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Sample records for acid silicates

  1. Process for acidizing hot siliceous material

    Scheuerman, R. F.; Silverman, S. A.

    1985-10-22

    The dissolving of siliceous material in an environment containing corrodable metal and having a temperature exceeding about 300/sup 0/ F. is improved by using an aqueous solution containing an amount of ammonium fluoride equivalent to that in a 2-3 molar solution of hydrogen fluoride and enough weak acid and weak acid salt to provide a pH of near to but less than 7.

  2. The fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic (NOTE

    DUSANKA KITIC

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The content and composition of fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic were analized by GC. It was found that unsaturated acids prevailed and that the major components were palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The hydrocarbon fractions of pentane extracts were shown to consist of the alkane homologues (C17 to C34 with nonacosane and hentriacontane being prevailing compounds.

  3. Leaf application of silicic acid to upland rice and corn

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Si (stabilized silicic acid, Silamol® leaf application on mineral nutrition and yield in upland rice and corn crops. The treatments were the control (without Si and Si foliar split spraying using 2 L ha-1 of the Silamol® commercial product, with 0.8% soluble Si as concentrated stabilized silicic acid. Silicon leaf application increased the concentrations of K, Ca and Si in rice and corn leaves, the number of panicles per m2 of rice and the number of grains per ear of corn; accordingly, the Si leaf application provided a higher grain yield in both crops.

  4. 77 FR 21676 - Silicic Acid, Sodium Salt etc.; Tolerance Exemption

    2012-04-11

    ... human skin. Since Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with chlorotrimethylsilane and iso-propyl... Register of Thursday, December 8, 2011 (76 FR 76674) (FRL-9328-8), EPA issued a notice pursuant to section... human health. In order to determine the risks from aggregate exposure to pesticide inert...

  5. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Jurkić Lela Munjas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon (Si is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4, as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K, the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel, silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide, and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4 in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  6. Competitive Adsorption of Arsenite and Silicic Acid on Goethite

    Luxton, Todd Peter

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of silicic acid and arsenite alone and competitively on goethite over a broad pH range (3-11) at environmentally relevant concentrations was investigated utilizing pH adsorption data and zeta potential measurements. Both addition scenarios (Si before As(III) and As(III) before Si) were examined. The results of the adsorption experiments and zeta potential measurements were then used to model the single ion and competitive ion adsorption on goethite with the CD-MUSIC ...

  7. A calculation of spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front

    A high alkali domain spreads out due to the use of cement materials for the construction of the repository of radioactive wastes. Sudden change of pH at this alkali front produces colloidal silicic acid (polymeric silicic acid) in addition to the deposition of supersaturated monomeric silicic acid onto the fracture surface of flow-pathway. The colloidal silicic acid also deposits with relatively small rate-constant in the co-presence of solid phase. Once the flow-path surface is covered with the amorphous silica, the surface seriously degrades the sorption behavior of radionuclides (RNs). Therefore, so far, the authors have examined the deposition rates of supersaturated silicic acid. This study summarized the deposition rate-constants defined by the first-order reaction equation under various conditions of co-presence of amorphous silica powder. Then, using the smallest rate-constant (1.0x10-12 m/s in the co-presence of calcium ion of 1 mM) and a simulation code, COLFRAC-MRL, the spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front was estimated. The results suggested the clogging caused by the deposition of colloidal silicic acid in flow-path. The altered spatial range in the flow-path was limited to around 30 m in fracture and to several centimeters in rock matrix. (author)

  8. A calculation of spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front

    A high alkali domain spreads out due to the use of cement materials for the construction of the repository of radioactive wastes. Sudden change of pH at this alkali front produces colloidal silicic acid (polymeric silicic acid) in addition to the deposition of supersaturated monomeric silicic acid onto the fracture surface of flow-pathway. The colloidal silicic acid also deposits with relatively small rate-constant in the co-presence of solid phase. Once the flow-path surface is covered with the amorphous silica, the surface seriously degrades the sorption behavior of radionuclides (RNs). Therefore, so far, the authors have examined the deposition rates of supersaturated silicic acid. This study summarized the deposition rate-constants defined by the first-order reaction equation under various conditions of co-presence of amorphous silica powder. Then, using the smallest rate-constant (1.0×10-12 m/s in the co-presence of calcium ions of 1 mM) and a simulation code, COLFRAC-MRL, the spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front was estimated. The results suggested the clogging caused by the deposition of colloidal silicic acid in flow-path. The altered spatial range in the flow-path was limited to around 30 m in fracture and to several centimeters in rock matrix. (author)

  9. Adsorption of Free Fatty Acid from Crude Palm Oil on Magnesium Silicate Derived from Rice Husk

    Pornsawan Assawasaengrat; Prakob Kitchaiya; Weerawat Clowutimon

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium silicate with various silica and magnesium oxide ratios (SiO2/MgO ratios) was used as the adsorbent for a study of adsorption of free fatty acid (FFA) in crude palm oil (CPO). Magnesium silicate was prepared from magnesium nitrate or magnesium sulfate solution precipitated with a solution of sodium silicate derived from rice husk. SiO2/MgO ratios of the magnesium silicate synthesized from magnesium nitrate and magnesium sulfate were 3.93, 3.75, 2.74, 2.40, 1.99 and 3.96, 3.61, 3.51,...

  10. Precipitation of silicic acid from geothermal water by addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide

    Kitsuki, Harumi; Yokoyama, Takushi; Shimada, Kanichi; Yamanaka, Chiho; Nishu, Keisuke; Shimizu, Shin; Tarutani, Toshikazu

    1986-01-25

    Cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) was added to sodium silicate solution and geothermal hot water (Ohtake Geothermal Power Plant and Hatchobaru Geo-thermal Power Plant) to precipitate silica. 1) CTA ions do not react with monosilicic acid, but only the polymerization among the polysilicic acids proceeds and causes silica to precipitate. Optimum pH for the silica precipitation is 6 - 7 and the higher concentration of polysilicic acid will cause more precipitation. 2) When added to geothermal hot water, the silica precipita-tion increases with the increase of CTAB concentration within the range of 10/sup -7/ - 10/sup -4/ mol dm/sup 3/ concentration. Almost all poly-silicic acid precipitated at 10/sup -4/ mol dm/sup 3/ when measured for silica precipitation after 5 minutes. Total concentration of silicic acid was higher in the Hatchobaru geothermal water than that of the Ohtake geothermal water. (10 figs, 14 refs)

  11. Migration of humic acid through silicate-packed columns considering filtration effect

    Humic acid, which is one of the humic substances, plays an important role in the migration of hazardous chemicals and heavy metal ions in soil and groundwater. In this work, the migration of humic acid labeled with C-14 through silicate-packed columns was studied and the concentration profiles of the humic acid in the columns were observed. Using the sorption distribution coefficients of humic acid on silicate obtained by batch experiments, and assuming that the filtration coefficients of humic acid were identical to those of latex particles, we qualitatively simulated the concentration profiles of humic acid. This suggests that the model used in this work will be used for predicting the environmental behavior of chemicals and heavy metals associated with humic acid through further improvement in future. (author)

  12. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Jurkić Lela Munjas; Cepanec Ivica; Pavelić Sandra Kraljević; Pavelić Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Silicon (Si) is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4), as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and wit...

  13. Use of mesoporous silicate nanoparticles as drug carrier for mefenamic acid

    Mustafa, F. M.; Hodali, H. A.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of mesoporous silicate nanoparticles for the loading and release of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, mefenamic acid. Nanoparticles of the mesoporous silicate materials, MCM-41 and SBA-16 were synthesized and characterized by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TGA and BET surface area techniques. Both silicate systems were loaded with mefenamic acid with loading capacities of 18.6% and 11.6%, respectively. The in vitro release of mefenamic acid into simulated body fluid (pH = 7.4) at 37°C was investigated. The percent release was nonlinearly regressed against time (t) according to the first order kinetic release model; Higuchi's first burst model and Kopcha's empirical model. The overall %release was obtained for both silicate systems and was found to be about 60%. Analysis of results show the rate of drug release is more rapid from SBA-16 (the more interconnected porous network) than from MCM-41. It also show that drug release from either mesoporous silicate is a diffusion controlled process.

  14. Sorption of small quantities of silver on silicic acid under the conditions of complex formation

    Present article is devoted to sorption of small quantities of silver on silicic acid under the conditions of complex formation. Study of precipitation of small quantities of silver (4.2·10-5mg/l) from the solutions of oxalic, tartaric and citric acids depending on ph showed that under these conditions the precipitation does not occur. This is due to formation of stable and soluble in the water silver complex compounds with oxalic, tartaric and citric acids.

  15. Adsorption of Free Fatty Acid from Crude Palm Oil on Magnesium Silicate Derived from Rice Husk

    Pornsawan Assawasaengrat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium silicate with various silica and magnesium oxide ratios (SiO2/MgO ratios was used as the adsorbent for a study of adsorption of free fatty acid (FFA in crude palm oil (CPO. Magnesium silicate was prepared from magnesium nitrate or magnesium sulfate solution precipitated with a solution of sodium silicate derived from rice husk. SiO2/MgO ratios of the magnesium silicate synthesized from magnesium nitrate and magnesium sulfate were 3.93, 3.75, 2.74, 2.40, 1.99 and 3.96, 3.61, 3.51, 2.91, 2.69, respectively. FFA adsorption on the magnesium silicate was carried out by adding 1 gram of the adsorbent to 50 grams of CPO and shaking for 1 hour at 50oC. It was found that SiO2/MgO ratio of 1.99 had the highest adsorption capacities of 185 mg of FFA per gram of adsorbent. In addition, increasing of SiO2/MgO ratios of magnesium silicate was found to reduce the adsorption capacities due to decreasing of FFA chemisorption. The effect of dosage amount to equilibrium adsorption capacities were carried out by adding different amount of magnesium silicate (SiO2/MgO ratio of 1.99 to 50 grams of CPO. The result showed that efficiency decreased when dosage increased. The Fruendlich and Langmuir isotherm were applied to describe this absorption system. The values of maximum sorption capacity (Q0 and Langmuir's sorption affinity (b in the Langmuir equation obtained by linear-regression were minus values which were physically meanigless. Thus, FFA adsorption on magnesium silicate was both physisorption and chemisorption and well represented by the Fruenlich isotherm.

  16. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    Elisa, A. A.; Ninomiya, S.; Shamshuddin, J.; Roslan, I.

    2016-03-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to ameliorate soil acidity in rice-cropped soil. The secondary objective was to study the effects of calcium silicate amendment on soil acidity, exchangeable Al, exchangeable Ca, and Si content. The soil was treated with 0, 1, 2, and 3 Mg ha-1 of calcium silicate under submerged conditions and the soil treatments were sampled every 30 days throughout an incubation period of 120 days. Application of calcium silicate induced a positive effect on soil pH and exchangeable Al; soil pH increased from 2.9 (initial) to 3.5, while exchangeable Al was reduced from 4.26 (initial) to 0.82 cmolc kg-1. Furthermore, the exchangeable Ca and Si contents increased from 1.68 (initial) to 4.94 cmolc kg-1 and from 21.21 (initial) to 81.71 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it was noted that calcium silicate was effective at alleviating Al toxicity in acid sulfate, rice-cropped soil, yielding values below the critical level of 2 cmolc kg-1. In addition, application of calcium silicate showed an ameliorative effect as it increased soil pH and supplied substantial amounts of Ca and Si.

  17. Deglacial diatom production in the tropical North Atlantic driven by enhanced silicic acid supply

    Hendry, Katharine R.; Gong, Xun; Knorr, Gregor; Pike, Jennifer; Hall, Ian R.

    2016-03-01

    Major shifts in ocean circulation are thought to be responsible for abrupt changes in temperature and atmospheric CO2 during the last deglaciation, linked to variability in meridional heat transport and deep ocean carbon storage. There is also widespread evidence for shifts in biological production during these times of deglacial CO2 rise, including enhanced diatom production in regions such as the tropical Atlantic. However, it remains unclear as to whether this diatom production was driven by enhanced wind-driven upwelling or density-driven vertical mixing, or by elevated thermocline concentrations of silicic acid supplied to the surface at a constant rate. Here, we demonstrate that silicic acid supply at depth in the NE Atlantic was enhanced during the abrupt climate events of the deglaciation. We use marine sediment archives to show that an increase in diatom production during abrupt climate shifts could only occur in regions of the NE Atlantic where the deep supply of silicic acid could reach the surface. The associated changes are indicative of enhanced regional wind-driven upwelling and/or weakened stratification due to circulation changes during phases of weakened Atlantic meridional overturning. Globally near-synchronous pulses of diatom production and enhanced thermocline concentrations of silicic acid suggest that widespread deglacial surface-driven breakdown of stratification, linked to changes in atmospheric circulation, had major consequences for biological productivity and carbon cycling.

  18. Alleviating aluminium toxicity on an acid sulphate soils in Peninsular Malaysia with application of calcium silicate

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to alleviate Al toxicity of an acid sulphate soils collected from paddy cultivation area in Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia. For this purpose, the collected acid sulphate soils were treated with calcium silicate. The treated soils were incubated for 120 days in submerged condition in a glasshouse. Subsamples were collected every 30 days throughout the incubation period. Soil pH and exchangeable Al showed positive effect; soil pH increased from ...

  19. The acid aging as alternative process for uranium recovery from silicated ores

    The influence of different variables on the extraction uranium efficiency and on the silicate solubility by means of acid aging is studied. The variables studied in bench scale were: acid/ore, oxidizing/ore and liquid/solid relationships; reaction time; temperature and recovery time. The results are discussed and compared with the ones of continuous operation of a semi-pilot plant. A flowsheet of the industrial process application is presented. (M.A.C.)

  20. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  1. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    Camilleri, Josette, E-mail: josette.camilleri@um.edu.mt

    2011-01-15

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: {yields} An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. {yields} No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. {yields} An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. {yields} A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  2. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: → An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. → No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. → An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. → A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  3. Determination of silica in silicates by differential spectrophotometry as α-molybdosilicic acid

    A method for determining silica in silicates by differential spectrophotometry, using β-molybdosilic acid, is described. The sample is attacked by a mixture of boron trioxide and lithium carbonate (10:1). α-molydbosilicic acid is developed in a buffered solution (pH approximatelly 3.9) containing acetic acid and sodium acetate. The analytical procedure involves a series of preliminary steps which were previously elaborated for the gravimetric determination of silica as oxine molybdosilicate and which account for the removal of phosphorus, titanium and zirconium through ion exchange resins. (C.L.B.)

  4. Surface modifications of silica gel nanoparticles by silicic acid derivatives. Their structure and thermophysical properties

    The results of surface modifications of silica gel nanoparticles by silicic acid derivatives, including propyl-three-methoxy-silan (C6H16O3N), vinyl-three-(2-methoxy-ethoxy)-silan (C11H24Sl) and gamma-amino-propyl-three-methoxy-silan (C6H17O3N) were considered in this article. By means of inter esterification reaction with using silicic acid derivatives the surfaces of silica gel nanoparticles was modified. The structural changes of surface of silica gel nanoparticles after modification were evaluated by means of electron microscopy, XRD, infrared spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis methods. According to obtained results, the surface of modified samples became more hydrophobic, the water-absorbing capacity of silica gel nanoparticles decreased.

  5. Effects of Calcium Lignosulfonate and Silicic Acid on Ammonium Nitrate Degradation

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate salts are the most commonly used nitrogenous fertilizers in industry. However, storage of ammonium nitrate is problematic, since its initial properties can decline because of environmental factors, leading to large economic losses. In this study, in order to prevent the caking and degradation of ammonium nitrate, an alternative composition with additional calcium lignosulfonate and silicic acid was studied. The resulting fertilizer was analyzed by screening analysis, ion chromatography, and electron microscopy methods.

  6. Sustainable activity of hydrothermally synthesized mesoporous silicates in acetic acid esterification

    ŞİMŞEK, VELİ; DEĞİRMENCİ, LEVENT; MÜRTEZAOĞLU, KIRALİ

    2015-01-01

    A hydrothermal method was applied in the synthesis of mesoporous silicates containing silicotungstic acid (STA). The synthesis procedures were developed by modification of procedures previously applied in the synthesis of MCM-41 and SBA-15. The synthesized catalysts were named MCM-41-S and SBA-15-S based on MCM-41 and SBA-15. Their activities were investigated in ethyl acetate production, which was selected as the model reaction. The results indicated that the activity of SBA-15-S catalysts i...

  7. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2016-01-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the ma...

  8. Surface site density, silicic acid retention and transport properties of compacted magnetite powder

    Mayant, C.; Grambow, B.; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Ribet, S.; Leclercq, S.

    2007-01-01

    In France, within the framework of investigations of the feasibility of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, studies on corrosion products of steel over packs are ongoing. Such studies concern silica and radionuclide retention. The objective of the present work is to study sorption of silicic acid on compacted magnetite in percolation cells to attempt to simulate confined site conditions. Potentiometric titration of commercial magnetite was carried out with both dispersed...

  9. Method of gradual acid leaching of uranium ores of silicate and aluminosilicate nature

    Leaching uranium ore pulp is divided into two stages. The first stage takes place without any addition of a leaching agent at elevated pressure and temperature. In the second stage, sulfuric acid is added to the pulp (50 to 1000 kg per tonne of ore) or an oxidation agent. Leaching then proceeds according to routine procedures. The procedure is used to advantage for silicate or aluminosilicate ores which contain uranium minerals which are difficult to leach, pyrite and reducing substances. The two stage leaching allows to use the technology of pressure leaching, reduces consumption of sulfuric acid and oxidation agents and still achieves the required reduction oxidation potential. (E.S.)

  10. Water-Dispersible Silica-Polyelectrolyte Nanocomposites Prepared via Acid-Triggered Polycondensation of Silicic Acid and Directed by Polycations

    Philip Overton; Elena Danilovtseva; Erno Karjalainen; Mikko Karesoja; Vadim Annenkov; Heikki Tenhu; Vladimir Aseyev

    2016-01-01

    The present work describes the acid-triggered condensation of silicic acid, Si(OH)4, as directed by selected polycations in aqueous solution in the pH range of 6.5–8.0 at room temperature, without the use of additional solvents or surfactants. This process results in the formation of silica-polyelectrolyte (S-PE) nanocomposites in the form of precipitate or water-dispersible particles. The mean hydrodynamic diameter (dh) of size distributions of the prepared water-dispersible S-PE composites ...

  11. Influence of Bath Composition at Acidic pH on Electrodeposition of Nickel-Layered Silicate Nanocomposites for Corrosion Protection

    Jeerapan Tientong; Casey R. Thurber; Nandika D’Souza; Adel Mohamed; Golden, Teresa D.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel-layered silicates were electrochemically deposited from acidic bath solutions. Citrate was used as a ligand to stabilize nickel (II) ions in the plating solution. The silicate, montmorillonite, was exfoliated by stirring in aqueous solution over 24 hours. The plating solutions were analyzed for zeta-potential, particle size, viscosity, and conductivity to investigate the effects of the composition at various pHs. The solution particles at pH 2.5 (−22.2 mV) and pH 3.0 (−21.9 mV) were mo...

  12. Improvement Seedling Growth Of Celery (Apium graveolens L.) Using Humic Acid, Potassium Silicate And Low Gamma Irradiation Doses

    The effects of different priming treatments either at room temperature or at 5 degree C in an incubator for 16 hours were studied. An experiment of pots was planted using hydro priming celery ( Apium graveolens L.) seeds for comparison with those primed in different solutions. Seeds were soaked in Petri dishes containing: tap water, different concentrations of potassium silicate (2, 4, 8, 16 mM Si) and humic acid concentrations (5, 20,100, 200 mM ) at room temperature and 5 degree C in an incubator before planting for 16 hours. Also, some dry seeds we re exposed to gamma rays at different low doses (20, 40, 60 Gy) before priming in tap water. This work aimed to improve the tolerance of celery seeds subjected to chilling stress by priming seeds in different concentrations of humic acid and potassium silicate in addition to use low doses of ionizing radiation to accelerate plants proliferation, growth, and leaves yield. Humic acid and potassium silicate were effective as priming solutions for alleviating the chilling stress, stimulating celery growth, and proliferation. In addition, using of low doses of ionizing radiation had a stimulant effect on plants after 120 days from planting

  13. Microwave-Assisted Conversion of Levulinic Acid to γ-Valerolactone Using Low-Loaded Supported Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Porous Silicates

    Alfonso Yepez; De, Sudipta; Maria Salud Climent; Antonio A. Romero; Rafael Luque

    2015-01-01

    The microwave-assisted conversion of levulinic acid (LA) has been studied using low-loaded supported Fe-based catalysts on porous silicates. A very simple, productive, and highly reproducible continuous flow method has been used for the homogeneous deposition of metal oxide nanoparticles on the silicate supports. Formic acid was used as a hydrogen donating agent for the hydrogenation of LA to effectively replace high pressure H2 mostly reported for LA conversion. Moderate LA conversion was ac...

  14. Novel antimony-silicate material Quasar-n for the removal of radionuclides from acidic decontamination liquids - 16157

    Novel antimony silicate material, commercially available from PQ Corporation (previously Ineos Silicas) is highly selective for the removal of several key radionuclides (Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-137, Pu-236 and Am-241) from acidic and neutral nuclear waste effluents. The paper will summarise most the key results that have been obtained in the previous studies of the material. In addition, new test results on the removal Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-137 and Am-241 from acid media are reported. Static batch experiments and column experiments show that Am can be removed efficiently from nitric and oxalic acid, indicating that Quasar is suitable e.g. for the purification of acidic decontamination solutions. (authors)

  15. Water-Dispersible Silica-Polyelectrolyte Nanocomposites Prepared via Acid-Triggered Polycondensation of Silicic Acid and Directed by Polycations

    Philip Overton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the acid-triggered condensation of silicic acid, Si(OH4, as directed by selected polycations in aqueous solution in the pH range of 6.5–8.0 at room temperature, without the use of additional solvents or surfactants. This process results in the formation of silica-polyelectrolyte (S-PE nanocomposites in the form of precipitate or water-dispersible particles. The mean hydrodynamic diameter (dh of size distributions of the prepared water-dispersible S-PE composites is presented as a function of the solution pH at which the composite formation was achieved. Poly(2-(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA and block copolymers of DMAEMA and oligo(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA were used as weak polyelectrolytes in S-PE composite formation. The activity of the strong polyelectrolytes poly(methacryloxyethyl trimethylammonium iodide (PMOTAI and PMOTAI-b-POEGMA in S-PE formation is also examined. The effect of polyelectrolyte strength and the OEGMA block on the formation of the S-PE composites is assessed with respect to the S-PE composites prepared using the PDMAEMA homopolymer. In the presence of the PDMAEMA60 homopolymer (Mw = 9400 g/mol, the size of the dispersible S-PE composites increases with solution pH in the range pH 6.6–8.1, from dh = 30 nm to dh = 800 nm. S-PDMAEMA60 prepared at pH 7.8 contained 66% silica by mass (TGA. The increase in dispersible S-PE particle size is diminished when directed by PDMAEMA300 (Mw = 47,000 g/mol, reaching a maximum of dh = 75 nm. S-PE composites formed using PDMAEMA-b-POEGMA remain in the range dh = 20–30 nm across this same pH regime. Precipitated S-PE composites were obtained as spheres of up to 200 nm in diameter (SEM and up to 65% mass content of silica (TGA. The conditions of pH for the preparation of dispersible and precipitate S-PE nanocomposites, as directed by the five selected polyelectrolytes PDMAEMA60, PDMAEMA300, PMOTAI60, PDMAEMA60-b-POEGMA38 and

  16. Chrysotile asbestos detoxification with a combined treatment of oxalic acid and silicates producing amorphous silica and biomaterial.

    Valouma, Aikaterini; Verganelaki, Anastasia; Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, Pagona; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-03-15

    This study was primarily imposed by the ever increasing need for detoxification of asbestos and asbestos containing materials (ACM), with potential application onsite. The present work investigates potential detoxification of pure chrysotile (Chr) asbestos via a combined treatment of oxalic acid dihydrate (Oxac) (Η2C2Ο4·2Η2Ο) with silicates, such as tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) (SiH20C8O4) and pure water glass (WG) (potassium silicate) (K2SiO3). These reagents used in the experimental procedure, do not cause adverse effects on the environment and are cost effective. The results of FTIR, XRD, optical and scanning microscopy coupled with EDS analyses indicated that all of the applied treatments destructed the Chr structure and yielded silica of amorphous phase and the biomaterial glushinskite from the Oxac reacted with brucite [Mg(OH)2] layer. Each of the proposed formulations can be applied for the detoxification of asbestos, according to priorities related to the specific products of the recovery treatment. Therefore, Oxac acid leaching followed by the TEOS addition is preferred in cases of glushinskite recovery; TEOS treatment of asbestos with subsequent Oxac addition produced amorphous silica production; finally Oxac acid leaching followed by WG encapsulated the asbestos fibers and can be used in cases of onsite asbestos and ACM detoxification. PMID:26685063

  17. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Pollastri, Simone; Gualtieri, Alessandro F. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via S. Eufemia 19I, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  18. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed

  19. Microwave-Assisted Conversion of Levulinic Acid to γ-Valerolactone Using Low-Loaded Supported Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Porous Silicates

    Alfonso Yepez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted conversion of levulinic acid (LA has been studied using low-loaded supported Fe-based catalysts on porous silicates. A very simple, productive, and highly reproducible continuous flow method has been used for the homogeneous deposition of metal oxide nanoparticles on the silicate supports. Formic acid was used as a hydrogen donating agent for the hydrogenation of LA to effectively replace high pressure H2 mostly reported for LA conversion. Moderate LA conversion was achieved in the case of non-noble metal-based iron oxide catalysts, with a significant potential for further improvements to compete with noble metal-based catalysts.

  20. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  1. Aluminum Silicate Nanotube Modification of Cotton-Like Siloxane-poly(L-lactic acid-vaterite Composites

    Daiheon Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier work, a cotton-like biodegradable composite, consisting of poly(L-lactic acid with siloxane-containing vaterite, has been prepared by electrospinning. In the present work, the fibers skeleton of the cotton-like composites was modified successfully with imogolite, which is hydrophilic and biocompatible, via a dip process using ethanol diluted solution to improve the cellular initial attachment. Almost no change in the fiber morphology after the surface modification was observed. The surface-modified composite showed the similar calcium and silicate ions releasabilities, for activating the osteoblasts, as an unmodified one. Cell culture tests showed that the initial adhesion of murine osteoblast-like cells on the surface of the fibers was enhanced by surface modification.

  2. Study and make sulfur dioxide treatment equipment for degradation process of fine silicate zircon ore by sulfuric acid

    The against absorbent method was researched by research group to solve the above issue. This method was carried out by adsorbent lime-milk agent on the buffer of porous material with diameter D=9 cm and height H=1.2 m. The main parameters were gained: absorbent effect reached 98% with lime-milk concentration of 14% in water, against air flow speed of 0.7 m/s and lime-milk output of 0.45 liter/minute. Base on the above main researched parameter, the SO2 treatment equipment system by sulfuric acid was worked out with the scale of 0.5 ton/batch/day; absorbent tower diameter D=0.47 m, buffer height H=3.5 m and expenditure of 33.2 kg CaO/ton of zircon silicate. (author)

  3. EFFECT OF QUARTZ/MULLITE BLEND CERAMIC ADDITIVE ON IMPROVING RESISTANCE TO ACID OF SODIUM SILICATE-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENT. CELCIUS BRINE.

    SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; VAN DE PUTTE, T.R.

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of manufactured quartz/mullite blend (MQMB) ceramic powder in increasing the resistance to acid of sodium silicate-activated slag (SSAS) cementitious material for geothermal wells. A 15-day exposure to 90{sup o} CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed that the MQMB had high potential as an acid-resistant additive for SSAS cement. Two factors, the appropriate ratio of slag/MQMB and the autoclave temperature, contributed to better performance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement in abating its acid erosion. The most effective slag/MQMB ratio in minimizing the loss in weight by acid erosion was 70/30 by weight. For autoclave temperature, the loss in weight of 100 C autoclaved cement was a less than 2%, but at 300 C it was even lower. Before exposure to acid, the cement autoclaved at 100 C was essentially amorphous; increasing the temperature to 200 C led to the formation of crystalline analcime in the zeolitic mineral family during reactions between the mullite in MQMB and the Na from sodium silicate. In addition, at 300 C, crystal of calcium silicate hydrate (1) (CSH) was generated in reactions between the quartz in MQMB and the activated slag. These two crystalline phases (CSH and analcime) were responsible for densifying the autoclaved cement, conveying improved compressive strength and minimizing water permeability. The CSH was susceptible to reactions with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, forming two corrosion products, bassanite and ionized monosilicic acid. However, the uptake of ionized monosilicic acid by Mg dissociated from the activated slag resulted in the formation of lizardite as magnesium silicate hydrate. On the other hand, the analcime was barely susceptible to acid if at all. Thus, the excellent acid resistance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement was due to the combined phases of lizardite and analcime.

  4. Determination of Iron in Layered Crystal Sodium Disilicate and Sodium Silicate by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Boric Acid as a Matrix Modifier

    Zhi Hua WANG; Min CAI; Shu Jun WANG

    2006-01-01

    The effects of matrix silicate and experimental conditions on the determination of iron in flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) were investigated. It was found that boric acid as a matrix modifier obviously eliminated silicate interference. Under the optimum operating conditions, the determination results of iron in layered crystal sodium disilicate and sodium silicate samples by FAAS were satisfactory. The linear range of calibration curve is 0-10.5 μg.mL-1, the relative standard deviation of method is 1.2%-2.2%, the recovery of added iron is 96.0%-101%, the of iron of the standard curve method, standard addition calibration and colorimetry method was the same, but the first has the merits of rapid sample preparation, reduced contamination risks and fast analysis.

  5. Textural Properties of Zirconium-Modified Mesoporous Silicates Containing 12-Molybdophosphoric Heteropoly Acid

    Kostova, N. G.; Spojakina, A. A.; Šolcová, Olga; Jirátová, Květa

    Praha : Process Engineering Publisher, 2004, s. 851. ISBN 80-86059-40-5. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2004 /16./. Praha (CZ), 22.08.2004-26.08.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : mesoporous materials * acid * zirconium Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Silicate Ester Prodrugs and Poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Block Copolymers for Formulation into Prodrug-Loaded Nanoparticles

    Wohl, Adam Richard

    Fine control of the physical and chemical properties of customized materials is a field that is rapidly advancing. This is especially critical in pursuits to develop and optimize novel nanoparticle drug delivery. Specifically, I aim to apply chemistry concepts to test the hypothesis "Silicate ester prodrugs of paclitaxel, customized to have the proper hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability, can be formulated with well-defined, biocompatible, amphiphilic block copolymers into nanoparticles that are effective drugs." Chapter 1 briefly describes the context and motivation of the scientific pursuits described in this thesis. In Chapter 2, a family of model silicate esters is synthesized, the hydrolysis rate of each compound is benchmarked, and trends are established based upon the steric bulk and leaving group ability of the silicate substituents. These trends are then applied to the synthesis of labile silicate ester prodrugs in Chapter 3. The bulk of this chapter focuses on the synthesis, hydrolysis, and cytotoxicity of prodrugs based on paclitaxel, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent. In Chapter 4, a new methodology for the synthesis of narrowly dispersed, "random" poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers by a constant infusion of the glycolide monomer is detailed. Using poly(ethylene glycol) as a macroinitiator, amphiphilic block copolymers were synthesized. Co-formulating a paclitaxel silicate and an amphiphilic block copolymer via flash nanoprecipitation led to highly prodrug-loaded, kinetically trapped nanoparticles. Studies to determine the structure, morphology, behavior, and efficacy of these nanoparticles are described in Chapter 5. Efforts to develop a general strategy for the selective end-functionalization of the polyether block of these amphiphilic block copolymers are discussed in Chapter 6. Examples of this strategy include functionalization of the polyether with an azide or a maleimide. Finally, Chapter 7 provides an outlook for future development of

  7. MODIFICATION OF PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLER USING SODIUM SILICATE/ZINC CHLORIDE BASED MODIFIERS TO IMPROVE ACID-RESISTANCE AND USE OF THE MODIFIED FILLER IN PAPERMAKING

    Jing Shen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the acid-resistant property of papermaking grade precipitated calcium carbonate filler and to obtain modified filler in powder form, sodium silicate/zinc chloride based modifiers were used in filler modification, and the use of modified filler in papermaking of deinked pulp derived from recycled newspaper was also preliminarily investigated. Under the preliminarily optimized experimental conditions, when sodium silicate, zinc chloride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and phosphoric acid with dosages of 10 wt%, 3 wt%, 1 wt% and 0.2 wt%, respectively, were used as modifiers, and when the temperature, aging time, and PCC concentration during the filler modification process was 70 oC, 7 h and 9.1 wt%, respectively, the acid-resistant property of filler was significantly improved after modification, as evaluated using alum consumption and pH methods. The use of modified precipitated calcium carbonate filler prepared under the optimized conditions provided considerably more brightness and light scattering improvement in comparison to unmodified filler, and filler modification was found to have only negligible influence on tensile and burst strength of the paper, air permeability of the paper, and retention performance of the filler. Surface analysis of the modified filler using XPS and SEM confirmed the occurring of surface encapsulation and modification of precipitated calcium carbonate filler when the relevant modifiers were used in filler modification. The encapsulating effect of modifiers on filler was thought to be favorable to improvement in acid-resistant property, and optical properties of the filled paper.

  8. Solid-phase extraction of galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids from natural sources (Galphimia glauca and Arnicae flos) using pure zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate powders as sorbents inside micro spin columns.

    Hussain, Shah; Schönbichler, Stefan A; Güzel, Yüksel; Sonderegger, Harald; Abel, Gudrun; Rainer, Matthias; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2013-10-01

    Galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids are among the most important pharmacological active groups of natural compounds. This study describes a pre-step in isolation of some selected representatives of these groups from biological samples. A selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for these compounds may help assign classes and isomer designations within complex mixtures. Pure zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate powders (325 mesh) were employed as two new sorbents for optimized SPE of phenolic acids. These sorbents possess electrostatic interaction sites which accounts for additional interactions for carbon acid moieties as compared to hydrophilic and hydrophobic sorbents alone. Based on this principle, a selective SPE method for 1,3,4,5-tetragalloylquinic acid (an anti-HIV and anti-asthamatic agent) as a starting compound was developed and then deployed upon other phenolic acids with success. The recoveries and selectivities of both sorbents were compared to most commonly applied and commercially available sorbents by using high performance liquid chromatography. The nature of interaction between the carrier sorbent and the acidic target molecules was investigated by studying hydrophilic (silica), hydrophobic (C18), mixed-mode (ionic and hydrophobic: Oasis(®) MAX) and predominantly electrostatic (zirconium silicate) materials. The newly developed zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate stationary phases revealed promising results for the selective extraction of galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids from natural sources. It was observed that zirconium silicate exhibited maximum recovery and selectivity for tetragalloylquinic acid (84%), chlorogenic acid (82%) and dicaffeoylquinic acid (94%) among all the tested sorbents. PMID:23831490

  9. Oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica. Reconstructing changes in surface water hydrography and silicic acid utilization in the late Pleistocene subarctic Pacific

    Deglacial variations in upper ocean nutrient dynamics and stratification in high latitudes, as well as associated changes in thermohaline overturning circulation, are thought to have played a key role in changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This thesis examines the relationship between past changes in subarctic Pacific upper ocean stratification and nutrient (silicic acid) utilization, using oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica, for the first time at millennial-scale resolution and analyzed with a new and efficient instrumentation set-up. The isotopic data, presented in three manuscripts, show a consistent picture of millennial-scale variability in upper ocean stratification and silicic acid utilization during the last ∝50 ka BP, e.g. indicating that the subarctic Pacific was a source region for atmospheric CO2 during the last deglaciation (late Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Boelling/Alleroed). The presented results demonstrate the high potential of combined diatom oxygen and silicon stable isotope analysis especially for, but not restricted to, marine regions characterized by a low biogenic carbonate content like the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean.

  10. Optical and Thermal Behaviors of Polyamide-Layered Silicate Nanocomposites Based on 4,4'-Azodibenzoic Acid by Solution Intercalation Technique

    Faghihi, Khalil; Shabanian, Meisam

    2011-04-01

    Two new samples of polyamide-montmorillonite reinforced nanocomposites based on 4,4'-azodibenzoic acid were prepared by a convenient solution intercalation technique. Polyamide (PA) 4 as a source of polymer matrix was synthesized by the direct polycondensation reaction of 4,4'-azodibenzoic acid 2 with 4,4'-diamino diphenyl sulfone 3 in the presence of triphenyl phosphate (TPP), CaCl2, pyridine and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Morphology and structure of the resulting PA-nanocomposite films 4a and 4b with 10 and 20% silicate particles were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of clay dispersion and the interaction between clay and polymeric chains on the properties of nanocomposite films were investigated by using Uv-vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and water uptake measurements.

  11. Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds of poly (L-lactic acid)-dicalcium silicate composite via ultrasonic-aging technique for bone regeneration

    Dong, Shengjie [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 188 Shizi St, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Sun, Junying, E-mail: wodaoshi@sohu.com [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 188 Shizi St, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Li, Yadong [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 188 Shizi St, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Cui, Wenguo [Orthopedic Institute, Soochow University, 708 Renmin Rd, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215007 (China); Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@suda.edu.cn [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 188 Shizi St, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Polymeric nanofibrous composite scaffolds incorporating bioglass and bioceramics have been increasingly promising for bone tissue engineering. In the present study, electrospun poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds containing dicalcium silicate (C{sub 2}S) nanoparticles (approximately 300 nm) were fabricated. Using a novel ultrasonic dispersion and aging method, uniform C{sub 2}S nanoparticles were prepared and they were homogenously distributed in the PLLA nanofibers upon electrospinning. In vitro, the PLLA-C{sub 2}S fibers induced the formation of HAp on the surface when immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). During culture, the osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells adhered well on PLLA-C{sub 2}S scaffolds, as evidenced by the well-defined actin stress fibers and well-spreading morphology. Further, compared to pure PLLA scaffolds without C{sub 2}S, PLLA-C{sub 2}S scaffolds markedly promoted the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells as well as their osteogenic differentiation, which was characterized by the enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Together, findings from this study clearly demonstrated that PLLA-C{sub 2}S composite scaffold may function as an ideal candidate for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate (C{sub 2}S) nanoparticles were prepared via a sol–gel process. • C{sub 2}S nanoparticles were stabilized using ultrasonic-aging technique. • PLLA-C{sub 2}S composite nanofibers were fabricated through electrospinning technique. • C{sub 2}S nanoparticles could be homogenously distributed in nanofibers. • The composite scaffolds enhanced proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts.

  12. Preparation and characterization of new poly(amide–imide reinforced layer silicate nanocomposite containing N,N′-pyrromellitoyl-bis-l-phenyl acetic acid

    Khalil Faghihi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new samples of poly(amide–imide/montmorillonite reinforced nanocomposites containing N,N′-pyrromellitoyl-bis-l-phenyl acetic acid moiety in the main chain were synthesized by a convenient solution intercalation technique. Poly(amide–imide (PAI 3 as a source of polymer matrix was synthesized by the direct polycondensation reaction of N,N′-pyrromelitoyl-bis-l-phenyl acetic acid 1 with 4,4′-diamino diphenyl ether 2 in the presence of triphenyl phosphite (TPP, CaCl2, pyridine and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP. Morphology and structure of the resulting PAI-nanocomposite films 4a and 4b with 10% and 20% silicate particles were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The effect of clay dispersion and the interaction between clay and polymeric chains on the properties of nanocomposite films were investigated by using UV–vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and water uptake measurements.

  13. Aluminum Silicate Nanotube Modification of Cotton-Like Siloxane-poly(L-lactic acid)-vaterite Composites

    Daiheon Lee; Hirotaka Maeda; Akiko Obata; Keiichi Inukai; Katsuya Kato; Toshihiro Kasuga

    2013-01-01

    In our earlier work, a cotton-like biodegradable composite, consisting of poly(L-lactic acid) with siloxane-containing vaterite, has been prepared by electrospinning. In the present work, the fibers skeleton of the cotton-like composites was modified successfully with imogolite, which is hydrophilic and biocompatible, via a dip process using ethanol diluted solution to improve the cellular initial attachment. Almost no change in the fiber morphology after the surface modification was observed...

  14. Profiling fatty acids in vegetable oils by reactive pyrolysis-gas chromatography with dimethyl carbonate and titanium silicate.

    Fabbri, Daniele; Baravelli, Valentina; Chiavari, Giuseppe; Prati, Silvia

    2005-12-30

    A novel methodology in on-line pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC) for the fast analysis of fatty acids in vegetable oils with minimal sample treatment and the use of non-toxic reagents is described. Pyrolysis at 500 degrees C for 10 s of sub-microgram quantity of vegetable oil dissolved in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and in the presence of nanopowder titanium silicon oxide resulted in the production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) as unique products. Pyrolysis performed by means of a resistively heated filament pyrolyser interfaced to a GC-MS apparatus enabled the direct analysis of evolved FAMEs. The DMC/Py-GC-MS analysis was tested on soybean, coconut, linseed, walnut and olive oil and the results compared to the classical BF(3)-methanol as reference methodology. The DMC method exhibited a lower precision and was biased towards lower levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in comparison to the BF(3)-methanol method, but was more advantageous in terms of reduced sample treatment, waste generation and risk factors of employed chemicals. PMID:16216255

  15. An integrated experimental-modeling approach to study the acid leaching behavior of lead from sub-micrometer lead silicate glass particles

    Highlights: • Generation of particles by laser ablation of lead silicate glass. • Collection of particles on filters and continuous acid leaching and ICP-MS monitoring. • Fitting of the lead leaching profile to a mathematical intraparticle diffusion model. • Extraction of individual leaching profiles for selected mono-dispersed size fractions. • Leaching kinetics is based on ion-exchange and correlated with particle size. -- Abstract: This work focuses on the development of a procedure to study the mechanism of leaching of lead from sub-micrometer lead glass particles using 0.3 mol l−1 HNO3 as a leachant. Glass particles with an effective size distribution range from 0.05 to 1.4 μm were generated by laser ablation (213 nm Nd:YAG laser) and collected on an inline 0.2 μm syringe filter. Subsequently, the glass particles on the filter were subjected to online leaching and continuous monitoring of lead (Pb-208) in the leachate by quadrupole ICP-MS. The lead leaching profile, aided by the particle size distribution information from cascade impaction, was numerically fitted to a mathematical model based on the glass intraparticle diffusion, liquid film distribution and thermodynamic glass-leachant distribution equilibrium. The findings of the modeling show that the rate-limiting step of leaching is the migration of lead from the core to the surface of the glass particle by an ion-exchange mechanism, governed by the apparent intraparticle lead diffusivity in glass which was calculated to be 3.1 × 10−18 m2 s−1. Lead leaching is illustrated in the form of graphs and animations of intraparticle lead release (in time and intraparticle position) from particles with sizes of 0.1 and 0.3 μm

  16. A fluorescence-based demonstration of intestinal villi and epithelial cell in chickens fed dietary silicic acid powder including bamboo vinegar compound liquid.

    Ruttanavut, J; Matsumoto, Y; Yamauchi, K

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the combined effect of silicic acid and bamboo vinegar compound liquid (SPV) on the growth and intestinal histological alterations in poultry. Forty-eight 7-day-old male Sanuki Cochin chickens were fed a commercial mash diet supplemented with SPV at 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% level ad libitum for 112 days. Body weight gain tended to improve with increased concentrations of dietary SPV, although these results were not statistically significant (PSPV groups, respectively, compared with the control. Cell mitosis within the duodenum and jejunum also increased in the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a prominent increase in the number of protuberant cells on the villus apical surface of the duodenum and jejunum for the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups compared with the control. Poultry in the 0.3% SPV group had the highest body weight gain and hypertrophied histological alterations of intestinal villi. Fluorescent microscopic images of cell mitosis and protuberant cells in the duodenal crypt clearly confirmed positive reactions for the activator protein 2α (AP-2α) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), compared with the control. The present results indicate that dietary SPV stimulates adsorption by the epithelial cells, which activate cell proliferation and self-renewal and regulate the expression of cell cycle regulators AP-2α and PCNA, resulting in higher body weight gain. Thus, we can conclude that a concentration of 0.3% dietary SPV is ideal for promoting growth in poultry. PMID:22936452

  17. Heavy silicon isotopic composition of silicic acid and biogenic silica in Arctic waters over the Beaufort shelf and the Canada Basin

    Varela, D. E.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Beucher, C. P.; Jones, J. L.; Giesbrecht, K. E.; Lansard, B.; Mucci, A.

