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Sample records for acid sensing ion

  1. Acid-sensing ion channels and migraine

    Yu-qi KANG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by extracellular protons (H+, which belong to epithelial sodium channels/degenerin (ENaC/DEG superfamily. ASICs are widely distributed in central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, digestive system and some tumor tissues. Different ASIC subunits play important roles in various pathophysiological processes such as touch, sour taste, learning and memory, including inflammation, ischemic stroke, pain, learning and memory decline, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS, migraine, irritable bowel syndrome and tumor. Research over the last 2 decades has achieved substantial advances in migraine pathophysiology. It is now largely accepted that inflammatory pathways play a key role and three main events seem to take place: cortical spreading depression (CSD, activation of the trigeminovascular system (i.e. dural nociceptors, peripheral and central sensitization of this pain pathway. However, the exact mechanisms that link these three events to each other and to inflammation have so far remained to be studied. This article takes an overview of newly research advances in structure, distribution and the relationship with migraine of ASICs.  DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.09.013

  2. Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants

    Spalding, Edgar P.

    2014-08-12

    The title of our project is “Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants”. Its goals are two-fold: to determine the molecular functions of glutamate receptor-like (GLR) proteins, and to elucidate their biological roles (physiological or developmental) in plants. Here is our final technical report. We were highly successful in two of the three aims, modestly successful in the third.

  3. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25582296

  4. Prokineticin 2 potentiates acid-sensing ion channel activity in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Qiu Chun-Yu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prokineticin 2 (PK2 is a secreted protein and causes potent hyperalgesia in vivo, and is therefore considered to be a new pronociceptive mediator. However, the molecular targets responsible for the pronociceptive effects of PK2 are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that PK2 potentiates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in the primary sensory neurons. Methods In the present study, experiments were performed on neurons freshly isolated from rat dorsal root ganglion by using whole-cell patch clamp and voltage-clamp recording techniques. Results PK2 dose-dependently enhanced proton-gated currents with an EC50 of 0.22 ± 0.06 nM. PK2 shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 1.81 ± 0.11 fold increase of the maximal current response. PK2 enhancing effect on proton-gated currents was completely blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist. The potentiation was also abolished by intracellular dialysis of GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor, or FSC-231, a protein interacting with C-kinase 1 inhibitor. Moreover, PK2 enhanced the acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, PK2 exacerbated nociceptive responses to the injection of acetic acid in rats. Conclusion These results suggest that PK2 increases the activity of acid-sensing ion channels via the PK2 receptor and protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways in rat primary sensory neurons. Our findings support that PK2 is a proalgesic factor and its signaling likely contributes to acidosis-evoked pain by sensitizing acid-sensing ion channels.

  5. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid sensing ion channel–toxin complexes

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels implicated in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non- and sodium-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH 7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a – psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracell...

  6. Identification of acid-sensing ion channels in adenoid cystic carcinomas

    Tissue acidosis is an important feature of tumor. The response of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) cells to acidic solution was studied using whole-cell patch-clamp recording in the current study. An inward, amiloride-sensitive Na+ current was identified in cultured ACC-2 cells while not in normal human salivary gland epithelial cells. Electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of the currents suggest that heteromeric acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) containing 2a and 3 may be responsible for the proton-induced currents in the majority of ACC-2 cells. Consistent with it, analyses of RT-PCR and Western blotting demonstrated the presences of ASIC2a and 3 in ACC-2 cells. Furthermore, we observed the enhanced expression of ASIC2a and 3 in the sample of ACC tissues. These results indicate that the functional expression of ASICs is characteristic feature of ACC cells

  7. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO2− oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  8. ASIC3, an acid-sensing ion channel, is expressed in metaboreceptive sensory neurons

    Fierro Leonardo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ASIC3, the most sensitive of the acid-sensing ion channels, depolarizes certain rat sensory neurons when lactic acid appears in the extracellular medium. Two functions have been proposed for it: 1 ASIC3 might trigger ischemic pain in heart and muscle; 2 it might contribute to some forms of touch mechanosensation. Here, we used immunocytochemistry, retrograde labelling, and electrophysiology to ask whether the distribution of ASIC3 in rat sensory neurons is consistent with either of these hypotheses. Results Less than half (40% of dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons react with anti-ASIC3, and the population is heterogeneous. They vary widely in cell diameter and express different growth factor receptors: 68% express TrkA, the receptor for nerve growth factor, and 25% express TrkC, the NT3 growth factor receptor. Consistent with a role in muscle nociception, small ( Conclusion Our data indicates that: 1 ASIC3 is expressed in a restricted population of nociceptors and probably in some non-nociceptors; 2 co-expression of ASIC3 and CGRP, and the absence of P2X3, are distinguishing properties of a class of sensory neurons, some of which innervate blood vessels. We suggest that these latter afferents may be muscle metaboreceptors, neurons that sense the metabolic state of muscle and can trigger pain when there is insufficient oxygen.

  9. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric [Oregon HSU

    2012-07-29

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na+-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a–psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH7.25 the pore is approximately 10Å in diameter, whereas at pH5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  10. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26946972

  11. Expression and activity of acid-sensing ion channels in the mouse anterior pituitary.

    Jianyang Du

    Full Text Available Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed in the nervous system and play an important role in fear learning and memory. The function of ASICs in the pituitary, an endocrine gland that contributes to emotions, is unknown. We sought to investigate which ASIC subunits were present in the pituitary and found mRNA expression for all ASIC isoforms, including ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, ASIC3 and ASIC4. We also observed acid-evoked ASIC-like currents in isolated anterior pituitary cells that were absent in mice lacking ASIC1a. The biophysical properties and the responses to PcTx1, amiloride, Ca2+ and Zn2+ suggested that ASIC currents were mediated predominantly by heteromultimeric channels that contained ASIC1a and ASIC2a or ASIC2b. ASIC currents were also sensitive to FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe amide, suggesting that FMRFamide-like compounds might endogenously regulate pituitary ASICs. To determine whether ASICs might regulate pituitary cell function, we applied low pH and found that it increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These data suggest that ASIC channels are present and functionally active in anterior pituitary cells and may therefore influence their function.

  12. Prolactin potentiates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in female rat primary sensory neurons.

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a polypeptide hormone produced and released from the pituitary and extrapituitary tissues. It regulates activity of nociceptors and causes hyperalgesia in pain conditions, but little is known the molecular mechanism. We report here that PRL can exert a potentiating effect on the functional activity of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), key sensors for extracellular protons. First, PRL dose-dependently increased the amplitude of ASIC currents with an EC50 of (5.89 ± 0.28) × 10(-8) M. PRL potentiation of ASIC currents was also pH dependent. Second, PRL potentiation of ASIC currents was blocked by Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL, a PRL receptor antagonist, and removed by intracellular dialysis of either protein kinase C inhibitor GF109203X, protein interacting with C-kinase 1(PICK1) inhibitor FSC-231, or PI3K inhibitor AS605240. Third, PRL altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of DRG neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Four, PRL exacerbated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in female rats. Finally, PRL displayed a stronger effect on ASIC mediated-currents and nociceptive behavior in intact female rats than OVX female and male rats and thus modulation of PRL may be gender-dependent. These results suggest that PRL up-regulates the activity of ASICs and enhances ASIC mediated nociceptive responses in female rats, which reveal a novel peripheral mechanism underlying PRL involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26188144

  13. Acid-sensing ion channels regulate spontaneous inhibitory activity in the hippocampus: possible implications for epilepsy.

