WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid sulfate soil

  1. Reversibility of soil solution acidity and of sulfate retention in acid forest soils

    Alewell, C.; Matzner, E. (Universitaet Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bodenoekologie)

    1993-11-01

    To quantify the effects of reduced sulfate input on the chemistry of soil solution and soil S storage in acid forest soils, an experiment with undisturbed soil columns from two different sites was implemented. The acid cambisol of the Solling is subjected to a high sulfate input and especially the B-horizon has a high sulfate content. On the contrary, the podzol of the Fuhrberg site is subjected to low input and has low sulfate content. Undisturbed soil columns were taken from both sites and were irrigated at 6[degree]C with a precipitation rate of 3 mmd[sup -1] over 10 mo. In treatment No. 1, an artificial throughfall with pH 5.2 and reduced sulfate load (45[mu]mol L[sup -1]) was applied. In treatment No. 2, an artificial throughfall representing a high sulfate deposition (427 [mu]mol L[sup -1], pH 3.2) was used. In the case of the Solling soil, the pH of soil solution was unaffected by treatments during the entire experiment. Alkalinity of the soil solution was slightly increased in treatment No. 1 at a depth of 20 cm. While treatment No. 1 resulted in a reduction of the sulfate concentrations of the soil solution in the top soil, sulfate concentrations were unaffected at a depth of 40 cm. The B-horizon of the Solling soil prevented deacidification of the soil solution by desorption of previously stored sulfate. In the case of the Fuhrberg soil, treatment No. 1 resulted in reduced sulfate concentrations of the soil solution even in deeper soil layers with concentrations approaching input levels. The pH of the solution was slightly elevated and the alkalinity of the solution increased. Organic S compounds in the soil seemed to have no influence on sulfate release in either soils. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Characteristics of Phosphorus in Some Eastern Australian Acid Sulfate Soils

    2002-01-01

    Forty-five acid sulfate topsoil samples (depth < 0.5 m) from 15 soil cores were collected from 11 locations along the New South Wales coast, Australia. There was an overall trend for the concentration of the HC1extractable P to increase along with increasing amounts of organic C and the HCl-extractable trivalent metals in the topsoils of some less-disturbed acid sulfate soils (pH <4.5). This suggests that inorganic P in these soils probably accumulated via biological cycling and was retained by complexation with trivalent metals or their oxides and hydroxides. While there was no clear correlation between pH and the water-extractable P, the concentration of the water-extractable P tended to increase with increasing amounts of the HCl-extractable P. This disagrees with some established models which suggest that the concentration of solution P in acid soils is independent of total P and decreases with increasing acidity. The high concentration of sulfate present in acid sulfate soils appeared to affect the chemical behavior of P in these soil systems. Comparison was made between a less disturbed wetland acid sulfate soil and a more intensively disturbed sugarcane acid sulfate soil.The results show that reclamation of wetland acid sulfate soils for sugarcane production caused a significant decrease in the HCl-extractable P in the topsoil layer as a result of the reduced bio-cycling of phosphorus following sugarcane farming. Simulation experiment shows that addition of hydrated lime had no effects on the immobilization of retained P in an acid sulfate soil sample within a pH range 3.5~4.6. When the pH was raised to above 4.6, soluble P in the soil extracts had a tendency to increase with increasing pH until the 15th extraction (pH 5.13). This, in combination with the poor pH-soluble P relationship observed from the less-disturbed acid sulfate soils, suggests that soluble P was not clearly pH-dependent in acid sulfate soils with pH < 4.5.

  3. Controls of Soluble Al in Experimental Acid Sulfate Conditions and Acid Sulfate Soils

    LINCHUXIA; M.D.MELVILLE

    1997-01-01

    The controls of soluble Al concentration were examined in three situations of acid sulfate conditions:1) experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of varying amounts of Al(OH)3(gibbsite) into a sequence of H2SO4 solutions;2)experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of the same sequence of H2SO4 solutions into two non-cid sulfacte soil samples with known amounts of acid oxalate extractable Al; and 3) actual acid sulfate soil conditions.The experiment using gibbsite as an Al-bearing mineral showed that increase in the concentration of H2SO4 solution increased the soluble Al concentration,accompanied by a decrease i the solution pH, Increasing amount of gibbsite added to the H2SO4 solutions also increased soluble Al concentration,but resulted in an increase in solution pH.Within the H2SO4 concentration range of 0.0005-0.5mol L-1 and the Al(OH)3 range of 0.01-0.5g(in 25 mL of H2SO4 solutions),the input of H2SO4 had the major control on soluble Al Concentration and pH .The availability of Al(OH)3,however,was responsible for the spread fo the various sample points,with a tendency that the samples containing more gibbsite had a higher soluble Al concentration than those containing less gibbsite at equivalent pH levels.The experimental results from treatment of soil samples with H2SO4 solutions and the analytical results of acid sulfate soils also showed the similar trend.

  4. Analytical Methods for Environmental Risk Assessment of Acid Sulfate Soils: A Review

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of acid sulfate soil risk is an important step for acid sulfate soil management and its reliability depends very much on the suitability and accuracy of various analytical methods for estimating sulfide-derived potential acidity, actual acidity and acid-neutralizing capacity in acid sulfate soils. This paper critically reviews various analytical methods that are currently used for determination of the above parameters, as well as their implications for environmental risk assessment of acid sulfate soils.

  5. Acid Sulfate Soils in Australia:Characteristics,Problems and Management

    C.LIN

    1999-01-01

    Acid sulfate soils(ASS) are widely distributod in Australia.This has only been recognised recently when intensive research on ASS has been done in this county.This paper reviews aspects concerning a )the distribution and acid potential,b) controls on acidic status,and c) problems and management of ASS problems from ASS exist but insufficient attention was paid to them.

  6. Soil Quality Assessment of Acid Sulfate Paddy Soils with Different Productivities in Guangdong Province, China

    LIU Zhan-jun; ZHOU Wei; SHEN Jian-bo; LI Shu-tian; LIANG Guo-qing; WANG Xiu-bin; SUN Jing-wen; AI Chao

    2014-01-01

    Land conversion is considered an effective measure to ensure national food security in China, but little information is available on the quality of low productivity soils, in particular those in acid sulfate soil regions. In our study, acid sulfate paddy soils were divided into soils with high, medium and low levels based on local rice productivity, and 60 soil samples were collected for analysis. Twenty soil variables including physical, chemical and biochemical properties were determined. Those variables that were signiifcantly different between the high, medium and low productivity soils were selected for principal component analysis, and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), total nitrogen (TN), available silicon (ASi), pH and available zinc (AZn) were retained in the minimum data set (MDS). After scoring the MDS variables, they were integrated to calculate a soil quality index (SQI), and the high, medium and low productivity paddy soils received mean SQI scores of 0.95, 0.83 and 0.60, respectively. Low productivity paddy soils showed worse soil quality, and a large discrepancy was observed between the low and high productivity paddy soils. Lower MBC, TN, ASi, pH and available K (AK) were considered as the primary limiting factors. Additionally, all the soil samples collected were rich in available P and AZn, but deifcient in AK and ASi. The results suggest that soil AK and ASi deifciencies were the main limiting factors for all the studied acid sulfate paddy soil regions. The application of K and Si on a national basis and other sustainable management approaches are suggested to improve rice productivity, especially for low productivity paddy soils. Our results indicated that there is a large potential for increasing productivity and producing more cereals in acid sulfate paddy soil regions.

  7. Acid sulfate soils are an environmental hazard in Finland

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) create significant threats to the environment on coastal regions of the Baltic Sea in Finland. The sediments were deposited during the ancient Litorina Sea phase of the Baltic Sea about 7500-4500 years ago. Finland has larger spatial extent of the ASS than any other European country. Mostly based on anthropogenic reasons (cultivation, trenching etc.) ASS deposits are currently being exposed to oxygen which leads to chemical reaction creating sulfuric acid. The acidic waters then dissolve metals form the soil. Acidic surface run off including the metals are then leached into the water bodies weakening the water quality and killing fish or vegetation. In constructed areas acidic waters may corrode building materials. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is mapping ASS deposits in Finland. The goal is to map a total of 5 million hectares of the potentially ASS affected region. It has been estimated that the problematic Litorina Sea deposits, which are situated 0-100 m above the recent Baltic Sea shoreline, cover 500 000 hectares area. There are several phases in mapping. The work begins at the office with gathering the existing data, interpreting airborne geophysical data and compiling a field working plan. In the field, quality of the soil is studied and in uncertain cases samples are taken to laboratory analyses. Also electrical conductivity and pH of soil and water are measured in the field. Laboratory methods include multielemental determinations with ICP-OES, analyses of grain size and humus content (LOI), and incubation. So far, approximately 60 % of the potential ASS affected regions in Finland are mapped. Over 15 000 sites have been studied in the field and 4000 laboratory analyses are done. The spatial database presented in the scale of 1: 250 000 can be viewed at the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/hasu/index.html).

  8. Characteristics of Soluble and Exchangeable Acidity in an Extremely Acidified Acid Sulfate Soil

    C.Lin; M.D.MELVILLE; 等

    1999-01-01

    An extremely acidified acid sulfate soil(ASS) was investigated to characterise its soluble and exchangeable acidity,The results showed that soluble acidity of a sample dtermined by titration with a KOH soulution was much significantly greater than that indicated by pH measured using a pH meter,paricularly for the extremely acidic soil samples,This is because the total soluble acidity of the extremely acidic soil samples was mainly composed of various soluble Al and Fe species,possibly in forms of Al sulfate complexes(e.g.,AlSO4+) and feerous Fe(Fe2+)_,It is therefore suggested not to use pH alone as an indicator of soluble acidity in ASS,particularly for extremely acidic ASS,It is also likely that AlSO4+ actively participated in cation exchange reactions.It appears that the possible involvement of this Al sulfate cation in the cation adsorption has significant effect on increasing the amount of acidity being adsorbed by the soils.

  9. Effects of Multiple Soil Conditioners on a Mine Site Acid Sulfate Soil for Vetiver Growth

    LIN Chu-Xia; LONG Xin-Xian; XU Song-Jun; CHU Cheng-Xing; MAI Shao-Zhi; JIANG Dian

    2004-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of various soil treatments on the growth of vetiver grass ( Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) with the objective of formulating appropriate soil media for use in sulfide-bearing mined areas. An acidic mine site acid sulfate soil (pH 2.8) was treated with different soil conditioner formula including hydrated lime, red mud (bauxite residues), zeolitic rock powder, biosolids and a compound fertilizer. Soils treated with red mud and hydrated lime corrected soil acidity and reduced or eliminated metal toxicity enabling the establishment of vetiver grass.Although over-liming affected growth, some seedlings of vetiver survived the initial strong alkaline conditions. Addition of appropriate amounts of zeolitic rock powder also enhanced growth, but over-application caused detrimental effects. In this experiment, soil medium with the best growth performance of vetiver was 50 g of red mud, 10 g of lime, 30 g of zeolitic rock powder and 30 g of biosolids with 2000 g of mine soils (100% survival rate with the greatest biomass and number of new shoots), but adding a chemical fertilizer to this media adversely impacted plant growth. In addition, a high application rate of biosolids resulted in poorer growth of vetiver, compared to a moderate application rate.

  10. Acid Release from an Acid Sulfate Soil Sample Under Successive Extractions with Different Extractants

    2000-01-01

    An acid sulfate soil sample was successively extracted with deionized water, 1 mol L-1 KCI and 0.000 5 mol L-1 Ca(OH)2 solutions. The results showed that only very small amounts of acidity were extracted by deionized water, possibly through slow jarosite hydrolysis. Acid release through jarosite hydrolysis was greatly enhanced by Ca(OH)2 extraction at the expense of the added OH- being neutralized by the acid released. Successive extraction of the sample with KCI removed the largest amounts of acidity from the sample. However, it is likely that the major form of acidity released by KC1 extraction was exchangeable acidity. The results also show the occurrence of low or non charged A1 and Fe species in water and Ca(OH)2 extracts after first a few extractions. It appears that such a phenomenon was related to a decreasing EC value with increasing number of extractions.

  11. Remote sensing of acid sulfate soils using multispectral and gamma-ray data

    Acid sulfate soils are a significant environmental problem in coastal regions of Australia. Drainage and disturbance of coastal lands can result in acid soil degradation and the release of sulfuric acid and toxic metals into coastal waters. Remote sensing can provide a useful tool for detection of these soils and monitoring of their disturbance. As acid sulfate soils become oxidised with exposure to air, iron-minerals are produced and precipitate at the surface. This results from the breakdown of pyrite to form hydrated iron minerals and elemental sulfur, the oxidation of which produces acidity. The concentration of iron minerals at the surface can be an indicator of the level of acid sulfate soil activity in the near subsurface. These iron minerals include goethite, ferrihydrite and jarosite. Space-borne remote sensing scanners such as Landsat TM are capable of detecting iron minerals as a result of ferric ion absorption of solar radiation. Hyperspectral scanners are capable of further discrimination of individual minerals. This paper will discuss spectral characteristics of active acid sulfate soils and demonstrate the use of spectral unmixing algorithms on Landsat TM to detect problem areas at the surface. This method matches multispectral data to material reflectance-spectra known as end-members. These end-members or materials are then resolved mathematically as to their respective contributions to the overall reflectance (Bierwirth, 1990). In this way, abundances for particular materials can be derived.Digital elevation data was used to distinguish between the iron minerals due to weathering of bedrock in upland areas and acid sulfate soils on the plains. Also, the results of a high resolution (200m linespacing) airborne gamma-ray survey are presented. This data senses the concentration of radioelements down to about 40 cm depth and is largely unaffected by vegetation. Concentrations of gamma-emitting elements can indicate the type and depth of alluvium that

  12. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2016-01-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the ma...

  13. Impact of mitigation strategies on acid sulfate soil chemistry and microbial community.

    Wu, Xiaofen; Sten, Pekka; Engblom, Sten; Nowak, Pawel; Österholm, Peter; Dopson, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Potential acid sulfate soils contain reduced iron sulfides that if oxidized, can cause significant environmental damage by releasing large amounts of acid and metals. This study examines metal and acid release as well as the microbial community capable of catalyzing metal sulfide oxidation after treating acid sulfate soil with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2). Leaching tests of acid sulfate soil samples were carried out in the laboratory. The pH of the leachate during the initial flushing with water lay between 3.8 and 4.4 suggesting that the jarosite/schwertmannite equilibrium controls the solution chemistry. However, the pH increased to circa 6 after treatment with CaCO3 suspension and circa 12 after introducing Ca(OH)2 solution. 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from community DNA extracted from the untreated and both CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 treated acid sulfate soils were most similar to bacteria (69.1% to 85.7%) and archaea (95.4% to 100%) previously identified from acid and metal contaminated environments. These species included a Thiomonas cuprina-like and an Acidocella-like bacteria as well as a Ferroplasma acidiphilum-like archeon. Although the CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 treatments did not decrease the proportion of microorganisms capable of accelerating acid and metal release, the chemical effects of the treatments suggested their reduced activity. PMID:25933291

  14. Identifying sources of acidity and spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils in the Anglesea River catchment, southern Australia

    Wong, Vanessa; Yau, Chin; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    Globally, coastal and estuarine floodplains are frequently underlain by sulfidic sediments. When exposed to oxygen, sulfidic sediments oxidise to form acid sulfate soils, adversely impacting on floodplain health and adjacent aquatic ecoystems. In eastern Australia, our understanding of the formation of these coastal and estuarine floodplains, and hence, spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils, is relatively well established. These soils have largely formed as a result of sedimentation of coastal river valleys approximately 6000 years BP when sea levels were one to two metres higher. However, our understanding of the evolution of estuarine systems and acid sulfate soil formation, and hence, distribution, in southern Australia remains limited. The Anglesea River, in southern Australia, is subjected to frequent episodes of poor water quality and low pH resulting in closure of the river and, in extreme cases, large fish kill events. This region is heavily reliant on tourism and host to a number of iconic features, including the Great Ocean Road and Twelve Apostles. Poor water quality has been linked to acid leakage from mining activities and Tertiary-aged coal seams, peat swamps and acid sulfate soils in the region. However, our understanding of the sources of acidity and distribution of acid sulfate soils in this region remains poor. In this study, four sites on the Anglesea River floodplain were sampled, representative of the main vegetation communities. Peat swamps and intertidal marshes were both significant sources of acidity on the floodplain in the lower catchment. However, acid neutralising capacity provided by carbonate sands suggests that there are additional sources of acidity higher in the catchment. This pilot study has highlighted the complexity in the links between the floodplain, upper catchment and waterways with further research required to understand these links for targeted acid management strategies.

  15. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2016-03-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to ameliorate soil acidity in rice-cropped soil. The secondary objective was to study the effects of calcium silicate amendment on soil acidity, exchangeable Al, exchangeable Ca, and Si content. The soil was treated with 0, 1, 2, and 3 Mg ha-1 of calcium silicate under submerged conditions and the soil treatments were sampled every 30 days throughout an incubation period of 120 days. Application of calcium silicate induced a positive effect on soil pH and exchangeable Al; soil pH increased from 2.9 (initial) to 3.5, while exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 (initial) to 0.82 cmolc kg-1. Furthermore, the exchangeable Ca and Si contents increased from 1.68 (initial) to 4.94 cmolc kg-1 and from 21.21 (initial) to 81.71 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it was noted that calcium silicate was effective at alleviating Al toxicity in acid sulfate, rice-cropped soil, yielding values below the critical level of 2 cmolc kg-1. In addition, application of calcium silicate showed an ameliorative effect as it increased soil pH and supplied substantial amounts of Ca and Si.

  16. Mobility of radium and heavy metals from uranium mine tailings in acid sulfate soils

    This study was aimed at determining whether heavy metals in tailings from Ranger Uranium Mine change in chemical form in such a way that they will become more mobile, or bioavailable, after they are mixed with extremely acidic soils from downstream of the mine. Four soils were studied: two samples were acid sulfate (jarositic or pyritic) materials and two were acidic materials overlying acid sulfate horizons. Copper, iron, manganese, lead, uranium and zinc fractions were determined in soils to which uranium mill tailings had been added. Total and exchangeable 226 Ra were also determined in selected samples. The tailings-soil mixtures were incubated for up to 4 months and included a comparison of reactions under continuously moist conditions and when subjected to a saturation and drying cycle. The tailings had considerably grater concentrations of total Mn, Pb, U and 226 Ra than the soils. The metals in the tailings occurred as relatively immobile forms. In the non-pyritic soils, the distribution of the metals between the fractions did not change much during 4 months of reaction. In the pyritic soil, which underwent oxidation and acidification during incubation, there were 2- to 3-fold increases in the exchangeable fractions of Fe, Mn,Cu and U. The metals in the tailings and soil behaved similarly. There appeared to be more likelihood of increased mobility of metals from oxidation of pyritic materials than from addition of tailings. The fraction of total 226 Ra that was exchangeable decreased from 11% in the original tailings to 2-7% after reaction with three of the soils but increased to 44% in one soil. At estimated long-term erosion rates, the tailings are not likely to be a source of heavy metal pollution, but addition of 226Ra to soils presents a possible radiological hazard. 19 refs., 12 tabs., 8 figs

  17. Impeded Acidification of Acid Sulfate Soils in an Inten- sively Drained Sugarcane Land

    2001-01-01

    Recent research results suggest that acidification of acid sulfate soils may be inhibited in well-drained estuarine floodplains in eastern Australia by the absence of natural creek levees. The lack of natural levees has allowed the inundation of the land by regular tidal flooding prior to the construction of flood mitigation work. Such physiographical conditions prevent the development of pre-drainage pyrite-derived soil acidifica- tion that possibly occurred at many levee-protected sites in eastern Australian estuarine floodplains during extremely dry spells. Pre-drainage acidification is considered as an important condition for accumulation of soluble Fe and consequently, the creation of favourable environments for catalysed pyrite oxidation. Under current intensively drained conditions, the acid materials produced by ongoing pyrite oxidation can be rapidly removed from soil pore water by lateral leaching and acid buffering, resulting in low concentrations of soluble Fe in the pyritic layer, which could reduce the rate of pyrite oxidation.

  18. Biochar Application in Malaysian Sandy and Acid Sulfate Soils: Soil Amelioration Effects and Improved Crop Production over Two Cropping Seasons

    Theeba Manickam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of biochar as an agricultural soil improvement was tested in acid sulfate and sandy soils from Malaysia, cropped with rice and corn. Malaysia has an abundance of waste rice husks that could be used to produce biochar. Rice husk biochar was produced in a gasifier at a local mill in Kelantan as well as in the laboratory using a controlled, specially designed, top lift up draft system (Belonio unit. Rice husk biochar was applied once to both soils at two doses (2% and 5%, in a pot set up that was carried out for two cropping seasons. Positive and significant crop yield effects were observed for both soils, biochars and crops. The yield effects varied with biochar type and dosage, with soil type and over the cropping seasons. The yield increases observed for the sandy soil were tentatively attributed to significant increases in plant-available water contents (from 4%–5% to 7%–8%. The yield effects in the acid sulfate soil were likely a consequence of a combination of (i alleviation of plant root stress by aluminum (Ca/Al molar ratios significantly increased, from around 1 to 3–5 and (ii increases in CEC. The agricultural benefits of rice husk biochar application to Malaysian soils holds promise for its future use.

  19. Biochar Application in Malaysian Sandy and Acid Sulfate Soils: Soil Amelioration Effects and Improved Crop Production over Two Cropping Seasons

    Theeba Manickam; Gerard Cornelissen; Robert T. Bachmann; Illani Z. Ibrahim; Jan Mulder; Hale, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biochar as an agricultural soil improvement was tested in acid sulfate and sandy soils from Malaysia, cropped with rice and corn. Malaysia has an abundance of waste rice husks that could be used to produce biochar. Rice husk biochar was produced in a gasifier at a local mill in Kelantan as well as in the laboratory using a controlled, specially designed, top lift up draft system (Belonio unit). Rice husk biochar was applied once to both soils at two doses (2% and 5%), in a pot set ...

  20. Sulfur isotope evidence for the contemporary formation of pyrite in a coastal acid sulfate soil

    The sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite (FeS2), greigite (Fe3S4) and pore-water sulfate was determined for a typical coastal acid sulfate soil (ASS). Greigite occurs only in the partially oxidised upper-most pyrite sediments as blackish clusters within vertical fissures and other macro-pores. The concentration of pyrite was an order of magnitude greater than greigite in this layer, continuing through the underlying reduced estuarine sediments. δ34S of pyrite (0.45 per mil) associated with greigite accumulations were distinctly different to the bulk average for pyrite (-3.7 per mil), but similar to greigite (0.9 per mil). Greigite is meta-stable under reducing conditions, readily transforming to pyrite. The transformation of iron monosulfides (including greigite) to pyrite is a sulfur-isotope conservative process and therefore, these observations indicate that pyrite is forming from greigite at the oxic/anoxic boundary

  1. Iron Monosulfide Distribution in Three Coastal Floodplain Acid Sulfate Soils, Eastern Australia

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of iron monosulfide (quantified as acid volatile sulfur: SAV) was compared with geo chemical properties that are known to affect its formation and accumulation in three coastal Holocene acid sulfate soils (ASS) at Tuckean Swamp, McLeods Creek and Bungawalbyn Swamp respectively. These proper ties included pH, reactive iron (FeR), pore-water sulfate (SO42-) and organic carbon (OC). Iron monosulfide was concentrated at the oxic/anoxic boundary. The Tuckean Swamp and McLeods Creek sites are Holocene sediments, whereas the Bungawalbyn Swamp is a Holocene peat. The concentration of SAV averaged 0.2 g kg-1 in a 0.5 m thick soil layer at the Tuckean Swamp, but was an order of magnitude lower in the oxic/anoxic transition layers at McLeods Creek and Bungawalbyn Swamp. The SAV mineral greigite (FesS4) was identified in the Tuckean Swamp by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). Very small concentrations of greigite were also observed in the McLeods Creek, based on crystal morphology and elemental composition. The concentration of SAV was a small fraction of the total reduced sulfur, representing at most 3% of the pyrite sulfur. However, the presence of this highly reactive sulfide mineral, distributed within pores where oxygen diffusion is most rapid, has important implications to the potential rate of acid production from these sediments.

  2. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2. PMID:24727041

  3. Impeded Acidification of Acid Sulfate Soils in an Inter—sively Drained Sugarcane Land

    C.LIN; R.T.BUSH; 等

    2001-01-01

    Recent research results suggest that acidification of acid sulfate soils may be inhibited in well-drained estuarine floodplains in eastern Australia by the absence of natural creek levees,The lack of natural levees has allowed the inuudation of the land by regular tidal flooding prior to the construction of flood mitigation work.Such physiographical conditions prevent the development of pre-draingae pyrite-derived soil acidifica-tion that possibly occurred at many levee-protected sites in eastern Australian estuarine floodplains during extremely dry spells.Pre-drainage acidification is considered as an important condition for accumulation of soluble Fe and consequently,the creation of favourable environments for catalysed pyrite oxidation.Under current intensively drained onditions,the acid materials produced by ongoing pyrite oxidation can be rapidly removed from soil pore water by lateral leaching and acid buffering,resulting in low concentrations of soluble Fe in the pyritic layer,which could reduce the rate of pyrite oxidation.

  4. Improved detection of coastal acid sulfate soil hotspots through biomonitoring of metal(loid) accumulation in water lilies (Nymphaea capensis).

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-15

    Anthropogenically disturbed coastal acid sulfate soils along the east coast of Australia, and worldwide, periodically result in the discharge of acid waters containing high concentrations of metals. Identifying priority sites (hotspots) within a catchment for acid sulfate soil remediation activities typically involves long-term monitoring of drainwater chemistry, including the capture of data on unpredictable rain-induced groundwater discharge events. To improve upon this monitoring approach, this study investigated using the water lily (Nymphaea capensis) as a biomonitor of drainage waters to identify hotspots in three acid sulfate soil impacted catchments (83 km(2)) in north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. In one catchment where the location of hotspots was known, water lily lamina concentrations of a suite of metal(loid)s were significantly (pcatchment-scale water lily sampling program undertaken in catchments with unidentified hotspots revealed within catchment variation of plant metal concentrations up to 70-fold. High resolution maps produced from these results, therefore, provided strong evidence for the location of potential hotspots which were confirmed with measurements of drainwater chemistry during rain-induced groundwater discharge events. Median catchment lily accumulation was ca. 160 mg Al kg(-1) and 1,300 mg Fe kg(-1), with hotspots containing up to 6- and 10-fold higher Al and Fe concentrations. These findings suggest that biomonitoring with N. capensis can be an important tool to rapidly identify priority sites for remediation in acid sulfate soil impacted landscapes. PMID:24805963

  5. Factors Controlling Deoxygenation of "Floodwater" Overlying an Acid Sulfate Soil: Experimental Modeling

    C. LIN; P. G. HASKINS; J. LIN

    2003-01-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to simulate the effect of flooding on water deoxygenation in acid sulfate soil floodplain systems. The originally oxygenated "floodwater" could be deoxygenated immediately following "flooding" and it is likely that this was caused mainly by decomposition of organic debris from the inundated plants. Deoxygenation eventually led to the depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the "floodwater"and it is highly possible that this resulted in the transformations of ferric Fe to ferrous Fe, sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and organic nitrogen to ammonia (ammonification). The accumulation of these reduced substances allows the "floodwater" to develop DO-consuming capacity (DOCC). When the "floodwater" is mixed with the introduced oxygenated water, apart from the dilution effects, the reduced substances contained in the "floodwater" oxidize to further consume DO carried by the introduced water. However, it appears that the DO drop in the mixed water can only last for a few hours if no additional DO-depleted "floodwater" is added.Entry of atmospheric oxygen into the water can raise the DO level of the mixed water and lower water pH through the oxidation of the reduced substances.

