex (CC, including total cortex and some gray), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) of rats treated with HD at a dosage of 1.75 or 3.50 mmol/kg for 8 weeks (five times per week). The results showed that CaM contents in CC, SC and SN were significantly increased, which indicated elevation of Ca2+ concentrations in nerve tissues. CaMKII contents and activities were also increased in CC and were positively correlated with gait abnormality, but it could not be found in SC and SN. The increases of PKC contents and activities were also observed in SN and were positively correlated with gait abnormality. Except for that of NF-M in CC, the PRs of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H were also elevated in nerve tissues, which was consistent with the activation of protein kinases. The results suggested that CaMKII might be partly (in CC but not in SC and SN) involved in HD-induced neuropathy. CaMKII and PKC might mediate the HD neurotoxicity by altering the NF phosphorylation status and PRs

  9. THE REGULATORY EFFECT OF NUCLEOSIDE DIPHOSPHATE KINASE ON G-PROTEIN AND G-PROTEIN MEDIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE C

    张德昌; 张宽仁

    1995-01-01

    The effect of nueleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) on the activity of guanine nueleotide regulatory protein (G-protein) mediated phospholipase C (PLC) and on the [35S ] GTPTτS binding of G-protein was investigated in this work in order to demonstrate the mechanism behind the regulation of G-protein and its effector PLC by NDPK. The stimulation of PLC in turkey erythrocyte membrane by both GTP and GTPτS indicated that the PLC stimulation was msdiated by G-protein, NDPK alone stimulated PLC activity, as well as the stimulation in the presence of GTP and GDP, in a dose-dependent manner. However, NDPK inhibited GTPτS-stimulated PLC, Furthermore, NDPK inhibited [35S] GTPτS binding of purified Gi-protein in a non-competitive manner. A hypothesis implying an important role of direct interaction of G-protein and NDPK in the regulation of their functions is suggested and discussed.

  10. Mechanism of sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction: role of protein kinases

    Debby Ickowicz; Maya Finkelstein; Haim Breitbart

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian sperm must undergo a series of biochemical and physiological modifications,collectively called capacitation,in the female reproductive tract prior to the acrosome reaction (AR).The mechanisms of these modifications are not well characterized though protein kinases were shown to be involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ during both capacitation and the AR.In the present review,we summarize some of the signaling events that are involved in capacitation.During the capacitation process,phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) is phosphorylated/activated via a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent cascade,and downregulated by protein kinase C α (PKCα).PKCα is active at the beginning of capacitation,resulting in P13K inactivation.During capacitation,PKCα as well as PP1γ2 is degraded by a PKA-dependent mechanism,allowing the activation of P13K.The activation of PKA during capacitation depends mainly on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) produced by the bicarbonate-dependent soluble adenylyl cyclase.This activation of PKA leads to an increase in actin polymerization,an essential process for the development of hyperactivated motility,which is necessary for successful fertilization.Actin polymerization is mediated by PIP2 in two ways:first,P(I)P2 acts as a cofactor for phospholipase D (PLD) activation,and second,as a molecule that binds and inhibits actin-severing proteins such as gelsolin.Tyrosine phosphorylation of gelsolin during capacitation by Src family kinase (SFK) is also important for its inactivation.Prior to the AR,gelsolin is released from P(I)P2 and undergoes dephosphorylation/activation,resulting in fast F-actin depolymerization,leading to the AR.

  11. Protein Kinase D Enzymes as Regulators of EMT and Cancer Cell Invasion

    Nisha Durand

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Protein Kinase D (PKD isoforms PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3 are effectors of the novel Protein Kinase Cs (nPKCs and diacylglycerol (DAG. PKDs impact diverse biological processes like protein transport, cell migration, proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and apoptosis. PKDs however, have distinct effects on these functions. While PKD1 blocks EMT and cell migration, PKD2 and PKD3 tend to drive both processes. Given the importance of EMT and cell migration to the initiation and progression of various malignancies, abnormal expression of PKDs has been reported in multiple types of cancers, including breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss how EMT and cell migration are regulated by PKD isoforms and the significance of this regulation in the context of cancer development.

  12. Protein Kinase D Enzymes as Regulators of EMT and Cancer Cell Invasion.

    Durand, Nisha; Borges, Sahra; Storz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Protein Kinase D (PKD) isoforms PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3 are effectors of the novel Protein Kinase Cs (nPKCs) and diacylglycerol (DAG). PKDs impact diverse biological processes like protein transport, cell migration, proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and apoptosis. PKDs however, have distinct effects on these functions. While PKD1 blocks EMT and cell migration, PKD2 and PKD3 tend to drive both processes. Given the importance of EMT and cell migration to the initiation and progression of various malignancies, abnormal expression of PKDs has been reported in multiple types of cancers, including breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss how EMT and cell migration are regulated by PKD isoforms and the significance of this regulation in the context of cancer development. PMID:26848698

  13. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine-phosphorylated protein substrates of oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases

    Cellular transformation by oncogenic retroviruses encoding protein tyrosine kinases coincides with the tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of multiple protein substrates. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein of 120 kDa, p120, correlated with src transformation in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Additionally, the authors previously identified two phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins, p130 and p110, that formed stable complexes with activated variants of pp60src, the src-encoded tyrosine kinase. To study transformation-relevant tyrosine kinase substrates, they have generated monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine phosphoproteins, including p130, p120, p110, and five additional phosphoproteins (p210, p125, p118, p85, and p185/p64). These antibodies detected several of the same tyrosine phosphoproteins in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by avian retroviruses Y73 and CT10, encoding the yes and crk oncogenes, respectively. Protein substrates in mouse, rat, hamster, and human cells overexpressing activated variants of chicken pp60src were also detected by several of the monoclonal antibodies

  15. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A)+ RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G2 phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  16. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1. PMID:27235398

  17. Silver nanoclusters-based fluorescence assay of protein kinase activity and inhibition.

    Shen, Congcong; Xia, Xiaodong; Hu, Shengqiang; Yang, Minghui; Wang, Jianxiu

    2015-01-01

    A simple and sensitive fluorescence method for monitoring the activity and inhibition of protein kinase (PKA) has been developed using polycytosine oligonucleotide (dC12)-templated silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) was found to enhance the fluorescence of Ag NCs, while the hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by PKA decreased the fluorescence of Ag NCs. Compared to the existing methods for kinase activity assay, the developed method does not involve phosphorylation of the substrate peptides, which significantly simplifies the detection procedures. The method exhibits high sensitivity, good selectivity, and wide linear range toward PKA detection. The inhibition effect of kinase inhibitor H-89 on the activity of PKA was also studied. The sensing protocol was also applied to the assay of drug-stimulated activation of PKA in HeLa cell lysates. PMID:25517425

  18. Identification of intracellular signaling pathways that induce myotonic dystrophy protein kinase expression during myogenesis.

    Carrasco, Marta; Canicio, Judith; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Kaliman, Perla

    2002-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common inherited adult neuromuscular disorder. DM is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of a protein kinase gene (DMPK). Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM, as revealed by gene target studies. However, the postnatal regulation of DMPK expression and its pathophysiological role remain undefined. We studied the regulation of DMPK protein and mRNA expression during myogenesis in rat L6E9 myoblasts, mouse C2C12 myoblasts, and 10T1/2 fibroblasts stably expressing the myogenic transcription factor MyoD (10T1/2-MyoD). We detected DMPK as an 80-kDa protein mainly localized to the cytosolic fraction of skeletal muscle cells. DMPK expression and protein kinase activity were enhanced in IGF-II-differentiated cells. In L6E9 and C2C12 cells, DMPK expression was regulated through the same signaling pathways (i.e. phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB, nitric oxide synthase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) that had been described as being crucial for the myogenesis induced by either low serum or IGF-II. However, in 10T1/2-MyoD cells, p38 MAPK inhibition blocked cell fusion and caveolin-3 expression without affecting DMPK up-regulation. These results suggest that although DMPK is induced during myogenesis, its expression cannot be totally associated with the development of a fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:12130568

  19. 87-kDa protein, a major specific substrate for protein kinase C: purification from bovine brain and characterization

    The 87-kDa protein, a major specific substrate for protein kinase C, has been purified 500-fold to apparent homogeneity from bovine forebrain supernatant. The purification procedure included batch adsorption to DE-52 (DEAE-cellulose), (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, Bio-Gel HTP (hydroxylapatite), Sephacryl S-400, and fast protein liquid chromatography ProRPC. The amino acid composition was notable for its high proportion of alanine (28.6 mol%) and its enrichment in glutamate/glutamine (18.1 mol%), glycine (12.6 mol%), and proline (11.3 mol%). The partial specific volume was 0.702 ml/g; the Stokes radius and sedimentation coefficient were 85 A and 2.11 S, respectively. Although the relative molecular mass of the protein on NaDodSO4/8% PAGE was 87-90 kDa, the molecular mass as determined from the above values was 68 kDa. The frictional ratio was 3.2, and the axial ratio was 60, indicating that the 87-kDa protein is an extremely elongated monomer. The purified 87-kDa protein was phosphorylated by purified protein kinase C to a stoichiometry of 2.2 mol of 32P per mol of 87-kDa protein (calculated using a value of 68 kDa for the molecular mass). Phosphorylation was exclusively on serine residues

  20. DMPD: Manipulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB-signalingcascades during intracellular Toxoplasma gondii infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 15361242 Manipulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB-sig...mmunol Rev. 2004 Oct;201:191-205. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Manipulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear... gondii infection. PubmedID 15361242 Title Manipulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-k

  1. Identifying allosteric fluctuation transitions between different protein conformational states as applied to Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2

    Gu Jenny

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms underlying protein function and associated conformational change are dominated by a series of local entropy fluctuations affecting the global structure yet are mediated by only a few key residues. Transitional Dynamic Analysis (TDA is a new method to detect these changes in local protein flexibility between different conformations arising from, for example, ligand binding. Additionally, Positional Impact Vertex for Entropy Transfer (PIVET uses TDA to identify important residue contact changes that have a large impact on global fluctuation. We demonstrate the utility of these methods for Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, a system with crystal structures of this protein in multiple functionally relevant conformations and experimental data revealing the importance of local fluctuation changes for protein function. Results TDA and PIVET successfully identified select residues that are responsible for conformation specific regional fluctuation in the activation cycle of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2. The detected local changes in protein flexibility have been experimentally confirmed to be essential for the regulation and function of the kinase. The methodologies also highlighted possible errors in previous molecular dynamic simulations that need to be resolved in order to understand this key player in cell cycle regulation. Finally, the use of entropy compensation as a possible allosteric mechanism for protein function is reported for CDK2. Conclusion The methodologies embodied in TDA and PIVET provide a quick approach to identify local fluctuation change important for protein function and residue contacts that contributes to these changes. Further, these approaches can be used to check for possible errors in protein dynamic simulations and have the potential to facilitate a better understanding of the contribution of entropy to protein allostery and function.

  2. A pathway containing the Ipl1/Aurora protein kinase and the spindle midzone protein Ase1 regulates yeast spindle assembly

    Kotwaliwale, Chitra V.; Frei, Stéphanie Buvelot; Stern, Bodo M.; Biggins, Sue

    2007-01-01

    It is critical to elucidate the pathways that mediate spindle assembly and therefore ensure accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. Our studies of a unique allele of the budding yeast Ipl1/Aurora protein kinase revealed that it is required for centrosome-mediated spindle assembly in the absence of the BimC motor protein Cin8. In addition, we found that the Ase1 spindle midzone-associated protein is required for bipolar spindle assembly. The cin8 ipl1 and cin8 ase1 double mutant ...