    Ievglevskyi, O; Isaev, D; Netsyk, O; Romanov, A; Fedoriuk, M; Maximyuk, O; Isaeva, E; Akaike, N; Krishtal, O

    2016-08-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) play an important role in numerous functions in the central and peripheral nervous systems ranging from memory and emotions to pain. The data correspond to a recent notion that each neuron and many glial cells of the mammalian brain express at least one member of the ASIC family. However, the mechanisms underlying the involvement of ASICs in neuronal activity are poorly understood. However, there are two exceptions, namely, the straightforward role of ASICs in proton-based synaptic transmission in certain brain areas and the role of the Ca(2+)-permeable ASIC1a subtype in ischaemic cell death. Using a novel orthosteric ASIC antagonist, we have found that ASICs specifically control the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory synaptic activity in the hippocampus. Inhibition of ASICs leads to a strong increase in the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents. This effect is presynaptic because it is fully reproducible in single synaptic boutons attached to isolated hippocampal neurons. In concert with this observation, inhibition of the ASIC current diminishes epileptic discharges in a low Mg(2+) model of epilepsy in hippocampal slices and significantly reduces kainate-induced discharges in the hippocampus in vivo Our results reveal a significant novel role for ASICs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377725

  14. Functional modifications of acid-sensing ion channels by ligand-gated chloride channels.

    Xuanmao Chen

    Full Text Available Together, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs and epithelial sodium channels (ENaC constitute the majority of voltage-independent sodium channels in mammals. ENaC is regulated by a chloride channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Here we show that ASICs were reversibly inhibited by activation of GABA(A receptors in murine hippocampal neurons. This inhibition of ASICs required opening of the chloride channels but occurred with both outward and inward GABA(A receptor-mediated currents. Moreover, activation of the GABA(A receptors modified the pharmacological features and kinetic properties of the ASIC currents, including the time course of activation, desensitization and deactivation. Modification of ASICs by open GABA(A receptors was also observed in both nucleated patches and outside-out patches excised from hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, ASICs and GABA(A receptors interacted to regulate synaptic plasticity in CA1 hippocampal slices. The activation of glycine receptors, which are similar to GABA(A receptors, also modified ASICs in spinal neurons. We conclude that GABA(A receptors and glycine receptors modify ASICs in neurons through mechanisms that require the opening of chloride channels.

  15. Role of acid-sensing ion channel 3 in sub-acute-phase inflammation

    Chen Chien-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation-mediated hyperalgesia involves tissue acidosis and sensitization of nociceptors. Many studies have reported increased expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 in inflammation and enhanced ASIC3 channel activity with pro-inflammatory mediators. However, the role of ASIC3 in inflammation remains inconclusive because of conflicting results generated from studies of ASIC3 knockout (ASIC3-/- or dominant-negative mutant mice, which have shown normal, decreased or increased hyperalgesia during inflammation. Results Here, we tested whether ASIC3 plays an important role in inflammation of subcutaneous tissue of paw and muscle in ASIC3-/- mice induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA or carrageenan by investigating behavioral and pathological responses, as well as the expression profile of ion channels. Compared with the ASIC3+/+ controls, ASIC3-/- mice showed normal thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia with acute (4-h intraplantar CFA- or carrageenan-induced inflammation, but the hyperalgesic effects in the sub-acute phase (1–2 days were milder in all paradigms except for thermal hyperalgesia with CFA-induced inflammation. Interestingly, carrageenan-induced primary hyperalgesia was accompanied by an ASIC3-dependent Nav1.9 up-regulation and increase of tetrodotoxin (TTX-resistant sodium currents. CFA-inflamed muscle did not evoke hyperalgesia in ASIC3-/- or ASIC3+/+ mice, whereas carrageenan-induced inflammation in muscle abolished mechanical hyperalgesia in ASIC3-/- mice, as previously described. However, ASIC3-/- mice showed attenuated pathological features such as less CFA-induced granulomas and milder carrageenan-evoked vasculitis as compared with ASIC3+/+ mice. Conclusion We provide a novel finding that ASIC3 participates in the maintenance of sub-acute-phase primary hyperalgesia in subcutaneous inflammation and mediates the process of granuloma formation and vasculitis in intramuscular inflammation.

  16. A Conformation Change in the Extracellular Domain that Accompanies Desensitization of Acid-sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) 3

    Cushman, Kenneth A.; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2007-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are thought to trigger some forms of acid-induced pain and taste, and to contribute to stroke-induced neural damage. After activation by low extracellular pH, different ASICs undergo desensitization on time scales from 0.1 to 10 s. Consistent with a substantial conformation change, desensitization slows dramatically when temperature drops (Askwith, C.C., C.J. Benson, M.J. Welsh, and P.M. Snyder. 2001. PNAS. 98:6459–6463). The nature of this conformation chang...

  17. Sensing with Ion Channels

    Martinac, Boris

    2008-01-01

    All living cells are able to detect and translate environmental stimuli into biologically meaningful signals. Sensations of touch, hearing, sight, taste, smell or pain are essential to the survival of all living organisms. The importance of sensory input for the existence of life thus justifies the effort made to understand its molecular origins. Sensing with Ion Channels focuses on ion channels as key molecules enabling biological systems to sense and process the physical and chemical stimuli that act upon cells in their living environment. Its aim is to serve as a reference to ion channel specialists and as a source of new information to non specialists who want to learn about the structural and functional diversity of ion channels and their role in sensory physiology.

  18. The Human Acid-Sensing Ion Channel ASIC1a: Evidence for a Homotetrameric Assembly State at the Cell Surface

    van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Huser, Delphine; Gautschi, Ivan; Schild, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The chicken acid-sensing ion channel ASIC1 has been crystallized as a homotrimer. We address here the oligomeric state of the functional ASIC1 in situ at the cell surface. The oligomeric states of functional ASIC1a and mutants with additional cysteines introduced in the extracellular pore vestibule were resolved on SDS-PAGE. The functional ASIC1 complexes were stabilized at the cell surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes or CHO cells either using the sulfhydryl crosslinker BMOE, or sodium tetrathi...

  19. Alterations in subcellular expression of acid-sensing ion channels in the rat forebrain following chronic amphetamine administration

    Suman, Ajay; Mehta, Bhavi; Guo, Ming-Lei; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Fibuch, Eugene E.; Mao, Li-Min; WANG, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are densely expressed in broad areas of mammalian brains and actively modulate synaptic transmission and a variety of neuronal activities. To explore whether ASICs are linked to addictive properties of drugs of abuse, we investigated the effect of the psychostimulant amphetamine on subcellular ASIC expression in the rat forebrain in vivo. Repeated administration of amphetamine (once daily for 7 days, 1.25 mg/kg for days 1/7, 4 mg/kg for days 2–6) induced typi...

  20. Interaction of Acid-sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) 1 with the Tarantula Toxin Psalmotoxin 1 is State Dependent

    Chen, Xuanmao; Kalbacher, Hubert; Gründer, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are Na+ channels gated by extracellular H+. Six ASIC subunits that are expressed in neurons have been characterized. The tarantula toxin psalmotoxin 1 has been reported to potently and specifically inhibit homomeric ASIC1a and has been useful to characterize ASICs in neurons. Recently we have shown that psalmotoxin 1 inhibits ASIC1a by increasing its apparent affinity for H+. However, the mechanism by which PcTx1 increases the apparent H+ affinity remained un...