    2016-06-01

    The silicon isotopic composition of silicic acid (δ30Si(OH)4) and biogenic silica (δ30Si-bSiO2) were measured for the first time in marine Arctic waters from the Mackenzie River delta to the deep Canada Basin in the late summer of 2009. In the upper 100 m of the water column, δ30Si(OH)4 signals (+1.82‰ to +3.08‰) were negatively correlated with the relative contribution of Mackenzie River water. The biogenic Si isotope fractionation factor estimated using an open system model, 30ɛ = -0.97 ± 0.17‰, agrees well with laboratory and global-ocean estimates. Nevertheless, the δ30Si dynamics of this region may be better represented by closed system isotope models that yield lower values of 30ɛ, between -0.33‰ and -0.41‰, depending on how the contribution of sea-ice diatoms is incorporated. In the upper 400 m, δ30Si-bSiO2 values were among the heaviest ever measured in marine suspended bSiO2 (+2.03‰ to +3.51‰). A positive correlation between δ30Si-bSiO2 and sea-ice cover implies that heavy signals can result from isotopically heavy sea-ice diatoms introduced to pelagic assemblages. Below the surface bSiO2 production zone, the δ30Si(OH)4 distribution followed that of major water masses. Vertical δ30Si(OH)4 profiles showed a minimum (average of +1.84 ± 0.10‰) in the upper halocline (125-200 m) composed of modified Pacific water and heavier average values (+2.04 ± 0.11‰) in Atlantic water (300-500 m deep). In the Canada Basin Deep Water (below 2000 m), δ30Si(OH)4 averaged +1.88 ± 0.12‰, which represents the most positive value ever measured anywhere in the deep ocean. Since most Si(OH)4 enters the Arctic from shallow depths in the Atlantic Ocean, heavy deep Arctic δ30Si(OH)4 signals likely reflect the influx of relatively heavy intermediate Atlantic waters. A box model simulation of the global marine δ30Si(OH)4 distribution successfully reproduced the observed patterns, with the δ30Si(OH)4 of the simulated deep Arctic Ocean being the

  18. The influence of surfactant structure on the mechanical and barrier properties of poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid)/layered silicate nanocomposites

    Kovářová, L.; Šlouf, Miroslav; Maláč, J.; Pientka, Zbyněk; Šimoník, J.

    Pretoria : Polymer Processing Society, 2006, s. 1-9. [Europe/Africa Meeting of Polymer Processing Society PPS. Pretoria (ZA), 09.10.2006-13.10.2006] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 500361 - NANOFUN-POLY Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : layered silicates * nanocomposites * morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  19. Evaluation of cyclonic ash, commercial Na-silicates, lime and phosphoric acid for metal immobilisation purposes in contaminated soils in Flanders (Belgium)

    In order to reduce the health risks associated with historically enriched metal smelting sites in Flanders (Belgium), the capacities of a non-beringite cyclonic ash and commercial Na-silicates to fix metals and create conditions to restore vegetation cover were evaluated and compared to lime and H3PO4. All tested amendments reduced Ca(NO3)2-extractable soil metal concentrations and reduced metal uptake in Agrostis capillaris seedlings. Sodium released by Na-silicates was possibly toxic to bean plants while an isotopic dilution technique revealed that metals were only weakly sorbed by silicates (i.e. reversible sorption). Cyclonic ash appeared more efficient than lime in both reducing oxidative stress in beans and Zn, Cu and Pb uptake in grasses. The metal fixing mechanism for both amendments appeared similar (i.e. irreversible fixation at constant pH), in contrast to H3PO4 where at least part of the immobilised Cd was irreversibly fixed across a range of pH. - Metal immobilising capacities of Na-silicates are weak, while the active mechanism of cyclonic ash is the same as lime

  20. Evaluation of cyclonic ash, commercial Na-silicates, lime and phosphoric acid for metal immobilisation purposes in contaminated soils in Flanders (Belgium)

    Geebelen, Wouter [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Environmental Biology, Agoralaan - Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)]. E-mail: wouter.geebelen@uhasselt.be; Sappin-Didier, Valerie [UMR TCEM, INRA, Centre de recherche Bordeaux - Aquitaine, BP 81, 33883 Villenave d' Ornon cedex (France)]. E-mail: didier@bordeaux.inra.fr; Ruttens, Ann [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Environmental Biology, Agoralaan - Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Carleer, Robert [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Applied Chemistry, Agoralaan - Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)]. E-mail: robert.carleer@uhasselt.be; Yperman, Jan [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Applied Chemistry, Agoralaan - Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)]. E-mail: jan.yperman@uhasselt.be; Bongue-Boma, Kwele [UMR TCEM, INRA, Centre de recherche Bordeaux - Aquitaine, BP 81, 33883 Villenave d' Ornon cedex (France); Mench, Michel [UMR BIOGECO INRA, Ecology of Communities, Bordeaux 1 University, Bat B8 RdC Est, av. des Facultes, F-33405 Talence (France)]. E-mail: mench@bordeaux.inra.fr; Lelie, Niels van der [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Biology Department, Bldg. 463, New York, NY 11973-5000 (United States)]. E-mail: vdlelied@bnl.gov; Vangronsveld, Jaco [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Environmental Biology, Agoralaan - Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)]. E-mail: jaco.vangronsveld@uhasselt.be

    2006-11-15

    In order to reduce the health risks associated with historically enriched metal smelting sites in Flanders (Belgium), the capacities of a non-beringite cyclonic ash and commercial Na-silicates to fix metals and create conditions to restore vegetation cover were evaluated and compared to lime and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. All tested amendments reduced Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-extractable soil metal concentrations and reduced metal uptake in Agrostis capillaris seedlings. Sodium released by Na-silicates was possibly toxic to bean plants while an isotopic dilution technique revealed that metals were only weakly sorbed by silicates (i.e. reversible sorption). Cyclonic ash appeared more efficient than lime in both reducing oxidative stress in beans and Zn, Cu and Pb uptake in grasses. The metal fixing mechanism for both amendments appeared similar (i.e. irreversible fixation at constant pH), in contrast to H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} where at least part of the immobilised Cd was irreversibly fixed across a range of pH. - Metal immobilising capacities of Na-silicates are weak, while the active mechanism of cyclonic ash is the same as lime.

  1. Determinazione della silice: metodo spettrofotometrico in assorbimento molecolare

    Gabriele A. TARTARI

    2012-01-01

    Metodo analitico interno al laboratorio di idrochimica del CNR-ISE di Verbania per la determinazione della silice disciolta reattiva al molibdato. Il metodo colorimetrico si basa sulla reazione della silice con il sodio molibdato in condizioni acide, per formare il complesso silicomolibdato poi ridotto dal cloruro stannoso al colorante blu di molibdeno che viene determinato alla lunghezza d'onda di 802 nm.

  2. Research Progress in Poly(lactic acid ) /Layered Silicate Nanocomposites%聚乳酸/层状硅酸盐纳米复合材料研究进展

    张玉霞; 刘学; 刘本刚; 王向东

    2012-01-01

    介绍了聚乳酸/层状硅酸盐纳米复合材料研究进展,阐述了其制备方法如原位聚合插层法、溶液插层法、熔融插层法等,详述了聚乳酸添加纳米层状硅酸盐后结构与性能的变化,包括复合材料的微观结构、结晶性能、热性能、力学性能、流变性能、加工性能、阻隔性能、阻燃性能的变化。研究表明,采用不同的制备方法如原位聚合插层法、溶液插层法、熔融插层法等能制得插层型、剥离型以及插层与剥离混合型聚乳酸/层状硅酸盐纳米复合材料;添加纳米层状硅酸盐后,得到的聚乳酸/层状硅酸盐纳米复合材料结晶速率提高,结晶度增加,说明层状硅酸盐起到了成核剂的作用;热稳定性、拉伸模量和冲击强度、阻透性能和阻燃性能都有不同程度提高;流变性能也得到改善。%Research advances in the preparation and properties of poiy (lactic acid ) /layered silicate nanocomposites were introduced. Details on preparation technologies of poly(lactic acid) /layered silicate nanocomposites such as intercalation from solution, in-situ intercalative polymerization, melt intercalation technique, and their properties such as morphologies, crystallization behavior, thermal performance, mechanical properties, rheological behavior, processing ability, barrier performance and flame retardance, etc. It was shown that poly(lactie acid)/layered silicate nanocomposites with interealative or/and exfoliated structure by the three preparation processes were made respectively. Their properties, including crystallization rate and degree, thermal stability, tensile modulus and impact strength, gas barrier and flame retardance, as well as rheological behavior were improved.

  3. Tin-Containing Silicates

    Tolborg, Søren; Meier, Sebastian; Sádaba, I.;

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic glycolytic systems, capable of transforming glucose through a cascade of catalytic steps, can lead to efficient chemical processes utilising carbohydrates as feedstock. Tin-containing silicates, such as Sn-Beta, are showing potential for the production of lactates from sugars through a ...

  4. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten;

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...

  5. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  6. Acid-resistant calcium silicate-based composite implants with high-strength as load-bearing bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices.

    Wei, Chung-Kai; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2016-09-01

    To achieve the excellent mechanical properties of biodegradable materials used for cortical bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices remains a challenge. To this end, the biomimetic calcium silicate/gelatin/chitosan oligosaccharide composite implants were developed, with an aim of achieving high strength, controlled degradation, and superior osteogenic activity. The work focused on the effect of gelatin on mechanical properties of the composites under four different kinds of mechanical stresses including compression, tensile, bending, and impact. The evaluation of in vitro degradability and fatigue at two simulated body fluid (SBF) of pH 7.4 and 5.0 was also performed, in which the pH 5.0 condition simulated clinical conditions caused by bacterial induced local metabolic acidosis or tissue inflammation. In addition, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were sued to examine osteogenic activity. Experimental results showed that the appropriate amount of gelatin positively contributed to failure enhancement in compressive and impact modes. The 10wt% gelatin-containing composite exhibits the maximum value of the compressive strength (166.1MPa), which is within the reported compressive strength for cortical bone. The stability of the bone implants was apparently affected by the in vitro fatigue, but not by the initial pH environments (7.4 or 5.0). The gelatin not only greatly enhanced the degradation of the composite when soaked in the dynamic SBF solution, but effectively promoted attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and formation of mineralization of hMSCs. The 10wt%-gelatin composite with high initial strength may be a potential implant candidate for cortical bone repair and fracture fixation applications. PMID:27254281

  7. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Robert J. Flatt; D'Espinose De Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measuremen...

  8. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  9. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  10. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin irritation study. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate and Sodium Magnesium Silicate caused minimal eye irritation in a Draize eye irritation test. Bentonite caused severe iritis after injection into the anterior chamber of the eyes of rabbits and when injected intralamellarly, widespread corneal infiltrates and retrocorneal membranes were recorded. In a primary eye irritation study in rabbits, Hectorite was moderately irritating without washing and practically nonirritating to the eye with a washout. Rats tolerated a single dose of Zeolite A without any adverse reaction in the eye. Calcium Silicate had no discernible effect on nidation or on maternal or fetal survival in rabbits. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate had neither a teratogenic nor adverse effects on the mouse fetus. Female rats receiving a 20% Kaolin diet exhibited maternal anemia but no significant reduction in birth weight of the pups was

  11. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  12. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  13. Interaction of silicic acid with goethite

    Hiemstra, T.; Barnett, M.O.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption of Si on goethite (¿-FeOOH) has been studied in batch experiments that cover the natural range of Si concentrations as found in the environment. The results have been interpreted and quantified with the charge distribution (CD) and multi-site surface complexation (MUSIC) model in comb

  14. Preparation of Hollow Calcium Silicate Microparticles by Simple Emulsion

    Eiichi Toorisaka; Syotaro Nagamatsu; Yasunobu Saruwatari; Makoto Hirata; Tadashi Hano

    2014-01-01

    Hollow calcium silicate microparticles were prepared by mixing a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion containing silicate ions in aqueous phase with an oil phase containing a calcium/di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) complex. The inorganic precipitation reaction at the oil-water interface was accelerated by using a simple W/O emulsion. Hollow microparticles were obtained when the mole ratio of D2EHPA and calcium in the oil phase was nearly 2:1. The shell formation of the par-ticles depended on ...

  15. Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric determination of Cd, Pb, and Cu in a hydrofluoric acid solution of siliceous spicules of marine sponges (from the Ligurian Sea, Italy, and the Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    Truzzi, C.; Annibaldi, A.; Illuminati, S.; Bassotti, E.; Scarponi, G. [Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy). Department of Marine Science

    2008-09-15

    Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was set up and optimized for simultaneous determination of cadmium, lead, and copper in siliceous spicules of marine sponges, directly in the hydrofluoric acid solution ({proportional_to}0.55 mol L{sup -1} HF, pH {proportional_to}1.9). A thin mercury-film electrode (TMFE) plated on to an HF-resistant epoxy-impregnated graphite rotating-disc support was used. The optimum experimental conditions, evaluated also in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, were as follows: deposition potential -1100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, KCl 3 mol L{sup -1}, deposition time 3-10 min, electrode rotation 3000 rpm, SW scan from -1100 mV to +100 mV, SW pulse amplitude 25 mV, frequency 100 Hz, {delta}E{sub step} 8 mV, t{sub step} 100 ms, t{sub wait} 60 ms, t{sub delay} 2 ms, t{sub meas} 3 ms. Under these conditions the metal peak potentials were Cd -654{+-}1 mV, Pb -458 {+-} 1 mV, Cu -198{+-}1 mV. The electrochemical behaviour was reversible for Pb, quasi-reversible for Cd, and kinetically controlled (possibly following chemical reaction) for Cu. The linearity of the response with concentration was verified up to {proportional_to}4 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cd and Pb and {proportional_to}20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cu. The detection limits were 5.8 ng L{sup -1}, 3.6 ng L{sup -1}, and 4.3 ng L{sup -1} for Cd, Pb, and Cu, respectively, with t{sub d}=5 min. The method was applied for determination of the metals in spicules of two specimens of marine sponges (Demosponges) from the Portofino natural reserve (Ligurian Sea, Italy, Petrosia ficiformis) and Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica, Sphaerotylus antarcticus). The metal contents varied from tens of ng g{sup -1} to {proportional_to}1 {mu}g g{sup -1}, depending on the metal considered and with significant differences between the two sponge species. (orig.)

  16. Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric determination of Cd, Pb, and Cu in a hydrofluoric acid solution of siliceous spicules of marine sponges (from the Ligurian Sea, Italy, and the Ross Sea, Antarctica).

    Truzzi, C; Annibaldi, A; Illuminati, S; Bassotti, E; Scarponi, G

    2008-09-01

    Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was set up and optimized for simultaneous determination of cadmium, lead, and copper in siliceous spicules of marine sponges, directly in the hydrofluoric acid solution (approximately 0.55 mol L(-1) HF, pH approximately 1.9). A thin mercury-film electrode (TMFE) plated on to an HF-resistant epoxy-impregnated graphite rotating-disc support was used. The optimum experimental conditions, evaluated also in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, were as follows: deposition potential -1100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, KCl 3 mol L(-1), deposition time 3-10 min, electrode rotation 3000 rpm, SW scan from -1100 mV to +100 mV, SW pulse amplitude 25 mV, frequency 100 Hz, DeltaE(step) 8 mV, t(step) 100 ms, t(wait) 60 ms, t(delay) 2 ms, t(meas) 3 ms. Under these conditions the metal peak potentials were Cd -654 +/- 1 mV, Pb -458 +/- 1 mV, Cu -198 +/- 1 mV. The electrochemical behaviour was reversible for Pb, quasi-reversible for Cd, and kinetically controlled (possibly following chemical reaction) for Cu. The linearity of the response with concentration was verified up to approximately 4 microg L(-1) for Cd and Pb and approximately 20 microg L(-1) for Cu. The detection limits were 5.8 ng L(-1), 3.6 ng L(-1), and 4.3 ng L(-1) for Cd, Pb, and Cu, respectively, with t(d) = 5 min. The method was applied for determination of the metals in spicules of two specimens of marine sponges (Demosponges) from the Portofino natural reserve (Ligurian Sea, Italy, Petrosia ficiformis) and Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica, Sphaerotylus antarcticus). The metal contents varied from tens of ng g(-1) to approximately 1 microg g(-1), depending on the metal considered and with significant differences between the two sponge species. PMID:18642105

  17. Tin-containing silicates

    Osmundsen, Christian M.; Holm, Martin Spangsberg; Dahl, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    The selective conversion of biomass-derived substrates is one of the major challenges facing the chemical industry. Recently, stannosilicates have been employed as highly active and selective Lewis acid catalysts for a number of industrially relevant reactions. In the present work, four different...

  18. Rubber curing chemistry governing the orientation of layered silicate

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing systems on the orientation and the dispersion of the layered silicates in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber nanocomposite is reported. Significant differences in X-ray diffraction pattern between peroxide curing and sulfur curing was observed. Intense X-ray scattering values in the XRD experiments from peroxide cured vulcanizates indicate an orientation of the layers in a preferred direction as evinced by transmission electron micrographs. However, sulfur cured vulcanizates show no preferential orientation of the silicate particles. Nevertheless, a closer inspection of transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of peroxide and sulfur cured samples shows exfoliated silicate layers in the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR matrix. It was revealed in the prevailing study that the use of an excess amount of stearic acid in the formulation of the sulfur curing package leads to almost exfoliated type X-ray scattering pattern.

  19. Oligo-lysine Induced Formation of Silica Particles in Neutral Silicate Solution

    2006-01-01

    Oligo-(lysine)n (n = 1-4) containing different numbers of lysine residues was used to induce the condensation of silicic acid to form silica particles in neutral silicate solution. It was found that the condensation rate and the formation of silica particles are dependent on the number of lysine residues in an oligo-lysine. Oligo-lysine with more lysine residues can link more silicic acid together to form a matrix that promotes the effective aggregation of the condensed silica pieces to form large silica particles.

  20. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  1. Development of Silicate Polymers

    Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Simonsen, Morten Enggrob

      The development of inorganic polymers is a new promising technology that may be used in many applications. The syntheses of inorganic polymers are normally carried out either by mixing an amorphous material for example silicium dioxide with a mineral base or dissolving metal oxids or metal...... hydroxide in acid and increase pH to saturation of the metal hydroxide. It is assumed that the syntheses of the inorganic polymer are carried out through polymerisation of oligomers (dimer, trimer) which provide the actual unit structures of the three dimensional macromolecular structure. In this work...

  2. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...

  3. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  4. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  5. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    Rajan Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7 using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source, magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesium silicate was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Calcium magnesium silicate crystallite size was observed in nano regime which can effectively mimic natural bone apatite composition. In-vitro bioactivity was investigated by immersing calcium magnesium silicate pellet in simulated body fluid (SBF for three weeks. Results show effective deposition of crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAP layer on its surface and predicting its possibilities for applications in hard tissue regeneration.

  6. A highly crystalline layered silicate with three-dimensionally microporous layers

    Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Nair, Sankar; Vogt, Thomas; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Layered silicates with three-dimensional microporosity within the layers have the potential to enable new applications in catalysis, adsorption and ion-exchange. Until now no such materials have been reported. However, here we present the synthesis and structure of AMH-3, a silicate with three-dimensionally microporous layers, obtained in high purity and crystallinity. AMH-3 is composed of silicate layers containing eight-membered rings in all three principal crystal directions, and spaced by strontium cations, sodium cations and water molecules. Because of its three-dimensional pore structure, acid and thermal stability, this layered material could find applications in polymer-silicate composites for membrane applications, for synthesis of combined microporous-mesoporous materials, and for the formation of new zeolites and microporous films. Its existence also opens new possibilities for the synthesis of other layered silicates with multidimensional microporous framework layers.

  7. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate....

  8. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  9. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen;

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 10(12) mol Si per year, which makes them the...... major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under d......Si-limited conditions in a chemokinetic response and, if gradients of this resource are present, increased directionality of cell movement promotes chemotaxis. The ability to exploit local and short-lived dSi hotspots using a specific search behaviour likely contributes to micro-scale patch dynamics in biofilm...

  10. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  11. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  12. Process and self-acidifying liquid system for dissolving a siliceous material in a remote location

    Lybarger, J.H.; Templeton, C.C.; Richardson, E.A.; Scheuerman, R.F.

    1980-12-02

    A process is provided for dissolving a siliceous material in a remote location into which a fluid can be flowed. The process comprises the following: 1) mixing at least one aqueous liquid, at least one water-soluble fluoride salt, and at least one relatively slowly reactive acid-yielding material that yeilds an acid capable of converting an aqueous solution of the fluoride salt to an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid, to form a substantially homogeneous liquid system in which the components interact to provide an aqueous solution that contains enough hydrofluoric acid to dissolve bentonite while having a pH of at least approx. 2; 2) flowing the liquid system into contact with siliceous material to be dissolved; and 3) adjusting the composition of the liquid system and the rate of flowing it so that the siliceous material is contacted by the system while the bentonite-dissolving proportion of hydrofluoric acid is present in the aqueous solution. 5 claims.

  13. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  14. Effect of silicate fertilization on soil and on palisade grass plants under grazing intensities

    Pedro Henrique de Cerqueira Luz; Letícia de Abreu Faria; Felipe Barros Macedo; Valdo Rodrigues Herling; Antonio Batista Sanches; Rosane Cláudia Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Application of calcium silicate (SiCa) as soil acidity corrective was evaluated in a Rhodic Hapludox soil with palisade grass conducted under pasture rotation system with different grazing intensities. Experimental design was complete randomized blocks with four grazing intensities - grazing intensities were imposed by forage supply (50, 100, 150 and 200 kg t-1 of DM per LW) - in experimental plots with four replicates and, in the subplots, with seven doses of calcium silicate combined with l...

  15. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    Rajan Choudhary; Sivasankar Koppala; Sasikumar Swamiappan

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7) using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source), magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent) and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesiu...

  16. Analytical properties of gaize- and silicate glue-based xerogels modified with Chrome Azurol S

    A method was proposed for the synthesis of silicic acid xerogels based on opoka aluminosilicate (Gaize) and silicate glue. The physicochemical properties of xerogels were studied. The complexation of Be(II) with immobilized Chrome Azurol S was studied by electronic absorption and diffuse-reflection spectrometry and solid-phase spectrophotometry. Test procedures were developed for determining Be(II) and Al(III) in waters and soils

  17. Effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy in 0.5M HCl

    Othman, N. K.; Mohamad, N.; Zulkafli, R.; Jalar, A.

    2013-05-01

    Silicate-based corrosion inhibitor prepared by treating silica powder extracted from rice husk ash with concentrated alkaline. The electrochemical behavior of the Al 6061 immersed in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) has been studied using the measurements of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and optical or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that, the optimum concentration of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was prominent at 5 ppm. The small addition of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was exhibited the decreasing of the weight loss of Al 6061 in acidic medium. SEM micrograph proved that the morphology of untreated Al 6061 with silicate-base corrosion inhibitor contributes more corrosion attack on sample compared to that treated Al 6061. The purpose of this research is to understand the effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor concentration yielded from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy.

  18. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  19. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  20. Determination of silicon dioxide in siliceous refractory materials by potassium fluosilicate precipitation-acid base titration method%氟硅酸钾沉淀-酸碱滴定法测定硅质耐火材科料中二氧化硅

    李环亭; 董艳艳; 刘晓毅; 孙晓红; 赵维平

    2011-01-01

    提出一种不用铂金坩埚和不需要用氢氟酸挥硅的氟硅酸钾沉淀-酸碱滴定法测定硅质耐火材料中SiO2含量方法,考察了检测的准确度和精确度,探讨了影响检测的干扰因素和可能的干扰机理.试样在银或者镍坩埚中,用氢氧化钠熔融,二氧化硅转化为硅酸钠,在有过量氯化钾存在的强酸性溶液中加入氟化钾溶液,生成氟硅酸钾沉淀,经过滤、洗涤后溶于沸水中,以酚酞为指示剂,NaOH标准溶液滴定水解后生成的氢氟酸.试样中SiO2的质量分数与Al2O3的质量分数比值大于或等于3.5时Al2O3对测定没有影响.应用本法检测硅质砂岩、硅砖等硅质耐火材料样品中的SiO2含量,测定值与认定值相符,且重复性较好.%A determination method of silicon dioxide in siliceous refractory materials by potassium fluosilicate precipitation-acid-base titration method was established. Neither a platinum crucible nor the volatilization of silicon by hydrofluoric acid was needed. The determination accuracy and precision were investigated. The interference factors and possible interference mechanism were discussed. The samples were melted in a silver or nickel crucible with sodium hydroxide, during which the silicon dioxide in sample was converted into sodium silicate. Then, potassium fluoride solution was added into strong acid solution containing excessive potassium chloride to form potassium fluosilicate precipitation. After filtration and washing, the precipitates were dissolved in boiling water. The generated hydrofluoric acid through hydrolysis was titrated with standard sodium hydroxide solution using phenolphthalein as indicator. It was generally considered that. when the ratio between mass fraction of silicon dioxide and aluminum oxide in sample was higher or equal to 3. 5, the aluminum oxide had no influence on the determination. This method has been applied to the determination of silicon dioxide in siliceous refractory materials

  1. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  2. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  3. Carbonate verse silicate Sr isotope in lake sediments and its response to Little Ice Age

    2003-01-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of silicate (acid-insoluble, AI) and carbonate (acid-soluble, AS) of the lake sediments from the Daihai Lake, Inner Mongolia, since the last 500 years are measured respectively, indicating that chemical weathering of silicate minerals was in an early stage since the Little Ice Age within the Daihai watershed by combination with mineral constitute, Rb/Sr ratio and CaCO3 content in the sediments. During the Little Ice Age maximum, an evident peak in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of both silicate and carbonate in sediments suggests that a cold climate condition is unfavorable to dissolving radiogenic strontium from silicate minerals. Meanwhile, the variation of 87Sr/86Sr ratios of silicate and carbonate also reflects a projected warming climate favorable to intensifying chemical weathering after the Little Ice Age. Consequently, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of both silicate and carbonate in inland lake sediments can be used as an effective proxy of the past climate in single watershed.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Lithium Zirconium Silicate for CO2 Capture

    T.S. Bhosale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were prepared by precipitation, template and sol-gel meth-ods. The samples were prepared with several mol ratios of Li:Zr:Si. The preparation of lithium zirco-nium silicate samples by precipitation method were carried out by using the lithium nitrate, zirconyl nitrate, zirconium(IV oxypropoxide and tetramethylorthosilicate (TEOS as precursors. The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were prepared by using cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (C-TAB and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAOH by template method. The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, 29Si-MAS NMR and FTIR. The surface area, alkalinity / acidity of the samples of lithium zirconium silicate were measured. The TGA analysis of lithium zirco-nium silicate samples was done. The CO2 captured by the samples of lithium zirconium silicate was es-timated. The captured CO2 by the samples of lithium zirconium silicate was found to be in the range 3.3 to 8.6 wt%. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 27th March 2014; Revised: 31st July 2014; Accepted: 2nd August 2014How to Cite: Bhosale, T.S. , Gaikwad, A.G. (2014. Preparation and Characterization of Lithium Zirconium Silicate for CO2 Capture. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9(3: 249-262. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6646.249-262Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6646.249-262

  5. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  6. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  7. 双极性膜电渗析技术在硅溶胶生产中的应用%Application of bipolar membrane electrodialysis in production of silicic acid

    林爱光

    2001-01-01

    报道了双极性膜电渗析取代现行工艺中泡花碱转化成硅溶胶的酸化过程的研究.转化得到的硅溶胶中SiO2含量达到6%~10%,pH值在3以下,平均电流效率在55%~75%范围内,平均耗电低于1 kW*h/kg(每千克硅溶胶),制得的硅溶胶产品符合工业要求.%A new technology, bipolar membrane electrodialysis(BME), was developed to convert sodium silicate(Na2SO3) into silicasol (H2SO3). By optimizing the operation condition, one can easily obtain the product with desired SiO2 content about 6%~10% and pH value about 3. In this new process, the average efficiency of electric current is 55%~75% and the power cost is less than 1 kW*h/(kg silicasol). So it provides a attractive method for the production of silicasol.

  8. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  9. Uranium-thorium silicates, with specific reference to the species in the Witwatersrand reefs

    (U,Th)-silicates form two complete series of anhydrous and hydrated species with general formulae (U,Th)SiO4 and (U,Th)SiO4.nH2O respectively. The end-members of the anhydrous series are anhydrous coffinite and thorite, and those of the hydrated series, coffinite and thorogummite. Although the silicates are relatively rare in nature, coffinite is a common ore mineral in uranium deposits of the sandstone type. In the Witwatersrand reefs, (U,Th)-silicates are extremely rare in most reefs, except for the Elsburg Reefs on the West Rand Goldfield and the Dominion Reef. In these reefs detrital uraninite has been partly or entirely transformed to (U,Th)-silicates of coffinite composition, but thorite and thorogummite of detrital origin are also found in the Dominion Reef. In leaching tests on polished sections of rock samples containing (U,Th)-silicates, a dilute sulphuric acid solution, to which ferric iron had been added, was used as the lixiviant. It appeared that the dissolution of coffinite is less rapid than that of uraninite and uraniferous leucoxene. However, the reaction of silicates of high thorium content is much slower, and was not completed during the tests

  10. Transport properties of silicate melts

    Ni, Huaiwei; Hui, Hejiu; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2015-09-01

    A quantitative description of the transport properties, diffusivity, viscosity, electrical, and thermal conductivity, of silicate melts is essential for understanding melting-related petrologic and geodynamic processes. We here provide a systematic overview on the current knowledge of these properties from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, their dependence on pressure, temperature, and composition, atomistic processes underlying them, and physical models to describe their variations. We further establish phenomenological and physical links between diffusivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity that are based on structural rearrangement in the melt. Neutral molecules and network-modifying cations with low electric field strength display intrinsic diffusivity, which is controlled by the intrinsic properties (size and valence) of the species. By contrast, oxygen and network formers with high field strength show extrinsic diffusivity, which is more sensitive to extrinsic parameters including temperature (T), pressure (P), and melt composition (X). Similar T-P-X dependence of diffusivity and electrical conductivity and their quantitative relation reveal the role of intrinsically diffusing species in electrical transport, while viscosity is tied to the extrinsically diffusing species in a similar way. However, the differences in the structural role and mobility of various atomic species diminish with increasing temperature and/or pressure: all transport processes are increasingly coupled, eventually converging to a uniform rate and mechanism. Accurate comprehension of interatomic interactions and melt structure is vital to fully accounting for the compositional dependence of transport properties, and simple polymerization parameters such as nonbridging oxygen per tetrahedrally coordinated cation are inadequate.

  11. Magnetic properties of sheet silicates

    Susceptibility, magnetisation and Moessbauer measurements are reported for a representative selection of 2:1 layer phyllosilicates. Eight samples from the mica, vermiculite and smectite groups include examples diluted in iron which are paramagnetic at all temperatures, as well as iron-rich silicates which order magnetically below 10 K. Anisotropic susceptibility of crystals of muscovite, biotite and vermiculite is quantitatively explained with a model where the Fe2+ ions lie in sites of effective trigonal symmetry, the trigonal axis lying normal to the sheets. The ferrous ground state is an orbital singlet. Ferric iron gives an isotropic contribution to the susceptibility. Fe2+-Fe2+ exchange interactions are ferromagnetic with Gapprox. equal to2 K, whereas Fe3+-Fe3+ coupling is antiferromagnetic in the purely ferric minerals. A positive paramagnetic Curie temperature for glauconite may be attributable to Fe2+ → Fe3+ charge transfer. Magnetic order was found to set in inhomogeneously for glauconite at 1-7 K. One biotite sample showed an antiferromagnetic transition at Tsub(N) = 7 K marked by a well-defined susceptibility maximum. Its magnetic structure, consisting of ferromagnetic sheets with moments in their planes coupled antiferromagnetically by other, weak interactions, resembles that found earlier for the 1:1 mineral greenalite. (orig.)

  12. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  13. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  14. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  15. Geo-neutrinos and Silicate Earth Enrichment

    Dye, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The terrestrial distribution of U, Th, and K abundances governs the thermal evolution, traces the differentiation, and reflects the bulk composition of the earth. Comparing the bulk earth composition to chondritic meteorites estimates the net amounts of these radiogenic heat-producing elements available for partitioning to the crust, mantle, and core. Core formation enriches the abundances of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by ~1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to ~2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from the ratio of K to U. Variable enrichment produces a range of possible heat-producing element abundances in the silicate earth. A model assesses the essentially fixed amounts of U, Th, and K in the approximately closed crust reservoir. Subtracting these sequestered crustal amounts from the variable amounts in the silicate earth results in a range of possible mantle allocations, leaving global dynamics and therm...

  16. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  17. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  18. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  19. Wear and chemistry of zirconium-silicate, aluminium-silicate and zirconium-aluminium-silicate glasses in alkaline medium

    A study of the chemical durability, in alkaline solutions, of zirconium silicate, aluminium silicate, zirconium/aluminium silicate glasses as a function of glass composition is carried out. The glasses were tested using standard DIN-52322 method, where the glass samples are prepared in small polished pieces and attacked for 3 hours in a 800 ml solution of 1N (NaOH + NA2CO3) at 970C. The results show that the presence of ZrO2 in the glass composition increases its chemical durability to alkaline attack. Glasses of the aluminium/zirconium silicate series were melted with and without TiO2. It was shown experimentally that for this series of glasses, the presence of both TiO2 and ZrO2 gave better chemical durability results. However, the best overall results were obtained from the simpler zirconium silicate glasses, where it was possible to make glasses with higher values of ZrO2. (Author)

  20. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  1. Porous Silicates Modified with Zirconium Oxide and Sulfate Ions for Alcohol Dehydration Reactions

    Heriberto Esteban Benito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicates were synthesized by a nonhydrothermal method, using sodium silicate as a source of silica and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a template agent. Catalysts were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, pyridine adsorption, potentiometric titration with n-butylamine, scanning electronic microscopy, and transmission electronic microscopy. The surface area of the materials synthesized was greater than 800 m2/g. The introduction of zirconium atoms within the porous silicates increased their acid strength from −42 to 115 mV, while the addition of sulfate ions raised this value to 470 mV. The catalytic activity for the dehydration of alcohols yields conversions of up to 70% for ethanol and 30% for methanol.

  2. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of phosphate and silicate ions in river water by using ion-exclusion chromatographic separation and post-column derivatization

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Masuda, Wakako; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of phosphate and silicate ions in river water was examined by using ion-exclusion chromatography and post-column derivatization. Phosphate and silicate ions were separated by the ion-exclusion column packed with a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+-form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) by using ultra pure water as an eluent. After the postcolumn derivatization with molybdate and ascorbic acid, so-called molybdenum-blue, ...

  3. Effects of surface application of dolomitic limestone and calcium-magnesium silicate on soybean and maize in rotation with green manure in a tropical region

    Gustavo Spadotti Amaral Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although lime is currently the material most frequently used to ameliorate soil acidity in Brazil, silicate could efficiently replace this source because of its greater solubility and its greater silicon content, which are beneficial for plant development. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of superficial lime and silicate application on soil chemical attributes as well as on soybean and maize nutrition and grain yields when these crops are grown in rotation with green manure. The experimental design was a complete randomized block with sixteen replicates. Plots were treated with one of two materials for acidity correction (dolomitic lime and calcium/magnesium silicate or with no soil correction, as a control. Silicate corrected soil acidity and increased exchangeable base levels in soil at greater depths faster than does liming. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased N, Ca and Mg leaf concentrations, and all yield components and grain yield in soybean; but in maize, just silicate also increased N and Si when compared with lime, whereas both acidity-correcting increased just two yield components: grains per ear and mass of 100 grains, resulting in highest grain yield. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased dry matter production of green manures, but for pigeon pea the silicate provided the best result in this dry-winter region.

  4. REM-containing silicate concentrates

    Pavlov, V. F.; Shabanova, O. V.; Pavlov, I. V.; Pavlov, M. V.; Shabanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    A new method of advanced complex processing of ores containing rare-earth elements (REE) is proposed to obtain porous X-ray amorphous aluminosilicate material with a stable chemical composition which concentrates oxides of rare-earth metals (REM). The ferromanganese oxide ores of Chuktukon deposit (Krasnoyarsk Region, RF) were used for the experiment. The obtained aluminosilicate material is appropriate for treatment with 5 - 15% solutions of mineral acids to leach REM.

  5. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  6. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-03-01

    II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  7. Dielectric properties of plasma sprayed silicates

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Neufuss, Karel; Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel

    -, č. 31 (2005), s. 315-321. ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Optical microscopy * electric al properties * silicates * insulators * plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2005

  8. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  9. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium...

  10. Dysprosium (III)-doped novel silicate glasses

    Stara-Janakova, S.; Spirková, J.; Míka, M.; Oswald, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2009), s. 79-84. ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : dysprosium silicate glass Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.728, year: 2009 www.elsevier.com/locate/optmat

  11. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ; TEREZA BĚLOUBKOVÁ; ZUZANA MIZEROVÁ; LUDVÍK ŠANDA; ZUZANA CÍLOVÁ; MARKÉTA ČASTORÁLOVÁ; ALEŠ HELEBRANT

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings cont...

  12. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Katarina Simon; Davorin Matanović

    2004-01-01

    The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact ...

  13. The importance of the Maillard-metal complexes and their silicates in astrobiology

    Liesch, Patrick J.; Kolb, Vera M.

    2007-09-01

    The Maillard reaction occurs when sugars and amino acids are mixed together in the solid state or in the aqueous solution. Since both amino acids and sugar-like compounds are found on meteorites, we hypothesized that they would also undergo the Maillard reaction. Our recent work supports this idea. We have shown previously that the water-insoluble Maillard products have substantial similarities with the insoluble organic materials from the meteorites. The Maillard organic materials are also part of the desert varnish on Earth, which is a dark, shiny, hard rock coating that contains iron and manganese and is glazed in silicate. Rocks that are similar in appearance to the desert varnish have been observed on the Martian surface. They may also contain the organic materials. We have undertaken study of the interactions between the Maillard products, iron and other metals, and silicates, to elucidate the role of the Maillard products in the chemistry of desert varnish and meteorites. Specifically, we have synthesized a series of the Maillard-metal complexes, and have tested their reactivity towards silicates. We have studied the properties of these Maillard-metal-silicate products by the IR spectroscopy. The astrobiological potential of the Maillard-metal complexes is assessed.

  14. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  15. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  16. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. Selectivity modification by ion memory of magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate as inorganic sorbents

    Synthetic magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate as inorganic ion exchange materials with the formula MgSi5.59O12.18.5.93H2O and MgAl2.32Si5.2O14.88.18.23H2O, respectively, have been found to be suitable for the removal of Cs+, Co2+ and Eu3+ ions with the selectivity sequence Eu3+ > Co2+ > Cs+. Samples of Cs-, Co- and Eu-loaded were prepared and thermally treated at 850 deg. C in a furnace for the creation of specific cavity. Surface area, IR and X-ray diffraction patterns of the products were conducted. Surface area values of OMS, OMAS, TMS, TMAS, ETMS and ETMAS were measured and indicated an increasing in the surface area values for the TMS and TMAS samples and decreasing in the ETMS and ETMAS samples. Desorption studies in nitric acid medium were carried out and reloading of the eluted solids with the studied cations were conduced and the data show an ion memory behaviour for the eluted solids. Finally, the rate of Cs+ ion sorption on OMS, OMAS, ETMS and ETMAS was studied. The diffusion coefficients calculated indicated that the diffusion of Cs+ ion is high for the ETMS and ETMAS samples compared to the OMS and OMAS samples

  18. Development of naturally occurring siliceous material for the preferential removal of thorium from U-Th from aquatic environment

    During this work highly particle reactive nature of thorium was exploited for the separation of Th from aquatic stream containing U/Th. The Kd value of Th(IV) ions is 106 which is two order of magnitude higher than uranium (IV and VI). Laboratory simulated experiments were conducted to study the preferential removal of thorium by using siliceous material having particle size of about 2,000 μm. Siliceous material was prepared by decomposing the organic layer on soil particles by giving treatment with HNO3 and H2O2. Experimental solutions were generated by spiking the surface water with Th (NO3)4 and UO2(NO3)2. Experimental results shows preferential uptake of Th compared to U by siliceous material. This association is further improved by coating the siliceous material with high and low molecular weight organic materials i.e. humic and fulvic acid, respectively. Characterization of the organic material was done by ATR-FTIR whereas determination of Th was done by ICP-OES and alpha spectrometry. Experimental results clearly showed that Th and U sorption capacity is 1 and 0.3 μg mg-1 (w/w), respectively, in case of siliceous material. Thorium sorption is increased five and eight times in the case of coating with fulvic acid and humic acid, respectively. Whereas the same does not shows any pronounced impact on sorption of uranium. (author)

  19. Silicate fertilization of tropical soils: silicon availability and recovery index of sugarcane

    Mônica Sartori de Camargo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is considered a Si-accumulating plant, but in Brazil, where several soil types are used for cultivation, there is little information about silicon (Si fertilization. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the silicon availability, uptake and recovery index of Si from the applied silicate on tropical soils with and without silicate fertilization, in three crops. The experiments in pots (100 L were performed with specific Si rates (0, 185, 370 and 555 kg ha-1 Si, three soils (Quartzipsamment-Q, 6 % clay; Rhodic Hapludox-RH, 22 % clay; and Rhodic Acrudox-RA, 68 % clay, with four replications. The silicon source was Ca-Mg silicate. The same Ca and Mg quantities were applied to all pots, with lime and/or MgCl2, when necessary. Sugarcane was harvested in the plant cane and first- and second-ratoon crops. The silicon rates increased soil Si availability and Si uptake by sugarcane and had a strong residual effect. The contents of soluble Si were reduced by harvesting and increased with silicate application in the following decreasing order: Q>RH>RA. The silicate rates promoted an increase in soluble Si-acetic acid at harvest for all crops and in all soils, except RA. The amounts of Si-CaCl2 were not influenced by silicate in the ratoon crops. The plant Si uptake increased according to the Si rates and was highest in RA at all harvests. The recovery index of applied Si (RI of sugarcane increased over time, and was highest in RA.

  20. Silicate weathering and CO2 consumption within agricultural landscapes, the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin, USA

    Fortner, S. K.; Lyons, W. B.; Carey, A. E.; Shipitalo, M. J.; Welch, S. A.; Welch, K. A.

    2012-03-01

    Myriad studies have shown the extent of human alteration to global biogeochemical cycles. Yet, there is only a limited understanding of the influence that humans have over silicate weathering fluxes; fluxes that have regulated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and global climate over geologic timescales. Natural landscapes have been reshaped into agricultural ones to meet food needs for growing world populations. These processes modify soil properties, alter hydrology, affect erosion, and consequently impact water-soil-rock interactions such as chemical weathering. Dissolved silica (DSi), Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, and total alkalinity were measured in water samples collected from five small (0.0065 to 0.383 km2) gauged watersheds at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) near Coshocton, Ohio, USA. The sampled watersheds in this unglaciated region include: a forested site (70+ year stand), mixed agricultural use (corn, forest, pasture), an unimproved pasture, tilled corn, and a recently (control of dissolved silicate transport. Median DSi yields (2210-3080 kg km-2 yr-1) were similar to the median of annual averages between 1979-2009 for the much larger Ohio-Tennessee River Basin (2560 kg km-2 yr-1). Corn watersheds, which only had surface runoff, had substantially lower DSi yields (fertilizer additions to the corn watershed and from leaf litter decomposition in the forest. This same relation was observed in the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin where dominant landuse types include both agricultural lands receiving nitrogenous fertilizers and forests. Greater gains in DSi with respect to alkalinity losses in the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin than in the NAEW sites suggested that soils derived from younger Pleistocene glacial-till may yield more DSi relative to nitrogenous fertilizer applications than the older NAEW soils. Because silicate weathering occurs via acids released from nitrification, CO2 consumption estimates based on the assumption that silicate

  1. Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces

    Li, Ling; Congiu, Emanuele; Roser, Joe; Swords, Sol; Perets, Hagai B; Lederhendler, Adina; Biham, Ofer; Brucato, John Robert; Pirronello, Valerio; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of functional copolymer/organo-silicate nanoarchitectures through interlamellar complex-radical (coterpolymerization

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The functional copolymers, having a combination of rigid/flexible linkages and an ability of complex-formation with interlayered surface of organo-silicate, and their nanocomposites have been synthesized by interlamellar complex-radical (coterpolymerization of intercalated monomer complexes of maleic anhydride (MA and itaconic acid (IA with dimethyl dodecylamine surface modified montmorillonite (organo-MMT (MA…DMDA-MMT and IA…DMDA-MMT n-butyl methacrylate (BMA and/or BMA/styrene monomer mixtures. The results of nanocomposite structure–composition– property relationship studies indicate that interlamellar complex-formation between anhydride/acid units and surface alkyl amine and rigid/flexible linkage balance in polymer chains are important factors providing the effective intercalation/ exfoliation of the polymer chains into the silicate galleries, the formation of nanostructural hybrids with higher thermal stability, dynamic mechanical behaviour and well dispersed morphology.

  3. Aqueous Dispersions of Silica Stabilized with Oleic Acid Obtained by Green Chemistry

    Cristina Lavinia Nistor; Raluca Ianchis; Marius Ghiurea; Cristian-Andi Nicolae; Catalin-Ilie Spataru; Daniela Cristina Culita; Jeanina Pandele Cusu; Victor Fruth; Florin Oancea; Dan Donescu

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes for the first time the synthesis of silica nanoparticles starting from sodium silicate and oleic acid (OLA). The interactions between OLA and sodium silicate require an optimal OLA/OLANa molar ratio able to generate vesicles that can stabilize silica particles obtained by the sol-gel process of sodium silicate. The optimal molar ratio of OLA/OLANa can be ensured by a proper selection of OLA and respectively of sodium silicate concentration. The titration of sodium ...

  4. Polymer Layered Silicate Nanocomposites: A Review

    Vikas Mittal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to present recent advances in the synthesis and structure characterization as well as the properties of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites. The advent of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites has revolutionized research into polymer composite materials. Nanocomposites are organic-inorganic hybrid materials in which at least one dimension of the filler is less than 100 nm. A number of synthesis routes have been developed in the recent years to prepare these materials, which include intercalation of polymers or pre-polymers from solution, in-situ polymerization, melt intercalation etc. The nanocomposites where the filler platelets can be dispersed in the polymer at the nanometer scale owing to the specific filler surface modifications, exhibit significant improvement in the composite properties, which include enhanced mechanical strength, gas barrier, thermal stability, flame retardancy etc. Only a small amount of filler is generally required for the enhancement in the properties, which helps the composite materials retain transparency and low density.

  5. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  6. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  7. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO4). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  8. Polymorphism in silicate-postperovskite reviewed (Invited)

    Tschauner, O. D.