  3. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G. (Sanofi); (Michigan)

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  4. Protein kinase inhibitors CK59 and CID755673 alter primary human NK cell effector functions

    Maxi eScheiter

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are part of the innate immune response and play a crucial role in the defense against tumors and virus-infected cells. Their effector functions include the specific killing of target cells, as well as the modulation of other immune cells by cytokine release. Kinases constitute a relevant part in signaling, are prime targets in drug research and the protein kinase inhibitor Dasatinib is already used for immune-modulatory theraphies. In this study, we have tested the effects of the kinase inhibitors CK59 and CID755673. These inhibitors are directed against CaMKII (CK59 and PKD family kinases (CID755673 that were previously suggested as novel components of NK activation pathways. Here, we use a multi-parameter, FACS-based assay to validate the influence of CK59 and CID755673 on the effector functions of primary NK cells. Dose dependent treatment with CK59 and CID755673 indeed results in a significant reduction of NK cell degranulation markers and cytokine release in freshly isolated PBMC populations from healthy blood donors. These results underline the importance of CaMKII for NK cell signaling and suggest PKD2 as a novel signaling component in NK cell activation. Notably, kinase inhibition studies on pure NK cell populations indicate significant donor variations.

  5. Evidence for the importance of hydrophobic residues in the interactions between the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and the protein kinase inhibitors.

    Baude, E J; Dignam, S S; Reimann, E M; Uhler, M D

    1994-07-01

    The protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) are potent inhibitors of the catalytic (C) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, the interaction between Phe10 of PKI and the C subunit residues Tyr235 and Phe239 was investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Previous peptide studies as well as the crystal structure suggested that these residues may play a key role in C-PKI binding. The C subunit codons for Tyr235 and Phe239 were changed singly and in combination to serine codons. The mutated C alpha proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified C alpha Y235S, C alpha F239S, and C alpha Y235S/F239S proteins did not exhibit any differences in their Km(app) for the peptide substrate Kemptide (Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly) or Vmax(app), with respect to wild-type C alpha. All of the C subunit mutants displayed less than 2-fold changes in their Km(app) for ATP. The PKI alpha isoform displayed increased IC50 values for C alpha Y235S (71-fold), C alpha F239S (150-fold), and C alpha Y235S/F239S (1800-fold). Similarly, the PKI beta 1 protein showed increased IC50 values against the C alpha Y235S, C alpha F239S, and C alpha Y235S/F239S proteins, 9.4-, 11-, and 44-fold, respectively. In addition, the PKI alpha F10 codon was altered to an alanine codon, and this mutation decreased its ability to inhibit C alpha kinase activity, but did not affect its ability to inhibit C alpha Y235S/F239S. The mutation of Tyr235 and Phe239 to serines, however, did not alter the ability of the type II R subunit to inhibit phosphotransferase activity. These results suggest that C alpha Y235 and C alpha F239 are important for specific inhibition by both PKI alpha and PKI beta but not the type II R subunit and that mutations at these residues would be useful for in vivo analysis of C-PKI interactions. PMID:8027074

  6. Signal transduction in neurons: effects of cellular prion protein on fyn kinase and ERK1/2 kinase

    Tomasi Vittorio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that cellular prion protein (PrPc co-localizes with caveolin-1 and participates to signal transduction events by recruiting Fyn kinase. As PrPc is a secreted protein anchored to the outer surface membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor (secPrP and caveolin-1 is located in the inner leaflet of plasma membrane, there is a problem of how the two proteins can physically interact each other and transduce signals. Results By using the GST-fusion proteins system we observed that PrPc strongly interacts with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain and with a caveolin-1 hydrophilic C-terminal region, but not with the caveolin-1 N-terminal region. In vitro binding experiments were also performed to define the site(s of PrPc interacting with cav-1. The results are consistent with a participation of PrPc octapeptide repeats motif in the binding to caveolin-1 scaffolding domain. The caveolar localization of PrPc was ascertained by co-immunoprecipitation, by co-localization after flotation in density gradients and by confocal microscopy analysis of PrPc and caveolin-1 distributions in a neuronal cell line (GN11 expressing caveolin-1 at high levels. Conclusions We observed that, after antibody-mediated cross-linking or copper treatment, PrPc was internalized probably into caveolae. We propose that following translocation from rafts to caveolae or caveolae-like domains, secPrP could interact with caveolin-1 and induce signal transduction events.

  7. Yeast Ste2 receptors as tools for study of mammalian protein kinases and adaptors involved in receptor trafficking

    2006-01-01

    Background Mammalian receptors that couple to effectors via heterotrimeric G proteins (e.g., beta 2-adrenergic receptors) and receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (e.g., insulin and IGF-I receptors) constitute the proximal points of two dominant cell signaling pathways. Receptors coupled to G proteins can be substrates for tyrosine kinases, integrating signals from both pathways. Yeast cells, in contrast, display G protein-coupled receptors (e.g., alpha-factor pheromone receptor ...

  8. Adiponectin Stimulates Angiogenesis by Promoting Cross-talk between AMP-activated Protein Kinase and Akt Signaling in Endothelial Cells*

    Ouchi, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Hideki; Kihara, Shinji; Kumada, Masahiro; Sato, Kaori; Inoue, Tatsuya; Funahashi, Tohru; Walsh, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-specific adipocytokine with anti-atherogenic and anti-diabetic properties. Here, we investigated whether adiponectin regulates angiogenic processes in vitro and in vivo. Adiponectin stimulated the differentiation of human umbilical vein endothelium cells (HUVECs) into capillary-like structures in vitro and functioned as a chemoattractant in migration assays. Adiponectin promoted the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), protein kinase Akt/protein ...

  9. Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates S6 phosphorylation and induced activation of S6 protein kinase in rat pancreatic acini

    Sung, C.; Okabayashi, Y.; Williams, J.

    1987-05-01

    CCK and insulin stimulate pancreatic protein synthesis at a post transcriptional step. To better understand this regulation the authors evaluated the phosphorylation state of ribosomal protein S6 and the presence of a specific S6 protein kinase in pancreatic acini from diabetic rats. Both CCK and insulin increased S6 phosphorylation by up to 400% in intact TSP-labelled acini. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate also stimulated both protein synthesis and S6 phosphorlyation suggesting a role for protein kinase C in mediating the effect of CCK. By contrast, the CaS ionophore ionomycin had no effect on either parameter. Recently, insulin has been shown to activate a unique S6 kinase in various cells. To test for its presence, cytosolic extracts were prepared from acini stimulated with CCK and insulin by homogenization in US -glycerophosphate buffer and assayed for the kinase using el-TSP ATP and rat pancreatic ribosomes followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CCK and insulin both increased S6 kinase activity which required neither CaS or phospholipid. The dose response for CCk was similar to S6 phosphorlyation in the intact acini. TPA did not stimulate the S6 kinase. Thus, CCK may induce S6 phosphorylation both via C kinase and by activation of a unique S6 kinase.

  10. Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates S6 phosphorylation and induced activation of S6 protein kinase in rat pancreatic acini

    CCK and insulin stimulate pancreatic protein synthesis at a post transcriptional step. To better understand this regulation the authors evaluated the phosphorylation state of ribosomal protein S6 and the presence of a specific S6 protein kinase in pancreatic acini from diabetic rats. Both CCK and insulin increased S6 phosphorylation by up to 400% in intact 32P-labelled acini. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate also stimulated both protein synthesis and S6 phosphorlyation suggesting a role for protein kinase C in mediating the effect of CCK. By contrast, the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin had no effect on either parameter. Recently, insulin has been shown to activate a unique S6 kinase in various cells. To test for its presence, cytosolic extracts were prepared from acini stimulated with CCK and insulin by homogenization in β-glycerophosphate buffer and assayed for the kinase using γ-32P ATP and rat pancreatic ribosomes followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CCK and insulin both increased S6 kinase activity which required neither Ca2+ or phospholipid. The dose response for CCk was similar to S6 phosphorlyation in the intact acini. TPA did not stimulate the S6 kinase. Thus, CCK may induce S6 phosphorylation both via C kinase and by activation of a unique S6 kinase

  11. Impaired spine formation and learning in GPCR kinase interacting protein-1 (GIT1) knockout mice

    Menon, Prashanthi; Deane, Rashid; Sagare, Abhay; Lane, Steven M.; Zarcone, Troy J; O’Dell, Michael R.; Yan, Chen; Zlokovic, Berislav V.; Berk, Bradford C.

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-kinase interacting proteins 1 and 2 (GIT1 and GIT2) are scaffold proteins with ADP-ribosylating factor GTPase activity. GIT1 and GIT2 control numerous cellular functions and are highly expressed in neurons, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). GIT1 promotes dendritic spine formation, growth and motility in cultured neurons, but its role in brain in vivo is unknown. By using global GIT1 knockout mice (GIT1 KO), we show that deletion o...

  12. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    Hjerrild, M.; Stensballe, A.; Rasmussen, T.E.; Kofoed, C.B.; Blom, Nikolaj; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Larsen, M.R.; Brunak, Søren; Jensen, O.N.; Gammeltoft, S.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...... kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites. The neural network was trained with a positive set of 258 experimentally verified PKA phosphorylation sites. The predictions by NetPhosK were! validated using four novel PKA substrates: Necdin, RFX5, En-2, and Wee 1. The four proteins were phosphorylated by PKA in...

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase expression in skeletal muscle

    Brandauer, Josef; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Andersen, Marianne Agerholm;

    2013-01-01

    -activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases sirtuin activity by elevating NAD levels. As NAM directly inhibits sirtuins, increased Nampt activation or expression could be a metabolic stress response. Evidence suggests that AMPK regulates Nampt mRNA content, but whether repeated AMPK activation is necessary for...... increasing Nampt protein levels is unknown. To this end, we assessed whether exercise training- or 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR)-mediated increases in skeletal muscle Nampt abundance are AMPK dependant. One-legged knee-extensor exercise training in humans increased Nampt protein...

  14. Phosphorylation of Zona Occludens-2 by Protein Kinase Cε Regulates Its Nuclear Exportation

    Chamorro, David; Alarcón, Lourdes; Ponce, Arturo; Tapia, Rocio; González-Aguilar, Héctor; Robles-Flores, Martha; Mejía-Castillo, Teresa; Segovia, José; Bandala, Yamir; Juaristi, Eusebio; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2009-01-01

    Here, we have analyzed the subcellular destiny of newly synthesized tight junction protein zona occludens (ZO)-2. After transfection in sparse cells, 74% of cells exhibit ZO-2 at the nucleus, and after 18 h the value decreases to 17%. The mutation S369A located within the nuclear exportation signal 1 of ZO-2 impairs the nuclear export of the protein. Because Ser369 represents a putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation site, we tested the effect of PKC inhibition and stimulation on the ...