  1. The pharmacology and therapeutic potential of small molecule inhibitors of acid-sensing ion channels in stroke intervention

    Tian-dong LENG; Zhi-gang XIONG

    2013-01-01

    In the nervous system,a decrease in extracellular pH is a common feature of various physiological and pathological processes,including synaptic transmission,cerebral ischemia,epilepsy,brain trauma,and tissue inflammation.Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems.Following the recent identification of ASICs as critical acid-sensing extracellular proton receptors,growing evidence has suggested that the activation of ASICs plays important roles in physiological processes such as nociception,mechanosensation,synaptic plasticity,learning and memory.However,the over-activation of ASICs is also linked to adverse outcomes for certain pathological processes,such as brain ischemia and multiple sclerosis.Based on the well-demonstrated role of ASlC1a activation in acidosis-mediated brain injury,small molecule inhibitors of ASIC1a may represent novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurological disorders,such as stroke.

  2. A conformation change in the extracellular domain that accompanies desensitization of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 3.

    Cushman, Kenneth A; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P; McCleskey, Edwin W

    2007-04-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are thought to trigger some forms of acid-induced pain and taste, and to contribute to stroke-induced neural damage. After activation by low extracellular pH, different ASICs undergo desensitization on time scales from 0.1 to 10 s. Consistent with a substantial conformation change, desensitization slows dramatically when temperature drops (Askwith, C.C., C.J. Benson, M.J. Welsh, and P.M. Snyder. 2001. PNAS. 98:6459-6463). The nature of this conformation change is unknown, but two studies showed that desensitization rate is altered by mutations on or near the first transmembrane domain (TM1) (Coric, T., P. Zhang, N. Todorovic, and C.M. Canessa. 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278:45240-45247; Pfister, Y., I. Gautschi, A.-N. Takeda, M. van Bemmelen, S. Kellenberger, and L. Schild. 2006. J. Biol. Chem. 281:11787-11791). Here we show evidence of a specific conformation change associated with desensitization. When mutated from glutamate to cysteine, residue 79, which is some 20 amino acids extracellular to TM1, can be altered by cysteine-modifying reagents when the channel is closed, but not when it is desensitized; thus, desensitization appears to conceal the residue from the extracellular medium. D78 and E79 are a pair of adjacent acidic amino acids that are highly conserved in ASICs yet absent from epithelial Na(+) channels, their acid-insensitive relatives. Despite large effects on desensitization by mutations at positions 78 and 79-including a shift to 10-fold lower proton concentration with the E79A mutant-there are not significant effects on activation. PMID:17389250

  3. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels Expression, Identity and Role in the Excitability of the Cochlear Afferent Neurons

    González-Garrido, Antonia; Vega, Rosario; Mercado, Francisco; López, Iván A.; Soto, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are activated by an increase in the extracellular proton concentration. There are four genes (ASIC1-4) that encode six subunits, and they are involved in diverse neuronal functions, such as mechanosensation, learning and memory, nociception, and modulation of retinal function. In this study, we characterize the ASIC currents of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). These ASIC currents are primarily carried by Na+, exhibit fast activation and desensitization, display a pH50 of 6.2 and are blocked by amiloride, indicating that these are ASIC currents. The ASIC currents were further characterized using several pharmacological tools. Gadolinium and acetylsalicylic acid reduced these currents, and FMRFamide, zinc (at high concentrations) and N,N,N’,N’–tetrakis-(2-piridilmetil)-ethylenediamine increased them, indicating that functional ASICs are composed of the subunits ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3. Neomycin and streptomycin reduced the desensitization rate of the ASIC current in SGNs, indicating that ASICs may contribute to the ototoxic action of aminoglycosides. RT-PCR of the spiral ganglion revealed significant expression of all ASIC subunits. By immunohistochemistry the expression of the ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3 subunits was detected in SGNs. Although only a few SGNs exhibited action potential firing in response to an acidic stimulus, protons in the extracellular solution modulated SGN activity during sinusoidal stimulation. Our results show that protons modulate the excitability of SGNs via ASICs. PMID:26733809

  4. Expression in Pichia pastoris and characterization of APETx2, a specific inhibitor of acid sensing ion channel 3.

    Anangi, Raveendra; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Wen; Cheng, Yuan-Ren; Cheng, Chun-Ho; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chu, Yuan-Ping; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2010-12-01

    Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are family of proteins predominantly present in the central and peripheral nervous system. They are known to play important roles in the pathophysiology of pain and ischemic stroke. APETx2 is a potent and selective inhibitor of ASIC3-containing channels and was isolated from sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. To facilitate the study on the molecular determinants of ASIC3-ligand interactions, we expressed recombinant APETx2 in the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression system and purified it to homogeneity. Recombinant APETx2 produced in P. pastoris inhibited the acid-evoked ASIC3 current with the IC(50) value of 37.3 nM. The potency of recombinant toxin is similar to that of native APETx2. The sequential assignment and structure analysis of APETx2 were obtained by 2D and 3D (15)N-edited NMR spectra. Our NMR data suggests that APETx2 produced in P. pastoris retained its native fold. The results presented here provide the first direct evidence that highly disulfide bonded peptide inhibitor of ASIC3, APETx2, can be expressed in P. pastoris with correct fold and high yield. We also showed that the R17A mutant exhibited a decrease in activity, suggesting the feasibility of the use of this expression system to study the interactions between APETx2 and ASIC3. These evidences may serve as the basis for understanding the selectivity and activity of APETx2. PMID:20813121

  5. Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 2a (ASIC2a) Promotes Surface Trafficking of ASIC2b via Heteromeric Assembly.

    Kweon, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dong-Il; Bae, Yeonju; Park, Jae-Yong; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-activated cation channels that play important roles as typical proton sensors during pathophysiological conditions and normal synaptic activities. Among the ASIC subunits, ASIC2a and ASIC2b are alternative splicing products from the same gene, ACCN1. It has been shown that ASIC2 isoforms have differential subcellular distribution: ASIC2a targets the cell surface by itself, while ASIC2b resides in the ER. However, the underlying mechanism for this differential subcellular localization remained to be further elucidated. By constructing ASIC2 chimeras, we found that the first transmembrane (TM1) domain and the proximal post-TM1 domain (17 amino acids) of ASIC2a are critical for membrane targeting of the proteins. We also observed that replacement of corresponding residues in ASIC2b by those of ASIC2a conferred proton-sensitivity as well as surface expression to ASIC2b. We finally confirmed that ASIC2b is delivered to the cell surface from the ER by forming heteromers with ASIC2a, and that the N-terminal region of ASIC2a is additionally required for the ASIC2a-dependent membrane targeting of ASIC2b. Together, our study supports an important role of ASIC2a in membrane targeting of ASIC2b. PMID:27477936

  6. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction

  7. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    Rahman, Taufiq, E-mail: mtur2@cam.ac.uk; Smith, Ewan St. John

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction.