  6. Gaseous Nitrogen Losses from Coastal Acid Sulfate Soils:A Short-Term Study

    B. C. T. MACDONALD; O. T. DENMEAD; I.WHITE; G. BYRANT

    2011-01-01

    NOx and N2O emissions from coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS) cultivated for sugarcane production were investigated on the coastal lowlands of northern New South Wales, Australia. Two series of short-term measurements were made using chambers and micrometeorological techniques. Series 1 occurred during the wet season, the water-filled pore space (WFPS) was between 60%-80% and the site flooded during the measurements. Measurements were made directly after the harvest of soybean crop, which fixed an estimated 100 kg N ha-1, and the emission amounted to 3.2 kg NOx-N ha-1 (12 d) and 1.8 kg N2O-N ha-1 (5 d). Series 2 was made towards the end of the dry season when the WFPS was less than 60%. In Series 2, after an application of 50 kg N ha-1, emissions were markedly less, amounting to 0.9 kg N ha-1 over 10 d. During both series when the soil was moist, emissions of NOx were larger than those of N2O. The emission of NOx appeared to be haphazard, with little time dependence, but there was a clear diurnal cycle for N2O, emphasising the need for continuous measurement procedures for both gases. Theseresults suggest that agricultural production on CASS could be important sources of greenhouse gases and nitrogen practices will need to be optimised to reduce the offsite effects of atmospheric warming, acidification or nitrification. Many questions still remain unanswered such as the emissions during the soybean bean filling stage and crop residue decomposition, the longer-term losses following the fertiliser application and emissions from CASS under different land uses.

  7. Forest-soil response to acid and salt additions of sulfate. 2. Aluminum and base cations

    Reconstructed spodosol and intact alfisol soil columns were used to examine the effects of 52 weeks of additions of various simulated throughfall solutions on base cation, Al, acid neutralizing capacity, and pH levels in soil leachates. The work illustrates the importance of soil cation exchange (especially in the forest floor), anion concentrations, and pCO2 levels in controlling the leachate chemistry in response to acidic and 'seasalt' deposition events

  8. Sulfate metabolism. I. Sulfate uptake and redistribution of acid rain sulfate by edible plants

    Sulfur is the major component of polluted air in industrialized societies. Atmospheric sulfur is converted to sulfuric acid through a series of chemical reactions which can eventually reenter many ecosystems. When edible plants are grown in soils containing varying amounts of sulfate, the roots take up and transport inorganic sulfate to the stems and leaves. The sulfate taken up by the roots and the amount transported to the stem and leaves was found to be a function of the concentration of sulfate in the soil. Inorganic sulfate taken up by a corn plant seedling can be rapidly converted to organic sulfate by the root system. Nine days after one of a pair of pea plants was inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate (dilute H235SO4) it was found that the sulfate was translocated not only in the inoculated plant, but also to the uninoculated pea plant in the same container. Also, when the leaves of a mature potato plant were inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate it was found that the sulfate was translocated into the edible potatoes. Fractionation of the potatoes showed that most of the sulfate was water soluble of which 30% was inorganic sulfate and 70% was in the form of organic sulfur. One third of the non-water soluble translocated acid rain sulfate was equally divided between lipid and non-lipid organic sulfur of the potato. 9 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  9. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  10. Significance of Ligand Exchange Relating to Sulfate in Retarding Acidification of Variable Charge Soils Caused by Acid Rain

    WANGJINGHUA; YUTIANREN

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of evaluating the role of ligand exchange of sulfate ions in retarding the rate of acidification of variable charge soils,the changes in pH after the addition of different amounts of HNO3 or H2SO4 to representative soils of China were measured .A difference between pH changes caused by the two kinds of acids was observed only for variable charge soils and kaolinite,but not for constant charge soils and bentonite,The larger the proportion of H2SO4 in the HNO3-H2SO4 mixture,the lower the calculated H+ ion activities remained in the suspension.The difference in H+ ion activities between H2SO4 systems and HNO3 systems was larger for soils with a low base-saturation(BS) percentage than those with a high BS percentage.The removal of free iron oxides from the soil led to a decrease in the difference,while the coating of Fe2O3 on a bentonite resulted in a remarkable appearance of the difference.The effect of ligand exchange on the acidity status of the soil varied with the soil type.Surface soils with a high organic matter content showed a less pronounced effect of ligand exchange than subsoils did.It was estimated that when acid rain chiefly containing H2SO4 was deposited on variable charge soils the acidification rate might be slower by 20%-40% than that when the acid rain chiefly contained HNO3 for soils with a high organic matter content,and that the rate might be half of that caused by HNO3 for soils with a low organic matter content,especially for latosols.

  11. The geochemistry during management of lake acidification caused by the rewetting of sulfuric (pH < 4) acid sulfate soils

    Highlights: • The dynamic geochemistry of a lake acidification event and its management was assessed. • Sulfate complexes dominated the aqueous metal speciation at low pH. • Iron oxydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite) were identified. • Aerial additions of limestone to the acidic water slowly returned the pH to near neutral. • Coating of the limestone with gypsum and metal precipitates limited its neutralisation efficiency. - Abstract: Understanding the geochemistry and kinetics of acidification events arising from acid sulfate soils is important to enable effective management and risk assessment. Large-scale exposure and oxidation of acid sulfate soils occurred during a drought in the Lower Lakes (Murray–Darling Basin) of South Australia. We examined the geochemical changes that occurred in one region (Boggy Lake) that experienced surface water acidification and was subsequently neutralised via aerial limestone (CaCO3) dosing and dilution via natural lake refill. Very low pH (< 3) and high concentrations (≈10–1000 mg/L Fe, Al, Mn) of dissolved metals were initially found in surface water. The water chemistry exhibited pH-dependent enhancement of constituents typically associated with acid sulfate soils (SO4, Al and Fe). Geochemical speciation calculations indicated that most (60–80%) of the acidity was present as dissolved metal-sulfate complexes at low pH. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the orange-brown precipitates present after an initial limestone dosing were secondary oxyhydroxysulfate minerals (schwertmannite, jarosite). Further limestone dosing resulted in neutralisation of the pH, reduction in dissolved metal concentrations, dissolution of jarosite and schwertmannite precipitates, and formation of other metal oxyhydroxide phases. The results were consistent with a pE-pH diagram constructed for metal-sulfur geochemistry. Assessment of the measured and simulated (using PHREEQC) pH and Ca/Cl ratio during limestone

  12. Recover of productivity in acids sulfate soils by means of addition organic and lime amendments under greenhouse conditions at Boyaca

    In flooded zones of Boyaca have been identified acid sulfate soil (SSA), restricted for extremes acidity originated for reactions of chemical and biological oxide-reduction by organic material of sulfur iron (pyrite), forming this way big quantities of sulfuric acid and high concentrations of Al toxic, besides it is characterized for being recent soils, with excessive quantities of S; high levels of organic matter and in some parts affected for salts and sodium that together with flooded areas and bad drenated make them inadequate for the establishing of cultivation. For this reason, it is looked for to make productive this SSA of high influence in the area of watering district. Starting with calcareous and organics rocks in winter pasture, the Resources to used were Ca (OH)2 and dolomite in doses of 10,25,50 and 100 t/ha; hen dung 5,10,20 and 30 t/ha mixes with limes hen dung 10+5, 10+10,25+20 and 50+30 using A. sative like indicator plant in a design completely on random with 22 treatments, correspond to ca (OH)2 25,50 ton/ha, dolomite 10,2.50 ton/ha and the mixes with calcareous rocks and hen dung with doses of 25+20 and 50+30 ton/ha respectively, which obtained the best answer in the development of the plant (biomass), reflected in the physical-chemical dynamic of the SSA. Due to this treatments increased in two units of pH, decreased the content of salts and the concentration of aluminum of non-toxic change, with respect to the initial soil, the soil with doses greater to 50 t/ha Ca (OH)2 evidenced over-limed together with the of hen-dung (5,10 t/ha) and the initial soil presented a restricted in develop and recuperation, indicating the conditions adverse in SSA

  13. Could Acid Sulfate Soils Be a Potential Environmental Threat to Estuarine Ecosystems on the South CHina Coast?

    C.LIN

    1999-01-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) contain considerable amounts of reduced sulfur compounds(mainly pyrite) which produce sulfuric acid upon their oxidation.ASS-derived environmental degradation widely occurs in the coastal lowlands around the world,especially in the tropical and subtropical areas.The presence of ASS iun the South China has been recognized but their distribution may be largely underestimated because the soil survey data concerning ASS are based on unreliable methods and techniques.ASS in the South China have been traditionally used for rice cultivation and this practice has been proved sustainable if appropriate improvement measures are adopted.Recently,the rapid economic growth in the region has resulted in intensified coastal development which frequently involves activities that may disturb ASS,Construction of roads,foundations and aquaculture ponds may cause the exposure of ASS to air and bring about severe environmental acidificvation.There is currently insufficient awareness of the problems among the researchers,policy-makers and land managers in the South China.More attention must be paid to the possible ASS-dervived environmental degradation in order to ensure a sustainable development of the coastal lowlands in the South China region.

  14. Applying Limestone or Basalt in Combination with Bio-Fertilizer to Sustain Rice Production on an Acid Sulfate Soil in Malaysia

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of applying ground magnesium limestone (GML or ground basalt in combination with bio-fertilizer to sustain rice production on an acid sulfate soil in Malaysia. Soils from Kelantan Plains, Malaysia, were treated with GML, ground basalt, bio-fertilizer, GML + bio-fertilizer, and ground basalt + bio-fertilizer (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that soil fertility was improved by applying the soil amendments. GML and basalt contain some Zn and Cu; thus, application of these amendments would increase their contents in the soil needed for the healthy growth of rice. Basalt applied in combination with bio-fertilizer appeared to be the best agronomic option to improve the fertility of acid sulfate soils for sustainable rice production in the long run. In addition to increasing Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu reserves in the soil, water pH increased and precipitated Al3+ and/or Fe2+. Ground basalt is cheaper than GML, but basalt dissolution in the acidic soil was slow. As such, its ameliorative effects could only be seen significantly from the second season onwards. The specially-formulated bio-fertilizer for alleviating the infertility of acid sulfate soil could also enhance rice growth. The use of the bio-fertilizer fortified with N2-fixing bacteria is a green technology that would help reduce NO3− and/or NO2− pollution and reduce the cost of rice production. The phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB present in the bio-fertilizer not only increased the available P, but also helped release organic acids that would inactivate Al3+ and/or Fe2+ via the process of chelation.

  15. Sulfate retention and cation leaching of forest soils in response to acid additions

    Much research within the past decade has focused on the effects of increased sulfur (S) deposition on surface waters. As inputs of S deposition as SO4(2-) build up in the soil over time, the concentration of SO4(2-) leaching from soils may also increase. Leachate SO4(2-) concentrations were greater for the high-S than for the low-S treatment for each soil type, resulting in greater cation leachate concentrations for soils that received the high-S treatment. Calcium was the primary base cation in both the Spodosol and Alfisol leachates. Declining concentrations of base cations and NH4(+) over the length of the study led to an increase in Al(3+) concentrations and decrease in pH for some of the Spodosol leachates. It is difficult to extrapolate their laboratory rates of change to the BBWM catchments because of differences between the experiment and field conditions. Soil temperature, the amount and rate of S application, and the total mass of soil exposed to treatment were hypothesized to be important factors affecting net S retention in Spodosols under field conditions. However, the authors feel that SO4(2-) adsorption under field conditions would still be the primary mechanism of S retention because of similarities between SO4(2-) concentrations in treatment solutions used for the present experiment and those in natural throughfall solutions

  16. Early Performance of Duong Mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco on Three Rootstock under Acid Sulfate Soil Fields at Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    Khoe Thi Le

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract About 1.6 billion hectare area of acid sulfate soils is at Mekong Delta of Vietnam, and Duong mandarin fruits are valued for the fresh market due to the easy peeling, attractive flavor, and health and nutritional properties; thereby, the investigation on early performance of Duong mandarin on three rootstock under acid sulfate soil fields (pH below 4 at Mekong Delta of Vietnam was undertaken from 2009 to 2012 for determination of the most promising scion stock combination of Duong mandarin, which introduced to growers for expanding citrus production to increase in income of farmers, and helping to use the sustainable and efficient land resource at acid sulfate soil region of Mekong Delta. Primary results showed that Duong mandarin grafted on Mat orange, Tau lemon and Carrizo citrange were significant differenence in vegetative parameters, fruit yield and quality. It proved that Duong mandarin trees grafted on Tau lemon were better growth and development on acid sulfate soil fields with below 4 pH in soil and water suspension of 1:2.5 ratio as compared to those grafted on Mat orange and Carrizo citrange rootstocks; whereby, that induced trees with 171.48 cm height, 6.65 m3 canopy volume and 51.84 mm trunk diameter, 1.08 scion/ stock ratio in third year after growing. Moreover, Duong mandarin trees grafted on Tau lemon were with spreading growth performance. In regarding to fruit yield and quality, Duong mandarin trees grafted on Tau lemon produced highest fruit yield of 9.21 kg per tree per year in third year after planting, and fruit with 115.30g weight, 8.85 brix juice, thinner and somewhat easy peel rind. 

  17. Acidification and buffering mechanisms in acid sulfate soil wetlands of the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia.

    Glover, Fiona; Whitworth, Kerry L; Kappen, Peter; Baldwin, Darren S; Rees, Gavin N; Webb, John A; Silvester, Ewen

    2011-04-01

    The acid generation mechanisms and neutralizing capacities of sulfidic sediments from two inland wetlands have been studied in order to understand the response of these types of systems to drying events. The two systems show vastly different responses to oxidation, with one (Bottle Bend (BB) lagoon) having virtually no acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and the other (Psyche Bend (PB) lagoon) an ANC that is an order of magnitude greater than the acid generation potential. While BB strongly acidifies during oxidation the free acid generation is less than that expected from the measured proton production and consumption processes, with additional proton consumption attributed to the formation of an acid-anion (chloride) FeIII (oxyhydr)oxide product, similar to akaganéite (Fe(OH)2.7Cl0.3). While such products can partially attenuate the acidification of these systems, resilience to acidification is primarily imparted by sediment ANC. PMID:21375259

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Jusop, Shamshuddin; Othman, Radziah; Latif, Md Abdul; Ismail, Mohd Razi

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia). The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c) kg(-1), respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis). The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA) and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65%) existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM) was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils. PMID:25285745

  19. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia. The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c kg(-1, respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis. The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65% existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils.

  20. Hydrological processes behind annual and decadal-scale variations in the water quality of runoff in Finnish catchments with acid sulfate soils

    Toivonen, Janne; Österholm, Peter; Fröjdö, Sören

    2013-04-01

    SummaryIn this study we assess long- and short term temporal variations in the impact of acid sulfate (a.s.) soils on river water quality. We demonstrate how such variations depend on changes in hydrological conditions driven by land use, meteorological variations and potential changes in climate with important implications on mitigation strategies, water ecology and utilization of water resources. Quality of river water discharging into the Larsmo-Öja Lake in Midwestern Finland was studied by using long term water data collected during 1963-2009. Acid sulfate soils are extremely acidic soils (pH depletion of the acidic pool in the existing a.s. soils. In the short run, water quality varied greatly due to varying hydrological conditions between seasons and years. Generally, the impact from a.s. soils was highest during high runoff in autumn and spring, and therefore, neutralization of acidity in discharge water by liming would at such occasions be very demanding. The relationship between the runoff and water quality was, however, somewhat different during different seasons. As expected, dry summers (low ground water levels) were found to increase the impact from a.s. soils in the subsequent autumn, but only if runoff was high. Towards the end of the study period winters tended to become warmer with higher runoff and spring floods tended to occur earlier. Thus, events with bad water quality during the winter months have become more common and acidic spring surges occur earlier. Seen from the data in this study, it is obvious that potential changes in the future climate will have significant consequences on the impact from a.s. soils on water courses.

  1. Forest soil response to acid and salt additions of sulfate. 3. Solubilization and composition of dissolved organic carbon

    A year-long experiment, using reconstructed spodosol and intact alfisol soil columns, was conducted to examine the effects of various simulated throughfall solutions on soil C dynamics. Soil organic C solubilization, dissolved organic C fractions, and decomposition rates were studied using simulated acidic and salt throughfall solutions. Based on the results of the study the authors propose that throughfall solutions of pH above 3.7 will have little or no influences on dissolved organic C cycling in the types of spodosol and alfisol forest soils used here. However, at pH 3.0 some alterations in organic C solubilization, dissolved organic C fractions, and mobility could be expected

  2. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN ACID SULFATE LANDSCAPES

    Chuxia Lin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation of sulfide minerals produces sulfuric acid and consequently creates Acid Sulfate Landscapes (ASLs), which represent one of the most degraded types of land-surface environments. Although acid sulfate-producing weathering is a naturally occurring process, it is markedly facilitated by human intervention. Mining is by far the dominant anthropogenic cause for the creation of inland acid sulfate footprints while land reclamation in coastal lowlands is the driver for the formation of coas...

  3. Fixation Status of Acid Soils

    Six acid soil series from different benchmark sites; Rangsit soil (Sulfic Tropaquepts) (two acid sulfate soils), Pakchong soil (Oxic Paleustults) Korat soil (Oxic Paleustults), Warin soil (Oxic Paleustults), Mae Taeng soil (Typic paleustults) and Boundary grey soil and two Thai phosphate rocks (P R) (Lampun P R and Ratchabuie P R) had been characterized in the laboratory by isotope techniques (E, value Part 1). Triple superphosphate (TSP) was used as a standard fertilizer. R P and TSP with 50 mg P Kg-1 soil were incubated for 30 days to examine the fixing capacity of the acid soils. The results showed that Rangsit Soil which is acid sulfate had high fixing capacity. Pakchong soil retained higher P fixation ability than Korat and Warin soil series. The highest fixation capacity among 7 acid soils were Grey Soil and Mae Taeng soil series. The solubility of TSP was decreased when incorporated with soil after incubation for 30 days. P R from Ratchaburi showed higher effectiveness than Lamphun P R

  4. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN ACID SULFATE LANDSCAPES

    Chuxia Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of sulfide minerals produces sulfuric acid and consequently creates Acid Sulfate Landscapes (ASLs, which represent one of the most degraded types of land-surface environments. Although acid sulfate-producing weathering is a naturally occurring process, it is markedly facilitated by human intervention. Mining is by far the dominant anthropogenic cause for the creation of inland acid sulfate footprints while land reclamation in coastal lowlands is the driver for the formation of coastal ASLs. The projected climate change highlights the possibility of an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events such as droughts and heavy rains, which is likely to accelerate the acid generation in some circumstances and increase the frequency and magnitude of acid discharge. Sea level rise as a result of global warming will cause additional problems with the coastal ASLs. This is a review article. The following aspects are covered: (a the overriding biogeochemical processes leading to acid sulfate-producing weathering, (b a brief introduction to the inland acid sulfate landscapes, (c a brief introduction to the coastal acid sulfate landscapes, (d the likely impacts of climate change on ASLs and (e the possible measures to combat climate change-induced environmental degradation in the identified key acid sulfate footprints. The projected climate change is like to significantly affect the acid sulfate landscapes in different ways. Appropriate management strategies and cost-effective technologies need to be developed in order to minimize the climate change-induced ecological degradation.

  5. Acid Sulfate Alteration in Gusev Crater, Mars

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Catalano, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit landed on the Gusev Crater plains west of the Columbia Hills in January, 2004, during the Martian summer (sol 0; sol = 1 Martian day = 24 hr 40 min). Spirit explored the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater in the vicinity of Home Plate at the onset on its second winter (sol approximately 900) until the onset of its fourth winter (sol approximately 2170). At that time, Spirit became mired in a deposit of fined-grained and sulfate-rich soil with dust-covered solar panels and unfavorable pointing of the solar arrays toward the sun. Spirit has not communicated with the Earth since sol 2210 (January, 2011). Like its twin rover Opportunity, which landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridiani Planum, Spirit has an Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument for chemical analyses and a Moessbauer spectrometer (MB) for measurement of iron redox state, mineralogical speciation, and quantitative distribution among oxidation (Fe(3+)/sigma Fe) and coordination (octahedral versus tetrahedral) states and mineralogical speciation (e.g., olivine, pyroxene, ilmenite, carbonate, and sulfate). The concentration of SO3 in Gusev rocks and soils varies from approximately 1 to approximately 34 wt%. Because the APXS instrument does not detect low atomic number elements (e.g., H and C), major-element oxide concentrations are normalized to sum to 100 wt%, i.e., contributions of H2O, CO2, NO2, etc. to the bulk composition care not considered. The majority of Gusev samples have approximately 6 plus or minus 5 wt% SO3, but there is a group of samples with high SO3 concentrations (approximately 30 wt%) and high total iron concentrations (approximately 20 wt%). There is also a group with low total Fe and SO3 concentrations that is also characterized by high SiO2 concentrations (greater than 70 wt%). The trend labeled "Basaltic Soil" is interpreted as mixtures in variable proportions between unaltered igneous material and oxidized and SO3-rich basaltic

  6. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  7. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  8. A review of acid sulfate soil impacts, actions and policies that impact on water quality in Great Barrier Reef catchments, including a case study on remediation at East Trinity.

    Powell, B; Martens, M

    2005-01-01

    An estimated 666,000 ha of acid sulfate soils (ASS) occur within the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) catchments of Queensland, Australia. Extensive areas have been drained causing acidification, metal contamination, deoxygenation and iron precipitation in reef receiving waters. The close proximity of ASS to reef waters makes them a substantial threat to water quality. Another important issue linked with ASS is their release of soluble iron, which is known to stimulate nuisance marine algal blooms, in particular Lyngbya majuscula. Known blooms of the cyanobacteria in reef waters have been confirmed at Shoalwater Bay, Corio Bay, the Whitsunday area and Hinchinbrook Channel. Acid sulfate soils are intimately related to coastal wetland landscapes. Where landscapes containing ASS have been disturbed (such as for agriculture, aquaculture, marinas, etc.) the biodiversity of adjacent wetlands can be adversely affected. However, there is no clear knowledge of the real extent of the so-called "hotspot" ASS areas that occur within the GBR catchments. Management of ASS in reef catchments has benefited from the implementation of the Queensland Acid Sulfate Soils Management Strategy through policy development, mapping, training programs, an advisory service, research and community participation. However, major gaps remain in mapping the extent and nature of ASS. Areas of significant acidification (i.e. hotspots) need to be identified and policies developed for their remediation. Research has a critical role to play in understanding ASS risk and finding solutions, to prevent the adverse impacts that may be caused by ASS disturbance. A case study is presented of the East Trinity site near Cairns, a failed sugar cane development that episodically discharges large amounts of acid into Trinity Inlet, resulting in periodic fish kills. Details are presented of scientific investigations, and a lime-assisted tidal exchange strategy that are being undertaken to remediate a serious ASS problem

  9. Sulfate Dynamics and Base Cation Release in a High Elevation Appalachian Forest Soil

    Lusk, Mary Gilchrist

    1998-01-01

    Two soils from the Fernow Experimental Forest near Parsons, West Virginia were characterized and evaluated in terms of their susceptibility to enhanced soil acidification via acidic atmospheric inputs. After initial physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization, the soils were analyzed for their ability to adsorb and retain sulfate (SO42-) through a series of batch adsorption and desorption experiments. Reconstructed soil profiles were then subjected to water leaching as the prelim...

  10. Sulfate, chloride and fluoride retention in Andosols exposed to volcanic acid emissions

    Delmelle, Pierre; Delfosse, Thomas; Delvaux, Bruno

    2003-12-01

    The continuous emissions of SO{sub 2}, HCl and HF by Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, represent a substantial source of atmospheric S-, Cl- and F-containing acid inputs for local ecosystems. We report on the effects of such acid depositions on the sulfate, chloride and fluoride contents in soils (0-40 cm) from two distinct transects located downwind from the volcano. The first transect corresponds to relatively undifferentiated Vitric Andosols, and the second transect to more weathered Eutric Andosols. These soils are exposed to various rates of volcanogenic acid addition, with the Vitric sites being generally more affected. Prolonged acid inputs have led to a general pH decrease and reduced exchangeable base cation concentrations in the Andosols. The concentrations of 0.5 M NH{sub 4}F- and 0.016 M KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-extractable sulfate (NH{sub 4}F-S and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-S, respectively) indicate that volcanic S addition has increased the inorganic sulfate content of the Vitric and Eutric soils at all depths. In this process, the rate of sulfate accumulation is also dependent on soil allophane contents. For all soils, NH{sub 4}F extracted systematically more (up to 40 times) sulfate than KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. This difference suggests sulfate incorporation into an aluminum hydroxy sulfate phase, whose contribution to total inorganic sulfate in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols is estimated from {approx}34 to 95% and {approx}65 to 98%, respectively. The distribution of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-extractable chloride in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols exposed to volcanic Cl inputs reveals that added chloride readily migrates through the soil profiles. In contrast, reaction of fluoride with Al and Fe oxyhydroxides and allophanes is an important sink mechanism in the Masaya Andosols exposed to airborne volcanic F. Fluoride dominates the anion distribution in all soil horizons, although F is the least concentrated element in the volcanic emissions and depositions. The soil anion

  11. Sulfate, chloride and fluoride retention in Andosols exposed to volcanic acid emissions

    The continuous emissions of SO2, HCl and HF by Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, represent a substantial source of atmospheric S-, Cl- and F-containing acid inputs for local ecosystems. We report on the effects of such acid depositions on the sulfate, chloride and fluoride contents in soils (0-40 cm) from two distinct transects located downwind from the volcano. The first transect corresponds to relatively undifferentiated Vitric Andosols, and the second transect to more weathered Eutric Andosols. These soils are exposed to various rates of volcanogenic acid addition, with the Vitric sites being generally more affected. Prolonged acid inputs have led to a general pH decrease and reduced exchangeable base cation concentrations in the Andosols. The concentrations of 0.5 M NH4F- and 0.016 M KH2PO4-extractable sulfate (NH4F-S and KH2PO4-S, respectively) indicate that volcanic S addition has increased the inorganic sulfate content of the Vitric and Eutric soils at all depths. In this process, the rate of sulfate accumulation is also dependent on soil allophane contents. For all soils, NH4F extracted systematically more (up to 40 times) sulfate than KH2PO4. This difference suggests sulfate incorporation into an aluminum hydroxy sulfate phase, whose contribution to total inorganic sulfate in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols is estimated from ∼34 to 95% and ∼65 to 98%, respectively. The distribution of KH2PO4-extractable chloride in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols exposed to volcanic Cl inputs reveals that added chloride readily migrates through the soil profiles. In contrast, reaction of fluoride with Al and Fe oxyhydroxides and allophanes is an important sink mechanism in the Masaya Andosols exposed to airborne volcanic F. Fluoride dominates the anion distribution in all soil horizons, although F is the least concentrated element in the volcanic emissions and depositions. The soil anion distribution reflects preferential retention of fluoride over sulfate and chloride, and of

  12. Sulfate, chloride and fluoride retention in Andosols exposed to volcanic acid emissions.

    Delmelle, Pierre; Delfosse, Thomas; Delvaux, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    The continuous emissions of SO(2), HCl and HF by Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, represent a substantial source of atmospheric S-, Cl- and F-containing acid inputs for local ecosystems. We report on the effects of such acid depositions on the sulfate, chloride and fluoride contents in soils (0-40 cm) from two distinct transects located downwind from the volcano. The first transect corresponds to relatively undifferentiated Vitric Andosols, and the second transect to more weathered Eutric Andosols. These soils are exposed to various rates of volcanogenic acid addition, with the Vitric sites being generally more affected. Prolonged acid inputs have led to a general pH decrease and reduced exchangeable base cation concentrations in the Andosols. The concentrations of 0.5 M NH(4)F- and 0.016 M KH(2)PO(4)-extractable sulfate (NH(4)F-S and KH(2)PO(4)-S, respectively) indicate that volcanic S addition has increased the inorganic sulfate content of the Vitric and Eutric soils at all depths. In this process, the rate of sulfate accumulation is also dependent on soil allophane contents. For all soils, NH(4)F extracted systematically more (up to 40 times) sulfate than KH(2)PO(4). This difference suggests sulfate incorporation into an aluminum hydroxy sulfate phase, whose contribution to total inorganic sulfate in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols is estimated from approximately 34 to 95% and approximately 65 to 98%, respectively. The distribution of KH(2)PO(4)-extractable chloride in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols exposed to volcanic Cl inputs reveals that added chloride readily migrates through the soil profiles. In contrast, reaction of fluoride with Al and Fe oxyhydroxides and allophanes is an important sink mechanism in the Masaya Andosols exposed to airborne volcanic F. Fluoride dominates the anion distribution in all soil horizons, although F is the least concentrated element in the volcanic emissions and depositions. The soil anion distribution reflects preferential retention

  13. Transformations of organic and inorganic sulfur: importance to sulfate flux in an adirondack forest soil

    Sulfate flux from forest soils as a result of inputs from acidic deposition is thought to be a critical process in regulating acidification of surface waters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate biotic transformations of sulfur in an Adirondack Mountain forest soil by adding 35S-sulfate to the forest floor. In September 1983 to each of two 0.5 m2 plots, 2.22 x 10/sub 10/ dpm of 35S-sulfate was added in 4 liters of solution. Analysis of soil horizons from the plot at the end of the six week incubation indicated that 70 and 99 percent of the added 35S was retained in the soil at plots 1 and 2, respectively. More than 70 percent of the 35S was found in Oa, Bh, and Bs1 horizons. In O horizons greater than 80 percent of the 35S was found as organic sulfur, whereas in mineral horizons most was found as adsorbed sulfate. These findings indicated that a portion of the sulfate moving through the soil is both rapidly immobilized in the forest floor and adsorbed in the mineral horizons. On a net basis, however, the soil is not accumulating sulfur so that mineralization and desorption must equal immobilization and adsorption

  14. Spectral identification of hydrated sulfates on Mars and comparison with acidic environments on Earth

    Bishop, Janice L.; Darby Dyar, M.; Lane, Melissa D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2004-10-01

    We interpret recent spectral data of Mars collected by the Mars Exploration Rovers to contain substantial evidence of sulfate minerals and aqueous processes. We present visible/near-infrared (VNIR), mid-IR and Mössbauer spectra of several iron sulfate minerals and two acid mine drainage (AMD) samples collected from the Iron Mountain site and compare these combined data with the recent spectra of Mars. We suggest that the sulfates on Mars are produced via aqueous oxidation of sulfides known to be present on Mars from Martian meteorites. The sulfate-rich rock outcrops observed in Meridiani Planum may have formed in an acidic environment similar to AMD environments on Earth. Because microorganisms are typically involved in the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates in terrestrial AMD sites, sulfate-rich rock outcrops on Mars may be a good location to search for evidence of life on that planet. Whether or not life evolved on Mars, following the trail of sulfate minerals is likely to lead to aqueous processes and chemical weathering. Our results imply that sulfate minerals formed in Martian soils via chemical weathering, perhaps over very long time periods, and that sulfate minerals precipitated following aqueous oxidation of sulfides to form the outcrop rocks at Meridiani Planum.