    2010-12-01

    Early on in the examination of postperovskite(ppv)-type magnesium metasilicate it had been debated if this potential deep mantle mineral can be subject to further structural transformation as function of composition, pressure, and temperature within the range of conditions in the lower mantle. MgSiO3-perovskite accommodates minor elements through local lattice distortions by tilt of the corner-sharing octahedral framework. The CaIrO3-type ppv structure does not seem to possess a similar mechanism of local relaxation of lattice strain. Instead minor elements may rather be accommodated by periodic kinks in this layered structure (1). This kinking-mechanism allows for generating a plethora of polymorphs similar in structure and free energy (1,2). However, the elastic properties of ppv may be strongly affected by this type of structural modification. While structural analogues of silicate-ppv exhibit this type of polymorphism (3,4) previous attempts to examine polymorphism in silicate-ppv remained suggestive (2,5). This is mostly owed to the severe constraints imposed on powder diffraction studies conducted under the extreme conditions of stability of MgSiO3-ppv. Here I present new results on silicate-ppv based on different experimental strategies which shed more light on this complex yet important issue of structural modifications in minor-element bearing silicate-ppv. (1) Oganov et al. Nature 438, 1142 (2005);(2) Tschauner et al. Am. Min. 93, 533 (2008); (3) Shirako et al. Phys. Chem. Min. 36, 455 (2009); Yakovlev et al. J. Sol. Stat. Chem. 182, 1545 (2009) Work supported through NNSA Cooperative Agreement DOE-FC88-01NV14049

  9. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  10. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and am...

  11. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation. PMID

  12. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: pengfei.wang@dit.ie [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic [Light-Matter Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Farrell, Gerald [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  13. Volume of ionic sites in silicate glasses

    Molar volume data of alkali and alkaline earth silicate glasses have been used to calculate the free volume associated with the bridging and nonbridging oxygen and modifier ions. The free volume associated with the bridging oxygen is constant (15.39 x 10-24 cm3) for all modifier ions up to 33.3 mol% modifier oxide. It decreases (in alkali or alkaline earth silicate glasses) with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The nonbridging oxygen ion is associated with a constant free volume (6.50 x 10-24 cm3) in all cases. Modifier ions are associated with free volume that increases with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The used model explores the change in the free volume due to changing the concentration of alkali oxides in mixed alkali silicate glasses. The results show that, in such glasses, the free volume related to a certain type of alkali oxide increases with increasing content

  14. DUSCOBS - a depleted-uranium silicate backfill for transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    A Depleted Uranium Silicate COntainer Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside storage, transport, and repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill all void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (1) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (2) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. In addition, the DUSCOBS improves the integrity of the package by acting as a packing material and ensures criticality control for the package during SNF storage and transport. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments

  15. Sorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution onto magnesium silicate hollow spheres

    The sorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions was investigated using synthesized magnesium silicate hollow spheres as a novel adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of initial pH, amount of adsorbent, contact time and initial U(VI) concentrations on uranium sorption efficiency. The desorbing of U(VI) and the effect of coexisting ions were also investigated. Kinetic studies showed that the sorption followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with the uranium sorption equilibrium data for the concentration range of 25-400 mg/L. The maximum uranium sorption capacity onto magnesium silicate hollow spheres was estimated to be about 107 mg/g under the experimental conditions. Desorption of uranium was achieved using inorganic acid as the desorbing agent. The practical utility of magnesium silicate hollow spheres for U(VI) uptake was investigated with high salt concentration of intercrystalline brine. This work suggests that magnesium silicate hollow spheres can be used as a highly efficient adsorbent for removal of uranium from aqueous solutions. (author)

  16. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from calcium silicates and carbon dioxide

    The possibilities for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the pulp and paper industry by calcium carbonation are presented. The current precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production uses mined, crushed calcium carbonate as raw materials. If calcium silicates were used instead, carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of carbonates would be eliminated. In Finland, there could, thus, be a potential for eliminating 200 kt of carbon dioxide emissions per year, considering only the PCC used in the pulp and paper industry. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility to produce PCC from calcium silicates and the potential to replace calcium carbonate as the raw material was made. Calcium carbonate can be manufactured from calcium silicates by various methods, but only a few have been experimentally verified. The possibility and feasibility of these methods as a replacement for the current PCC production process was studied by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using HSC software and process modelling using Aspen Plus[reg]. The results from the process modelling showed that a process that uses acetic acid for extraction of the calcium ions is a high potential option for sequestering carbon dioxide by mineral carbonation. The main obstacle seems to be the limited availability and relatively high price of wollastonite, which is a mineral with high calcium silicate content. An alternative is to use the more common, but also more complex, basalt rock instead

  17. Effects of surface application of dolomitic limestone and calcium-magnesium silicate on soybean and maize in rotation with green manure in a tropical region

    2015-01-01

    Although lime is currently the material most frequently used to ameliorate soil acidity in Brazil, silicate could efficiently replace this source because of its greater solubility and its greater silicon content, which are beneficial for plant development. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of superficial lime and silicate application on soil chemical attributes as well as on soybean and maize nutrition and grain yields when these crops are grown in rotation with green manure. The exper...

  18. An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones

    Dolph, Brittany Helen

    Culturally significant monuments made of weathered siliceous stone often display sub-surface condition issues such as cracks and voids. These issues require grouts that are ideally compatible with the composition and properties of the substrate. Based on the successful application of ethyl silicates as consolidants in recent literature, this study examines possible formulation pathways for the development of a grout incorporating ethyl silicate. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL) as a catalyst, silicone oil (PDMS), various grades of ground quartz, sepiolite, and hollow glass spheres were used in differing concentrations to create samples. These were visually and physically assessed on workability, separation, shrinkage, cracking, strength, and flexibility. Quantitative analysis was performed on selected formulations using UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy in coordination with a weight loss experiment to investigate kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Successful formulations tended to include oligomeric TEOS, crushed quartz of mixed grades, sepiolite powder, and PDMS, and show promise for future investigations.

  19. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Maria Fernanda Cruz; Fabrício Ávila Rodrigues; Ana Paula Cardoso Diniz; Maurilio Alves Moreira; Everaldo Gonçalves de Barros

    2013-01-01

    The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS) and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS) on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection ...

  20. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    Discussed are acid rain control options available to the electric utility industry. They include coal switching, flue gas desulfurization, and such emerging lower cost technologies as Limestone Injection Multistage Burners (LIMB) and Advanced Silicate (ADVACATE), both developed ...

  1. Redox control of sulfur degassing in silicic magmas

    Scaillet, Bruno; Clémente, Béatrice; Evans, Bernard W.; Pichavant, Michel

    1998-01-01

    International audience Explosive eruptions involve mainly silicic magmas in which sulfur solubility and diffusivity are low. This inhibits sulfur exsolution during magma uprise as compared to more mafic magmas such as basalts. Silicic magmas can nevertheless liberate large quantities of sulfur as shown by the monitoring of SO2 in recent explosive silicic eruptions in arc settings, which invariably have displayed an excess of sulfur relative to that calculated from melt degassing. If this e...

  2. Silicate Removal in Aluminum Hydroxide Co-Precipitation Process

    Chiharu Tokoro; Shinya Suzuki; Daisuke Haraguchi; Sayaka Izawa

    2014-01-01

    The removal mechanisms of silicate using an aluminum hydroxide co-precipitation process was investigated and compared with an adsorption process, in order to establish an effective and validated method for silicate removal from wastewater. Adsorption isotherms, XRD and FT-IR analyses showed that silicate uptake occurred by adsorption to boehmite for initial Si/Al molar ratios smaller than two, but by precipitation of poorly crystalline kaolinite for the ratios larger than two, in both co-pre...

  3. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  4. High-pressure rare earth silicates: Lanthanum silicate with barium phosphate structure, holmium silicate apatite, and lutetium disilicate type X

    The phase relations of a wide selection of rare earth disilicates have been investigated up to 10 GPa and 1700 deg. C using piston cylinder and multi-anvil equipment. Single-crystal X-ray structures have been obtained for the following high-pressure phases: (1) La2.67(SiO4)2: monoclinic, space group C2/m, Z=2, a=9.419(2), b=5.445(1), c=7.214(1) A, β=115.71(3)o, R=0.042; disordered Ba3(PO4)2 structure type, with 3xb and 7xb superstructures identified. (2) Ho8.67(SiO4)6(OH)2: hexagonal, P63/m, Z=1, a=9.3221(4), c=6.7347(2) A, R=0.026; silicate hydroxyapatite. (3) Lu2Si2O7: tetragonal, P41212, Z=4, a=6.5620(2), c=11.9535(4) A, R=0.023; type X diorthosilicate structure, and the silicate analogue of tetragonal Er2Ge2O7

  5. EXAFS studies of silicate glasses containing uranium

    Sodium silicate glasses containing hexavalent uranium ions have been studied using the EXAFS technique. The U6+ ions appear in the uranyl configuration with two oxygen atoms at 1.85 A and four to five at 2.2-2.3 A. In the glasses (0.25Na2O.0.75SiO2)sub(1-x)(UO3)sub(x) with x = 0.02 to x = 0.1, planar (or nearly planar) uranium containing clusters, with U-U distances of 3.3 A, are observed. A layered model is proposed to describe these glasses. (Auth.)

  6. Tribo-exoemission from some silicate materials

    The tribo-exoemission from some minerals has been investigated in view of applications in the porcelain industries. Milling and sample preparation were performed under defined (liquid and solvent free) conditions. Quartz and the members of the alumo-silicate family feldspar, kaolin, and pegmatite are characterised by a strongly overlapped TSEE-peak between 1000C and 2000C, growing strongly with the mechanical dispersion of the powders. Thermal (TSEE) as well as optical (OSEE) stimulation reveal pegmatite as the strongest emitter with a very low fading of the tribo-signal at room temperature. (author)

  7. Tribo-exoemission from some silicate materials

    Holzapfel, G.; Lesz, J.; Otto, W. (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-01-01

    The tribo-exoemission from some minerals has been investigated in view of applications in the porcelain industries. Milling and sample preparation were performed under defined (liquid and solvent free) conditions. Quartz and the members of the alumo-silicate family feldspar, kaolin, and pegmatite are characterised by a strongly overlapped TSEE-peak between 100/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/C, growing strongly with the mechanical dispersion of the powders. Thermal (TSEE) as well as optical (OSEE) stimulation reveal pegmatite as the strongest emitter with a very low fading of the tribo-signal at room temperature.

  8. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.)

  9. Submarine silicic volcanism: Processes and products

    Kalangutkar, N.G.; Iyer, S.D.

    version: Geo-Spect. Interface, vol.6(1); 2012; 30-39 Submarine Silicic Volcanism Niyati G. Kalangutkar* and Sridhar D. Iyer National Institute of Oceanography (CSIR), Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India. * Corresponding author. Tel.: +91 832 2450 244; Fax... Nodules (PMN 2005); Regional Research Laboratory, Bhubaneswar, Orissa; India; 29-30 Sep 2005), 19-21. IYER, S. D., SHYAM PRASAD, M., GUPTA, S. M. and CHARAN, S. N. (1997) Evidence for recent hydrothermal activity in the Central Indian Basin. Deep...

  10. Immobilization of Papain on Siliceous Mesocellular Foam

    ZOU Ze-Chang,WEI Qi,NA Wei,SUN Hui,NIE Zuo-Ren

    2009-01-01

    Siliceous mesocellular foam (MCF) was employed as carriers in the immobilization of papain, and the properties and the stabilities of the immobilized enzyme were investigated in detail. The results show that the amount of papain immobilized on MCF material reaches 334 mg/g MCF. The optimal pH and reaction temperature of the immobilized papain are 7.5 and 50¡䪠respectively. The Michaelis constant (Km) of immobilized papain is disclosed as 6.99¡�0-3mol/L by the Lineweaver-Burk plot at 37¡䬠The im...

  11. Silicate emissions in active galaxies - From LINERs to QSOs

    Sturm, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Lutz, D.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Lehnert, M. D.; Tacconi, L.J.; Veilleux, S.; Rupke, D. S.; Kim, D. -C.; Sternberg, A; Maoz, D.; Lord, S.; Mazzarella, J.; Sanders, D. B.

    2005-01-01

    We report the first detection of ~10 and ~18 micron silicate dust emissions in a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), obtained in Spitzer-IRS 7-37 micron spectroscopy of the Type 1 LINER galaxy NGC3998. Silicate emissions in AGN have only recently been detected in several quasars. Our detection counters suggestions that silicate emissions are present only in the most luminous AGN. The silicate features may be signatures of a dusty ``obscuring torus'' viewed face-on as postulated for ...

  12. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  13. Location of silicic caldera formation in arc settings

    Hughes, Gwyneth R; Mahood, Gail A [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra, Mall, Building 320, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Silicic calderas are the surface expressions of silicic magma chambers, and thus their study may yield information about what tectonic and crustal features favor the generation of evolved magma. The goal of this study is to determine whether silicic calderas in arc settings are preferentially located behind the volcanic front. After a global analysis of young, arc-related calderas, we find that silicic calderas at continental margins do form over a wide area behind the front, as compared to other types of arc volcanoes.

  14. Mechanical loss associated with silicate bonding of fused silica

    We report on mechanical loss associated with hydroxy-catalysis (or 'silicate') bonding between fused silica substrates in the presence of potassium hydroxide or sodium silicate. We measured the mechanical quality factor of three fused silica samples, each composed of two half-rods bonded together on their flat surfaces and compared them to that of an unbonded half-rod. The measurements show a significant reduction of quality factor due to mechanical loss associated with the silicate bonds. We calculate the loss factor of the bonded region φbond and estimate that the effect of silicate bonding on thermal noise in the Advanced LIGO interferometers will be small

  15. Simple preparation and initial characterization of semi-amorphous hollow calcium silicate hydrate nanoparticles by ammonia-hydrothermal-template techniques

    Semi-amorphous hollow calcium silicate hydrate nanoparticles (CS10d120Hac) were successfully synthesized via simple ammonia-hydrothermal-template approach (AHT) followed by acid treatment. Results revealed that the newly synthesized samples had homogenous hollow nano-interior wherein the shell wall contained semi-amorphous calcium silicate hydrate. The AHT intensified the formation of a stronger electrostatic interaction (Si–O–Ca) from the weaker electrostatic contact composed of silicate wall-calcium hydroxide interaction (Si–OH–Ca) forming a thin semi-amorphous calcium silicate hydrate shell wall. This is also a convenient way for structural stability of the hollow CS10d120Hac. The CS10d120Hac showed a relatively higher surface area, which is uniquely rare especially if compared with bulk calcium silicate particles. This CS10d120Hac can be selectively functionalized with multiple organic and inorganic groups. Hence, this work may open a new route for the formation of hybrid hollow bio-active particles.

  16. Enhanced dissolution of silicate minerals by bacteria at near-neutral pH.

    Vandevivere, P; Welch, S A; Ullman, W J; Kirchman, D L

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that various microorganisms can enhance the dissolution of silicate minerals at low (8) pH. However, it was not known if they can have an effect at near-neutral pH. Almost half of 17 isolates examined in this study stimulated bytownite dissolution at near-neutral pH while in a resting state in buffered glucose. Most of the isolates found to stimulate dissolution also oxidized glucose to gluconic acid. More detailed analysis with one of these isolates suggested that this partial oxidation was the predominant, if not sole, mechanism of enhanced dissolution. Enhanced dissolution did not require direct contact between the dissolving mineral and the bacteria. Gluconate-promoted dissolution was also observed with other silicate minerals such as albite, quartz, and kaolinite. PMID:24190338

  17. SPM nanolithography of hydroxy-silicates

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is becoming a crucial technique with applications ranging from molecular and cell biology to medicine. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is one of the most useful tools for nanopatterning of flat surfaces. However, these patterns are usually built on homogeneous surfaces and require chemical functionalization to ensure specific affinity. Layered magnesium–aluminum hydroxide–silicates have already shown unique self-assembly properties on DNA molecules, due to their peculiar crystal chemistry based on alternating positive and negative crystal layers. However, patterns on these surfaces tend to be randomly organized. Here we show etching and oxidation at the nanometer scale of magnesium–aluminum hydroxide–silicates using the same SPM probe for the creation of organized nanopatterns. In particular, it is possible to produce three-dimensional structures in a reproducible way, with a depth resolution of 0.4 nm, lateral resolution of tens of nm, and a speed of about 10 μm s−1. We report, as an example, the construction of an atomically flat charged pattern, designed to guide DNA deposition along predetermined directions without the need of any chemical functionalization of the surface. (paper)

  18. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  19. Chapter 2 Anion Sorption Topology on Hematite: Comparison of Arsenate and Silicate

    Arsenate and silicate are tetrahedral anions that strongly sorb to positive Fe oxide surfaces over the pH range 2-7. Both are important agents for modification of Fe oxide surface reactivity, and notably passivate against other sorption reactions. Arsenate is a significant health hazard as a sorbed pollutant associated with acid mine drainage, while silicate is a common anion in natural solutions. Our aim is to understand the types of sorption complexes that form with these anions on different crystal faces, and whether polymerization occurs with the silicate units. Silicate polymerization could dramatically alter Fe oxide surface reactivity. The structural characterization is conducted using both grazing incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GIEXAFS) at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), and surface diffraction (using crystal truncation rod (CTR) analysis) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). GIEXAFS yields interatomic distances from arsenic and silicon to their oxygen first neighbor shell and second Fe or other next neighbor shell, and thus allows identification of the local geometry of sorption. Polarized X-ray fine structure spectroscopy further allows determination of the orientation and density of the complexes on the various Fe surface planes. However, this information is incomplete as any response of the surface to sorption is not revealed, and hydrogen bonding and water molecule arrangement at the surface can be changed due to the sorption process. To access these we use CTR experiments and compare the results with samples without sorbed anions. GIEXAFS results for both hematite (0 0 0 1) and (1(bar 1)02) planes show arsenate sorbed in two ways: bidentate binuclear and bidentate mononuclear. Most of the latter type of sorption geometry appears to be present on surface step edges on the (1(bar 1)02) surface, while there is little or no such attachment to the (1(bar 1)02) surface

  20. Self-assembly of natural light-harvesting bacteriochlorophylls of green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria in silicate capsules as stable models of chlorosomes.

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Akai, Sho; Miyatake, Tomohiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Naturally occurring bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)s-c, -d, and -e from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria were self-assembled in an aqueous solution in the presence of octadecyltriethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane, followed by polycondensation of the alkoxysilanes by incubation for 50 h at 25 degrees C. The resulting BChl self-assemblies in silicate capsules exhibited visible absorption and circular dichroism spectra similar to the corresponding natural light-harvesting systems (chlorosomes) of green sulfur bacteria. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicated that the silicate capsules had an average hydrodynamic diameter of several hundred nanometers. BChl self-aggregates in silicate capsules were significantly stable to a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, which was apt to decompose the BChl aggregates to their monomeric form, compared with conventional micelle systems. BChls in silicate capsules were more tolerant to demetalation of the central magnesium under acidic conditions than the natural systems. PMID:16848406

  1. Spectral properties of porphyrins in the systems with layered silicates

    This work is focused on investigation of hybrid materials based on layered silicates, representing host inorganic component, and porphyrin dyes as organic guest. Aqueous colloidal dispersions, as well as thin solid films of layered silicate/porphyrin systems were studied. Modification of photophysical properties, such as absorption and fluorescence of molecules, adsorbed or incorporated in layered silicate hosts, were studied mainly to spread the knowledge about the environments suitable for incorporating aromatic compounds, providing photoactive properties of potential technological interest. TMPyP cations interact with the surfaces of layered silicates via electrostatic interactions. The extent of dye adsorption on colloidal particles of the silicates is influenced by the CEC values and swelling ability of silicates. Interaction of porphyrins with layered silicate hosts leads to significant changes of dye spectral properties. One of the key parameters that has a crucial impact on this interaction is the layer charge of silicate template. Other factors influence the resulting spectral properties of hybrid systems, such as the method of hybrid material preparation, the material's type (colloid, film), and the modification of the silicate host. Molecular orientation studies using linearly-polarized spectroscopies in VIS and IR regions revealed that TMPyP molecules were oriented in almost parallel fashion with respect to the silicate surface plane. Slightly higher values of the orientation angle of TMPyP transition moment were observed for the TMPyP/FHT system. Thus, flattening of the guest TMPyP molecules is the next important factor (mainly in the systems with lower layer charge), influencing its spectral properties upon the interaction with layered silicates. Fluorescence was effectively quenched in the systems based on solid films prepared from the high concentration of the dye (10-3 mol.dm-3). The quenching is most probably related to the structure of the

  2. Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Amorphous Silicates Under Interstellar Conditions

    Perets, H B; Biham, O; Vidali, G; Li, L; Swords, S; Congiu, E; Roser, J; Manico, G; Brucato, J R; Pirronello, V; Perets, Hagai B.; Lederhendler, Adina; Biham, Ofer; Vidali, Gianfranco; Li, Ling; Swords, Sol; Congiu, Emanuele; Roser, Joe; Manico, Giulio; Brucato, John Robert; Pirronello, Valerio

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented for the first time and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained earlier for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. These barriers are used in order to evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation within a temperature range which is relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds (but not to photo-dissociation regions, where grain temperatures are higher). The results also indicate that the hydrogen molecules are thermalized with the surface and desorb with low kinetic energy. Thus, they are unlikely to occupy highly excited states.

  3. Low-Temperature Crystallization of Amorphous Silicate in Astrophysical Environments

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reaction...

  4. Silicate weathering and CO2 consumption within agricultural landscapes, the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin, USA

    S. A. Welch

    2011-09-01

    alkalinity losses in the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin than in the NAEW sites suggested that soils derived from younger Pleistocene glacial-till may yield more DSi relative to nitrogenous fertilizer applications than the older NAEW soils. Because silicate weathering occurs via acids released from nitrification, CO2 consumption estimates based on the assumption that silicate weathers via carbonic-acid alone may be especially over-estimated in fertilized agricultural watersheds with little baseflow (i.e. 67% overestimated in the corn till watershed. CO2 consumption estimates based on silicate weathering may be as much as an average of 8% lower than estimates derived from carbonic acid weathering alone for the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin between 1979–2009.

  5. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  6. Kinetics of iron oxidation in silicate melts

    High-temperature XANES experiments at the Fe K-edge have been used to study the kinetics of iron oxidation in a supercooled melt of Fe-bearing pyroxene composition. These experiments, made just above the glass transition between 600 and 700 deg C, show that variations in relative abundances of ferric and ferrous iron can be determined in situ at such temperatures. The kinetics of iron oxidation do not vary much with temperature down to the glass transition. This suggests that rate-limiting factor in this process is not oxygen diffusion, which is coupled to relaxation of the silicate network, but diffusion of network modifying cations along with a counter flux of electrons. To give a firmer basis to redox determinations made from XANES spectroscopy, the redox state of a series of a samples was first determined from wet chemical, Moessbauer spectroscopy and electron microprobe analyses. (authors)

  7. Ion-implantation damage in silicate glasses

    Arnold, G. W.

    Ion implantation is a rapid technique for simulating damage induced by alpha recoil nuclei in nuclear waste forms. The simulation has been found to be quite good in TEM comparisons with natural alpha decay damage in minerals, but leach rate differences have been observed in glass studies and were attributed to dose rate differences. The similarities between ion implantation and recoil nuclei as a means of producing damage suggest that insights into the long term behavior of glass waste forms can be obtained by examination of what is known about ion implantation damage in silicate glasses. This paper briefly reviews these effects and shows that leaching results in certain nuclear waste glasses can be understood as resulting from plastic flow and track overlap. Phase separation is also seen to be a possible consequence of damage induced compositional changes.

  8. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg Kα irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  9. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  10. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na2O-B2O3-SiO2-FeO and Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe3+/ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO4 species in the glass network whereas the BO3 and BO4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO3 and BO4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  11. Interstellar Silicate Dust in the z=0.89 Absorber Towards PKS 1830-211: Crystalline Silicates at High Redshift?

    Aller, Monique C; York, Donald G; Vladilo, Giovanni; Welty, Daniel E; Som, Debopam

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence of a >10-sigma detection of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of tau_10=0.27+/-0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources wit...

  12. Method of chemical analysis of silicate rocks (1962)

    A rapid method of analysis for the physical and chemical determination of the major constituents of silicate rocks is described. Water losses at 100 deg. C and losses of volatile elements at 1000 deg. C are estimated after staying in oven for these temperatures, or by mean of a thermo-balance. The determination of silica is made by a double insolubilization with hydrochloric acid on attack solution with sodium carbonate; total iron and aluminium, both with calcium and magnesium, after ammoniacal precipitation of Fe and Al, are determined on the filtration product of silica by titrimetry-photometry of their complexes with EDTA. The alkalis Na and K by flame spectrophotometry, Mn by colorimetry of the permanganate, and Ti by mean of his complex with H2O2, are determined on fluosulfuric attack solution. Phosphorus is determined by his complex with 'molybdenum blue' on a fluoro-nitro-boric attack solution; iron is estimated by potentiometry, with the help of bichromate on hydrofluoric solution. (author)

  13. Facile preparation of apatite-type lanthanum silicate by a new water-based sol–gel process

    Yamagata, Chieko, E-mail: yamagata@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – CCTM (Centro de Ciência e Tecnologia de Materiais), São Paulo (Brazil); Elias, Daniel R.; Paiva, Mayara R.S.; Misso, Agatha M.; Castanho, Sonia R.H. Mello [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – CCTM (Centro de Ciência e Tecnologia de Materiais), São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► We use a Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} waste solution as source of Si. ► We present a simple, rapid and low temperature method of lanthanum silicate apatite preparation. ► TEOS, a high cost reagent, was successfully substituted by a cheap price Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, to obtain pure La{sub 9.56}(SiO{sub 4})6O{sub 2.33} lanthanum silicate apatite. - Abstract: In recent years, apatite-type lanthanum silicates ([Ln{sub 10−x}(XO{sub 4})6O{sub 3–1.5x}] (X = Si or Ge)) have been studied for use in SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells), at low temperature (600–800 °C), due to its ionic conductivity which is higher than that of YSZ (Yttrium Stabilized Zirconia) electrolyte. For this reason they are very promising materials as solid electrolyte for SOFCs. Synthesis of functional nanoparticles is a challenge in the nanotechnology. In this work, apatite-type lanthanum silicate nanoparticles were synthesized by a water-based sol–gel process, i.e., sol–gel technique followed by chemical precipitation of lanthanum hydroxide on the gel of the silica. Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} waste solution was used as silica source. Spherical aerogel silica was prepared by acid catalyzed reaction, followed by precipitation of lanthanum hydroxide to obtain the precursor of apatite-type lanthanum silicate. Powders of apatite-type lanthanum silicate achieved from the precursor were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and specific surface area measurements (BET). The apatite phase was formed at 900 °C.

  14. Behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution

    LI Xiao-bin; ZHAO Zhuo; LIU Gui-hua; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; PENG Zhi-hong

    2005-01-01

    Using calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate as starting materials, two kinds of calcium silicate hydrates, CaO · SiO2 · H2O and 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2O, were hydro-thermally synthesized at 120 ℃. The reaction rule of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution was investigated. The result shows that CaO · SiO2 · H2O is more stable than 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2 O in aluminate solution and its stability increases with the increase of reaction temperature but decreases with the increase of caustic concentration. The reaction between calcium silicate hydrate and aluminate solution is mainly through two routes. In the first case, Al replaces partial Si in calcium silicate hydrate, meanwhile 3CaO · Al2 O3 · xSiO2 · (6-2x) H2 O (hydro-garnet) is formed and some SiO2 enters the solution. In the second case, calcium silicate hydrate can react directly with aluminate solution, forming hydro-garnet and Na2O · Al2O3 · 2SiO2 · nH2O (DSP). The desilication reaction of aluminate solution containing silicate could contribute partially to forming DSP.

  15. Phosphorus availability in oxidic soils treated with lime and silicate applications

    Aline da Silva Sandim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that silicate application can raise soil P availability for crops, the aim of this research was to compare the effect of silicate application on soil P desorption with that of liming, in evaluations based on two extractors and plant growth. The experiment was carried out in randomized blocks with four replications, in a 3 × 3 × 5 factorial design, in which three soil types, three P rates, and four soil acidity correctives were evaluated in 180 experimental plots. Trials were performed in a greenhouse using corn plants in 20-dm³ pots. Three P rates (0, 50 and 150 mg dm-3 were applied in the form of powder triple superphosphate and the soil was incubated for 90 days. After this period, soil samples were collected for routine chemical analysis and P content determination by the extraction methods resin, Mehlich-1 and remaining P. Based on the results, acidity correctives were applied at rates calculated for base saturation increased to 70 %, with subsequent incubation for 60 more days, when P content was determined again. The acidity correctives consisted of: dolomitic lime, steelmaking slag, ladle furnace slag, and wollastonite. Therefore, our results showed that slags raised the soil P content more than lime, suggesting a positive correlation between P and Si in soil. Silicon did not affect the extractor choice since both Mehlich-1 and resin had the same behavior regarding extracted P when silicon was applied to the soil. For all evaluated plant parameters, there was significant interaction between P rates and correctives; highest values were obtained with silicate.

  16. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    叶大年; 马哲生; 赫伟; 李哲; 施倪承; D.Pushcharovsky

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-0 and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures. Therefore, those silicates may be named titano-and zircono-silicates. Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra, the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet, respectively. As a new concept, the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  17. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  18. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  19. Silicate weathering and CO2 consumption within agricultural landscapes, the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin, USA

    K. A. Welch

    2012-03-01

    respect to alkalinity losses in the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin than in the NAEW sites suggested that soils derived from younger Pleistocene glacial-till may yield more DSi relative to nitrogenous fertilizer applications than the older NAEW soils. Because silicate weathering occurs via acids released from nitrification, CO2 consumption estimates based on the assumption that silicate weathers via carbonic acid alone may be especially over-estimated in fertilized agricultural watersheds with little baseflow (i.e. 67 % overestimated in the corn till watershed. CO2 consumption estimates based on silicate weathering may be as much as 20 % lower than estimates derived from carbonic acid weathering alone for the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin between 1979–2009. Globally, this may mean that younger landscapes with soils favorable for agriculture are susceptible to fertilizer-enhanced silicate weathering. Increases in silicate weathering, however, may be offset by shifts in hydrology resulting from agricultural land management practices or even from soil silica losses in response to repeated acidification.

  20. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg2SiO4 and Fe2SiO4, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H2 formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg2SiO4 and Fe2SiO4 described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  1. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  2. OPTIMAL METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF SILICATE ROCK SAMPLES FOR ANALYTICAL PURPOSES

    Maja Vrkljan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine an optimal dissolution method for silicate rock samples for further analytical purposes. Analytical FAAS method of determining cobalt, chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc content in gabbro sample and geochemical standard AGV-1 has been applied for verification. Dissolution in mixtures of various inorganic acids has been tested, as well as Na2CO3 fusion technique. The results obtained by different methods have been compared and dissolution in the mixture of HNO3 + HF has been recommended as optimal.

  3. Studies on Thermal Degradation Behavior of Siliceous Agriculture Waste (Rice Husk, Wheat Husk and Bagasse)

    Javed Syed H.; Aslam Umair; Kazmi Mohsin; Rustam Masooma; Riaz Sheema; Munir Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Various siliceous agriculture waste (SAW) such as rice husk, wheat husk and bagasse have been investigated to study their thermal degradation behavior using Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) technique. The focus of this research is to conduct TGA of raw and acid treated (20% HCl & 1M H2SO4) SAW at heating rate 10°C/min in the atmosphere of nitrogen. The results were analyzed on the basis of thermograms and it was inferred that 24 hours soaking with 20% HCl prior to thermal degradation enhanced...

  4. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  5. The di- and tricalcium silicate dissolutions

    In this study, a specially designed reactor connected to an ICP spectrometer enabled the careful determination of the dissolution rates of C3S, C2S and CaO, respectively, over a broad range of concentration of calcium and silicates under conditions devoid of C–S–H. The kinetic laws, bridging the dissolution rates and the undersaturations, were obtained after extrapolation of rate zero allowing the estimation of the true experimental solubility products of C3S (Ksp = 9.6 · 10−23), C2S (Ksp = 4.3 · 10−18) and CaO (Ksp = 9.17 · 10−6). The latter are then compared to the solubilities calculated from the enthalpies of formation. We propose that the observed deviations result from the protonation of the unsaturated oxygen atoms present at the surface of these minerals. Hydration rates measured in cement pastes or in C3S pastes are in excellent agreement with the kinetic law found in this study for C3S under conditions undersaturated with respect to C–S–H

  6. Immobilization of active concrete debris using soluble sodium silicates

    Demolition of biological shields will generate large quantities of active concrete debris. Sodium silicate solutions have already been shown capable of immobilizing such debris in a pellet form; this new study investigates debris immobilization via a silicate solution/debris slurry. A study of the physical and chemical properties of demolition debris has been undertaken. Laboratory scale trials have shown that only the finer (''less than''5mm) debris fractions set satisfactorily when mixed with a sodium silicate solution. Debris from ordinary portland cement concrete set more quickly than that containing a 30% pulverized fuel ash cement replacement. The particle size of the debris is a major factor in the setting process, but chemical interactions are also significant. A ratio of 1.2:1 debris:sodium silicate solution (SiO2/Na2O = 3.30), produced an optimum mix. A brief study of the logistics of a full scale process plant has also been made. (author)

  7. Properties of sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating

    Wang Jina; Fan Zitian; Zan Xiaolei; Pan Di

    2009-01-01

    The sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating has many advantages,such as low sodium silicate adding quantity,fast hardening speed,high room temperature strength,good collapsibility and certain surface stability. However,it has big moisture absorbability in the air,which would lead to the compression strength and the surface stability of the sand molds being sharply reduced. In this study,the moisture absorbability of the sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating in different humidity conditions and the effect factors were investigated. Meanwhile,the reasons for the big moisture absorbability of the sand were analyzed.Some measures to overcome the problems of high moisture absorbability,bad surface stability and sharply reducing strength in the air were discussed. The results of this study establish the foundation of green and clean foundry technology based on the microwave heating hardening sodium silicate sand process.

  8. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine.

  9. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    Hoang, Thiem; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when those small grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing the dipole moment per atom ($\\beta$) and can reach $P\\sim 20\\%$ for $\\beta\\sim 0.1$D at grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space $(\\beta,Y_{Si})$ for silicate nanoparticles in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the ob...

  10. Study of thermal effects of silicate-containing hydroxyapatites

    Golovanova, O. A.; Zaits, A. V.; Berdinskaya, N. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of modifications of hydroxyapatite silicate ions, from the extracellular fluid prototype solution under near-physiological conditions has been studied. Formation of silicon-structured hydroxyapatite with different extent of substitution of phosphate groups in the silicate group has been established through chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained are in agreement and suggest the possibility of substitution of phosphate groups for silicate groups in the hydroxyapatite structure when introducing different sources of silica, tetraethoxysilane and sodium silicate, in the reaction mixture. Growth in the amount of silicon in Si-HA results in the increase in the thermal stability of the samples. The greatest mass loss occurs at temperatures in the range of 25-400 0C that is caused by the removal of the crystallization and adsorption water and volatile impurities. It is shown that the modified apatites are of imperfect structure and crystallize in a nanocrystalline state.

  11. Evaluation of Three Chitin Metal Silicate Co-Precipitates as a Potential Multifunctional Single Excipient in Tablet Formulations

    Rana Al-Shaikh Hamid; Faisal Al-Akayleh; Mohammad Shubair; Iyad Rashid; Mayyas Al Remawi; Adnan Badwan

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the novel chitin metal silicate (CMS) co-precipitates as a single multifunctional excipient in tablet formulation using direct compression and wet granulation methods is evaluated. The neutral, acidic, and basic drugs Spironolactone (SPL), ibuprofen (IBU) and metronidazole (MET), respectively, were used as model drugs. Commercial Aldactone®, Fleximex® and Dumazole® tablets containing SPL, IBU and MET, respectively, and tablets made using Avicel® 200, were used in the study ...

  12. A study of rare earth doped silicate and phosphate glasses

    Bowron, Daniel Timothy

    1994-01-01

    The complementary techniques of X-ray diffraction and EXAFS have been applied to silicate and phosphate glass systems containing varying quantities of rare earth elements. The silicate systems that have been studied are rare earth doped fibre optic preforms of interest to the optoelectronics and telecommunications industry. Techniques were developed to allow spatially resolved diffraction and EXAFS data to be taken from the small ~1mm diameter core region of the preforms. Absorpt...

  13. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles...

  14. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    Quirk, J; D. J. Beerling; S. A. Banwart; Kakonyi, G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increase...

  15. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Yukio Homma; Akira Ishikawa; Kanami Takaya; Teruaki Kobayashi; Yorito Nose; Toshikazu Sato; Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilep...

  16. Influence of PC superplasticizers on tricalcium silicate hydration.

    Pourchet, S.; Comparet, C.; Nicoleau, L.; Nonat, A.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of polycarboxylate superplasticizers with variations of content of anionic groups was studied on pure tricalcium silicate hydration. The hydration in diluted suspension has been investigated by conductimetry, calorimetry, and ionic and total organic carbon analysis of the liquid phase. The tricalcium silicate hydration is always delayed in presence of polycarboxylate superplasticizer. Moreover, the delay can be correlated with the number of carboxylate groups which are on the ad...

  17. Effects of silicate application on soil fertility and wheat yield

    Marcos Vinícius Mansano Sarto; Maria do Carmo Lana; Leandro Rampim; Jean Sérgio Rosset; Jaqueline Rocha Wobeto

    2015-01-01

    An improvement in soil chemical properties and crop development with silicate application has been confirmed in several plant species. The effects of silicate application on soil chemical properties and wheat growth were investigated in the present study. The experiment was carried out in 8-L plastic pots in a greenhouse. Treatments were arranged in a randomized block design in a 3 × 5 factorial: three soils [Rhodic Acrudox (Ox1), Rhodic Hapludox (Ox2) and Arenic Hapludult (Ult)] and five sil...

  18. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior; Lucia Helena Garófala Chaves; Fernando Antônio Melo da Costa; Hans Raj Gheyi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to...

  19. Mineralogy and chemical compositions of Colomera (IIE) silicate inclusions

    Hsu, W.; H. Takeda; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Irons of groups lAB and IIE contain silicate inclusions. In IAB irons, these inclusions are basically chondritic, but in IIE they vary from chondritic to highly differentiated [1,2]. In this work, we present detailed studies of mineralogy and trace-element geochemistry of eight silicate inclusions from Colomera with the goal of better understanding early planetary differentiation and possible genetic relationships between iron and stony meteorites.

  20. Fluoroalkylsilane versus Alkylsilane as Hydrophobic Agents for Silica and Silicates

    Teofil Jesionowski; Hieronim Maciejewski; Adam Piasecki; Joanna Karasiewicz; Magdalena Nowacka; Filip Ciesielczyk; Damian Ambrożewicz

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobic powders were obtained via surface modification of silica or magnesium silicate with selected silanes. A modified precipitation method, carried out in an emulsion system, was used for monodisperse silica synthesis, while magnesium silicate was precipitated in a traditional water system. Functionalization of the obtained inorganic supports was performed with selected alkylsilanes: one newly synthesized, 3-(2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5-octafluoropentyloxy)propyltriethoxysilane (OPF), and two comm...

  1. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Koter, de, A.; Hovenier, J. W.; Keller, L.P.; Markwick-Kemper, F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effects of the amount of magnesium and iron in the silicate lattice are studied in detail. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu m extinction feature as observed towards the galactic center using various particle shapes and dust materials. We use very irregularly shaped coated and non- coated porous Gaussian Random Field particles as well as a statistical approach to mod...

  2. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  3. H-Bond interactions between silicates and water during zeolite pre-nucleation.

    Mora-Fonz, Miguel J; Catlow, C Richard A; Lewis, Dewi W

    2008-11-21

    The relative strength of water-water, water-silicate and silicate-silicate interactions are studied, in order to explain the low solubility of the monomer (Si(OH)(4)), and determine the degree of dispersion of silicate clusters in solution during the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites. We will show how the hydrogen bond interactions between water and monomeric silicate species are similar to that in pure water, whilst monomer-monomer interactions are stronger. However, when larger silicate species are also considered we find the relative hydrogen-bonding strength to follow: water-water silicate-water silicate-silicate. The effects of pH are also considered. The implications of the relative strength of these interactions on the formation of larger silicate species, leading to zeolite pre-nucleation, are discussed. PMID:18979042

  4. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  5. REACTION MECHANISMS OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES WITH CARBON DIOXIDE IN MICROWAVE FIELDS

    William B. White; Michael R. Silsbee; B. Joe Kearns

    2004-02-18

    The objective of the investigation was to determine whether microwave fields would enhance the reactions of CO{sub 2} with silicates that are relevant to the sequestration of carbon dioxide. Three sets of experiments were conducted. (1) Serpentine and CO{sub 2} were reacted directly at one atmosphere pressure in a microwave furnace. Little reaction was observed. (2) Serpentine was dehydroxylated in a microwave furnace. The reaction was rapid, reaching completion in less than 30 minutes. A detailed investigation of this reaction produced an S-shaped kinetics curve, similar to the kinetics from dehydroxylating serpentine in a resistance furnace, but offset to 100 C lower temperature. This set of experiments clearly demonstrates the effect of microwaves for enhancing reaction kinetics. (3) Reactions of serpentine with alkaline carbonates and in acid solution were carried out in a microwave hydrothermal apparatus. There was a greatly enhanced decomposition of the serpentine in acid solution but, at the temperature and pressure of the reaction chamber (15 bars; 200 C) the carbonates did not react. Overall, microwave fields, as expected, enhance silicate reaction kinetics, but higher CO{sub 2} pressures are needed to accomplish the desired sequestration reactions.

  6. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings contained calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate. Mechanically and chemically treated titanium substrates were dipped into sols and dried and fired. Silicate coatings from the first group were also chemically treated in 10 mol.l-1 solution of sodium hydroxide. All coatings were measured to determine their adhesive and bioactive properties and furthermore the antibacterial properties were tested in the case of first group. Surfaces of the coated substrates were investigated after the firing and after the individual tests with optical and electron microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction. A tape test demonstrated excellent adhesive property of all coatings to the substrate, classified with degree 5. A static in vitro test demonstrated bioactivity of nearly all the coatings. The basic silicate coating from the first group and one type of coating from the second group were identified as inert. Antibacterial properties of silicate coatings containing silver showed to be different when tested against Escherichia coli bacteria. A complete inhibition of the growth of bacteria under our experimental conditions was observed for the coating containing silver and monetite and a partial inhibition of the growth of bacteria for coatings containing silver and silver in combination with brushite.

  7. Deinking of different furnishes of recycled MOW, ONP, and OMG pulps in silicate-free conditions using organic complex of PHASS

    Iman Akbarpour; Mansour Ghaffari; Ali Ghasemian

    2013-01-01

    Sodium silicate causes problems in papermaking such as deposit formation, decreased retention, and lower sheet strength. Due to these problems, chemical deinking of different recycled papers furnishes including 100% ONP, 80% ONP, and 20% OMG, and a combination of 70% ONP/ 20% OMG/ 10% MOW was accomplished using an organic complexing agent which included poly-hydroxyl acrylic acid and sodium salt (PHAAS) in silicate-free conditions. PHAAS was utilized at four levels of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1% (...

  8. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to water replacement of 50, 75, 100 and 125% of the crop evapotranspiration, with fertilizer levels of 0, 82, 164 and 246 g of calcium-magnesium silicate, with three replications. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, with the irrigation depths distributed in bands while the silicon levels constituted the subplots. Corn yield was influenced by calcium-magnesium silicate and by irrigation depth, obtaining the greatest grain yield with the dose of 164 g pot-1 irrigated at the highest water level. The water-use efficiency of in corn production tended to decrease when the irrigation depth was increased. The best water-use efficiency was observed when the irrigation level was between 87 and 174 mm, and the dose of silicate was 164 g pot-1.

  9. SON68 glass dissolution driven by magnesium silicate precipitation

    Experimental results are reported on the effect of magnesium silicate precipitation on the mechanisms and rate of borosilicate glass dissolution. Leaching experiments with SON68 glass, a borosilicate containing no Mg, were carried out in initially deionized water at 50 °C with a glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume ratio of 20,000 m−1. After 29 days of alteration the experimental conditions were modified by the addition of Mg to trigger the precipitation of Mg-silicate. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate the importance of other parameters such as pH or dissolved silica on the mechanisms of precipitation of Mg-silicates and their consequences on the glass dissolution rate. Mg-silicates precipitate immediately after Mg is added. The amount of altered glass increases with the quantity of added Mg, and is smaller when silicon is added in solution. A time lag is observed between the addition of magnesium and the resumption of glass alteration because silicon is first provided by partial dissolution of the previously formed alteration gel. It is shown that nucleation does not limit Mg-silicate precipitation. A pH above 8 is necessary for the phase to precipitate under the investigated experimental conditions. On the other hand the glass alteration kinetics limits the precipitation if the magnesium is supplied in solution at a non-limiting rate

  10. Deinking of different furnishes of recycled MOW, ONP, and OMG pulps in silicate-free conditions using organic complex of PHASS

    Iman Akbarpour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium silicate causes problems in papermaking such as deposit formation, decreased retention, and lower sheet strength. Due to these problems, chemical deinking of different recycled papers furnishes including 100% ONP, 80% ONP, and 20% OMG, and a combination of 70% ONP/ 20% OMG/ 10% MOW was accomplished using an organic complexing agent which included poly-hydroxyl acrylic acid and sodium salt (PHAAS in silicate-free conditions. PHAAS was utilized at four levels of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1% (based on oven-dry weight of recycled paper rather than sodium silicate. The optical and physical properties of deinked pulp were compared to control pulp (conventional deinking containing 2% sodium silicate. The results showed that the paper brightness was improved and the yellowness, dirt count, and dirt area were decreased significantly by increasing PHAAS charge up to 0.9%. Also, in different recycled paper furnishes above mentioned, using different charges of PHAAS had different effects on paper opacity. Using different charges of PHAAS (especially 0.7 to 0.9% decreased paper caliper, increased paper air resistance, increased freeness, and gave similar or slightly better paper tear indices. Differences of tear indices were not significant at confidence level of 99%. Based on the present research, the use of 0.7 to 0.9% PHAAS in place of sodium silicate is advisable because of the better quality of final papers compared to conventional deinking process.