  15. The isothiocyanate class of bioactive nutrients covalently inhibit the MEKK1 protein kinase

    Dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs) are electrophilic compounds that have diverse biological activities including induction of apoptosis and effects on cell cycle. They protect against experimental carcinogenesis in animals, an activity believed to result from the transcriptional induction of 'Phase 2' enzymes. The molecular mechanism of action of ITCs is unknown. Since ITCs are electrophiles capable of reacting with sulfhydryl groups on amino acids, we hypothesized that ITCs induce their biological effects through covalent modification of proteins, leading to changes in cell regulatory events. We previously demonstrated that stress-signaling kinase pathways are inhibited by other electrophilic compounds such as menadione. We therefore tested the effects of nutritional ITCs on MEKK1, an upstream regulator of the SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway. The activity of MEKK1 expressed in cells was monitored using in vitro kinase assays to measure changes in catalytic activity. The activity of endogenous MEKK1, immunopurified from ITC treated and untreated LnCAP cells was also measured by in vitro kinase assay. A novel labeling and affinity reagent for detection of protein modification by ITCs was synthesized and used in competition assays to monitor direct modification of MEKK1 by ITC. Finally, immunoblots with phospho-specific antibodies were used to measure the activity of MAPK protein kinases. ITCs inhibited the MEKK1 protein kinase in a manner dependent on a specific cysteine residue in the ATP binding pocket. Inhibition of MEKK1 catalytic activity was due to direct, covalent and irreversible modification of the MEKK1 protein itself. In addition, ITCs inhibited the catalytic activity of endogenous MEKK1. This correlated with inhibition of the downstream target of MEKK1 activity, i.e. the SAPK/JNK kinase. This inhibition was specific to SAPK, as parallel MAPK pathways were unaffected. These results demonstrate that MEKK1 is directly modified and inhibited by

  16. The isothiocyanate class of bioactive nutrients covalently inhibit the MEKK1 protein kinase

    Macdonald Timothy L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs are electrophilic compounds that have diverse biological activities including induction of apoptosis and effects on cell cycle. They protect against experimental carcinogenesis in animals, an activity believed to result from the transcriptional induction of "Phase 2" enzymes. The molecular mechanism of action of ITCs is unknown. Since ITCs are electrophiles capable of reacting with sulfhydryl groups on amino acids, we hypothesized that ITCs induce their biological effects through covalent modification of proteins, leading to changes in cell regulatory events. We previously demonstrated that stress-signaling kinase pathways are inhibited by other electrophilic compounds such as menadione. We therefore tested the effects of nutritional ITCs on MEKK1, an upstream regulator of the SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway. Methods The activity of MEKK1 expressed in cells was monitored using in vitro kinase assays to measure changes in catalytic activity. The activity of endogenous MEKK1, immunopurified from ITC treated and untreated LnCAP cells was also measured by in vitro kinase assay. A novel labeling and affinity reagent for detection of protein modification by ITCs was synthesized and used in competition assays to monitor direct modification of MEKK1 by ITC. Finally, immunoblots with phospho-specific antibodies were used to measure the activity of MAPK protein kinases. Results ITCs inhibited the MEKK1 protein kinase in a manner dependent on a specific cysteine residue in the ATP binding pocket. Inhibition of MEKK1 catalytic activity was due to direct, covalent and irreversible modification of the MEKK1 protein itself. In addition, ITCs inhibited the catalytic activity of endogenous MEKK1. This correlated with inhibition of the downstream target of MEKK1 activity, i.e. the SAPK/JNK kinase. This inhibition was specific to SAPK, as parallel MAPK pathways were unaffected. Conclusion These results

  17. Ku autoantigen is the regulatory component of a template-associated protein kinase that phosphorylates RNA polymerase II.

    Dvir, A; Peterson, S R; Knuth, M W; Lu, H.; Dynan, W S

    1992-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II contains a tandemly repeated heptapeptide sequence. Previous work has shown that this sequence is phosphorylated at multiple sites by a template-associated protein kinase, in a reaction that is closely associated with the initiation of RNA synthesis. We have purified this kinase to apparent homogeneity from human (HeLa) cells. The purified kinase phosphorylates native RNA polymerase II only in the presence of DNA and the general transcription ...

  18. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways.

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  19. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK21 Functions in Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Sandra Franz; Britta Ehlert; Anja Liese; Joachim Kurth; Anne-Claire Cazalé; Tina Romeis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases(CDPKs)comprise a family of plant serine/threonine protein kinases in which the calcium sensing domain and the kinase effector domain are combined within one molecule.So far,a biological function in abiotic stress signaling has only been reported for few CDPK isoforms,whereas the underlying biochemical mechanism for these CDPKs is still mainly unknown.Here,we show that CPK21 from Arabidopsis thaliana is biochemically activated in vivo in response to hyperosmotic stress.Loss-of-function seedlings of cpk21 are more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress and mutant plants show increased stress responses with respect to marker gene expression and metabolite accumulation.In transgenic Arabidopsis complementation lines in the cpk21 mutant background,in which either CPK21 wildtype,or a full-length enzyme variant carrying an amino-acid substitution were stably expressed,stress responsitivity was restored by CPK21 but not with the kinase inactive variant.The biochemical characterization of in planta synthesized and purified CPK21 protein revealed that within the calcium-binding domain,N-terminal EF1- and EF2-motifs compared to C-terminal EF3- and EF4-motifs differ in their contribution to calcium-regulated kinase activity,suggesting a crucial role for the N-terminal EF-hand pair.Our data provide evidence for CPK21 contributing in abiotic stress signaling and suggest that the N-terminal EF-hand pair is a calcium-sensing determinant controlling specificity of CPK21 function.

  20. Cordycepin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via interaction with the γ1 subunit

    Wu, Chongming; Guo, Yanshen; Su, Yan; Zhang, Xue; Luan, Hong; Zhang, Xiaopo; Zhu, Huixin; He, Huixia; Wang, Xiaoliang; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Guo, Peng; Zhu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Cordycepin is a bioactive component of the fungus Cordyceps militaris. Previously, we showed that cordycepin can alleviate hyperlipidemia through enhancing the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but the mechanism of this stimulation is unknown. Here, we investigated the potential mechanisms of cordycepin-induced AMPK activation in HepG2 cells. Treatment with cordycepin largely reduced oleic acid (OA)-elicited intracellular lipid accumulation and increased AMPK activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cordycepin-induced AMPK activation was not accompanied by changes in either the intracellular levels of AMP or the AMP/ATP ratio, nor was it influenced by calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibition; however, this activation was significantly suppressed by liver kinase B1 (LKB1) knockdown. Molecular docking, fluorescent and circular dichroism measurements showed that cordycepin interacted with the γ1 subunit of AMPK. Knockdown of AMPKγ1 by siRNA substantially abolished the effects of cordycepin on AMPK activation and lipid regulation. The modulating effects of cordycepin on the mRNA levels of key lipid regulatory genes were also largely reversed when AMPKγ1 expression was inhibited. Together, these data suggest that cordycepin may inhibit intracellular lipid accumulation through activation of AMPK via interaction with the γ1 subunit. PMID:24286368

  1. Impact of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases on the Regulation of Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    Pompeo, Frédérique; Foulquier, Elodie; Galinier, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess many kinases that catalyze phosphorylation of proteins on diverse amino acids including arginine, cysteine, histidine, aspartate, serine, threonine, and tyrosine. These protein kinases regulate different physiological processes in response to environmental modifications. For example, in response to nutritional stresses, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can differentiate into an endospore; the initiation of sporulation is controlled by the master regulator Spo0A, which is activated by phosphorylation. Spo0A phosphorylation is carried out by a multi-component phosphorelay system. These phosphorylation events on histidine and aspartate residues are labile, highly dynamic and permit a temporal control of the sporulation initiation decision. More recently, another kind of phosphorylation, more stable yet still dynamic, on serine or threonine residues, was proposed to play a role in spore maintenance and spore revival. Kinases that perform these phosphorylation events mainly belong to the Hanks family and could regulate spore dormancy and spore germination. The aim of this mini review is to focus on the regulation of sporulation in B. subtilis by these serine and threonine phosphorylation events and the kinases catalyzing them. PMID:27148245

  2. Inhibitory effects of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 on the aorta-gonad-mapharsen hematopoiesis

    Definitive hematopoiesis starts in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mouse embryo. Our previous studies revealed that STAT3, a gp130 downstream transcription factor, is required for AGM hematopoiesis and that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) phosphorylates serine-727 of STAT3. HIPK2 is a serine/threonine kinase known to be involved in transcriptional repression and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the role of HIPK2 in hematopoiesis in mouse embryo. HIPK2 transcripts were found in fetal hematopoietic tissues such as the mouse AGM region and fetal liver. In cultured AGM cells, HIPK2 protein was detected in adherent cells. Functional analyses of HIPK2 were carried out by introducing wild-type and mutant HIPK2 constructs into AGM cultures. Production of CD45+ hematopoietic cells was suppressed by forced expression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures. This suppression required the kinase domain and nuclear localization signals of HIPK2, but the kinase activity was dispensable. HIPK2-overexpressing AGM-derived nonadherent cells did not form cobblestone-like colonies in cultures with stromal cells. Furthermore, overexpression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures impeded the expansion of CD45lowc-Kit+ cells, which exhibit the immature hematopoietic progenitor phenotype. These data indicate that HIPK2 plays a negative regulatory role in AGM hematopoiesis in the mouse embryo

  3. Resorufin: a lead for a new protein kinase CK2 inhibitor

    Sandholt, Iben Skjøth; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Guerra, Barbara;

    2009-01-01

    Screening a natural compound library led to the identification of resorufin as a highly selective and potent inhibitor of protein kinase CK2. Out of 52 kinases tested, only CK2 was inhibited, in contrast to emodin, a structurally related, known CK2 inhibitor that, in addition to CK2, inhibited ten...... within 24 h. Endogenous protein kinase CK2 was inhibited by resorufin by ca. 80% in the three prostate cell lines. In the case of the HCT116 cells, the inhibition was only 40% supporting the notion of cell line-specific selectivity. Moreover, we analysed the effect of resorufin and emodin on selected...... other kinases by 90%. The IC50 values determined for the CK2 holoenzymes were 1.5 mol/l and for the free catalytic subunits ca. 4 mol/l. Altogether four cell lines were subjected to resorufin and emodin treatment. In the case of the three prostate carcinoma cell lines (PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP), 24 h...

  4. Sensory Protein Kinase Signaling in Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae: Host Location and Invasion.

    Ressurreição, Margarida; Kirk, Ruth S; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Page, Nigel M; Walker, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    Schistosoma mansoni cercariae display specific behavioral responses to abiotic/biotic stimuli enabling them to locate and infect the definitive human host. Here we report the effect of such stimulants on signaling pathways of cercariae in relation to host finding and invasion. Cercariae exposed to various light/temperature regimens displayed modulated protein kinase C (PKC), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activities, with distinct responses at 37 °C and intense light/dark, when compared to 24 °C under normal light. Kinase activities were localized to regions including the oral sensory papillae, acetabular ducts, tegument, acetabular glands, and nervous system. Furthermore, linoleic acid modulated PKC and ERK activities concurrent with the temporal release of acetabular gland components. Attenuation of PKC, ERK, and p38 MAPK activities significantly reduced gland component release, particularly in response to linoleic acid, demonstrating the importance of these signaling pathways to host penetration mechanisms. PMID:26401028

  5. Protein kinase Cη activates NF-κB in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    Highlights: → Protein kinase C-eta (PKCη) is an upstream regulator of the NF-κB signaling pathway. → PKCη activates NF-κB in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. → PKCη regulates NF-κB by activating IκB kinase (IKK) and inducing IκB degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-κB in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-κB regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKCη) regulates NF-κB upstream signaling by activating the IκB kinase (IKK) and the degradation of IκB. Furthermore, PKCη enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-κB under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKCη confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKCη is involved in NF-κB signaling leading to drug resistance.