  15. SULFATION OF ARABINOGALACTAN BY SULFAMIC ACID IN DIOXANE MEDIUM

    Наталья Юрьевна Васильева

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sulfation of arabinogalactan (AG by sulfamic acid in the presence of urea at temperatures 70–95 °C in dioxane medium was studied. The growth of sulfation temperature from 70 to 95 °C increases a degree of AG sulfation. According to NMR 13C spectroscopy data sulfate groups are fixed at С2 and C4 positions of galactose unit of basic chain and at C6 position of terminal galactose units of basic and side chains of arabinogalactan. The sulfation of AG by complex sulfamic acid – urea in dioxane medium makes possible to increase the environmental safety and efficiency of the process as compared to the known sulfation methods.

  16. Characteristics of Some Heavy Metals in AcidSulfate{1mmTopsoils, Eastern Australia

    2001-01-01

    Forty-five acid sulfate topsoil samples (depth < 0.5 m) from 15soil cores at 11 locations along the New South Wales coast, Australia,were selected to investigate the chemical behavior of Zn, Mn, Cr, Coand Pb in these soils. The amount of HCl-extractable Mn was muchsmaller than the mean value of the total Mn documented for other soils.This may be attributed to enhanced mobilization of Mn from the soilsunder the extremely acidic and seasonally flooded conditionsencountered in the investigated soils.   The pH-dependency of soluble Zn and Mn was strongly affected by theavailability of acid reactive Zn and Mn compounds. There were fairlygood relationships between soluble Zn and acid reactive Zn compounds,and between soluble Mn and acid reactive Mn compounds. Soluble Zn andsoluble Mn concentrations were important controls on exchangeable Znand Mn concentrations, respectively.   In contrast to the suggestion by other authors that adsorption of Cowas closely associated with Mn oxides present in soils, theexchangeable Co in the investigated acid sulfate soils was not clearlyrelated to the abundance of Mn minerals. In addition to the fact thatthere are few Mn minerals present in the soils, this might also bebecause the availability of cation exchange sites on the crystalsurfaces of Mn oxides was reduced under extremely acidic conditions.

  17. Biological functions of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate

    Thelin, Martin A.; Bartolini, Barbara; Axelsson, Jakob; Gustafsson, Renata; Tykesson, Emil; Pera, Edgar; Oldberg, Åke; Maccarana, Marco; Malmstrom, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The presence of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate changes the properties of the polysaccharides because it generates a more flexible chain with increased binding potentials. Iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate influences multiple cellular properties, such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis and the regulation of cytokine/growth factor activities. Under pathological conditions such as wound healing, inflammation and cancer, iduronic acid has diverse...

  18. Characteristics of Some Heavy Metals in Acid Sulfate Topsoile,Eastern Australia

    C.LIN; D.MCCONCHIE; 等

    2001-01-01

    Forty-five acid sulfate topsoil samples(depth<0.5m)from 15 soil cores at 11 locations along the New South Wales coast,Australia,were selected to investigate the chemical behavior of Zn,Mn,Cr,Co and Pb in these soils.The amount of HCl-extractable Mn was much smaller than the mean value of the total Mn documented for other soils of HCl-extractable Mn was much smaller than the mean value of the total Mn documented for other soils.This may be attributed to enhanced mobilization of Mn from the soils under the extrenely acidic and seasonally flooded conditions encountered in the investigated soils.The pH-dependency of soluble Zn and Mn was strongly affected by the availabiltiy of acid reactive Zn and Mn compounds .There were fairly good relationships between soulble Zn and acid reactive Zn compounds, and between soluble Mn and acid reactive Mn compounds .Soluble Zn and soluble Mn concentations were important controls on exchangeable Zn and Mn Concentrations respectively.In contrast to the suggestion by other authors that adsorption of Co was closely associated with Mn oxides present in soils,the exchangeable Co in the investigated acid sulfate soils was not clearly realt to the abundance of Mn minerals.In addition to the fact that there are few Mn minerals present in the soils,this might also be because the availabiliy of cation exchange sites on the crystal surfaces of Mn oxides was reduced under extremely acidic conditions.

  19. Bioremediation of coal contaminated soil under sulfate-reducing condition.

    Kuwano, Y; Shimizu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of coal-derived hydrocarbons, especially high molecular weight (HMW) components, under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose biodegradation experiments were performed, using specifically designed soil column bioreactors. For the experiment, coal-contaminated soil was prepared, which contains high molecular weight hydrocarbons at high concentration (approx. 55.5 mgC g-drysoil(-1)). The experiment was carried out in two different conditions: sulfate reducing (SR) condition (SO4(2-) = 10 mmol l(-1) in the liquid medium) and control condition (SO4(2-)resin fraction decreased to half (from 6,541 to 3,386 mgC g-soil(-1)) under SR condition, with the concomitant increase of two PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene, 9 and 2.5 times, respectively). From these results, we could conclude that high molecular hydrocarbons were biodegradable and transformed to low molecular weight PAHs under the sulfate-reducing condition. Since these PAHs are known to be biologically degraded under aerobic condition, a serial combination of anaerobic (sulfate reducing) and then aerobic bioremediations could be effective and useful for the soil pollution by petroleum and/or coal derived hydrocarbons. PMID:16457179

  20. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  1. Mechanism of cement-stabilized soil polluted by magnesium sulfate

    HAN Peng-ju; WANG Shuai; Frank Y. Chen; BAI Xiao-hong

    2015-01-01

    In order to simulate and study the mechanism of cement stabilized soils polluted by different contents of magnesium sulfate (MS), a series of tests were conducted on the cemented soil samples, including unconfined compression strength (UCS) tests of blocks, X-ray diffraction (XRD) phase analysis of powder samples, microstructure by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), element composition by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and pore distribution analysis by Image Processed Plus 6.0 (IPP 6.0) software. The UCS test results show that UCS of cemented soils reaches the peak value when the MS content is 4.5 g/kg. While, the UCS for Sample MS4 having the MS content of 18.0 g/kg is the lowest among all tested samples. Based on the EDS analysis results, Sample MS4 has the greater contents for the three elements, oxygen (O), magnesium (Mg) and sulfur (S), than Sample MS1. From the XRD phase analysis, C-A-S-H (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O and 3CaO·Al2O3·CaSO4·18H2O), M-A-H (MgO·Al2O3·H2O), M-S-H (MgO·SiO2·H2O), Mg(OH)2 and CaSO4phase diffraction peaks are obviously intense due to the chemical action associated with the MS. The pore distribution analysis shows that the hydrated products change the distribution of cemented soil pores and the pores with average diameter (AD) of 2-50μm play a key role in terms of the whole structure of cemented soil. The microscopic structure of the cemented soil with MS exhibits the intertwined and embedded characteristics between the cement and granular soils from the SEM images of cemented soils. The microstructure analysis shows that the magnesium sulfate acts as the additive, which is beneficial to the soil strength when the MS content is low (i.e., Sample MS2). However, higher MS amount involving a chemical action makes samples crystallize and expand, which is adverse to the UCS of cemented soils (i.e., Sample MS4).

  2. Electrochemical treatment of acidic aqueous ferrous sulfate and copper sulfate as models for acid mine drainage.

    Bunce, N J; Chartrand, M; Keech, P

    2001-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a serious environmental problem in the mining industry. The present work describes electrolytic reduction of solutions of synthetic AMD, comprising FeSO4/H2SO4 and CuSO4/H2SO4, in flow-through cells whose anode and cathode compartments were separated using ion exchange membranes. In the case of FeSO4/H2SO4 at constant flow rate, the pH of the effluent from the catholyte increased progressively with current at a variety of cathodes, due to electrolytic reduction of H+ ions to elemental hydrogen. Near-quantitative removal of iron was achieved by sparging air into the catholyte effluent, thereby precipitating iron outside the electrochemical cell, and avoiding fouling of the electrodes. The anode reaction was the oxidation of water to O2, a proton-releasing process. Using cation exchange membranes and sodium sulfate as the supporting electrolyte in the anode compartment, the efficiency of the process was compromised at high currents by transport of H+ competitively with Na+ from the anode to the cathode compartments. Higher efficiencies were obtained when anion exchange membranes were used, and in this case no additional supporting electrolyte other than dilute H2SO4 was needed, the net reaction being the electrochemically driven transfer of the elements of H2SO4 from the cathode to the anode compartments. Current efficiencies approximately 50% were achieved, the loss of efficiency being accounted for by ohmic heating of the solutions. In the case of CuSO4/H2SO4 and anion exchange membranes at high currents, reduction of Cu2+ and H+ ions and transport of SO4(2-) ions out of the catholyte caused unacceptably high potentials to be generated. PMID:11763043

  3. Effects of Electrolyte Anions and pH on Adsortpion of Sulfate by Variable Charge Soils

    ZHANGGANGYA; G.M.BRUEMMER; 等

    1996-01-01

    The effects of three electrolyte anions,ionic strength and pH on the adsorption of sulfate by two variable charge soils,with different surface charge properties were studied.Under the conditions of the same pH and ionic strength the effect of electrolyte anions on the adsorption of sulfate was in the order of Cl->NO3->ClO4-,indicating the difference of the nature among these three anions.For ferralsol in the same concentration of chloride and perchloride solutions,the two sulfate adsorption-pH curves could intersect at certain pH value.When pH was higher than the intersecting point.more sulfate was adsorbed in the perchloride solution,while when it was lower than the intersecting point,more sulfate was adsorbed in the chloride solution.In different concentratioins of electrolyte solution,the curves of the amount of oxy-acid anion adsorbed,which changed with pH,could intersect at a certain pH,which is termed point of zero salt effect(PZSE) on adsortpion.The nature of electrolyte anions influenced obviously the appearace of PZSE for sulfate adsorption.For ferralsol the curves of adsorption converged to about pH 7 in NaCl solution seemed to intersect in NaNO3 solution and to have a typical PZSE for sulfate adsorption in NaClO4 solution,For Acrisol the three curves of adsorption were nearly parallel in NaCl and NaNO3 solutions and converged to pH 6.5 in NaClO4 solution.

  4. Parameterization and evaluation of sulfate adsorption in a dynamic soil chemistry model

    Including sulfate adsorption improves the dynamic behavior of the SAFE model. - Sulfate adsorption was implemented in the dynamic, multi-layer soil chemistry model SAFE. The process is modeled by an isotherm in which sulfate adsorption is considered to be fully reversible and dependent on sulfate concentration as well as pH in soil solution. The isotherm was parameterized by a site-specific series of simple batch experiments at different pH (3.8-5.0) and sulfate concentration (10-260 μmol l-1) levels. Application of the model to the Lake Gaardsjoen roof covered site shows that including sulfate adsorption improves the dynamic behavior of the model and sulfate adsorption and desorption delay acidification and recovery of the soil. The modeled adsorbed pool of sulfate at the site reached a maximum level of 700 mmol/m2 in the late 1980s, well in line with experimental data

  5. Oxydesulfurization of coal by acidic iron sulfate solutions

    Mixon, D.A.; Vermeulen, T.

    1981-08-01

    To facilitate by-product recovery and eliminate elemental sulfur formation in coal oxydesulfurization, high-sulfur bituminous coal has been treated with aqueous ferric sulfate/sulfuric acid and oxygen at 100 to 150/sup 0/C. The rate of pyrite oxidation increases with oxygen partial pressure, temperature, and fineness of grinding. This reaction rate is relatively insensitive to sulfuric acid and ferric sulfate concentrations, so that pyrite removal may be satisfactorily performed in solutions containing 25% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 12% Fe/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ (weight percentages relative to total H/sub 2/O plus H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/); preliminary data suggest that such a leaching solution is only mildly corrosive to T316 stainless steel, at 150/sup 0/C or below, in the presence of oxygen. To provide an accurate assessment of coal oxydesulfurization stoichiometry, an analytical technique based on uv spectrophotometry has been developed for the determination of elemental sulfur in coal. Prepared coal samples are extracted for 24 hours with cyclohexane. Other exploratory oxydesulfurization runs have shown that vanadium oxides are not effective catalysts at 100/sup 0/C, with oxygen. Nor are lauryl sulfate or sulfates of zinc, copper, or manganese effective additives in the ferric sulfate/sulfuric acid/oxygen system at 150/sup 0/C. Elemental chlorine has been shown to be capable of removing significant amounts of organic sulfur from coal, at 74/sup 0/C, but suffers the drawback of chlorinating the coal's orgaic matrix. Hydrogen peroxide in aqueous sulfuric acid is an effective reagent for pyrite removal at 100/sup 0/C, but is unduly expensive.

  6. Two Dermatan Sulfate Epimerases Form Iduronic Acid Domains in Dermatan Sulfate*

    Pacheco, Benny; Malmström, Anders; Maccarana, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A second dermatan sulfate epimerase (DS-epi2) was identified as a homolog of the first epimerase (DS-epi1), which was previously described by our group. DS-epi2 is 1,222 amino acids long and has an ∼700-amino acid N-terminal epimerase domain that is highly conserved between the two enzymes. In addition, the C-terminal portion is predicted to be an O-sulfotransferase domain. In this study we found that DS-epi2 has epimerase activity, which involves conversion of d-glucu...

  7. Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols

    Kravitz, Ben

    2009-07-28

    We used a general circulation model of Earth\\'s climate to conduct geoengineering experiments involving stratospheric injection of sulfur dioxide and analyzed the resulting deposition of sulfate. When sulfur dioxide is injected into the tropical or Arctic stratosphere, the main additional surface deposition of sulfate occurs in midlatitude bands, because of strong cross-tropopause flux in the jet stream regions. We used critical load studies to determine the effects of this increase in sulfate deposition on terrestrial ecosystems by assuming the upper limit of hydration of all sulfate aerosols into sulfuric acid. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2 into the tropical stratosphere or 3 Tg of SO2 into the Arctic stratosphere, neither the maximum point value of sulfate deposition of approximately 1.5 mEq m−2 a−1 nor the largest additional deposition that would result from geoengineering of approximately 0.05 mEq m−2 a−1 is enough to negatively impact most ecosystems.

  8. Development of a rapid method for simultaneous separation of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate and heparin by capillary electrophoresis.

    Zhao, Ting; Song, Xinlei; Tan, Xiaoqing; Xu, Linghua; Yu, Mingxiu; Wang, Siyi; Liu, Xiumei; Wang, Fengshan

    2016-05-01

    This study reports the use of diethylenetriamine as background electrolyte for the simultaneous separation of hyaluronan acid, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate and heparin. The analytes were baseline separated by using an uncoated fused silica capillary at 37°C with a run time of 23min. The migration order, with hyaluronan acid at first and heparin at last, was related to the sulfation degree. The effect of salt concentration on resolution and migration order was also investigated. The developed method was applied to the simultaneous determination of hyaluronan acid and chondroitin sulfate in mouse plasma. Interferences in plasma were removed by protein precipitation and glycosaminoglycans were further purified by ethanol precipitation. The method was validated over the concentration range from 50 to 600μg/mL for hyaluronan acid and 500 to 6000μg/mL for chondroitin sulfate in mouse plasma. Results from assay validations showed that the method was selective and robust. PMID:26877013

  9. 75 FR 78243 - Propionic Acid and Salts, Urea Sulfate, Methidathion, and Methyl Parathion; Registration Review...

    2010-12-15

    ... AGENCY Propionic Acid and Salts, Urea Sulfate, Methidathion, and Methyl Parathion; Registration Review... pesticides propionic acid and salts, case no. 4078, urea sulfate, case no. 7213, methidathion, case no. 0034... pesticides in the table below--propionic acid and salts, case 4078, urea sulfate, case no. 7213,...

  10. Inactivation of Prions by Acidic Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate

    Peretz, David; Supattapone, Surachai; Giles, Kurt; Vergara, Julie; Freyman, Yevgeniy; Lessard, Pierre; Safar, Jiri G; Glidden, David V.; McCulloch, Charles; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Scott, Michael; Stephen J DeArmond; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2006-01-01

    Prompted by the discovery that prions become protease-sensitive after exposure to branched polyamine dendrimers in acetic acid (AcOH) (S. Supattapone, H. Wille, L. Uyechi, J. Safar, P. Tremblay, F. C. Szoka, F. E. Cohen, S. B. Prusiner, and M. R. Scott, J. Virol. 75:3453-3461, 2001), we investigated the inactivation of prions by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in weak acid. As judged by sensitivity to proteolytic digestion, the disease-causing prion protein (PrPSc) was denatured at room temperat...

  11. Buffer capacities of podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils to sulfuric and nitric acids

    Kuznetsov, N. B.; Alekseeva, S. A.; Shashkova, G. V.; Dronova, T. Ya.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2007-04-01

    Soil samples from the main genetic horizons of pale podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils from the Central Forest Reserve were subjected to a continuous potentiometric titration by sulfuric and nitric acids. The sulfate sorption capacity was determined in soil mineral horizons. The buffer capacity of mineral horizons of both soils to sulfuric acid was found to be higher than that to the nitric acid. This is explained by the sorption of sulfates via the mechanism of ligand exchange with the release of hydroxyl groups from the surfaces of Fe and Al hydroxide particles and edge faces of clay crystallites. The buffer capacity of organic horizons of the pale podzolic soil to sulfuric acid proved to be higher than that to nitric acid; in organic horizons of the peat gleyic podzolic soil, the buffer capacity to sulfuric acid was lower than that to nitric acid. The reasons for this phenomenon have yet to be investigated.

  12. Estimation of interfacial acidity of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles

    Arghya Dey; G Naresh Patwari

    2011-11-01

    An enhancement in the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) processes of coumarin-102 (C-102) dye was observed upon addition of salicylic acid and hydrochloric acid in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solution. The phenomenon was observed only in the micellar medium of anionic surfactant SDS and not in case of cationic (CTAB) or neutral (Trition X -100) surfactants. ESPT of C-102 was also observed in aqueous solutions but on addition of very high concentrations of hydrochloric acid. However, on comparing the ratio of the protonated species from the emission spectra in the presence and absence of SDS micelle, a conclusive estimation of the local proton concentration at the Stern layer of SDS micelles could be evaluated.

  13. 75 FR 51055 - Propionic Acid and Salts, and Urea Sulfate; Registration Review Proposed Decisions; Notice of...

    2010-08-18

    ... AGENCY Propionic Acid and Salts, and Urea Sulfate; Registration Review Proposed Decisions; Notice of... urea sulfate and opens a public comment period on the proposed decisions. Registration review is EPA's.... Urea sulfate is used as a desiccant on ] cotton. No food crop uses remain and all tolerances for...

  14. Sorption and degradation of 17ß-estradiol-17-sulfate in sterilized soil-water systems

    To identify abiotic processes that govern the fate of a sulfate conjugated estrogen, 17ß-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), soil batch experiments were conducted to investigate the dissipation, sorption, and degradation of radiolabeled E2-17S under sterilized conditions. The aqueous dissipation half-liv...

  15. Sulfur-accumulating plants convert sulfate salts from soils into environmentally resilient biominerals

    Robson, Thomas; Reid, Nathan; Stevens, Jason; Dixon, Kingsley

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur-accumulator plants (thiophores), which accumulate atypically high sulfur and calcium concentrations in their aerial biomass, may be suitable for revegetating and phytostabilising reactive sulfur-enriched substrates such as mine tailings, acid-sulfate soils and polluted soils. We present biogeochemical insights on thiophores from the Australian Great Sandy Desert, which accumulate up to 40 times as much sulfur (2-5 %S) versus comparator species. X-ray microanalyses revealed this accumulation relates to peculiar gypsum-like mineralisation throughout their foliage, illustrating a mechanism for sulfate removal from soils and sequestration as sparingly soluble biominerals. However, we did not know whether these species treat the excess Ca/S as a waste to be shed with senescent litter and, if so, how resilient these 'biominerals' are to photo-biodegradation once shed and so to what extent the accumulated elements are recycled back into the reactive/bioavailable sulfate reservoir. To address these questions, we sampled four foliage (phyllode) fractions from ten individuals of the thiophore, Acacia bivenosa: healthy mature phyllodes, senescent phyllodes on the branch, recently shed and older, more degraded ground litter. We selected two thiophores (A. bivenosa and A. robeorum) and a non-thiophore (A. ancistrocarpa) for detailed soil/regolith studies. Samples were collected from trenches bisected by each tree, taken from varying depth (20-500 mm) and distance from the stem (0.1-5 m). Dried foliage was cleaned, sectioned for SEM-EDXS examination and elemental compositions of foliage and soils were determined (microwave-assisted acid digestion + ICP-OES/MS). Each species generated a 'halo' of elevated S/Ca in the soil immediately beneath their crowns, although that of A. ancistrocarpa was of minor magnitude. These anomalies were confined to shallow soil (20-50 mm i.e. influenced by litter), suggesting limited S/Ca re-mobilisation from the litter. Foliar elemental

  16. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin▿

    Maccarana, Marco; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Kongsgaard, Mads; Magnusson, S. Peter; Oldberg, Åke; Malmström, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated struct...

  17. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.; Magnusson, S.P.; Oldberg, A.; Malmstrom, A.

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in...... versican-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We...

  18. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  19. Decontamination of acid mine water from Ronneburg/Thueringen which is high in sulfates and metals using sulfate-reducing bacteria. Subproject. Final report

    The authors analyzed and developed the fundamentals of a microbiological water treatment process for decontamination of acid water from a uranium mine which is high in sulfates and heavy metals. The process is based on microbiological sulfate reduction. In the pre-phase of the project, sulfate-reducing microorganisms were isolated and cultivation methods for these microorganisms developed

  20. Accelerated swell testing of artificial sulfate bearing lime stabilised cohesive soils

    Buttress, A.J.; Grenfell, J.R.A.; Airey, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the physico-chemical response of two lime stabilised sulfate bearing artificial soils subject to the European Accelerated Volumetric Swell Test (EN13286-49). At various intervals during the test, a specimen was removed and subject to compositional and microstructural analysis. Ettringite was formed by both soils types, but with significant differences in crystal morphology. Ettringite crystals formed from kaolin based soils were very small, colloidal in size and tended t...

  1. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    Craig, Patricia; Ming, Douglas; Rampe, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are common in Noachian terrains whereas sulfates are found in the younger Hesperian terrains and suggest alteration under more acidic conditions. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era would have been exposed to the prevailing acidic conditions during the Hesperian. The purpose of this project is to characterize the effects of acid-weathering on phyllosilicates to better understand the aqueous history of Mars. Nontronite, montmorillonite, and saponite were exposed to H2SO4 solutions at water-rock (WR) ratios of 50 and 25.X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of all three acid-treated minerals showed progressive collapse of the phyllosilicate basal spacing with increasing acid concentration. Bassanite formed as an intermediate phase in weathered nontronite and montmorillonite from extracted interlayer Ca. The octahedral cation determined which sulfate formed at high acid concentration: rhomboclase from nontronite, alunogen from montmorillonite, hexahydrite and kieserite from saponite. Gypsum and anhydrite also formed as intermediate phases in nontronite treated at WR=25, showing a change in sulfate hydration state with changing acid concentration (i.e. water activity). Scanning electron microscopy analyses detected phases not identified by XRD. Al-sulfate was found in nontronite weathered at WR=25 and Ca-sulfate in weathered saponite. Near-infrared reflectance spectra of the weathered samples showed decreasing intensity of the hydration/hydroxylation bands and a change or disappearance of metal-OH bands indicating dehydration and dissociation of the interlayers and octahedral layers, respectively, with increased acid weathering.Sulfate mineral formation from acid-weathered phyllosilicates may explain the presence of phyllosilicates and sulfates in close proximity to each other on Mars, such as in Gale Crater. The CheMin XRD instrument on Curiosity may find evidence for acid-weathered phyllosilicates in Mt. Sharp by comparing the 001

  2. Raman scattering spectra and crystal structure of acid potassium-lithium sulfate

    Paper presents the results of the comprehensive investigation into Raman scattering in potassium-lithium acid sulfate crystal. A model of crystal structure is suggested on the basis of the study data. The suggested consistent model of the crystalline structure of potassium-lithium acid sulfate crystal describes well both spectrum high-frequency and low-frequency sections and may be used to analyze models of phase transformation

  3. Phytotoxicity of heptachlor and endosulfan sulfate contaminants in soils to economic crops.

    Somtrakoon, Khanitta; Pratumma, Sununta

    2012-11-01

    The intensive use of organochlorine in the past decades has resulted in contamination of soil worldwide. The phytotoxicity of two organochlorine pesticide, endosulfan sulfate and heptachlor, on the early growth stage of sweet corn (Zea mays), waxy corn (Zea mays) cowpea (Vigna sinensis), cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and water morning glory (Ipomoea aquatica) were studied. In the range of concentration found in Thai agricultural soil, 0.4-40 mg kg(-1) of each pesticide, did not affect the percentage of seed germination. Heptachlor seemed to affect the shoot and root length of test plants more than endosulfan sulfate. The combined effect of both pesticides to corn seedling growth was tested. There was no significant effect on combined treatment of both pesticides to corn growth. The 0.4-40 mg kg(-1) concentration of endosulfan sulfate and heptachlor did not produced significant effect on early growth of plants. PMID:23741808

  4. Reactive Crystallization of Calcium Sulfate Dihydrate from Acidic Wastewater and Lime

    邓立聪; 张亦飞; 陈芳芳; 曹绍涛; 游韶玮; 刘艳; 张懿

    2013-01-01

    The present work focused on the recycle of the sulfate and the metal ions from acidic wastewater dis-charged by nonferrous metallurgical industry. The effects of the temperature, the reactant concentration, the stirring speed and the metal ions on the reactive crystallization process of calcium sulfate between sulfuric acid and lime were systematically investigated. The morphology of the precipitated crystals evolved from platelet-like and nee-dle-like shape to rod-like shape when the temperature was increased from 25 to 70 °C. An increase in the agglom-eration of calcium sulfate was found with increasing lime concentration. Metal ions markedly retard the rate of crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate. The crystallization of gypsum was slowed with the existence of Mg2+in the solution, and the morphology of gypsum was transformed from platelet-like shape to rod-like shape when Mg2+concentration reached 0.08 mol·L-1. The amorphous ferric hydroxide was coated on the calcium sulfate after the co-precipitation process while Zn2+and Al3+ions in the solution enhanced the agglomeration of the calcium sulfate by absorbing on the surface of the crystals. Comprehensive acidic wastewater containing heavy metals was effi-ciently purified by the two stage lime neutralization technology, and highly agglomerated gypsum precipitates with needle-like shape were obtained. The precipitates could be purified by sulfuric acid washing, and the metal ions were effectively separated from the calcium sulfate by-products.