  8. The Human Acid-Sensing Ion Channel ASIC1a: Evidence for a Homotetrameric Assembly State at the Cell Surface.

    van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Huser, Delphine; Gautschi, Ivan; Schild, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The chicken acid-sensing ion channel ASIC1 has been crystallized as a homotrimer. We address here the oligomeric state of the functional ASIC1 in situ at the cell surface. The oligomeric states of functional ASIC1a and mutants with additional cysteines introduced in the extracellular pore vestibule were resolved on SDS-PAGE. The functional ASIC1 complexes were stabilized at the cell surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes or CHO cells either using the sulfhydryl crosslinker BMOE, or sodium tetrathionate (NaTT). Under these different crosslinking conditions ASIC1a migrates as four distinct oligomeric states that correspond by mass to multiples of a single ASIC1a subunit. The relative importance of each of the four ASIC1a oligomers was critically dependent on the availability of cysteines in the transmembrane domain for crosslinking, consistent with the presence of ASIC1a homo-oligomers. The expression of ASIC1a monomers, trimeric or tetrameric concatemeric cDNA constructs resulted in functional channels. The resulting ASIC1a complexes are resolved as a predominant tetramer over the other oligomeric forms, after stabilization with BMOE or NaTT and SDS-PAGE/western blot analysis. Our data identify a major ASIC1a homotetramer at the surface membrane of the cell expressing functional ASIC1a channel. PMID:26252376

  9. Upregulation of acid-sensing ion channel 1 protein expression by chronic administration of cocaine in the mouse striatum in vivo

    Zhang, Guo-Chi; Mao, Li-Min; WANG, John Q.; Chu, Xiang-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are ligand-gated cation channels activated by a drop in extracellular pH. They are enriched in the mammalian brain with a high synaptic density. Accumulating evidence suggests that ASIC1 contributes to synaptic activity related to learning/memory and fear conditioning, and also plays critical roles in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we explored the effect of the psychostimulant, cocaine, on protein expression of ASICs in the mouse forebrain in vivo...

  10. Highly Luminescent Microporous Organic Polymer with Lewis Acidic Boron Sites on the Pore Surface: Ratiometric Sensing and Capture of F(-) Ions.

    Suresh, Venkata M; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Roy, Syamantak; Pati, Swapan K; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2015-07-20

    Reversible and selective capture/detection of F(-) ions in water is of the utmost importance, as excess intake leads to adverse effects on human health. Highly robust Lewis acidic luminescent porous organic materials have potential for efficient sequestration and detection of F(-) ions. Herein, the rational design and synthesis of a boron-based, Lewis acidic microporous organic polymer (BMOP) derived from tris(4-bromo-2,3,5,6-tetramethylphenyl)boron nodes and diethynylbiphenyl linkers with a pore size of 1.08 nm for selective turn-on sensing and capture of F(-) ion are reported. The presence of a vacant pπ orbital on the boron center of BMOP results in intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) from the linker to boron. BMOP shows selective turn-on blue emission for F(-) ions in aqueous mixtures with a detection limit of 2.6 μM. Strong B-F interactions facilitate rapid sequestration of F(-) by BMOP. The ICT emission of BMOP can be reversibly regenerated by addition of an excess of water, and the polymer can be reused several times. PMID:26074403

  11. The RS685012 Polymorphism of ACCN2, the Human Ortholog of Murine Acid-Sensing Ion Channel (ASIC1) Gene, is Highly Represented in Patients with Panic Disorder.

    Gugliandolo, Agnese; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Currò, Monica; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Quattrone, Diego; Crucitti, Manuela; Zoccali, Rocco Antonio; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria Anna

    2016-03-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a disabling anxiety disorder that is characterized by unexpected, recurrent panic attacks, associated with fear of dying and worrying about possible future attacks or other behavioral changes as a consequence of the attacks. The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-sensing channels expressed throughout the nervous system. Their activity is linked to a variety of behaviors including fear, anxiety, pain, depression, learning, and memory. The human analog of ASIC1a is the amiloride-sensitive cation channel 2 (ACCN2). Adenosine A2A receptors are suggested to play an important role in different brain circuits and pathways involved in anxiety reactions. In this work we aimed to evaluate the distribution of ACCN2 rs685012 and ADORA2A rs2298383 polymorphisms in PD patients compared with healthy subjects. We found no association between ADORA2A polymorphism and PD. Instead, the C mutated allele for ACCN2 rs685012 polymorphism was significantly more frequent in patients than in controls. On the contrary, the TT homozygous wild-type genotype and also the ACCN2 TT/ADORA2A CT diplotype were significantly more represented in controls. These results are suggestive for a role of ACCN2 rs685012 polymorphism in PD development in Caucasian people. PMID:26589317

  12. Nanopore Device for Reversible Ion and Molecule Sensing or Migration

    Pourmand, Nader (Inventor); Vilozny, Boaz (Inventor); Actis, Paolo (Inventor); Seger, R. Adam (Inventor); Singaram, Bakthan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and devices for detection of ion migration and binding, utilizing a nanopipette adapted for use in an electrochemical sensing circuit. The nanopipette may be functionalized on its interior bore with metal chelators for binding and sensing metal ions or other specific binding molecules such as boronic acid for binding and sensing glucose. Such a functionalized nanopipette is comprised in an electrical sensor that detects when the nanopipette selectively and reversibly binds ions or small molecules. Also disclosed is a nanoreactor, comprising a nanopipette, for controlling precipitation in aqueous solutions by voltage-directed ion migration, wherein ions may be directed out of the interior bore by a repulsing charge in the bore.

  13. Cyclisation Increases the Stability of the Sea Anemone Peptide APETx2 but Decreases Its Activity at Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3

    Lachlan D. Rash

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available APETx2 is a peptide isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. It is the most potent and selective inhibitor of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 and it is currently in preclinical studies as a novel analgesic for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain. As a peptide it faces many challenges in the drug development process, including the potential lack of stability often associated with therapeutic peptides. In this study we determined the susceptibility of wild-type APETx2 to trypsin and pepsin and tested the applicability of backbone cyclisation as a strategy to improve its resistance to enzymatic degradation. Cyclisation with either a six-, seven- or eight-residue linker vastly improved the protease resistance of APETx2 but substantially decreased its potency against ASIC3. This suggests that either the N- or C-terminus of APETx2 is involved in its interaction with the channel, which we confirmed by making N- and C-terminal truncations. Truncation of either terminus, but especially the N-terminus, has detrimental effects on the ability of APETx2 to inhibit ASIC3. The current work indicates that cyclisation is unlikely to be a suitable strategy for stabilising APETx2, unless linkers can be engineered that do not interfere with binding to ASIC3.

  14. The function and regulation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC): IUPHAR Review 19.

    Boscardin, Emilie; Alijevic, Omar; Hummler, Edith; Frateschi, Simona; Kellenberger, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) are both members of the ENaC/degenerin family of amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels. ASICs act as proton sensors in the nervous system where they contribute, besides other roles, to fear behaviour, learning and pain sensation. ENaC mediates Na(+) reabsorption across epithelia of the distal kidney and colon and of the airways. ENaC is a clinically used drug target in the context of hypertension and cystic fibrosis, while ASIC is an interesting potential target. Following a brief introduction, here we will review selected aspects of ASIC and ENaC function. We discuss the origin and nature of pH changes in the brain and the involvement of ASICs in synaptic signalling. We expose how in the peripheral nervous system, ASICs cover together with other ion channels a wide pH range as proton sensors. We introduce the mechanisms of aldosterone-dependent ENaC regulation and the evidence for an aldosterone-independent control of ENaC activity, such as regulation by dietary K(+) . We then provide an overview of the regulation of ENaC by proteases, a topic of increasing interest over the past few years. In spite of the profound differences in the physiological and pathological roles of ASICs and ENaC, these channels share many basic functional and structural properties. It is likely that further research will identify physiological contexts in which ASICs and ENaC have similar or overlapping roles. PMID:27278329

  15. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    We present a protocol for using trapped ions to measure rotations via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry. The trap allows the interferometer to enclose a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without losing contrast. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb-Dicke regime, thermal states with many phonons should be sufficient for operation.