  11. The role of an organic matrix during the formation of siliceous scales in the heliozoon Actinophrys sol (actinophryida, protista).

    Newman, P J; Patterson, D J

    1993-07-25

    Actinophrys sol is a freshwater heliozoon which has trophic and encysted body forms. During encystment, siliceous scales are laid down in silica deposition vesicles. The scales form one layer of a multi-layered cyst wall. Scale production is described using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. Silica is laid down on an organic matrix which is visible prior to silicification and after removal of silica with hydrofluoric acid. Actinophrys sol can be cultured under silica impoverished conditions, with the result that the siliceous plates are absent. The cysts continue to form but are fragile. Silica is not a prerequisite for the processes of encystment and cyst formation. PMID:23195646

  12. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown

  13. Natural Rubber - Layered Silicates Nanocomposites: Mechanical Properties, Structure & Dynamics

    Retsos, Haris

    2008-03-01

    Natural Rubber (NR) is one of the most industrially relevant elastomers due to unique elastic properties. Recently we have been developed NR composites with incorporated natural or synthetic clays. We present structural, dynamical and mechanical properties to justify the influence of different parameters, like silicate dispersion, cross-linking density and strength of polymer/silicate interface, on the reinforcement phenomena of those composites. To understand the improvement of the mechanical properties we have investigated the possibility of any bound rubber formation on the outer surface of fillers like in carbon black or silica composites. Evidence from a rather similar situation have been found in silicate nanocomposites by dielectric spectroscopy and the existence of a possible relaxation mode suggests a strong adhesion with the fillers (interfacially adsorbed polymer IA) that corresponds to a glass transition around 100 C higher than the bulk glass transition.

  14. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  15. Multiparameter structure optimization of the cellular silicate concrete

    A.A. Bedarev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening the concept of energy efficiency requires the development and implementation of high-performance wall materials. The most promising in this respect is the cellular silicate concrete (gas silicate, which properties are superior to other insulating building materials. However, production of gas silicate insulation purpose with medium density less than 300 kg/m3 poses a number of difficulties due to the nature of its structure. In this regard, the current task is to maintain the specified quality of concrete porous silica with a decrease in its average density. In the article this problem is solved by a multi-level optimization of the macro- and microstructure based on multi-rich (multiparameter mathematical model. Algorithm and the general structure of the model and the results of laboratory studies are given.

  16. Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticle surface modified with chitosan for mucosal delivery

    Kanjanakawinkul, Watchara [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rades, Thomas [School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit [Department of Manufacturing Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Pongjanyakul, Thaned, E-mail: thaned@kku.ac.th [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS), a negatively charged clay, and nicotine (NCT), a basic drug, can interact electrostatically to form microparticles. Chitosan (CS) was used for the surface modification of the microparticles, and a lyophilization method was used to preserve the original particle morphology. The microparticles were characterized in terms of their physicochemical properties, NCT content, mucoadhesive properties, and release and permeation across porcine esophageal mucosa. The results showed that the microparticles formed via electrostatic interaction between MAS and protonated NCT had an irregular shape and that their NCT content increased with increasing NCT ratios in the microparticle preparation solution. High molecular weight CS (800 kDa) adsorbed to the microparticle surface and induced a positive surface charge. CS molecules intercalated into the MAS silicate layers and decreased the crystallinity of the microparticles, leading to an increase in the release rate and diffusion coefficient of NCT from the microparticles. Moreover, the microparticle surface modified with CS was found to have higher NCT permeation fluxes and mucoadhesive properties, which indicated the significant role of CS for NCT mucosal delivery. However, the enhancement of NCT permeation and of mucoadhesive properties depended on the molecular weight and concentration of CS. These findings suggest that NCT-MAS microparticle surface modified with CS represents a promising mucosal delivery system for NCT. Highlights: ► Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticles were prepared using electrostatic interaction. ► Lyophilization was used for drying and maintaining an original morphology of the microparticles. ► Chitosan (CS) was used for surface modification of the microparticles at acidic pH. ► Surface modification using CS caused an increase in release and permeation of nicotine. ► Microparticle surface-modified with CS presented better mucoadhesive properties.

  17. Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticle surface modified with chitosan for mucosal delivery

    Magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS), a negatively charged clay, and nicotine (NCT), a basic drug, can interact electrostatically to form microparticles. Chitosan (CS) was used for the surface modification of the microparticles, and a lyophilization method was used to preserve the original particle morphology. The microparticles were characterized in terms of their physicochemical properties, NCT content, mucoadhesive properties, and release and permeation across porcine esophageal mucosa. The results showed that the microparticles formed via electrostatic interaction between MAS and protonated NCT had an irregular shape and that their NCT content increased with increasing NCT ratios in the microparticle preparation solution. High molecular weight CS (800 kDa) adsorbed to the microparticle surface and induced a positive surface charge. CS molecules intercalated into the MAS silicate layers and decreased the crystallinity of the microparticles, leading to an increase in the release rate and diffusion coefficient of NCT from the microparticles. Moreover, the microparticle surface modified with CS was found to have higher NCT permeation fluxes and mucoadhesive properties, which indicated the significant role of CS for NCT mucosal delivery. However, the enhancement of NCT permeation and of mucoadhesive properties depended on the molecular weight and concentration of CS. These findings suggest that NCT-MAS microparticle surface modified with CS represents a promising mucosal delivery system for NCT. Highlights: ► Nicotine–magnesium aluminum silicate microparticles were prepared using electrostatic interaction. ► Lyophilization was used for drying and maintaining an original morphology of the microparticles. ► Chitosan (CS) was used for surface modification of the microparticles at acidic pH. ► Surface modification using CS caused an increase in release and permeation of nicotine. ► Microparticle surface-modified with CS presented better mucoadhesive properties

  18. Potassium Silicate Foliar Fertilizer Grade from Geothermal Sludge and Pyrophyllite

    Muljani Srie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium silicate fertilizer grade were successfully produced by direct fusion of silica (SiO2 and potasium (KOH and K2CO3 in furnaces at temperatures up to melting point of mixture. The geothermal sludge (98% SiO2 and the pyrophyllite (95% SiO2 were used as silica sources. The purposes of the study was to synthesise potassium silicate fertilizer grade having solids concentrations in the range of 31-37% K2O, and silica in the range of 48-54% SiO2. The weight ratio of silicon dioxide/potasium solid being 1:1 to 5:1. Silica from geothermal sludge is amorphous, whereas pyrophylite is crystalline phase. The results showed that the amount of raw materials needed to get the appropriate molar ratio of potassium silicate fertilizer grade are different, as well as the fusion temperature of the furnace. Potassium silicate prepared from potassium hydroxide and geothermal sludge produced a low molar ratio (2.5: 1 to 3: 1. The potassium required quite small (4:1 in weight ratio, and on a fusion temperature of about 900 °C. Meanwhile, the potassium silicate prepared from pyrophyllite produced a high molar ratio (1.4 - 9.4 and on a fusion temperature of about 1350 °C, so that potassium needed large enough to meet the required molar ratio for the fertilizer grade. The product potassium silicate solid is amorphous with a little trace of crystalline.

  19. Mantle Mineral/Silicate Melt Partitioning

    McFarlane, E. A.; Drake, M. J.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction: The partitioning of elements among mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. It has been proposed that the elevated Mg/Si ratio of the upper mantle of the Earth is a consequence of the flotation of olivine into the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). Agee and Walker (1988) have generated a model via mass balance by assuming average mineral compositions to generate upper mantle peridotite. This model determines that upper mantle peridotite could result from the addition of 32.7% olivine and 0.9% majorite garnet into the upper mantle, and subtraction of 27.6% perovskite from the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). The present contribution uses experimental data to examine the consequences of such multiple phase fractionations enabling an independent evaluation of the above mentioned model. Here we use Mg-perovskite/melt partition coefficients from both a synthetic and a natural system (KLB-1) obtained from this laboratory. Also used are partition coefficient values for majorite garnet/melt, beta spinel/melt and olivine/melt partitioning (McFarlane et al., 1991b; McFarlane et al., 1992). Multiple phase fractionations are examined using the equilibrium crystallization equation and partition coefficient values. The mineral proportions determined by Agee and Walker (1988) are converted into weight fractions and used to compute a bulk partition coefficient value. Discussion: There has been a significant debate concerning whether measured values of trace element partition coefficients permit large-scale fractionation of liquidus phases from an early terrestrial magma ocean (Kato et al., 1988a,b; Walker and Agee, 1989; Drake, 1989; Drake et al., 1991; McFarlane et al., 1990, 1991). It should be noted that it is unclear which, if any, numerical values of partition coefficients are appropriate for examining this question, and certainly the assumptions for the current model must be more fully

  20. Mathematical Viscosity Models for Ternary Metallic and Silicate Melts

    FU Yuan-kun; MENG Xian-min; GUO Han-jie

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical viscosity models for metallic melts were discussed. The experimental data of Ag-Au-Cu systems were used to verify the models based on Chou's general geometric thermodynamic model and the calculated results are consistent with the reported experimental data. A new model predicting the viscosity of multi-component silicate melts was established. The CaO-MnO-SiO2, CaO-FeO-SiO2 and FeO-MnO-SiO2 silicate slag systems were used to verify the model.

  1. Aluminum-silicates flotation with quaternary ammonium salts

    王毓华; 胡岳华; 陈湘清

    2003-01-01

    The zeta potential measurements show that the flotation separation of diaspore from kaolinite, illite and pyrophyllite could be achieved in the range of pH 46.5 with cationic collectors. A special quaternary ammonium salts(DTAL) shows better selectivity than that the dodecyl amine(DDA) does for the flotation of three silicates. The closed-circuit flotation results show that the reverse flotation de-silicate can be achieved with DTAL as collector, a new inorganic reagent(SFL) as depressant and MIBC as frother to obtain a bauxite concentrate m(Al2O3)/m(SiO2)>10, Al2O3 recovery>86%).

  2. High-Q bismuth silicate nonlinear glass microsphere resonators

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Ganapathy; Lee, Timothy; Ding, Ming; Brambilla, Gilberto; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Koizumi,Fumihito; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a bismuth-silicate glass microsphere resonator has been demonstrated. At wavelengths near 1550 nm, high-modes can be efficiently excited in a 179-μm diameter bismuth-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of circa 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as were observed. The dependence of the spectral response on variations in the input power level was studied in detail to gain an insight in...

  3. Lead Silicate Glass Microsphere Resonators With Absorption-Limited Q

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Genapathy; Lee, Timothy; Feng, Xian; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Loh, Wei; Brambilla, Gilberto; Wilkinson, James; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a lead-silicate glass microsphere resonator. We show that at the wavelengths near 1555 nm high Q modes can be efficiently excited from a 109 μm diameter lead-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as 0.9×107 were observed. This is very close to the theoretical material-limited Q-factor and is the highest Q-factor reported so far from a non...

  4. Obtainment and characterization of pure and doped gadolinium oxy ortho silicates with terbium III, precursor of luminescent silicates with sulphur

    Silicate and sulfide lattices are uniquely efficient luminescent materials to excitation by cathodic rays and furthermore the cathodoluminescence study of these compounds have been few investigated. In this work it has been prepared, characterized and investigated some spectroscopic properties of pure and Tba+ - activated Gd2 Si O3 system and it has been tried to substitute oxygen by sulphur in order to obtain this or sulfide-silicate lattices. Products were characterized by vibrational infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction patterns and electronic emission in UV-VIS region. (author)

  5. Synthesis, Characterization and Ion Exchange Properties of Lithium Zirconium Silicate as Inorganic Ion Exchanger

    A new three components inorganic ion exchange material lithium zirconium silicate (Li Zr Si) has been synthesized by adding a mixture of lithium hydroxide (LiOH)and zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCI2) to sodium metasilicate (Na2Si O3) in different volume ratios. the synthesized materials ratios I,II and III have been characterize on the basis of chemical composition, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analysis . from the data obtained the synthesized different ratios of lithium zirconium silicates can be written as (Zr O)2 Li2 (SiO3)3. 10.7H2O, (Zr O) Li2(SiO3)2-5.3H2O and (Zr o)Li4 (SiO3)3- 4.4 H2O with amorphous structure. The chemical stability of the materials has been tested in water and acidic media. The ion exchange capacities of these materials for Na+, K+and Cs+ ions have been found to take the order Na+>K+>Cs+for all synthesized materials and depend on the crystal ionic radii of exchanging cations

  6. Synthesis, Characterization and Ion Exchange Properties of Lithium Zirconium Silicate as Inorganic Ion Exchanger

    A new three components inorganic ion exchange material lithium zirconium silicate (LiZrSi) has been synthesized by adding a mixture of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and zirconium oxychloride(ZrOCl2) to sodium metasilicate (Na2SiO3) at different ratios. The synthesized materials ratios I, II and III have been characterized on the basis of chemical composition, X-ray fluorescence, XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analysis. From the data obtained, the synthesized different ratios of lithium zirconium silicates can be written as (ZrO)2Li2(SiO3)3. 10.7H2O, (ZrO)Li2(SiO3)2. 5.3H2O and (ZrO)Li4(SiO3.3. 4.4H2O with amorphous structure. The solubility of the materials has been tested in water and acidic media. The ion exchange capacities of these materials for Na+, K+ and Cs+ ions have been found to take the order Na+ > K+ > Cs+ for all synthesized materials and depend on the ionic radii of exchanging cations

  7. Non-conservative controls on distribution of dissolved silicate in Cochin Backwaters

    Balachandran, K.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.

    Cochin backwater system was studied with regard to dissolved silicate (DSi) to understand its seasonal distribution and behaviour during estuarine mixing. Silicate had a linear relationship with salinity during the high river discharge period...

  8. PLASMA SPRAYING AND DIELECTRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM SILICATE

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Neufuss, Karel

    online, č. 2 (2007), s. 4-9. ISSN 1335-9053 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200430560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * Electric al properties * Zircon * Silicates * Insulators Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://web.mtf.stuba.sk/sk/casopis/index.htm

  9. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life. PMID:22035594

  10. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  11. Annealing of Silicate Dust by Nebular Shocks at 10 AU

    Harker, David E.; Desch, Steven J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium are known to be mostly amorphous, yet crystalline silicate grains have been observed in many long-period comets and in protoplanetary disks. Annealing of amorphous silicate grains into crystalline grains requires temperatures greater than or approximately equal to 1000 K, but exposure of dust grains in comets to such high temperatures is apparently incompatible with the generally low temperatures experienced by comets. This has led to the proposal of models in which dust grains were thermally processed near the protoSun, then underwent considerable radial transport until they reached the gas giant planet region where the long-period comets originated. We hypothesize instead that silicate dust grains were annealed in situ, by shock waves triggered by gravitational instabilities. We assume a shock speed of 5 km/s, a plausible value for shocks driven by gravitational instabilities. We calculate the peak temperatures of pyroxene grains under conditions typical in protoplanetary disks at 5-10 AU. We show that in situ annealing of micron-sized dust grains can occur, obviating the need for large-scale radial transport.

  12. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    Skaug, V; Davies, R.; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells.

  13. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  14. Siliceous surfaces treated with supercritical water: applications in separation methods

    Karásek, Pavel; Horká, Marie; Šlais, Karel; Planeta, Josef; Foret, František; Roth, Michal

    Salzburg : Society of Analytical Chemistry , 2014. OR42. [International Symposium on Chromatography /30./. 14.09.2014-18.09.2014, Salzburg] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : treatment of siliceous surfaces * separation methods * supercritical water Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation

  15. Calorimetric signature of structural heterogeneity in a ternary silicate glass

    Zhang, Yanfei; Yang, G.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural heterogeneity in a silicate glass by hyperquenching–annealing–calorimetry approach. The results show a striking phenomenon: two separated sub-Tg relaxation peaks appear on the calorimetric curve of the hyperquenched CaO–MgO–SiO2 glass, implying the existence of two...

  16. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  17. Radiation effects on transport and bubble formation in silicate glasses

    Advanced Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (pulsed EPR, time-resolved EPR, high-frequency EPR, ENDOR) has been used to structurally characterize metastable point defects in irradiated alkali borate, silicate, and borosilicate glasses and to study mobile interstitial H atoms. In addition, the yield of radiolytic oxygen has been determined by outgassing. Several mechanisms for the defect formation in oxide glasses have been established

  18. Square Root Relationship in Growth Kinetics of Silicate-1 Membranes

    Novák, Pavel; Brabec, Libor; Šolcová, Olga; Bortnovsky, Oleg; Zikánová, Arlette; Kočiřík, Milan

    Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2002, s. 1505-1511. - (Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis.. 142 B). [International FEZA Conference /2./. Taormina (IT), 01.09.2002-05.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/0522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : silicate-1 layer * growth kinetics * sedimentation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  19. Small angle X-ray scattering from hydrating tricalcium silicate

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique was used to study the structural evolution of hydrated tricalcium silicate at room temperature. The changes in specific area of the associated porosity and the evolution of density fluctuations in the solid hydrated phase were deduced from the scattering data. A correlation of these variations with the hydration mechanism is tried. (Author)

  20. Silicate karst associated with lateritic formations (examples from eastern Niger)

    Sponholz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Silicate and iron crust karst pits and sinkholes in eastern Niger are filled with reworked lateritic sediments or with unconsolidated palaeosoils and aeolian deposits. The fillings facies depend on the environmental conditions during deposition. Geomorphological and sedimentological studies on the karst fillings and the interpretation of various karst/filling associations allow an approach to the chronology of landscape development in eastern Niger plateaus.

  1. The silicate absorption profile in the ISM towards the heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418

    Roche, P. F.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Gonzalez-Martin, O.

    2015-01-01

    The 9.7-micron silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium provides important information on the physical and chemical composition of interstellar dust grains. Measurements in the Milky Way have shown that the profile in the diffuse interstellar medium is very similar to the amorphous silicate profiles found in circumstellar dust shells around late M stars, and narrower than the silicate profile in denser star-forming regions. Here, we investigate the silicate absorption profile to...

  2. Silicate anion structural change in calcium silicate hydrate gel on dissolution of hydrated cement

    High pH conditions of aqueous solutions in a radioactive waste repository can be brought about by dissolution of cementitious materials. In order to clarify the mechanisms involved in maintaining this high pH for long time, we investigated the dissolution phenomena of OPC hydrate. In the present research, leaching tests on powdered cement hydrates were conducted by changing the ratio of mass of leaching water to mass of OPC hydrate (liquid/solid ratio) from 10 - 2,000 (wt/wt). Ordinary Portland Cement hydrate was contacted with deionized water and placed in a sealed bottle. After a predetermined period, the solid was separated from the solution. From the results of XRD analysis on the solid phase and the Ca concentration in the aqueous phase, it was confirmed that Ca(OH)2 was preferentially dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 10 or 100 (wt/wt), and that C-S-H gel as well as Ca(OH)2 were dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or larger. 29Si-NMR results showed that the silicate anion chain of the C-S-H gel became longer when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or greater. This indicates that leaching of OPC hydrate results in a structural change of C-S-H gel. (author)

  3. Silicate Dispersion and Mechanical Reinforcement in Polysiloxane/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    Schmidt, Daniel F.

    2010-01-12

    We report the first in-depth comparison of the mechanical properties and equilibrium solvent uptake of a range of polysiloxane nanocomposites based on treated and untreated montmorillonite and fumed silica nanofillers. We demonstrate the ability of equilibrium solvent uptake data (and, thus, overall physical and chemical cross-link density) to serve as a proxy for modulus (combining rubber elasticity and Flory-Rehner theory), hardness (via the theory of Boussinesq), and elongation at break, despite the nonideal nature of these networks. In contrast, we find that tensile and tear strength are not well-correlated with solvent uptake. Interfacial strength seems to dominate equilibrium solvent uptake and the mechanical properties it predicts. In the montmorillonite systems in particular, this results in the surprising consequence that equilibrium solvent uptake and mechanical properties are independent of dispersion state. We conclude that edge interactions play a more significant role than degree of exfoliation, a result unique in the field of polymer nanocomposites. This demonstrates that even a combination of polymer/nanofiller compatibility and thermodynamically stable nanofiller dispersion levels may not give rise to reinforcement. These findings provide an important caveat when attempting to connect structure and properties in polymer nanocomposites, and useful guidance in the design of optimized polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites in particular. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  4. PREFACE: 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials

    Mezinskis, G.; Bragina, L.; Colombo, P.; Frischat, G. H.; Grabis, J.; Greil, P.; Deja, J.; Kaminskas, R.; Kliava, J.; Medvids, A.; Nowak, I.; Siauciunas, R.; Valancius, Z.; Zalite, I.

    2011-12-01

    Logo This Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of the contributions to the 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials (BaltSilica2011) held at Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia from 23-25 May 2011. The conference was organized by Riga Technical University (Latvia) and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). The series of Baltic conferences on silicate materials was started since 2004: the first conference was held in Riga, Latvia, 2004; the second conference was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2005; the third was held again in Riga, Latvia, 2007, and the fourth was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2009. BaltSilica 2011 was attended by around 50 participants from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Ukraine and Russia. In comparison with previous silicate materials conferences, the broadening of participating countries is an indication of the interest of scientists, engineers and students to exchange research ideas, latest results, and to find new research topics for cooperation in the fields of silicate, high temperature materials, and inorganic nanomaterials. The scientific programme included 8 invited plenary lectures 23 oral presentations and 25 posters [1]. Scientific themes covered in the conference and in this special issue: Natural and Artificial Stone Materials; Traditional and New Ceramic and Glass-Like Materials; Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials. This volume consists of 23 selected proceeding papers. The Editor of this special issue is grateful to all the contributors to BaltSilica 2011. I am also very grateful to the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the session chairs, the referees who refereed the submitted articles to this issue, and to students from the Department of Silicate, High Temperature and Inorganic Nanomaterials Technology of the Riga Technical University who ensured the smooth running of the conference. Particular thanks goes to eight plenary

  5. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous-Ooze Sediments, More Basin, Norwegian Sea

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic siliceous-ooze sediments occur above the hydrocarbon reservoir of the Ormen Lange gas field in More Basin, Norwegian Sea. A possible hydrocarbon prospect of siliceous ooze was proposed, but siliceous ooze is significantly different in texture from most commonly known reservoir rocks...

  6. Laboratory Analysis of Silicate Stardust Grains of Diverse Stellar Origins

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Silicate dust is ubiquitous in a multitude of environments across the cosmos, including evolved oxygen-rich stars, interstellar space, protoplanetary disks, comets, and asteroids. The identification of bona fide silicate stardust grains in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites, and dust returned from comet Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft has revolutionized the study of stars, interstellar space, and the history of dust in the Galaxy. These stardust grains have exotic isotopic compositions that are records of nucleosynthetic processes that occurred in the depths of their now extinct parent stars. Moreover, the chemical compositions and mineralogies of silicate stardust are consequences of the physical and chemical nature of the stellar condensation environment, as well as secondary alteration processes that can occur in interstellar space, the solar nebula, and on the asteroid or comet parent body in which they were incorporated. In this talk I will discuss our use of advanced nano-scale instrumentation in the laboratory to conduct coordinated isotopic, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of silicate stardust grains from AGB stars, supernovae, and novae. By analyzing the isotopic compositions of multiple elements in individual grains, we have been able to constrain their stellar sources, explore stellar nucleosynthetic and mixing processes, and Galactic chemical evolution. Through our mineralogical studies, we have found these presolar silicate grains to have wide-ranging chemical and mineral characteristics. This diversity is the result of primary condensation characteristics and in some cases secondary features imparted by alteration in space and in our Solar System. The laboratory analysis of actual samples of stars directly complements astronomical observations and astrophysical models and offers an unprecedented level of detail into the lifecycles of dust in the Galaxy.

  7. Effects of surface application of calcium-magnesium silicate and gypsum on soil fertility and sugarcane yield

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lime application recommendations for amendment of soil acidity in sugarcane were developed with a burnt cane harvesting system in mind. Sugarcane is now harvested in most areas without burning, and lime application for amendment of soil acidity in this system in which the sugarcane crop residue remains on the ground has been carried out without a scientific basis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in soil acidity and stalk and sugar yield with different rates of surface application of calcium, magnesium silicate, and gypsum in ratoon cane. The experiment was performed after the 3rd harvest of the variety SP 81-3250 in a commercial green sugarcane plantation of the São Luiz Sugar Mill (47º 25' 33" W; 21º 59' 46" S, located in Pirassununga, São Paulo, in southeast Brazil. A factorial arrangement of four Ca-Mg silicate rates (0, 850, 1700, and 3400 kg ha-1 and two gypsum rates (0 and 1700 kg ha-1 was used in the experiment. After 12 months, the experiment was harvested and technological measurements of stalk and sugar yield were made. After harvest, soil samples were taken at the depths of 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20, 0.20-0.40, and 0.40-0.60 m in all plots, and the following determinations were made: soil pH in CaCl2, organic matter, P, S, K, Ca, Mg, H+Al, Al, Si, and base saturation. The results show that the application of gypsum reduced the exchangeable Al3+ content and Al saturation below 0.05 m, and increased the Ca2+ concentration in the whole profile, the Mg2+ content below 0.10 m, K+ below 0.4 m, and base saturation below 0.20 m. This contributed to the effect of surface application of silicate on amendment of soil acidity reaching deeper layers. From the results of this study, it may be concluded that the silicate rate recommended may be too low, since the greater rates used in this experiment showed greater reduction in soil acidity, higher levels of nutrients at greater depths and an increase in stalk and sugar

  8. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  9. Experimental weathering rates of aluminium silicates

    The chemical weathering of primary rocks and minerals in natural systems has a major impact on soil development and its composition. Chemical weathering is driven to a large extent by mineral dissolution. Through mineral dissolution, elements are released into groundwater and can readily react to precipitate secondary minerals such as clays, zeolites, and carbonates. Carbonates form from divalent cations (e.g. Ca, Fe and Mg) and CO2, and kaolin clay and gibbsite formation is attributed to the weathering of aluminium-rich minerals, most notably the feldspars. The CarbFix Project in Hellisheidi (SW-Iceland) aims to use natural weathering processes to form carbonate minerals by the re-injection of CO2 from a geothermal power plant back into surrounding basaltic rocks. This process is driven by the dissolution of basaltic rocks, rich in divalent cations, which can combine with injected CO2 to form and precipitate carbonates. This thesis focuses on the dissolution behaviour of Stapafell crystalline basalt, which consists of three major phases (plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine) and is rich in divalent cations. Steady-state element release rates from crystalline basalt at far-from-equilibrium conditions were measured at pH from 2 to 11 and temperatures from 5 to 75 C in mixed-flow reactors. Steady-state Si and Ca release rates exhibit a U-shaped variation with pH, where rates decrease with increasing pH at acid condition but increase with increasing pH at alkaline conditions. Silicon release rates from crystalline basalt are comparable to Si release rates from basaltic glass of the same chemical composition at low pH and temperatures ≥25 C but slower at alkaline pH and temperatures ≥50 C. In contrast, Mg and Fe release rates decrease continuously with increasing pH at all temperatures. This behaviour is interpreted to stem from the contrasting dissolution behaviours of the three major minerals comprising the basalt: plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine. Element

  10. The dissolution rate of silicate glasses and minerals: an alternative model based on several activated complexes

    Most of the mineral reactions in natural water-rock systems progress at conditions close to the chemical equilibrium. The kinetics of these reactions, in particular the dissolution rate of the primary minerals, is a major constrain for the numerical modelling of diagenetic and hydrothermal processes. In the case of silicates, recent experimental studies have pointed out the necessity to better understand the elementary reactions which control the dissolution process. This article presents several models that have been proposed to account for the observed dissolution rate/chemical affinity relationships. The case of glasses (R7T7), feldspars and clays, in water, in near neutral pH aqueous solutions and in acid/basic media, are reviewed. (A.C.)

  11. Polymerisation, basicity, oxidation state and their role in ionic modelling of silicate melts

    R. Moretti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe and quantify the reactivity of silicate melts, the ionic notation provided by the Temkin formalism has been historically accepted, giving rise to the study of melt chemical equilibria in terms of completely dissociated ionic species. Indeed, ionic modelling of melts works properly as long as the true extension of the anionic matrix is known. This information may be attained in the framework of the Toop-Samis (1962a,b model, through a parameterisation of the acid-base properties of the dissolved oxides. Moreover, by combining the polymeric model of Toop and Samis with the «group basicity» concept of Duffy and Ingram (1973, 1974a,b, 1976 the bulk optical basicity (Duffy and Ingram, 1971; Duffy, 1992 of molten silicates and glasses can be split into two distinct contributions, i.e. the basicity of the dissolved basic oxides and the basicity of the polymeric units. Application to practical cases, such as the assessment of the oxidation state of iron, require bridging of the energetic gap between the standard state of completely dissociated component (Temkin standard state and the standard state of pure melt component at P and T of interest. On this basis it is possible to set up a preliminary model for iron speciation in both anhydrous and hydrous aluminosilicate melts. In the case of hydrous melts, I introduce both acidic and basic dissociation of the water component, requiring the combined occurrence of H+ cations, OH- free anions and, to a very minor extent, of T-OH groups. The amphoteric behaviour of water revealed by this study is therefore in line with the earlier prediction of Fraser (1975.

  12. X-ray scattering on layered silicates in polymeric matrices

    Nanocomposites based on polymeric matrices have been studied via small angle X-ray scattering with respect to the dispersion and the orientation of filler particles. Both natural and synthetic layered silicates were used as filler particles. For this purpose, a software was developed which allows to determine the size and the size distribution of nanoparticles with various geometries by analyzing small angle X-ray scattering data. In contrast to conventional software, the one developed and used here is based on free distribution functions, e.g. no particular size distribution is pre-supposed. By example of three different reference systems it could be shown that the software works reliably and accurately. Using the computer-based evaluation of scattering data, significantly more information can be obtained about the samples compared to classical analytical and numerical evaluation schemes. By means of this software, the inner structure of the microgel PVCUAAEM (Poly(N-Vinylcaprolactam- co-acetoacetoxyethylmethacrylat)) filled with a synthetic layered silicate was investigated as a function of temperature. For this temperature-sensitive microgelnanocomposite, the dispersion of the silicate layers was determined and a structural model was developed. It could be shown that with increasing temperature, the layers move closer together and, depending on the amount of filler content, the filler particles drift to the surface of the nanocomposites. Additionally, for higher filler contents the charged layered silicate prevents the typical reduction of the particle radius, which is otherwise observed with increasing temperature. For polyethylene filled with natural layered silicate, it could be shown that small angle X-ray scattering allows the quantitative evaluation of the orientation of platelet-shaped nanoparticles in a polymeric matrix. Based on spatially resolved measurements of injection-molded tensile bars, the degree of orientation could be determined quantitatively

  13. Fabrication of unique hollow silicate nanoparticles with hierarchically micro/mesoporous shell structure by a simple double template approach.

    Rivera-Virtudazo, R V; Fuji, M; Takai, C; Shirai, T

    2012-12-01

    An innovative type of hollow silicate nanoparticle with a micro/mesoporous shell wall (NSHPMS) was synthesized at room temperature via an eco-friendly double template approach, followed by simple acid reflux. TEM observations of NSHPMSs showed hollow interior nanoparticles (wormhole-like shell structure. The nitrogen gas (N(2)) adsorption/desorption isotherm exhibited a unique two-step pattern: the first step (0.2 wormhole mesoporous shell wall provided sufficient spaces that contribute to high adsorption capacities and faster adsorption rates. One can envision that larger quantities of framework composition can be obtained using our NSHPMSs. PMID:23138674

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Si/Ga Eni Carbon Silicates

    Giuseppe Bellussi; Angela Carati; Stefania Guidetti; Caterina Rizzo; Roberto Millini; Stefano Zanardi; Erica Montanari; Wallace O’Neil Parker Jr.; Michela Bellettato

    2015-01-01

    Phenylene-gallosilicates were prepared with the same crystalline structure as their aluminum ana-logues. The new Ga-Eni Carbon Silicates (Ga-ECS) phases were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and thermogravimetric analysis, which demonstrated that gallium isomorphously replaced aluminum in the framework of the organ-ic-inorganic hybrids similar to the case of classical zeolites. Hybrid ECS materials were obtained with different types of bridged silsesquioxane precursors that maintained the aluminum-silicate nature of the inorganic moiety. This work confirms a new level of crystal chemistry versatility for this class of materials, and demonstrates the possibility to tailor also the inorganic part of the framework by changing the nature of the trivalent heteroatom.

  15. Chemical bonding and structural ordering of cations in silicate glasses

    The specific surrounding of cations in multicomponent silicate glasses is briefly presented. Information about interatomic distances and site geometry may be gained by using spectroscopic methods among which x-ray absorption spectroscopy may be used for the largest number of glass components. Scattering of x-rays and neutrons may also be used to determine the importance of medium range order around specific cations. All the existing data show that cations occur in sites with a well-defined geometry, which are in most cases connected to the silicate polymeric network. Medium range order has been detected around cations such as Ti, Ca and Ni, indicating that these elements have an heterogeneous distribution within the glassy matrix. (authors)

  16. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  17. EXAFS studies of sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved actinides

    Sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved Th, U, Np, and Pu have been studied using the EXAFS technique. Th4+, U4+, Np4+, and Pu4+ ions in the silicate glasses are 8-fold coordinated to oxygen neighbors. The higher valent U6+ and Np5+ ions have complex local symmetries. The U6+ ions appear in a uranyl configuration with 2 oxygen atoms at 1.85A and 4 at 2.25A from the U ion. The Np5+ local symmetry is more complex and difficult to determine uniquely. The U6+ glasses show substantial clustering of the uranium atoms. A structural model, with nearly planar uranyl sheets sandwiched between alkali and silica layers, is used to explain the U6+ EXAFS data. This model allows us to understand why U6+ ions are much more soluble in the glasses than the actinide 4+ ions. 4 references, 2 figures

  18. Lanthanum containing silicates and germanates as halogen apatites and oxyapatites

    Halogen apatites M4La6(XO4)6Z2 and oxyapatites M2La8(XO4)6O2 have been prepared: M = Sr, Pb, Ba; X = Si, Ge, and Z = F, Cl. The lattice parameters are discussed. The i.r. active internal vibrations of the silicate ion are assigned. A translational vibration of the 'free' oxide ions in the oxyapatites causes an intense absorption at about 400 cm-1 (silicates) and 350 cm-1 (germanates), respectively. The products 'M3La6(XO4)6' and 'M4La6(XO4)6O' are mixtures of various phases. Their respective apatite phase is a solid solution between M2La8(XO4)6O2 and the defect apatite M4La6(XO4)6Osub(vacant). Its composition mostly approximates to M2La8(XO4)6O2, however. (author)

  19. In vitro bioactivity of a tricalcium silicate cement

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent of Portland cement and the responsible for their mechanical strength at early stages. In order to be used as and additive of conventional calcium phosphate cement (CPC), in vitro bioactivity of a calcium silicate cement (CSC) after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days was study. The cement was obtained by mixing Ca3SiO5, obtained by sol-gel process, and a Na2HPO4 solution. The morphological and structural changes of the material before and after soaking were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the formation of a layer of a Hydroxyapatite (HA) onto the CSC cement after soaking for 1h in SBF that became denser with the increase of soaking time. The study suggests that Ca3SiO5 would be an effective additive to improve the bioactivity and long term strength of conventional CPC. (author)

  20. Silicates in D-type symbiotic stars: an ISO overview

    Angeloni, R; Ciroi, S; Rafanelli, P

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the IR spectral features of a sample of D-type symbiotic stars. Analyzing unexploited ISO-SWS data, deriving the basic observational parameters of dust bands and comparing them with respect to those observed in other astronomical sources, we try to highlight the effect of environment on grain chemistry and physic. We find strong amorphous silicate emission bands at 10 micron and 18 micron in a large fraction of the sample. The analysis of the 10 micron band, along with a direct comparison with several astronomical sources, reveals that silicate dust in symbiotic stars shows features between the characteristic circumstellar environments and the interstellar medium. This indicates an increasing reprocessing of grains in relation to specific symbiotic behavior of the objects. A correlation between the central wavelength of the 10 and 18 micron dust bands is found. By the modeling of IR spectral lines we investigate also dust grains conditions within the shocked nebulae. Both the unusual depletion ...

  1. Chemical Fractionation in the Silicate Vapor Atmosphere of the Earth

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Eiler, John; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.10.03

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance to questions of lunar origin, the chemical composition of the Moon is not precisely known. In recent years, however, the isotopic composition of lunar samples has been determined to high precision and found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial mantle despite widespread isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar System. In the context of the giant-impact hypothesis, this level of isotopic homogeneity can evolve if the proto-lunar disk and post-impact Earth undergo turbulent mixing into a single uniform reservoir while the system is extensively molten and partially vaporized. In the absence of liquid-vapor separation, such a model leads to the lunar inheritance of the chemical composition of the terrestrial magma ocean. Hence, the turbulent mixing model raises the question of how chemical differences arose between the silicate Earth and Moon. Here we explore the consequences of liquid-vapor separation in one of the settings relevant to the lunar composition: the silicate vapor atmosphere...

  2. Structural characterization of gel-derived calcium silicate systems.

    Meiszterics, Anikó; Rosta, László; Peterlik, Herwig; Rohonczy, János; Kubuki, Shiro; Henits, Péter; Sinkó, Katalin

    2010-09-30

    The main aim of this study is to synthesize calcium silicate ceramics that exhibit suitable properties to be used for biomedical applications. In the present work, attention was paid to the understanding of processing-structure relationships. A particular effort was made to clarify the identification of Ca-O-Si bonds by means of spectroscopy. The calcium silicate systems were prepared via a sol-gel route, varying the chemical compositions, the catalyst concentration, and the temperature and time of aging and heat treatment. The processes and the phases evolved during the sol-gel procedure were determined. The bond systems were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and the aggregate structures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. PMID:20828114

  3. Silica from triethylammonium tris (oxalato) silicate (IV) thermal decomposition

    Silica can be obtained from differents precursors by differents methods. In this paper it has been investigated the thermal decomposition of triethylammonium tris (oxalato) silicate (IV) to render silica. Among the trisoxalato-complexes of silicon preparation methods reviewed it has been used the Bessler's one with the reflux adaptaded in microwave oven. Thermal decomposition analysis of the compound has been made by TG-DTG and DTA curves. Silica powders obtained and heated between 300 to 9000C in a oven were characterized by infrared vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray powder difraction and nitrogen adsorption isotherm (BET). The triethylammonium tris (oxalato) silicate (IV) thermal decomposition takes place at 3000C and the silica powder obtained is non cristalline with impurities that are eliminated with heating at 4000C. (author)

  4. Effective elastic moduli of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites

    2001-01-01

    Polymer-layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites exhibit some mechanical properties that are much better than conventional polymer filled composites. A relatively low content of layered silicate yields a significant enhancement of material performance. After the volume fraction of clay reaches a relatively low "critical value"; however, further increasing does not show a greater stiffening effect. This phenomenon is contrary to previous micromechanical pre-dictions and is not understood well. Based on the analysis on the microstructures of PLS nanocomposites, the present note provides an insight into the physical micromechanisms of the above unexpected phenomenon. The Mori-Tanaka scheme and a numerical method are employed to estimate the effec-tive elastic moduli of such a composite.

  5. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  6. Dosimetric investigations of Tb3+ doped strontium silicate phosphor

    In past few decades, silicates are found to exhibit excellent luminescent properties in the blue, green and red spectral regions. Eu2+ doped Strontium Silicate is known to be an excellent yellow phosphor applicable in LED based solid-state lighting applications. Tb3+ doped Mg2SiO4 is known to be a promising TLD material for the dosimetry due to high TL sensitivity and its use to access the real time dose has been recently reported. Also amongst several rare earths, Tb3+ is known to be used as a green light emitting luminescent materials because of the 5D4-7F5 transition peak at around 545 nm of the Tb3+ ion. However, luminescence properties of SrSiO3:Tb3+ has been rarely studied. In this paper we report the dosimetric properties of Tb doped SrSiO3 synthesized by co-precipitation technique

  7. Petrophysical Analysis of Siliceous Ooze Sediments, Ormen Lange Field, Norway

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    structure is complex and the solids are mechanically fragile and hydrous. Normal petrophysical methods used in formation evaluation might not be suitable for interpreting siliceous ooze. For example, density and neutron logging tools are calibrated to give correct porosity readings in a limestone formation......, but apparent porosity indications in any other lithology, such as siliceous ooze, are wrong and they should be corrected. The apparent bulk density log should be influenced by the hydrogen in opal as also the neutron porosity tools because they are sensitive to the amount of hydrogen in a formation...... and to a lesser extent upon other elements. It is normally assumed that the contribution to the neutron porosity measurement comes entirely from the hydrogen in fluids fully occupying the pore space. But, elements other than hydrogen that exist in the rock matrix do contribute to the signal; and...

  8. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  9. The Characterisation of Silicate Glasses Implanted with Ag+ Ions

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Kormunda, M.; Kolitsch, A.

    Melville: American Institute of Physics, 2011, s. 327-334. ISBN 978-0-7354-0986-6. ISSN 0094-243X. [11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques. Crete (GR), 12.06.2011-18.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ion implantation * silicate glasses * metal nanoparticles * Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy * optical absorption Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  10. Forming the Moon from terrestrial silicate-rich material

    Meijer, R.J.; Anisichkin, V. F.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent high-precision measurements of the isotopic composition of lunar rocks demonstrate that the bulk silicate Earth and the Moon show an unexpectedly high degree of similarity. This is inconsistent with one of the primary results of classic dynamical simulations of the widely accepted giant impact model for the formation of the Moon, namely that most of the mass of the Moon originates from the impactor, not Earth. Resolution of this discrepancy without changing the main premises of the gia...

  11. Analysis of silicate rocks by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    This study aims at developing an all-purpose method for the determination of various elements in silicate rocks, by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The sample is prepared by borax fusion, in the presence of cobalt oxide acting as an inner standard meant for eliminating certain errors. Contents are computed in comparison with outer standards having a chemical composition akin to that of the rock sample under analysis. (authors)

  12. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E. Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  13. Strength and impermeability recovery of siliceous mudstone from complete failure

    Radionuclide migration can be undesirably increased by weakening the mechanical properties of a rock mass in the excavated disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnels of a geological disposal facility for high level radioactive waste. Laboratory testing of loading stress and loading time on failed siliceous mudstone specimens has identified the potential for the long-term recovery of the strength and impermeability of the rock mass in the EDZ. (author)

  14. Coloration processes in soda-lime silicate glasses

    The effect of mechanical stretching upon room temperature γ coloration of soda-lime silicate (SLS) glasses has been investigated. Optical absorption measurements were performed to follow the formation and thermal bleaching of the induced color centers. It has been shown that the mechanical deformation reduces the coloration effectivity and thermal stability of the created centers. It has been proposed that increase of the concentration of the non-bridging oxygens accelerate the bleaching processes

  15. Geotechnical properties of siliceous sediments from the Central Indian Basin

    Khadge, N.H.

    COMMUNICATIONS CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 82, NO. 3, 10 FEBRUARY 2002 Geotechnical properties of siliceous sediments from the Central Indian B a sin N. H. Khadge National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India Indian Deep - sea... , for baseline data collec - tion. A NW - SE trending strip of 3000 m length and RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 82, NO. 3, 10 FEBRUARY 2002 339 200 m width was selected for carrying out simulated disturbance studies in this area...