  5. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  6. Some negative chemical properties of acid soils

    SVETLANA ANTIC-MLADENOVIC; SRDJAN BLAGOJEVIC; MIRJANA KRESOVIC; MIODRAG JAKOVLJEVIC

    2005-01-01

    Some important chemical properties of various samples of two types of acid soil fromWestern Serbia (pseudogley and brown forest) are presented in this paper.Mobile Al was found in elevated and toxic quantities (10–30 mg/100 g) in the more acid samples of pseudogley soil. All samples of brown forest soil were very acid and the quantities ofmobile Al were in the range from 12.8 to 90.0mg/100 g. In a selected number of pseudogley soils, the influence of pH and other soil properties on the minera...

  7. Persistent endosulfan sulfate is found with highest abundance among endosulfan I, II, and sulfate in German forest soils.

    Bussian, Bernd M; Pandelova, Marchela; Lehnik-Habrink, Petra; Aichner, Bernhard; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2015-11-01

    Endosulfan - an agricultural insecticide and banned by Stockholm Convention - is produced as a 2:1 to 7:3 mixture of isomers endosulfan I (ESI) and endosulfan II (ESII). Endosulfan is transformed under aerobic conditions into endosulfan sulfate (ESS). The study shows for 76 sampling locations in German forests that endosulfan is abundant in all samples with an opposite ratio between the ESI and ESII than the technical product, where the main metabolite ESS is found with even higher abundance. The ratio between ESI/ESII and ESS show clear dependence on the type of stands (coniferous vs. deciduous) and humus type and increases from deciduous via mixed to coniferous forest stands. The study argues for a systematic monitoring of ESI, ESII, and ESS and underlines the need for further research, specifically on the fate of endosulfan including biomagnifications and bioaccumulation in soil. PMID:26319511

  8. Sulfate adsorption and surface precipitation on a volcanic ash soil (allophanic andisol).

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Makino, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Yasunobu

    2006-08-15

    Sulfate strongly adsorbs on metal oxides and soils with variable charges. However, its surface precipitation has not been clearly evaluated and its adsorption mechanism has been in dispute. In the present study, an allophanic andisol, a typical volcanic ash soil having both negative and positive variable charges, was used to identify the adsorption mechanism of sulfate. Sulfate adsorption isotherms were obtained by a batch method at pH values of 4, 5, 6, and 7 in a wide range of concentrations in an Na-H-SO(4)-OH system. Theoretical isotherms were applied to the measured values for the evaluation. The surface precipitation was detected by the measured adsorption isotherms, and the BET isotherm confirmed the presence of multilayer adsorption. Stronger and weaker adsorption sites were suggested by using the Langmuir isotherm for the monolayer adsorption. The adsorption energies obtained from the Langmuir equation and recent spectroscopic analysis suggested that the stronger adsorption corresponded to an inner-sphere surface complex and that the weaker adsorption corresponded to outer-sphere surface complexation. The BET and Langmuir equations showed three types of adsorption mechanisms for the sulfate adsorption on the soil. PMID:16750540

  9. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  10. Phosphate fixation capacity of Thai acid soils using 32P isotope techniques

    Five acid soil samples from benchmark sites in Thailand were collected: Rangsit soil, two samples (Sulfic Tropaquepts or acid sulfate soils), Pakchong soil (Oxic Paleustults) Warin soil (Oxic Paleustults), Mae Taeng soil (Typic Paleustults). The soil P status was characterized in the laboratory by the 32P isotope exchange technique using treatments with and without P addition. In another experiment, the P-fixing capacity of the same soils was examined. They were incubated for 30 days with two Thai phosphate rocks Lamphun PR and RP and Ratchaburi PR, and TSP was used as a standard fertilizer. All of them were added at a rate of 50 mg P kg-1 . The soils can be ranked according to their P- fixing capacity as follows: Rangsit series (acid sulfate soil) > Mae Tang series (Typic Paleustult) > Pakchong series (Oxic Paleustult) > Warin series (Oxic Paleustult). The P availability from TSP decreased after 30 days incubation with the soils. PR from Ratchaburi was more effective than Lamphun PR. (author)

  11. Physicochemical behaviour of artificial lime stabilised sulfate bearing cohesive soils

    Buttress, Adam James

    2013-01-01

    Soil stabilisation is a useful civil engineering technique that enables the insitu material to be used as part of an engineered structure. Stabilised layers are used in road foundation; working platforms and for slope stabilisation and sea defences. Chemical stabilisation involves the use of a hydraulic binder (and sometimes additional pozzolans). Commonly, quicklime (CaO) or slaked-lime (Ca(OH)2) is used. On mixing into the ground, this reacts with the aluminosilicates of the clay fraction, ...

  12. Insights Into the Aqueous History of Mars from Acid-Sulfate Weathered Phyllosilicates

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed during Mars' earliest Noachian geologic era (approx. 4.1-3.7 Ga). Sulfate formation, on the other hand, requires more acidic conditions which are thought to have occurred later during Mars' Hesperian era (approx. 3.7-3.0 Ga). Therefore, regions on Mars where phyllosilicates and sulfates are found in close proximity to each other provide evidence for the aqueous conditions during this global transition. Both phyllosilicates and sulfates form in the presence of water and thus give clues to the aqueous history of Mars and its potential for habitability. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era would have been weathered by the prevailing acidic conditions that define the Hesperian. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the alteration products of acid-sulfate weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments, focusing on the Fe/Mg-smectites commonly identified on Mars. We also compare our results to observations of phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars in regions such as Endeavour Crater and Mawrth Vallis to understand the formation process of sulfates and constrain the aqueous history of these regions.

  13. Competitive surface complexation reactions of sulfate and natural organic carbon on soil

    The ecological implications of subsurface SO42- loading on nutrient cation leaching, acidification, and the destruction of concrete containers used to store low-level radioactive waste, has been thoroughly addressed. Processes favoring SO42- adsorption by the subsurface matrix tend to alleviate these adverse ecological conditions and this has been investigated to a lesser extent. In this study, the adsorption of SO42 onto several soil types with indigenous SO42- and organic carbon removed, was measured as a function of pH in the presence and absence of added natural organic matter (NOM). Sulfate adsorption was strongly pH dependent and the presence of >2 mg L-1 NOM resulted in a consistent decrease in sulfate adsorption over the pH range 4.5 to 8. The tendency of these soils to adsorb SO42- was related to their large quantity of Fe-oxides and the presence of kaolinite in the 42- was related to their large quantity of Fe-oxides and the presence of kaolinite in the 42- onto positive or neutral surface sites (XOH + H+ + SO42- = XSO4- + H2O) as a inner-sphere complex proved successful in describing the adsorption of sulfate under the experimental conditions. The estimated value of the intrinsic equilibrium constant (K) for the above reaction was of the order 1010 suggesting strong sulfate adsorption. Estimated K values were found to be unaffected by the presence of added NOM. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Acidification of musts in warm regions with tartaric acid and calcium sulfate at industrial scale

    Gómez Juan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidification of musts is necessary in warm areas where high temperatures during ripening accelerate breathing com- bustion of tartaric acid and, in particular, malic acid in the berries. L(+ tartaric acid, L(- or D,L malic acid and lactic acids are the only chemical acidifiers authorized by the OIV and European Community regulations. The use of calcium sulfate (gypsum: CaSO4·2H2O is also authorized in the European Community as a complementary acidifier in generous and generous liquor 42 wines from Spain (a practice known as plastering, provided that the residual sulfate content in the wine does not exceed 2.5 g/L expressed as potassium sulfate. However, this practice is not yet approved by OIV. To predict the effect on pH of different acidi- fiers, several chemical modeling approaches have been described in the literature, in particular a simplified model where the acidity of wine is considered to be due to a monoprotic acid. The aim of this work is to verify this model at pilot and industrial scale in the acidification of musts with tartaric and calcium sulfate, added either individually and in combination, using doses up to 3 g/L and to study the modifications that these practices produce on the compositions of the resulting wines. This work sup- plies useful information to study this practice in OIV in order to consider its approval.

  15. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Received for publication June 18, 2007. Acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid is a recent agricultural practice that may serve a double purpose: reducing ammonia emission and ensuring crop sulfur sufficiency. We investigated S transformations in untreated and acidified pig slurry stored for up...... plant-available sulfate form. Microbial sulfate reduction during storage of acidified pig slurry was limited, presumably due to initial pH effects and a limitation in the availability of easily degradable organic matter. Sulfide accumulation was observed during storage but the sulfide levels in...

  16. Dispersion Process and Effect of Oleic Acid on Properties of Cellulose Sulfate- Oleic Acid Composite Film

    Guo Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cellulose sulfate (CS is a newly developed cellulose derivative. The work aimed to investigate the effect of oleic acid (OA content on properties of CS-OA film. The process of oleic acid dispersion into film was described to evaluate its effect on the properties of the film. Among the formulations evaluated, the OA addition decreased the solubility and water vapor permeability of the CS-OA film. The surface contact angle changed from 64.2° to 94.0° by increasing CS/OA ratio from 1:0 to 1:0.25 (w/w. The TS increased with OA content below 15% and decreased with OA over 15%, but the ε decreased with higher OA content. The micro-cracking matrices and micro pores in the film indicated the condense structure of the film destroyed by the incorporation of oleic acid. No chemical interaction between the OA and CS was observed in the XRD and FTIR spectrum. Film formulation containing 2% (w/w CS, 0.3% (w/w glycerol and 0.3% (w/w OA, showed good properties of mechanic, barrier to moisture and homogeneity.

  17. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere. PMID:26460477

  18. Spatial Distribution of Sulfate and the Formation of Ettringite in Lime-Amended Soils of Central Texas

    Kuo, L.; Markley, C. T.; Herbert, B. E.; Little, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    During road construction, the use of calcium-based stabilizers, such as calcium oxide (lime), in sulfate-bearing clay soils has historically lead to distress and heave due to the formation of ettringite and possibly thaumasite. Ettringite (Ca6(Al(OH)6)2(SO4)3*26H2O) is a hydrous calcium alumino-sulfate mineral that precipitates in environments with high pH and high sulfate activity. Field surveys of soil conductivity quantified using electromagnetics (EM31), geochemical characterization of soils, geochemical modeling of ettringite precipitation in lime-amended soils, and landscape characterization using existing geospatial databases were coupled to prediction the potential for ettringite formation along the SH 130 corridor, a new toll road being constructed in central Texas. Electromagnetic surveys of soil conductivities were conducted at two sites near HWY 290 and HWY 79, in the SH 130 corridor. Soil conductivities at the two sites were correlated extractable SO42- and other soil properties (extractable Al, Ca, and Mg) quantified by water extracts at two pHs (pH 8-9 and 12). At the HWY 290 site, the soil conductivity ranged from 111 to 184 ms/m, while the conductivity ranged from 34-48 ms/m at the HWY 79 site. The concentration of extractable SO42- in HWY 290 and HWY 79 sites are up to 7269 mg/kg and 406 mg/kg, respectively. Soils at these sites are dominated by smectitic clay with relatively high amounts of carbonate. Information from STATSGO, the USDA soil database, and the comparisons between the results of the field surveys and laboratory soil analyses show that variations in sulfate levels at the two sites are strongly influenced by topography. The HWY 79 site is fairly level and there are only very weak trends in the sulfate composition of the soils. The HWY 290 site, on the other hand, is fairly hilly, with a dry stream channel, whose soil and sediments exhibited very high sulfate concentrations. The strong topographic slope influences hydrologic flow

  19. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  20. Transformation of diphenylarsinic acid in agricultural soils.

    Maejima, Yuji; Arao, Tomohito; Baba, Koji

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the transformation and fate of diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) during incubation in two types of soils (Entisol and Andisol) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions only, DPAA was transformed into methyldiphenylarsine oxide by methylation. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, DPAA was degraded to phenylarsonic acid by dephenylation, and phenylarsonic acid was subsequently methylated to form methylphenylarsinic acid and dimethylphenylarsine oxide. The degradation of DPAA in the Andisol was less extensive than in the Entisol. In autoclaved soil under anaerobic conditions, DPAA underwent little degradation during the 24-wk incubation. In unautoclaved soils, the concentration of DPAA in soil clearly decreased after 24 wk of incubation, indicating that DPAA degradation was driven by microbial activity. PMID:21488495

  1. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  2. Exchangeable aluminum evaluation in acid soils

    Abreu Jr. Cassio Hamilton; Muraoka Takashi; Lavorante André Fernando

    2003-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting agricultural production in tropical climate regions is mainly related to the presence of exchangeable aluminum (Al3+) in highly weathered acid soils. Four methods of Al3+ determination extracted with neutral 1 mol L¹ KCl solution were evaluated: three colorimetric methods (aluminon plus ascorbic acid, and eriochrome cyanine R by FIA) and the usual titrimetric method with back-titration. Surface samples from 20 soils of different Brazilian regions, with active ...

  3. The effect of copper sulfate, potassium permanganate, and peracetic acid on Ichthyobodo necator in channel catfish

    Ichthyobodo necator is a single celled biflagellate that can cause significant mortalities in fish, particularly young, tank-reared fish. Copper sulfate (CuSO4), potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and peracetic acid (PAA) were evaluated for effectiveness against Ichthybodosis in juvenile channel catfis...

  4. Kinetics of Reductive Acid Leaching of Cadmium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Mixture Using Hydrazine Sulfate

    Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Jianqiang; Min, Xiaobo; Wang, Mi; Zhou, Bosheng; Shen, Chen

    2015-09-01

    The reductive acid leaching kinetics of synthetic cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite was investigated, and the influence of reaction temperature, sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate were studied. The results illustrated that an increase in the reaction temperature, initial sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate significantly enhanced the extraction efficiencies of cadmium, zinc and iron. The leaching kinetics were controlled by a surface chemical reaction based on a shrinking core model. The empirical equation applied was found to fit well with the kinetics analysis; the leaching processes of cadmium, zinc and iron were similar and the activation energies were 79.9 kJ/mol, 77.9 kJ/mol and 79.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The apparent orders of cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite dissolution with respect to sulfuric acid concentration were 0.83, 0.83 and 0.84 for Cd, Zn and Fe, respectively.

  5. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils...... from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42– radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of 142 ± 20 nmol cm–3 day–1. Concentrations of...... heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone...

  6. Formation,characteristics and ecological effects of acid sulfate soil%酸性硫酸盐土的形成、特性及其生态环境效应

    黄巧义; 唐拴虎; 卢瑛; 张发宝; 杨少海

    2014-01-01

    过程进行综述,进一步梳理了ASS中硫的演变和铁的地球化学过程,并着重阐述了ASS的酸性特点,最后对ASS的生态环境效应进行了讨论。结合我国研究现状,展望了进一步研究ASS的主要问题,旨在为科学开发和利用酸性硫酸盐土提供参考。%Acid su1fate soi1( ASS)is one of the nastiest soi1s in the word because of its strong acidity. Fe and S biogeochemica1 cyc1ing in ASS P1ays an imPortant ro1e in g1oba1 materia1 recyc1ing. The Parent materia1s of ASS are often form troPica1 and subtroPica1 estuary,bay and other coasta1 environment,where is submerged and rich in organic matter. Dissimi1ation bacteria reduce seawater su1fate to form mackinawite( FeS),greigite( Fe3 S4 ),Pyrite ( FeS2 )and other reduced Fe-S sediments. Sedimentation of reduced Fe-S minera1s coPreciPitates free meta1s,rare earth e1ements and trace e1ements in the environment,Purifies seawater and enrichs meta1s. ASS is formed through oxidation of reduced Fe-S minera1s in soi1s by natura1 Process or anthroPogenic interventions. The oxidation of Fe-S minera1s u1timate1y resu1ts in Products such as Fe-hydroxides,acidity and su1fate,invo1ves a series of comP1ex reactions,with severa1 Fe and S intermediate and strong acidic soi1. In strong acid soi1s,the mobi1ities of A1,Cd, Mn,As,Cr and other Potentia11y toxic meta1s are significant1y high,whi1e the bioavai1abi1ities of P,K,Zn,B and other essentia1 nutrients are significant1y 1ow,which adverse1y affects anima1 and P1ant growth. On the other hand, the mobi1ised acid and toxic e1ements can enter nearby waterways and groundwater through rain,runoff,seePage and other ways,threatening the surrounding eco1ogica1 security. The formation mechanism of ASS has been disc1osed,and its eco1ogica1 effect has been understood. In the ear1y studies,Chinese researchers have focused on concentrations of iron,a1uminum and su1fur in ASS and the remediation and aPP1ications of ASS farm1and,few studies on

  7. Zinc-Nickel Codeposition in Sulfate Solution Combined Effect of Cadmium and Boric Acid

    Y. Addi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of cadmium and boric acid on the electrodeposition of zinc-nickel from a sulfate has been investigated. The presence of cadmium ion decreases zinc in the deposit. In solution, cadmium inhibits the zinc ion deposition and suppresses it when deposition potential value is more negative than −1.2 V. Low concentration of CdSO4 reduces the anomalous nature of Zn-Ni deposit. Boric acid decreases current density and shifts potential discharge of nickel and hydrogen to more negative potential. The combination of boric acid and cadmium increases the percentage of nickel in the deposit. Boric acid and cadmium.

  8. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy B; Howell, Graham; Jenkins, Meaghan E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfate in acid rain is known to suppress methane (CH4) emissions from natural freshwater wetlands. Here we examine the possibility that CH4 emissions from rice agriculture may be similarly affected by acid rain, a major and increasing pollution problem in Asia. Our findings suggest that acid rain rates of SO2-4 deposition may help to reduce CH4 emissions from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants treated with simulated acid rain at levels of SO2-4 consistent with the range of depositi...

  9. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    Alpers Charles N; Wilkin Richard T; Church Clinton D; Rye Robert O; McCleskey R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated ...

  10. An ultracapacitor circuit for reducing sulfation in lead acid batteries for Mild Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    The nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries used in most hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) provide satisfactory performance, but are quite expensive. In spite of their lower energy density, lead acid batteries would be much more economical except they are prone to sulfation in HEV applications. However, sulfation can be greatly reduced by a circuit that uses an ultracapacitor in conjunction with the battery. The resulting system will provide much cheaper energy storage if ultracapacitor prices can be reduced to levels predicted by some manufacturers. (author)

  11. The relation between soil sulfate concentration and proanthocyanidin content of Selliguea feei Bory from around Ratu crater, Mount Tangkuban Perahu

    Novianti, Vivi; Choesin, Devi N.

    2014-03-01

    Proanthocyanidin is a chemical compound with a basic flavan-3-ol structure formed from flavonoid secondary metabolism in plants, with potential for human use because of its anti-hypertension, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Considering the fact that S. feei contains proanthocynidin and grows abundantly around Ratu Crater, Mount Tangkuban Perahu, which actively emits S02 gas, this study aimed to see the relation between soil sulfate concentration and proanthocyanidin content in leaves and rhizomes of S. feei. Field sampling was conducted in 1 m2 plots at elevations of 1400, 1600 m above sea level (100 m distance from sulfur source), 1700, 1800 and 1900 m a.s.l. (75 m from sulfur source). Measurements included soil sulfate concentration, proanthocyanidin content of rhizomes and leaves, and environmental factors. An experiment was conducted by planting S. feei from the field into polybags which were then given treatments of sterile plant media with varying sulfate concentrations (0 ppm, 100 ppm, 250 ppm, 400 ppm, 600 ppm, and 800 ppm). Proanthocyanidin content of S. feei leaves and rhizomes were measured on the third, sixth and ninth week. Soil sulfate concentrations were found to be very high (428.22 - 992.91 ppm) with values increasing according to altitude. Proanthocyanidin content in rhizomes were higher than in leaves, in both field and experimental data. Soil sulfate concentrations correlated positively and significantly with proanthocyanidin content in rhizomes of S. feei. As in the field, experimental results indicated no correlation or relation between soil sulfate concentration and proanthocyanidin content in leaves. Besides soil sulfate concentration, environmental factors have a role in incresing peoanthocyanidin content of S.feei. Proanthocyanidin content of S.feei rhizomes could be classified as being very high, thus having potential to be developed as raw material in medicine and food industries.

  12. Promoting Effect of Foliage Sprayed Zinc Sulfate on Accumulation of Sugar and Phenolics in Berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot Growing on Zinc Deficient Soil

    Chang-Zheng Song

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas.

  13. Sulfur utilization by rice and Crotalaria juncea from sulfate - 34S applied to the soil

    Trivelin Paulo Cesar Ocheuze

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In tropical soils with intensive agriculture an increasing sulfur deficiency has been verified in several crops. The low available S in these soils is caused by the continuous use of concentrated NPK fertilizers. The objective of this work was to evaluate the utilization by rice (Oriza sativa L. and crotalaria juncea (Crotalaria juncea L. of sulfur applied to the soil, under greenhouse conditions. Pots with 3 kg of an Argisol (Paleudalf were used to test the isotopic technique with the stable isotope 34S, adding a solution of sodium sulfate labeled with 34S (14.30 ± 0.05 atom % of 34S to the soil (70 mg SO4-S per kg-1 of soil 18 days after sowing both species. The shoots of the crotalaria and rice were harvested, respectively on the 72nd and 122nd days after S fertilization. The concentration and the amount of sulfur in the crotalaria were higher than in rice, due to the higher legume requirement for this nutrient. The sulfur requirement and the short time interval between fertilization and harvest of the crotalaria resulted in a small amount of native SO4-S mineralized in the soil and a small quantity of 34SO4 immobilized by soil microorganisms. Thus, the percentage of sulfur in the crotalaria derived from the fertilizer (Sdff was higher than in the rice (%Sdff crotalaria = 91.3 ± 3.5%; %Sdff rice = 66.3 ± 0.8%. The expressive values of %Sdff indicate a low rate of mineralization of SO4-S probably as a consequence of the low available sulfur content in the soil.

  14. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  15. Boric acid and sodium sulfate production from ulexite concentrate. Vacuum crystallization process

    South America reserves of boron minerals are concentrated in the Central Andes. Ulexite is one of the most important borates in these deposits. The mineral is associated with impurities such as sand, clays, chlorides and sulfates. At present, boric acid is produced in Argentina by leaching the ulexite with sulfuric acid and it is recovered through a process of liquid-solid separation and then, by a cooling crystallization process. The residual slurry rejected and the periodical bleedings of the crystallization residual solution produce adverse environmental effects. This paper reports and improved process to produce boric acid using concentrated ulexite as raw material instead or ore. Anhydrous sodium sulfate is obtained as a by-product using a fractional crystallization process: vacuum crystallization for boric acid and evaporating crystallization for sodium sulfate. It has been developed to minimize the pollution problems through the decreasing of residual solids production and avoiding the bleeding of residual solutions. The fractional crystallization process has been studied with the equilibrium diagrams of the H3 B O3 - Na2 S O4 - H2 O at different temperatures. (author)

  16. On the determination of exchangeable cations in acid forest soils. Zur Bestimmung austauschbarer Kationen in sauren Waldboeden

    Matzner, E. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Forschungszentrum Waldoekosysteme); Buerstinghaus, C. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Bodenkunde und Waldernaehrung)

    1990-12-01

    Different samples from acid forest soils were percolated with large amounts of H{sub 2}O. Significant amounts of anions, especially sulfate, were found in the percolates mainly accompanied by Na, K, Ca and Mg (M{sub b}-cations). The dissolution of Al-sulfates and subsequent exchange of M{sub b}-cations by Al as dominant mechanism is proposed. Thus the common method for determination of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of acid forest soils, the percolation with NH{sub 4}Cl may overestimate the CEC. The overestimation may be related to the sulfate content of the soil and also influences the calculation of relative CEC proportions of individual cations. (orig.).

  17. Annual sulfate budgets for Dutch lowland peat polders: The soil is a major sulfate source through peat and pyrite oxidation

    Vermaat, Jan E.; Harmsen, Joop; Hellmann, Fritz A.; van der Geest, Harm G.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Kosten, Sarian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.; Mes, Ron G.; Ouboter, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Annual sulfate mass balances have been constructed for four low-lying peat polders in the Netherlands, to resolve the origin of high sulfate concentrations in surface water, which is considered a water quality problem, as indicated amongst others by the absence of sensitive water plant species. Potential limitation of these plants to areas with low sulfate was analyzed with a spatial match-up of two large databases. The peat polders are generally used for dairy farming or nature conservation, and have considerable areas of shallow surface water (mean 16%, range 6-43%). As a consequence of continuous drainage, the peat in these polders mineralizes causing subsidence rates generally ranging between 2 and 10 mm y-1. Together with pyrite oxidation, this peat mineralization the most important internal source of sulfate, providing an estimated 96 kg SO4 ha-1 mm-1 subsidence y-1. External sources are precipitation and water supplied during summer to compensate for water shortage, but these were found to be minor compared to internal release. The most important output flux is discharge of excess surface water during autumn and winter. If only external fluxes in and out of a polder are evaluated, inputs average 37 ± 9 and exports 169 ± 17 kg S ha-1 y-1. During summer, when evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall, sulfate accumulates in the unsaturated zone, to be flushed away and drained off during the wet autumn and winter. In some polders, upward seepage from early Holocene, brackish sediments can be a source of sulfate. Peat polders export sulfate to the regional water system and the sea during winter drainage. The available sulfate probably only plays a minor role in the oxidation of peat: we estimate that this is less than 10% whereas aerobic mineralization is the most important. Most surface waters in these polders have high sulfate concentrations, which generally decline during the growing season when aquatic sediments are a sink. In the sediment, this sulfur is

  18. The role of sulfate and ionic strength on the shift from acid to alkaline mine drainage in southwest Pennsylvania

    Four Mile Run, Latrobe, PA, receives discharges from abandoned deep mines. In 1971, the effluent was characterized as having low pH, high acidity, and high concentrations of iron, manganese, and sulfate. After 22 yr of neglect, the water flow rate, pH, and alkalinity all increased, while the acidity, iron, manganese, and sulfate concentrations decreased. The overall loading of iron and sulfate to the stream has not changed significantly. This change from acid to alkaline drainage is fairly typical for mine effluent in the surrounding area. However, the mechanism for change is not well understood. Laboratory studies have shown that the neutralization rate of marble chips (CaCO3) is depressed by high ionic strength or elevated levels of sulfate. The decrease in sulfate levels may be an important factor contributing to the change in water quality discharged into Four Mile Run. A similar kinetic phenomenon may occur with mine spoils and anoxic drains

  19. Total Nucleic Acid Extraction from Soil

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Roey Angel ### Abstract The following protocol is intended for the simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from various soil samples along with suggestions on how to tweak the protocol for soil with higher humic content. The protocol has been used by many and results in very high yields of nucleic acids, typically much more than commercial kits. For buffers and solutions used in this protocol, please see accompanying document Buffers and Solutions for TNA Extractions.pdf. ...