  16. A Novel Colorimetric Sensing Material, Poly(γ-Glutamic acid)-graft-3, 4-Dihydro-3-(2'-ethyl hydroxyl)-6-Ethyl-1,3,2H-Benzoxazine (γ-PGA-graft-ethyl-Bx), for Iron (III) Ions

    A novel rapid ion colorimetric sensing material for iron (III) ions was developed from poly(γ-glutamic acid) and 3,4-dihydro-3-(2'-ethyl hydroxyl)-6-ethyl-1,3,2H-benzoxazine (ethyl-Bx). The benzoxazine as an ionophore segment was grafted into γ-PGA backbone via the esterification reaction, which is a simple and effective reaction. The structure of γ-PGA-graft-ethyl-Bx was characterized by using FT-IR and 1H-NMR. The most attainable degree of conversion was 25 %. The γ-PGA-graft-ethyl-Bx showed a highly selective and sensitive recognition toward iron (III), which was clearly observable with the naked eye. The iron (III) ions sensing property of γ-PGA-graft-ethyl-Bx was further examined by using photometric titration method. After the interaction between the γ-PGA-graft-ethyl-Bx and iron (III) ions was formed, the solution of the polymer in dimethyl sulfoxide was changed from clear and colorless to red color, resulting in the shift of the maximum wavelength from UV to visible range. (author)

  17. Copper ion sensing with fluorescent electrospun nanofibers

    Ongun, Merve Zeyrek; Ertekin, Kadriye; Gocmenturk, Mustafa; Ergun, Yavuz; Suslu, Aslıhan

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the use of electrospun nanofibrous materials as highly responsive fluorescence quenching-based copper sensitive chemosensor is reported. Poly(methyl methacrylate) and ethyl cellulose were used as polymeric support materials. Sensing slides were fabricated by electrospinning technique. Copper sensors based on the change in the fluorescence signal intensity of fluoroionophore; N'-3-(4-(dimethylamino phenly)allylidene)isonicotinohydrazide. The sensor slides exhibited high sensitivities due to the high surface area of the nanofibrous membrane structures. The preliminary results of Stern-Volmer analysis show that the sensitivities of electrospun nanofibrous membranes to detect Cu(II) ions are 6-20-fold higher than those of the continuous thin films. By this way we obtained linear calibration plots for Cu(II) ions in the concentration range of 10-12-10-5 M. The response times of the sensing slides were less than 1 min. Stability of the employed ionophore in the matrix materials was excellent and when stored in the ambient air of the laboratory there was no significant drift in signal intensity after 6 months. Our stability tests are still in progress.

  18. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H+), alkali metal cations (M+), calcium ions (Ca2+), and hydronium ions (H3O+) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C9H7NS2), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M+ + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M+ = H+, Li+, Na+, or K+. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from -0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  19. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K.

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  20. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  1. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T...

  2. Wellcome Prize Lecture. Cell surface, ion-sensing receptors.

    Riccardi, Daniela

    2002-07-01

    Changes in extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) concentration ([Ca2+]o) affect kidney function both under basal and hormone-stimulated conditions. The molecular identification of an extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) has confirmed a direct role of Ca(2+)o on parathyroid and kidney function (i.e. independent of calciotropic hormones) as a modulator of Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, evidence accumulated over the last 10 years has shown that CaR is also expressed in regions outside the calcium homeostatic system where its role is largely undefined but seems to be linked to regulation of local ionic homeostasis. The parathyroid and kidney CaRs are 1081 and 1079 amino acids long, respectively, and belong to the type III family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which includes other CaRs, metabotropic glutamate receptors and putative vomeronasal organ receptors. For the CaR, its low (millimolar) affinity for Ca2+, its positive cooperativity and its large ion-sensing extracellular domain, indicate that the receptor is more sensitive to changes in net cationic charge rather than to a specific ligand. Mg2+, trivalent cations of the lanthanide series and polyvalent cations such as spermine and aminoglycoside antibiotics can all activate the receptor in vitro with EC50 values in the micromolar range for trivalent and polyvalent cations or in the millimolar range for Ca2+ and Mg2+. In addition to true CaR agonists, CaR sensitivity to Ca(2+)o is also susceptible to allosteric modulation by ionic strength, L-amino acids and by pharmacological agents. This review will address endogenous and exogenous CaR agonists, the role of the receptor in the calcium homeostatic system and some speculation on possible role(s) of the CaR in regions not involved in mineral ion homeostasis. PMID:12392104

  3. Functional Expression in Escherichia coli of the Disulfide-Rich Sea Anemone Peptide APETx2, a Potent Blocker of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3

    Glenn F. King

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are proton-gated sodium channels present in the central and peripheral nervous system of chordates. ASIC3 is highly expressed in sensory neurons and plays an important role in inflammatory and ischemic pain. Thus, specific inhibitors of ASIC3 have the potential to be developed as novel analgesics. APETx2, isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima, is the most potent and selective inhibitor of ASIC3-containing channels. However, the mechanism of action of APETx2 and the molecular basis for its interaction with ASIC3 is not known. In order to assist in characterizing the ASIC3-APETx2 interaction, we developed an efficient and cost-effective Escherichia coli periplasmic expression system for the production of APETx2. NMR studies on uniformly 13C/15N-labelled APETx2 produced in E. coli showed that the recombinant peptide adopts the native conformation. Recombinant APETx2 is equipotent with synthetic APETx2 at inhibiting ASIC3 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Using this system we mutated Phe15 to Ala, which caused a profound loss of APETx2’s activity on ASIC3. These findings suggest that this expression system can be used to produce mutant versions of APETx2 in order to facilitate structure-activity relationship studies.

  4. Ions in hyaluronic acid solutions

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Londono, David J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic biopolymer that is almost ubiquitous in biological tissues. An attempt is made to determine the dominant features that account for both its abundance and its multifunctional role, and which set it apart from other types of biopolymers. A combination of osmotic and scattering techniques is employed to quantify its dynamic and static properties in near-physiological solution conditions, where it is exposed both to mono- and divalent counterions. An equation of state is derived for the osmotic pressure Π in the semidilute concentration region, in terms of two variables, the polymer concentration c and the ionic strength J of the added salt, according to which Π =1.4×103c9/4/J3/4 kPa, where c and J are expressed in mole. Over the physiological ion concentration range, the effect of the sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of HA solutions is fully accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. The absence of precipitation, even at high CaCl2 concentrations, distinguishes this molecule from other biopolymers such as DNA. Dynamic light scattering measurements reveal that the collective diffusion coefficient in HA solutions exceeds that in aqueous solutions of typical neutral polymers by a factor of approximately 5. This property ensures rapid adjustment to, and recovery from, stress applied to HA-containing tissue. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements confirm the absence of appreciable structural reorganization over the observed length scale range 10-1000 Å, as a result of calcium-sodium ion exchange. The scattered intensity in the transfer momentum range q >0.03 Å-1 varies as 1/q, indicating that the HA chain segments in semidilute solutions are linear over an extended concentration range. The osmotic compression modulus c ∂Π/∂c, a high value of which is a prerequisite in structural biopolymers, is several times greater than in typical neutral polymer solutions.