  6. The Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

    Bergamin, E.; Hallock, P; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2010-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7 (or Dok-7), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adaptor proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK, but also an activator of MuSK's kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7-binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  7. Neuronal phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Paquet, Claire

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and their relationship to accumulated prion protein (PrP) are unclear. A recent cell culture study showed that intracytoplasmic PrP may induce phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR(p))-mediated cell stress. The double-stranded RNA protein kinase PKR is a proapoptotic and stress kinase that accumulates in degenerating neurons in Alzheimer disease. To determine whether neuronal apoptosis in human CJD is associated with activation of the PKR(p) signaling pathway, we assessed in situ end labeling and immunocytochemistry for PrP, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD68, activated caspase 3, and phosphorylated PKR (Thr451) in samples of frontal, occipital, and temporal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum from 6 patients with sporadic CJD and 5 controls. Neuronal immunostaining for activated PKR was found in all CJD cases. The most staining was in nuclei and, in contrast to findings in Alzheimer disease, cytoplasmic labeling was not detected. Both the number and distribution of PKR(p)-positive neurons correlated closely with the extent of neuronal apoptosis, spongiosis, astrocytosis, and microglial activation and with the phenotype and disease severity. There was no correlation with the type, topography, or amount of extracellular PrP deposits. These findings suggest that neuronal apoptosis in human CJD may result from PKR(p)-mediated cell stress and are consistent with recent studies supporting a pathogenic role for intracellular or transmembrane PrP.

  8. Mitochondrial ADCK3 employs an atypical protein kinase-like fold to enable coenzyme Q biosynthesis

    Stefely, Jonathan A.; Reidenbach, Andrew G.; Ulbrich, Arne; Oruganty, Krishnadev; Floyd, Brendan J.; Jochem, Adam; Saunders, Jaclyn M.; Johnson, Isabel E.; Minogue, Catherine E.; Wrobel, Russell L.; Barber, Grant E.; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Kannan, Natarajan; Coon, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Pagliarini, David J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ancient UbiB protein kinase-like family is involved in isoprenoid lipid biosynthesis and is implicated in human diseases, but demonstration of UbiB kinase activity has remained elusive for unknown reasons. Here, we quantitatively define UbiB-specific sequence motifs and reveal their positions within the crystal structure of a UbiB protein, ADCK3. We find that multiple UbiB-specific features are poised to inhibit protein kinase activity, including an N-terminal domain that occupies the typical substrate binding pocket and a unique A-rich loop that limits ATP binding by establishing an unusual selectivity for ADP. A single alanine-to-glycine mutation of this loop flips this coenzyme selectivity and enables autophosphorylation, but inhibits coenzyme Q biosynthesis in vivo, demonstrating functional relevance for this unique feature. Our work provides mechanistic insight into UbiB enzyme activity and establishes a molecular foundation for further investigation of how UbiB family proteins affect diseases and diverse biological pathways. PMID:25498144

  9. Serum Albumin Stimulates Protein Kinase G-dependent Microneme Secretion in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Brown, Kevin M; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L David

    2016-04-29

    Microneme secretion is essential for motility, invasion, and egress in apicomplexan parasites. Although previous studies indicate that Ca(2+) and cGMP control microneme secretion, little is known about how these pathways are naturally activated. Here we have developed genetically encoded indicators for Ca(2+) and microneme secretion to better define the signaling pathways that regulate these processes in Toxoplasma gondii We found that microneme secretion was triggered in vitro by exposure to a single host protein, serum albumin. The natural agonist serum albumin induced microneme secretion in a protein kinase G-dependent manner that correlated with increased cGMP levels. Surprisingly, serum albumin acted independently of elevated Ca(2+) and yet it was augmented by artificial agonists that raise Ca(2+), such as ethanol. Furthermore, although ethanol elevated intracellular Ca(2+), it alone was unable to trigger secretion without the presence of serum or serum albumin. This dichotomy was recapitulated by zaprinast, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor that elevated cGMP and separately increased Ca(2+) in a protein kinase G-independent manner leading to microneme secretion. Taken together, these findings reveal that microneme secretion is centrally controlled by protein kinase G and that this pathway is further augmented by elevation of intracellular Ca(2.) PMID:26933037

  10. wKinMut-2: Identification and Interpretation of Pathogenic Variants in Human Protein Kinases.

    Vazquez, Miguel; Pons, Tirso; Brunak, Søren; Valencia, Alfonso; Izarzugaza, Jose M G

    2016-01-01

    Most genomic alterations are tolerated while only a minor fraction disrupts molecular function sufficiently to drive disease. Protein kinases play a central biological function and the functional consequences of their variants are abundantly characterized. However, this heterogeneous information is often scattered across different sources, which makes the integrative analysis complex and laborious. wKinMut-2 constitutes a solution to facilitate the interpretation of the consequences of human protein kinase variation. Nine methods predict their pathogenicity, including a kinase-specific random forest approach. To understand the biological mechanisms causative of human diseases and cancer, information from pertinent reference knowledge bases and the literature is automatically mined, digested, and homogenized. Variants are visualized in their structural contexts and residues affecting catalytic and drug binding are identified. Known protein-protein interactions are reported. Altogether, this information is intended to assist the generation of new working hypothesis to be corroborated with ulterior experimental work. The wKinMut-2 system, along with a user manual and examples, is freely accessible at http://kinmut2.bioinfo.cnio.es, the code for local installations can be downloaded from https://github.com/Rbbt-Workflows/KinMut2. PMID:26443060

  11. dsRNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR and its Role in Stress, Signaling and HCV Infection

    Eliane F. Meurs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR plays multiple roles in cells, in response to different stress situations. As a member of the interferon (IFN‑Stimulated Genes, PKR was initially recognized as an actor in the antiviral action of IFN, due to its ability to control translation, through phosphorylation, of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2a. As such, PKR participates in the generation of stress granules, or autophagy and a number of viruses have designed strategies to inhibit its action. However, PKR deficient mice resist most viral infections, indicating that PKR may play other roles in the cell other than just acting as an antiviral agent. Indeed, PKR regulates several signaling pathways, either as an adapter protein and/or using its kinase activity. Here we review the role of PKR as an eIF2a kinase, its participation in the regulation of the NF-kB, p38MAPK and insulin pathways, and we focus on its role during infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV. PKR binds the HCV IRES RNA, cooperates with some functions of the HCV core protein and may represent a target for NS5A or E2. Novel data points out for a role of PKR as a pro-HCV agent, both as an adapter protein and as an eIF2a-kinase, and in cooperation with the di-ubiquitin-like protein ISG15. Developing pharmaceutical inhibitors of PKR may help in resolving some viral infections as well as stress-related damages.

  12. Interplay between Ku, Artemis, and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit at DNA ends.

    Drouet, Jérôme; Frit, Philippe; Delteil, Christine; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2006-09-22

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway in mammals requires at least seven proteins involved in a simplified two-step process: (i) recognition and synapsis of the DNA ends dependent on the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) formed by the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs in association with Artemis; (ii) ligation dependent on the DNA ligase IV.XRCC4.Cernunnos-XLF complex. The Artemis protein exhibits exonuclease and endonuclease activities that are believed to be involved in the processing of a subclass of DSB. Here, we have analyzed the interactions of Artemis and nonhomologous end-joining pathway proteins both in a context of human nuclear cell extracts and in cells. DSB-inducing agents specifically elicit the mobilization of Artemis to damaged chromatin together with DNA-PK and XRCC4/ligase IV proteins. DNA-PKcs is necessary for the loading of Artemis on damaged DNA and is the main kinase that phosphorylates Artemis in cells damaged with highly efficient DSB producers. Under kinase-preventive conditions, both in vitro and in cells, Ku-mediated assembly of DNA-PK on DNA ends is responsible for a dissociation of the DNA-PKcs. Artemis complex. Conversely, DNA-PKcs kinase activity prevents Artemis dissociation from the DNA-PK.DNA complex. Altogether, our data allow us to propose a model in which a DNA-PKcs-mediated phosphorylation is necessary both to activate Artemis endonuclease activity and to maintain its association with the DNA end site. This tight functional coupling between the activation of both DNA-PKcs and Artemis may avoid improper processing of DNA. PMID:16857680

  13. Phosphorylation of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 by checkpoint kinase Chk1: identification of the in vitro CK2beta phosphorylation site

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Højrup, Peter; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Guerra, Barbara

    The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 mediates the formation of the CK2 tetrameric form and it has functions independent of CK2 catalytic subunit through interaction with several intracellular proteins. Recently, we have shown that CK2beta associates with the human checkpoint kinase Chk......1. In this study, we show that Chk1 specifically phosphorylates in vitro the regulatory beta-subunit of CK2. Chymotryptic peptides and mutational analyses have revealed that CK2beta is phosphorylated at Thr213. Formation of a stable complex between CK2beta and Chk1 is not affected by the...

  14. Bile acids modulate the Golgi membrane fission process via a protein kinase Ceta and protein kinase D-dependent pathway in colonic epithelial cells.

    Byrne, Anne-Marie; Foran, Eilis; Sharma, Ruchika; Davies, Anthony; Mahon, Ciara; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid; Kelleher, Dermot; Long, Aideen

    2010-04-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a secondary bile acid that modulates signalling pathways in epithelial cells. DCA has been implicated in pathogenesis of colon carcinoma, particularly by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a tertiary bile acid, has been observed to have chemopreventive effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DCA and UDCA on the subcellular localization and activity of PKCeta and its downstream effects on Golgi structure in a colon cancer cell model. PKCeta expression was localized to the Golgi in HCT116 colon cancer cells. DCA induced fragmentation of the Golgi in these cells following activation of PKCeta and its downstream effector protein kinase D (PKD). Pretreatment of cells with UDCA or a glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, inhibited DCA-induced PKCeta/PKD activation and Golgi fragmentation. Knockdown of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression using small interfering RNA or inhibition using the GR antagonist mifepristone attenuated the inhibitory effect of UDCA on Golgi fragmentation. Elevated serum and faecal levels of DCA have been previously reported in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and colon cancer. Analysis of Golgi architecture in vivo using tissue microarrays revealed Golgi fragmentation in UC and colorectal cancer tissue. We have demonstrated that DCA can disrupt the structure of the Golgi, an organelle critical for normal cell function. Inhibition of this DCA-induced Golgi fragmentation by UDCA was mediated via the GR. This represents a potential mechanism of observed chemopreventive effects of UDCA in benign and malignant disease of the colon. PMID:20093383

  15. Rapid activation of the T-cell tyrosine protein kinase pp56lck by the CD45 phosphotyrosine phosphatase.

    Mustelin, T; Coggeshall, K M; Altman, A

    1989-01-01

    T lymphocytes express a tyrosine protein kinase (TPK; protein-tyrosine kinase; ATP:protein-tyrosine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.112), pp56lck that is encoded by the lck protooncogene. This TPK was recently found to be associated with the intracellular domain of the T-cell surface glycoproteins, CD4 and CD8, suggesting that it plays an important role in T-cell development and activation. We have studied the regulation of pp56lck and found that this kinase can be rapidly activated by an endo...