  16. Silicate Scales Formation During ASP Flooding: A Review

    Abubakar Abubakar Umar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reviewed and assessed some of the inhibition techniques used in the industry with regards to handling oilfield scales in general and silicates scales in particular. Conventional scale inhibitors used are facing restrictions world over, due to their ecotoxicity and non-biodegradability, which has led to the call for green scale inhibition in the oil and industry. Due to the inefficiency of the conventional primary and secondary recovery methods to yield above 20-40% OOIP, the need for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR techniques to recover a higher proportion of the Oil Originally in Place (OOIP has become vital. Alkaline/Surfactant/Polymer (ASP is one of such techniques and has proven successful due to its ability to raise displacement and sweep efficiency. Despite its popularity as a potentially cost-effective chemical flooding method, it is not without (its problems, one of which is the excessive formation of silicate scales. Silicate scale is a very serious problem in the oil and gas industry; which forms in perforation holes, casing surface, tubing and surface facilities. During an ASP flood, as the flood progresses into the production well, liquid produced from different layers intermingle, leading to a rapid decrease in the pH value of the mixed waters. Other factors such as temperature, pressure, divalent cations present also play some roles, but pH variation plays the major role. These among other factors facilitate precipitation of silicates and its deposition on tubing, surface pipeline, pumps and surface production facilities resulting in excessive production loss; increasing the average work over periods, which influences the production and causes low commercial effectiveness. Green scale inhibitors are considered as alternative scale inhibitors due to their value-added benefits to the environment with respect to the methods of treating oilfield scales. It is recommended that the industry should shift to the green technology as

  17. Synthesis of lithium silicates generators of tritium by a modified method of combustion

    The ceramics of lithium have been proposed as generating materials of tritium through the following reaction: 6 Li + 1 n → 4 He + 3 H . In previous works carried out by Pfeiffer and collaborators, the lithium silicates generators of tritium were prepared using the following methods: reactions of solid state, precipitation and sol-gel synthesis. Although those methods have advantages, it is required of heating at high temperatures (900 C during four hours) to be able to obtain the crystalline compounds. Those products found in these works were diverse crystallization forms of the lithium silicates and of SiO2, such as, Li2SiO3, Li2Si205, Li4SiO4, and quartz (SiO2). The combustion method uses exothermic reactions to take place ceramic compounds. The precursor solutions are mixtures of the nitrate of metal oxidizer and the fuels (urea, glycine, carbohydrazide). However the reported method in the literature, it is not useful to prepare lithium silicates, for what was modified using non oxidizers compounds. The lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and the silicic acid (H2SiO3) they were the compounds non oxidizers used, and the urea (CH4N2O) it was the one fuel. They were carried out two series of experiments; inside the series 1 of experiments are varied the molar ratio of lithium hydroxide and urea (LiOH : H2SiO3 = 1, 2 and 3, LiOH : CH4N2O = 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) and the prepared mixtures were taken to one muffle previously preheated to a temperature of 450 C during 5 minutes. In the series 2 of experiments was studied the effect of the temperature and of the washed with distilled water in the prepared samples with the following molar ratios: LiOH : H2SiO3 : CH4N2O = 1:1:3, 2:1:3, 3:1:3 and 3:1:6, those which were heated to temperatures from 450 C up to 750 C and were washed. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Infrared spectroscopy (I S), semiquantitative elemental analysis (EDS) and Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that the molar

  18. Radiative Forcing of the Stratosphere by SO_2 Gas, Silicate Ash, and H_2SO_4 Aerosols Shortly after the 1982 Eruptions of El Chichón

    Gerstell, M. F.; Crisp, Joy; Crisp, David

    1995-01-01

    The 1982 eruptions of the El Chichón volcano injected large quantities of sulfur dioxide gas and silicate ash into the stratosphere. Several studies have shown that the long-lived sulfuric acid aerosols derived from these volcanic effluents produced measurable changes in the radiative heating rates and the global circulation. The radiative and dynamical perturbations associated with the short-lived but more strongly absorbing sulfur dioxide and ash clouds have received much 1ess attention. Th...

  19. A Review: Fundamental Aspects of Silicate Mesoporous Materials

    Zeid A. ALOthman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicate mesoporous materials have received widespread interest because of their potential applications as supports for catalysis, separation, selective adsorption, novel functional materials, and use as hosts to confine guest molecules, due to their extremely high surface areas combined with large and uniform pore sizes. Over time a constant demand has developed for larger pores with well-defined pore structures. Silicate materials, with well-defined pore sizes of about 2.0–10.0 nm, surpass the pore-size constraint (<2.0 nm of microporous zeolites. They also possess extremely high surface areas (>700 m2 g−1 and narrow pore size distributions. Instead of using small organic molecules as templating compounds, as in the case of zeolites, long chain surfactant molecules were employed as the structure-directing agent during the synthesis of these highly ordered materials. The structure, composition, and pore size of these materials can be tailored during synthesis by variation of the reactant stoichiometry, the nature of the surfactant molecule, the auxiliary chemicals, the reaction conditions, or by post-synthesis functionalization techniques. This review focuses mainly on a concise overview of silicate mesoporous materials together with their applications. Perusal of the review will enable researchers to obtain succinct information about microporous and mesoporous materials.

  20. Translational dynamics of water in a nanoporous layered silicate

    Nair, Sankar; Chowdhuri, Zema; Peral, Inmaculada; Neumann, Dan A.; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tompsett, Geoffrey; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy have been used to study the translational diffusion of water molecules in the unusual layered material AMH-3, which consists of (zeolitelike) three-dimensionally nanoporous silicate layers spaced by (claylike) interlayer regions. The synthesis of AMH-3 and its characterization by Si29 NMR, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy, are described. An analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra using the random jump diffusion model reveals two translational diffusive motions clearly separated in time scales: a fast process ( Dtilde 10-9m2/s at 300 K), and a much slower process ( Dtilde 10-11m2/s at 300 K). Considering the structural model of AMH-3 and the transport properties extracted from the QENS data, it is suggested that the slower motion corresponds to diffusion by water molecules in the interlayer spaces whereas the fast process involves diffusion in the silicate layer. This first investigation of transport phenomena in nanoporous layered silicates like AMH-3 indicates that they have the potential to offer mass transport properties different from zeolite materials and layered clays.

  1. Development of Li+ alumino-silicate ion source

    To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, one strategy is to deposit most of the ion energy at the peak of energy loss (dE/dx) with a low (E < 5 MeV) kinetic energy beam and a thin target. Lower mass ions have a peak dE/dx at a lower kinetic energy. To this end, a small lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate source has been fabricated, and its emission limit has been measured. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1000-1150 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Alumino-silicates sources of K+ and Cs+ have been used extensively in beam experiments, but there are additional challenges for the preparation of high-quality Li+ sources: There are tighter tolerances in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. We report on recent measurements ofhigh ( up to 35 mA/cm2) current density from a Li+ source. Ion species identification of possible contaminants is being verified with a Wien (E x B) filter, and via time-of-flight.

  2. Electrical properties of iron doped apatite-type lanthanum silicates

    SHI Qingle; ZHANG Hua

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Fe doping on the electrical properties of lanthanum silicates was investigated.The apatite-type lanthanum silicates La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 (x=0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0) were synthesized via sol-gel process.The unit cell volume increased with Fe doping because the ionic radius of Fe3+ ion is larger than that of Si4+ ion.The conductivities of La10Si6-xFexO27 x/2 first increased and then decreased with the increasing of Fe content.The increase of the conductivity might be attributed to the distortion of the cell lattice,which assisted the migration of the interstitial oxygen ions.The decrease of the conductivity might be caused by the lower concentration of interstitial oxygen ions.The optimum Fe doping content in lanthanum silicates was 0.6.La10Si5.4Fe0.6O26.7 exhibited the highest ionic conductivity of 2.712× 10-2 S/cm at 800 ℃.The dependence of conductivity on oxygen partial pressure p(O2) suggested that the conductivity of La10Si6-xFexO27-x/2 was mainly contributed by ionic conductivity.

  3. Proton tunneling in low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1

    In low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1 (monoclinic phase of CsHSi2O5), anomalous infrared absorption bands observed at 93, 155, 1210, and 1220 cm−1 are assigned to the vibrational mode of protons, which contribute to the strong hydrogen bonding between terminal oxygen atoms of silicate chain (O–O distance = 2.45 Å). The integrated absorbance (oscillator strength) for those modes is drastically enhanced at low temperatures. The analysis of integrated absorbance employing two different anharmonic double-minimum potentials makes clear that proton tunneling through the potential barrier yields an energy splitting of the ground state. The absorption bands at 93 and 155 cm−1, which correspond to the different vibrational modes of protons, are attributed to the optical transition between the splitting levels (excitation from the ground state (n = 0) to the first excited state (n = 1)). Moreover, the absorption bands at 1210 and 1220 cm−1 are identified as the optical transition from the ground state (n = 0) to the third excited state (n = 3). Weak Coulomb interactions in between the adjacent protons generate two types of vibrational modes: symmetric mode (93 and 1210 cm−1) and asymmetric mode (155 and 1220 cm−1). The broad absorption at 100–600 cm−1 reveals an emergence of collective mode due to the vibration of silicate chain coupled not only with the local oscillation of Cs+ but also with the proton oscillation relevant to the second excited state (n = 2)

  4. Kinetics of structure formation in PP/layered silicate nanocomposites

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP/organophilized montmorillonite (OMMT and polypropylene/organophilized montmorillonite/maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP composites were prepared in an internal mixer under a wide range of processing conditions to study the kinetics of structure formation. Structure and properties were characterized by a variety of techniques. The gallery structure of the organophilic silicate changed in spite of the fact that no compatibilizer was added to PP/OMMT composites. Silicate reflection shifted towards smaller 2θangles, broadened and its intensity decreased indicating intercalation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM micrographs even showed individual platelets at long mixing times. However, the extent and direction of changes in the gallery structure of the silicate did not justify those observed in properties. The analysis of the results and additional experiments proved that the degradation of the polymer also takes place during processing leading to the formation of carbonyl and/or carboxyl groups, as well as to the decrease of molecular weight. The modification of the chain structure of the polymer influences interfacial interactions and the intercalation process. Some properties are directly determined by molecular weight (rheological properties, elongation. Both the clay and the MAPP seem to accelerate degradation. Thermooxidative degradation must have disadvantageous effect during the application of PP nanocomposites and needs further study.

  5. Crystalline silicate dust around evolved stars I. The sample stars

    Molster, F J; Tielens, A G G M; Barlow, M J

    2002-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series of three where we present the first comprehensive inventory of solid state emission bands observed in a sample of 17 oxygen-rich circumstellar dust shells surrounding evolved stars. The data were taken with the Short and Long Wavelength Spectrographs on board of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and cover the 2.4 to 195 micron wavelength range. The spectra show the presence of broad 10 and 18 micron bands that can be attributed to amorphous silicates. In addition, at least 49 narrow bands are found whose position and width indicate they can be attributed to crystalline silicates. Almost all of these bands were not known before ISO. We have measured the peak positions, widths and strengths of the individual, continuum subtracted bands. Based on these measurements, we were able to order the spectra in sequence of decreasing crystalline silicate band strength. We found that the strength of the emission bands correlates with the geometry of the circumstellar shell, as derive...

  6. Electrochemical Studies on Silicate and Bicarbonate Ions for Corrosion Inhibitors

    Mohorich, Michael E.; Lamb, Joshua; Chandra, Dhanesh; Daemen, Jaak; Rebak, Raul B.

    2010-10-01

    Several types of carbon and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels are being considered for use in the underground reinforcement of the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. In this study, potentiodynamic polarization under reducing conditions was used to determine the corrosion rates (CRs) and passivity behavior of AISI 4340 steel using different combinations of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), in both pure water (PW) and simulated seawater (SW, 3.5 pct NaCl). These experiments were carried out to examine the potential inhibiting properties of the silicate or bicarbonate ions on the surface of the steel. The addition of sodium silicate to solution reduced the observed CR at room temperature to 19 μm/y at 0.005 M concentration and 7 μm/y at 0.025 M concentration in PW. The addition of sodium bicarbonate increased the CR from 84 μm/y (C = 0.1 M) to 455 μm/y (C = 1 M). These same behaviors were also observed at higher temperatures.

  7. Thermal treatment of mixtures of Tunisian phosphorite and additives of aluminum silicate

    The process in the mixtures of Tunisian phosphorite (TP) with addition of aluminum silicate waste by chemical and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses was studied. The influence of the additive's quantity, the temperature of thermal treatment, as well as the mechanical activation on the solubility of the heated mixtures in various extracting agents (citric acid, ammonium citrate and formic acid), were investigated. The solubility of P2O5 is higher in the case of the calcined and mechanically activated TP and its mixtures with ''Medet's steryl'' (MS) compared to the non-activated TP and its mixtures. The activated mixtures with 20% of MS have highest rate of P2O5 solubilization in citrate acid (66%) as well into ammonium citrate soluble form (60%). New phases [Ca5(PO4)3(OH), Ca5(PO4)2·SiO4, Ca7(PO4)2·(SiO4)2 and Ca4P2O9] in non-activated and activated calcined products were determined using XRD analysis

  8. Studies on Thermal Degradation Behavior of Siliceous Agriculture Waste (Rice Husk, Wheat Husk and Bagasse

    Javed Syed H.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Various siliceous agriculture waste (SAW such as rice husk, wheat husk and bagasse have been investigated to study their thermal degradation behavior using Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA technique. The focus of this research is to conduct TGA of raw and acid treated (20% HCl & 1M H2SO4 SAW at heating rate 10°C/min in the atmosphere of nitrogen. The results were analyzed on the basis of thermograms and it was inferred that 24 hours soaking with 20% HCl prior to thermal degradation enhanced the percent weight loss. The process also improved the percentage of residual weight of SAW indicating the extraction of amorphous silica with increased purity. The effect of acid treatment was verified by determining chemical composition of SAW samples before and after soaking with 20% HCl. Proximate analysis, thermal degradation temperature ranges and percentage of residual weight at 800°C for each of rice husk, wheat husk and bagasse were also quantified to observe the thermal degradation behavior. XRF analysis was performed to observe the effect of acid treatment for extraction of pure silica.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a novel layered sodium titanium silicate Na2TiSi2O7·2H2O

    A novel layered sodium titanium silicate Na2TiSi2O7·2H2O has been synthesized by the reaction of a titanium-hydrogen peroxide complex and silicic acid in alkaline media under mild hydrothermal conditions (200 degree C). The product was characterized by elemental analysis, TGA, FT-IR, MAS 29Si and 23Na NMR and X-ray spectroscopy. The intercalation reaction of n-alkylamines from the gaseous phase and the ion exchange behavior of Na2TiSi2O7·2H2O towards alkali, alkaline earth and some transition metal ions in model individual and complex solutions were studied. It was found that the layered sodium titanium silicate contains acidic hydroxyl functional groups, which results in cation uptake at pH>1.5. The high affinity of the exchanger for cesium in weakly acid and neutral solutions makes it a promising material for the treatment of some types of nuclear wastes, contaminated ground water and different biological liquors. 20 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  11. The effect of land plants on weathering rates of silicate minerals

    Drever, James I.

    1994-05-01

    Land plants and their associated microbiota directly affect silicate mineral weathering in several ways: by generation of chelating ligands, by modifying pH through production of CO 2 or organic acids, and by altering the physical properties of a soil, particularly the exposed surface areas of minerals and the residence time of water. In laboratory experiments far from equilibrium, 1 mM oxalate (a strong chelator of Al) has a negligible effect on the dissolution rate of alkali feldspars, but some effect on calcic feldspars and olivine. By analogy to oxalate, the overall effect of organic ligands on the weathering rate of silicate minerals in nature is likely to be small, except perhaps in microenvironments adjacent to roots and fungal hyphae. The effect of pH on silicate mineral dissolution rate depends on pH: below pH 4-5, the rate increases with decreasing pH, in the circumneutral region the rate is pH-independent, and at pH values above around 8 the rate increases with increasing pH. Vegetation should thus cause an increase in weathering rate through the pH effect only where the pH is below 4-5. As an overall generalization, the effect of plants on weathering rate through changes in soil-solution chemistry is probably small for granitic rocks; it may be greater for more mafic rocks. It is the release of Ca and Mg from mafic rocks that has the greatest influence on the global CO 2 budget. The effect of changes in soil physical properties on weathering rate can be major. By binding fine particles, plants can greatly increase weathering rates in areas of high physical erosion. Where erosion rates are lower, the effect of plants is less clear. On long timescales plants may decrease chemical weathering by binding secondary products and isolating unweathered minerals from meteoric water. A major unknown in estimating the effect of the advent of land plants on weathering rates is the nature (thickness, particle size distribution, permeability) of the regolith on the

  12. Fractionation and solubility of cadmium in paddy soils amended with porous hydrated calcium silicate

    ZHAO Xiu-lan; Saigusa Masaihiko

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that porous hydrated calcium silicate(PS)is very effective in decreasing cadmium(Cd)content in brown rice.However,it is unclear whether me PS influences cadmium transformation in soil.The present study examined the effect of PS on pH,cadmium transformation and cadmium solubility in Andosol and Alluvial soil,and also compared its effects with CaCO3,acidic porous hydrated calcium silicate(APS)and silica gel.Soil cadmium was operationally fractionationed into exchangeable(Exch),bound to carbonates(Carb).bound to iron and manganese oxides(FeMnOx),bound to organic matters(OM)and residual(Res)fraction.ApplicatiOn of PS and CaCO3 at hig rates enhanced soil pH,while APS and silica gel did not obviously change soil pH.PS and CaCO3 also increased the FeMnOx-Cd in Andosol and Carb-Cd in Alluvial soil,thus reducing the Exch-Cd in me tested soils.However,PS was less effecfive than CaCO3 at the same application rate.Cadmium fractions in the two soils were not changed by the treatments of APS and silica gel.There were no obvious differences in the solubility of cadmium in soils treated with PS,APS,silica gel and CaCO3 except Andosol treated 2.0%CaCO3 at the same pH of soil-CaCl2 suspensions.These findings suggested that the decrease of cadmium availability in soil was mainly attributed to the increase of soil pH caused by PS.

  13. Effect of drying technique on the physicochemical properties of sodium silicate-based mesoporous precipitated silica

    The conventional drying (oven drying) method used for the preparation of precipitated mesoporous silica with low surface area (>300 m2/g) and small pore volume is often associated with a high production cost and a time consuming process. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to develop a cost-effective and fast drying process for the production of precipitated mesoporous silica using inexpensive industrial grade sodium silicate and spray drying of the precipitated wet-gel silica slurry. The precipitated wet-gel silica slurry was prepared from an aqueous sodium silicate solution through the drop-wise addition of sulfuric acid. Mesoporous precipitated silica powder was prepared by drying the wet-gel slurry with different drying techniques. The effects of the oven drying (OD), microwave drying (MD), and spray drying (SD) techniques on the physical (oil, water absorption, and tapping density), and textural properties (specific BET surface area, pore volume, pore size, and % porosity) of the precipitated mesoporous silica powder were studied. The dried precipitated mesoporous silica powders were characterized with field-emission scanning electron microscopy; Brunauer, Emmett and Teller and BJH nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption methods; Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy; thermogravimetric and differential analysis; N2 physisorption isotherm; pore size distribution and particle size analysis. There was a significant effect of drying technique on the textural properties, such as specific surface area, pore size distribution and cumulative pore volume of the mesoporous silica powder. Additionally, the effect of the microwave-drying period on the physicochemical properties of the precipitated mesoporous silica powder was investigated and discussed.

  14. Preparation and fluorescence property of red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor

    This paper describes the energy efficient synthesis of a red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor produced by heating a Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor. Concentration quenching of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was not observed and the emission intensity did not decrease up to a Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio of 0.46. Heating of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate (Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio = 0.32) phosphor produced an amorphous Eu3+-activated calcium silicate phosphor, which had a maximum emission intensity at 870 oC and emitted in the red under near-ultraviolet irradiation (395 nm). The emission intensity of the Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was about half that of a commercial BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphor, and shows great potential for application in white light-emitting diodes.

  15. The silicate absorption profile in the ISM towards the heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418

    Roche, P F; Gonzalez-Martin, O

    2015-01-01

    The 9.7-micron silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium provides important information on the physical and chemical composition of interstellar dust grains. Measurements in the Milky Way have shown that the profile in the diffuse interstellar medium is very similar to the amorphous silicate profiles found in circumstellar dust shells around late M stars, and narrower than the silicate profile in denser star-forming regions. Here, we investigate the silicate absorption profile towards the very heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418, the galaxy with the deepest known silicate absorption feature, and compare it to the profiles seen in the Milky Way. Comparison between the 8-13 micron spectrum obtained with TReCS on Gemini and the larger aperture spectrum obtained from the Spitzer archive indicates that the former isolates the nuclear emission, while Spitzer detects low surface brightness circumnuclear diffuse emission in addition. The silicate absorption profile towards the nucleus is very similar to...

  16. Electrochemical Acceleration of Carbonate and Silicate Weathering for CO2 Mitigation

    Rau, G. H.; Carroll, S.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate and many silicate minerals dissolve in strong acids, and such acids are commonly generated at the anode of a conventional saline water electrolysis cell. It was therefore reasoned that encasing such an anode with base minerals would lead to enhanced mineral dissolution and hence increased hydroxide (base) generation at the cathode, formed in course of splitting water, generating H2 and OH-. Subsequent exposue of the alkalized solution to CO2 (e.g., as in air) would lead to absorption of the CO2 and formation of stable dissolved or solid (bi)carbonates for carbon sequestration. Previously, it has been demonstrated that mineral carbonate encasement of a seawater electrolysis cell anode indeed generated basic solutions in excess of pH 9 that were subsequently neutralized via contact with air CO2, increasing the carbon content of the initial seawater by 30% (Rau, G.H. 2008. Environ Sci. Techol. 42, 8935-). To test such a weathering/CO2 capture scheme using silicate minerals, either powdered wollastonite or ultramafic rock standard (UM-4) was encased around the anode of an electrolysis cell composed of graphite electrodes and a 0.25M Na2SO4 electrolyte solution. After 0.5 to 1.5 hrs of electricity application (3.5Vdc, 5-10mA), the electrolyte pH rose to as much as 11.1 (initial and blank solution pH's anolyte acid, H2SO4, forming mostly insoluble CaSO4 and MgSO4 at the anode. This then allowed NaOH normally produced at the cathode to accumulate in solution, in turn reacting with air CO2 to form NaHCO3. Longer electrolysis times and/or alternative electrolyte solutions might allow formation and precipitation of Ca or Mg carbonates. Such electrochemistry might ultimately provide a safe, efficient way to harness the planet's: i) large, off-peak or off-grid renewable electricity potential, ii) abundant basic minerals, and iii) vast natural brine electrolytes for large-scale air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

  17. Productivity and nutritive value of bluestem grass fertilized with calcium and magnesium silicate

    Cinthya Souza Santana; Laura Souza Santos; Greiciele de Morais; Luiz Arnaldo Fernandes; Luciana Castro Geraseev

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of application of calcium and magnesium silicate on the productivity, chemical composition and in situ ruminal degradation of bluestem grass (Andropogon gayanus Kunth, cv. Baeti; Embrapa 23) during the rainy and dry seasons. The design consisted of completely randomized blocks in a 6x2 factorial scheme (six silicate doses and two cutting seasons), arranged in plots subdivided over time. The plots were the calcium and magnesium silicate doses (0, 200, 400, 600, ...

  18. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO2–(60−x)Bi2O3–40SiO2 with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10−1 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623–703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), so called crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses

  19. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  20. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  1. Experimental study of the electrolysis of silicate melts

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K. T.

    1991-01-01

    To produce oxygen from lunar resources, it may be feasible to melt and electrolyze local silicate ores. This possibility was explored experimentally with synthesized melts of appropriate compositions. Platinum electrodes were employed at a melt temperature of 1425 C. When silicon components of the melt were reduced, the platinum cathode degraded rapidly, which prompted the substitution of a graphite cathode substrate. Discrete particles containing iron or titanium were found in the solidified electrolyte after three hours of electrolysis. Electrolyte conductivities did not decrease substantially, but the escape of gas bubbles, in some cases, appeared to be hindered by high viscosity of the melt.

  2. Silicate rock and rock forming mineral neutron activation analysis

    A neutron-activation scheme for the determination of nine rare earths and other trace elements in various rock forming minerals (feldspars, ilmenite, magnetite, pyroxenes) and silicate rocks is presented. The procedure is based on three different irradiations involving three separate samples: - epithermal neutron irradiation (2 days) followed by nondestructive analysis; - thermal neutron irradiation (1 day) followed by instrumental analysis; - thermal neutron irradiation (1 week) followed by radiochemical analysis (precipitation, anion exchange separation, liquid-liquid extraction). Two USGS reference samples - granite G-2 and andesite AGV-1 - have been analysed in order to assess the accuracy of the proposed procedure. Our results agree with previous neutron-activation data. (orig.)

  3. Kinetics of Cyclohexanone Ammoximation over Titanium Silicate Molecular Sieves

    李永祥; 吴巍; 闵恩泽

    2005-01-01

    An intrinsic kinetics of cyclohexanone ammoximation in the liquid phase over titanium silicate molecular sieves is investigated in an isothermal slurry reactor at different initial reactant concentrations, catalyst loading,and reaction temperature. The rate equations are developed by analyzing data of kinetic measurements. More than 10 side reactions were found. H202 decomposition reaction Inust be considered and other side reactions can be neglected in the kinetic modeling. The predicted values of reaction rates based on the kinetic models are almost consistent with experimental ones. The models have guidance to the selection of reactor types and they are useful to the design and operation of reactor used.

  4. Minerals ontology: application in the environmental field to silicates

    The aim of this paper is to describe the application of an ontology, or up-to-date computerized tool, developed in the field of artificial intelligence and in particular of knowledge engineering, to inert elements, in this case the silicate class, which are minerals of scientific, technical and economic interest. The importance of applying ontology to minerals lies in the fact that these substances are capable of causing negative environmental impacts upon other variables in the natural environment, such as the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, and possible subsequent effects on human health. (Author) 37 refs.

  5. Characterization of Silicate Glasses Implanted with Ag+ Ions

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Kormunda, M.; Kolitsch, A.

    Crete: 11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques, 2011, s. 25-25. [11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques. Crete (GR), 12.06.2011-18.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Grant ostatní: UJEP Usti nad Labem(CZ) iga ujep 5322215000901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ion implantation * silicate glasses * metal nanoparticles * Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy * optical absorption Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  6. In vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of tricalcium silicate

    Xiaoming Liao; Hongyang Zhu; Guangfu Yin; Zhongbing Huang; Yadong Yao; Xianchun Chen

    2011-08-01

    The in vitro bioactivity of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5) ceramics was investigated by the bone-like apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid (SBF), and the cytocompatibility was evaluated through osteoblast adhesion and proliferation assay. The results show that the Ca3SiO5 ceramics possess bone-like apatite formation ability in SBF. In vitro cytocompatible evaluation reveals that osteoblasts adhere and spread well on the Ca3SiO5 ceramics, indicating good bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

  7. Micro-PIXE analysis of silicate reference standards

    Czamanske, G.K.; Sisson, T.W.; Campbell, J.L.; Teesdale, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the University of Guelph proton microprobe have been evaluated through trace-element analysis of well-characterized silicate glasses and minerals, including BHVO-1 glass, Kakanui augite and hornblende, and ten other natural samples of volcanic glass, amphibole, pyroxene, and garnet. Using the 2.39 wt% Mo in a NIST steel as the standard, excellent precision and agreement between reported and analyzed abundances were obtained for Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, and Nb. -from Authors

  8. Tin in silicate glasses: structure, thermodynamics and kinetics

    In this work Moessbauer spectroscopy is used to investigate the oxidation states and structures of tin in silicate glasses. Thermal treatment of the glasses in atmospheres with varying oxygen partial pressure leads to the simultaneous appearance of reduction and diffusion. Experiments with varying treatment time give the opportunity to study diffusion and reduction processes in detail. Comparison of the hyperfine parameters of reference materials with measured parameter provides information about the local surroundings of the tin atoms. An octahedral surrounding for Sn4+ is presumed, while Sn2+ and three oxygen atoms form a tetrahedral coordination.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  10. Microstructural study of an iron silicate catalyst by electron microscopy

    This paper reports the effects of various synthesis conditions on the structure of iron silicate analogs of zeolite ZSM-5 considered. Scanning electron microscopy and morphologies. Particle sizes vary from tenths of a micron to several microns, depending on degree of agitation during crystal growth, while morphology is additionally dependent on the concentration of iron in the gel during crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine the size and spatial distributions of iron-rich (as compared to the FeZSM-5 matrix) second phase particles within the ZSM-5 framework as a function of SiO2/Fe2O3-ratio, thermal and hydrothermal treatments

  11. Formation of Uranyl-Silicate Nanoparticles at Ambient Conditions

    Nagy, K. L.; Sturchio, N. C.; Klie, R. F.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium(VI)-silicates are the dominant crystalline form of U(VI) at and near Earth's surface, but are difficult to form as pure phases under ambient conditions because of slow reaction kinetics aided by similar thermodynamic stabilities of the many possible minerals. We have investigated the effects of pH (2 to 11) and time (1 to 10 days) on the formation of U(VI)-silicates from initial solutions with U = 0.05 M and a fixed molar ratio of U:Si = 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:5 using high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and solution thermodynamic modeling. Previously, we used HEXS to identify from solutions with U:Si = 1:2 at pH 5 to 9, aged for one day, a trimeric U-silicate structural unit, or synthon, approximately one nanometer in dimension with U-U correlation lengths of about 0.4 nm. This synthon is a structural building block in uranyl silicate minerals such as soddyite, boltwoodite, and weeksite. ATR-FTIR results on the full set of samples show systematic changes in peak positions along with appearance and disappearance of vibrational modes that occurred with reaction time, pH and/or U:Si ratio; whereas, XRD indicated only a crystalline Na-boltwoodite-like phase at pH 11 and without the correlation length-scale resolution of HEXS. HRTEM results show few particles in a matrix of material containing areas having the lower correlation length visible in HEXS data. The data show clearly different mixtures of solids, including silica, and precipitate sizes under all conditions that transform over the 1 to 10 day aging period. The experimental reactions simulate conditions in the subsurface at sites contaminated with uranium, and the results are relevant to processes of uranium adsorption and colloid formation. [This work is supported by DOE's Environmental Remediation Science Program].

  12. Cracking phenomena in lithium-di-silicate glass ceramics

    Rajat Banerjee

    2001-04-01

    Lithium-di-silicate glass ceramic (Li2O, SiO2) with uniformly oriented crystals was placed on a Vickers indentation with extrusion axis horizontally parallel to the base axis. The material was rotated through 0°– 90° and at each angle a 20 N load was applied to ascertain the crack path. It was observed that the crack length decreases and the crack deviates from its original path with increasing angle. The deviation of the crack was correlated with the component of the crack driving force and the theoretical strength of the aligned crystals at different angles.

  13. Separation and concentration of uranium (VI) using titanium oxide (IV) modified with silicate

    This work reports the behavior of an efficient inorganic ion exchanger for the uptake of uranium fuel cycle plants. This absorber is prepared using a commercial powder titanium dioxide that was pasted with water or modified with sodium silicate, dried and calcined. This treatment has the benefit of enhancing the ion exchange ability of the titanium dioxide and allows to obtain the granulated absorber suitable for the work as a column bed. Uranium was recovered from solution of low concentration with the mentioned sorber, enabling the recovery of uranium from waste solution like the ammonium diuranate filtrate. This exchanger allows also the separation of uranium from solutions of high salt concentration, as for instance seawater and solutions of equivalent or higher salinity. In a test using seawater spiked with uranyl nitrate and adjusted its pH to be slightly acidic, the exchanger promoted very successfully the recovery of U(VI), which was concentrated on the column top, as a typical chromatographic yellow zone. Uranium was eluted with sodium carbonate or dilute nitric acid solution. (author). 23 refs

  14. Nutrient accumulation and biomass production of alfafa after soil amendment with silicates

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the use of silicate correctives in agriculture show that they have great potential to improve soil chemical characteristics, however, little information is available on the reactivity rates of their particle-size fractions. This study investigated whether the reactivity rates obtained experimentally could be considered in the calculation of ECC (effective calcium carbonate for soil liming, promoting adequate development of alfalfa plants. Six treatments were evaluated in the experiment, consisting of two slag types applied in two rates. The experimental ECC was used to calculate one of the rates and the ECC determined in the laboratory was used to calculate the other. Rates of limestone and wollastonite were based on the ECC determined in laboratory. The rates of each soil acidity corretive were calculated to increase the base saturation to 80%. The treatments were applied to a Rhodic Hapludox and an Alfisol Ferrudalfs. The methods for ECC determination established for lime can be applied to steel slag. The application of slag corrected soil acidity with consequent accumulation of Ca, P, and Si in alfalfa, favoring DM production.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and modelling of zinc and silicate co-substituted hydroxyapatite

    Friederichs, Robert J.; Chappell, Helen F.; Shepherd, David V.; Best, Serena M.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental chemistry and atomic modelling studies were performed here to investigate a novel ionic co-substitution in hydroxyapatite (HA). Zinc, silicate co-substituted HA (ZnSiHA) remained phase pure after heating to 1100°C with Zn and Si amounts of 0.6 wt% and 1.2 wt%, respectively. Unique lattice expansions in ZnSiHA, silicate Fourier transform infrared peaks and changes to the hydroxyl IR stretching region suggested Zn and silicate co-substitution in ZnSiHA. Zn and silicate insertion in...

  16. On the Anomalous Silicate Absorption Feature of the Prototypical Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1068

    Koehler, Melanie; Li, Aigen

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of the silicate absorption feature in AGNs was made at 9.7 micrometer for the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 over 30 years ago, indicating the presence of a large column of silicate dust in the line-of-sight to the nucleus. It is now well recognized that type 2 AGNs exhibit prominent silicate absorption bands, while the silicate bands of type 1 AGNs appear in emission. More recently, using the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument on the Very Large Telescope Inte...

  17. Selective and simultaneous determination of phosphate and silicate ions in leaching process waters for ceramics glaze raw materials of narutal origin by ion-exclusion chromatography coupled with UV-detection after postcolumn derivatization.

    Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Kurachi, Kazumasa; Hu, Wenzhi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The selective and simultaneous ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) with UV-detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column in the H+ -form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was developed and applied for the simultaneous determination of phosphate and silicate ions as the water quality parameters required for optimizing the water-leaching process for ceramics glaze raw materials of natural origin including feldspar, woods-ash, and straw-ash. Phosphate and silicate ions in these water-leaching process water samples were separated selectively from the coexisting anions such as sulfate, chloride, nitrate and carbonate ions, based on the ion-exclusion separation mechanism. They were detected selectively and simultaneously by a postcolumn derivatization with molybdenum-yellow using the UV-detector. Under the optimized separation and detection conditions (eluent, 0-1 mM sulfuric acid; reactant, 10 mM sodium molybdate-25 mM sulfuric acid; detector, UV at 370 nm; temperature, 45 degrees C), the linearity of calibration was in the range 0.1 - 10 ppm for both phosphate and silicate ions, and the detection limits at S/N = 3 were 2.58 ppb for silicate ions and 4.75 ppb for phosphate ions. The effectiveness of this method was demonstrated in practical applications to the water-leaching process for some ceramics glaze raw materials. PMID:16429785

  18. The structure of alkali silicate gel by total scattering methods

    Benmore, C.J.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of the alkali silicate gel (ASR) collected from the galleries of Furnas Dam in Brazil was determined by a pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of high energy X-ray diffraction data. Since this method is relatively new to concrete structure analysis a detailed introduction on the PDF method is given for glassy SiO2. The bulk amorphous structure of the dam material is confirmed as no Bragg peaks are observed in the scattered intensity. The real space results show that the local structure of the amorphous material is similar to kanemite (KHSi2O5:3H2O) however the long range layer structure of the crystal is broken up in the amorphous state, so that ordering only persists of the length scale of a few polyhedra. The silicate layer structure is a much more disordered than predicted by molecular dynamics models. The X-ray results are consistent with the molecular dynamics model of Kirkpatrick et al. (2005) [1] which predicts that most of the water resides in pores within the amorphous network rather than in layers. The total scattering data provide a rigorous basis against which other models may also be tested. © 2010.

  19. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  20. 6Li-doped silicate glass for thermal neutron shielding

    Glass formulations are described that contain high concentrations of 6Li and are suitable for use as thermal neutron shielding. One formulation contained 31 mol% of 6Li2O and 69 mol% of SiO2. Studies were performed on a second formulation that contained as much as 37 mol% of 6Li2O and 59 mol% of SiO2, with 4 mol% Al2O3 added to prevent crystallization at such high 6Li2O concentrations. These lithium silicate glasses can be formed into a variety of shapes using conventional glass fabrication techniques. Examples include flat plates, disks, hollow cylinders, and other more complex geometries. Both in-beam and in-core experiments have been performed to study the use and durability of Li silicate glasses. In-core experiments show the glass can withstand the intense radiation fields near the core of a reactor. The neutron attenuation of the glasses used in these studies was 90%/mm. In-beam studies show that the glass is effective for reducing the gamma-ray and neutron fields near experiments. ((orig.))

  1. New electrorheological fluid obtained from mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate suspensions

    Marins, Jessica A.; Dahmouche, Karim; Soares, Bluma G., E-mail: bluma@ima.ufrj.br

    2013-01-01

    Ormosil based on mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate (SiO{sub 2}/SSQ-SH) particle was prepared by sol-gel process involving a co-condensation of the hydrolyzed 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and tetraetoxysilane (TEOS). The resulting material was characterized by {sup 29}Si solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 29}Si NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The (SiO{sub 2}/SSQ-SH) particle presents a hierarchical structure, extending from micro to nanoscale and consisting of three structural levels. This SiO{sub 2}/SSQ-SH particle was used for the first time as the dispersed phase in silicone oil suspension to develop a new electro-rheological fluid with a very good response under the action of electrical field from 1 to 4 kV/mm, whose values are comparable to those exhibited by other conventional ER fluids, under the influence of electric field. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ormosil based on mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate particle was prepared by sol gel process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro/nano-structured mercapto-silica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercapto-modified ormosil particles with outstanding electro-rheological properties.

  2. Santaclaraite, a new calcium-manganese silicate hydrate from California.

    Erd, Richard C.; Ohashi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Santaclaraite, ideally CaMn4(Si5O14(OH))(OH).H2O, occurs as pink and tan veins and masses in Franciscan chert in the Diablo Range, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties, California. It is associated with four unidentified Mn silicates, Mn-howieite, quartz, braunite, calcite, rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, baryte, harmotome, chalcopyrite and native copper. Santaclaraite is triclinic, space group B1, a 15.633(1), b 7.603(1) , c 12.003(1) A, alpha 109.71(1)o, beta 88.61(1)o, gamma 99.95(1) o, V 1322.0(3) A3; Z = 4. The strongest lines of the X-ray pattern are 7.04(100), 3.003(84), 3.152(80), 7.69(63), 3.847(57) A. Crystals are lamellar to prismatic (flattened on (100)), with good cleavage on (100) and (010); H. 61/2 Dcalc. 3.398 g/cm3, Dmeas. 3.31 (+ or -0.01); optically biaxial negative, alpha 1.681, beta 1.696, gamma 1.708 (all + or - 0.002), 2Valpha 83 (+ or -1)o. Although chemically a hydrated rhodonite, santaclaraite dehydrates to Mn-bustamite at approx 550oC (in air) . Santaclaraite is a five-tetrahedral-repeat single-chain silicate and has structural affinities with rhodonite, nambulite, marsturite, babingtonite and inesite.-J.A.Z.

  3. Polymer-Layered Silicate Nanocomposites for Cryotank Applications

    Miller, Sandi G.; Meador, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous composite cryotank designs have relied on the use of conventional composite materials to reduce microcracking and permeability. However, revolutionary advances in nanotechnology derived materials may enable the production of ultra-lightweight cryotanks with significantly enhanced durability and damage tolerance, as well as reduced propellant permeability. Layered silicate nanocomposites are especially attractive in cryogenic storage tanks based on results that have been reported for epoxy nanocomposite systems. These materials often exhibit an order of magnitude reduction in gas permeability when compared to the base resin. In addition, polymer-silicate nanocomposites have been shown to yield improved dimensional stability, strength, and toughness. The enhancement in material performance of these systems occurs without property trade-offs which are often observed in conventionally filled polymer composites. Research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center have led to the development of epoxy-clay nanocomposites with 70% lower hydrogen permeability than the base epoxy resin. Filament wound carbon fiber reinforced tanks made with this nanocomposite had a five-fold lower helium leak rate than the corresponding tanks made without clay. The pronounced reduction observed with the tank may be due to flow induced alignment of the clay layers during processing. Additionally, the nanocomposites showed CTE reductions of up to 30%, as well as a 100% increase in toughness.

  4. Authigenic Mineralization of Silicates at the Organic-water Interface

    McEvoy, B.; Wallace, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    It is relatively common for some fraction of organic material to be preserved in the sedimentary rock record as disseminated molecular fragments. The survival of wholly coherent tissues from primarily soft-bodied organisms is far more unusual. However, the literature is now well- populated with spectacular examples of soft-tissue preservation ranging from a 2,600 year old human brain to the tissues of the Ediacaran biota that have survived ~600 million years. Some of the most exceptional examples of soft tissue preservation are from the Proterozoic-Cambrian transition, however, nearly all modes of fossil preservation during this time are debated. Clay mineral templates have been implicated as playing a role in several types of soft tissue preservation, including Burgess Shale and Beecher's Trilobite-type preservation, and more recently, Bitter Springs-type silicification. Yet, there is still much debate over whether these clay mineral coatings form during early stage burial and diagenesis, or later stage metamorphism. This research addresses this question by using in situ fluid cell Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to investigate the nucleation and growth of silicate minerals on model biological surfaces. Herein we present preliminary results on the deposition of hydrous magnesium silicates on self-assembled monolayers (-OH, -COOH, -CH3, and -H2PO3 terminated surfaces) at ambient conditions.

  5. Geo-neutrinos, Mantle Circulation and Silicate Earth

    Fiorentini, G; Mantovani, F; Vannucci, R; Fiorentini, Gianni; Lissia, Marcello; Mantovani, Fabio; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    In preparation to the experimental results which will be available in the future, we consider geo-neutrino production in greater detail than in [F. Mantovani et al., arXiv:hep-ph/0309013], putting the basis for a more refined model. We study geo-neutrino production for different models of matter circulation and composition in the mantle. By using global mass balance for the Bulk Silicate Earth, the predicted flux contribution from distant sources in the crust and in the mantle is fixed within +-15% (full range). A detailed geological and geochemical investigation of the region near the detector has to be performed, for reducing the flux uncertainty from fluctuations of the local abundances to the level of the global geochemical error. A five-kton detector operating over four years at a site relatively far from nuclear power plants can measure the geo-neutrino signal with 5% accuracy (1 sigma). It will provide a crucial test of the Bulk Silicate Earth and a direct estimate of the radiogenic contribution to ter...

  6. Silicates on Iapetus from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    Young, Cindy L; Clark, Roger N; Spencer, John R; Jennings, Donald E; Hand, Kevin P; Poston, Michael J; Carlson, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal to noise ratios (S/Rs) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/R and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure hav...

  7. Lightning and Mass Independent Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation in Nebular Silicates

    Nuth, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Lightning has long been postulated as the agent of Chondru|e formation in the solar nebula, but it may have an additional role to play as well. Lightning bolts of almost any scale will both vaporize dust and liberate oxygen atoms that will then interact with both nebular gases as well as the refractory silicate vapor as it re-condenses. Such processes should result in the addition of the heavy oxygen isotopes to the growing silicate grains while the light oxygen-16 becomes part of the gas phase water. This process will proceed to some extent throughout the history of any turbulent nebula and will result in the gradual increase of O-16 in the gas phase and in a much larger relative increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of the nebular dust. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the production of such "heavy oxygen enriched", non-mass-dependently-fractionated dust grains in a high voltage discharge in a hydrogen rich gas containing small quantities of silane, pentacarbonyl iron and oxygen.

  8. Potassium-silicate glass exposed to low energy H+ beam

    Highlights: ► Pristine potassium-silicate glass was irradiated with 5 keV protons. ► Surface relaxation increases amount of K and NBO in the surface layer. ► Enhanced bombardment leads to a continuous decrease of NBO and K. ► A constant surplus of K in elemental state was found on the glass surface. - Abstract: Pristine surface of binary potassium silicate glass 85SiO2·15K2O was prepared in vacuum and irradiated with a 5 keV proton beam within the range of 0.6–103 C/m2. The response of glass surface was monitored by XPS and the evolution of atomic concentrations divided it into two stages. During the first one, amounts of both potassium and non-bridging oxygen (NBO) increase in the surface layer and are governed by surface relaxation. The second stage is characterised by a continuous decrease of NBO and K. Comparison of K and NBO concentrations yielded a constant surplus of K proving the existence of potassium elemental state on the glass surface. Ratio of bridging oxygen (BO) and silicon is conserved during proton bombardment. The extrapolation of the glass response to the enhanced irradiation predicts a formation of substoichiometric SiOx with some elemental K on the topmost surface.

  9. Identification and Practical Application of Silicate-dissolving Bacteria

    LIN Qi-mei; RAO Zheng-hua; SUN Yan-xing; YAO Jun; XING Li-jun

    2002-01-01

    Slime-forming bacteria were isolated from soils, rock surface and earthworm intestine, and their effects on dissolving silicate minerals and tomato growth were examined. One of the bacteria, Bacillus mucilaginosus RGBc13, had particularly strong ability to form slime and dissolve silicates. RGBc13 could also colonize and develop in both non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soil. Total number of slime-forming bacteria increased from 2.9 × 103 cfu·g- 1and 8.4 × 103 cfu·g-1 to 9.6 × 106 cfu·g-1 and 6.0 × 107 cfu·g-1 in the non-rhizosphere and rhizosphere soils respectively. Potassium and phosphorus nutritional conditions in the rhizosphere were markedly improved through inoculation of this bacterium. Available K and P respectively increased from 25.86 and 3.63mg· kg-1 in the non-rhizosphere soil to 91.23 and 5.74mg· kg-1 in the rhizosphere soil. Tomato biomass increased by 125%, K and P uptakes were more than 150%, greater than the non- inoculation. Thus, there is a potential in applying RGBc13 for improving plant K and P nutrition.

  10. Formation of Water on a Warm Amorphous Silicate Surface

    Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao

    2014-06-01

    It is well established that reactions on interstellar dust grain surfaces are indispensable for water formation in space. Among all the intermediate products that lead to water formation, the OH radical is especially important because is a product of all the three main water formation surface routes, i.e., the hydrogenation of O, O2, and O3, and it also connects these three routes. The desorption energy of OH from dust grain surfaces, along with dust grain temperature, determines the availability OH for grain surface versus gas-phase reactions. We experimentally investigated water formation on the surface of a warm amorphous silicate via H+O3→OH+O2. The surface temperature was kept at 50 K so as to exclude the interference of O2. It is found that OH has a significant residence time at 50 K. The OH desorption energy from amorphous silicate surface is calculated to be at least 1680 K, and possibly as high as 4760 K. Water is formed efficiently via OH+H and OH+H2, and the product H2O stays on the surface upon formation. Deuterium has also been used in place of hydrogen to check isotopic effects. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958) and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  11. Carbon substitution for oxygen in silicates in planetary interiors.