  5. Experiment D010: Ion sensing attitude control

    Sagalyn, R. C.; Smiddy, M.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility of an attitude control system that uses environmental positive ions and an electrostatic detection system to measure spacecraft pitch and yaw is studied. The secondary objective was to measure the spatial and temporal variations of ambient positively charged particles along the orbital path of the Gemini 10 and 12 spacecrafts. The results proved that the use of a horizon detector in conjunction with pitch and yaw sensors would facilitate complete description of the spacecraft position and attitude. Furthermore, with the addition of a servosystem, the unit could be used as a complete automatic attitude-control system that would be applicable from the lowest satellite altitudes up to at least 10 earth radii. Also, results established that the charge density along the trajectory of the satellite could be determined by transmission of output voltages from the individual electrometers.

  6. Metal ion (silver, cadmium and zinc ions) modified CdS quantum dots for ultrasensitive copper ion sensing

    Metal ion (Ag+, Cd2+, Zn2+) modified CdS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized and used for Cu2+ sensing. Modification by these metal ions could enhance the PL intensity of CdS QDs with the extent of the PL enhancement being related to the concentration of the metal ions. Different metal ion (Ag+, Cd2+, Zn2+) modified CdS QDs also showed different analytical characteristics for Cu2+ sensing. In particular, Ag+ modified CdS QDs showed greatly enhanced sensitivity for Cu2+ determination than did the unmodified CdS QDs. A limit of detection (LOD) of 2.0 x 10-10 M was obtained for Ag+ modified CdS QDs, which is the lowest LOD obtained using QDs as fluorescence probes for Cu2+ sensing. This study demonstrates the important role of surface state of QDs in fluorescence sensing.

  7. Colorimetric Sugar Sensing Using Boronic Acid-Substituted Azobenzenes

    Yuya Egawa; Ryotaro Miki; Toshinobu Seki

    2014-01-01

    In association with increasing diabetes prevalence, it is desirable to develop new glucose sensing systems with low cost, ease of use, high stability and good portability. Boronic acid is one of the potential candidates for a future alternative to enzyme-based glucose sensors. Boronic acid derivatives have been widely used for the sugar recognition motif, because boronic acids bind adjacent diols to form cyclic boronate esters. In order to develop colorimetric sugar sensors, boronic acid-conj...

  8. Ions in hyaluronic acid solutions

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Londono, David J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic biopolymer that is almost ubiquitous in biological tissues. An attempt is made to determine the dominant features that account for both its abundance and its multifunctional role, and which set it apart from other types of biopolymers. A combination of osmotic and scattering techniques is employed to quantify its dynamic and static properties in near-physiological solution conditions, where it is exposed both to mono- and divalent counterions. An equation of...

  9. Hybrid metallic ion-exchanged waveguides for SPR biological sensing

    de Bonnault, S.; Bucci, D.; Zermatten, P.. J.; Charette, P. G.; Broquin, J. E.

    2015-02-01

    Glass substrates have been used for decades to create biosensors due to their biocompatibility, low thermal conductivity, and limited fluorescence. Among the different types of sensors, those based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) allow exploitation of the sensing lightwave at the vicinity of the sensor surface where small entities such as DNA or proteins are located. In this paper, ion-exchanged waveguides and SPR are combined to create a multianalyte optical sensor integrated onto glass. First the principle of operation is introduced, then the theoretical analysis and design of the sensing element. Simulations have been carried out using the Aperiodic Fourier Modal Method (AFMM) and a custom software that handles ion-exchange index-profiles. Fabrication and characterization processes are also presented. Finally the first experimental spectra are displayed and discussed. The sensor presents a bulk sensibility of 5000nm/RIU.

  10. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran

    2015-04-01

    and detection occurs as a consecution it is hard to understand their QS mechanism. In this review, connection between QS mechanism and some characteristics of lactic acid bacteria are evaluated such as concordance with its host, inhibition of pathogen development and colonization in gastrointestinal system, bacteriocin production, acid and bile resistance, adhesion to epithelium cells. Understanding QS mechanism of lactic acid bacteria will be useful to design metabiotics which is defined as novel probiotics.

  11. Synthesis of functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters for acid phosphatase sensing

    Sun, Jian; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-10-01

    A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by introducing an alkaline aqueous solution of MUA into the GSH-Au+ complexes or AuNC@GSH solution. Subsequently, a reliable AuNC@GSH/MUA-based real-time assay of acid phosphatase (ACP) is established for the first time, inspired by the selective coordination of Fe3+ with surface ligands of AuNCs, the higher binding affinity between the pyrophosphate ion (PPi) and Fe3+, and the hydrolysis of PPi into orthophosphate by ACP. Our fluorescent chemosensor can also be applied to assay ACP in a real biological sample and, furthermore, to screen the inhibitor of ACP. This report paves a new avenue for synthesizing AuNCs based on either the bottom-up reduction or top-down etching method, establishing real-time fluorescence assays for ACP by means of PPi as the substrate, and further exploring the sensing applications of fluorescent AuNCs.A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by

  12. Colorimetric Sugar Sensing Using Boronic Acid-Substituted Azobenzenes

    Yuya Egawa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In association with increasing diabetes prevalence, it is desirable to develop new glucose sensing systems with low cost, ease of use, high stability and good portability. Boronic acid is one of the potential candidates for a future alternative to enzyme-based glucose sensors. Boronic acid derivatives have been widely used for the sugar recognition motif, because boronic acids bind adjacent diols to form cyclic boronate esters. In order to develop colorimetric sugar sensors, boronic acid-conjugated azobenzenes have been synthesized. There are several types of boronic acid azobenzenes, and their characteristics tend to rely on the substitute position of the boronic acid moiety. For example, o-substitution of boronic acid to the azo group gives the advantage of a significant color change upon sugar addition. Nitrogen-15 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR studies clearly show a signaling mechanism based on the formation and cleavage of the B–N dative bond between boronic acid and azo moieties in the dye. Some boronic acid-substituted azobenzenes were attached to a polymer or utilized for supramolecular chemistry to produce glucose-selective binding, in which two boronic acid moieties cooperatively bind one glucose molecule. In addition, boronic acid-substituted azobenzenes have been applied not only for glucose monitoring, but also for the sensing of glycated hemoglobin and dopamine.

  13. Interaction of neptunyl ion with humic acid

    Study of the complexation of NpO2+ ion with humic acid is one of the important factors to understand the behaviour of Np in the natural water receiving discharges of radioactive waste containing Np. The use of solvent extraction methods in the study of complex formations found more wide spread use with the advent of radioactive tracer technique. In the present context, TTA-phenanthroline extraction system has been used to study the formations of Np-humic acid. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs

  14. Highly sensitive urea sensing with ion-irradiated polymer foils

    Recently we prepared urea-sensors by attaching urease to the inner walls of etched ion tracks within thin polymer foil. Here, alternative track-based sensor configurations are examined where the enzyme remained in solution. The conductivities of systems consisting of two parallel irradiated polymer foils and confining different urea/urease mixtures in between were examined. The correlations between conductivity and urea concentration differed strongly for foils with unetched and etched tracks, which points at different sensing mechanisms – tentatively attributed to the adsorption of enzymatic reaction products on the latent track entrances and to the enhanced conductivity of reaction product-filled etched tracks, respectively. All examined systems enable in principle, urea sensing. They point at the possibility of sensor cascade construction for more sensitive or selective sensor systems.