  16. Jiawei Wendan decoction affects mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in the hippocampus of depression rats

    Liping Zhang; Man Zhang; Li Wu; Meng Xia; Guangbin Li

    2011-01-01

    A previous study from our group showed that Jiawei Wendan decoction inhibits protein expression of interleukin-1β, 2, and 6, as well as plasma neuropeptide Y, P substance and somatostatin in the hippocampus of depression rat models. The present study analyzed the influence of Jiawei Wendan decoction on the mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway in the hippocampus. Results demonstrated that Jiawei Wendan decoction effectively upregulated expression of small molecular G proteins, extracellular regulated kinase 1/2, and activated ribosomal S6 kinase protein in the rat hippocampus. In addition, Jiawei Wendan decoction exhibits antidepressant effects similar to fluoxetine. The underlying mechanisms were shown to be dependent on increased mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway activity.

  17. The catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 structurally deviates from its maize homologue in complex with the nucleotide competitive inhibitor emodin

    Raaf, Jennifer; Klopffleisch, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg;

    2008-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (former name: casein kinase 2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha) attached to a dimer of noncatalytic subunits. Together with the cyclin-dependent kinases and the mitogen-activated protein kinases, CK2alpha belongs to the CMGC family of...

  18. Crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays at 2.1 A resolution

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Pinna, L A;

    1998-01-01

    CK2alpha is the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2, an acidophilic and constitutively active eukaryotic Ser/Thr kinase involved in cell proliferation. A crystal structure, at 2.1 A resolution, of recombinant maize CK2alpha (rmCK2alpha) in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, shows the enzyme in an ...

  19. Crystal structure of human protein kinase CK2: insights into basic properties of the CK2 holoenzyme

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I; Issinger, O G

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalyt...

  20. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway: Role in Immune Evasion by Trypanosomatids.

    Soares-Silva, Mercedes; Diniz, Flavia F; Gomes, Gabriela N; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are the causative agents of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, two neglected tropical diseases that affect about 25 million people worldwide. These parasites belong to the family Trypanosomatidae, and are both obligate intracellular parasites that manipulate host signaling pathways and the innate immune system to establish infection. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are serine and threonine protein kinases that are highly conserved in eukaryotes, and are involved in signal transduction pathways that modulate physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. This mini-review highlights existing knowledge concerning the mechanisms that Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have evolved to target the host's MAPK signaling pathways and highjack the immune response, and, in this manner, promote parasite maintenance in the host. PMID:26941717

  1. EFFECT OF PHORBOL ESTER ON cAMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE ACTIVITY IN CARDIOMYOCYTES

    周文华; 肖殿模; 郑超强; 王小鲁; 张俊保

    1995-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal rats were treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate(PMA) ranging from 10-11 to 10-7mol/L for 20 min,causing cytosol protein kinase A (PKA) activity to decrease while particulate PKA activity increase in a concentration-dependent manner.The change of PKA activity induced by PMA was abolished completely by pretreatment of polymyxin B or depletion of protein kinase C (PKC).Type Ⅱ PKA activity in particulate fraction was enhanced remarkably,while that of type I PKA was not altered when the cells were treated with 100 nmol/L PMA.The results suggested that subcellular distribution and activity of PKA in cardiomyocytes may be regulated by PKC.

  2. Syndecan-4 proteoglycan regulates the distribution and activity of protein kinase C

    Oh, E S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    During cell-matrix adhesion, both tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases are activated. Integrin ligation correlates with tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas the later stages of spreading and focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in primary fibroblasts requires interactions of cell surface...... proteoglycan with heparin-binding moieties. This correlates with protein kinase C (PKC) activation, and PKCalpha can become localized to focal adhesions in normal, but not transformed, cells. PKC activation has been thought to be downstream of initial receptor-ligand interactions. We now show, however, that...... syndecan-4 transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan and PKC co-immunoprecipitate and co-patch in vivo. The core protein of syndecan-4 can directly bind the catalytic domain of PKCalpha and potentiate its activation by phospholipid mediators. It can also directly activate PKCalpha in the absence of other...

  3. Activation of resting human T cells requires prolonged stimulation of protein kinase C

    Berry, N.; Ase, K.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishizuka, Y. (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Purified resting human T cells can be induced to express the {alpha} subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and to proliferate by treatment with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin but not with 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin. Determination of the translocation of protein kinase C showed that 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin caused a prolonged membrane association of the enzyme for more than 4 hr, whereas 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin induced a transient membrane association, which was maximal at 20 min. Delivery of multiple additions of 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin to the T cells resulted in progressively increased expression of the {alpha} subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and proliferation commensurate with the number of multiple additions delivered, suggesting that prolonged protein kinase C activity is required for T-cell activation.

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase-like function is shared by the beta- and gamma- subset of the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases.

    Chad V Kuny

    Full Text Available The UL97 protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, or HHV-5 (human herpesvirus 5, is a kinase that phosphorylates the cellular retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor and lamin A/C proteins that are also substrates of cellular cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks. A functional complementation assay has further shown that UL97 has authentic Cdk-like activity. The other seven human herpesviruses each encode a kinase with sequence and positional homology to UL97. These UL97-homologous proteins have been termed the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases (CHPKs to distinguish them from other human herpesvirus-encoded kinases. To determine if the Cdk-like activities of UL97 were shared by all of the CHPKs, we individually expressed epitope-tagged alleles of each protein in human Saos-2 cells to test for Rb phosphorylation, human U-2 OS cells to monitor nuclear lamina disruption and lamin A phosphorylation, or S. cerevisiae cdc28-13 mutant cells to directly assay for Cdk function. We found that the ability to phosphorylate Rb and lamin A, and to disrupt the nuclear lamina, was shared by all CHPKs from the beta- and gamma-herpesvirus families, but not by their alpha-herpesvirus homologs. Similarly, all but one of the beta and gamma CHPKs displayed bona fide Cdk activity in S. cerevisiae, while the alpha proteins did not. Thus, we have identified novel virally-encoded Cdk-like kinases, a nomenclature we abbreviate as v-Cdks. Interestingly, we found that other, non-Cdk-related activities reported for UL97 (dispersion of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs and disruption of cytoplasmic or nuclear aggresomes showed weak conservation among the CHPKs that, in general, did not segregate to specific viral families. Therefore, the genomic and evolutionary conservation of these kinases has not been fully maintained at the functional level. Our data indicate that these related kinases, some of which are targets of approved or developmental antiviral drugs

  5. Protein Kinase C Epsilon and Genetic Networks in Osteosarcoma Metastasis

    Goudarzi, Atta, E-mail: atta.goudarzi@utoronto.ca [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, 1 King’s College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8 (Canada); Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G 1X5 (Canada); Gokgoz, Nalan; Gill, Mona; Pinnaduwage, Dushanthi [Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G 1X5 (Canada); Merico, Daniele [The Centre for Applied Genomics, The Hospital for Sick Children, MaRS Centre-East Tower, 101 College Street Rm.14-701, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); Wunder, Jay S. [Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G 1X5 (Canada); Andrulis, Irene L. [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, 1 King’s College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8 (Canada); Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G 1X5 (Canada)

    2013-04-08

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the bone, and pulmonary metastasis is the most frequent cause of OS mortality. The aim of this study was to discover and characterize genetic networks differentially expressed in metastatic OS. Expression profiling of OS tumors, and subsequent supervised network analysis, was performed to discover genetic networks differentially activated or organized in metastatic OS compared to localized OS. Broad trends among the profiles of metastatic tumors include aberrant activity of intracellular organization and translation networks, as well as disorganization of metabolic networks. The differentially activated PRKCε-RASGRP3-GNB2 network, which interacts with the disorganized DLG2 hub, was also found to be differentially expressed among OS cell lines with differing metastatic capacity in xenograft models. PRKCε transcript was more abundant in some metastatic OS tumors; however the difference was not significant overall. In functional studies, PRKCε was not found to be involved in migration of M132 OS cells, but its protein expression was induced in M112 OS cells following IGF-1 stimulation.

  6. Protein Kinase C Epsilon and Genetic Networks in Osteosarcoma Metastasis

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the bone, and pulmonary metastasis is the most frequent cause of OS mortality. The aim of this study was to discover and characterize genetic networks differentially expressed in metastatic OS. Expression profiling of OS tumors, and subsequent supervised network analysis, was performed to discover genetic networks differentially activated or organized in metastatic OS compared to localized OS. Broad trends among the profiles of metastatic tumors include aberrant activity of intracellular organization and translation networks, as well as disorganization of metabolic networks. The differentially activated PRKCε-RASGRP3-GNB2 network, which interacts with the disorganized DLG2 hub, was also found to be differentially expressed among OS cell lines with differing metastatic capacity in xenograft models. PRKCε transcript was more abundant in some metastatic OS tumors; however the difference was not significant overall. In functional studies, PRKCε was not found to be involved in migration of M132 OS cells, but its protein expression was induced in M112 OS cells following IGF-1 stimulation

  7. G-patch domain and KOW motifs-containing protein, GPKOW; a nuclear RNA-binding protein regulated by protein kinase A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA takes place in several steps and requires involvement of a number of RNA-binding proteins. How pre-mRNA processing is regulated is in large enigmatic. The catalytic (C) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) is a serine/threonine kinase, which regulates numerous cellular processes including pre-mRNA splicing. Despite that a significant fraction of the C subunit is found in splicing factor compartments in the nucleus, there are no indications ...

  8. Age-related changes in AMP-activated protein kinase after stroke

    Liu, Fudong; Benashski, Sharon E; Persky, Rebecca; Xu, Yan; Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionary conserved energy sensor sensitive to changes in cellular AMP/ATP ratio which is activated by phosphorylation (pAMPK). pAMPK levels decrease in peripheral tissues with age, but whether this also occurs in the aged brain, and how this contributes to the ability of the aged brain to cope with ischemic stress is unknown. This study investigated the activation of AMPK and the response to AMPK inhibition after induced stroke...

  9. Protein kinase C activity is associated with prefrontal cortical decline in aging

    Brennan, Avis R.; Yuan, Peixiong; Dickstein, Dara L; Rocher, Anne B.; Hof, Patrick R.; Manji, Husseini; Arnsten, Amy F.T.

    2007-01-01

    Aging is associated with deficiencies in the prefrontal cortex, including working memory impairment, and compromised integrity of neuronal dendrites. Although protein kinase C (PKC) is implicated in structural plasticity, and overactivation of PKC results in working memory impairments in young animals, the role of PKC in prefrontal cortical impairments in the aged has not been examined. This study provides the first evidence that PKC activity is associated with prefrontal cortical dysfunction...

  10. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinase with the microtubule cytoskeleton.

    Reszka, A. A.; Seger, R.; Diltz, C D; Krebs, E G; Fischer, E H

    1995-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical techniques, we have determined that approximately one-third of the total mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is associated with the microtubule cytoskeleton in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This population of enzyme can be separated from the soluble form that is found distributed throughout the cytosol and is also present in the nucleus after mitogen stimulation. The microtubule-associated enzyme pool constitutes half of all detect...