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett J; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mera, Gabriela; Tavakoli, Amir; Ionescu, Emanuel; Riedel, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs), synthesized from organometallic precursors, contain carbon- and silica-rich nanodomains, the latter with extensive substitution of carbon for oxygen, linking Si-centered SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra. Calorimetric studies demonstrated these PDCs to be thermodynamically more stable than a mixture of SiO2, C, and silicon carbide. Here, we show by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy that substitution of C for O is also attained in PDCs with depolymerized silica-rich domains containing lithium, associated with SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra with nonbridging oxygen. We suggest that significant (several percent) substitution of C for O could occur in more complex geological silicate melts/glasses in contact with graphite at moderate pressure and high temperature and may be thermodynamically far more accessible than C for Si substitution. Carbon incorporation will change the local structure and may affect physical properties, such as viscosity. Analogous carbon substitution at grain boundaries, at defect sites, or as equilibrium states in nominally acarbonaceous crystalline silicates, even if present at levels at 10-100 ppm, might form an extensive and hitherto hidden reservoir of carbon in the lower crust and mantle. PMID:24043830

  12. Structure and dynamics in polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites

    A poly(methyl phenyl siloxane) homopolymer is intercalated within the organophilized galleries of layered silicates forming nanocomposites in which the polymer chains are confined within the ∼1.5 nm interlayer spacing. These are found to be equilibrium structures since they are independent of the preparation method whereas the spacing is independent of the hybrid composition as well. Quasielastic neutron scattering investigated the effect of such severe confinement on polymer dynamics. Two relaxation processes corresponding to the methyl group rotation and the polymer segmental relaxation were clearly identified for both the bulk homopolymer and the nanocomposite. The very local process of methyl group rotation was unaffected by the confinement within the silicate galleries. At temperatures above the polymer glass transition temperature, the quasielastic data reveal a strong coupling between the segmental motion and the motion of the surfactant chains of the organosilicate. However, the mean square displacement data show that the segmental process in confinement is actually faster than that of the bulk polymer even when the contribution of the surfactant chains is taken into account

  13. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  14. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

    Rau, Greg H; Carroll, Susan A; Bourcier, William L; Singleton, Michael J; Smith, Megan M; Aines, Roger D

    2013-06-18

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 10(5)-fold increase in OH(-) concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH(-) initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23729814

  15. Evidence for stable Sr isotope fractionation by silicate weathering in a small sedimentary watershed in southwestern Taiwan

    Chao, Hung-Chun; You, Chen-Feng; Liu, Hou-Chun; Chung, Chuan-Hsiung

    2015-09-01

    Radiogenic Sr isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) are robust for provenance identification in hydrology, affected mainly by the age of background lithologies and the degree of chemical weathering. However, there is limited knowledge concerning the fractionation mechanism of stable Sr isotopes (88Sr/86Sr) in rivers. In this study, river water was collected on a weekly to monthly basis throughout dry and wet seasons. Furthermore, to study the variations of radiogenic and stable Sr isotopes during intense weathering, a major flooding event (2000 mm precipitation in three days, Typhoon Morakot), water was captured within a small drainage catchment system (161 km2) along the Hou-ku River in southwestern Taiwan. For a better constraint on the end member compositions, bedload sediments, suspended particles, and several host rocks were sampled for a systematic investigation. The carbonate and silicate phases of these solids were chemically separated. Dissolved major elements indicate that the watersheds were predominated by silicate weathering. Stable Sr isotopes show no significant variation (δ88Sr = 0.24-0.31‰) temporally and spatially with an average of 0.28‰. Additionally, all solids showed lower δ88Sr values than the river water while the host rocks had higher δ88Sr values (δ88Sr = 0.20-0.26‰) than the residual weathering products (δ88Sr = 0.08-0.22‰), indicating preferential leaching of heavy Sr into the hydrosphere and leaving light Sr in the residual solids. Results of laboratory acid leaching experiments reveal that dissolution of high δ88Sr value minerals occurred at an early stage of weathering. The variation of weathering intensity does not alter stable Sr isotopes in silicate weathering dominated river water, which contains higher stable Sr isotopes than the associated sediments. The silicatic sedimentary rocks preferentially released higher stable Sr isotopes into the hydrosphere during chemical weathering, thus leaving lower stable Sr isotopes in the residual

  16. Corrosion resistance of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particle for steel reinforcement in concrete

    Tang, Fujian

    Porcelain enamel has stable chemical property in harsh environments such as high temperature, acid and alkaline, and it can also chemically react with substrate reinforcing steel resulting in improved adherence strength. In this study, the corrosion resistances of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particles, which are designed for improved bond strength with surrounding concrete, were investigated in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. It consists of two papers that describe the results of the study. The first paper investigates the corrosion behavior of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by OCP, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The coatings include a pure enamel, a mixed enamel that consists of 50% pure enamel and 50% calcium silicate by weight, and a double enamel that has an inner pure enamel layer and an outer mixed enamel layer. Electrochemical tests demonstrates that both pure and double enamel coatings can significantly improve corrosion resistance, while the mixed enamel coating offers very little protection due to connected channels. The second paper is focused on the electrochemical characteristics of enamel coating modified by sand particle applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by EIS. Six percentages by weight are considered including 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. Results reveal that addition of sand particle does not affect its corrosion resistance significantly. Most of the sand particles can wet very well with enamel body, while some have a weak zone which is induced during the cooling stage due to different coefficient of thermal expansion. Therefore, quality control of sand particle is the key factor to improve its corrosion resistance.

  17. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  18. EXAMINATION OF SILICATE LIMITATION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN JIAOZHOU BAY, CHINA——I. SILICATE BEING A LIMITING FACTOR OF PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION

    杨东方; 张经; 吕吉斌; 高振会; 陈豫

    2002-01-01

    Jiaozhou Bay data collected from May 1991 to February 1994, in 12 seasonal investigations, and provided the authors by the Ecological Station of Jiaozhou Bay, were analyzed to determine the spatiotemporal variations in temperature, light, nutrients (NO3--N, NO2--N, NH4+-N, SIO32--Si, PO43--P), phytoplankton, and primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The results indicated that only silicate correlated well in time and space with, and had important effects on, the characteristics, dynamic cycles and trends of, primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The authors developed a corresponding dynamic model of primary production and silicate and water temperature. Eq. ( 1 ) of the model shows that the primary production variation is controlled by the nutrient Si and affected by water temperature; that the main factor controlling the primary production is Si; that water temperature affects the composition of the structure of phytoplankton assemblage; that the different populations of the phytoplankton assemblage occupy different ecological niches for C, the apparent ratio of conversion of silicate in seawater into phytoplankton biomas and D, the coefficient of water temperature's effect on phytoplankton biomass. The authors researched the silicon source of Jiaozhou Bay, the biogeochemical sediment process of the silicon, the phytoplankton predominant species and the phytoplankton structure. The authors considered silicate a limiting factor of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, whose decreasing concentration of silicate from terrestrial source is supposedly due to dilution by current and uptake by phytoplankton; quantified the silicate assimilated by phytoplankton, the intrinsic ratio of conversion of silicon into phytoplankton biomass, the proportion of silicate uptaken by phytoplankton and diluted by current; and found that the primary production of the phytoplankton is determined by the quantity of the silicate assimilated by them. The phenomenon of apparently high plant

  19. EXAMINATION OF SILICATE LIMITATION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN JIAOZHOU BAY, CHINA Ⅰ. SILICATE BEING A LIMITING FACTOR OF PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION

    杨东方; 张经; 吕吉斌; 高振会; 陈豫

    2002-01-01

    Jiaozhou Bay data collected from May 1991 to February 1994, in 12 seasonal investigations, and provided the authors by the Ecological Station of Jiaozhou B ay, were analyzed to determine the spatiotemporal variations in temperature, light, nutrients (NO-3-N, NO-2-N, NH+4-N, SiO2-3-Si, PO3-4-P), phytoplankton, and primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The results indicated that only silicate correlated well in time and space with, and had important effects on, the characteristics, dynamic cycles and trends of, primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The authors developed a corresponding dynamic model of primary production and silicate and water temperature. Eq.(1) of the model shows that the primary production variation is controlled by the nutrient Si and affected by water temp erature; that the main factor controlling the primary production is Si; that water temper ature affects the composition of the structure of phytoplankton assemblage; that the different populations of the phytoplankton assemblage occupy different ecologica l niches for C, the apparent ratio of conversion of silicate in seawater into phytoplankton biomas and D, the coefficient of water temperature's effect on phytoplankton biomass. The authors researched the silicon source of Jiaozhou Bay , the biogeochemical sediment process of the silicon, the phytoplankton predominan t species and the phytoplankton structure. The authors considered silicate a limit ing factor of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, whose decreasing concentration of silicate from terrestrial source is supposedly due to dilution by current and up take by phytoplankton; quantified the silicate assimilated by phytoplankton, the intrins ic ratio of conversion of silicon into phytoplankton biomass, the proportion of silicate uptaken by phytoplankton and diluted by current; and found that the primary production of the phytoplankton is determined by the quantity of the silicate assimilated by them. The phenomenon of apparently high plant

  20. Effects of solution pH and synthetic method on destabilization process of polytitanium-silicate-chloride.

    Huang, Xin; Gao, Baoyu; Sun, Yangyang; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Effect of solution pH on coagulation performance and flock properties of a novel inorganic polymer coagulant-polytitanium-silicate-chloride (PTSC) in humic acid-kaolin water treatment was investigated in this work. PTSC was synthesized by two approaches: composite and co-complexion, denoted as PTSCm and PTSCc respectively. The effect of the synthetic method was also considered. Results indicated that turbidity and DOM removal were improved by addition of polysilicic acid, especially under acidic condition. PTSCc achieved slightly better DOM removal than that of PTSCm. Flocks formed under acidic condition was smaller than those form under alkaline condition. In addition, flocks formed by PTSCc were larger than PTSCm flocks. Results also indicated that flock strength and recovery ability was slightly improved by the addition of PSiA. Moreover, under acidic condition, PTSC flocks had larger fractal dimension with more compact structure, especially for PTSCm flocks. In contrast, they were looser compared with PTC flock, especially for PTSCm flocks under neutral and alkaline conditions. PMID:26994354

  1. Annealing of Pre-Cometary Silicate Grains in Solar Nebula Shocks

    Harker, D. E.; Desch, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Comets contain crystalline silicate grains which could only have formed at high temperatures, not generally experienced by comets. We test the hypothesis that amorphous silicates were annealed by shock waves in the solar nebula. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Mechanical and thermal properties of sodium silicate treated moso bamboo particles reinforced PVC composites

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to study the potential of sodium silicate modification on moso bamboo particles as reinforcements for thermoplastic. Moso bamboo particles were modified with sodium silicate aqueous solutions (of 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% and 10% concentrations). The mechanical properties of sodium silicate treated moso bamboo particles reinforced PVC composites (BPPC) were calculated and compared with raw bamboo particles filled samples. The thermal characteristics of the BPPC were studied to investigate the feasibility of sodium silicate treatment on moso bamboo particles. The particle morphology and BPPC microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of the BPPC increased before the concentration of sodium silicate solution reached 5% and got their maximum values of 15.72 MPa and 2956.80 MPa, respectively at 5% concentration. The modulus of rupture obtained the maximum value of 27.73 MPa at 2% concentration. The mechanical curve decreased as the concentration of solution went higher. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis illustrated that the sodium silicate solution treated BPPC possesses a better compatibility. More uniform dispersion of moso bamboo particles in PVC matrix was obtained after the sodium silicate treatment. Hence, the sodium silicate was a feasible and competitive agent of creating moso bamboo particles reinforced PVC composites.

  3. Effect of silicate pretreatment, post-sealing and additives on corrosion resistance of phosphated galvanized steel

    2007-01-01

    Sodium silicate (water glass) pretreatment before phosphating, silicate post-sealing after phosphating and adding silicate to a traditional phosphating solution were respectively carried out to obtain the improved phosphate coatings with high corrosion resistance and coverage on hot-dip galvanized(HDG) steel. The corrosion resistance, morphology and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated using neutral salt spray(NSS) tests, scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS). The results show that pretreatment HDG steel with silicate solutions, phosphate coatings with finer crystals and higher coverage are formed and the corrosion resistance is enhanced. Adding silicate to a traditional phosphating solution, the surface morphology of the coatings is nearly unchanged. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is mainly dependent on phosphating time.Phosphating for a longer time (such as 5 min), the corrosion resistance, increasing with concentration of silicate, is improved significantly. Post-sealing the phosphated HDG steel with silicate solutions, the pores among the zinc phosphate crystals are sealed with the films containing Si, P, O and Zn and the continuous composite coatings are formed. The corrosion resistance of the composite coatings, related to the pH value, contents of hydrated gel of silica and Si2O52- and post-sealing time, is increased markedly. The improved coatings with optimal corrosion resistance are obtained for phosphating 5 min and post-sealing with 5 g/L silicate solution for 10 min.

  4. The interaction of components organic-silicate paintwork material with painted surface

    Шолух, Н.Е.; Кудюков, Ю.П.; Ржецкий, Е.А.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of components organic-silicate paintwork material with painted surface is studied. It is shown that coverings on a basis of organic-silicate composition that is putting on a surfaces of concrete, brick, plaster, asbestos cement and similar building materials, have good physical-mechanical indicators.

  5. Controlled structure and properties of silicate nanoparticle networks for incorporation of biosystem components

    Inorganic nanoparticles are of technological interest in many fields. We created silicate nanoparticle hydrogels that effectively incorporated biomolecules that are unstable and involved in complicated reactions. The size of the silicate nanoparticles strongly affected both the physical characteristics of the resulting hydrogel and the activity of biomolecules incorporated within the hydrogel. We used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze in detail the hydrogel network patterns formed by the silicate nanoparticles. We obtained clear nanostructured images of biomolecule-nanoparticle composite hydrogels. The TEM images also showed that larger silicate nanoparticles (22 nm) formed more loosely associated silicate networks than did smaller silicate nanoparticles (7 nm). The loosely associated networks formed from larger silicate nanoparticles might facilitate substrate diffusion through the network, thus promoting the observed increased activity of the entrapped biomolecules. This doubled the activity of the incorporated biosystems compared with that of biosystems prepared by our own previously reported method. We propose a reaction scheme to explain the formation of the silicate nanoparticle networks. The successful incorporation of biomolecules into the nanoparticle hydrogels, along with the high level of activity exhibited by the biomolecules required for complicated reaction within the gels, demonstrates the nanocomposites' potential for use in medical applications.

  6. Synthesis, structure peculiarities and electric conductivity of alkali metal-rare earth silicates (germanates)

    The process of obtaining of rare earth-alkali metal silicates (germanates) is studied. The analysis of possibilities of structural disordering of alkaline cations in these structures is given. The interaction of the structure of different by the composition alkali alkali metal - rare earth silicates with electric conductivity values is shown

  7. 78 FR 14540 - Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl...

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl Sodium... the registration review of cyromazine, silica silicates (silica dioxide and silica gel), glufosinate..., consistent with the notice published in the Federal Register of August 17, 2012, (77 FR 49792)...

  8. Sodium Silicate Behavior in Porous Media Applied for In-Depth Profile Modifications

    Hossein A. Akhlaghi Amiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses alkaline sodium silicate (Na-silicate behavior in porous media. One of the advantages of the Na-silicate system is its water-like injectivity during the placement stage. Mixing Na-silicate with saline water results in metal silicate precipitation as well as immediate gelation. This work demonstrated that low salinity water (LSW, sea water diluted 25 times could be used as a pre-flush in flooding operations. A water override phenomenon was observed during gel formation which is caused by gravity segregation. Dynamic adsorption tests in the sand-packed tubes showed inconsiderable adsorbed silicon density (about 8.5 × 10−10 kg/cm3 for a solution with 33 mg/L silicon content, which is less than the estimated mono-layer adsorption density of 1.4 × 10−8 kg/cm3. Na-silicate enhanced water sweep efficiency after application in a dual-permeability sand-pack system, without leak off into the oil-bearing low permeability (LP zone. Field-scale numerical sensitivity studies in a layered reservoir demonstrated that higher permeability and viscosity contrasts and lower vertical/horizontal permeability ratio result in lower Na-silicate leakoff into the matrix. The length of the mixing zone between reservoir water and the injected Na-silicate solution, which is formed by low salinity pre-flush, acts as a buffer zone.

  9. Quantitative estimation of the reinforcing effect of layered silicates in PP nanocomposites

    Szazdi, Laszlo; Pukansky Jr, Bela; Vancso, G. Julius; Pukanszky, Bela

    2006-01-01

    Various polypropylene/layered silicate composites were prepared with different silicate contents. Montmorillonites with and without organophilization as well as three maleinated polypropylenes were used to change the extent of exfoliation and hence the properties of the composites. Structure was cha

  10. Synthesis and reaction behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in basic system

    刘桂华; 贺强; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2004-01-01

    At the molar ratio of CaO to SiO2 of 1, with calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate, calcium silicate hydrate was synthesized at 50, 100, 170 ℃, respectively. The results show that temperature favors the formation of calcium silicate hydrate with perfect structure. When calcium silicate hydrate reacts with caustic solution, the decomposition rate of calcium silicate hydrate increases with the increasing caustic concentration and decreases with the raising synthesis temperature and the prolongation of reaction time. The decomposition rate is all less than 1.2 % in caustic solution, and XRD pattern of the residue after reaction with caustic solution is found as the same as that of original calcium silicate hydrate, which indicates the stable existence of calcium silicate hydrate in caustic solution.When reacted with soda solution, the decomposition rate increases with the increasing soda concentration and reaction time, while decreases with the synthesis temperature. The decomposition rate is more than 2% because CaO · SiO2 · H2O(CSH( Ⅰ )), except Ca5 (OH)2Si6O16 · 4H2O and Ca6Si6O17 (OH)2, is decomposed. So the synthesis temperature and soda concentration should be controlled in the process of transformation of sodium aluminosilicate hydrate into calcium silicate hydrate.

  11. Performance of Different Acids on Sandstone Formations

    M. A. Zaman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of sandstone formations is a challenging task, which involves several chemicals and physical interactions of the acid with the formation. Some of these reactions may result in formation damage. Mud acid has been successfully used to stimulate sandstone reservoirs for a number of years. It is a mixture of hydrofluoric (HF and hydrochloric (HCl acids designed to dissolve clays and siliceous fines accumulated in the near-wellbore region. Matrix acidizing may also be used to increase formation permeability in undamaged wells. The change may be up to 50% to 100% with the mud acid. For any acidizing process, the selection of acid (Formulation and Concentration and the design (Pre-flush, Main Acid, After-flush is very important. Different researchers are using different combinations of acids with different concentrations to get the best results for acidization. Mainly the common practice is combination of Hydrochloric Acid – Hydrofluoric with Concentration (3% HF – 12% HCl. This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Orthophosphoric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in one combination and the second combination is Fluoboric and formic acid and the third one is formic and hydrofluoric acid. The results are compared with the mud acid and the results calculated are porosity, permeability, and FESEM Analysis and Strength tests. All of these new combinations shows that these have the potential to be used as acidizing acids on sandstone formations.

  12. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    Dult, Meenakshi; Kundu, R.S. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Murugavel, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Punia, R., E-mail: rajeshpoonia13@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Kishore, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India)

    2014-11-01

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO{sub 2}–(60−x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}–40SiO{sub 2} with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10{sup −1} Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623–703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σ{sub dc}), so called crossover frequency (ω{sub H}), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (H{sub f}) and enthalpy of migration (H{sub m}) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti{sup 3+} and Ti{sup 4+} ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses.

  13. Apatite: a new redox proxy for silicic magmas?

    Miles, Andrew; Graham, Colin; Hawkesworth, Chris; Gillespie, Martin; Bromiley, Geoff; Hinton, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The oxidation states of magmas provide valuable information about the release and speciation of volatile elements during volcanic eruptions, metallogenesis, source rock compositions, open system magmatic processes, tectonic settings and potentially titanium (Ti) activity in chemical systems used for Ti-dependent geothermometers and geobarometers. In this presentation we explore the use of Mn in apatite as an oxybarometer in intermediate and silicic igneous rocks. Increased Mn concentrations in apatite in granitic rocks from the zoned Criffell granitic pluton (southern Scotland) correlate with decreasing Fe2O3 (Fe3+) and Mn in the whole-rock and likely reflect increased Mn2+/Mn3+and greater compatibility of Mn2+ relative to Mn3+ in apatite under reduced conditions. Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in biotites have previously been used to calculate oxygen fugacities (fO2) in the outer zone granodiorites and inner zone granites where redox conditions have been shown to change from close to the magnetite-hematite buffer to close to the nickel-nickel oxide buffer respectively[1]. This trend is apparent in apatite Mn concentrations from a range of intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks that exhibit varying redox states and are shown to vary linearly and negatively with log fO2, such that logfO2=-0.0022(±0.0003)Mn(ppm)-9.75(±0.46) Variations in the Mn concentration of apatites appear to be largely independent of differences in the Mn concentration of the melt. Apatite Mn concentrations may therefore provide an independent oxybarometer that is amenable to experimental calibration, with major relevance to studies on detrital mineral suites, particularly those containing a record of early Earth redox conditions, and on the climatic impact of historic volcanic eruptions[2]. [1] Stephens, W. E., Whitley, J. E., Thirlwall, M. F. and Halliday, A. N. (1985) The Criffell zoned pluton: correlated behaviour of rare earth element abundances with isotopic systems. Contributions to Mineralogy and

  14. Physical properties of sodium silicate based silica aerogels prepared by single step sol-gel process dried at ambient pressure

    The experimental results on physical properties of water glass (sodium silicate) based silica aerogels prepared by single step sol-gel process, dried at atmospheric pressure are reported. The hydrolysis and condensation reactions of the sodium silicate precursor proceeded with tartaric acid as a catalyst. The hydrogel was vapour passed in order to remove sodium salt from the gel network. Solvent exchange was carried out using methanol and hexane as a solvents. Finally, surface chemical modification of the gel was done using trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) followed by ambient pressure drying of the gel up to the temperature 200 deg. C. To get good quality aerogels various sol-gel parameters such as water vapour passing period varied from 0.5 to 2 h, gel aging from 1 to 4 h, Na2SiO3/H2O molar ratio from 3 x 10-3 to 1.5 x 10-2, tartaric acid/Na2SiO3 molar ratio from 0.3 to 1.9 and TMCS/Na2SiO3 molar ratio from 4.8 to 12. The aerogels were characterized by percentage of volume shrinkage, bulk density, porosity and hydrophobicity. The hydrophobicity of the aerogel was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Microstructural studies have been carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen adsorption BET analysis. From the TGA-DTA studies of the aerogels, it was found that the aerogels were thermally stable up to 470 oC. Low density (∼0.066 g/cm3), high hydrophobicity (∼145 deg.), high porosity (∼97 %), high pore volume, surface area of 510 m2/g aerogels have been obtained for Na2SiO3:H2O:tartaric acid (C4H6O6):TMCS molar ratio at 1:166.6:2.5:12 respectively with half an hour water vapour passing.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of gamma radiation-induced coloration in silicate glass for nuclear applications

    Silicate glass irradiated by γ-rays was investigated in this study using spectroscopic analyses which included ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The phenomenon of coloration on γ-ray-irradiated silicate glass was analyzed and the effect of annealing on the silicate coloration was also investigated. The results revealed that the coloration originates from the creation of hole-centers (HC) caused by radiation. The shade of the coloration highly correlates to the amount of these HC-related defects but can be reversed by thermal annealing. The variation in coloration is an effective predictive factor in understanding radiation damage on silicate glass. Therefore, this study is relevant in the development of radiation detectors using silicate material as well as in the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in glass form

  16. Search for Large Presolar Silicate Grains in the QUE 99177 CR Chondrite

    Nguyen, A. N.; Messenger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silicates are among the most abundant pre-solar grain type, and their diverse chemical and isotopic compos-tions preserve detailed constraints on their stellar origins, condensation conditions, and nucleosynthetic and interstellar processes. Yet, owing to their small sizes, relatively few grains have been measured for isotopic compositions besides O and Si, and their mineralogy is poorly characterized. The average grain size (approx 270 nm) limits the number of analyses that can be conducted on a given grain, and their identification among solar system silicates introduces contaminating signal. These difficulties can be overcome by identifying large presolar silicate grains. However, such grains are very rare and only two approx 1 micron grains have been discovered. We are conducting a dedicated search for large presolar silicates in size-separated QUE 99177 matrix material. This primitive meteorite has among the highest abundance of presolar silicates

  17. Soft X-ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications on Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Ciaravella, A; Chen, Y -J; Caro, G M Muñoz; Huang, C -H; Jiménez-Escobar, A; Venezia, A M

    2016-01-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate ?lms submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted solgel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  18. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated. PMID:27287140

  19. Preparation and characterization of bioactive and degradable composites containing ordered mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide)

    Highlights: • Mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide) composite was fabricated. • The composite has good hydrophilicity, in vitro degradation and bioactivity. • The composite could support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. - Abstract: Polylactide (PLA) and its copolymers have been widely used for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, a bioactive composite of ordered mesoporous calcium–magnesium silicate (m-CMS) and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) was fabricated by melt blending method. The results indicated that the m-CMS particles were entrapped by polymer phase, and crystallinity of PLLA significantly decreased while the thermal stability of the m-CMS/PLLA composites was not obviously affected by addition of the m-CMS into PLLA. In addition, compared to PLLA, incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA significantly improved the hydrophilicity, in vitro degradability and bioactivity (apatite-formation ability) of the m-CMS/PLLA composite, which were m-CMS content dependent. Moreover, it was found that incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA could neutralize the acidic degradation by-products and thus compensated for the decrease of pH value. In cell culture experiments, the results showed that the composite enhanced attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of MC3T3-E1 cells, which were m-CMS content dependent. The results indicated that the addition of bioactive materials to PLLA could result in a composite with improved properties of hydrophilicity, degradability, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

  20. Preparation and characterization of bioactive and degradable composites containing ordered mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide)

    Ji, Jiajin [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Dong, Xieping, E-mail: jxzhyxh@163.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Jiangxi People' s Hospital, Nanchang 330006 (China); Ma, Xuhui [Polymer Science (Shenzhen) New Materials Co., Ltd., Shenzhen 518101 (China); Tang, Songchao, E-mail: schtang@ecust.edu.cn [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wu, Zhaoying; Xia, Ji; Wang, Quanxiang; Wang, Yutao; Wei, Jie [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide) composite was fabricated. • The composite has good hydrophilicity, in vitro degradation and bioactivity. • The composite could support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. - Abstract: Polylactide (PLA) and its copolymers have been widely used for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, a bioactive composite of ordered mesoporous calcium–magnesium silicate (m-CMS) and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) was fabricated by melt blending method. The results indicated that the m-CMS particles were entrapped by polymer phase, and crystallinity of PLLA significantly decreased while the thermal stability of the m-CMS/PLLA composites was not obviously affected by addition of the m-CMS into PLLA. In addition, compared to PLLA, incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA significantly improved the hydrophilicity, in vitro degradability and bioactivity (apatite-formation ability) of the m-CMS/PLLA composite, which were m-CMS content dependent. Moreover, it was found that incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA could neutralize the acidic degradation by-products and thus compensated for the decrease of pH value. In cell culture experiments, the results showed that the composite enhanced attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of MC3T3-E1 cells, which were m-CMS content dependent. The results indicated that the addition of bioactive materials to PLLA could result in a composite with improved properties of hydrophilicity, degradability, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

  1. Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions

    Tricalcium silicate was hydrated at 274, 278, 283, 298, and 313 K in stirred suspensions of saturated CaO solutions under a nitrogen-gas atmosphere until the end of deceleratory period. The suspension conductivities and energy flows were measured continuously. The individual reaction rates for tricalcium silicate dissolution, calcium silicate hydrate precipitation, and calcium hydroxide precipitation were calculated from these measurements. The results suggest that the proportion of tricalcium silicate dissolved was determined by the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution and the time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation. The time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation was more sensitive to changes in temperature than was the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution, so that the proportion of tricalcium silicate hydration dissolved by the deceleratory period increased with decreasing temperature. The average chain length of the calcium silicate hydrate ascertained by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy increased with increasing temperature

  2. Hydrogen isotope investigation of amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in silicic magmas erupted at Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    Underwood, S.J.; Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    prior to eruption, degassed vesiculated magma or lava had drained back down the volcanic conduit and mixed with less devolatilized magma. The vesiculated magma contained hydrous phenocrysts with lattice damage, which locally raised the effective H diffusion coefficient by ca 10–100 × and resulted in increased mineral dehydrogenation. Remobilization of dacite magma mush by relatively more reduced mafic magma appears to have generated further fO2 variations in May 1915 as oxidized magma from shallow levels circulated to depths where dehydrogenation of hydrous phenocrysts began. The δDMagmatic H2O expressed in LVC acid hot springs is likely a mixture derived from devolatilized ascending mafic magmas and crystallizing silicic magma mush.

  3. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with 29Si and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca2+ concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca2+ and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation.

  4. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses.

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with (29)Si and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca(2+) concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca(2+) and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation. PMID:26559965

  5. High-performance polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites

    Heidecker, Matthew J.

    High-performance layered-silicate nanocomposites of Polycarbonate (PC), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and their blends were produced via conventional melt-blending techniques. The focus of this thesis was on the fundamentals of dispersion, control of thermal stability, maintenance of melt-blending processing conditions, and on optimization of the composites' mechanical properties via the design of controlled and thermodynamically favorable nano-filler dispersions within the polymer matrices. PET and PC require high temperatures for melt-processing, rendering impractical the use of conventional/commercial organically-modified layered-silicates, since the thermal degradation temperatures of their ammonium surfactants lies below the typical processing temperatures. Thus, different surfactant chemistries must be employed in order to develop melt-processable nanocomposites, also accounting for polymer matrix degradation due to water (PET) or amine compounds (PC). Novel high thermal-stability surfactants were developed and employed in montmorillonite nanocomposites of PET, PC, and PC/PET blends, and were compared to the respective nanocomposites based on conventional quaternary-ammonium modified montmorillonites. Favorable dispersion was achieved in all cases, however, the overall material behavior -- i.e., the combination of crystallization, mechanical properties, and thermal degradation -- was better for the nanocomposites based on the thermally-stable surfactant fillers. Studies were also done to trace, and ultimately limit, the matrix degradation of Polycarbonate/montmorillonite nanocomposites, through varying the montmorillonite surfactant chemistry, processing conditions, and processing additives. Molecular weight degradation was, maybe surprisingly, better controlled in the conventional quaternary ammonium based nanocomposites -- even though the thermal stability of the organically modified montmorillonites was in most cases the lowest. Dependence of the

  6. The GRD Model for Silicate Melt Viscosity: Volcanological Applications

    Russell, K.; Giordano, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    We recently published a model for predicting the non-Arrhenian Newtonian viscosity of silicate melts as a function of temperature (T) and melt composition (X), including the volatile constituents H2O and F (Giordano et al. 2008). The non-Arrhenian T-dependence is accounted for by the VFT equation [log η = A + B/(T(K) -C)] and the model is calibrated on > 1750 measurements of melt viscosity. All compositional dependence is accommodated by 17 model coefficients embedded in the parameters B and C. The optimization assumes a common, high-T limit (A) for silicate melt viscosity and returns a value for this limit of - 4.55 (± 0.2) (e.g., log η ~ 10-4.6 Pa s) making for a total of 18 model coefficients. The effects of pressure on the silicate melt viscosity are not accounted for in this model, however, the model has the following attributes: a) it covers over fifteen log units of viscosity [10-1 to 1014 Pa s], b) it spans most of the compositional range found in naturally-occurring volcanic rocks, c) it is computationally continuous across the entire compositional and temperature spectrum of the database, and d) it is capable of accommodating both strong (near-Arrhenian T-dependence) and fragile (non-Arrhenian T-dependence) behaviour of silicate melts. Lastly, the model for melt viscosity can be used to predict other transport properties including glass transition temperatures (Tg) and melt fragility (m). Volcanic regimes feature constantly changing T-X melt conditions and, in many instances, these small changes generate strong non- linear variations in melt viscosity. The GRD model allows for accurate, continuous prediction of melt properties as a function of temperature and melt composition and, thus, is ideal for modelling transport properties in dynamic natural systems. Below we demonstrate the utility of this model with three volcanological applications: (A) We track variations in viscosity along liquid lines of descent predicted by MELTS (Ghiorso et al. 1995) and

  7. High-dose dosimetry using natural silicate minerals

    Carmo, Lucas S. do; Mendes, Leticia, E-mail: isatiro@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Watanabe, Shigueo; Rao, Gundu; Lucas, Natasha; Sato, Karina, E-mail: lacifid@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Nuclear; Barbosa, Renata F., E-mail: profcelta@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Santos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias do Mar

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, certain natural silicate minerals such as aquamarine (AB), morganite (PB), goshenite (WB), white jadeite (JW), green jadeite (JG), pink tourmaline (PT) and two varieties of jadeite-like quartz, denoted here by JQ1 and JQ2, were investigated using the thermoluminescence technique to evaluate their potential for use as very-high- and high-dose dosimeters. These minerals respond to high doses of γ-rays of up to 1000 kGy and often to very high doses of up to 3000 kGy. The TL response of these minerals may be considered to be satisfactory for applications in high-dose dosimetry. Investigations of electron paramagnetic resonance and optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry are in progress. (author)

  8. Shear viscosity of alkali and alkaline earth titanium silicate liquids

    Dingwell, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The shear viscosities of l3 silicate liquids along the NarSiOr-TiO, and CaSiOr-TiO, joins as well as six liquids based on the sphene stoichiometry X#TiSiO. (where X represents Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ca, and Sr) have been measured in equilibrium with air using the concentric cylinder method. The NarSiOr-TiO, join was investigated from l0 to 50 mol0/oT iO, in the temperaturer ange 1000-1150 "C, whereast he CaSiO3-TiO,jo in was investigated from l0 to 80 molo/oT iO, in the temperature range of 1400-...

  9. Beneficiation studies of an uranium siliceous - phosphate ore

    The consolidation of the beneficiation studies of a low-grade uranium siliceous - phosphate ore (11% P2O5) from Itataia region in the Northeast of Brazil, owned by Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. - NUCLEBRAS, are presented. Laboratory studies using froth flotation technique and applying statistical methods for data evaluation were made. Pilot plant tests in a 120 Kg/h scale were conducted as a consequence of the bench scale tests. The developed process using tall-oil as collector and starch as depressant gave a total yield of 80% for the P2O5 and 71% the U3O8, for a 33% P2O5 phosphate concentrate. (Author)

  10. Laser induced changes of refractive index of lead - silicate glasses

    The mechanisms of photoinduced changes of refractive index of the TΦ lead - silicate glasses (analogous with the SF glasses from Schott catalog) under the effect of high power laser radiation with quantum energy less bandgap have been studied. It is shown that the laser induced color centers results in increase of refractive index into the exposed bulk during the laser pulse action. This leads to considerable redistribution of irradiance and decrease of laser radiation brightness even in the case of optical elements less 1 mm thickness. The observed effect may be connected both with radiation induced dilatation of matter and heating of interaction region owing to absorption of radiation by color centers. Comparison the kinetics of refractive index change of the glass after exposure by laser pulse at 0.53 μm and the kinetics of color centers decay allowed to draw a conclusion about heat character of observed changes

  11. Shrinking core models applied to the sodium silicate production process

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The sodium silicate production process, with the molar ratio SiO2/Na2O = 2, for detergent zeolite 4A production, is based on quartz sand dissolving in NaOH aqueous solution, with a specific molality. It is a complex process performed at high temperature and pressure. It is of vital importance to develop adequate mathematical models, which are able to predict the dynamical response of the process parameters. A few kinetic models were developed within this study, which were adjusted and later compared to experimental results. It was assumed that SiO2 particles are smooth spheres, with uniform diameter. This diameter decreases during dissolving. The influence of particle diameter, working temperature and hydroxide ion molality on the dissolution kinetics was investigated. It was concluded that the developed models are sufficiently correct, in the engineering sense, and can be used for the dynamical prediction of process parameters.

  12. Discrete element modeling of calcium-silicate-hydrate

    The discrete element method (DEM) was used to model calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) at the nanoscale. The C-S-H nanoparticles were modeled as spherical particles with diameters of approximately 5 nm. Interparticle forces included traditional mechanical contact forces, van der Waals forces and ionic correlation forces due to negatively charged C-S-H nanoparticles and ion species in the nanopores. Previous work by the authors demonstrated the DEM method was feasible in studying the properties of the C-S-H nanostructures. In this work, the simulations were performed to look into the effects of nanoparticle packing, nanoparticle morphology, interparticle forces and nanoparticle properties on the deformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of the C-S-H matrix. This work will provide insights into possible ways to improve the properties of the C-S-H matrix. (paper)

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the sulfation of porous calcium silicate

    Miller, R. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfation of plasma sprayed calcium silicate in flowing SO2/air mixtures at 900 and 1000 C was investigated thermogravimetrically. Reaction products were analyzed using electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction analysis techniques, and results were compared with thermodynamic predictions. The percentage, by volume, of SO2 in air was varied between 0.036 and 10 percent. At 10 percent SO2 the weight gain curve displays a concave downward shoulder early in the sulfation process. An analytical model was developed which treats the initial process as one which decays exponentially with increasing time and the subsequent process as one which decays exponentially with increasing weight gain. At lower SO2 levels the initial rate is controlled by the reactant flow rate. At 1100 C and 0.036 percent SO2 there is no reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions.

  14. Chemistry of Silicate Atmospheres of Evaporating Super-Earths

    Schaefer, Laura

    2009-01-01

    We model the formation of silicate atmospheres on hot volatile-free super-Earths. Our calculations assume that all volatile elements such as H, C, N, S, and Cl have been lost from the planet. We find that the atmospheres are composed primarily of Na, O2, O, and SiO gas, in order of decreasing abundance. The atmospheric composition may be altered by fractional vaporization, cloud condensation, photoionization, and reaction with any residual volatile elements remaining in the atmosphere. Cloud condensation reduces the abundance of all elements in the atmosphere except Na and K. We speculate that large Na and K clouds such as those observed around Mercury and Io may surround hot super-Earths. These clouds would occult much larger fractions of the parent star than a closely bound atmosphere, and may be observable through currently available methods.

  15. The solubility of rare gases in silicate melts

    The solubilities of neon, argon, and krypton in basaltic andesite, alkali-olivine basalt, and tholeiitic basalt melts have been measured as functions of the pressure of the dissolving gas and the temperature of the melt. For the purposes of K-Ar dating it is shown that the solubility of Ar in silicate melts (magma) is large enough that the 'no initial argon' assumption and hence the atmospheric argon correction is no longer valid. It is also shown that the excess argon phenomenon is actually a manifestation of an aspect of initial argon incorporated in magma prior to emplacement and subsequent crystallization, and that the conventional method of K-Ar age calculation should be replaced with an isochron approach. Other findings concerning the origin and composition of the primordial atmosphere of the earth and of outgassing processes in the molten earth are discussed

  16. The mechanisms of water diffusion in polymerized silicate melts

    Behrens, Harald; Nowak, M.

    1997-02-01

    Diffusion of water was experimentally investigated for melts of albitic (Ab) and quartz-orthoclasic (Qz29Or71, in wt %) compositions with water contents in the range of 0 to 8.5 wt % at temperatures of 1100 to 1200 °C and at pressures of 1.0 and 5.0 kbar. Apparent chemical diffusion coefficients of water ( D water) were determined from concentration-distance profiles measured by FTIR microspectroscopy. Under the same P- T condition and water content the diffusivity of water in albitic, quartz-orthoclasic and haplogranitic (Qz28Ab38 Or34, Nowak and Behrens, this issue) melts is identical within experimental error. Comparison to data published in literature indicates that anhydrous composition only has little influence on the mobility of water in polymerized melts but that the degree of polymerization has a large effect. For instance, Dwater is almost identical for haplogranitic and rhyolitic melts with 0.5-3.5 wt % water at 850 °C but it is two orders of magnitude higher in basaltic than in haplogranitic melts with 0.2-0.5 wt % water at 1300 °C. Based on the new water diffusivity data, recently published in situ near-infrared spectroscopic data (Nowak 1995; Nowak and Behrens 1995), and viscosity data (Schulze et al. 1996) for hydrous haplogranitic melts current models for water diffusion in silicate melts are critically reviewed. The NIR spectroscopy has indicated isolated OH groups, pairs of OH groups and H2O molecules as hydrous species in polymerized silicate melts. A significant contribution of isolated OH groups to the transport of water is excluded for water contents above 10 ppm by comparison of viscosity and water diffusion data and by inspection of concentration profiles from trace water diffusion. Spectroscopic measurements have indicated that the interconversion of H2O molecules and OH pairs is relatively fast in silicate glasses and melts even at low temperature and it is inferred that this reaction is an active step for migration of water. However

  17. XPS study of CaO in sodium silicate glass

    This paper shows that CaO added to silicate glasses behaves much like Na2O in converting bridging oxygen sites to nonbridging sites. Good correspondence with model predictions was obtained but deviations were still sufficiently large to warrant attention. We speculate that some CaO may remain unreacted or that small-scale phase separation may occur. XPS core level shifts were monitored and possible charge-transfer effects were considered. Preliminary theoretical calculations utilizing a molecular-cluster approach were presented. XPS spectra for various glass compositions were simulated by appropriately combining local densities of state calculated for individual atoms. Dominant spectral features observed experimentally were found in the simulations. In conjunction with experiments, more carefully refined calculations will be subsequently examined. 7 figures

  18. Highly porous silicate ceramics prepared from saponite clay mineral

    Extremely porous silicate ceramics were fabricated by a freeze-drying process. This material was prepared from a water-based clay mineral. Porosity reached 99% for sintering bodies prepared from 2 mass% suspension. Porosity was controllable in the range of 95% 99% by modifying exchangeable cations. Card-house and card-pack structures were developed, which resembled dried agar. Heat treatments up to 1100 deg C had no effect on porosity for the sintered specimens. It was assumed that multiple condensation to be occurred on the basis of the N2 adsorption and desorption isotherm. Specific surface area of these porous materials was high. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  19. Structural changes between soda-lime silicate glass and melt

    Neutron diffraction has been used to study the structure of a glass and melt of composition 75SiO2-15Na2O-10CaO. RMC modeling of the neutron and X-ray diffraction data for the glass allowed the determination of the Na and Ca environment. The structure has been investigated at 300 K, just below the glass transition at 823 K and in the melt at 1273 K. The short range order does not present important modifications with temperature while significant reorganization appears at the medium range order. These latter changes can be associated with the Si and O pairs and indicate the relaxation of the silicate network. This indicates that the glass formation involved structural rearrangement during cooling. (authors)

  20. Femtosecond Laser Induced Rewritable Optical Memory in Silicate Glasses

    JIANG Xiongwei; QIU Jianrong; ZHU Congshan; K.Hirao; GAN Fuxi

    2001-01-01

    A novel method for producing rewritable optical memory with ultra-high storage density and ultra-high recording and readout speed is presented. A 120 fs, 800 nm, 1 kHz laser focused by an objective lens is used to produce recording bits in glass with high transmittance contrast. These recording bits can be erased by heat-treatment. The mechanism has been discussed by means of the absorption and electron spin resonance(ESR) spectra of silicate glasses before and after irradiation by the laser. The absorption of glasses increases greatly after irradiation because of color-center generation through multi-photon absorption. ESR spectra shows that the color-center induced in the glass are hole-trapped defects. The color-center disappears when the glass heated because the holes and electrons at traps are released by thermal stimulation and recombine again.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Different Crystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrate: Application for the Removal of Aflatoxin B1 from Aqueous Solution

    Lu Zeng; Ligang Yang; Shuping Wang; Kai Yang

    2014-01-01

    Different crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) were synthesized under specific hydrothermal conditions and several methods were used to analyze samples. Amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (ACSH) mainly consists of disordered calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H gel) and crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CCSH) consists of crystallized tobermorite. The adsorption of carcinogenic aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) onto ACSH and CCSH was investigated. The adsorption kinetics was studied using pseudo...

  2. Oxygen isotope and petrological study of silicate inclusions in IIE iron meteorites and their relationship with H chondrites

    Mcdermott, Kathryn H.; Greenwood, Richard C.; Scott, Edward R. D.; Franchi, Ian A.; Anand, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The origin of silicate-bearing irons, especially those in groups IAB, IIICD, and IIE, is poorly understood as silicate should have separated rapidly from molten metal. Here we report the results of high precision oxygen isotope analysis of silicate inclusions in eleven group IIE meteorites and a petrological study of silicate inclusions in ten IIE irons including those in Garhi Yasin and Tarahumara, which have not been described in detail before. Oxygen isotopes have also been analysed in 20 ...

  3. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses.