  15. Colorimetric detection of fluoride ion by 5-arylidenebarbituric acids: dual interaction mode for fluoride ion with single receptor.

    Saravanan, Chinnusamy; Easwaramoorthi, Shanmugam; Wang, Leeyih

    2014-04-01

    Two 5-arylidenebarbituric acid derivatives (IH and IM) have been synthesized by the Knoevenagel condensation of barbituric acid with 4-N,N-dimethylamino benzaldehyde and studied for anion sensing activities. Both receptors sense fluoride ion with high selectivity and sensitivity and the sensing action has been demonstrated by naked eye detection, UV-visible absorption, and fluorescence spectral changes in the presence of F(-). Indeed, the F(-) sensing mechanism for receptor IH depends on F(-) ion concentration. While at higher concentrations F(-) forms strong hydrogen bonding interaction with the N-H proton of the receptor, at lower concentrations sensing is influenced by the deprotonation of the methylene proton, followed by the chemical reaction, which is also confirmed by the (1)H-NMR technique. On the other hand, when replacing the N-H proton with a methyl group, IM does not show any concentration dependent behaviour with F(-). The F(-) concentration dependent sensing is attributed to the changes in the receptor-anion interaction equilibrium, where at higher F(-) concentrations, F(-) interacts with the receptor through hydrogen bonding and at lower concentrations it induces a chemical reaction. PMID:24500374

  16. DMPD: Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 17082566 Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. Deane JA, Bolland ...S. J Immunol. 2006 Nov 15;177(10):6573-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity.... PubmedID 17082566 Title Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. Aut

  17. Remote sensing of acid sulfate soils using multispectral and gamma-ray data

    Acid sulfate soils are a significant environmental problem in coastal regions of Australia. Drainage and disturbance of coastal lands can result in acid soil degradation and the release of sulfuric acid and toxic metals into coastal waters. Remote sensing can provide a useful tool for detection of these soils and monitoring of their disturbance. As acid sulfate soils become oxidised with exposure to air, iron-minerals are produced and precipitate at the surface. This results from the breakdown of pyrite to form hydrated iron minerals and elemental sulfur, the oxidation of which produces acidity. The concentration of iron minerals at the surface can be an indicator of the level of acid sulfate soil activity in the near subsurface. These iron minerals include goethite, ferrihydrite and jarosite. Space-borne remote sensing scanners such as Landsat TM are capable of detecting iron minerals as a result of ferric ion absorption of solar radiation. Hyperspectral scanners are capable of further discrimination of individual minerals. This paper will discuss spectral characteristics of active acid sulfate soils and demonstrate the use of spectral unmixing algorithms on Landsat TM to detect problem areas at the surface. This method matches multispectral data to material reflectance-spectra known as end-members. These end-members or materials are then resolved mathematically as to their respective contributions to the overall reflectance (Bierwirth, 1990). In this way, abundances for particular materials can be derived.Digital elevation data was used to distinguish between the iron minerals due to weathering of bedrock in upland areas and acid sulfate soils on the plains. Also, the results of a high resolution (200m linespacing) airborne gamma-ray survey are presented. This data senses the concentration of radioelements down to about 40 cm depth and is largely unaffected by vegetation. Concentrations of gamma-emitting elements can indicate the type and depth of alluvium that

  18. Ion-exchange selectivities on antimonic acids and metal antimonates

    Antimonic acids and metal antimonates as the inorganic ion-exchangers exhibit extremely high selectivity for a certain element or group of elements for comparison with sulfonated polystyrene ion-exchange resin. Various antimonic acid materials have been obtained with different compositions and ion-exchange properties, depending on the method of their preparations as well as on aging. The species can be divided into three groups - crystalline, amorphous and glassy. The affinity sequence for alkali metal ions shows LiNa>K>Rb>Cs. These selectivities are discussed in the terms of steric effect and entropy changes of the ion-exchange reactions. (author)

  19. Nucleic Acid Nanostructures for Chemical and Biological Sensing.

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Wady, Heitham; Subramanian, Hari K K

    2016-05-01

    The nanoscale features of DNA have made it a useful molecule for bottom-up construction of nanomaterials, for example, two- and three-dimensional lattices, nanomachines, and nanodevices. One of the emerging applications of such DNA-based nanostructures is in chemical and biological sensing, where they have proven to be cost-effective, sensitive and have shown promise as point-of-care diagnostic tools. DNA is an ideal molecule for sensing not only because of its specificity but also because it is robust and can function under a broad range of biologically relevant temperatures and conditions. DNA nanostructure-based sensors provide biocompatibility and highly specific detection based on the molecular recognition properties of DNA. They can be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism and to sense pH both in solution and in cells. They have also been used to detect clinically relevant tumor biomarkers. In this review, recent advances in DNA-based biosensors for pH, nucleic acids, tumor biomarkers and cancer cell detection are introduced. Some challenges that lie ahead for such biosensors to effectively compete with established technologies are also discussed. PMID:27040036

  20. Ion sensing properties of vanadium/tungsten mixed oxides

    Guidelli, Eder Jose, E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Guerra, Elidia Maria [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao Del Rei, CAP, Ouro Branco-MG (Brazil); Mulato, Marcelo [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    Vanadium/tungsten mixed oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/WO{sub 3}) sensing membranes were deposited on glassy carbon substrates and used as the H{sup +} sensor of the extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) device. X-ray diffractograms indicated a decrease of the interplanar spacing of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} after the insertion of WO{sub 3} revealing that the lamellar structure is under compressive stress. The crystallinity increases with increasing WO{sub 3} molar ratio. The film is not homogeneous, with more WO{sub 3} material sitting at the surface. This influences the response of pH sensors using the EGFET configuration. The maximum sensitivity of 68 mV pH{sup -1} was obtained for the sample with 5% WO{sub 3} molar ratio. For higher WO{sub 3} molar ratios, the behavior is not linear. It can be concluded that V{sub 2}O{sub 5} dominates for acidic solutions while WO{sub 3} dominates for basic solutions. Therefore, the mixed oxide with low amount of WO{sub 3} is the main candidate for further use as biosensor.

  1. Ion sensing properties of vanadium/tungsten mixed oxides

    Vanadium/tungsten mixed oxide (V2O5/WO3) sensing membranes were deposited on glassy carbon substrates and used as the H+ sensor of the extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) device. X-ray diffractograms indicated a decrease of the interplanar spacing of V2O5 after the insertion of WO3 revealing that the lamellar structure is under compressive stress. The crystallinity increases with increasing WO3 molar ratio. The film is not homogeneous, with more WO3 material sitting at the surface. This influences the response of pH sensors using the EGFET configuration. The maximum sensitivity of 68 mV pH-1 was obtained for the sample with 5% WO3 molar ratio. For higher WO3 molar ratios, the behavior is not linear. It can be concluded that V2O5 dominates for acidic solutions while WO3 dominates for basic solutions. Therefore, the mixed oxide with low amount of WO3 is the main candidate for further use as biosensor.