  20. Brown coal derived products ameliorating soil acidity

    Issa, J.; Patti, A.F.; Jackson, W.R. [Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Centre for Green Chemistry

    2000-07-01

    Humic acid derived from brown coal, with added calcium, when applied to the soil surface, can increase pH deeper into the soil profile. The humates can move down with water percolating the soil. As they move down the added calcium bound to the humate's cation exchange sites (the acidic oxygen functional groups) can exchange with toxic aluminium ions and ions on exchange sites in the soil. Thus the soil pH is buffered, nutrient transport to plants assisted, and phytotoxic aluminium bound and rendered harmless to plants. K Humate is a commercially available source of humate (ex HRL Agriculture Pty Ltd Australia) derived from brown coal. It can be obtained by the treatment of brown coal with potassium hydroxide. Calsulmag is a commercial treated coal fly ash (also ex HRL Agriculture Pty Ltd) which can be used instead of lime due to its high inorganic calcium and magnesium content. When K humate and Calsulmag are combined in an aqueous mixture, and applied to the surface of an acidic soil, pH is increased (from 3.8 to 4.5) as is exchangeable calcium (30-50%), while exchangeable aluminium is decreased (30-50%), down to a 5 cm depth.

  1. Production of furans from pulp sheet over sulfated solid acid catalysts

    Hongdan Zhang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Furans are high value-added biomass-derived chemicals that can be used to replace petrochemicals. In this study, sulfated solid acid catalysts were prepared by precipitation and impregnation and were used for the conversion of a cellulosic pulp sheet into furans. The physicochemical properties of the prepared sulfated solid acid with different calcination temperatures and different mol ratios of Ti-Al were characterized using XRD, elemental analysis, TG, and NH3-TPD. Furthermore, the effects of various processing parameters such as temperature, time, and catalyst dosage on the reaction performance were studied. The combined yield of 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural and furfural reached 8.9% and 4.5% of pulp sheet mass with a 5% dosage of SO42-/TiO2-Al2O3 catalyst at 220 oC for 30 min. The activity for recovered catalyst was also investigated in this study.

  2. Fractionation of microimpurities during precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate out of nitric acid solutions

    A study was made on fractionation of microimpurities during precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate out of concentrated with respect to ZrO2 nitric acid solutions. Investigation into fractionation of Sc(3), Cr(3), Mn(2), Fe(3), Co(2), CU(2), Zn(2) and Y(3) microirpurities during hydrolytic precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate out of nitric acid solutions showed that a majority of microimpurities are characterized by high distribution factors and concentrate in mother liquor. Adsorption isotherms were constructed for Cu(2) and Fe(3) microimpurities. The assumption about the effect of microimpurity nature (ionic charge and radius, the electron structure) on precipitation mechanism was made on the base of obtained data

  3. Fluctuations of sulfate, S-bearing amino acids and magnesium in a giant clam shell

    T. Yoshimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We used micro-X-ray fluorescence combined with X-ray photoabsorption spectroscopy to investigate speciation-specific sulfur profiles in the inner shell layer of a giant clam (Hippopus hippopus. The sulfate, S-bearing amino acids, and total sulfur profiles indicated that inorganic sulfate was the dominant component in the shell of this bivalve. Sulfur profiles in the inner shell layer showed clear annual fluctuations that varied by more than one order of magnitude, from K-edge XANES and comparison of Mg and S-bearing amino acids profiles indicated that a pronounced effect of the organic fraction or disordered phases were observed in aragonitic shell of H. hippopus rather than regulated substitution into the aragonite crystal lattice.

  4. Synergistic extraction of uranium from acidic sulfate leach liquor using D2EHPA mixed with TOPO

    Uranium extraction from sulfate leach liquor acid by D2EHPA and TOPO mixture in kerosene was investigated. The effect of different factors affecting the extraction mechanism such as sulfate leach liquor acid, D2EHPA and TOPO concentrations and temperature have been studied. The mathematical treatment for the obtained date suggested that the composition of synergistic extraction species is (UO2(D)2T). The logarithm of the apparent equilibrium constant, log Kex, of synergistic extraction reaction has been evaluated, to be 3.35 ± 0.1. The effect of temperature on extraction process was investigated and the apparent values of the thermodynamics parameters (∆H, ∆G and ∆S) were 38.2 kJ/mol, -19.1 kJ/mol and 192.5 J/mol respectively. (author)

  5. Variation in the Activity Coefficient of Zinc Sulfate in the Presence of Sulfuric Acid

    Begar, A.; Djeghlal, M. A.; Saada, A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study concerns the dissolution process of sphalerite in synthetic aqueous solution of sulfuric acid in the absence of oxygen, which allows zinc sulfate to be obtained from a sphalerite. The reaction product of the reaction solution in the absence of oxygen is determined using the Pitzer model used to calculate the various activity coefficients. As the leaching experiments of the present study covered the temperature range from 25° C to 200° C, it is necessa...

  6. Sulfated Steroid–Amino Acid Conjugates from the Irish Marine Sponge Polymastia boletiformis

    Vangelis Smyrniotopoulos; Margaret Rae; Sylvia Soldatou; Yuanqing Ding; Wolff, Carsten W.; Grace McCormack; Coleman, Christina M.; Daneel Ferreira; Deniz Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal bioactivity-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the sponge Polymastia boletiformis, collected from the west coast of Ireland, led to the isolation of two new sulfated steroid-amino acid conjugates (1 and 2). Extensive 1D and 2D NMR analyses in combination with quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra, optical rotation, and 13C chemical shifts were used to establish the chemical structures of 1 and 2. Both compounds exhibited mode...

  7. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene, E-mail: irene.sanchezandrea@wur.nl [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sanz, Jose Luis [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bijmans, Martijn F.M. [Wetsus, Centre of Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Stams, Alfons J.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen (Netherlands); IBB – Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed.

  8. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage

    Highlights: • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an important environmental concern. • Remediation through biological sulfate reduction and metal recovery can be applied for AMD. • Microbial community composition has a major impact on the performance of bioreactors to treat AMD. • Acidophilic SRB are strongly influenced by proton, sulfide and organic acids concentration. - Abstract: Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed

  9. Solubility of strontium sulfate in phosphoric acid and in solutions of the CaO-SrO-P2O5-H2O system

    Solubility of strontium sulfate in phosphoric acid aqueous solutions containing 5-40 wt. % P2O5 as well as in phosphoric acid solutions saturated by calcium dihydrophosphate is studied by isothermal method in the temperature range of 25-100 Deg C. It is ascertained that strontium sulfate solubility depends on phosphoric acid concentration being approximately an order lower than calcium sulfate stable phase solubility in similar conditions. In phosphoric acid solutions saturated by calcium dihydrophosphate calcium sulfate solubility is higher than that of strontium sulfate in diluted phosphoric acid solutions (up to 20 wt. % P2O5) and lower in more concentrated solutions

  10. The effects of acid deposition on sulfate reduction and methane production in peatlands

    Murray, Georgia L.; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Peatlands, as fens and bods, make up a large percentage of northern latitude terrestrial environments. They are organic rich and support an active community of anaerobic bacteria, such as methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The end products of these microbial activities, methane and hydrogen sulfide, are important components in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. Since these two bacterial groups compete for nutritional substrates, increases in sulfate deposition due to acid rain potentially can disrupt the balance between these processes leading to a decrease in methane production and emission. This is significant because methane is a potent greenhouse gas that effects the global heat balance. A section of Mire 239 in the Experimental Lakes Area, in Northwestern Ontario, was artificially acidified and rates of sulfate reduction and methane production were measured with depth. Preliminary results suggested that methane production was not affected immediately after acidification. However, concentrations of dissolved methane decreased and dissolved sulfide increased greatly after acidification and both took several days to recover. The exact mechanism for the decrease in methane was not determined. Analyses are under way which will be used to determine rates of sulfate reduction. These results will be available by Spring and will be discussed.

  11. Designer, acidic biochar influences calcareous soil characteristics.

    Ippolito, J A; Ducey, T F; Cantrell, K B; Novak, J M; Lentz, R D

    2016-01-01

    In a proof-of-concept study, an acidic (pH 5.8) biochar was created using a low pyrolysis temperature (350 °C) and steam activation (800 °C) to potentially improve the soil physicochemical status of an eroded calcareous soil. Biochar was added at 0%, 1%, 2%, and 10% (by wt.) and soils were destructively sampled at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 month intervals. Soil was analyzed for gravimetric water content, pH, NO3-N, plant-available Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, and P, organic C, CO2 respiration, and microbial enumeration via extractable DNA and 16S rRNA gene copies. Gravimetric soil water content increased with biochar application regardless of rate, as compared to the control. Soil pH decreased between 0.2 and 0.4 units, while plant-available Zn, Mn, and P increased with increasing biochar application rate. Micronutrient availability decreased over time likely due to insoluble mineral species precipitation. Increasing biochar application raised the soil organic C content and remained elevated over time. Increasing biochar application rate also increased respired CO2, yet the CO2 released decreased over time. Soil NO3-N concentrations significantly decreased with increasing biochar application rate likely due to microbial immobilization or denitrification. Depending on application rate, biochar produced a 1.4 to 2.1-fold increase in soil DNA extracted and 1.4- to 2.4-fold increase in 16S rRNA gene abundance over control soils, suggesting microbial stimulation and a subsequent burst of activity upon biochar addition. Our results showed that there is promise in designing a biochar to improve the quality and water relations of eroded calcareous soils. PMID:26077798

  12. Iduronic Acid in Chondroitin/Dermatan Sulfate: Biosynthesis and Biological Function

    Malmström, Anders; Bartolini, Barbara; Thelin, Martin A.; Pacheco, Benny; Maccarana, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The ability of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) to convey biological information is enriched by the presence of iduronic acid. DS-epimerases 1 and 2 (DS-epi1 and 2), in conjunction with DS-4-O-sulfotransferase 1, are the enzymes responsible for iduronic acid biosynthesis and will be the major focus of this review. CS/DS proteoglycans (CS/DS-PGs) are ubiquitously found in connective tissues, basement membranes, and cell surfaces or are stored intracellularly. Such wide distr...

  13. Sulfated steroid-amino acid conjugates from the Irish marine sponge Polymastia boletiformis.

    Smyrniotopoulos, Vangelis; Rae, Margaret; Soldatou, Sylvia; Ding, Yuanqing; Wolff, Carsten W; McCormack, Grace; Coleman, Christina M; Ferreira, Daneel; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2015-04-01

    Antifungal bioactivity-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the sponge Polymastia boletiformis, collected from the west coast of Ireland, led to the isolation of two new sulfated steroid-amino acid conjugates (1 and 2). Extensive 1D and 2D NMR analyses in combination with quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra, optical rotation, and 13C chemical shifts were used to establish the chemical structures of 1 and 2. Both compounds exhibited moderate antifungal activity against Cladosporium cucumerinum, while compound 2 was also active against Candida albicans. Marine natural products containing steroidal and amino acid constituents are extremely rare in nature. PMID:25812034

  14. Sulfated Steroid–Amino Acid Conjugates from the Irish Marine Sponge Polymastia boletiformis

    Vangelis Smyrniotopoulos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Antifungal bioactivity-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the sponge Polymastia boletiformis, collected from the west coast of Ireland, led to the isolation of two new sulfated steroid-amino acid conjugates (1 and 2. Extensive 1D and 2D NMR analyses in combination with quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic circular dichroism (ECD spectra, optical rotation, and 13C chemical shifts were used to establish the chemical structures of 1 and 2. Both compounds exhibited moderate antifungal activity against Cladosporium cucumerinum, while compound 2 was also active against Candida albicans. Marine natural products containing steroidal and amino acid constituents are extremely rare in nature.

  15. Sulfated Steroid–Amino Acid Conjugates from the Irish Marine Sponge Polymastia boletiformis

    Smyrniotopoulos, Vangelis; Rae, Margaret; Soldatou, Sylvia; Ding, Yuanqing; Wolff, Carsten W.; McCormack, Grace; Coleman, Christina M.; Ferreira, Daneel; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal bioactivity-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the sponge Polymastia boletiformis, collected from the west coast of Ireland, led to the isolation of two new sulfated steroid-amino acid conjugates (1 and 2). Extensive 1D and 2D NMR analyses in combination with quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra, optical rotation, and 13C chemical shifts were used to establish the chemical structures of 1 and 2. Both compounds exhibited moderate antifungal activity against Cladosporium cucumerinum, while compound 2 was also active against Candida albicans. Marine natural products containing steroidal and amino acid constituents are extremely rare in nature. PMID:25812034

  16. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction. PMID:27058913

  17. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation. PMID:27071053

  18. Impact of Seasalt Deposition on Acid Soils in Maritime Regions

    ZHANG Zhen-Hua

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of seasalt deposition and its impact on acid soils in maritime regions are reviewed. It is pointed out that studies involving the impact of seasalt deposition on acid soils have been concentrated on short-term effects on soil and water acidification. A deep consideration of long-term effects on soil acidification in maritime regions is still needed.

  19. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    Alpers Charles N

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5. The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1 preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2 stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2–3 ‰ heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3 reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures.

  20. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water.

    Church, Clinton D; Wilkin, Richard T; Alpers, Charles N; Rye, Robert O; McCleskey, R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 per thousand heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. PMID:17956615

  1. Consequences of Aluminum or Ferrous Sulfate Amended Poultry Litter on Concentrations of Aluminum in Plants and Soil

    Amending poultry litter with aluminum sulfate (alum) reduces phosphorous (P) runoff and ammonia volatilization but its effects on soil pH are not completely researched. Greenhouse pot experiments with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and soybean (Glycine max. L. Merr) as test crops were conducted with...

  2. Screening of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms in rhizosphere and rhizoplane of adverse soil-adapting plants in Southern Thailand

    Pengnoo, Ashara; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Onthong, Jumpen; Gimsanguan, Sayjai; Sae-ong, Manoon; Shinano, Takuro; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    Various adverse soils; peat, podzolic sandy, acid sulfate and salted-affected acid sulfate soils were widely distributed throughout Southern Thailand. These soils were infertile and strongly acidic. Phosphorus fertility of these soils was low due to the low content of available phosphorus (0.31-3.70 mg kg-1) especially in podzolic sandy soil. Acid sulfate soil and salt-affected acid sulfate soil contain relatively high level of exchangeable Al (13.3 and 9.87 cmolc kg-1, respectively). However...

  3. Copper binding to soil fulvic and humic acids

    Xu, Jinling; Tan, Wenfeng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Mingxia; Fang, Linchuan; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of Cu(II) to soil fulvic acid (JGFA), soil humic acids (JGHA, JLHA), and lignite-based humic acid (PAHA) was investigated through NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectrum (CAS). It is to extend the knowledge of copper binding by soil humic substances (HS) both in respect of

  4. Supported zirconium sulfate on carbon nanotubes as water-tolerant solid acid catalyst

    A new solid acid of zirconium sulfate (CZ) was successfully supported on carbon nanotube (CNT) for esterification reaction. Preparation conditions of the supported CZ have been investigated, to obtain highest catalytic activity for esterification reaction. XRD, TEM, BET, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and in situ FTIR analysis has also been carried out to understand the characteristics of the catalyst. In the esterification of acrylic acid with n-octanol, the supported CZ exhibited high catalytic activity and stability. The catalytic activity was nearly unchanged during four times of reuse. XRD and TEM analysis indicated that CZ was finely dispersed on CNT. XPS analysis shows that the CZ species was preserved and the chemical environment of the CZ has changed after loaded on CNT. This finding show that CNT as CZ support is an efficient water-tolerant solid acid

  5. Refractory status epilepticus after inadvertent intrathecal injection of tranexamic acid treated by magnesium sulfate.

    Hatch, D M; Atito-Narh, E; Herschmiller, E J; Olufolabi, A J; Owen, M D

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of accidental injection of tranexamic acid during spinal anesthesia for an elective cesarean delivery. Immediately following intrathecal injection of 2mL of solution, the patient complained of severe back pain, followed by muscle spasm and tetany. As there was no evidence of spinal block, the medications given were checked and a 'used' ampoule of tranexamic acid was found on the spinal tray. General anesthesia was induced but muscle spasm and tetany persisted despite administration of a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant. Hemodynamic instability, ventricular tachycardia, and status epilepticus developed, which were refractory to phenytoin, diazepam, and infusions of thiopental, midazolam and amiodarone. Magnesium sulfate was administered postoperatively in the intensive care unit, following which the frequency of seizures decreased, eventually stopping. Unfortunately, on postoperative day three the patient died from cardiopulmonary arrest after an oxygen supply failure that was not associated with the initial event. This report underlines the importance of double-checking medications before injection in order to avoid a drug error. As well, it suggests that magnesium sulfate may be useful in stopping seizures caused by the intrathecal injection of tranexamic acid. PMID:26775897

  6. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Anderson R. Meda

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.Foram conduzidos experimentos de laboratórios para avaliar os efeitos de extratos de plantas solúveis em água na acidez do solo. Os materiais de plantas foram: aveia preta, nabo, tremoço branco e azul, mucuna cinza e anã, Crotalaria spectabilis e C. breviflora, milheto, guandu, grama estrela, grama mato grosso, folhas de café, folhas de cana-de-açúcar, palhada de arroz e palhada de trigo. Foi utilizado o seguinte procedimento para o extrato da planta solúvel em água: pesar 3g de material de planta, adicionar 150 ml de água, agitar por 8h e filtrar. Os extratos de plantas foram adicionados na superfície do solo em uma coluna de PVC (1 ml min-1. Após, adicionou-se água deionizada em quantidade equivalente a três volumes de poros. Os extratos de plantas aumentaram o pH, Ca e K trocável e diminuíram Al. Nabo, aveia preta e tremoço azul foram os melhores e milheto o pior material para amenizar a acidez do solo. Nabo aumentou Al na água de drenagem. As altera

  7. Temperature effect on adiolysis of deaerated acid aqueous solutions of ferrous sulfate

    In the course of γ-radiolysis (60Co, dose rate=3.75 Gr/c, doses=1.575-3.375 kGr) of deaerated acid aqueous solution 3.6x10-3 mol/l of ferrous sulfate in the 20-250 deg C range the hydrogen molecules radiochemical yield per 100 eV of absorbed energy G(H2) decreases from 3.82±0.12 to 2.72±0.26, whereas G(Fe3+) independently of temperature is equal 8.34±0.36

  8. Iduronic Acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate affects directional migration of aortic smooth muscle cells

    B. Bartolini; Thelin, M.A.; Svensson, L; Ghiselli, G.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Malmstrom, A.; Maccarana, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic smooth muscle cells produce chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) proteoglycans that regulate extracellular matrix organization and cell behavior in normal and pathological conditions. A unique feature of CS/DS proteoglycans is the presence of iduronic acid (IdoA), catalyzed by two DS epimerases. Functional ablation of DS-epi1, the main epimerase in these cells, resulted in a major reduction of IdoA both on cell surface and in secreted CS/DS proteoglycans. Downregulation of IdoA led to ...

  9. Nitrous Oxide and Methane Fluxes Following Ammonium Sulfate and Vinasse Application on Sugar Cane Soil.

    Paredes, Debora da S; Alves, Bruno J R; dos Santos, Marco A; Bolonhezi, Denizart; Sant'Anna, Selenobaldo A C; Urquiaga, Segundo; Lima, Magda A; Boddey, Robert M

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to quantify nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emission/sink response from sugar cane soil treated with fertilizer nitrogen (N) and vinasse applied separately or in sequence, the latter being investigated with regard to the time interval between applications for a possible effect on emissions. The study was carried out in a traditional area of unburned sugar cane in São Paulo state, Brazil. Two levels of N fertilization (0 and 100 kg N ha(-1)) with no added vinasse and combined with vinasse additions at different times (100 m(-3) ha(-1) at 3 and 15 days after N fertilization) were evaluated. Methane and N2O fluxes were monitored for 211 days. On average, the soil was a sink for CH4, which was not affected by the treatments. Emissions of N2O were induced by N fertilizer and vinasse applications. For ammonium sulfate, 0.6% of the added N was emitted as N2O, while for vinasse, this ranged from 1.0 to 2.2%. Changes in N2O fluxes were detected the day after application of vinasse on the N fertilized areas, but although the emission factor (EF) was 34% greater, the EF was not significantly different from fertilizer N alone. Nevertheless, we recommend to not apply vinasse after N fertilization to avoid boosting N2O emissions. PMID:26295867

  10. Similarities Across Mars: Acidic Fluids at Both Meridiani Planum and Gale Crater in the Formation of Magnesium-Nickel Sulfates

    Yen, Albert S.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gellert, Ralf; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Vaniman, David T.; Thompson, Lucy M.; Morris, Richard V.; Clark, Benton C.; Arvidson, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    In-situ identification of sulfates at the martian surface by the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Mars Science Laboratory have included calcium sulfates with various states of hydration (gypsum, bassanite, anhydrite), iron sulfates of likely fumarolic origin, massive deposits of iron hydroxysulfates indicative of an acidic history, and minor occurrences of magnesium sulfates. Recent measurements by the Opportunity and Curiosity Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers (APXS) have indicated the presence of Ni-substituted Mg-sulfates at the Meridiani Planum and Gale Crater landing sites. The Opportunity rover has traversed nearly 43 km and is currently exploring the impact breccias of the rim of Endeavour crater, near a location where signatures of aqueous alteration have been established from orbit. APXS analyses of subsurface materials excavated by a rover wheel show clear evidence for a Mg(Ni)-sulfate with Mg:Ni (is) approximately 100:1 (molar). On the other side of the planet, Curiosity is continuing its climb up Mount Sharp after driving (is) approximately 13 km since landing. Over the last 4 km of the traverse, there have been multiple chemical analyses of erosionally-resistant nodules and dendritic features in a finely laminated mudstone unit which also indicate Mg(Ni)-sulfate (Mg:Ni (is) approximately 30:1, molar). The geologic settings for the Endeavour rim and the Mount Sharp mudstones are clearly different, but similar formation conditions for these sulfates may be possible. Ni(2+) readily substitutes for Mg(2+) in a variety of geochemical processes due to their comparable ionic radii. The availability of soluble Ni at the time of Mg-sulfate precipitation suggests acidic solutions. The fluids responsible for alteration in the Endeavour rim and for the formation of nodules in Gale mudstones may have had similar chemical characteristics at the time the Mg-sulfates were formed.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Soil Fulvic Acid

    Mir Munsif Ali Talpur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fulvic acid was isolated from the agriculture soil of District Naushahro Feroz, Sindh, Pakistan by International Humic Substances Society (IHSS method. The nutrient contents of the soil like N. P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn were determined by using the Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. The Spectroscopic analysis was carried out by studying the UV-Vis, FT-IR and NIR spectra of isolated compounds. The data has been compared with the literature and correlated. Moisture as well as texture shows good water holding capacity and silt- loam type of soil. pH and EC are indicators of the fertility of soil to be beneficial for plantation. The spectral data (UV-Visible, FTIR and NIR supports the characteristic functional groups (-COOH, C=O, -OH, -NH2, C=C, CH2 and Polysaccharides present in Fulvic acid. E4/E6 values depict its hydrophilic nature, having less aromatic and more aliphatic groups. The presence of metal ions indicates its chelating ability.

  12. Sulfates on Mars: Indicators of Aqueous Processes

    Bishop, Janice L.; Lane, Melissa D.; Dyar, M. Darby; Brown, Adrian J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent analyses by MER instruments at Meridiani Planum and Gusev crater and the OMEGA instrument on Mars Express have provided detailed information about the presence of sulfates on Mars [1,2,3]. We are evaluating these recent data in an integrated multi-disciplinary study of visible-near-infrared, mid-IR and Mossbauer spectra of several sulfate minerals and sulfate-rich analog sites. Our analyses suggest that hydrated iron sulfates may account for features observed in Mossbauer and mid-IR spectra of Martian soils [4]. The sulfate minerals kieserite, gypsum and other hydrated sulfates have been identified in OMEGA spectra in the layered terrains in Valles Marineris and Terra Meridiani [2]. These recent discoveries emphasize the importance of studying sulfate minerals as tracers of aqueous processes. The sulfate-rich rock outcrops observed in Meridiani Planum may have formed in an acidic environment similar to acid rock drainage environments on Earth [5]. Because microorganisms typically are involved in the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates in terrestrial sites, sulfate-rich rock outcrops on Mars may be a good location to search for evidence of past life on that planet. Whether or not life evolved on Mars, following the trail of sulfate minerals will lead to a better understanding of aqueous processes and chemical weathering.

  13. The Hydrothermal System at Home Plate in Gusev Crater, Mars: Formation of High Silica Material by Acid-Sulfate Alteration of Basalt

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Yen, A.; Clark, B. C.; Gnaff, T. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit measured three targets on or adjacent to Home Plate in Gusev Crater that have unusually high SiO2 concentrations (68% to 91%), unusually low FeO concentrations (1% to 7%, with total Fe as FeO), and unusually high TiO2/FeO ratios (0.2 to 1.2 by weight) [1]. Two targets (Kenosha Comets and Lefty Ganote) are located on high albedo soil (Gertrude Weise) that was exposed by the rover wheels, and one target is a float rock called Fuzzy Smith. Kenosha Comets has the highest SiO2 concentration, lowest FeO concentration, and highest TiO2/FeO ratio. Mineralogical evidence from the MER Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) suggests that the SiO2 is present as amorphous (noncrystalline) SiO2 at Gertrude Weise and nearby targets [2,3]. Mini-TES data were not acquired for Fuzzy Smith. Home Plate is considered to have an explosive volcanic origin, resulting when basaltic magma came into contact with ground water or ice [4]. Within 50 m to 1 km of Home Plate are sulfate rich soil deposits (Paso Robles class soils with 22-35% SO3) which are considered to be probable fumarolic and/or hydrothermal deposits associated with the volcanism [5]. We develop the model here, suggested by [5], that the high-silica materials are another manifestation of acid-sulfate processes associated with fumarolic and hydrothermal activity at Home Plate. This is done by analogy with basaltic materials altered by acid sulfate processes on the Island of Hawaii.

  14. Effect of sulfate on methanogenic communities that degrade unsaturated and saturated long-chain fatty acids (LCFA)

    Sousa, D.Z.; Alves, J.I.; Alves, M. M.; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria involved in the degradation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), in the presence of sulfate as electron acceptor, were studied by combined cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques. The bacterial diversity in four mesophilic sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures, growing on oleate (C18:1, unsaturated LCFA) or palmitate (C16:0, saturated LCFA), was studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene ...

  15. Application of acidic calcium sulfate and e-polylysine to pre-rigor beef rounds for reduction of pathogens

    Foodborne illness continues to be a serious public health problem and is a major concern for the United States food industry. This study evaluated the effectiveness of warm solutions of acidic calcium sulfate (ACS), lactic acid (LA), episolon-polylysine (EPL), ACS plus EPL, and sterile distilled wa...

  16. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    Fernando Pizarro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers´ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001. The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers´ requirements of this micronutrient.