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-24

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm(-1) in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si(4+) ions by Al(3+) and Na(+) ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties. PMID:26815634

  4. Evaluation of apatite silicates as solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    Marrero-Lopez, D. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martin-Sedeno, M.C.; Aranda, M.A.G. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Pena-Martinez, J. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto de Energias Renovables, Parque Tecnologico, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, 02006 Albacete (Spain); Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Nunez, P. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Apatite-type silicates have been considered as promising electrolytes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC); however studies on the potential use of these materials in SOFC devices have received relatively little attention. The lanthanum silicate with composition La{sub 10}Si{sub 5.5}Al{sub 0.5}O{sub 26.75} has been evaluated as electrolyte with the electrode materials commonly used in SOFC, i.e. manganite, ferrite and cobaltite as cathode materials and NiO-CGO composite, chromium-manganite and Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} as anode materials. Chemical compatibility, area-specific resistance and fuel cell studies have been performed. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis did not reveal any trace of reaction products between the apatite electrolyte and most of the aforementioned electrode materials. However, the area-specific polarisation resistance (ASR) of these electrodes in contact with apatite electrolyte increased significantly with the sintering temperature, indicating reactivity at the electrolyte/electrode interface. On the other hand, the ASR values are significantly improved using a ceria buffer layer between the electrolyte and electrode materials to prevent reactivity. Maximum power densities of 195 and 65 mWcm{sup -2} were obtained at 850 and 700 C, respectively in H{sub 2} fuel, using an 1 mm-thick electrolyte, a NiO-Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} composite as anode and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} as cathode materials. This fuel cell was tested for 100 h in 5%H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere showing stable performance. (author)

  5. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  6. Silicate reduces cadmium uptake into cells of wheat.

    Greger, Maria; Kabir, Ahmad H; Landberg, Tommy; Maity, Pooja J; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a health threat all over the world and high Cd content in wheat causes high Cd intake. Silicon (Si) decreases cadmium content in wheat grains and shoot. This work investigates whether and how silicate (Si) influences cadmium (Cd) uptake at the cellular level in wheat. Wheat seedlings were grown in the presence or absence of Si with or without Cd. Cadmium, Si, and iron (Fe) accumulation in roots and shoots was analysed. Leaf protoplasts from plants grown without Cd were investigated for Cd uptake in the presence or absence of Si using the fluorescent dye, Leadmium Green AM. Roots and shoots of plants subjected to all four treatments were investigated regarding the expression of genes involved in the Cd uptake across the plasma membrane (i.e. LCT1) and efflux of Cd into apoplasm or vacuole from the cytosol (i.e. HMA2). In addition, phytochelatin (PC) content and PC gene (PCS1) expression were analysed. Expression of iron and metal transporter genes (IRT1 and NRAMP1) were also analysed. Results indicated that Si reduced Cd accumulation in plants, especially in shoot. Si reduced Cd transport into the cytoplasm when Si was added both directly during the uptake measurements and to the growth medium. Silicate downregulated LCT1 and HMA2 and upregulated PCS1. In addition, Si enhanced PC formation when Cd was present. The IRT1 gene, which was downregulated by Cd was upregulated by Si in root and shoot facilitating Fe transport in wheat. NRAMP1 was similarly expressed, though the effect was limited to roots. This work is the first to show how Si influences Cd uptake on the cellular level. PMID:26745394

  7. Selective separation of silica from a siliceous-calcareous phosphate rock

    Guo Fang; Li Jun

    2011-01-01

    Selective separation of silica from a siliceous-calcareous phosphate ore that had been sieved into different size fractions is investigated by a combination of chemical analysis, zeta potential measurement and FTIR and XPS techniques. Scrubbing is a better choice than flotation for removing silica from the coarse fractions. The P2O5 grade of the coarse fractions is increased to about 30% by scrubbing and the product yields are higher than those obtained by flotation. The silica in the fine fraction is separated by reverse flotation. An alkyl amine salt (DAH) is an effective collector and the P2Os grade of the fine fraction can be increased by 7% to beyond 30% under acidic conditions. The higher zeta potential obtained using DAH suggests that it is more strongly absorbed onto the ore panicles than the other cationic collectors.FTIR and XPS results confirm physical absorption of the cationic collector onto the ore surface. They also indicate that calcite is dissolved at low pH values, which increases the Si concentration on the ore surface.

  8. Chelation Ion Chromatography on 1-(2-Pyridylazo-2-naphthol Sorbed Stannic Silicate: Selective Separation of Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ from some Transition Metal Ions

    Rawat, J.P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective separation of three of the most toxic metal ions Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ has been achieved on a column packed with 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol (PAN sorbed stannic silicate using nitric acid solution of pH 1 and 6 as eluents. Adsorption behavior of several metal ions like Al3+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ on PAN sorbed stannic silicate from aqueous solution at different pH (from 1 to 6 was studied to calculate their distribution coefficients. In addition to the selective separation of Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ several binary separations of metal ions e. g., Hg2+ - Al3+, Pb2+ - Cr3+, Cd2+ - Cr3+ and Hg2+ - Cr3+ using aqueous solutions of pH 6 and pH 1 aseluents have been successfully achieved on PAN sorbed stannic silicate.

  9. Use of silicate shells to prevent sintering during thermally induced chemical ordering of iron platinum nanoparticles

    Reed, Dwayne Fitzgerald

    Its very high value of magnetocrystalline anisotropy makes the L1 0 phase of FePt a leading candidate for future high density magnetic recording systems. FePt nanoparticles can be prepared by a number of chemical methods. However, these particles have a face-centered cubic structure, with low anisotropy and are superparamagnetic. They must be heated to temperatures above 500 °C to obtain the chemically ordered L10 phase. However, during heating the particles coalesce to give twinned grains with large sizes (10-30 nm). Here we provide a solution to the sintering problem by developing a sol-gel procedure for coating the FePt particles with an amorphous silica shell. The silica shell prevents the FePt particles from agglomerating when heated to 700 °C to effect chemical ordering. FePt nanoparticles were prepared by the super-hydride reduction of platinum(II) acetylacetonate and iron(II) chloride in hot diphenyl ether in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid capping ligands. The particles had an average diameter of 5-6 nm, a face-centered cubic structure and were superparamagnetic. The particles were coated using a microemulsion process producing a 6 nm silicon oxide shell with a single nanoparticle core-shell structure. The nanoparticles were heated to 700 °C for times of 30 min and 1hr to achieve L10 phase transformation. These samples were annealed in a tube furnace under 95% Ar/5% H2. Many procedures were found to be ineffective. They mostly consisted of biphasic reaction systems and several trials where reaction variables were altered in search of the appropriate conditions. This work has impacted the search for a higher density magnetic recording medium by allowing the study of FePt under a protected environment while achieving chemical ordering. If the L10 FePt nanoparticles will be used in magnetic recording, the particles will require a hard coating to prevent wear. In the course of the present work, it has been shown that the silicate shells

  10. Sorption of Cs(I) on magnetite in the presence of silicates

    The sorption of H4SiO4 on magnetite has been qualified and quantified using three different surface complexation models, CCM, DLM, and NEM. The three tested models can account for the sorption of silicates using the same stoichiometry, one neutral species binding on a neutral surface, and the same constant, error aside. Experiments have also been performed to demonstrate that the sorption of dissolved silicates has a nonnegligible effect on the behavior of the surface of magnetite. Then, the sorption of cesium is insignificant on the neat surface of magnetite and is increased up to 10--20% when silicates are present in solution. A theoretical model, where the rule of electrostatics is pointed out, has been developed to account for the experimental observations. This model allows the reproduction of the sorption of cesium in the presence of dissolved silicates for the following four cases: Concentration of silicates under solubility limit, concentration of silicates over solubility limit, binary mixtures of silica and magnetite, and natural magnetite with silica as impurity. The reaction given in the model to account for the experimental observations proposes that silicates may act as a bridge between the surface of magnetite and cesium

  11. Sorption of Cs(I) on magnetite in the presence of silicates

    Marmier, N.; Fromage, F.

    2000-03-01

    The sorption of H{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} on magnetite has been qualified and quantified using three different surface complexation models, CCM, DLM, and NEM. The three tested models can account for the sorption of silicates using the same stoichiometry, one neutral species binding on a neutral surface, and the same constant, error aside. Experiments have also been performed to demonstrate that the sorption of dissolved silicates has a nonnegligible effect on the behavior of the surface of magnetite. Then, the sorption of cesium is insignificant on the neat surface of magnetite and is increased up to 10--20% when silicates are present in solution. A theoretical model, where the rule of electrostatics is pointed out, has been developed to account for the experimental observations. This model allows the reproduction of the sorption of cesium in the presence of dissolved silicates for the following four cases: Concentration of silicates under solubility limit, concentration of silicates over solubility limit, binary mixtures of silica and magnetite, and natural magnetite with silica as impurity. The reaction given in the model to account for the experimental observations proposes that silicates may act as a bridge between the surface of magnetite and cesium.

  12. Sorption of Cs(I) on Magnetite in the Presence of Silicates.

    Marmier; Fromage

    2000-03-01

    The sorption of H(4)SiO(4) on magnetite has been qualified and quantified using three different surface complexation models, CCM, DLM, and NEM. The three tested models can account for the sorption of silicates using the same stoichiometry, one neutral species binding on a neutral surface, and the same constant, error aside. Experiments have also been performed to demonstrate that the sorption of dissolved silicates has a nonnegligible effect on the behavior of the surface of magnetite. Then, the sorption of cesium is insignificant on the neat surface of magnetite and is increased up to 10-20% when silicates are present in solution. A theoretical model, where the rule of electrostatics is pointed out, has been developed to account for the experimental observations. This model allows the reproduction of the sorption of cesium in the presence of dissolved silicates for the following four cases: -concentration of silicates under solubility limit -concentration of silicates over solubility limit -binary mixtures of silica and magnetite -natural magnetite with silica as impurity. The reaction given in the model to account for the experimental observations proposes that silicates may act as a "bridge" between the surface of magnetite and cesium. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10684671

  13. On the Anomalous Silicate Absorption Feature of the Prototypical Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1068

    Koehler, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of the silicate absorption feature in AGNs was made at 9.7 micrometer for the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 over 30 years ago, indicating the presence of a large column of silicate dust in the line-of-sight to the nucleus. It is now well recognized that type 2 AGNs exhibit prominent silicate absorption bands, while the silicate bands of type 1 AGNs appear in emission. More recently, using the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, Jaffe et al. (2004) by the first time spatially resolved the parsec-sized dust torus around NGC 1068 and found that the 10 micrometer silicate absorption feature of the innermost hot component exhibits an anomalous profile differing from that of the interstellar medium and that of common olivine-type silicate dust. While they ascribed the anomalous absorption profile to gehlenite (Ca_2Al_2SiO_7, a calcium aluminum silicate species), we propose a physical dust model and argue that, although the presence of gehl...

  14. Effect of silicate incorporation on in vivo responses of α-tricalcium phosphate ceramics.

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Tatsukawa, Eri; Shibata, Yasuaki; Umemoto, Shota; Yokoi, Taishi; Ioku, Koji; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-05-01

    In addition to calcium phosphate-based ceramics, glass-based materials have been utilized as bone substitutes, and silicate in these materials has been suggested to contribute to their ability to stimulate bone repair. In this study, a silicate-containing α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) ceramic was prepared using a wet chemical process. Porous granules composed of silicate-containing α-TCP, for which the starting composition had a molar ratio of 0.05 for Si/(P + Si), and silicate-free α-TCP were prepared and evaluated in vivo. When implanted into bone defects that were created in rat femurs, α-TCP ceramics either with or without silicate were biodegraded, generating a hybrid tissue composed of residual ceramic granules and newly formed bone, which had a tissue architecture similar to physiological trabecular structures, and aided regeneration of the bone defects. Supplementation with silicate significantly promoted osteogenesis and delayed biodegradation of α-TCP. These results suggest that silicate-containing α-TCP is advantageous for initial skeletal fixation and wound regeneration in bone repair. PMID:27003839

  15. Evaluation of the effect of sodium silicate addition to mine backfill, Gelfill − Part 1

    M. Kermani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mechanical properties of sodium silicate-fortified backfill, called Gelfill, were investigated by conducting a series of laboratory experiments. Two configurations were tested, i.e. Gelfill and cemented hydraulic fill (CHF. The Gelfill has an alkali activator such as sodium silicate in its materials in addition to primary materials of mine backfill which are tailings, water and binders. Large numbers of samples of Gelfill and CHF with various mixture designs were cast and cured for over 28 d. The mechanical properties of samples were investigated using uniaxial compression test, and the results were compared with those of reference samples made without sodium silicate. The test results indicated that the addition of an appropriate amount of an alkali activator such as sodium silicate can enhance the mechanical (uniaxial compressive strength and physical (water retention properties of backfill. The microstructure analysis conducted by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP revealed that the addition of sodium silicate can modify the pore size distribution and total porosity of Gelfill, which can contribute to the better mechanical properties of Gelfill. It was also shown that the time and rate of drainage in the Gelfill specimens are less than those in CHF specimens made without sodium silicate. Finally, the study showed that the addition of sodium silicate can reduce the required setting time of mine backfill, which can contribute to increase mine production in accordance with the mine safety.

  16. Evaluation of the effect of sodium silicate addition to mine backfill, Gelfill L Part 1

    M. Kermani; F.P. Hassani; E. Aflaki; M. Benzaazoua; M. Nokken

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of sodium silicate-fortified backfill, called Gelfill, were investi-gated by conducting a series of laboratory experiments. Two configurations were tested, i.e. Gelfill and cemented hydraulic fill (CHF). The Gelfill has an alkali activator such as sodium silicate in its materials in addition to primary materials of mine backfill which are tailings, water and binders. Large numbers of samples of Gelfill and CHF with various mixture designs were cast and cured for over 28 d. The me-chanical properties of samples were investigated using uniaxial compression test, and the results were compared with those of reference samples made without sodium silicate. The test results indicated that the addition of an appropriate amount of an alkali activator such as sodium silicate can enhance the mechanical (uniaxial compressive strength) and physical (water retention) properties of backfill. The microstructure analysis conducted by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) revealed that the addition of sodium silicate can modify the pore size distribution and total porosity of Gelfill, which can contribute to the better mechanical properties of Gelfill. It was also shown that the time and rate of drainage in the Gelfill specimens are less than those in CHF specimens made without sodium silicate. Finally, the study showed that the addition of sodium silicate can reduce the required setting time of mine backfill, which can contribute to increase mine production in accordance with the mine safety.

  17. Valence determination of rare earth elements in lanthanide silicates by L 3-XANES spectroscopy

    Kravtsova, Antonina N.; Guda, Alexander A.; Goettlicher, Joerg; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Taroev, Vladimir K.; Kashaev, Anvar A.; Suvorova, Lyudmila F.; Tauson, Vladimir L.

    2016-05-01

    Lanthanide silicates have been hydrothermally synthesized using Cu and Ni containers. Chemical formulae of the synthesized compounds correspond to K3Eu[Si6O15] 2H2O, HK6Eu[Si10O25], K7Sm3[Si12O32], K2Sm[AlSi4O12] 0.375H2O, K4Yb2[Si8O21], K4Ce2[Al2Si8O24]. The oxidation state of lanthanides (Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb) in these silicates has been determined using XANES spectroscopy at the Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb, L 3- edges. The experimental XANES spectra were recorded using the synchrotron radiation source ANKA (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) and the X-ray laboratory spectrometer Rigaku R- XAS. By comparing the absorption edge energies and white line intensities of the silicates with the ones of reference spectra the oxidation state of lanthanides Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb has been found to be equal to +3 in all investigated silicates except of the Ce-containing silicate from the run in Cu container where the cerium oxidation state ranges from +3 (Ce in silicate apatite and in a KCe silicate with Si12O32 layers) to +4 (starting CeO2 or oxidized Ce2O3).

  18. The silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium towards the heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418

    Roche, P. F.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Gonzalez-Martin, O.

    2015-05-01

    The 9.7-μm silicate absorption profile in the interstellar medium (ISM) provides important information on the physical and chemical composition of interstellar dust grains. Measurements in the Milky Way have shown that the profile in the diffuse ISM is very similar to the amorphous silicate profiles found in circumstellar dust shells around late M stars, and narrower than the silicate profile in denser star-forming regions. Here, we investigate the silicate absorption profile towards the very heavily obscured nucleus of NGC 4418, the galaxy with the deepest known silicate absorption feature, and compare it to the profiles seen in the Milky Way. Comparison between the 8-13 μm spectrum obtained with Thermal-Region Camera Spectrograph on Gemini and the larger aperture spectrum obtained from the Spitzer archive indicates that the former isolates the nuclear emission, while Spitzer detects low surface brightness circumnuclear diffuse emission in addition. The silicate absorption profile towards the nucleus is very similar to that in the diffuse ISM in the Milky Way with no evidence of spectral structure from crystalline silicates or silicon carbide grains.

  19. Method of chemical analysis of silicate rocks (1962); Methode d'analyse chimique des roches silicatees (1962)

    Pouget, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A rapid method of analysis for the physical and chemical determination of the major constituents of silicate rocks is described. Water losses at 100 deg. C and losses of volatile elements at 1000 deg. C are estimated after staying in oven for these temperatures, or by mean of a thermo-balance. The determination of silica is made by a double insolubilization with hydrochloric acid on attack solution with sodium carbonate; total iron and aluminium, both with calcium and magnesium, after ammoniacal precipitation of Fe and Al, are determined on the filtration product of silica by titrimetry-photometry of their complexes with EDTA. The alkalis Na and K by flame spectrophotometry, Mn by colorimetry of the permanganate, and Ti by mean of his complex with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, are determined on fluosulfuric attack solution. Phosphorus is determined by his complex with 'molybdenum blue' on a fluoro-nitro-boric attack solution; iron is estimated by potentiometry, with the help of bichromate on hydrofluoric solution. (author) [French] Une methode d'analyse rapide est decrite pour la determination physico-chimique des constituants principaux des roches silicatees. Les pertes en eau a 100 deg. C et en matieres volatiles a 1000 deg. C sont evaluees apres passage au four a ces temperatures, ou a l'aide d'une thermobalance. La determination de la silice se fait par double insolubilisation a l'acide chlorhydrique, sur une attaque au carbonate de sodium; le fer total et l'aluminium ainsi que le calcium et le magnesium, apres precipitation a l'ammoniaque des deux premiers metaux, sont determines sur le filtrat de la silice par titrimetrie-photometrie de leurs complexes avec l'E.D.T.A. Les alcalins sodium et potassium par spectrophotometrie de flamme, le manganese par colorimetrie du permanganate, le titane a l'aide de son complexe avec l'eau oxygenee, sont determines sur une attaque fluosulfurique. Le phosphore est determine par son

  20. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    Leticia Boldrin MESTIERI; GOMES-CORNÉLIO, Ana Lívia; RODRIGUES, Elisandra Márcia; SALLES, Loise Pedrosa; BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; Juliane Maria GUERREIRO-TANOMARU; TANOMARU-FILHO, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3...

  1. Synthesis of pure zeolite P2 from calcium silicate hydrate; tobermorite

    Nasser Y. Mostafa; Rasha A. Garib; Z. K. Heiba; Abd-Elkader, Omar H.; M. M. Al-Majthoub

    2015-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate phases offer the possibility to become potential zeolites precursors due to its high silica contents. Pure calcium silicate hydrate phase; tobermorite (Ca5Si6O16(OH)2·4H2O), was prepared by hydrothermal method at 175°C. Tobermorite was sucssefully converted to Zeolite P2 for the first time via refluxing in 3 M NaOH solution and in the presence of Al source. Sodium hydroxide removed calcium ions from the interlayers of calcium silicate phase and form mesoporous zeolite...

  2. The Dependence of the XRD Morphology of Some Bionanocomposites on the Silicate Treatment

    Doina Dimonie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The degree of intercalation of the polyvinyl alcohol-starch blend with the layered silicate is increased if the silicates is untreated or intercalated with ammonium ions that contain small radicals. If untreated silicate like NaMMT is used, it is possible to obtain exfoliated-intercalated nanocomposites. The materials based on PVOH, starch, and Nanocor I 28, Nanocor I 33, or Cloisite 15 A can be intercalated nanocomposites. If the blend of PVOH and starch is reinforced with Cloisite 93 A, microcomposites can result. The study will continue with the analysis of the new morphologies considering the transmission electron microscopy (TEM.

  3. Effects of modulus and dosage of sodium silicate on limestone flotation

    Danda S. Rao

    2010-01-01

    Sodium silicates are probably one of the oldest and most widely used industrial chemicals. Among a wide variety of applications, an important one is as a depressant in flotation. In this investigation, the effectiveness of sodium silicates of different values of modulus (silica-to-soda ratio) and dosage was investigated on a low-grade siliceous limestone sample having CaO = 45.10%, SiO2 = 15.60% and LOI = 36.03% from Jayantipuram mine of Andhra Pradesh, India. Direct flotation (flotation of c...

  4. Uniform upconversion in high-concentration Er3+-doped soda lime silicate and aluminosilicate glasses

    Uniform upconversion in erbium-doped silicate glasses is investigated as a function of glass composition, concentration, and fabrication method. Comparisons of upconversion coefficients are made among soda lime silicate and aluminosilicate bulk glasses and soda lime silicate waveguides. Comparisons are also made with studies performed by other researchers. The results indicate that both the composition and the preparation method of the glass affect the value of the upconversion coefficient, with as much as a factor-of-4 variation observed at fixed Er3+ concentration. Values of the upconversion coefficient are found to be consistent with the Foerster endash Dexter microscopic model. copyright 1997 Optical Society of America

  5. Interannual variability in biochemistry of partially mixed estuaries: Dissolved silicate cycles in northern San Francisco Bay

    Peterson, David H.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Festa, John F.

    1986-01-01

    Much of the interannual variability in partially mixed estuaries in dissolved inorganic nutrient and dissolved oxygen patterns results from an enhancement or reduction of their annual cycle (generally via climatic forcing). In northern San Francisco Bay estuary the annual cycle of dissolved silicate supply peaks in spring and the effect of phytoplankton removal peaks in fall. Because riverine silicate sources are enhanced in wet years and reduced in dry years, the annual silicate cycle is modified accordingly. Effects of phytoplankton removal are reduced and delayed in wet years and enhanced and advanced (seen earlier) in dry years. Similar reasoning can apply to interpreting and understanding other mechanisms and rates.

  6. On mechanism of polarographic reduction of molybdenotungstosilicic heteropoly acids

    The mechanism of polarographic reduction of molybdic-tungstic-silicic acids at a platinum electrode is studied. In aqueous solutions the polarograms reveal three waves. It is shown that Mo is reduced in the heteropolyanion. The third wave corresponds to the reduction of the particles of Mo(W) formed on dissociation of molybdenumtungstensilicates in aqueous solutions

  7. Lifetime Predictions of a Titanium Silicate Glass with Machined Flaws

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly

    2003-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate glass to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure and to compare the results with those of a previous study. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions. The material strength and lifetime was seen to increase due to the removal of residual stress through grinding and polishing. Influence on time-to-failure is addressed for the case with and without residual stress present. Titanium silicate glass otherwise known as ultra-low expansion (ULE)* glass is a candidate for use in applications requiring low thermal expansion characteristics such as telescope mirrors. The Hubble Space Telescope s primary mirror was manufactured from ULE glass. ULE contains 7.5% titanium dioxide which in combination with silica results in a homogenous glass with a linear expansion coefficient near zero. delayed failure . This previous study was based on a 230/270 grit surface. The grinding and polishing process reduces the surface flaw size and subsurface damage, and relieves residual stress by removing the material with successively smaller grinding media. This results in an increase in strength of the optic during the grinding and polishing sequence. Thus, a second study was undertaken using samples with a surface finish typically achieved for mirror elements, to observe the effects of surface finishing on the time-to-failure predictions. An allowable stress can be calculated for this material based upon modulus of rupture data; however, this does not take into account the problem of delayed failure, most likely due to stress corrosion, which can significantly shorten lifetime. Fortunately, a theory based on fracture mechanics has been developed enabling lifetime predictions to be made for brittle materials susceptible to delayed failure. Knowledge of the factors governing the rate of subcritical flaw growth in a given environment enables the development of

  8. Structural study of nickel reduction in silicate melts

    Marcq, B.; Galoisy, L.; Libourel, G.; Calas, G.

    2003-04-01

    Composition of the global Earth has been partially controlled by precursors chemical variability (chondrites) and by primitive earth differentiation processes. In the core, the segregation of a metallic phase (Fe, Ni) and the metal-silicate melt reactions are essential to understand primitive earth differenciation processes. From an industrial point of view, the segregation of a metallic phase from melts is widely used in metallurgy to obtain steel and cast in blast furnaces. Ni2+ bearing glasses, used as snapshot of the corresponding, melts have been synthesized under a controlled oxygen fugacity, in order to understand metal-silicate melts reduction mechanisms. The aim of this study is to follow Ni2+ environment, as a function of reduction. The methods used, optical absorption spectroscopy, EXAFS and XANES, precisely describe the sites occupied by Ni2+ in the glass. Reduction experiments were performed between 1350^oC and 1365^oC using a composition close to the anorthite-diopside system eutectic (49% SiO_2, 22% CaO, 19% Al_2O_3, 9% MgO in weight percent) with 1% NiO. A wide range of oxygen fugacities has been used, from 6.5 (Ni +1/2 O_2 NiO buffer value at 1350^oC, 1atm) to 13 (beyond Iron-Wustite buffer) with duration going from 15 min to 24 hours. Effect of Fe content and pressure are not taken into account in the present study, as it would result in a multiplication of parameters, making results more difficult to interpret. Optical spectroscopy shows that Ni2+, is mainly 5- and 4-coordinated in the initial composition (^5[Ni]/^4[Ni]=7,14). Optical spectra shows an important evolution with reduction, indicating that modifications occurs in the glass structure around Ni2+. ^5[Ni]/^4[Ni] ratio decrease with oxygen fugacity. The apparition of metallic Ni in the glass is not the only origin of the varitation of the optical spectra. EXAF and XANES data, showing a strong evolution with the glass reduction, will be also discussed.

  9. The limitations of melting on the reactivation of silicic mushes

    Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Dufek, Josef

    2010-08-01

    High crystallinity silicic ignimbrites (such as the Monotonous Intermediates) typically erupt magma with an average crystallinity ranging from 40 to 50%. This average crystallinity is believed to be just under the threshold at which magma behaves as a solid (50-60% crystals), i.e. the locking point crystallinity, where convection is suppressed and large eruptions are unlikely. These magmas often display textural features which suggest that their average crystallinity was once higher and decreased before the eruption as a result of reheating through the injection of new magma. In this study, we use a theoretical 1D heat conduction model with phase change to test the ability of different melting scenarios of crystal mushes to meet the 40 to 50% crystallinity constraint observed in the field. Our heat conduction and melting models allow us to derive analytical solutions for the average crystallinity in the magma body (initially a crystal mush). We focus on the propagation of the melting front coinciding with the locking point crystallinity for different crystallinity-temperature relationships and various choices of temperature boundary conditions. We develop another analytical model based on stagnant-lid convection scaling to assess the role of convection on the expected average crystallinity of the magma subjected to wholesale steady-state convection. We find that, for all realistic melting scenarios, the average crystallinity of a silicic magma body that passed through the rheological transition is always substantially lower than what is observed in the field. We further show with a simple energy balance that the thermal energy needed to unlock/remobilize these magma bodies requires the intrusion of about an order of magnitude of more magma than the mush. Based on these results we argue that, although melting is a key process in the thermal reactivation of high crystallinity magma bodies, another coupled process is required in order to reactivate large volumes of

  10. Polyamide-layered silicate nanocomposites by melt processing

    Fornes, Timothy Dean

    Polyamide-layered silicate nanocomposites based on nylon 6, 11, and 12 and organically modified montmorillonites (organoclay) were prepared by twin screw extrusion. Carefully designed component structure-nanocomposite morphology and property investigations on these materials were executed to understand why nylon 6 readily exfoliates organoclay. The polyamide structure strongly influences the extent of clay platelet delamination and level of property enhancement, as determined by X-ray, transmission electron microscopy and stress-strain analyses. High molecular weight nylon 6 materials lead to better organoclay exfoliation and greater nanocomposite moduli and yield strengths than lower molecular weight materials; this is attributed to higher levels of shear stress imparted on the clay by the higher viscosity polymer. The ratio of amide to methylene units in the repeat structure of nylon 6 appears to affect the polymer-organoclay affinity since a large increase in aliphatic content, i.e., nylon 6 versus nylon 12, results in less organoclay dispersion and lower reinforcing efficiency. The structure of the organoclay is also critical for producing well-exfoliated nylon 6 nanocomposites. Alkyl ammonium surfactants that cover less montmorillonite surface in the organoclay are more effective at exfoliating clay and generating improved nanocomposite stiffness and strength; such surfactants facilitate more desirable polyamide-silicate interactions, yet maintain sufficient organoclay gallery spacings needed both to overcome the cohesive forces between neighboring platelets and to facilitate polymer intercalation. The source of sodium montmorillonite used to form the organoclay is also important. The superior properties observed in nylon 6 nanocomposites may be explained by conventional ideas of reinforcement as predicted by composite theories like those of Halpin-Tsai or Mori-Tanaka. Based on good agreement between experimental nanocomposite moduli and model predictions it

  11. Functional nanocomposites prepared by self-assembly and polymerization of diacetylene surfactants and silicic acid

    Yang, Yi; Lu, Yunfeng; Lu, Mengcheng; Huang, Jinman; Haddad, Raid; Xomeritakis, George; Liu, Nanguo; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Sturmayr, Dietmar; Fan, Hongyou; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Assink, Roger A.; Shelnutt, John A.; van Swol, Frank; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Burns, Alan R.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Conjugated polymer/silica nanocomposites with hexagonal, cubic, or lamellar mesoscopic order were synthesized by self-assembly using polymerizable amphiphilic diacetylene molecules as both structure-directing agents and monomers. The self-assembly procedure is rapid and incorporates the organic monomers uniformly within a highly ordered, inorganic environment. By tailoring the size of the oligo(ethylene glycol) headgroup of the diacetylene-containing surfactant, we varied the resulting self-assembled mesophases of the composite material. The nanostructured inorganic host altered the diacetylene polymerization behavior, and the resulting nanocomposites show unique thermo-, mechano-, and solvatochromic properties. Polymerization of the incorporated surfactants resulted in polydiacetylene (PDA)/silica nanocomposites that were optically transparent and mechanically robust. Molecular modeling and quantum calculations and (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) of the PDA/silica nanocomposites indicated that the surfactant monomers can be uniformly organized into precise spatial arrangements prior to polymerization. Nanoindentation and gas transport experiments showed that these nanocomposite films have increased hardness and reduced permeability as compared to pure PDA. Our work demonstrates polymerizable surfactant/silica self-assembly to be an efficient, general approach to the formation of nanostructured conjugated polymers. The nanostructured inorganic framework serves to protect, stabilize, and orient the polymer, mediate its performance, and provide sufficient mechanical and chemical stability to enable integration of conjugated polymers into devices and microsystems.

  12. Strong, Thermally Superinsulating Biopolymer-Silica Aerogel Hybrids by Cogelation of Silicic Acid with Pectin.

    Zhao, Shanyu; Malfait, Wim J; Demilecamps, Arnaud; Zhang, Yucheng; Brunner, Samuel; Huber, Lukas; Tingaut, Philippe; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-11-23

    Silica aerogels are excellent thermal insulators, but their brittle nature has prevented widespread application. To overcome these mechanical limitations, silica-biopolymer hybrids are a promising alternative. A one-pot process to monolithic, superinsulating pectin-silica hybrid aerogels is presented. Their structural and physical properties can be tuned by adjusting the gelation pH and pectin concentration. Hybrid aerogels made at pH 1.5 exhibit minimal dust release and vastly improved mechanical properties while remaining excellent thermal insulators. The change in the mechanical properties is directly linked to the observed "neck-free" nanoscale network structure with thicker struts. Such a design is superior to "neck-limited", classical inorganic aerogels. This new class of materials opens up new perspectives for novel silica-biopolymer nanocomposite aerogels. PMID:26447457

  13. Reduction in Acidity of RDX and its Compositions by Use of Suitable Additives

    Harihar Singh

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium Silicate and Zinc Stearate have been used as additives to reduce the acidity of RDX and RDX/TNT compositions. They have been found to be effective in reducing the acidity of RDX/TNT compositions but ineffective for RDX alone. An explanation to this effect has been provided.

  14. Relationships between Basic and Silicic Magmatism in Continental Rift Settings: A Petrogeochemical Study of Carboniferous Post-collisional Rift Silicic Volcanics in Tianshan, NW China

    2005-01-01

    Petrogeochemical data are reported for silicic volcanic rocks from the Tianshan Carboniferous rift, with the aim of discussing the petrogenesis of silicic magmas. Incompatible element vs. incompatible element diagrams display smooth positive trends for the Tianshan Carboniferous rift-related volcanic rocks; the isotope ratios of the silicic lavas [87Sr/86Sr(t)=0.69988-0.70532; εNd(t)=4.76-8.00; 206Pb/204Pb(t)=17.435-18.017; 207Pb/204Pb(t)=15.438-15.509; 208Pb/204Pb(t) = 37.075-37.723] encompass those of the basic lavas. These data suggest a genetic link between rhyolites and basalts, but are not definitive in establishing whether silicic rocks are related to basalts through fractional crystallization or partial melting. Geochemical modeling of incompatible vs. compatible elements excludes the possibility that silicic melts are generated by the melting of basaltic rocks, and indicates a derivation by fractional crystallization plus moderate assimilation of wall rocks (AFC) starting from intermediate rocks to silicic rocks. Continuous AFC from basalt to rhyolite,with small rates of crustal assimilation, best explains the geochemical data. The presence or absence of bimodal volcanism (the "Daly Gap") might be related to cooling rates of magma chambers. In central and eastern Tianshan, the crust was thinner and the cooling rates of the magma chamber within the crust were greater. These conditions resulted in a rapid fall in temperature within the magma reservoir and caused a narrow temperature interval over which intermediate melts formed, effectively reducing the volume of the intermediate melts.

  15. O-17 NMR studies of some silicate crystals and glasses

    Yildirim, E K

    2000-01-01

    structure. Therefore some of the Sn has to be in three coordinated to oxygen for charge balancing. The sup 1 sup 7 O MAS NMR spectra of a partially crystallised sample showed three distinct sites which are assigned as Sn-O-Sn, Si-O-Sn, and Si-O-Si on the basis of their chemical shift. The C sub Q values obtained from the simulations of these peaks supports this assignment. The sup 2 sup 9 Si MAS NMR of the same sample showed two crystalline and a glassy peaks which are fitted to two crystalline and two glassy sites. The possible composition of this sample was calculated and found to be SiSn sub 8 O sub 1 sub 0. Crystalline and glassy silicates were investigated by means of sup 1 sup 7 O NMR. The dependence of the measured efg on the Si-O-AI bond angle was investigated in some crystalline aluminosilicate sodalites and kalsilite. The results show that C sub Q increases with increasing bond angle while eta decreases with increasing bond angle and they both follow a similar function to that found for the Si-O-Si ...

  16. Micromechanical properties of silicate glass films on sapphire substrates

    Zagrebelny, A.V.; Carter, C.B. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    1998-12-31

    The deformation of thin layers of glass on crystalline materials has been examined using newly developed experimental methods for nanomechanical testing. Continuous films of anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}), celsian (BaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}), and monticellite (CaMgSiO{sub 4}) were deposited onto Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD). Mechanical properties such as Young`s modulus and hardness were probed with a high-resolution depth-sensing indentation instrument. Nanomechanical testing, combined with AFM in-situ imaging of the deformed regions, allowed force-displacement measurements and imaging of the same regions of the specimen before and immediately after indentation. Emphasis has been placed on examining how changes in the glass composition, residual stress introduced into the films, effect of film`s heat-treatment, and the effect of substrate crystallographic orientation will affect the mechanical properties of silicate-glass films.

  17. The role of silicate surfaces on calcite precipitation kinetics

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Bovet, Nicolas Emile;

    2014-01-01

    H equal to 9.1. Although the inlet fluid composition, flow rate, and temperature were identical for all experiments, the onset of calcite precipitation depended on the identity of the seeds present in the reactor. Calcite precipitated instantaneously and at a constant rate in the presence of calcite......The aim of this study is to illuminate how calcite precipitation depends on the identity and structure of the growth substrate. Calcite was precipitated at 25°C from supersaturated aqueous solutions in the presence of seeds of either calcite or one of six silicate materials: augite, enstatite......, labradorite, olivine, basaltic glass and peridotite rock. Calcite saturation was achieved by mixing a CaCl2-rich aqueous solution with a NaHCO3-Na2CO3 aqueous buffer in mixed-flow reactors containing 0.5-2g of mineral, rock, or glass seeds. This led to an inlet fluid calcite saturation index of 0.6 and a p...

  18. New electrorheological fluid obtained from mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate suspensions.

    Marins, Jéssica A; Dahmouche, Karim; Soares, Bluma G

    2013-01-01

    Ormosil based on mercaptosilsesquioxane-modified silicate (SiO2/SSQ-SH) particle was prepared by sol-gel process involving a co-condensation of the hydrolyzed 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and tetraetoxysilane (TEOS). The resulting material was characterized by (29)Si solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((29)Si NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The (SiO2/SSQ-SH) particle presents a hierarchical structure, extending from micro to nanoscale and consisting of three structural levels. This SiO2/SSQ-SH particle was used for the first time as the dispersed phase in silicone oil suspension to develop a new electro-rheological fluid with a very good response under the action of electrical field from 1 to 4 kV/mm, whose values are comparable to those exhibited by other conventional ER fluids, under the influence of electric field. PMID:25428054

  19. Praseodymium silicate high-k dielectrics on Si(001)

    Aggressive scaling of the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors resulted in the silicon dioxide (SiO2) gate dielectrics being as thin as 1.2 nm in the state-of-the-art high performance transistors. In consequence, the leakage current due to direct tunneling of electrons through the gate oxide increased significantly resulting in an unacceptably high level of power dissipation. For this reason, it is very desirable to replace the SiO2 gate dielectric with an insulator of a higher dielectric constant (high-k). The higher dielectric constant allows for the use of physically thicker dielectric layers with high capacitance densities but strongly reduced tunneling currents. This work focuses on the preparation and characterization of Praseodymium silicate high-k dielectric layers on Si(001) and evaluates the potential of this material to replace SiO2 as a gate dielectric in the state-of-the-art and future CMOS technology generations. (orig.)

  20. Silicate grout curtains behaviour for the protection of coastal aquifers

    Elektorowicz, M.; Chifrina, R.; Hesnawi, R. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour of silicate grout with different reagents (ethylacetate - formamide SA and calcium chloride SC) in pure silica sand and natural soils from coastal areas containing organic matter, clayey soil and silica sand. The grouted specimens were tested with simulated fresh and salt water. The setting process during chemical grouting in the soil and sand was studied. The grouting of soil and sand with SA caused a transfer to the environment of some compounds: sodium formate, sodium acetate, ammonia and part of the initial ethylacetate and formamide. This process had a tendency to decrease for approximately 4 months. The stability of specimens was low. The grouting of soil and sand with SC caused no significant contamination of the environment. The increase of pH of environmental water was even less than with SA grouting. Also, the stability of specimens is higher in comparison with SA grouting. Salt water protected the specimens grouted with SA and SC from destruction and prevented contamination.

  1. Preparation of calcium silicate absorbent from iron blast furnace slag.

    Brodnax, L F; Rochelle, G T

    2000-09-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) solids were prepared from hydrated lime and iron blast furnace slag in an aqueous agitated slurry at 92 degrees C. While it was hoped a minimal lime/slag ratio could be used to create near-amorphous CSH, the surface area of the product improved by increasing the lime/slag weight ratio to 2. The addition of gypsum to the lime/slag system dramatically improved the formation of surface area, creating solids with 139 m2/g after 30 hr of reaction when only a minimal amount of lime was present. The SO2 reactivity of solids prepared with gypsum greatly exceeded that of hydrated lime, achieving greater than 70-80% conversion of the alkalinity after 1 hr of reaction with SO2. The use of CaCl2 as an additive to the lime/slag system, in lieu of gypsum, also produced high-surface-area solids, 115 m2/g after 21 hr of reaction. However, the SO2 reactivity of these sorbents was relatively low given the high surface area. This emphasized that the correlation between surface area and SO2 reactivity was highly dependent on the solid phase, which was subsequently dependent on slurry composition. PMID:11055162

  2. High level radioactive waste isolation by incorporation in silicate rock

    A number of technical possibilities for isolating high level radioactive materials have been theoretically investigated at various times and places. Isolating such wastes deep underground to insure long-term removal from the biosphere is one such possibility which has been investigated. The present concept involves as a first step creating the necessary void space at considerable depth, say 2 to 5 km, in a very low permeability silicate medium such as shale. Waste in dry, calcined or vitrified form is then lowered into the void space, and the access hole or shaft sealed. Energy released by the radioactive decay raises the temperature to a point where the surrounding rock begins to melt. The waste is then dissolved in it. The extent of this melt region grows until the heat generated is balanced by conduction away from the molten zone. Resolidification then begins, and ends when the radioactive decay has progressed to the point that the temperature falls below the melting point of the rock-waste solution. Calculations are presented showing the growth and resolidification process. The use of a nuclear explosion presents one alternative way of creating the void space

  3. Distribution of Water in Synthetic Calcium Silicate Hydrates.

    Roosz, C; Gaboreau, S; Grangeon, S; Prêt, D; Montouillout, V; Maubec, N; Ory, S; Blanc, P; Vieillard, P; Henocq, P

    2016-07-12

    Understanding calcium silicate hydrates (CSHs) is of paramount importance for understanding the behavior of cement materials because they control most of the properties of these man-made materials. The atomic scale water content and structure have a major influence on their properties, as is analogous with clay minerals, and we should assess these. Here, we used a multiple analytical approach to quantify water distribution in CSH samples and to determine the relative proportions of water sorbed on external and internal (interlayer) surfaces. Water vapor isotherms were used to explain the water distribution in the CSH microstructure. As with many layered compounds, CSHs have external and internal (interlayer) surfaces displaying multilayer adsorption of water molecules on external surfaces owing to the hydrophilic surfaces. Interlayer water was also quantified from water vapor isotherm, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA) data, displaying nonreversible swelling/shrinkage behavior in response to drying/rewetting cycles. From this quantification and balance of water distribution, we were able to explain most of the widely dispersed data already published according to the various relative humidity (RH) conditions and measurement techniques. Stoichiometric formulas were proposed for the different CSH samples analyzed (0.6 < Ca/Si < 1.6), considering the interlayer water contribution. PMID:27281114

  4. Fluorescence properties of Eu3+-doped alumino silicate glasses

    Herrmann, Andreas; Kuhn, Stefan; Tiegel, Mirko; Rüssel, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Alumino silicate glasses of a very broad range of molar compositions doped with 1 ṡ 1020 Eu3+ cm-3 (about 0.2 mol% Eu2O3) were prepared. As network modifier oxides Li2O, Na2O, K2O, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, PbO, Y2O3 and La2O3 have been used. All glasses show relatively broad fluorescence excitation and emission spectra. For most glasses only a weak effect of the glass composition on the excitation and emission spectra is observed. Although the glasses should be structurally similar, notable differences are found for the fluorescence lifetimes. These increase steadily with decreasing mean atomic weight, decreasing refractive index and decreasing optical basicity of the glasses, which may be explained by local field effects. An exception from this rule are the strontium, barium and potassium containing glasses, which show significantly increased fluorescence lifetimes despite of their high refractive index, optical basicity and molecular weight. The non mono-exponential fluorescence decay curves as well as the fluorescence spectra indicate a massive change in the local surroundings of the doped rare earth ions for these glasses.

  5. Immobilisation of active concrete debris using soluble sodium silicates

    Demolition of concrete biological shields will generate large quantities of active demolition debris. The size distribution of such concrete may range from pieces of size less than one tonne down to dust. Handling and disposal methods for this material are still the subject of current research. Although the literature indicates that the mechanisms of silicate/concrete interaction are not well understood, successful setting of the smaller size fraction of concrete demolition debris can be achieved at laboratory scale. Hardened properties of the set slurry are also acceptable. A study of the full scale process has resulted in an outline design for a suitable on-site plant. Estimated capital costs of the equipment are of the order of pounds 1.1M. The project has shown that the material of less than 5mm particle size can be set by this technique. Whilst this meets the original objectives of immobilising dust, it had been hoped that the 10mm size material, (which will require removal from the larger debris before grouting can take place) could also be disposed of by the slurry setting technique. Co-disposal of slurry and large active items in the same container is unlikely to be worthwhile. 14 tabs., 5 figs., 30 refs

  6. Zeta potentials in the flotation of oxide and silicate minerals.

    Fuerstenau, D W; Pradip

    2005-06-30

    Adsorption of collectors and modifying reagents in the flotation of oxide and silicate minerals is controlled by the electrical double layer at the mineral-water interface. In systems where the collector is physically adsorbed, flotation with anionic or cationic collectors depends on the mineral surface being charged oppositely. Adjusting the pH of the system can enhance or prevent the flotation of a mineral. Thus, the point of zero charge (PZC) of the mineral is the most important property of a mineral in such systems. The length of the hydrocarbon chain of the collector is important because of chain-chain association enhances the adsorption once the surfactant ions aggregate to form hemimicelles at the surface. Strongly chemisorbing collectors are able to induce flotation even when collector and the mineral surface are charged similarly, but raising the pH sufficiently above the PZC can repel chemisorbing collectors from the mineral surface. Zeta potentials can be used to delineate interfacial phenomena in these various systems. PMID:16007737

  7. Neutron-scattering studies of Yb-bearing silicate glasses

    The static and dynamic magnetic response of the Yb3+ ions in 2Na2O·Yb2O3·6SiO2 glass and the isochemical crystalline silicate Na3YbSi3O9 has been studied by neutron diffraction, inelastic magnetic-scattering, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The rare earth sites in the glass have an average coordination number of 5.6 ± 0.5 and give a mean rare earth-oxygen bond length of 2.23 Angstrom; average Si-O and O-O coordination numbers and bond distances are comparable to those in vitreous SiO2. The magnetic excitation spectrum of the Na3YbSi3O9 material was analyzed by a crystal-field model using a method of descending symmetry. The magnetic susceptibility and the excitation spectrum of the Yb glasses can be described by a distribution of ligand-field effects on the Yb3+ ions that are similar to the nominal crystal field in crystalline Na3YbSi3O9

  8. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    Palkovic, Steven D.; Moeini, Sina; Büyüköztürk, Oral, E-mail: obuyuk@mit.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Yip, Sidney [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces.