  11. Berberine Promotes Glucose Consumption Independently of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation

    Miao Xu; Yuanyuan Xiao; Jun Yin; Wolin Hou; Xueying Yu; Li Shen; Fang Liu; Li Wei; Weiping Jia

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with anti-diabetic action. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway has been proposed as mechanism for berberine's action. This study aimed to examine whether AMPK activation was necessary for berberine's glucose-lowering effect. We found that in HepG2 hepatocytes and C2C12 myotubes, berberine significantly increased glucose consumption and lactate release in a dose-dependent manner. AMPK and acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACC) phosphorylation wer...

  12. Involvement of Hypothalamic AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Leptin-Induced Sympathetic Nerve Activation

    Mamoru Tanida; Naoki Yamamoto; Toshishige Shibamoto; Kamal Rahmouni

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effec...

  13. Phospholipase C-gamma 1 binding to intracellular receptors for activated protein kinase C.

    Disatnik, M H; Hernandez-Sotomayor, S M; G. Jones; Carpenter, G.; Mochly-Rosen, D

    1994-01-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC-gamma 1; EC 3.1.4.11) hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to generate diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and is activated in response to growth factor stimulation and tyrosine phosphorylation. Concomitantly, the enzyme translocates from the cytosol to the particulate cell fraction. A similar process of activation-induced translocation from the cytosol to the cell particulate fraction has also been described for protein kinase C (PKC). We ...

  14. Cordycepin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via interaction with the γ1 subunit

    Wu, Chongming; Guo, Yanshen; Su, Yan; Zhang, Xue; Luan, Hong; Zhang, Xiaopo; Zhu, Huixin; He, Huixia; Wang, Xiaoliang; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Guo, Peng; Zhu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Cordycepin is a bioactive component of the fungus Cordyceps militaris. Previously, we showed that cordycepin can alleviate hyperlipidemia through enhancing the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but the mechanism of this stimulation is unknown. Here, we investigated the potential mechanisms of cordycepin-induced AMPK activation in HepG2 cells. Treatment with cordycepin largely reduced oleic acid (OA)-elicited intracellular lipid accumulation and increased AMPK activity in...

  15. Protein kinase A cascade regulates quantal release dispersion at frog muscle endplate

    Bukharaeva, E. A.; Samigullin, D.; Nikolsky, E.; Vyskočil, František

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 538, č. 3 (2002), s. 837-848. ISSN 0022-3751 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011902 Grant ostatní: EU(XC) EU Nesting; RFBR(RU) 99-04-48286 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : EPCs * latency dispersion * protein kinase A Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.650, year: 2002

  16. Activation of transfer RNA-guanine ribosyltransferase by protein kinase C.

    Morris, R C; Brooks, B. J.; Eriotou, P; Kelly, D F; Sagar, S.; Hart, K L; Elliott, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Transfer RNA-guanine ribosyltransferase (TGRase) irreversibly incorporates queuine into the first position in the anticodon of four tRNA isoacceptors. Rat brain protein kinase C (PKC) was shown to stimulate rat liver TGRase activity. TGRase preparations derived from rat liver have been observed to decrease in activity over time in storage at -20 or -70 degrees C. Contamination of the samples by phosphatases was indicated by a p-nitrophenylphosphate conversion test. The addition of micromolar ...

  17. Skeletal muscle metabolic flexibility : The roles of AMP-activated protein kinase and calcineurin

    Long, Yun Chau

    2007-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers differ considerably in their metabolic and physiological properties. The metabolic properties of skeletal muscle display a high degree of flexibility which adapts to various physiological demands by shifting energy substrate metabolism. Studies were conducted to evaluate the roles of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcineurin in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Fasting elicited a coordinated expression of genes involved in lipid ...

  18. Enhanced biocontrol activity of Trichoderma through inactivation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase

    Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Pozo, María J.; Grzegorski, Darlene; Martínez, Pedro; García, Juan M.; Olmedo-Monfil, Vianey; Cortés, Carlos; Kenerley, Charles; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The production of lytic enzymes in Trichoderma is considered determinant in its parasitic response against fungal species. A mitogen-activated protein kinase encoding gene, tvk1, from Trichoderma virens was cloned, and its role during the mycoparasitism, conidiation, and biocontrol was examined in tvk1 null mutants. These mutants showed a clear increase in the level of the expression of mycoparasitism-related genes under simulated mycoparasitism and during direct confrontation with the plant ...

  19. The conserved protein kinase Ipl1 regulates microtubule binding to kinetochores in budding yeast

    Biggins, Sue; Fedor F. Severin; Bhalla, Needhi; Sassoon, Ingrid; Hyman, Anthony A.; Murray, Andrew W.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome segregation depends on kinetochores, the structures that mediate chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle. We isolated mutants in IPL1, which encodes a protein kinase, in a screen for budding yeast mutants that have defects in sister chromatid separation and segregation. Cytological tests show that ipl1 mutants can separate sister chromatids but are defective in chromosome segregation. Kinetochores assembled in extracts from ipl1 mutants show altered binding to microtubules. Ip...

  20. The budding yeast Ipl1/Aurora protein kinase regulates mitotic spindle disassembly

    Buvelot, Stéphanie; Tatsutani, Sean Y.; Vermaak, Danielle; Biggins, Sue

    2003-01-01

    Ipl1p is the budding yeast member of the Aurora family of protein kinases, critical regulators of genomic stability that are required for chromosome segregation, the spindle checkpoint, and cytokinesis. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Ipl1p also has a function in mitotic spindle disassembly that is separable from its previously identified roles. Ipl1–GFP localizes to kinetochores from G1 to metaphase, transfers to the spindle after metaphase, and accumulates at the spindle midzone ...

  1. Transgenic Inhibition of Neuronal Protein Kinase A Activity Facilitates Fear Extinction

    Isiegas, Carolina; Park, Alice; Kandel, Eric R.; Abel, Ted; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Much is known about the neurobiology of memory storage for learned fear. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms underlying extinction of fear memory are just beginning to be delineated. Here, we investigate the role of protein kinase A (PKA) in extinction of memory for contextual fear by using conventional and temporally regulated transgenic approaches that allow us to inhibit PKA activity in neurons within brain regions thought to be involved in extinction. Strikingly, reduction of PKA activi...

  2. Electronic and protein structural dynamics of a photosensory LOV histidine kinase

    Alexandre, Maxime T.A.; Purcell, Erin B.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Robert, Bruno; Kennis, John T. M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus encodes a two-component signalling protein, LovK, that contains an N-terminal photosensory LOV domain coupled to a C-terminal histidine kinase. LovK binds a flavin cofactor, undergoes a reversible photocycle, and displays regulated ATPase and autophosphorylation activity in response to visible light. Femtosecond to nanosecond visible absorption spectroscopy demonstrates congruence between full-length LovK and isolated LOV domains in the mechanism and kinet...

  3. Protein Kinase C ε Expression in Platelets from Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Cecilia Carubbi; Prisco Mirandola; Maria Mattioli; Daniela Galli; Nicola Marziliano; Piera Angelica Merlini; Daniela Lina; Francesca Notarangelo; Maria Rita Cozzi; Marco Gesi; Diego Ardissino; Luigi De Marco; Marco Vitale; Giuliana Gobbi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Platelets play crucial roles in the pathophysiology of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Protein kinase C ε (PKCε) is virtually absent in human platelets and its expression is precisely regulated during human megakaryocytic differentiation. On the basis of what is known on the role of platelet PKCε in other species, we hypothesized that platelets from myocardial infarction patients might ectopically express PKCε with a pathophysiological role in the disease. METHODS AND RESULTS...

  4. Carbon Dioxide-Mediated Generation of Hybrid Nanoparticles for Improved Bioavailability of Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    Jesson, Gérald; Brisander, Magnus; Andersson, Per; Demirbüker, Mustafa; Derand, Helene; Lennernäs, Hans; Malmsten, Martin

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose A versatile methodology is demonstrated for improving dissolution kinetics, gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, and bioavailability of protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs). Methods The approach is based on nanoparticle precipitation by sub- or supercritical CO2 together with a matrix-forming polymer, incorporating surfactants either during or after nanoparticle formation. Notably, striking synergistic effects between hybrid PKI/polymer nanoparticles and surfactant added after parti...

  5. Tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors block invasin-promoted bacterial uptake by epithelial cells.

    Rosenshine, I.; Duronio, V; Finlay, B B

    1992-01-01

    The ability to enter into (invade) mammalian cells is an essential virulence determinant of many pathogenic bacteria and intracellular parasites. These organisms are internalized by host cells upon attachment to their surface. However, the mechanisms used by intracellular parasites to induce internalization into host cells have not been defined. We found that the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine blocks invasion by some pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ...

  6. Protein Kinase C Regulates the Cell Surface Activity of Endothelin-Converting Enzyme-1

    Smith, A Ian; Lew, Rebecca A.; Thomas, Walter G; Tochon-Danguy, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    The potent vasoconstrictor endothelin is a 21 amino acid peptide whose principal physiological function is to regulate vascular tone. The generation of endothelin is crucially dependent on the local presence and activity of endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells. In this study, we have shown in endothelial cells that the enzyme is phosphorylated, and that phosphorylation is increased by phorbol ester stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC)....

  7. Modular Total Synthesis of Protein Kinase C Activator (-)-Indolactam V.

    Haynes-Smith, Jeremy; Diaz, Italia; Billingsley, Kelvin L

    2016-05-01

    A concise, eight-step total synthesis of (-)-indolactam V, a nanomolar agonist of protein kinase C, is reported. The synthesis relies upon an efficient copper-catalyzed amino acid arylation to establish the indole C4-nitrogen bond. This cross-coupling method is applicable to a range of hydrophobic amino acids, providing a platform for further diversification of indolactam alkaloid scaffolds and studies on their potent biological activity. PMID:27074538

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Calcium-dependent Protein Kinase in Tomato

    Hu, Zhangjian; Lv, Xiangzhang; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play critical roles in regulating growth, development and stress response in plants. Information about CDPKs in tomato, however, remains obscure although it is one of the most important model crops in the world. In this study, we performed a bioinformatics analysis of the entire tomato genome and identified 29 CDPK genes. These CDPK genes are found to be located in 12 chromosomes, and could be divided into four groups. Analysis of the gene structure a...

  9. Endothelin-1 activates phospholipase D and thymidine incorporation in fibroblasts overexpressing protein kinase C beta 1.

    Pai, J K; Dobek, E A; Bishop, W R

    1991-01-01

    Endothelins (ETs) are a family of extremely potent vasoconstrictor peptides. In addition, ET-1 acts as a potent mitogen and activates phospholipase C in smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. We examined the effects of ET-1 on phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism and thymidine incorporation in control Rat-6 fibroblasts and in cells that overexpress protein kinase C beta 1 (PKC). PC pools were labeled with [3H]myristic acid, and formation of phosphatidylethanol (PEt), an unambiguous marker of pho...

  10. Exercise stimulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in human skeletal muscle.

    Aronson, D; Violan, M A; Dufresne, S D; Zangen, D; FIELDING, R.A.; Goodyear, L J

    1997-01-01

    Physical exercise can cause marked alterations in the structure and function of human skeletal muscle. However, little is known about the specific signaling molecules and pathways that enable exercise to modulate cellular processes in skeletal muscle. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is a major signaling system by which cells transduce extracellular signals into intracellular responses. We tested the hypothesis that a single bout of exercise activates the MAPK signaling pat...