  17. Calcium Sulfate with Stearic Acid as an Encouraging Carrier for Reindeer Bone Protein Extract

    Pekka Jalovaara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Various bone proteins and growth factors in specific concentrations are required for bone formation. If the body cannot produce sufficient quantities of these factors, bone trauma can be healed with an implant that includes the required factors in a carrier. This study was designed to evaluate various calcium salt candidates that can be used as carrier with reindeer bone protein extract to induce ectopic bone formation in the muscle pouch model of mouse. The bone protein extract was either impregnated into the disc form of carrier or mixed with carrier powder before implantation. The radiographic analysis indicated increased bone formation in all of the active groups containing the bone protein extract compared to the controls within 21 days follow-up. The highest bone formation was seen in the group with calcium sulfate with stearic acid where new bone and calcified cartilage were clearly visible. The greatest bone formation occurred in the groups that had bone protein extract readily available. This indicates that the bone forming factors in sufficient concentrations are required at the early stage of bone formation. The calcium sulfate with stearic acid was the most suitable and effective carrier for reindeer bone protein extract.

  18. Kinetics and Mechanistic Chemistry of Oxidation of Butacaine Sulfate by Chloramine-B in Acid Medium

    Shubha, Jayachamarajapura Pranesh; Kotabagi, Vinutha [Bosco Institute of Technology, Bangalore (India); Puttaswamy [Bangalore Univ., Bangalore (India)

    2012-11-15

    Butacaine sulfate is an ester of p-aminobenzoic acid which has been widely used as a local anaesthetic and it is a long standing agent particularly for spinal anaesthesia. For this reason, a kinetic study of oxidation of butacaine sulfate by sodium N-chlorobenzenesulfonamide (chloramine-B or CAB) has been carried out in HClO{sub 4} medium at 303 K in order to explore this redox system mechanistic chemistry. The rate shows a first-order dependence on both [CAB]{sub o}, and [substrate]{sub o}, and a fractional-order dependence on acid concentration. Decrease of dielectric constant of the medium, by adding methanol, increases the rate of the reaction. Variation of ionic strength and addition of benzenesulfonamide or NaCl have no significant effect on the rate. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters have been evaluated. The stoichiometry of the reaction has been found to be 1:2 and the oxidation products have been identified by spectral analysis. The observed results have been explained by plausible mechanism and the related rate law has been deduced.

  19. Morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) toughened by precipitated barium sulfate

    Yang, Jinian; Wang, Chuang; Shao, Kaiyun; Ding, Guoxin; Tao, Yulun; Zhu, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based composites were prepared by blending PLA with precipitated barium sulfate (BaSO4) modified with stearic acid. The morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of samples with increased mass fraction of BaSO4 were investigated. Results showed that PLA was toughened and reinforced simultaneously by incorporation of precipitated BaSO4 particles. The highest impact toughness and elongation at break were both achieved at 15% BaSO4, while the elastic modulus increased monotonically with increasing BaSO4 loading. Little effect of BaSO4 on the thermal behavior of PLA was observed in the present case. However, the thermal stability of PLA/BaSO4 composites at high temperature was enhanced.

  20. Characterization of the sulfate-reducing bacterial population in sediments of acid mining lakes

    With respect to remediation of acid mine drainage (AMD), concomitant alteration of redox conditions, formation of metal sulfides and alkalinity generation are of special interest. The majority of lakes formed in the Lusatian lignite mining district bear waters of low pH and high ionic strength. For several of these acid mining lakes, sulfate-reducing activities have been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to find out which bacteria are responsible for these activities, whether these SRB exhibit special traits to thrive under extreme conditions, and whether the population differed from those inhabiting freshwater and marine environments. For this purpose we estimated the most probable number (MPN) of culturable SRB in surface sediments of three mining lakes (ML) and obtained isolates from the same sites. The strains were characterised physiologically and phylogenetically. (orig.)

  1. Titanium Mass-balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia Hills soils have been exposed to aqueous alteration in alkaline [1] as well as acid conditions [2,3]. The Paso Robles class soils are bright soils that possess the highest S concentration of any soil measured on Mars [2]. Ferric-sulfate detection by Moessbauer analysis indicated that acid solutions were involved in forming these soils [4]. These soils are proposed to have formed by alteration of nearby rock by volcanic hydrothermal or fumarolic activity. The Paso Robles soils consist of the original Paso Robles-disturbed-Pasadena (PR-dist), Paso Robles- PasoLight (PR-PL), Arad-Samra, Arad-Hula, Tyrone- Berker Island1 and Tyrone-MountDarwin [2 ,3. ]Chemical characteristics indicate that the PR-dist and PR-PL soils could be derived from acid weathering of local Wishstone rocks while the Samra and Hula soils are likely derived from local Algonquin-Iroquet rock [3]. The Paso Robles soils were exposed to acidic sulfur bearing fluids; however, little else is known about the chemistry of the alteration fluid and its effects on the alteration of the proposed parent materials. The objectives of this work are to conduct titanium normalized mass-balance analysis to1) assess elemental gains and losses from the parent materials in the formation of the Paso Robles soils and 2) utilize this information to indicate the chemical nature of the alteration fluids.

  2. Recovery and separation of sulfuric acid and iron from dilute acidic sulfate effluent and waste sulfuric acid by solvent extraction and stripping.

    Qifeng, Wei; Xiulian, Ren; Jingjing, Guo; Yongxing, Chen

    2016-03-01

    The recovery and simultaneous separation of sulfuric acid and iron from dilute acidic sulfate effluent (DASE) and waste sulfuric acid (WSA) have been an earnest wish for researchers and the entire sulfate process-based titanium pigment industry. To reduce the pollution of the waste acid and make a comprehensive use of the iron and sulfuric acid in it, a new environmentally friendly recovery and separation process for the DASE and the WSA is proposed. This process is based on the reactive extraction of sulfuric acid and Fe(III) from the DASE. Simultaneously, stripping of Fe(III) is carried out in the loaded organic phase with the WSA. Compared to the conventional ways, this innovative method allows the effective extraction of sulfuric acid and iron from the DASE, and the stripping of Fe(III) from the loaded organic phase with the WSA. Trioctylamine (TOA) and tributyl phosphate (TBP) in kerosene (10-50%) were used as organic phases for solvent extraction. Under the optimal conditions, about 98% of Fe(III) and sulfuric acid were removed from the DASE, and about 99.9% of Fe(III) in the organic phase was stripped with the WSA. PMID:26546698

  3. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Lin, Qing-quan; Gu, Guo-hua; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Ren-feng; Liu, You-cai; Fu, Jian-gang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leaching efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sulfuric acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respectively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  4. Bromine accumulation in acidic black colluvial soils

    Cortizas, Antonio Martínez; Vázquez, Cruz Ferro; Kaal, Joeri; Biester, Harald; Casais, Manuela Costa; Rodríguez, Teresa Taboada; Lado, Luis Rodríguez

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations showed that bromine is incorporated to soil organic matter (SOM), its content increasing with humification. But few research was done on its long-term accumulation and the role played by pedogenetic processes, as those involved in organic matter stabilization. We investigated bromine content and distribution in four deep, acidic, organic-rich, Holocene soils from an oceanic area of Western Europe. Bromine concentrations (93-778 μg g-1) in the silt + clay (area, and total estimated retention was low (6-16%). The degree of SOM bromination, expressed as the Br/C molar ratio, varied between 0.03 and 1.20 mmol Br/mol C. The ratio was highly correlated (n = 23, r2 0.88, p pool of metal-clay-stabilized organic matter.

  5. Origin of dimethylsulfide, non-sea-salt sulfate, and methanesulfonic acid in eastern Antarctica

    Cosme, E.; Hourdin, F.; Genthon, C.; Martinerie, P.

    2005-02-01

    Ignoring the origin of atmospheric chemicals is often a strong limitation to the full interpretation of their measurement. In this article, this question is addressed in the case of the sulfur species in Antarctica, with an original method of retrotransport of tracers. The retrotransport model is derived from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoom-Tracers (LMD-ZT) atmospheric general circulation model, optimized for polar climate and expanded to simulate atmospheric sulfur chemistry. For two East Antarctic scientific stations (Dumont d'Urville and Vostok) the effects of transport and chemistry and the influence of oceanic, volcanic, and anthropogenic sources on dimethylsulfide (DMS), non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate, and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentrations are evaluated in summer and winter. The oceanic source largely dominates, but other sources can episodically be significant. The meridional origin and the age of DMS, MSA, and biogenic nss sulfate are also estimated. The latitudes of origin of MSA and nss sulfate are similar in summer, but they differ markedly in winter. This is a signature of their different chemical production scheme. Also, the interannual variability of the origin of the sulfur species at Vostok is weak compared to that at Dumont d'Urville. Acknowledging that the DMS concentrations in the ocean have no interannual variability in the model, this result suggests unsurprisingly that inland Antarctic stations may be better observation sites to monitor large-scale DMS bioproductivity variability than coastal sites are. The combination of slower chemistry and more intense atmospheric circulation in winter leads to unexpected results, such as a younger DMS in winter than in summer at Vostok.

  6. Cholesterol versus cholesterol sulfate: effects on properties of phospholipid bilayers containing docosahexaenoic acid.

    Schofield, M; Jenski, L J; Dumaual, A C; Stillwell, W

    1998-09-01

    The important omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is present at high concentration in some membranes that also contain the unusual sterol cholesterol sulfate (CS). The association between these lipids and their effect on membrane structure is presented here. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), MC540 fluorescence, erythritol permeability, pressure/area isotherms on lipid monolayers and molecular modeling are used to compare the effect of CS and cholesterol on model phospholipid membranes. By DSC, CS decreases the main phase transition temperature and broadens the transitions of dipalmitolyphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,18:1 PC) and 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,22:6 PC) to a much larger extent than does cholesterol. In addition CS produces a three-component transition in 18:0,18:1 PC bilayers that is not seen with cholesterol. In a mixed phospholipid bilayer composed of 18:0,18:1 PC/18:0,22:6 PC (1:1, mol/mol), CS at 2.5 membrane mol% or more induces lateral phase separation while cholesterol does not. CS decreases lipid packing density and increases permeability of 18:0,18:1 PC and 18:0,22:6 PC bilayers to a much larger extent than cholesterol. CS disrupts oleic acid-containing bilayers more than those containing DHA. Molecular modeling confirms that the anionic sulfate moiety on CS renders this sterol more polar than cholesterol with the consequence that CS likely resides higher (extends further into the aqueous environment) in the bilayer. CS can therefore be preferentially accommodated into DHA-enriched bilayers where its tetracyclic ring system may fit into the delta 4 pocket of DHA, a location excluded to cholesterol. It is proposed that CS may in part replace the membrane function of cholesterol in DHA-rich membranes. PMID:9807808

  7. Microwave-assisted digestion using nitric acid for heavy metals and sulfated ash testing in active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    Pluhácek, T; Hanzal, J; Hendrych, J; Milde, D

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of inorganic impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients plays a crucial role in the quality control of the pharmaceutical production. The heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash methods employing microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid have been demonstrated as alternatives to inappropriate compendial methods recommended in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). The recoveries using the heavy metals method ranged between 89% and 122% for nearly all USP and Ph. Eur. restricted elements as well as the recoveries of sodium sulfate spikes were around 100% in all tested matrices. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion method allowed simultaneous decomposition of 15 different active pharmaceutical ingredients with sample weigh up to 1 g. The heavy metals and sulfated ash procedures were successfully applied to the determination of heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash content in mycophenolate mofetil, nicergoline and silymarin. PMID:27209695

  8. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  9. Factors Affecting Sensitivity of Variable Charge Soils to Acid Rain

    WANGJING-HUA

    1995-01-01

    The sensitivity of a large number of variable charge soils to acid rain was evaluated through examining pH-H2SO4 input curves.Two derivative parameters,the consumption of hydrogen ions by the soil and the acidtolerant limit as defined as the quantity of sulfuric acid required to bring the soil to pH 3.5 in a 0.001mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 solution,were used.The sensitivity of variable charge soils was higher than that of constant charge soils,due to the predominance of kaolinite in clay mineralogical composition.Among these soils the sensitivity was generally of the order lateritic red soil>red soil> latosol.For a given type of soil within the same region the sensitivity was affected by parent material,due to differences in clay minerals and texture.The sensitivity of surface soil may be lower or higher than that of subsiol,depending on whether organic matter or texture plays the dominant role in determining the buffering capacity.Paddy soils consumed more acid within lower range of acid input when compared with upland soils,due to the presence of more exchangeable bases,but consumed less acid within higher acid input range,caused by the decrease in clay content.

  10. Amendment of Acid Soils with Crop Residues and Biochars

    YUAN Jin-Hua; XU Ren-Kou; WANG Ning; LI Jiu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The liming potential of some crop residues and their biochars on an acid Ultisol was investigated using incubation experiments. Rice hulls showed greater liming potential than rice hull biochar, while soybean and pea straws had less liming potential than their biochars. Due to their higher alkalinity, biochars from legume materials increased soil pH much compared to biochars from non-legume materials. The alkalinity of biochars was a key factor affecting their liming potential,and the greater alkalinity of biochars led to greater reductions in soil acidity. The incorporation of biochars decreased soil exchangeable acidity and increased soil exchangeable base cations and base saturation, thus improving soil fertility.

  11. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Sulfuric Acid and Application to Urinary Sulfate

    Masuoka,Noriyoshi

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available A new gas chromatographic method for the determination of sulfate was developed. In this method, sulfate was quantitatively converted to a volatile derivative, dimethyl sulfate, by a two-step procedure. First, sulfate was converted to silver sulfate by reaction with silver oxide, and then to dimethyl sulfate by reaction with methyl iodide. The derivative was analyzed by gas chromatography. Methyl methanesulfonate was used as an internal standard. The method was applied to the determination of total urinary sulfate. Phosphate and chloride ions, which interfered with the present method, were eliminated with the use of basic magnesium carbonate and an excess of silver oxide, respectively. Recovery was over 96% when 5 to 40 mumol/ml of sulfate was added to human urine samples.

  12. Phenolic Acids in Plant-Soil-Microbe System: A Review

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic acids are very common compounds in pedosphere. The objective of this review was to summarize the current knowledge of the behaviors of phenolic acids in plant-soil-microbe system. When phenolic acids originated from leaching, decomposition and exudation of living and dead plant tissues enter soils, they can react physicochemically with soil particle surfaces and/or incorporate into humic matter. Phenolic acids desorbed from soil particle surfaces and remained in solution phase can be utilized by microbe as carbon sources and absorbed by plants. The degradation products of phenolic acids by microbe include some organic and/or inorganic compounds such as new phenolic acids. In addition, phenolic acids in soils can stimulate population and activity of microbe. Phenolic acids can inhibit plants growth by affecting ion leakage, phytohormone activity, membrane permeability, hydraulic conductivity, net nutrient uptake, and enzyme activity. Behaviors of phenolic acids in soils are influenced by other organic compounds (phenolic acids, methionine, glucose, etc.) and/or inorganic ions. The role of phenolic acids as allelopathic agents should not be neglected only based on their low specific concentrations in natural soils, because numbers and interactions of phenolic acids will increase their allelopathic activities.

  13. Evidence for shift from acidobacteria to proteobacteria dominance in soil profile of boreal acid sulphate soils

    Chroňáková, Alica; Bryndová, Michala; Otáhalová, Šárka; Yli-Halla, M.; Šimek, Miloslav

    Dijon : INRA, 2014. s. 276. [Global Soil Biodiversity Conference. Assessing soil biodiversity and its role for ecosystem services /1./. 02.12.2014-05.12.2014, Dijon] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : boreal acid sulphate soils * soil profile * bacteria community structure * subsoil horizons Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  14. Distribution of nitrogen ammonium sulfate (15N) soil-plant system in a no-tillage crop succession

    the n use by maize (Zea mays, l.) is affected by n-fertilizer levels. this study was conducted using a sandy-clay texture soil (Hapludox) to evaluate the efficiency of n use by maize in a crop succession, based on 15N labeled ammonium sulfate (5.5 atom %) at different rates, and to assess the residual fertilizer effect in two no-tillage succession crops (signal grass and corn). Two maize crops were evaluated, the first in the growing season 2006, the second in 2007, and brachiaria in the second growing season. The treatments consisted of n rates of 60, 120 and 180 kg ha-1in the form of labeled 15N ammonium sulfate. This fertilizer was applied in previously defined subplots, only to the first maize crop (growing season 2006). The variables total accumulated n; fertilizer-derived n in corn plants and pasture; fertilizer-derived n in the soil; and recovery of fertilizer-n by plants and soil were evaluated.The highest uptake of fertilizer n by corn was observed after application of 120 kg ha-1N and the residual effect of n fertilizer on subsequent corn and brachiaria was highest after application of 180 kg ha-1N. After the crop succession, soil n recovery was 32, 23 and 27 % for the respective applications of 60, 120 and 180 kg ha-1N. (author)

  15. Soil Acidification due to Acid Deposition in Southern China

    Liao, Bohan

    1998-12-31

    Anthropogenic emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to the atmosphere has made acid deposition one of the most serious environmental problems. In China, acid deposition research started in the late 1970s. The present thesis is part of a joint Chinese-Norwegian research project. The main goal of the thesis was to investigate the mechanism of soil acidification, to estimate soil responses to acid deposition, and to compare relative soil sensitivity to acidification in southern China. Laboratory experiments and modelling simulations were included. Specifically, the thesis (1) studies the characteristics of anion adsorption and cation release of the soils from southern China, (2) examines the effects of increased ionic strength in the precipitation and the effects of anion adsorption on cation release from the soils, (3) compares the relative sensitivity of these soils to acidification and the potentially harmful effects of acid deposition, (4) estimates likely soil responses to different deposition scenarios, including changes in soil waters and soil properties, and (5) investigates long-term changes in soils and soil waters in the Guiyang catchment due to acid deposition. 218 refs., 31 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Preparation and application of zirconium sulfate supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve as solid acid catalyst for esterification

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAPO-34 supported zirconium sulfate solid acid catalyst was prepared. • Esterification of acetic acid with ethanol can be catalyzed by ZS/SAPO-34. • The hydration of ZS is vital to the acidic property and catalytic performance. • The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C shows good reusability. - Abstract: Zirconium sulfate (ZS) was supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve by using an incipient wetness impregnation method with zirconium sulfate as the precursor. The as-prepared catalysts were used as solid acid catalyst for esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol. The influence of calcination temperature on the acidic property, catalytic activity, and reusability of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts were mainly investigated. FT-IR, SEM, EDS and TG analysis have been carried out to demonstrate the characteristics of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts. It was found that the 30 wt%ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts display the property of superacid irrespective of calcination temperature. The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C can enhance the interaction between the supported ZS and SAPO-34 and keep the catalyst remaining substantially active after several reaction cycles. However, further increasing calcination temperature will cause the transfer of ZS from hydrate to anhydrous phase, and thus the decrease of activity

  17. Role of dissimilatory sulfate reduction in wetlands constructed for acid coal mine drainage (AMD) treatment. Master's thesis

    Five constructed wetlands with different organic substrates were exposed to the same quantity/quality of acid mine drainage (AMD). During the 16-month exposure to AMD, all wetlands accumulated S in the forms of organic and reduced inorganic S and Fe in the form of iron sulfides. Iron sulfide and probably most of the organic S(C-bonded S) accumulation were end products of bacterial dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Results of study support the notion that sulfate reduction and accumulation of Fe sulfides contribute to Fe retention in wetlands exposed to AMD. Detailed information is provided

  18. Fixation of radiocaesium in an acid brown forest soil

    The influence of clay minerals and organic matter on the sorption and desorption of radiocaesium in an acid brown forest soil is investigated. A highly selective adsorption of radiocaesium is often reported in the surface horizons of acid forest soils. For this reason, soil humus is often considered as a key parameter in modelling the behaviour of Cs in these soils. The Ca2+-clay fractions, extracted from the surface hemi-organic horizon and the deeper mineral horizons of an acid brown soil, exhibit similarly high Cs+ sorption properties. Desorption yields are much lower in the surface layers, resulting in higher net retention of radiocaesium. Organic matter dynamics in the soil containing Hydroxy Interlayered Vermiculite minerals has an indirect effect on radiocaesium retention properties through Al complexation by organic acids. Acidocomplexolysis of Hydroxy Interlayered Vermiculitic clays results in the formation of degraded vermiculite in the topsoil layers, inducing a larger amount of high charged interlayer sites for Cs+ specific adsorption

  19. Perlecan Heparan Sulfate Is Required for the Inhibition of Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by All-trans-Retinoic Acid.

    Tran-Lundmark, Karin; Tannenberg, Philip; Rauch, Bernhard H; Ekstrand, Johan; Tran, Phan-Kiet; Hedin, Ulf; Kinsella, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation is a key process in stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques, and during restenosis after interventions. A clearer understanding of SMC growth regulation is therefore needed to design specific anti-proliferative therapies. Retinoic acid has been shown to inhibit proliferation of SMCs both in vitro and in vivo and to affect the expression of extracellular matrix molecules. To explore the mechanisms behind the growth inhibitory activity of retinoic acid, we hypothesized that retinoids may induce the expression of perlecan, a large heparan sulfate proteoglycan with anti-proliferative properties. Perlecan expression and accumulation was induced in murine SMC cultures by all-trans-retinoic acid (AtRA). Moreover, the growth inhibitory effect of AtRA on wild-type cells was greatly diminished in SMCs from transgenic mice expressing heparan sulfate-deficient perlecan, indicating that the inhibition is perlecan heparan sulfate-dependent. In addition, AtRA influenced activation and phosphorylation of PTEN and Akt differently in wild-type and mutant SMCs, consistent with previous studies of perlecan-dependent SMC growth inhibition. We demonstrate that AtRA regulates perlecan expression in SMCs and that the inhibition of SMC proliferation by AtRA is, at least in part, secondary to an increased expression of perlecan and dependent upon its heparan sulfate-chains. PMID:25078760

  20. Contemporaneous deposition of phyllosilicates and sulfates: Using Australian acidic saline lake deposits to describe geochemical variability on Mars

    Baldridge, A.M.; Hook, S.J.; Crowley, J.K.; Marion, G.M.; Kargel, J.S.; Michalski, J.L.; Thomson, B.J.; de Souza, Filho C.R.; Bridges, N.T.; Brown, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the origin of the Martian sulfate and phyllosilicate deposits have led to the hypothesis that there was a marked, global-scale change in the Mars environment from circum-neutral pH aqueous alteration in the Noachian to an acidic evaporitic system in the late Noachian to Hesperian. However, terrestrial studies suggest that two different geochemical systems need not be invoked to explain such geochemical variation.Western Australian acidic playa lakes have large pH differences separated vertically and laterally by only a few tens of meters, demonstrating how highly variable chemistries can coexist over short distances in natural environments. We suggest diverse and variable Martian aqueous environments where the coetaneous formation of phyllosilicates and sulfates at the Australian sites are analogs for regions where phyllosilicates and sulfates coexist on Mars. In these systems, Fe and alkali earth phyllosilicates represent deep facies associated with upwelling neutral to alkaline groundwater, whereas aluminous phyllosilicates and sulfates represent near-surface evaporitic facies formed from more acidic brines. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Titratable Acidity and Alkalinity of Red Soil Surfaces

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The surfaces of red soils have an apparent amphoteric character,carrying titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity simultaneously.The titratable acidity arises from deprotonation of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces and dissociation of weak-acid functional groups of soil organic matter,while the titratable alkalinity is derived from release of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity mainly depended on the composition and content of iron and aluminum oxides in the soils.The results showed that the titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity were in significantly positive correlation not only with the content of amorphous aluminum oxide(Alo) and iron oxide(Feo) extracted with acid ammonium oxalate solution,free iron oxide(Fed) extracted with sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate(DCB) and clays,but also with the zero point of charge (ZPC) of the samples.Organic matter made an important contribution to the titratable acidity.the titratable alkalinity was closely correlated with the amount of fluoride ions adsorbed.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity of red soils were influenced by parent materials,being in the order of red soil derived from basalt> that from tuff> that from granite.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity ware closely related with origination of the variable charges of red soils,and to a certain extent were responsible for variable negative and positive charges of the soils.

  2. Methylsulfonylmethane and boswellic acids versus glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee arthritis: Randomized trial.

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Moretti, Lorenzo; Pesce, Vito; Tafuri, Silvio; Fiore, Alessandra; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-03-01

    Until now glucosamine sulfate (GS) has been the most widely used supplement and has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and boswellic acids (BA) are new effective supplements for the management of inflammation and joint degeneration, according to previous experimental studies. The aim of our study is to test the effectiveness of association of MSM and BA in comparison with GS in knee arthritis.In this prospective randomized clinical trial, MEBAGA (Methylsulfonylmethane and Boswellic Acids versus Glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee Arthritis), 120 participants affected by arthritis of the knee were randomly assigned to an experimental group (MB group) or a control group (GS group) treated for 60 days with 5 g of MSM and 7.2 mg of BA or with 1500 mg of GS daily, respectively. At the 2-month (T1) and 6-months (T2) follow-up , the efficacy of these two nutraceuticals was assessed using the visual analog pain scale (VAS) and the Lequesne Index (LI) for joint function, along with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-cyclooxygenase-2).The repeated measures ANOVA analysis shows that for VAS, LI, and the use of anti-inflammatory drugs scores there are improvements due to the time in the two groups (respectively, F=26.0; P<0.0001; F=4.15; P=0.02; F=3.38; P=0.04), with a tendency to better values for the MB group at T2.On the basis of these preliminary data, we could support the efficacy of the MSM in association with BA in the treatment of OA. These results are consistent with the anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective effects previously occurred in experimental studies. This new combination of integration (MSM and BS) has presented good results and satisfactory in comparison with GS, until now the cornerstone of the treatment of arthritis in according to guidelines. PMID:26684635

  3. Assignment of hexuronic acid stereochemistry in synthetic heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides with 2-O-sulfo uronic acids using electron detachment dissociation

    Agyekum, Isaac; Patel, Anish B.; Zong, Chengli; Boons, Geert Jan; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The present work focuses on the assignment of uronic acid stereochemistry in heparan sulfate (HS) oligomers. The structural elucidation of HS glycosaminoglycans is the subject of considerable importance due to the biological and biomedical significance of this class of carbohydrates. They are highly

  4. Succession of Soil Acidity Quality and its Influence on Soil Phosphorus Types

    DUANWenbiao; CHENLixin

    2004-01-01

    Succession rules of soil acidity quality of larch plantations in first rotation at different development stages, succession rules of soil acidity quality of young stand of larch plantations in second rotation and the relationship between soil acidity and various forms of organic phosphorus and inorganic phosphorus were studied in mountainous area of eastern part of Northeastern China. The results showed that active acidity (pH value) inrhizosphere soil decreased continually with stand age increasing from young stand, half-mature stand, near mature stand to mature stand, but active acidity (pH value) in non-rhizosphere soil, exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, total hydrolytic acidity, and the ratio of exchange acidity and total hydrolytic acidity in rhizosphere soil and in non-rhizosphere soil increased apparently; total organic P, moderately resistant organic P, and highly resistant organic P in soil decreased at all age stages in larch plantations when soil acidity added. For rhizosphere soil of all stands of larch plantations at different development stages,there was positive correlation between Ca-P (except in young stand), Al-P(except in half-mature stand), Fe-P (except in near mature stand and mature stand), O-P (except in young stand), and soil active acidity,respectively; For rhizosphere soil, there was negative correlation between Ca-P (except in half-mature stand), Al-P(except in young stand), O-P, and exchange acidity, exchangeable aluminium, there was also negative correlation between Ca-P, Al-P(except in young stand and half-mature stand), Fe-P, O-P, and total hydrolytic acidity respectively. For rhizosphere soil, the correlation coefficient between Ca-P, O-P and total hydrolytic aciditydecreased, respectively, as stand ages up and that between Fe-P and exchange acidity,exchangeable aluminium increased, respectively, as stand ages grew. For non-rhizosphere soil, there was not significant correlation between soil acidity and various forms of

  5. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and tension lysimetry indicated that expelled solution concentrations were higher than those obtained with either type of lysimeter, although there was less difference with tension

  6. Characterization of specific membrane fatty acids as chemotaxonomic markers for sulfate-reducing bacteria involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane

    Elvert, M.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.; Jørgensen, BB

    2003-01-01

    Membrane fatty acids were extracted from a sediment core above marine gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific. Anaerobic sediments from this environment are characterized by high sulfate reduction rates driven by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The assimilation of methane carbon into...... bacterial biomass is indicated by carbon isotope values of specific fatty acids as low as -103parts per thousand. Specific fatty acids released from bacterial membranes include C(16:1omega5c) , C(17:1omega6c) , and cyC(17:0omega5,6) , all of which have been fully characterized by mass spectrometry. These...