  9. Calcium silicate hydrates: Solid and liquid phase composition

    This paper presents a review on the relationship between the composition, the structure and the solution in which calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) is equilibrated. The silica chain length in C–S–H increases with the silicon concentration and the calcium content in the interlayer space with the calcium concentrations. Sodium and potassium are taken up in the interlayer space, preferentially at low calcium concentrations and thus by low Ca/Si C–S–H. Aluminium uptake in C–S–H increases strongly at higher aluminium concentrations in the solution. At low Ca/Si, aluminium substitutes silica in the bridging position, at Ca/Si > 1 aluminium is bound in TAH. Recently developed thermodynamic models are closely related to the structure of C–S–H and tobermorite, and able to model not only the solubility and the chemical composition of the C–S–H, but also to predict the mean silica chain length and the uptake of aluminium

  10. Calcium silicate hydrates: Solid and liquid phase composition

    Lothenbach, Barbara, E-mail: Barbara.lothenbach@empa.ch [Laboratory Concrete & Construction Chemistry, Empa (Switzerland); Nonat, André [ICB, UMR CNRS 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a review on the relationship between the composition, the structure and the solution in which calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) is equilibrated. The silica chain length in C–S–H increases with the silicon concentration and the calcium content in the interlayer space with the calcium concentrations. Sodium and potassium are taken up in the interlayer space, preferentially at low calcium concentrations and thus by low Ca/Si C–S–H. Aluminium uptake in C–S–H increases strongly at higher aluminium concentrations in the solution. At low Ca/Si, aluminium substitutes silica in the bridging position, at Ca/Si > 1 aluminium is bound in TAH. Recently developed thermodynamic models are closely related to the structure of C–S–H and tobermorite, and able to model not only the solubility and the chemical composition of the C–S–H, but also to predict the mean silica chain length and the uptake of aluminium.

  11. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces

  12. LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF PRESOLAR SILICATE STARDUST FROM A NOVA

    We report the major element as well as the oxygen, magnesium, and silicon isotope composition of a unique presolar silicate grain found in the fine-grained fraction of the Antarctic CR2 chondrite Graves Nunataks 95229. The grain is characterized by an extremely high 17O/16O ratio (6.3 ± 0.2 × 10–3) relative to solar values, whereas its 18O/16O ratio is solar within measurement uncertainty. It also shows enrichments in 25,26Mg and a significant excess in 30Si relative to solar system compositions, with δ25Mg = 79 ± 21 per mille , δ26Mg = 70 ± 20 per mille , and δ30Si = 379 ± 92 per mille . This isotopic composition is consistent with an origin in the ejecta of a ∼1.3-1.4 M☉ ONe nova with large contributions of material from a main-sequence companion star of roughly solar metallicity. However, many details of the stellar source remain undetermined, owing to the uncertainties of current nova nucleosynthesis models. Auger electron spectroscopic analyses identify O, Mg, Si, and Fe as the grain's major constituents. Its (Mg+Fe)/Si atomic ratios are lower than that of olivine and correspond on average to Fe-Mg-pyroxene. A complex texture and heterogeneous major element distribution within the grain attest to condensation under non-equilibrium conditions, which is consistent with the proposed nova origin.

  13. Quantum-dot composite silicate glasses obtained by ion implantation

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to obtain composite materials such as nanocluster-containing silicate glasses. Depending on the choice of the pair 'implanted atom-dielectric host', ion implantation of metals in glass gives rise to the formation of new compounds and/or metallic nanoparticles. In spite of the great interest, processes governing the chemical and physical interaction between the implanted atoms and the atoms in the host matrix are not completely understood. In this paper, metal, alloy and binary compound nanocluster formation is studied after ion implantation in silica and soda-lime glass. Particular emphasis is given to the comparison among different existing approaches to the understanding of the chemical interactions in these systems. As the physical properties of these composites depend on the cluster structure, composition and size, it is important to set procedures for modifying these characteristics. Recent results indicate that thermal treatments in controlled atmosphere of gold + copper double-implanted silica favor the formation of either alloy nanoclusters or copper compounds, depending on the annealing atmosphere

  14. Silicate features in Galactic and extragalactic post-AGB discs

    Gielen, C; Van Winckel, H; Evans, T Lloyd; Woods, P M; Kemper, F; Marengo, M; Meixner, M; Sloan, G C; Tielens, A G G M

    2011-01-01

    Aims. In this paper we study the Spitzer and TIMMI2 infrared spectra of post-AGB disc sources, both in the Galaxy and the LMC. Using the observed infrared spectra we determine the mineralogy and dust parameters of the discs, and look for possible differences between the Galactic and extragalactic sources. Methods. Modelling the full spectral range observed allows us to determine the dust species present in the disc and different physical parameters such as grain sizes, dust abundance ratios, and the dust and continuum temperatures. Results. We find that all the discs are dominated by emission features of crystalline and amorphous silicate dust. Only a few sample sources show features due to CO2 gas or carbonaceous molecules such as PAHs and C60 fullerenes. Our analysis shows that dust grain processing in these discs is strong, resulting in large average grain sizes and a very high crystallinity fraction. However, we do not find any correlations between the derived dust parameters and properties of the central...

  15. Thermal properties of polyolefin composites with copper silicate

    Klozinski, Arkadiusz; Jakubowska, Paulina; Ambrozewicz, Damian; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work was to specify thermal properties of polyolefin composites with copper silicate. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polypropylene (PP) composites with 2, 4 and 8 wt % of the filler (CuO.SiO2) were analyzed. Characteristic temperatures of the polymer compositions, i.e. the melting (Tm) and crystallization temperatures (Tc), obtained by means of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), were determined. The impact of the applied additives on composites thermal stability was established using thermogravimetry measurements (TGA). Afterwards, the flammability test was performed. The measurement was complemented with the establishment of the maximum combustion temperature using infrared recording techniques and image analysis (infrared camera). One of the most important parameter of thermoplastics is the softening point which was also determined. The measurement was carried out using a Vicat apparatus. Thermal characteristic was also supplemented with an assessment of the thermal diffusivity (the parameter determining the cooling time in an injection mold). The tests were conducted using the modified Angstrom method and an infrared camera.

  16. Interfacial interactions in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites.

    Kato, Ryo; Liauw, Christopher M; Allen, Norman S; Irure, Ainhoa; Wilkinson, Arthur N; Stanford, John L; Fithriyah, Nurul H

    2008-03-01

    Interactions between sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and a variety of probes, some of which are intended to model components of a polyurethane system, have been studied. Particular attention was given to the effect of preadsorbed water on the adsorption behavior of the probes. Flow microcalorimetry (FMC), diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) were used to monitor the adsorption process. The probe set included alcohols, amines, ethers, poly(propylene glycol) monobutyl ethers (PPG), and 4-ethylphenyl isocyanate (4-EPI). FMC revealed that the preadsorbed water molecules on undried Na-MMT hindered the adsorption of alcohol and ether probes, but had little effect on the adsorption of amines. Drying of Na-MMT to less than 0.3% w/w H2O led to an increase in heat of adsorption and generally greater retention of the probes. PPG showed strong interaction with Na-MMT due to multipoint adsorption. With dried Na-MMT, WAXS revealed that PPG of molecular weight (MW) 1000 was partly intercalated into the gallery while lower molecular weight PPG (MW 340) did not intercalate the Na-MMT. DRIFTS spectra of 4-EPI adsorbed on undried Na-MMT revealed urea linkages, indicating formation of N,N'-bis(4-ethylphenyl) urea. In contrast, with dried Na-MMT the 4-EPI formed a urethane linkage with hydroxyl groups present at the edges of the silicate platelets. PMID:18205417

  17. Combustion synthesis and photoluminescence study of silicate biomaterials

    V B Bhatkar; N V Bhatkar

    2011-10-01

    Silicate based bioceramics are promising candidates as biomaterials for tissue engineering. The combustion synthesis method provides control on the morphology and particle size of the synthesized material. This paper discusses the combustion synthesis of akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7 and Sr2MgSi2O7), which has been shown to have good in vitro and in vivo bioactivities by earlier studies. Both Ca2MgSi2O7 and Sr2MgSi2O7 have akermanite structure. Ca2MgSi2O7 and Sr2MgSi2O7 were prepared using urea and ammonium nitrate. The combustion synthesis using urea and ammonium nitrate was found to be cost effective and efficient method of synthesis. The photoluminescence study of Ca2MgSi2O7 : Eu2+ and Sr2MgSi2O7 :Eu2+ shows host specific intense emission of Eu2+.

  18. Lunar highland melt rocks - Chemistry, petrology and silicate mineralogy

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A selected suite containing several of the largest samples of lunar highland melt rocks includes impact melt specimens (anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro) and volcanic specimens (intermediate-K Fra Mauro). Although previous assumptions of LKFM volcanism have fallen into disfavor, no fatal arguments against this hypothesis have been presented, and the evidence of a possibly 'inherited igneous' olivine-plagioclase cosaturation provides cause for keeping a volcanic LKFM hypothesis viable. Comparisons of silicate mineralogy with melt rock compositions provide information on the specimen's composition and cooling history. Plagioclase-rock compositions can be matched to the experimentally determined equilibria for appropriate samples to identify melt rocks with refractory anorthitic clasts. Olivine-rock compositions indicate that melt rock vitrophyres precipitate anomalously Fe-rich olivine; the cause of this anomaly is not immediately evident. The Al-Ti and Ca-Fe-Mg zonation in pyroxene provide information on relative cooling rates of highland melt rocks, but Cr- and Al-content (where Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene cores are preserved in rapidly cooled samples) can be correlated with composition of the host rock.

  19. CO2 sequestration using calcium-silicate concrete

    This study examined the feasibility of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) using calcium silicate while developing a strong and durable concrete building product. In addition to offering a solution for a safe, environmentally sound manner to sequester carbon dioxide, the carbonation curing of concrete has the potential to provide a permanent storage for exhaust CO2. The calcium compounds in cement react with CO2 through the early-age carbonation curing, forming geologically stable calcium carbonates. In this study, both type 10 and type 30 Portland cements were used as CO2 binders in concretes with 0, 25, 50, and 75 per cent quartz aggregates and lightweight aggregates. The sequestration took place in a chamber under 0.5 MPa pressure at ambient temperature for a duration of 2 hours. The recovered CO2 from flue gas was simulated using a 100 per cent concentration of CO2. The CO2 uptake was quantified by direct mass gain and by an infrared-based carbon analyzer. The performance of the carbonated concrete was evaluated by its strength. In 2 hours, a CO2 uptake of 9 to 16 per cent by binder mass was achieved. The carbonation curing of concrete was found to provide better strength, stability, permeability and abrasion resistance in concrete products without steel reinforcement. 10 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  20. Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO2 sequestration

    Blencoe, James G; Palmer, Donald A; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Beard, James S

    2014-03-18

    In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

  1. Cementing properties of steel slag activated by sodium silicates and sodium hydroxide

    Wen Ni; En Wang; Jianping Li; Han Sun

    2005-01-01

    Steel slag which is mainly composed of γ-CasSiO4 and other silicates or alumino-silicates is activated by sodium silicates and sodium hydroxide. The powders of such steel slag are usually inert to hydrate and subsequently have very low ability of cementing. But when sodium silicates and sodium hydroxide are used as activators the steel slag shows very good properties of cementing. When activated with NaOH solution the hardened slurry of the steel slag has a compressive strength of 11.13 MPa after being cured for 28 days. When activated with Na2SiO3 solution the samples after being cured for 28 days have an average compressive strength of 40.23 MPa. While the steel slag slurry which is only mixed with water has a compressive of 0.88 MPa after being cured for 28 days.

  2. Photo-induced processes in silicate glasses exposed to IR femotosecond pulses

    The optical properties variation in silicate glasses (fused silica, boro-silicate crowns K8 (Russia) and BK7 (USA), and high purity alkali-silicate glass) after exposure to high-power femtosecond laser radiation at 0.85 μm have been studied. The laser spectral line broadening leading to the supercontinuum generation in visible and UV spectral regions was observed in all studied glasses. Color center generation and intrinsic luminescence were found in boro- and alkali-silicate glasses. It is believed that these processes result from linear and/or two-photon absorption of the short-wavelength part of this supercontinuum which causes glass matrix ionization. No color center absorption in the visible region was observed in fused silica at irradiances up to the laser damage threshold. It was concluded that there is no significant ionization of fused silica under exposure to IR femtosecond laser pulses with irradiance below laser induced damage threshold

  3. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging a rapidly evolving state-of-the-art technical base empowered by Phase I NASA SBIR funding, NanoSonic's polymer derived rare earth silicate EBCs will...

  4. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  5. Polymer Derived Yttrium Silicate Ablative TPS Materials for Next-Generation Exploration Missions Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Through the proposed NASA SBIR program, NanoSonic will optimize its HybridSil® derived yttrium silicates to serve as next-generation reinforcement for carbon...

  6. THE ALUMINA-SILICATES IN STABILIZATION PROCESSES IN FLUIDIZED-BED ASH

    IVANA PERNA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Presented study of coal fluidized-bed ash solidification was accompanied with specific studies of alumino-silicates residues in ashes. The specific technology of fluid coal burning and its relatively low temperature combustion combines coal burning and decomposition of calcium carbonate added to the fluid layer in the main endeavor to capture all sulfur oxides. The burning temperature seems be decisive to the behavior of clayed residues and calcium carbonate decomposition in connection for the future solidification of fluidized bed ash. The calcareous substances in combination with alumino-silicate residues form solid bodies where silicates play decisive role of long-term stability and insolubility of obtained solids. The position of aluminum ions in clayed residues of burned coal were studied by MAS-NMR with attention on aluminum ion coordination to oxygen and formation of roentgen amorphous phase of poly-condensed calcium alumina-silicate.

  7. Some observations on use of siliceous mineral waters in reduction of corrosion in RCC structures

    Venugopal, C.

    The corrosion-resisting characteristics of reinforcement in cement blended with siliceous mineral wastes viz. gold tailing and flyash have been evaluated by using an accelerated corrosion technique. The additions of these mineral admixtures...

  8. Geotechnical properties of two siliceous cores from the central Indian Ocean

    Khadge, N.H.

    Physical properties of the siliceous sediments from the Central Indian Basin are measured on two short cores. The properties such as water content, Atterberg limits, porosity specific gravity, wet density show the medium to high plastic sediment...

  9. Viscosity and thermal expansion of rare earth containing soda-lime-silicate glass

    Viscosity, coefficient of thermal expansion, glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening temperature of soda-lime-silicate glass doped with rare earth oxides (La2O3, CeO2, Nd2O3) were investigated by the rotating crucible viscometer and dilatometry, the melting temperature and activation energy for viscous flow of the studied melt were derived on the basis of Arrhenius equation, in order to reveal the effects of rare earth elements on the behavior of soda-lime-silicate glass. The results show that introduction of rare earth oxides increases the coefficient of thermal expansion, decreases viscosity of soda-lime-silicate glass, and Nd2O3 is an exception in viscosity. The glass transition temperature, dilatometric softening temperature, melting temperature and activation energy for viscous flow of soda-lime-silicate glass doped with rare earth oxides increase with increasing cationic field strength of corresponding rare earth ions.

  10. SELF-LIMITING GROWTH OF TITANIUM SILICATE AND EFFECTS OF THERMAL ANNEALING ON THE ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM SILICATE/SiO2

    SEUNGJAE LEE; KIJUNG YONG

    2007-01-01

    Titanium silicate thin films were deposited using self-limiting atomic layer growth technique. Grown films showed smooth film surface morphology. As deposited, 8 nm-thick film surface showed an RMS value of 0.43 nm and annealed film showed a smoother surface having RMS of 0.2 nm. Electrical properties of titanium silicate/SiO2 bilayer were investigated using capacitance–voltage (C–V) and leakage current-voltage (I–V) measurements. The grown films showed high dielectric properties with low imp...

  11. Comparative petrology of silicates in the Udei Station (IAB) and Miles (IIE) iron meteorites: Implications for the origin of silicate-bearing irons

    Ruzicka, Alex; Hutson, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    The textures and mineral chemistries of silicate inclusions in the Udei Station (IAB) and Miles (fractionated IIE) iron meteorites were studied using optical and electron microscopy, SEM, EMPA, and LA-ICP-MS techniques to better understand the origin of silicate-bearing irons. Inclusions in Udei Station include near-chondritic, basaltic/gabbroic, feldspathic orthopyroxenitic, and harzburgitic lithologies. In Miles, most inclusions can be described as feldspathic pyroxenite or pyroxene-enriched basalt/gabbro. The trace-element compositions of both orthopyroxene and plagioclase grains are similar in different lithologies from Udei Station; whereas in different inclusions from Miles, the compositions of orthopyroxene grains are similar, while those of clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and especially Cl-apatite are variable. Orthopyroxene in Miles tends to be enriched in REE compared to that in Udei Station, but the reverse is true for plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The data can be explained by models involving partial melting of chondritic protoliths, silicate melt migration, and redox reactions between silicate and metal components to form phosphate. The extent of heating, melt migration, and phosphate formation were all greater in Miles. Silicates in Miles were formed from liquids produced by ˜30% partial melting of a chondritic precursor brought to a peak temperature of ˜1250 °C. This silicate melt crystallized in two stages. During Stage 1, crystallizing minerals (orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, chromite, and olivine) were largely in equilibrium with an intercumulus melt that was evolving by igneous fractionation during slow cooling, with a residence time of ˜20 ka at ˜1150 °C. During Stage 2, following probable re-melting of feldspathic materials, and after the silicate "mush" was mixed with molten metal, plagioclase and phosphate fractionally crystallized together during more rapid cooling down to the solidus. In Udei Station, despite a lower peak temperature (IIE

  12. Application of reference point indentation for micro-mechanical surface characterization of calcium silicate based dental materials.

    Antonijević, Djordje; Milovanović, Petar; Riedel, Christoph; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Busse, Björn; Djurić, Marija

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate micromechanical properties of Biodentine and two experimental calcium silicate cements (CSCs) using Reference Point Indentation (RPI). Biomechanical characteristics of the cement type and the effects of a radiopacifier, liquid components, acid etching treatment and bioactivation in simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated by measuring the microhardness, average unloading slope (Avg US) and indentation distance increase (IDI). Biodentine had a greater microhardness than the experimental CSCs, while the Avg US and IDI values were not significantly different among investigated materials. There was a statistically significant difference in microhardness and IDI values between pure CSCs and radiopacified cements (p < 0.05). Micromechanical properties were not affected by different liquid components used. Acid-etching treatment reduced Biodentine's microhardness while cements' immersion in SBF resulted in greater microhardness and higher IDI values compared to the control group. Clearly, the physiological environment and the cements' composition affect their surface micromechanical properties. The addition of calcium chloride and CSCs' immersion in SBF are beneficial for CSCs' micromechanical performance, while the addition of radiopacifiers and acid etching treatment weaken the CSCs' surface. Application of RPI aids with the characterization of micromechanical properties of synthetic materials' surfaces. PMID:26888441

  13. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of acetic-cure silicone with the addition of magnesium silicate

    Ronald Vargas Orellana; Neide Pena Coto; Igor Studart Medeiros; Reinaldo Brito Dias

    2015-01-01

    Current study evaluates the mechanical properties (tensile and tear strength) of an acetic-cure silicone with the addition of 10 or 20% vol. magnesium silicate. Magnesium silicate was added to the silicone at concentrations of 10 (MS-10) and 20% (MS-20) volume, followed by the analysis of tensile strength, maximal elongation during tensile and tear strength. Results were compared to control group of silicone without additives (CG). Mean rates were determined and compared by analysis of v...

  14. Spectroscopic study of silicate glass structure. Application to the case of iron and magnesium

    During the last 10 years, I focused my research topics on silicate glass structure. More specifically I have been interested by two main components of natural and technological silicate glasses, Fe and Mg. Using solid state spectroscopic methods adapted to the disordered nature of glass coupled to molecular dynamics simulation and modeling or ab initio calculation, I have studied the environment of iron and magnesium and their impact on glass properties. Information on the distribution of environments in glasses have been extracted. (author)

  15. Determinazione della silice: metodo colorimetrico (Automated Discrete Analyser SEAL AQ2)

    Gabriele A. TARTARI

    2012-01-01

    Metodo analitico interno al laboratorio di idrochimica del CNR-ISE di Verbania per la determinazione della silice disciolta reattiva al molibdato con l'analizzatore discreto multiparametrico SEAL AQ2e, strumento automatico in grado di eseguire contemporaneamente pi? metodi colorimetrici ad assorbimento molecolare utilizzando micro quantit? di campione e reattivi. La determinazione della silice viene eseguita con lo stesso metodo spettrofotometrico al blu di molibdeno adattato all'analizzatore...

  16. STUDY ON CORROSION RESISTANCE OF REBAR IN HYBRID GRINDING FLY ASH-LIME SILICATE CONCRETE

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of rebar in fly ash-lime sili cate concrete as well as its marco properties and pore distribution is investiga ted.The results show that the fly ash is activated, the compressive strength of the silicate concrete is strengthened and its pore structure is modified after f ly ash and lime being hybrid ground.Also the corrosion resistance of rebar in the silicate concrete is improved.

  17. Creating of highly active calcium-silicate phases for application in endodontics

    Čolović B.; Jokanović V.; Jović N.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of active silicate phases by combined sol gel and high-temperature selfpropagating wave method, is described in this paper. They show a significant decrease of setting time and good mechanical properties, which are very important for its potential application in endodontic practice. Particularly, process of hydration of calcium silicate phases is carefully analyzed, from the aspect of phase changes during their soaking in water for 1, 3, 7 and...

  18. Biocompatibility of a new nanomaterial based on calcium silicate implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    Petrović Violeta; Opačić-Galić Vanja; Jokanović V.; Jovanović M.; Basta-Jovanović Gordana; Živković S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate rat connective tissue response to a new calcium silicate system 7, 15, 30 and 60 days after implantation. Twenty Wistar albino male rats received two tubes half-filled with a new calcium silicate system (NCSS) or MTA in subcutaneous tissue. The empty half of the tubes served as controls. Five animals were sacrificed after 7, 15, 30 and 60 days and samples of the subcutaneous tissue around implanted material were submi...

  19. Use of Propranolol-Magnesium Aluminium Silicate Intercalated Complexes as Drug Reservoirs in Polymeric Matrix Tablets

    T. Pongjanyakul; S Rojtanatanya

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the use of propranolol-magnesium aluminium silicate intercalated complexes as drug reservoirs in hydroxypropylmethylcellulose tablets. The matrix tablets containing the complexes were prepared and characterised with respect to propranolol release and were subsequently compared with those loading propranolol or a propranolol-magnesium aluminium silicate physical mixture. Additionally, the effects of varying viscosity grades of hydroxypropyl...

  20. Determine the Compressive Strength of Calcium Silicate Bricks by Combined Nondestructive Method

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of combined nondestructive method for assessment of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks. In this case, it is a combination of the rebound hammer method and ultrasonic pulse method. Calibration relationships for determining compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks obtained from nondestructive parameter testing for the combined method as well as for the L-type Schmidt rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse method are quoted here. Calibration ...

  1. The natural hydrous sodium silicates from the northern bank of Lake Chad : occurrence, petrology and genesis

    Sebag, D.; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Lee, Seong-Joo; Durand, A

    2005-01-01

    Hydrous sodium silicates sometimes associated with zeolites, form in an alkaline environment, in which there is a high concentration of dissolved silica. Such an environment existed during the Holocene in N'Guigmi interdunal depressions (Lake Chad), which led to the precipitation of various types of hydrous sodium silicates, including magadiite, kenyaite, and zeolites. Scanning electron and optical microscope observations allow several microstructures to be distinguished. These microstructure...

  2. Improved mechanical and corrosion properties of nickel composite coatings by incorporation of layered silicates

    Tientong, J.; Ahmad, Y.H.; Nar, M.; D'Souza, N.; Mohamed, A.M.A.; Golden, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    Layered silicates as exfoliated montmorillonite are incorporated into nickel films by electrodeposition, enhancing both corrosion resistance and hardness. Films were deposited onto stainless steel from a plating solution adjusted to pH 9 containing nickel sulfate, sodium citrate, and various concentrations of exfoliated montmorillonite. The presence of the incorporated layered silicate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The composite films ...

  3. XRF analysis of major and trace elements for silicate rocks using low dilution ratio fused glass

    Tanaka, Ryoji; ORIHASHI, Yuji

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) method to determine 10 major and 18 trace elements in silicate rocks has been investigated. The analysis is carried out on fused glass beads, containing one part rock powder, two parts of lithium metaborate/tetraborate flux and 0.3 parts of lithium n itrate by weight. Calibration lines were established using international silicate rock reference materials. The low dilution fused glass technique effectively eliminates particle size effect...

  4. Silicate Esters of Paclitaxel and Docetaxel: Synthesis, Hydrophobicity, Hydrolytic Stability, Cytotoxicity, and Prodrug Potential

    Wohl, Adam R.; Michel, Andrew R.; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Macosko, Christopher W.; Panyam, Jayanth; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the synthesis and selected properties of various silicate ester derivatives (tetraalkoxysilanes) of the taxanes paclitaxel (PTX) and docetaxel (DTX) [i.e., PTX-OSi(OR)3 and DTX-OSi(OR)3]. Both the hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability of these silicates can be (independently) controlled by choice of the alkyl group (R). The synthesis, structural characterization, hydrolytic reactivity, and in vitro cytotoxicity against the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line of most of these de...

  5. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of chondrites and silicate planetary reservoirs

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Merdian, Alexandra; Holmden, Chris; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Haßler, Kathrin; Wille, Martin; Reitter, Elmar

    2016-06-01

    The depletion of chromium in Earth's mantle (∼2700 ppm) in comparison to chondrites (∼4400 ppm) indicates significant incorporation of chromium into the core during our planet's metal-silicate differentiation, assuming that there was no significant escape of the moderately volatile element chromium during the accretionary phase of Earth. Stable Cr isotope compositions - expressed as the ‰-difference in 53Cr/52Cr from the terrestrial reference material SRM979 (δ53/52CrSRM979 values) - of planetary silicate reservoirs might thus yield information about the conditions of planetary metal segregation processes when compared to chondrites. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of 7 carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, 5 HED achondrites and 2 martian meteorites determined by a double spike MC-ICP-MS method are within uncertainties indistinguishable from each other and from the previously determined δ53/52CrSRM979 value of -0.124 ± 0.101‰ for the igneous silicate Earth. Extensive quality tests support the accuracy of the stable Cr isotope determinations of various meteorites and terrestrial silicates reported here. The uniformity in stable Cr isotope compositions of samples from planetary silicate mantles and undifferentiated meteorites indicates that metal-silicate differentiation of Earth, Mars and the HED parent body did not cause measurable stable Cr isotope fractionation between these two reservoirs. Our results also imply that the accretionary disc, at least in the inner solar system, was homogeneous in its stable Cr isotopic composition and that potential volatility loss of chromium during accretion of the terrestrial planets was not accompanied by measurable stable isotopic fractionation. Small but reproducible variations in δ53/52CrSRM979 values of terrestrial magmatic rocks point to natural stable Cr isotope variations within Earth's silicate reservoirs. Further and more detailed studies are required to investigate whether silicate

  6. Determining the Metal/Silicate Partition Coefficient of Germanium: Implications for Core and Mantle Differentiation.

    King, C.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are several hypotheses for the thermal state of the early Earth. Some hypothesize a shallow magma ocean, or deep magma ocean, or heterogeneous accretion which requires no magma ocean at all. Previous models are unable to account for Ge depletion in Earth's mantle relative to CI chondrites. In this study, the element Ge is used to observe the way siderophile elements partition into the metallic core. The purpose of this research is to provide new data for Ge and to further test these models for Earth's early stages. The partition coefficients (D(sub Ge) = c(sub metal)/c(sub silicate), where D = partition coefficient of Ge and c = concentration of Ge in the metal and silicate, respectively) of siderophile elements were studied by performing series of high pressure, high temperature experiments. They are also dependent on oxygen fugacity, and metal and silicate composition. Ge is a moderately siderophile element found in both the mantle and core, and has yet to be studied systematically at high temperatures. Moreover, previous work has been limited by the low solubility of Ge in silicate melts (less than 100 ppm and close to detection limits for electron microprobe analysis). Reported here are results from 14 experiments studying the partitioning of Ge between silicate and metallic liquids. The Ge concentrations were then analyzed using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) which is sensitive enough to detect ppm levels of Ge in the silicate melt.

  7. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities. PMID:26691955

  8. Growth of titanium silicate thin films by photo-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Wang, Z.M.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, J.-Y.; Wu, J.X.; Di, Y.; Chen, W.; Chen, M.L.; Boyd, Ian W

    2004-04-01

    Titanium silicate thin films have been grown on Si substrates by photo-induced chemical vapor deposition using 222-nm ultraviolet excimer lamps. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) were used as precursors. TTIP and TEOS were dissolved together in cyclohexane and introduced into the photochemical reaction chamber through a droplet injector vaporizer. The composition of the film was controlled by changing the ratio of TTIP to TEOS in the precursor solution. High quality titanium silicate films with various Ti/Si ratios and low carbon content have been achieved as revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The atomic percentage of Ti content in the grown silicate films is significantly larger than that in the precursor solution. The films were measured to be 30-80 nm in thickness and 1.91-2.31 in refractive index by ellipsometry. Both the growth rate and refractive index increase with increasing Ti percentage in the silicate films. The evolution of Fourier transform infrared spectra of the silicate films with solution composition shows that the Ti-O-Si absorption at approximately 920 cm{sup -1} becomes stronger, while the Ti-O absorption at approximately 430 cm{sup -1} becomes weaker with decreasing Ti percentage in the solution. A small feature at {approx}1035 cm{sup -1} related to Si-O-Si bonds is also observed in the SiO{sub 2}-rich Ti silicate film.

  9. The Silicon Layer Supports Acid Resistance of Bacillus cereus Spores

    Hirota, Ryuichi; Hata, Yumehiro; Ikeda, Takeshi; Ishida, Takenori; Kuroda, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is considered to be a “quasiessential” element for most living organisms. However, silicate uptake in bacteria and its physiological functions have remained obscure. We observed that Si is deposited in a spore coat layer of nanometer-sized particles in Bacillus cereus and that the Si layer enhances acid resistance. The novel acid resistance of the spore mediated by Si encapsulation was also observed in other Bacillus strains, representing a general adaptation enhancing survival u...

  10. Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethanes Laminated Glass Treated by Acid Etching Combined with Cold Plasma

    To overcome the problem of interlaminar delamination of thermoplastic polyurethane laminated glass, silicate glass was etched with hydrofluoric acid and thermoplastic polyurethane was then treated with cold plasma. Compared with the untreated samples, the interlaminar shear strength of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 97%, 84% and 341%, respectively. Acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples exhibited a higher flexural strength and strain as compared with the untreated samples. The impact energy of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 8.7%, 8.1% and 11.6%, respectively, in comparison with the untreated samples. FT-IR analysis showed that a large number of –C=O, –CO–N and –CO–O–C– groups appeared on the surface of cold plasma-treated thermoplastic polyurethane, which resulted in the formation of hydrogen bonds. SEM results showed that some pittings formed on the surface of the silicate glass treated by acid etching, which resulted in the formation of a three-dimensional interface structure between the silicate glass and polyurethane. Hydrogen bonds combined with the three-dimensional interface between silicate glass and polyurethanes co-improved the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes laminated glass. (plasma technology)

  11. Cesium and strontium exchange by the framework potassium titanium silicate K3HTi4O4(SiO4)3 x 4H2O

    Potassium titanium silicate with a semicrystalline framework of the formula K3HTi4O4(SiO4)3 x 4H2O has been prepared under mild hydrothermal conditions and its protonic form, H4Ti4O4(SiO4)3 x 8H2O, was obtained by acid treatment of the potassium compound. A comparative ion exchange testing of the H4Ti4O4(SiO4)3 x 8H2O towards alkali and alkaline earth metals in a broad pH and concentration range was carried out. It was found that potassium titanium silicate is a moderately weak cation exchanger, possessing high ion exchange capacity (up to 4-5 meq/g) and showing preference for heavy alkali and alkaline earth metals uptake. The selectivity of K3HTi4O4(SiO4)3 x 4H2O towards Cs+ and Sr2+ ions in alkaline and acid media in the presence of competitive inorganic ions and certain organic compounds was also studied. The data obtained suggest that despite the existence of well defined tunnel structure with parameters fitting for cesium ion in the K3HTi4O4(SiO4)3 x 4H2O, potassium titanium silicate could remove cesium (and strontium) efficiently only under some specific conditions, namely, at pH close to neutral and in the absence of competitive ions and especially of organic complexing agents. (author)

  12. Carbon mineralization and pyrite oxidation in groundwater: Importance for silicate weathering in boreal forest soils and stream base-flow chemistry

    Research highlights: → Organic compounds is mineralized during later transport in deep groundwater aquifers. → Carbonic acid generated by this process stimulates dissolution of silicate minerals. → Protons derived from pyrite oxidation also affects weathering in deep groundwater. → The identified weathering mechanisms affect base-flow chemistry in boreal streams. - Abstract: What role does mineralized organic C and sulfide oxidation play in weathering of silicate minerals in deep groundwater aquifers? In this study, how H2CO3, produced as a result of mineralization of organic matter during groundwater transport, affects silicate weathering in the saturated zone of the mineral soil along a 70 m-long boreal hillslope is demonstrated. Stream water measurements of base cations and δ18O are included to determine the importance of the deep groundwater system for downstream surface water. The results suggest that H2CO3 generated from organic compounds being mineralized during the lateral transport stimulates weathering at depths between 0.5 and 3 m in the soil. This finding is indicated by progressively increasing concentrations of base cations-, silica- and inorganic C (IC) in the groundwater along the hillslope that co-occur with decreasing organic C (OC) concentrations. Protons derived from sulfide oxidation appear to be an additional driver of the weathering process as indicated by a build-up of SO42- in the groundwater during lateral transport and a δ34S per mille value of +0.26-3.76 per mille in the deep groundwater indicating S inputs from pyrite. The two identified active acids in the deep groundwater are likely to control the base-flow chemistry of streams draining larger catchments (>1 km2) as evident by δ18O signatures and base cation concentrations that overlap with that of the groundwater.

  13. Correlative spectroscopy of silicates in mineralised nodules formed from osteoblasts

    Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Fearn, Sarah; Gentleman, Eileen; Spillane, Liam; Carzaniga, Raffaella; McComb, David W.; Stevens, Molly M.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2013-07-01

    Silicon supplementation has been shown to play an important role in skeleton development, however, the potential role that silicon plays in mediating bone formation, and an understanding of where it might localise in the resulting bone tissue remain elusive. An improved understanding of these processes could have important implications for treating pathological mineralisation. A key aspect of defining the role of silicon in bone is to characterise its distribution and coordination environment, however, there is currently almost no information available on either. We have combined a sample-preparation method that simultaneously preserved mineral, ions, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to examine the distribution and coordination environment of silicon in murine osteoblasts (OBs) in an in vitro model of bone formation. SIMS analysis showed a high level of surface contamination from polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) resulting from sample preparation. When the PDMS was removed, silicon compounds could not be detected within the nodules either by SIMS or by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. In comparison, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) provided a powerful and potentially widely applicable means to define the coordination environment and localisation of silicon in mineralising tissues. We show that trace levels of silicon were only detectable from the mineral deposits located on the collagen and in the peripheral region of mineralised matrix, possibly the newly mineralised regions of the OB nodules. Taken together our results suggest that silicon plays a biological role in bone formation, however, the precise mechanism by which silicon exerts its physicochemical effects remains uncertain. Our analytical results open the door for compelling new sets of EELS experiments that can provide detailed and specific information about the role that silicates play in bone

  14. Revisiting classical silicate dissolution rate laws under hydrothermal conditions

    Pollet-Villard, Marion; Daval, Damien; Saldi, Giuseppe; Knauss, Kevin; Wild, Bastien; Fritz, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    apparent modification of silicate dissolution rate over time. In addition, we evidenced that the relation between K-spar dissolution rate and ΔG depends on the crystallographic orientation of the altered surface, and differs from the transition state theory currently implemented into geochemical codes. Importantly, this theoretical curve overestimates the dissolution rates measured in close-to-equilibrium conditions. Taken together, the new findings show promise as a means for improving the accuracy of geochemical simulations. [1] Schott, J., Pokrovsky, O. S., and Oelkers, E. H., 2009. The Link Between Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation Kinetics and Solution Chemistry. Rev Mineral Geochem 70, 207-258. [2] Daval, D., Hellmann, R., Saldi, G. D., Wirth, R., and Knauss, K. G., 2013. Linking nm-scale measurements of the anisotropy of silicate surface reactivity to macroscopic dissolution rate laws: New insights based on diopside. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 107, 121-134.

  15. Preparation of novel nanoporous layered silicates by swelling of AMH-3 and their use in nanocomposite membranes for gas separation

    Choi, Sunho

    Nanoporous layered materials can be described as a class of lamellar solids that have an intermediate structure between layered materials (e.g., clays) and nanoporous frameworks (e.g., zeolites). Among these, nanoporous layered silicates have been studied for various industrial applications since the rich intercalation chemistry of clays can be applied to yield their swollen and exfoliated derivatives. Their pore connectivity in the direction perpendicular to the layers has been expected to provide an ability of molecular recognition based on the size of permeating species. These unique structural characteristics are important in the membrane industry because the molecular sieving of permeable nanolayers, if exfoliated and incorporated in polymers, is able to enhance the separation properties of polymeric membranes. AMH-3, a layered silicate built of nanoporous layers and interlayer space occupied by cations and water molecules, has been known to have a unique three-dimensional eight membered-ring (8 MR) pore system. Due to its unique porosity, it has been proposed to use exfoliated layers of AMH-3 as a selectivity-enhancing additive in polymers for small molecule separation. However, experimental procedures for the AMH-3 swelling, required for the nanocomposite demonstrated. This research reveals a novel process for AMH-3 swelling, involving the sequential intercalation of surfactant molecules following proton exchange of interlayer cations in the presence of amino acids. Structural information of swollen AMH-3 is investigated using various characterization techniques and the emergence of structural changes indicates that it should be considered as a new nanoporous layered silicate rather than a simple intercalated derivative. Consequently, polymeric nanocomposites incorporating the nanoparticles of swollen AMH-3 are fabricated by solution blending. These nanocomposite membranes present substantial improvements of the hydrogen/carbon dioxide ideal selectivity more

  16. Sodium silicate solutions from dissolution of glasswastes. Statistical analysis

    Torres-Carrasco, M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It has studied the solubility process of four different waste glasses (with different particle sizes, 125 µm in alkaline solutions (NaOH and NaOH/Na₂CO₃ and water as a reference and under different conditions of solubility (at room temperature, at 80°C and a mechano-chemical process. Have established the optimal conditions of solubility and generation of sodium silicates solutions, and these were: the smaller particle size (Se ha estudiado el proceso de solubilidad de cuatro diferentes residuos vítreos (con distintas granulometrías, 125 µm en disoluciones alcalinas de NaOH y NaOH/Na₂CO₃ y agua como medio de referencia y bajo distintas condiciones de solubilidad (a temperatura ambiente, a 80°C y con un proceso mecano-químico. Se han establecido las condiciones óptimas de solubilidad y generación de disoluciones de silicato sódico, y estas son: menor tamaño de partícula del residuo vítreo (inferior a 45 µm, con la disolución de NaOH/Na₂CO₃ y tratamiento térmico a 80°C durante 6 horas de agitación. El análisis estadístico realizado a los resultados obtenidos da importancia a las variables estudiadas y a las interacciones de las mismas. A través de ²⁹Si RMN MAS se ha confirmado la formación, tras los procesos de disolución, de un silicato monomérico, apto para su utilización como activador en la preparación de cementos y hormigones alcalinos.

  17. First principles characterization of silicate sites in clay surfaces.

    Alvim, Raphael S; Miranda, Caetano R

    2015-02-21

    Aluminosilicate clays like Montmorillonite (MMT) and Muscovite Mica (MT) have siloxane cavities on the basal plane. The hydroxyl groups localized in these cavities and van der Waals (vdW) forces contribute significantly to adsorption processes. However, the basal sites are found to be difficult to characterize experimentally. Here, (001) surfaces of MMT and MT clays were investigated using first-principles calculations to understand how these silicate surface sites are influenced by hydroxyl groups and the effective role of inner layer vdW interactions. Based on density-functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), different types of exchange-correlation functionals were tested to check the effect of vdW dispersion correction. Noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in the near-edge region and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) spectroscopy were simulated. In both clays, the oxygen surface sites are directly affected by the intralayer interaction through hydroxyl groups. Our results indicated that the chemical environment of the hydroxyl groups is distinct in the MMT and MT structures. The vdW correction was essential for a better description of the surface oxygen sites and correctly describes the similarity between both clays. Particularly, the bulk apical oxygen sites in the MT structure are less influenced by vdW interaction. Compared to MMT, the silicon surface sites of MT are more sensitive to the intralayer changes in Si-Oapical-Al and with less effect of the hydroxyl groups. These results provide a clear understanding of influence of the siloxane cavity on the oxygen and silicon surface sites in aluminosilicates. PMID:25592132

  18. New dense hydrous magnesium silicate in the lower mantle

    Nishi, M.; Irifune, T.; Tsuchiya, J.; Tange, Y.; Nishihara, Y.; Fujino, K.; Higo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A small amount of water has been shown to strongly affect several key properties of the deep mantle, such as melting temperature, rheological property, electrical conductivity, atomic diffusivity. Recent experimental studies suggest that dense hydrous magnesium silicates (DHMS) are stable over a wide range of pressure, and therefore DHMS possibly carry water into the deep Eath's interior. The most dense form of DHMS, phase D, has been believed to be stable at least under the uppermost part of the lower mantle conditions along cold slab geotherms. However, little is known about the high pressure transformation of phase D, and the other DHMS that can be stable in the lower mantle. To determine the stability fields of the DHMS in the lower mantle, we conducted the high pressure and high temperature experiments using a large volume multianvil apparatus with sintered diamond as the second-stage anvils. In-situ X-ray diffraction measurements were also conducted in order to observe the structure of the present dense hydrous magnesium phases. The starting materials were mixture of Mg(OH)2 brucite and SiO2 silica powder. The microstructures and chemical compositions of the recovered samples were examined using a field emission-scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We found that phase D transforms to an assemblage with a new DHMS at pressures above ~48 GPa. Phase H has a chemical composition close to MgSiH2O4. A significant amount of water is retained in the descending slabs of this new DHMS, which may be delivered to the deepest part of the lower mantle and may influence the structure and dynamics of the mantle.

  19. Investigations in silicate glasses. I. Radiation damage. II. Optical nonlinearity

    The investigation of two poorly understood but technologically important physical properties of silicate glasses and related materials is described. The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance to investigate the nature of radiation-induced damage in glasses exposed to a variety of high-energy radiation sources is discussed first. Second, the measurement of the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient in a variety of optical materials related to the design of high-power laser systems is described. The radiation damage investigations rely heavily on the comparison of experimental results for different experimental situations. The comparison of EPR lineshapes, absolute spin densities and power saturation behavior is used to probe a variety of microscopic and macroscopic aspects of radiation damage in glasses. Comparison of radiation damage associated with exposure to gamma rays and fast neutrons (and combinations thereof) are interpreted in terms of the microscopic damage mechanisms which are expected to be associated with the specific radiations. Comparison of radiation damage behavior in different types of glasses is also interpreted in terms of the behavior expected for the specific materials. The body of data which is generated is found to be internally self-consistent and is also generally consistent with the radiation damage behavior expected for specific situations. A new and versatile technique for measuring the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient, n2, in optical materials is described. The technique utilizes a 1 ns pulsed neodymium-glass laser system and time-resolved interferometry to determine the ratio of the coefficient n2 of sample materials to the n2 of CS2. This method avoids some of the complications associated with performing absolute measurements of n2 and allows the use of a relatively simple experimental technique. The measurements determine the nonlinear index ratios of the samples with an accuracy of about +-15 percent

  20. Atomic Oxygen Desorption from an Amorphous Silicate Surface

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen is the third most abundant element in space. How oxygen-containing molecules form in space, and whether they form through gas-phase or grain-surface reactions, depends largely on the availability of atomic oxygen in gas-phase versus on surfaces of dust grains. The relative abundance of O in gas-phase versus on grain surfaces is determined by the residence time, or equivalently, desorption energy, of atomic oxygen on grain surfaces. Though important in astrochemical modeling, experimental investigations of atomic oxygen desorption from grain surfaces are lacking in the literature. In most astrochemical models, the O desorption energy value has been taken to be 800 K, which is a guessed value without experimental support. Based on this value, the predicted molecular oxygen abundance in space is at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than what space observations have found. This long running discrepancy of molecular oxygen abundance could be resolved if the O desorption energy is twice as the widely used value (Melnick, G., Tolls, V., et al. 2012, Astrophys. J., 752, 26). We performed TPD (thermal programmed desorption) experiments to study the ozone formation process via O+O2 on an amorphous silicate surface that emulates interstellar conditions. A rate equation model was used to characterize the surface kinetics of both atomic and molecular oxygen. The O desorption energy was extracted from rate equation simulations that best fit the TPD data. The value was found to be 1764±232 K, which agrees with what Melnick et al. proposed. We suggest that the newly found value for the O desorption energy should be used in astrochemical modeling. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958), and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.