  11. Metabolic Basis for Thyroid Hormone Liver Preconditioning: Upregulation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Videla, Luis A; Virginia Fernández; Pamela Cornejo; Romina Vargas

    2012-01-01

    The liver is a major organ responsible for most functions of cellular metabolism and a mediator between dietary and endogenous sources of energy for extrahepatic tissues. In this context, adenosine-monophosphate- (AMP-) activated protein kinase (AMPK) constitutes an intrahepatic energy sensor regulating physiological energy dynamics by limiting anabolism and stimulating catabolism, thus increasing ATP availability. This is achieved by mechanisms involving direct allosteric activation and reve...

  12. Activation of resting human T cells requires prolonged stimulation of protein kinase C.

    Berry, N; Ase, K; Kishimoto, A.; Nishizuka, Y

    1990-01-01

    Purified resting human T cells can be induced to express the alpha subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and to proliferate by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin but not with 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin. Determination of the translocation of protein kinase C showed that 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin caused a prolonged membrane association of the enzyme for more than 4 hr, whereas 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin induced a tr...

  13. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid

    Mingyue Zhao; Lihui Lu; Song Lei; Hua Chai; Siyuan Wu; Xiaoju Tang; Qinxue Bao; Li Chen; Wenchao Wu; Xiaojing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardi...

  14. CPK12: A Ca2+-dependent protein kinase balancer in abscisic acid signaling

    Zhao, Rui; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ is believed to be a critical second messenger in ABA signal transduction. Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are the best characterized Ca2+ sensors in plants. Recently, we identified an Arabidopsis CDPK member CPK12 as a negative regulator of ABA signaling in seed germination and post-germination growth, which reveals that different members of the CDPK family may constitute a regulation loop by functioning positively and negatively in ABA signal transduction. We observed that both R...

  15. Catharanthus roseus mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 confers UV and heat tolerance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Raina, Susheel Kumar; Wankhede, Dhammaprakash Pandhari; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important source of pharmaceutically important Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids (MIAs). Accumulation of many of the MIAs is induced in response to abiotic stresses such as wound, ultra violet (UV) irradiations, etc. Recently, we have demonstrated a possible role of CrMPK3, a C. roseus mitogen-activated protein kinase in stress-induced accumulation of a few MIAs. Here, we extend our findings using Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate the role of CrMPK3 in giving tole...

  16. Cell adhesion-dependent inactivation of a soluble protein kinase during fertilization in Chlamydomonas.

    Zhang, Y.; Luo, Y.; Emmett, K; Snell, W J

    1996-01-01

    Within seconds after the flagella of mt+ and mt- Chlamydomonas gametes adhere during fertilization, their flagellar adenylyl cyclase is activated several fold and preparation for cell fusion is initiated. Our previous studies indicated that early events in this pathway, including control of adenylyl cyclase, are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we describe a soluble, flagellar protein kinase activity that is regulated by flagellar adhesion. A 48-kDa, soluble flagellar...

  17. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Male Germ Cell Apoptosis in the Rat1

    Jia, Yue; Castellanos, Jesse; Wang, Christina; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Lue, YanHe; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P.

    2008-01-01

    Programmed germ cell death is critical for functional spermatogenesis. Increased germ cell apoptosis can be triggered by various regulatory stimuli, including testicular hyperthermia or deprivation of gonadotropins and intratesticular testosterone. We have previously shown the involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 14 in apoptotic signaling of male germ cells across species after hormone deprivation. This study investigates the role of MAPK14 in germ cell apoptosis in rats...

  18. Exercise Protects against Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance through Downregulation of Protein Kinase Cβ in Mice

    Xiaoquan Rao; Jixin Zhong; Xiaohua Xu; Brianna Jordan; Santosh Maurya; Zachary Braunstein; Tse-Yao Wang; Wei Huang; Sudha Aggarwal; Muthu Periasamy; Sanjay Rajagopalan; Kamal Mehta; Qinghua Sun

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise is an important and effective therapy for diabetes. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Protein kinase Cβ (PKCβ) has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance, but the role of PKCβ in exercise-induced improvements in insulin resistance is completely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the involvement of PKCβ in exercise-attenuated insulin resistance in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. PKCβ(-/-) and wild-type mice...

  19. Up-regulation and redistribution of protein kinase C-delta in chronically hypoxic heart

    Hlaváčková, M.; Kožichová, K.; Neckář, Jan; Kolář, František; Musters, R.J.P.; Novák, O.; Nováková, O.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 345, 1-2 (2010), s. 271-282. ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Grant ostatní: Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 97908 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : protein kinase C * chronic intermittent hypoxia * heart Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2010

  20. Role of protein kinases in chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced cardioprotection

    Kolář, František; Novák, F.; Neckář, Jan; Nováková, O.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Musters, R.J.P.

    Hauppauge, N.Y : Nova Science, 2009 - (Xi, L.; Serebrovskaya, T.), s. 213-230 ISBN 978-1-60876-127-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875; GA ČR(CZ) GP305/06/P372 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : chronic hypoxia * cardioprotection * protein kinases Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  1. Crosstalk between mitogen-activated protein kinases and mitochondria in cardiac diseases: therapeutic perspectives

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Agostini, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases cause more mortality and morbidity worldwide than any other diseases. Although many intracellular signaling pathways influence cardiac physiology and pathology, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family has garnered significant attention because of its vast implications in signaling and cross-talk with other signaling networks. The extensively studied MAPKs ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and ERK5, demonstrate unique intracellular signaling mechanisms, responding to a myria...

  2. Protein Kinase C Deficiency-induced Alcohol Insensitivity and Underlying Cellular Targets in Drosophila

    Chen, Jiang; Zhang, Yan; Shen, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Multiple subtypes of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes are implicated in various neurological disorders including alcohol insensitivity, a trait strongly associated with alcoholism in humans, but molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the PKC activities remain poorly understood. Here we show that functional knockdown of conventional, novel or atypical PKC in the fly nervous system each resulted in alcohol insensitivity. Neuroanatomical mapping of conventional Ca2+-sensitive PKC53E activit...

  3. Protein Kinase C-Independent Activation of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle

    Gradoville, Lyndle; Kwa, David; El-Guindy, Ayman; Miller, George

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) pathway has been considered to be essential for activation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into the lytic cycle. The phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA), a PKC agonist, is one of the best understood activators of EBV lytic replication. Zp, the promoter of the EBV immediate-early gene BZLF1, whose product, ZEBRA, drives the lytic cycle, contains several phorbol ester response elements. We investigated the role of the PKC pathway in lytic cycle activa...

  4. Adiponectin Increases Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis by Suppressing Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1

    Qiao, Liping; Kinney, Brice; Yoo, Hyung sun; Lee, Bonggi; Schaack, Jerome; Shao, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms through which adiponectin induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial contents, expression, and activation status of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) were compared between skeletal muscle samples from adiponectin gene knockout, adiponectin-reconstituted, and control mice. Adenovi...

  5. Structural and molecular basis of interaction of HCV non-structural protein 5A with human casein kinase 1α and PKR

    Sudha Govindarajan; Yamunadevi Subburaj; Tyagi Nidhi; Das Saumitra; Srinivasan Narayanaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Interaction of non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) with human kinases namely, casein kinase 1α (ck1α) and protein kinase R (PKR) have different functional implications such as regulation of viral replication and evasion of interferon induced immune response respectively. Understanding the structural and molecular basis of interactions of the viral protein with two different human kinases can be useful in developing strategies for treatment against H...

  6. Comparison of phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins from HeLa and Krebs II ascites-tumour cells by cyclic AMP-dependent and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases

    Issinger, O G; Beier, H; Speichermann, N; Flokerzi, V; Hofmann, F

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in vitro by essentially homogeneous preparations of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase was compared. Each protein kinase was added at a concentration of 30nM. Ribosomal proteins were...... cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme. Between 0.1 and 0.2 mol of phosphate was incorporated/mol of these phosphorylated proteins. With the exception of protein S7, the same proteins were also major substrates for the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase. Time courses of the phosphorylation of individual proteins...... from the small and large ribosomal subunits in the presence of either protein kinase suggested four types of phosphorylation reactions: (1) proteins S2, S10 and L5 were preferably phosphorylated by the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase; (2) proteins S3 and L6 were phosphorylated at very similar rates...

  7. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  8. A targeted library screen reveals a new inhibitor scaffold for protein kinase D.

    Manuj Tandon

    Full Text Available Protein kinase D (PKD has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in multiple pathological conditions, including cancer and heart diseases. Potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of PKD are valuable for dissecting PKD-mediated cellular signaling pathways and for therapeutic application. In this study, we evaluated a targeted library of 235 small organic kinase inhibitors for PKD1 inhibitory activity at a single concentration. Twenty-eight PKD inhibitory chemotypes were identified and six exhibited excellent PKD1 selectivity. Five of the six lead structures share a common scaffold, with compound 139 being the most potent and selective for PKD vs PKC and CAMK. Compound 139 was an ATP-competitive PKD1 inhibitor with a low double-digit nanomolar potency and was also cell-active. Kinase profiling analysis identified this class of small molecules as pan-PKD inhibitors, confirmed their selectivity again PKC and CAMK, and demonstrated an overall favorable selectivity profile that could be further enhanced through structural modification. Furthermore, using a PKD homology model based on similar protein kinase structures, docking modes for compound 139 were explored and compared to literature examples of PKD inhibition. Modeling of these compounds at the ATP-binding site of PKD was used to rationalize its high potency and provide the foundation for future further optimization. Accordingly, using biochemical screening of a small number of privileged scaffolds and computational modeling, we have identified a new core structure for highly potent PKD inhibition with promising selectivity against closely related kinases. These lead structures represent an excellent starting point for the further optimization and the design of selective and therapeutically effective small molecule inhibitors of PKD.

  9. Fluorescent detection of protein kinase based on zirconium ions-immobilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Tan, Penglong; Lei, Chunyang; Liu, Xin; Qing, Meng; Nie, Zhou; Guo, Manli; Huang, Yan, E-mail: huangyan.hnu@gmail.com; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Present a novel method for PKA activity analysis based on magnetic separation. •Zr-NTA MNPs are implemented in detection of PKA activation in cell lysates. •Specific adsorption between zirconium ions and phosphate group. •Highly selective, sensitive and fast recognition of phosphorylated peptides. •The MNPs are recyclable. -- Abstract: We report here an affinity separation-based fluorometric method for monitoring the activity and inhibition of protein kinase. In this assay, when the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled substrate peptides (S-peptide) are phosphorylated by kinase, the product peptides (P-peptide) will be adsorbed and concentrated onto the surface of Zr{sup 4+}-immobilized nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Zr-NTA MNPs) through the chelation of Zr{sup 4+} and phosphate groups. After magnetic separation, the fluorescence intensity of the homogeneous solution changes dramatically. Hence the fluorescence response allows this MNPs-based method to easily probe kinase activity by a spectrometer. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by sensitive measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) with a low detection limit (0.5 mU μL{sup −1}). Moreover, the system is successfully applied to estimate the IC{sub 50} value of PKA inhibitor H-89 and detect the Forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) stimulated activation of PKA in cell lysate. Additionally, Zr-NTA MNPs are reusable by stripping Zr{sup 4+} ions from NTA-coated MNPs and rechelating again. This method, which relies on the surface-functionalized MNPs, presents a promising candidate for simple and cost-effective assay of kinase activity and inhibitor screening.