  7. Experimental and theoretical enthalpies of formation of glycine-based sulfate/bisulfate amino acid ionic liquids.

    Zhu, Jing-Fang; He, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Ming; Tao, Guo-Hong

    2012-01-12

    The experimental and theoretical enthalpies of formation of several structural-similar glycine-based sulfate/bisulfate amino acid ionic liquids including glycine sulfate (Gly(2)SO(4), 1), glycine bisulfate (GlyHSO(4), 2), N,N-dimethylglycine sulfate ([DMGly](2)SO(4), 3), N,N-dimethylglycine bisulfate ([DMGly]HSO(4), 4), N,N-dimethylglycine methyl ester sulfate ([DMGlyC(1)](2)SO(4), 5), N,N-dimethylglycine methyl ester bisulfate ([DMGlyC(1)]HSO(4), 6), N,N,N-trimethylglycine methyl ester sulfate ([TMGlyC(1)](2)SO(4), 7), and N,N,N-trimethylglycine methyl ester bisulfate ([TMGlyC(1)]HSO(4), 8) were studied. Their experimental enthalpies of formation were obtained from the corresponding energies of combustion determined by the bomb calorimetry method. The enthalpies of formation of these amino acid ionic liquids are in the range from -1406 kJ mol(-1) to -1128 kJ mol(-1). Systematic theoretical study on these amino acid ionic liquids were performed by quantum chemistry calculation using the Gaussian03 suite of programs. The geometric optimization and the frequency analyses are carried out using the B3LYP method with the 6-31+G** basis set. Their calculated enthalpies of formation were derived from the single point energies carried out with the HF/6-31+G**, B3LYP/6-31+G**, B3LYP/6-311++G**, and MP2/6-311++G** level of theory, respectively. The relevance of experimental and calculated enthalpies of formation was studied. The calculated enthalpies of formation are in good agreement with their experimental data in less than 3% error. PMID:22148242

  8. Comparison of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic Acid doped conductive polypyrrole films for adipose stem cells.

    Björninen, Miina; Siljander, Aliisa; Pelto, Jani; Hyttinen, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Seppänen, Riitta; Haimi, Suvi

    2014-09-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a conductive polymer that has aroused interest due to its biocompatibility with several cell types and high tailorability as an electroconductive scaffold coating. This study compares the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) doped PPy films on human adipose stem cells (hASCs) under electrical stimulation. The PPy films were synthetized electrochemically. The surface morphology of PPy-HA and PPy-CS was characterized by an atomic force microscope. A pulsed biphasic electric current (BEC) was applied via PPy films non-stimulated samples acting as controls. Viability, attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hASCs were evaluated by live/dead staining, DNA content, Alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization assays. Human ASCs grew as a homogenous cell sheet on PPy-CS surfaces, whereas on PPy-HA cells clustered into small spherical structures. PPy-CS supported hASC proliferation significantly better than PPy-HA at the 7 day time point. Both substrates equally triggered early osteogenic differentiation of hASCs, although mineralization was significantly induced on PPy-CS compared to PPy-HA under BEC. These differences may be due to different surface morphologies originating from the CS and HA dopants. Our results suggest that PPy-CS in particular is a potential osteogenic scaffold coating for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24823653

  9. A sulfated polysaccharide, fucoidan, enhances the immunomodulatory effects of lactic acid bacteria.

    Kawashima, Tadaomi; Murakami, Katsura; Nishimura, Ikuko; Nakano, Takahisa; Obata, Akio

    2012-03-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide contained in brown algae, has a variety of immunomodulatory effects, including antitumor and antiviral effects. On the other hand, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) also have immunomodulatory effects such as anti-allergic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan enhances the probiotic effects of LAB on immune functions. By using Peyer's patch cells and spleen cells in vitro, fucoidan amplified interferon (IFN)-γ production in response to a strain of LAB, Tetragenococcus halophilus KK221, and this activity was abolished by desulfation of fucoidan. Moreover, this IFN-γ response was abolished by interleukin (IL)-12 neutralization. These results indicate that fucoidan enhanced IL-12 production in response to KK221, resulting in promoting IFN-γ production. In an in vivo study, Th1/Th2 immunobalance was most improved by oral administration of both fucoidan and KK221 to ovalbumin-immunized mice. These findings suggest that fucoidan can enhance a variety of beneficial effects of LAB on immune functions. PMID:22160132

  10. Tough and elastic hydrogel of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as potential cell scaffold materials.

    Ni, Yilu; Tang, Zhurong; Cao, Wanxu; Lin, Hai; Fan, Yujiang; Guo, Likun; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Natural polysaccharides are extensively investigated as cell scaffold materials for cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation due to their excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, and biofunctions. However, their application is often severely limited by their mechanical behavior. In this study, a tough and elastic hydrogel scaffold was prepared with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). HA and CS were conjugated with tyramine (TA) and the degree of substitution (DS) was 10.7% and 11.3%, respectively, as calculated by (1)H NMR spectra. The hydrogel was prepared by mixing HA-TA and CS-TA in presence of H2O2 and HRP. The sectional morphology of hydrogels was observed by SEM, static and dynamic mechanical properties were analyzed by Shimadzu electromechanical testing machine and dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer Q800. All samples showed good ability to recover their appearances after deformation, the storage modulus (E') of hydrogels became higher as the testing frequency went up. Hydrogels also showed fatigue resistance to cyclic compression. Mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in hydrogels showed good cell viability as detected by CLSM. This study suggests that the hydrogels have both good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, and may serve as model systems to explore mechanisms of deformation and energy dissipation or find some applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25445680

  11. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  12. Biocompatibility Assessment of Novel Collagen-Sericin Scaffolds Improved with Hyaluronic Acid and Chondroitin Sulfate for Cartilage Regeneration

    Sorina Dinescu; Bianca Gălăţeanu; Mădălina Albu; Adriana Lungu; Eugen Radu; Anca Hermenean; Marieta Costache

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) applications are focused towards the use of implantable biohybrids consisting of biodegradable scaffolds combined with in vitro cultured cells. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were identified as the most potent prochondrogenic factors used to design new biomaterials for CTE, while human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were proved to display high chondrogenic potential. In this context, our aim was not only to build novel 3D porous scaffol...

  13. Effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate on folding and thermal stability of acid-denatured cytochrome c: A spectroscopic approach

    Xu, Qi; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2004-01-01

    The molten globule (MG) state can be an intermediate in the protein folding pathway; thus, its detailed description can help understanding protein folding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an anionic surfactant that is commonly used to mimic hydrophobic binding environments such as cell membranes, is known to denature some native state proteins, including horse cytochrome c (cyt c). In this article, refolding of acid denatured cyt c is studied under the influence of SDS to form MG-like states at...

  14. Acidic sandy soil improvement with biochar - A microcosm study.

    Molnár, Mónika; Vaszita, Emese; Farkas, Éva; Ujaczki, Éva; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Tolner, Mária; Klebercz, Orsolya; Kirchkeszner, Csaba; Gruiz, Katalin; Uzinger, Nikolett; Feigl, Viktória

    2016-09-01

    Biochar produced from a wide range of organic materials by pyrolysis has been reported as a means to improve soil physical properties, fertility and crop productivity. However, there is a lack of studies on the complex effects of biochar both on the degraded sandy soil physico-chemical properties and the soil biota as well as on toxicity, particularly in combined application with fertilizer and compost. A 7-week microcosm experiment was conducted to improve the quality of an acidic sandy soil combining variations in biochar types and amounts, compost and fertilizer application rates. The applied biochars were produced from different feedstocks such as grain husks, paper fibre sludge and wood screenings. The main purpose of the microcosm experiment was to assess the efficiency and applicability of different biochars as soil amendment prior to field trials and to choose the most efficient biochar to improve the fertility, biological activity and physical properties of acidic sandy soils. We complemented the methodology with ecotoxicity assessment to evaluate the possible risks to the soil as habitat for microbes, plants and animals. There was clear evidence of biochar-soil interactions positively affecting both the physico-chemical properties of the tested acidic sandy soil and the soil biota. Our results suggest that the grain husk and the paper fibre sludge biochars applied to the tested soil at 1% and 0.5 w/w% rate mixed with compost, respectively can supply a more liveable habitat for plants and soil living animals than the acidic sandy soil without treatment. PMID:26850860

  15. Acid soils of western Serbia and their further acidification

    Mrvic, Vesna

    2010-05-01

    Acid soils cause many unfavorable soil characteristics from the plant nutrition point of view. Because of increased soil acidity the violation of buffering soil properties due to leaching of Ca and Mg ions is taking place that also can cause soil physical degradation via peptization of colloids. Together with increasing of soil acidity the content of mobile Al increases that can be toxic for plants. Easily available nutritive elements transforms into hardly avaialble froms. The process of deactivation is especially expressed for phosphorous that under such conditions forms non-soluble compounds with sesqui-oxides. From the other hand the higher solubility of some microelements (Zn and B) can cause their accelerated leaching from root zone and therefore, result in their deficiency for plant nutrition. Dangerous and toxic matters transforms into easly-available forms for plants, especially, Cd and Ni under the lower soil pH. The studied soil occupies 36675 hectare in the municipality of Krupan in Serbia, and are characterized with very unfavorable chemical properties: 26% of the territory belongs to the cathegory of very acidic, and 44 % belongs to the cathegory of acidic. The results showed that the soil of the territory of Krupan is limited for agricultural land use due to their high acidity. Beside the statement of negative soil properties determined by acidity, there is a necessity for determination of soil sensitivity for acidification processes toward soil protection from ecological aspect and its prevention from further acidification. Based on such data and categorization of soils it is possible to undertake proper measures for soil protection and melioration of the most endangered soil cover, where the economic aspect of these measures is very important. One of the methods of soil classification based on sensitivity for acidification classification the determination of soil categories is based on the values of soil CEC and pH in water. By combination of these

  16. Arsenic removal from contaminated soil using phosphoric acid and phosphate

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to study Arsenic (As) removal from a naturally contaminated soil using phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4). Both H3PO4 and KH2PO4 proved to clearly reduce toxicity of the soil in terms of soil As content, attaining more than 20% As removal at a concentration of 200 mmol/L, although soil As tolerance limit of 30 mg/kg, according to Chinese Environmental quality standard for soil (EQSS), was not satisfied by using these two extractants. At the same time, acidification of soil and dissolution of soil components (Ca, Mg, and Si) resulted from using these two extractants, especially H3PO4. The effectiveness of these two extractants could be attributed to the replacement of As by phosphate ions (PO43-). The function of H3PO4 as an acid to dissolve soil components had little effects on As removal. KH2PO4 almost removed as much As as H3PO4, but it did not result in serious damage to soils, indicating that it was a more promising extractant. The results of a kinetic study showed that As removal reached equilibrium after incubation for 360 min, but dissolution of soil components, especially Mg and Ca, was very rapid. Therefore dissolution of soil components would be inevitable if As was further removed. Elovich's model best described the kinetic data of As removal among the four models used in the kinetic study.

  17. Determination of amino acids in industrial effluents contaminated soil

    38 samples of soil for 19 locations partially irrigated on the effluents of sugar mill and oil andghee mill, bottom sediments of evaporation ponds of sugar and fertilizer industries were collected and analyzed for amino acids after acid digestion by gas chromatography using pre column derivatization with trifluroacetyleacetone and ethyl chloroformate. The results obtained were compared with the soil samples irrigated with fresh water. The soil samples were also analyzed for pH, total nitrogen contents and organic carbon. Nine essential (leucine (Leu), threonine (Thr), lysine (Lys), L-phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), histadine (His), L-valine (Val), methionine (Met) and isoleucine Ile) and ten non-essential ( alanine (Ala), cysteine (Cys), asparagine (Asn), glutamic acid (Glu), serine (Ser), glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), Glutamine (Gln), aspartic acid (Asp), tyrosine (Tyr)) amino acids were analyzed 13-15 amino acids were identified and determined quantitatively from soil samples. Amino acids Met, Asn, Gln and Trp were observed absent from all the samples. The variation in the amino acids contents in soil with the industrial effluents added and total nitrogen and organic carbon is discussed. (author)

  18. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  19. Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils

    Evans, Ch. D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Ostle, N.; Zielinski, P.; Cooper, M.; Peacock, M.; Clark, J.; Oulehle, Filip; Cooper, D.; Freeman, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2012), s. 3317-3331. ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : acidity * dissolved organic carbon * organic soil * peat * podzol * soil carbon * sulphur Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.910, year: 2012

  20. Influence of vegetation on phenolic acid contents in soil

    Malá, J.; Cvikrová, M.; Hrubcová, M. (Marie); Máchová, P.

    2013-01-01

    The study described in this paper was undertaken in order to assess the impact of different woody plants on the dynamics of phenolic acids in soil. The influence of plant litter on the amount of phenolic compounds occurring in soils beneath several deciduous and coniferous tree species was examined in pot experiments. The contents of endogenous methanol soluble free and conjugated phenolic acids in Norway spruce, larch, rowan and two species of willow were determined. We focused on the dynami...

  1. Microbiological transformations of phosphorus and sulphur compounds in acid soils

    Stamenov Dragana; Jarak Mirjana; Đurić Simonida; Jafari Hajnal Timea; Bjelić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of phosphorus and sulphur in soil is closely related to the dynamics of the biological cycle in which microorganisms play a central role. There is not much microbiological activity in acid soils because aerobes are scarce, rhizosphere is restricted to the shallow surface layer, and the biomass of microorganisms decreases with higher acidity. The aim of the research was to investigate the number of microorganisms, which decompose organic and inorganic phosphorus compounds an...

  2. FROM GENE TO STRUCTURE: Formation of Iduronic Acid in Dermatan Sulfate by Two DS-epimerases

    Pacheco, Benny

    2008-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life a wide range of cell behaviors such as differentiation, proliferation and migration are in effect to maintain tissue integrity and function. An integral part of these dynamic processes is the interplay between the cells and their environment, i.e. the extracellular space. Complex polysaccharides, such as dermatan sulfate play a key role in these processes. Dermatan sulfate is a long linear polysaccharide of a repeating disaccharide unit consisti...

  3. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer

    Cánovas, C. R.; Macías, F.; Pérez-López, R.

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40 days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in

  4. Bile salts of the West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris: novel bile alcohol sulfates and absence of bile acids.

    Kuroki, S; Schteingart, C D; Hagey, L R; Cohen, B I; Mosbach, E H; Rossi, S S; Hofmann, A F; Matoba, N; Une, M; Hoshita, T

    1988-04-01

    The bile salts present in gallbladder bile of the West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris, an herbivorous marine mammal of the tropical and subtropical margins of the Atlantic Ocean, were found to consist of a mixture of bile alcohol sulfates. Bile acids, previously believed to be present in all mammals, were not detected. Using chromatography, mass spectrometry, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the major bile alcohol was identified as 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,6 beta,7 alpha-25,26-pentol; that is, it had the nuclear structure of alpha-muricholic acid and the side chain structure of bufol. This compound has not been described previously and the trivial name "alpha-trichechol" is proposed. The second most abundant compound was 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,7 alpha,25,26-tetrol. Other bile alcohols were tentatively identified as 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,6 beta,7 beta,25,26-pentol (named beta-trichechol), 3 alpha,6 alpha,7 beta, 25-26-pentol (named omega-trichechol) and 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,6 beta,7 alpha,26-tetrol. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the four 6,7 epimers of 3,6,7 trihydroxy bile acids are described and discussed. All bile alcohols were present as ester sulfates, the sulfate group being tentatively assigned to the 26-hydroxy group. 12-Hydroxy compounds were not detected. The manatee is the first mammal found to lack bile acids, presumably because it lacks the enzymes required for oxidation of the 26-hydroxy group to a carboxylic acid. Trichechols, like other bile salts, are water-soluble end products of cholesterol metabolism; whether they also function as biological surfactants in promoting biliary cholesterol secretion or lipid digestion is unknown. PMID:3392467

  5. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  6. Thermal stability and surface acidity of mesoporous silica doubly doped by incorporation of sulfate and zirconium ions

    A sulfated Si-Zr-MCM-41 solid with highly ordered mesostructure was synthesized through a templated synthesis route where the CTAB surfactant was used as template. During the synthesis procedure, various amounts of (NH4)2SO4 were added into the mixed solution of Zr and Si precursors to in situ sulfate the MCM-41 solids, aiming to enhance the acidity and thermal stability. The resultant materials showed a long-range ordered hexagonal arrangement with high surface area larger than 797 m2/g and an average pore size distributed at approximate 2.5-2.8 nm. The high-resolution TEM observations confirmed that the order of the mesostructure gained when the molar ratio of SO42-/(ZrO2 + SiO2) increased from 0.1 to 0.3 but decreased as it reached 0.5, which is consistent with the results of 29Si MAS-NMR and XRD analysis. Compared to Si-MCM-41, the (Q2 + Q3)/Q4 ratio derived from the NMR spectra of the Zr-doped sample was higher, indicating that zirconium atoms were incorporated into the silica framework. Unexpectedly, in situ sulfation does not enhance the surface Broensted acidity, most likely due to the sulfur retained within the bulk of the materials; however, it indeed improved the thermal stability of the solid and long-range order of the structure

  7. Partition of Chiral pharmaceutical intermediate R(-)-Mandelic Acid in Aqueous Two-Phase System of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Ammonium Sulfate

    Xu Xiaoping; Li Zhongqin; Chen Jiebo; Huang Xinghua

    2004-01-01

    An aqueous two-phase system of poly (ethylene glycol)-ammonium sulfate was employed to separate R (-)-mandelic acid.The result showed that R (-)-mandelic acid has priority to partition in PEG-rich top phase. This indicated that aqueous two-phase is a very suitable system for separation of R(-)-mandelic acid.

  8. Ruthenium sulfate complexes forming during electrochemical dissolution of Ni-Fe-Ru alloys in sulfuric acid solutions

    Ruthenium sulfate complexes, prepared by anodic dissolution of Ni-Fe-Ru alloys in sulfuric acid solutions, have been studied. Ruthenium oxidation states in the complexes, their charge, dimensions, are determined, and Fe effect on the formation of different forms of complexes is clarified. Using the method of gel-chromatography, it is established, that at the anode potential >= 1w0 V ruthenium transfers into solution in the form of several neutral and anion complex forms of Ru(4): grey-violet polymeric ones (dimensions 1.6-2.3 nm), presumably containing the groupings (Rusub(n)(OH)sub(2(n-1))) or [Rusub(n)Osub(2(n-1))], where n>=3, red dimeric ones, containing (RuO)2, mixture of monomeric browngrey sulfate complexes with the grouping RuO. Fe hinders the formation of Ru complex polymeric forms

  9. BIOREMEDIATION FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE: ORGANIC SOLID WASTE AS CARBON SOURCES FOR SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA: A REVIEW

    I. N. Jamil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological sulfate reduction has been slowly replacing chemical unit processes to treat acid mine drainage (AMD. Bioremediations for AMD treatment are favored due to their low capital and maintenance cost. This paper describes the available AMD treatment, current SRB commercialization such as THIOPAQ® and BioSulphide® technologies, and also the factors and limitations faced. THIOPAQ® and BioSulphide® technologies use expensive carbon sources such as hydrogen as the electron donor. This paper discusses the possibility of organic solid waste as an alternative substrate as it is cheaper and abundant. A possible AMD treatment system setup was also proposed to test the efficiency of sulfate-reducing bacteria utilizing organic solid substrate.

  10. Modeling the neutralizing processes of acid precipitation in soils and glacial sediments of northern Ohio

    Eckstein, Yoram; Hau, Joseph A.

    1992-02-01

    Most studies of the acidic deposition phenomena have been focused on processes occurring in the northeastern USA and Scandinavia. In these regions the soil cover is thin, the bedrock is acidic, and the terrain has very poor acid buffering capacity. Most of the US Midwest, including northern Ohio, has been ignored because the terrain is covered by glacial sediments with an abundance of carbonate minerals. Yet, for the last three decades the area has been experiencing acidic precipitation with a pH range of 3.5-4.5. the lowest in the USA. Samples of precipitation, soil water, and shallow ground water from Leroy Township in Lake County, Ohio, and from Wooster Township in Wayne County, Ohio, were analyzed and processed using WATEQ3 and PHREEQE computer models to quantify the effects of the acidic deposition. The two regions are characterized by very similar topographic, geological and hydrogeological conditions. Although the cation content of the precipitation in both regions is similar, the anion concentrations are much higher (sulfate by 70%, nitrate by 14% and chloride by 167%) in Leroy, located 50 km east-northeast and downwind of the Cleveland-Akron industrial complex, than in Wooster, located 80 km south-southwest and off-wind from the industrial complex. Computer modeling results indicate that buffering of acidic deposition in the surficial sediments and glacial tills of the two regions is dominated apparently by calcite dissolution, and dissolution and exchange of hydrogen for magnesium ions are the dominant neutralizing processes. However, reaction simulations also suggest that the buffering capacity of the Leroy soils and tills has been depleted to a much greater degree than in Wooster Township. In Leroy more acidic input is reacting with less buffering material to produce lower soil and groundwater pH. The depletion of carbonate and alumino-silicate minerals in the soils of Leroy Township is occurring at a rate that is 3-5 times faster than in the same type

  11. Effect of acid rain on soil microbial processes

    Acid rain is real; the pH of precipitation in many areas of the world is below its normal equilibrium value, and concentrations of inorganic N and S are elevated above background. The impact of acid rain on soil microbial processes is less clear. This is largely because of the chemical buffering of the soil ecosystem and the inherent resiliency and redundancy of soil microorganisms. Microorganisms have an amazing capacity to adapt to new situations, which is enhanced by their ability to evolve under selection pressure. Their resilience is a function of both the large number of microorganisms present in a given volume of soil and their high growth rate relative to macroorganisms. This suggests that microorganisms are likely to be able to adapt more quickly to acidification than plants or animals, which may be one reason why symbiotic associations, such as ectomycorrhizae, are more susceptible to acid inputs than their saprophytic counterparts

  12. Visible-near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy of volcanic acid-sulfate alteration in Nicaragua: Analogs for early Mars

    Marcucci, Emma C.; Hynek, Brian M.; Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Rogers, K. L.

    2013-10-01

    Acid-sulfate weathering at Nicaraguan hydrothermal sites Cerro Negro, Momotombo, and Telica volcanoes and Hervidores de San Jacinto mudpots was characterized as an analog for similar processes that likely operated on early Mars. In situ mineralogical analyses were conducted with a field portable visible near-infrared spectrometer for comparison to similar Martian data sets. Three classes of alteration minerals were identified: sulfates (gypsum and natroalunite), oxides/hydroxides (hematite and goethite), and phyllosilicates (kaolinite/halloysite, montmorillonite, and saponite), as well as elemental sulfur and hydrated silica phases. Our sites had similar suites of minerals, but frequencies varied with location. The results of this field campaign allow inferences regarding the paleo-environmental conditions that were likely present at similar relic hydrothermal sites identified on Mars. In particular, sulfates and phyllosilicates could have coevolved under hydrothermal conditions at Noctis Labyrinthus as is seen in Nicaragua. Fe/Mg smectites were detected in areas with pH of 3-4. Alunite spectra at Terra Sirenum demonstrated mineral mixing effects on spectroscopy. Mineral mixing can cause uncertainties in spectral identification due to a dominant spectrum, such as iron minerals, masking another or the suppression of weaker bands. When viewed from orbit, our field sites would likely be dominated by hydrated silica and Mars sites, such as one in Syrtis Major, could have a more diverse mineralogy than the data reveal. Concentrated amorphous silica, such as at Gusev crater, can result from acidic fumarolic activity, while Mg sulfates may indicate a lack of reworking by water. This field spectroscopy study helps confirm and provide insight into hydrothermal processes on ancient Mars.

  13. Chemical Species of Aluminum Lons in Acid Soils

    XURENKOU; JIGUOLIANG

    1998-01-01

    Soil samples collected from several acid soils in Guangdong,Fujian,Zhejiang and Anhui provinces of the southern China were employded to characterize the chemical species of aluminum ions in the soils.The proportion or monoeric inorganic Al to total Al in soil solution was in the range of 19% to 70%,that of monomeric organlic Al (Al-OM) to total Al ranged from 7.7% to 69%,and that of the acid-soluble Al to total Al was generally smaller and was lower than 20% in most of the acid soils studied ,The Al-OM concentration in soil solution was postively correlated with the content of dissolved organic carbon(DOC) and aslo affected by the concentration of Al3+,The complexes of aluminum with fluoride(Al-F) were the predominant forms of inorganic Al,and the proportion of Al-F compexes to total inorganic Al increased with pH.Under strongly acid ondition,Al3+ was also a mjaor form of inorganic Al,and the proportio of Al3+ to total inorganic Al decreased with increasing pH.The,proportions of Al-OH and Al-SO4 complexes to total inorganic Al were small and were not larger than 10% in the most acid soils.The concentration of inorganic Al in solution depended largely on pH and the concentration of total F in soil solution,The concentrations of Al-OM,Al3+,Al-F and Al-OH complexes in topsoil were higher than those in subsoil and decreased with the increase in soil depth,The chemical species of aluminum ions were influenced by pH,The concentrations of Al-OM, Al3+,Al-F complexes and Al-OH complexes decreased with the increase in pH.

  14. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  15. The synthesis of taurine-conjugated bile acids and bile acid sulfates labeled with 14C or 3H in the taurine moiety

    Studies of bile acid transport systems require radio-labeled taurine-conjugated bile acids with high specific activity. An established procedure was optimized to provide mild, fast, and effective conjugation of radio-labeled taurine with different types of bile acids, including those with labile 7α-hydroxy-3-oxo-Δ4 or 3β, 7α-dihydroxy-Δ5 structures. Taurine labeled with 14C or 3H was reacted with excess bile acid anhydride formed from the tributylamine salt and ethylchloroformate (2/1 M/M) in aqueous dioxane for 15 min at room temperature. The yields were higher than 95% and less than 2% side products were formed. Bile acid sulfates were conjugated with 14C- or 3H-labeled taurine by using N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline as the coupling reagent. The products were effectively purified by chromatography of the sodium salts on Sephadex LH-20. The yields of taurine-conjugated bile acid sulfates were 65-70%. (author)

  16. A new allele of acid soil tolerance gene from a malting barley variety

    Bian, Miao; Jin, Xiaoli; Broughton, Sue; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Zhou, Gaofeng; Zhou, Meixue; Zhang, Guoping; Sun, Dongfa; Li, Chengdao

    2015-01-01

    Background Acid soil is a serious limitation to crop production all over the world. Toxic aluminium (Al) cations in acid soil inhibit root growth and reduce yield. Although a gene tolerant to acid soil has been identified, it has not been used in malting barley breeding, which is partly due to the acid soil tolerance gene being linked to unfavorable malting quality traits. Results A Brazilian malting barley variety Br2 was identified as tolerant to acid soil. A doubled haploid (DH) population...

  17. Differentiating chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans using collision-induced dissociation; uronic acid cross-ring diagnostic fragments in a single stage of tandem mass spectrometry.