  10. Fluorescent detection of protein kinase based on zirconium ions-immobilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Present a novel method for PKA activity analysis based on magnetic separation. •Zr-NTA MNPs are implemented in detection of PKA activation in cell lysates. •Specific adsorption between zirconium ions and phosphate group. •Highly selective, sensitive and fast recognition of phosphorylated peptides. •The MNPs are recyclable. -- Abstract: We report here an affinity separation-based fluorometric method for monitoring the activity and inhibition of protein kinase. In this assay, when the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled substrate peptides (S-peptide) are phosphorylated by kinase, the product peptides (P-peptide) will be adsorbed and concentrated onto the surface of Zr4+-immobilized nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Zr-NTA MNPs) through the chelation of Zr4+ and phosphate groups. After magnetic separation, the fluorescence intensity of the homogeneous solution changes dramatically. Hence the fluorescence response allows this MNPs-based method to easily probe kinase activity by a spectrometer. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by sensitive measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) with a low detection limit (0.5 mU μL−1). Moreover, the system is successfully applied to estimate the IC50 value of PKA inhibitor H-89 and detect the Forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) stimulated activation of PKA in cell lysate. Additionally, Zr-NTA MNPs are reusable by stripping Zr4+ ions from NTA-coated MNPs and rechelating again. This method, which relies on the surface-functionalized MNPs, presents a promising candidate for simple and cost-effective assay of kinase activity and inhibitor screening

  11. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  12. DNA-dependent protein kinase participates in the radiation activation of NF-kB

    The NF-kB transcription factor is maintained in an inactive state by binding to the lkBa inhibitory protein. Activation requires phosphorylation and degradation of lkBa, releasing active NF-kB. NF-kB can be activated by cytokines, antigens, free radicals and X-ray irradiation. The protein kinase responsible for phosphorylation of lkBa in vivo has not been fully characterized. Here, we have examined the role of the DNA-dependent protein kinases (DNA-PK) in the radiation-activation of NF-kB. Wortmannin is an inhibitor of DNA-PK and related kinases. Exposure of SW480 cells to wortmannin inhibited the radioactivation of NF-kB DNA-binding. Analysis of lkBa levels by western blotting indicated that wortmannin blocked the radiation induced degradation of lkBa. In in vitro experiments, purified DNA-PK was able to efficiently phosphorylate lkBa, and this phosphorylation was inhibited by wortmannin. In contrast, the induction of NF-kB activity by TNFa was unaffected by wortmannin. The results suggest that DNA-PK may phosphorylate lkBa following irradiation, leading to degradation of lkBa and the release of active NF-kB. The inability of wortmannin to block TNFa activation of NF-kB indicates there may be more than one pathway for the activation of NF-kB

  13. Possible involvement of protein kinase C in apoptotic cell death of macrophages infected with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    Nonaka, K; Ishisaki, A; Muro, M; Kato, S; Oido, M; Nakashima, K; Kowashi, Y; Nishihara, T

    1998-02-15

    We have previously reported the evidence for apoptosis in the mouse macrophage cell line J774.1 by the periodontopathic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. In this study, we examined the role of protein kinases in the induction of apoptosis in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected J774.1 cells by the MTT assay, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. After J774.1 cells were precultured with protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), J774.1 cells infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans showed the increased percentage of apoptotic cells. On the contrary, protein kinase A (PKA) activators, such as forskolin and dibutyryl cAMP, do not mimic the effect of PMA. PKC inhibitors, such as staurosporine, calphostin C, chelerythrine chloride, and H7 were found to suppress apoptotic cell death in J774.1 cells infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, HA1004, known as PKA inhibitor, had no effect on apoptosis in infected macrophages. The results presented here suggest that the signals through PKC may play crucial roles in the modulation of apoptosis in macrophages infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:9503618

  14. Roles of protein kinase C in oocyte meiotic maturation and fertilization

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a superfamily of Ser/Thr protein kinases that is distributed widely in eukaryotes. It plays key regulatory roles at multiple steps of oocyte meiotic maturation and fertilization. During the process of meiotic maturation, the activation of PKC in cumulus cells stimulates meiotic maturation, whereas the activation of PKC in oocytes results in the inhibition of germinal vesicle breakdown. PKC activity increases following the meiotic maturation, and decreases at the transition of metaphase/anaphase in meiosis I, so as to facilitate the release of the first polar body and the entry of meiosis II. In fertilization of mammalian oocytes, PKC may act as one of the downstream targets of Ca2+ to stimulate the cortical granule exocytosis, release the oocytes from MII arrest and to induce pronucleus formation. PKC is also involved in the regulation of maturation promoting factor (MPF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Several PKC isoforms have been identified in mammalian oocytes, and there is evidence showing that classical PKCs may be the principal mediator of oocyte cortical reaction.

  15. Abrogation of TNF-mediated cytotoxicity by space flight involves protein kinase C

    Woods, K. M.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Experiments conducted on STS-50 indicated that space flight significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated killing of LM929 cells compared to ground controls. In ground-based studies, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also inhibited TNF-mediated killing of LM929 cells. Therefore, we used PKC inhibitors to determine if the inhibitory effects of spaceflight on TNF-mediated cytotoxicity involved the activation of PKC. In experiments conducted onboard space shuttle mission STS-54, we saw that in the presence of the protein kinase C inhibitors H7 and H8, TNF-mediated cytotoxicity was restored to levels of those observed in the ground controls. Subsequent experiments done during the STS-57 mission tested the dose response of two protein kinase inhibitors, H7 and HA1004. We again saw that killing was restored in a dose-dependent manner, with inhibitor concentrations known to inhibit PKC being most effective. These data suggest that space flight ameliorates the action of TNF by affecting PKC in target cells.

  16. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: A multifunctional enzyme and potential therapeutic target.

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-05-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family, and is primarily involved in transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, neurons and male germ cells. CAMKIV operates the signaling cascade and regulates activity of several transcription activators by phosphorylation, which in turn plays pivotal roles in immune response, inflammation and memory consolidation. In this review, we tried to focus on different aspects of CAMKIV to understand the significance of this protein in the biological system. This enzyme is associated with varieties of disorders such as cerebral hypoxia, azoospermia, endometrial and ovarian cancer, systemic lupus, etc., and hence it is considered as a potential therapeutic target. Structure of CAMKIV is comprised of five distinct domains in which kinase domain is responsible for enzyme activity. CAMKIV is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as regulation of gene expression, T-cell maturation, regulation of survival phase of dendritic cells, bone growth and metabolism, memory consolidation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we performed an extensive analysis on structure, function and regulation of CAMKIV and associated diseases. PMID:26773169

  17. The role of the Drosophila LAMMER protein kinase DOA in somatic sex determination

    Leonard Rabinow; Marie-Laure Samson

    2010-09-01

    DOA kinase, the Drosophila member of the LAMMER/Clk protein kinase family, phosphorylates SR and SR-like proteins, including TRA, TRA2 and RBP1, which are responsible for the alternative splicing of transcripts encoding the key regulator of sex-specific expression in somatic cells of the fly, DOUBLESEX. Specific Doa alleles induce somatic female-to-male sex transformations, which can be enhanced when combined with mutations in loci encoding SR and SR-like proteins. The Doa locus encodes six different kinases, of which a 69-kDa isoform is expressed solely in females. Expression of this isoform is itself under the regulation of the somatic sex determination regulatory network, thus forming a putative positive autoregulatory loop which would reinforce the choice of the female cell-fate. We speculate that this loop is part of the evolutionary ancestral sex-determination machinery, based upon evidence demonstrating the existence of an autoregulatory loop involving TRA and TRA2 in several other insect species.

  18. Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) dependent signaling mediates endometrial cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis

    Haughian, James M.; Reno, Elaine M.; Thorne, Alicia M.; Bradford, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy, yet molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying its etiology and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. We sought to define a functional role for the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCα, in an established cell model of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Ishikawa cells depleted of PKCα protein grew slower, formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent growth assays and exhibited impaired xenograft tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with impaired growth, PKCα knockdown increased levels of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 (p21) and p27Kip1 (p27). Despite the absence of functional phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein in Ishikawa cells, PKCα knockdown reduced Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 and concomitantly inhibited phosphorylation of the Akt target, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). PKCα knockdown also resulted in decreased basal ERK phosphorylation and attenuated ERK activation following EGF stimulation. p21 and p27 expression was not increased by treatment of Ishikawa cells with ERK and Akt inhibitors, suggesting PKCα regulates CDK expression independently of Akt and ERK. Immunohistochemical analysis of grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma revealed aberrant PKCα expression, with foci of elevated PKCα staining, not observed in normal endometrium. These studies demonstrate a critical role for PKCα signaling in endometrial tumorigenesis by regulating expression of CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 and activation of Akt and ERK dependent proliferative pathways. Thus, targeting PKCα may provide novel therapeutic options in endometrial tumors. PMID:19672862

  19. Immunocytochemical evidence for translocation of protein kinase C in human megakaryoblastic leukemic cells: synergistic effects of Ca2+ and activators of protein kinase C on the plasma membrane association

    1988-01-01

    Immunological analysis using monoclonal antibodies against subspecies of protein kinase C revealed the predominant expression of the isozyme, type II, in human megakaryoblastic leukemic cells. We investigated the effects of phorbol diester 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and synthetic diacylglycerol 1-oleoyl-2- acetylglycerol (OAG) on the immunocytochemical localization of protein kinase C in these cells. Indirect immunofluorescence techniques reveale...

  20. The complement of protein kinases of the microsporidium Encephalitozoon cuniculi in relation to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Vivares Christian P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsporidia, parasitic fungi-related eukaryotes infecting many cell types in a wide range of animals (including humans, represent a serious health threat in immunocompromised patients. The 2.9 Mb genome of the microsporidium Encephalitozoon cuniculi is the smallest known of any eukaryote. Eukaryotic protein kinases are a large superfamily of enzymes with crucial roles in most cellular processes, and therefore represent potential drug targets. We report here an exhaustive analysis of the E. cuniculi genomic database aimed at identifying and classifying all protein kinases of this organism with reference to the kinomes of two highly-divergent yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Results A database search with a multi-level protein kinase family hidden Markov model library led to the identification of 29 conventional protein kinase sequences in the E. cuniculi genome, as well as 3 genes encoding atypical protein kinases. The microsporidian kinome presents striking differences from those of other eukaryotes, and this minimal kinome underscores the importance of conserved protein kinases involved in essential cellular processes. ~30% of its kinases are predicted to regulate cell cycle progression while another ~28% have no identifiable homologues in model eukaryotes and are likely to reflect parasitic adaptations. E. cuniculi lacks MAP kinase cascades and almost all protein kinases that are involved in stress responses, ion homeostasis and nutrient signalling in the model fungi S. cerevisiae and S. pombe, including AMPactivated protein kinase (Snf1, previously thought to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. A detailed database search and phylogenetic analysis of the kinomes of the two model fungi showed that the degree of homology between their kinomes of ~85% is much higher than that previously reported. Conclusion The E. cuniculi kinome is by far the smallest eukaryotic kinome characterised to date