    Kailemia, Muchena J; Patel, Anish B; Johnson, Dane T; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The stereochemistry of the hexuronic acid residues of the structure of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is a key feature that affects their interactions with proteins and other biological functions. Electron based tandem mass spectrometry methods, in particular electron detachment dissociation (EDD), have been able to distinguish glucuronic acid (GlcA) from iduronic acid (IdoA) residues in some heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides by producing epimer-specific fragments. Similarly, the relative abundance of glycosidic fragment ions produced by collision-induced dissociation (CID) or EDD has been shown to correlate with the type of hexuronic acid present in chondroitin sulfate GAGs. The present work examines the effect of charge state and degree of sodium cationization on the CID fragmentation products that can be used to distinguish GlcA and IdoA containing chondroitin sulfate A and dermatan sulfate chains. The cross-ring fragments (2,4)A(n) and (0,2)X(n) formed within the hexuronic acid residues are highly preferential for chains containing GlcA, distinguishing it from IdoA. The diagnostic capability of the fragments requires the selection of a molecular ion and fragment ions with specific ionization characteristics, namely charge state and number of ionizable protons. The ions with the appropriate characteristics display diagnostic properties for all the chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate chains (degree of polymerization of 4-10) studied. PMID:26307707

  18. Ion-exchange equilibria of tungsten in the ionite-sodium sulfate sulfuric acid solution system

    Ion-exchange equilibrium in the system macroporous ionite-Na2WO4-Na2SO4-H2O(H2SO4) are studied by the methods of IR- and absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy and mercury porometry to develop methods for tungsten selective extraction from solutions mentioned. It is ascertained that amine-containing macroporous anionites features a high exchange capacity towards tungsten ions in sulfate solutions at pH 2.5-5.5. The anionites permit a complete separation of tungsten ions from sulfate ions and preparation of pure tungsten salts

  19. Response of the sulfate-reducing community to the re-establishment of estuarine conditions in two contrasting soils: a mesocosm approach

    Miletto, M.; Loeb, R.; Antheunisse, A.M.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the response of the sulfate-reducing prokaryote (SRP) communities to the experimental variation of salinity and tide in an outdoor mesocosm setup. Intact soil monoliths were collected at two areas of the Haringvliet lagoon (The Netherlands): one sampling location consisted of agricultural

  20. Sorption and leaching potential of acidic herbicides in Brazilian soils.

    Spadotto, Claudio A; Hornsby, Arthur G; Gomes, Marco A F

    2005-01-01

    Leaching of acidic herbicides (2,4-D, flumetsulam, and sulfentrazone) in soils was estimated by comparing the original and modified AF (Attenuation Factor) models for multi-layered soils (AFi). The original AFi model was modified to include the concept of pH-dependence for Kd (sorption coefficient) based on pesticide dissociation and changes in the accessibility of soil organic functional groups able to interact with the pesticide. The original and modified models, considering soil and herbicide properties, were applied to assess the leaching potential of selected herbicides in three Brazilian soils. The pH-dependent Kd values estimated for all three herbicides were observed to be always higher than pH-independent Kd values calculated using average Koc data, and therefore the original AFi model overestimated the overall leaching potential for the soils studied. PMID:15656159

  1. Soil bacterial and fungal communities along a soil chronosequence assessed by fatty acid profiling

    Welc, M.; Bünemann, E. K.; Flieβbach, A.; Frossard, E.; Jansa, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 49, JUN 2012 (2012), s. 184-192. ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fatty acid methyl esters * Glacier forefield * Soil chronosequence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.654, year: 2012

  2. Bacterial Growth at the High Concentrations of Magnesium Sulfate Found in Martian Soils

    Crisler, J.D.; Newville, T.M.; Chen, F.; Clark, B. C.; Schneegurt, M A

    2012-01-01

    The martian surface environment exhibits extremes of salinity, temperature, desiccation, and radiation that would make it difficult for terrestrial microbes to survive. Recent evidence suggests that martian soils contain high concentrations of MgSO4 minerals. Through warming of the soils, meltwater derived from subterranean ice-rich regolith may exist for an extended period of time and thus allow the propagation of terrestrial microbes and create significant bioburden at the near surface of M...

  3. The production and degradation of trichloroacetic acid in soil: Results from in situ soil column experiments

    Heal, M. R.; Dickey, C. A.; Heal, K.V.; Stidson, R.T.; Matucha, Miroslav; Cape, J. N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 4 (2010), s. 401-407. ISSN 0045-6535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Trichloroacetic acid * TCA * Soil lysimeter Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 3.155, year: 2010

  4. Tolerance of VA Mycorrhizal Fungi to Soil Acidity

    2001-01-01

    A 45-day greenhouse experiment was carried out to determine effect of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizai fungi on colonization rate,plant height, plant growth,hyphae length,total Al in the plants,exchangeable A1 in the soil and soil pH by comparison at soil pH 3.5,4.5 and 6.0.Plant mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus L.) and crotalaria (Crotalaria mucronata Desv.) were grown with and without VA mycorrhizal fungi in pots with red soil.Ten VA mycorrhizal fungi strains were tested,including Glomus epigaeum (No.90001),Glomus caledonium (No.90036),Glomus mosseae (No.90107), Acaulospora spp.(No.34),Scutellospora heterogama (No.36),Scutellospora calospora (No. 37),Glomus manihotis (No.38),Gigaspora spp.(No.47),Glomus manihotis (No.49),and Acaulospora spp.(No.53).Being the most tolerant to acidity,strain 34 and strain 38 showed quicker and higher-rated colonization without lagging,three to four times more in number of nodules,two to four times more in plant dry weight,30% to 60% more in hyphae length,lower soil exchangeable Al,and higher soil pH than without VA mycorrhizal fungi (CK).Other strains also could improve plant growth and enhance plant tolerance to acidity,but their effects were not marked.This indicated that VA mycorrhizal fungi differed in the tolerance to soil acidity and so did their inoculation effects.In the experiment,acidic soil could be remedied by inoculation of promising VA mycorrhizal fungi tolerant of acidity.

  5. Preparation and Catalytic Application of Novel Water Tolerant Solid Acid Catalysts of Zirconium Sulfate/HZSM-5

    JIANG Ya-jie; JUAN Joon Ching; MENG Xiu-juan; CAO Wei-liang; YARMO Mohd Ambar; ZHANG Jing-chang

    2007-01-01

    Esterification of acrylic acid(AA) to produce AA esters has widespread application in the chemical industry. A series of water tolerant solid acid catalysts was prepared, and characterized by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, TGA-DTA, XPS, and ammonia adsorption FTIR. The effects of Si/Al ratio, zirconium sulfate(ZS) loading on HZSM-5 and calcination temperature on the esterification were investigated. When 20%(mass fraction) ZS is loaded on HZSM-5, the conversion of AA reaches 100%. XRD analysis indicates that ZS is highly dispersed on HZSM-5 because no crystalline structure assigned to ZS is found. Catalytic activity and hydrophobicity of ZS supported on HZSM-5 are higher compared with those of parent ZS or HZSM-5. Results show that this kind of novel catalysts is an efficient water tolerant solid acid catalyst for esterification reactions.

  6. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  7. Specific transformations of mineral forms of nitrogen in acid soils

    MIRJANA KRESOVIC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were performed on soils of different acidity, ranging in the pH interval 4.65–5.80 (in water. Changes of the mineral nitrogen forms in the examined soils were studied by applying short-term incubation experiments performed under aerobic conditions, with a humidity of 30 % and a temperature of 20 °C, both with and without the addition of 100 and 300 ppm NH4–N. The results of the incubation experiments showed that retarded nitrification was present in all the examined soils. Increased and toxic quantities of nitrites (35.7 ppm were formed during the incubation, which remained in the soil solution for several days, and even weeks, in spite of favorable conditions of moisture, aeration and temperature for the development of the process of chemo-autotrophic nitrification. Decelerated chemoautotrophic nitrification was the source of the occurrence of nitrite in the examined less acid soil (soil 1, while in soils of higher acidity (soils 2 and 3 after addition of 100 and 300 ppm NH4–N, nitrite occurred due to chemical denitrification (chemodenitrification. Nitrites formed in the process of chemodenitrification underwent spontaneous chemical oxidation resulting in nitrate formation (chemical nitrification. The content of mineral nitrogen (NH4 + NO3 + NO2–N decreased during the incubation period, proving gaseous losses from the examined soils. Application of lower doses of nitrogen fertilizers could decrease nitrogen losses by denitrification as well as the occurrence of nitrite in toxic quantities in the investigated pseudogley soil.

  8. MICROBIAL SULFATE REDUCTION AND METAL ATTENUATION IN PH 4 ACID MINE WATER

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing...

  9. Long term response of acid-sensitive Vermont Lakes to sulfate deposition

    Atmospheric deposition of sulfur can negatively affect the health of lakes and streams, particularly in poorly buffered catchments. In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments, wet deposition of sulfate decreased more than 35% in Vermont between 1990 and 2008. However, most of ...

  10. Molecular Basis of the Receptor Interactions of Polysialic Acid (polySia), polySia Mimetics, and Sulfated Polysaccharides.

    Zhang, Ruiyan; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta; Boelens, Rolf; Wienk, Hans; Siebert, Simone; Eckert, Thomas; Kraan, Stefan; Rojas-Macias, Miguel A; Lütteke, Thomas; Galuska, Sebastian P; Scheidig, Axel; Petridis, Athanasios K; Liang, Songping; Billeter, Martin; Schauer, Roland; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Siebert, Hans-Christian

    2016-05-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) and polySia glycomimetic molecules support nerve cell regeneration, differentiation, and neuronal plasticity. With a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, as well as data mining and molecular modeling techniques, it is possible to correlate specific ligand-receptor interactions with biochemical processes and in vivo studies that focus on the potential therapeutic impact of polySia, polySia glycomimetics, and sulfated polysaccharides in neuronal diseases. With this strategy, the receptor interactions of polySia and polySia mimetics can be understood on a submolecular level. As the HNK-1 glycan also enhances neuronal functions, we tested whether similar sulfated oligo- and polysaccharides from seaweed could be suitable, in addition to polySia, for finding potential new routes into patient care focusing on an improved cure for various neuronal diseases. The knowledge obtained here on the structural interplay between polySia or sulfated polysaccharides and their receptors can be exploited to develop new drugs and application routes for the treatment of neurological diseases and dysfunctions. PMID:27136597

  11. Biochar impacts soil microbial community composition and nitrogen cycling in an acidic soil planted with rape.

    Xu, Hui-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Hu; Yao, Huai-Ying; Su, Jian-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-08-19

    Biochar has been suggested to improve acidic soils and to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. However, little has been done on the role of biochar in ameliorating acidified soils induced by overuse of nitrogen fertilizers. In this study, we designed a pot trial with an acidic soil (pH 4.48) in a greenhouse to study the interconnections between microbial community, soil chemical property changes, and N2O emissions after biochar application. The results showed that biochar increased plant growth, soil pH, total carbon, total nitrogen, C/N ratio, and soil cation exchange capacity. The results of high-throughput sequencing showed that biochar application increased α-diversity significantly and changed the relative abundances of some microbes that are related with carbon and nitrogen cycling at the family level. Biochar amendment stimulated both nitrification and denitrification processes, while reducing N2O emissions overall. Results of redundancy analysis indicated biochar could shift the soil microbial community by changing soil chemical properties, which modulate N-cycling processes and soil N2O emissions. The significantly increased nosZ transcription suggests that biochar decreased soil N2O emissions by enhancing its further reduction to N2. PMID:25054835

  12. Effect of abietic acid addition on anodic dissolution of zinc- cadmium- and thallium amalgams in sodium sulfate solution

    The method of inversion voltametry with a stationary mercury drop electrode has been applied to investigate the effect of abietic acid (AA) on anodic oxidation of cadmium, zinc, thallium from their amalgams as well as from mixed cadmium-thallium and zinc-thallium amalgams against the background of 0.5 M sodium sulfate at 298 K. Constants of peak of analgam anodic oxidation in the background solution and with additions of different AA concentrations are calculated. It is established that AA has the inhibiting effect on the processes of oxidation of cadmium- and zinc amalgams and does not produce the inhibiting effect on the oxidation of thallium amalgam

  13. Liquid-liquid phase separation and morphology of internally mixed dicarboxylic acids/ammonium sulfate/water particles

    Song, M.; Marcolli, C.; U. K. Krieger; A. Zuend; Peter, T

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the physical state and morphology of internally mixed organic/inorganic aerosol particles is still largely uncertain. To obtain more detailed information on liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and morphology of the particles, we investigated complex mixtures of atmospherically relevant dicarboxylic acids containing 5–7 carbon atoms (C5, C6 and C7) having oxygen-to-carbon atomic ratios (O:C) of 0.80, 0.67, and 0.57, respectively, mixed with ammonium sulfate (AS). With mi...

  14. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated wetland

    JohnWMoreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  15. Soil remediation: humic acids as natural surfactants in the washings of highly contaminated soils

    The remediation of the highly contaminated site around the former chemical plant of ACNA (near Savona) in Northern Italy is a top priority in Italy. The aim of the present work was to contribute in finding innovative and environmental-friendly technology to remediate soils from the ACNA contaminated site. Two soils sampled from the ACNA site (A and B), differing in texture and amount and type of organic contaminants, were subjected to soil washings by comparing the removal efficiency of water, two synthetic surfactants, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100 (TX100), and a solution of a natural surfactant, a humic acid (HA) at its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The extraction of pollutants by sonication and soxhlet was conducted before and after the soil washings. Soil A was richer in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas soil B had a larger content of thiophenes. Sonication resulted more analytically efficient in the fine-textured soil B. The coarse-textured soil A was extracted with a general equal efficiency also by soxhlet. Clean-up by water was unable to exhaustively remove contaminants from the two soils, whereas all the organic surfactants revealed very similar efficiencies (up to 90%) in the removal of the contaminants from the soils. Hence, the use of solutions of natural HAs appears as a better choice for soil washings of highly polluted soils due to their additional capacity to promote microbial activity, in contrast to synthetic surfactants, for a further natural attenuation in washed soils. - Solutions of natural humic acids appear to be a better choice for washing highly polluted soils

  16. Transcriptional profile of maize roots under acid soil growth

    Mattiello Lucia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aluminum (Al toxicity is one of the most important yield-limiting factors of many crops worldwide. The primary symptom of Al toxicity syndrome is the inhibition of root growth leading to poor water and nutrient absorption. Al tolerance has been extensively studied using hydroponic experiments. However, unlike soil conditions, this method does not address all of the components that are necessary for proper root growth and development. In the present study, we grew two maize genotypes with contrasting tolerance to Al in soil containing toxic levels of Al and then compared their transcriptomic responses. Results When grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al, the Al-sensitive genotype (S1587-17 showed greater root growth inhibition, more Al accumulation and more callose deposition in root tips than did the tolerant genotype (Cat100-6. Transcriptome profiling showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in S1587-17 grown in acid soil, probably due to secondary effects of Al toxicity. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of organic acids, which are frequently associated with an Al tolerance response, were not differentially regulated in both genotypes after acid soil exposure. However, genes related to the biosynthesis of auxin, ethylene and lignin were up-regulated in the Al-sensitive genotype, indicating that these pathways might be associated with root growth inhibition. By comparing the two maize lines, we were able to discover genes up-regulated only in the Al-tolerant line that also presented higher absolute levels than those observed in the Al-sensitive line. These genes encoded a lipase hydrolase, a retinol dehydrogenase, a glycine-rich protein, a member of the WRKY transcriptional family and two unknown proteins. Conclusions This work provides the first characterization of the physiological and transcriptional responses of maize roots when grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al. The

  17. Combined Use of Alkaline Slag and Rapeseed Cake to Ameliorate Soil Acidity in an Acid Tea Garden Soil

    WANG Lei; YANG Xing-Lun; K.RACHEL; WANG Yu; TONG De-Li; YE Mao; JIANG Xin

    2013-01-01

    Rapeseed cake (RC),the residue of rapeseed oil extraction,is effective for improving tea (Camellia sinensis) quality,especially taste and aroma,but it has limited ability to ameliorate strongly acidic soil.In order to improve the liming potential of RC,alkaline slag (AS),the by-product of recovery of sodium carbonate,was incorporated.Combined effects of different levels of RC and AS on ameliorating acidic soil from a tea garden were investigated.Laboratory incubations showed that combined use of AS and RC was an effective method to reduce soil exchangeable acidity and A1 saturation and increase base saturation,but not necessarily for soil pH adjustment.The release of alkalinity from the combined amendments and the mineralization of organic nitrogen increased soil pH initially,but then soil pH decreased due to nitrifications.Various degrees of nitrification were correlated with the interaction of different Ca levels,pH and N contents.When RC was applied at low levels,high Ca levels from AS repressed soil nitrification,resulting in smaller pH fluctuations.In contrast,high AS stimulated soil nitrification,when RC was applied at high levels,and resulted in a large pH decrease.Based on the optimum pH for tea production and quality,high ratios of AS to RC were indicated for soil acidity amelioration,and 8.0 g kg-1 and less than 2.5 g kg-1 were indicated for AS and RC,respectively.Further,field studies are needed to investigate the variables of combined amendments.

  18. Simulated acid rain effects on soil chemistry and microbiology

    A research study was carried out regarding the effects of artificial rains at different pH's (3.1, 4.0, 5.6) on soil samples from Appiano Gentile pinewood. Chemical parameters, biological activities and microbiological groups, particularly sensitive to possible variations in the presence of pH changes, were monitored after 2, 4 and 6 months of treatment of the soil on eluate obtained from treatment with artificial acid rains. The paper reports the results research

  19. Interaction of Cd and citric acid, EDTA in red soil

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption process of cadmium in redsoil(Ferrisols) as well as the influence by media's pH were investigated in detail with and without citric acid and EDTA. Experimental results clearly showed that Cd adsorption in red soil was affected significantly by the coexisted organic chemicals. In the presence of citric acid and EDTA, Cd adsorption in red soil increased with pH in acid media but decreased in high pH one. Further studies placed stress on the adsorbed Cd in red soil which was found to be existed mainly as exchangeable one at pH<5.5, and desorption rate by 0.10 mol/L NaNO3 gave a peak-shaped curve due to the difference of specifically and nonspecifically adsorbed Cd with pH's change.

  20. TOLERANCE OF PEANUT GENOTYPES TO ACIDIC SOIL CONDITION

    Astanto Kasno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The acidic soil is generally less productive due to soil pH ranging from 3.1 to 5.0. However, it could be solved through soil amelioration, planting tolerant varieties to acidic soil condition, and a combination of both. Twenty peanut genotypes including two check varieties (Jerapah and Talam 1 were evaluated on dolomite-ameliorated and non ameliorated soil. In the greenhouse, the treatments were laid out in factorial design with four replications, while in the field using strip plot design with three replications. Assessment of tolerance was using Stressed Tolerance Index (STI according to Fernandez (1992. Results showed that dolomite application at dose equivalent to 0.5 x exchangeable Al was optimal in improving peanut growth, and peanut yield on acidic soil. Lines of GH3 (G/92088/92088-02-B-2-8-1 and GH 4 (G/92088/ 92088-02-B-2-8-2 genotypes had high STI with average yield of 2.47 tha-1 and 2.62 t ha-1 of dry pods and potential yield of 4.05 t ha-1 and 3.73 t ha-1 of dry pods, respectively as well as check varieties (Jerapah and Talam-1. It is concluded that peanut genotype of G/92088//92088-02-B-2-8-1 and G/92088//920 88- 02-B-2-8-2 were adaptable and tolerance to acidic, and tolerance of peanuts on acidic soil condition were probably controlled by the buffering mechanisms.

  1. Mechanisms for the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils of southern China

    Zhang, Jin-Bo; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhu, Tong-bin; Yang, Wen-Yan; Müller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the retention of inorganic N in acidic forest soils in southern China are not well understood. Here, we simultaneously quantified the gross N transformation rates of various subtropical acidic forest soils located in southern China (southern soil) and those of temperate forest soils located in northern China (northern soil). We found that acidic southern soils had significantly higher gross rates of N mineralization and significantly higher turnover rates but a much ...

  2. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-03-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  3. The solubility of aluminum in acidic forest soils: Long-term changes due to acid deposition

    Mulder, Jan; Stein, Alfred

    1994-01-01

    Despite the ecological and pedogenic importance of Al, its solubility control in acidic forest soils is poorly understood. Here we discuss the solubility of Al and its development with time in three acid brown forest soils in The Netherlands, which are under extreme acidification from atmospheric deposition. All soil solutions (to a 60 cm depth) were undersaturated with respect to synthetic gibbsite (Al(OH) 3; log K = 9.12 at 8°C), with the highest degree of undersaturation occurring in the surface soil. In about one third of the individual soil layers a significant positive correlation existed between the activity of Al 3+ and H +, but this relationship was far less than cubic. Kinetically constrained dissolution of Al is unlikely to explain the disequilibrium with respect to gibbsite, because undersaturation was highest through summer when water residence times were longest and temperatures greatest. Time series analysis of six year data sets for several soil layers revealed a significant annual decline in soil solution pH and Al solubility (defined as log Al + 3 pH) despite a constant concentration of strong acid anions. The annual decline of both pH and Al solubility was greatest in the surface soil and was positively correlated with the relative depletion of reactive organically bound soil Al. The results support our earlier hypothesis that in strongly acidified forest soils complexation by solid phase organics controls the solubility of Al even in mineral soil layers, relatively low in organic C. The data lend no support to the current widespread and often uncritical use of gibbsite as a model for the Al solubility in highly acidic forest soils (pH temperate zone.

  4. Microbiological aspects of determination of trichloroacetic acid in soil

    Soils have been shown to possess a strong microbial trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-degrading activity. High TCA-degradation rate was also observed during soil extraction with water. For correct measurements of TCA levels in soil all TCA-degrading activities have to be inhibited immediately after sampling before analysis. We used rapid freezing of soil samples (optimally in liquid nitrogen) with subsequent storage and slow thawing before analysis as an efficient technique for suppressing the degradation. Frozen soil samples stored overnight at −20 °C and then thawed slowly exhibited very low residual TCA-degrading activity for several hours. Omitting the above procedure could lead to the confusing differences between the TCA levels previously reported in the literature

  5. CHARGE DEVELOPMENT AND ACID-BASE CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL AND COMPOST HUMIC ACIDS

    P. A. CAMPITELLI

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous works, the acid-base properties, charging behavior and chemical heterogeneity of humic substances have been studied using different mathematical equations to fit the experimental data. The objective of this research is to study the charge behavior, acid-base properties and analyze the chemical heterogeneity of humic acids (HA extracted from soil and composted municipal solid waste by potentiometric titrations. The humic acids extracted from compost have some characteristics and behavior similar to those obtained from soil. The negative charge development of HA extracted from composted material are lower than those extracted from soil and increase as ionic strength increase. The amount of carboxylic groups is lower in compost HA than in soil HA The heterogeneity of HA extracted from compost is higher than those extracted from soil. As the time of composting period increase the humification processes that take place trends to produce compost HA that has similar characteristics to soil HA. We suggest that HA extracted from composted material are macromolecules "like soil humic acids", i.e. "humiclike fraction"

  6. Potential sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids for saprophagous soil invertebrates

    Elhottová, Dana; Frouz, Jan; Krištůfek, Václav; Lukešová, Alena; Nováková, Alena; Tříska, Jan

    České Budějovice: Institute of Soil Biology AS CR, 2002, s. 31-37. ISBN 80-86525-00-7. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /6./. České Budějovice (CZ), 23.04.2001-25.04.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/99/P033; GA AV ČR IAB6066903; GA AV ČR IAA6066001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : polyunsaturated fatty acids * soil microorganisms * animal diet Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Effects of particle size and acid addition on the remediation of chromite ore processing residue using ferrous sulfate.

    Jagupilla, Santhi Chandra; Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Christodoulatos, Christos; Kim, Min Gyu

    2009-08-30

    A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to assess the effects of particle size and acid addition on the remediation of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) using ferrous sulfate. The remediation scheme entailed the chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and the mitigation of swell potential. Leaching tests and the EQ3/6 geochemical model were used to estimate the acid dosage required to destabilize Cr(VI)-bearing and swell-causing minerals. The model predicted greater acid dosage than that estimated from the batch leaching tests. This indicated that mass transfer limitation may be playing a significant role in impeding the dissolution of COPR minerals following acid addition and hence hindering the remediation of COPR. Cr(VI) concentrations determined by alkaline digestion for the treated samples were less than the current NJDEP standard. However, Cr(VI) concentrations measured by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were greater than those measured by alkaline digestion. Greater Cr(VI) percentages were reduced for acid pretreated and also for smaller particle size COPR samples. Upon treatment, brownmillerite content was greatly reduced for the acid pretreated samples. Conversely, ettringite, a swell-causing mineral, was not observed in the treated COPR. PMID:19272700

  8. Solid and liquid media for isolating and cultivating acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Ňancucheo, Ivan; Rowe, Owen F; Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-05-01

    Growth media have been developed to facilitate the enrichment and isolation of acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria (aSRB) from environmental and industrial samples, and to allow their cultivation in vitro The main features of the 'standard' solid and liquid devised media are as follows: (i) use of glycerol rather than an aliphatic acid as electron donor; (ii) inclusion of stoichiometric concentrations of zinc ions to both buffer pH and to convert potentially harmful hydrogen sulphide produced by the aSRB to insoluble zinc sulphide; (iii) inclusion of Acidocella aromatica (an heterotrophic acidophile that does not metabolize glycerol or yeast extract) in the gel underlayer of double layered (overlay) solid media, to remove acetic acid produced by aSRB that incompletely oxidize glycerol and also aliphatic acids (mostly pyruvic) released by acid hydrolysis of the gelling agent used (agarose). Colonies of aSRB are readily distinguished from those of other anaerobes due to their deposition and accumulation of metal sulphide precipitates. Data presented illustrate the effectiveness of the overlay solid media described for isolating aSRB from acidic anaerobic sediments and low pH sulfidogenic bioreactors. PMID:27036143

  9. Anode oxidation of cadmium in acid and that of zinc in neutral sulfate solutions

    By the method of anode polarization curves on rotary disc electrode there have been studied kinetics and mechanism of zinc and cadmium dissolution in 0.1-2.0 N sulfate solutions. There have been determined exchange currents of the first and second stages of ionization and transfer coefficients. Cadmium anode dissolution takes place in sequent single-electron stages with diffusion stage of reaction being superimposed

  10. Barren Acidic Soil Assessment using Seismic Refraction Survey

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.; Zawawi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the geophysics subsurface exploration techniques used to determine subsurface profile characteristics. From past experience, seismic refraction method is commonly used to detect soil layers, overburden, bedrock, etc. However, the application of this method on barren geomaterials remains limited due to several reasons. Hence, this study was performed to evaluate the subsurface profile characteristics of barren acidic soil located in Ayer Hitam, Batu Pahat, Johor using seismic refraction survey. The seismic refraction survey was conducted using ABEM Terraloc MK 8 (seismograph), a sledge hammer weighing 7 kg (source) and 24 units of 10 Hz geophones (receiver). Seismic data processing was performed using OPTIM software which consists of SeisOpt@picker (picking the first arrival and seismic configureuration data input) and SeisOpt@2D (generating 2D image of barren acidic soil based on seismic velocity (primary velocity, Vp) distribution). It was found that the barren acidic soil profile consists of three layers representing residual soil (Vp= 200-400 m/s) at 0-2 m, highly to completely weathered soil (Vp= 500-1800 m/s) at 3-8 m and shale (Vp= 2100-6200 m/s) at 9-20 m depth. Furthermore, result verification was successfully done through the correlation of seismic refraction data based on physical mapping and the geological map of the study area. Finally, it was found that the seismic refraction survey was applicable for subsurface profiling of barren acidic soil as it was very efficient in terms of time, cost, large data coverage and sustainable.