  2. Complexation of metal ions with humic acid: metal ion charge neutralization model

    The humic acid complexation reaction presented in this work is based on the concept of metal ion charge neutralization upon complexation to humic acid functional groups. Experimental results from the complexation of UO22+, Am3+, and Cm3+ with humic acids of different origin are presented to demonstrate and validate the proposed model. By introducing the operational humic acid concentration and the loading capacity, the complexation constants are derived, which are independent of the metal ion concentration, pH, and origin of humic acid. The loading capacity is an operational term needed for the intercomparison of stability constants and is the mole fraction of the maximum available complexing sites of humic acid under a given set of experimental conditions. The metal ion charge neutralization model adequately describes the thermodynamic equilibrium reaction of metal ions with humic acid and allows a direct application of the resulting stability constants for geochemical modeling of actinide migration at an environmentally relevant pH. (orig.)

  3. MOLECULAR PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF THE VOLTAGE-SENSING DOMAIN OF NEURONAL ION CHANNELS

    Maurizio Taglialatela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated ion channels (VGIC are membrane proteins that switch from a closed to open state in response to changes in membrane potential, thus enabling ion fluxes across the cell membranes. The mechanism that regulate the structural rearrangements occurring in VGIC in response to changes in membrane potential still remains one of the most challenging topic of modern biophysics. Na+, Ca2+ and K+ voltage-gated channels are structurally formed by the assembly of four similar domains, each comprising six transmembrane segments. Each domain can be divided in two main regions: the Pore Module (PM and the Voltage-Sensing Module (VSM. The PM (helices S5 and S6 and intervening linker is responsible for gate opening and ion selectivity; by contrast, the VSM, comprising the first four transmembrane helices (S1-S4, undergoes the first conformational changes in response to membrane voltage. In particular, the S4 segment of each domain, which contains several positively charged residues interspersed with hydrophobic amino acids, is located within the membrane electric field and plays an essential role in voltage sensing. In neurons, specific gating properties of each channel subtype underlie a variety of biological events, ranging from the generation and propagation of electrical impulses, to the secretion of neurotransmitters, to the regulation of gene expression. Given the important functional role played by the VSM in neuronal VGICs, it is not surprising that various VSM mutations affecting the gating process of these channels are responsible for human diseases, and that compounds acting on the VSM have emerged as important investigational tools with great therapeutic potential. In the present review we will briefly describe the most recent discoveries concerning how the VSM exerts its function, how genetically inherited diseases caused by mutations occurring in the VSM affects gating in VGICs, and how several classes of drugs and toxins selectively

  4. Phosphinic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes for sensitive and selective sensing of chromium(VI)

    Deep, Akash, E-mail: dr.akashdeep@csio.res.in; Sharma, Amit L.; Tuteja, Satish K.; Paul, A.K.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • SWCNTs have been conjugated with bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (PA/d). • SWCNT-PA/d adduct is demonstrated for electrochemical sensing of Cr(VI). • Linear response is obtained for 0.01–10 ppb Cr(VI). • Sensitivity and the limit of detection are 35 ± 4 nA/ppb and 0.01 ppb, respectively. • Proposed sensing of Cr(VI) is selective with respect to many other metals. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been functionalized with a phosphinic acid derivative ‘bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid’ (PA/d). It has been achieved by treating the chlorinated SWCNTs with PA/d at 80 °C. Successful functionalization and different nanomaterial properties have been investigated by UV–vis–NIR, FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, AFM and FE-SEM. PA/d conjugated SWCNTs (CNT–PA) are dispersible in some common organic solvents, e.g. CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, DMF, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF. The ‘CNT–PA’ complex was spin-casted on boron doped silicon wafer. Thus fabricated sensing electrode is demonstrated for sensitive and selective electrochemical sensing of chromium(VI) ions. A linear response is obtained over a wide range of Cr(VI) concentration (0.01–10 ppb). The sensor's sensitivity and the limit of detection are observed to be 35 ± 4 nA/ppb and 0.01 ppb, respectively. The practical utility of the proposed sensor is demonstrated by determining the Cr(VI) concentration in an industrial effluent sample and an underground water sample.

  5. Recovery of boric acid from ion exchangers

    The recovery of boric acid from an anion exchange resin is improved by eluting the boric acid with an aqueous solution of ammonium bicarbonate. The boric acid can be readily purified and concentrated by distilling off the water and ammonium bicarbonate. This process is especially useful for the recovery of boric acid containing a high percentage of 10B which may be found in some nuclear reactor coolant solutions. 10 claims

  6. The polarographic electroreduction of uranyl ion in arsenic acid solution

    The electroreduction of uranyl ion in arsenic acid studied by d.c. polarography shows one reduction wave at all the used arsenic acid concentrations corresponding to one electron reduction mechanism. At low arsenic acid concentration (0,1 - 0,3 M)UO2(ClO4)2 is reduced to HUO2AsO4. At higher acid concentration (0,6 M) the HUO2AsO4 molecules are reduced to UO2+ (pentavalent uranium). It is also reliable to study polarographic behaviour of uranyl ions in arsenic acid solutions up to pH 3,01. It is also possible to apply this method for the analytical determination of uranyl ion concentrations up to 2 mM. (Author)

  7. A color-switching colorimetric sensor towards Cu2+ ion: Sensing Behavior and logic operation

    In this paper, we synthesize and report a Cu2+-sensing probe with two detection channels, 6,6′-(1E,1′E)-((2E,2′E)-(1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diylidene) bis(hydrazine-2,1-diylidene))bis(methan-1-yl-1-ylidene)bis (3-(diethylamino)phenol) (referred to as BDBP). Its colorimetric and fluorescence quenching sensing responses towards Cu2+ ion are fully investigated. It is found that BDBP can recognize Cu2+ by forming a large conjugation plane with it, resulting in a red shift of electronic transition and correspondingly color-switching of BDBP. Correspondingly, the absorption and emission spectra of BDBP are both sensitive towards Cu2+ ion with high sensitivity, as well as excellent selectivity. Based on above sensing mechanism, an AND logic operation can be achieved using Cu+ ion and ClO- as the inputs, making BDBP a promising candidate for further applications in molecular logic devices. -- Highlights: • A Cu2+-sensing probe with two sensing channels has been constructed. • Its sensing responses have been fully characterized and studied. • High sensitivity and good selectivity have been achieved by both sensing channels. • An AND logic operation can be achieved using Cu+ ion and ClO− as inputs

  8. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

    1999-03-30

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

  9. Procedure for reducing hydrogen ion concentration in acidic anion eluate

    A procedure is suggested for reducing the concentration of hydrogen ions in the acidic anionic eluate formed during the separation of uranium. The procedure involves anex elution, precipitation, filtration, precipitate rinsing, and anex rinsing. The procedure is included in the uranium elution process and requires at least one ion exchanger column and at least one tank in the continuous or discontinuous mode. Sparing the neutralizing agent by reducing the hydrogen ion concentration in the acidic anionic eluate is a major asset of this procedure. (Z.S.). 1 fig

  10. Reproducible Design for the Optical Screening and Sensing of Hg(II Ions

    Emad A. Elshehy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated silica nanotubes with hexagonally ordered mesopores (6 nm inside a membrane disc with a uniform channel neck size of 200 nm and a longitudinal thickness of 60 μm to design an optical sensor membrane (OSM for the screening and sensing of extremely toxic Hg(II ions. The optical detection and quantitative recognition of Hg(II ions in water were conducted even at trace concentrations without the need for sophisticated instruments. The OSM design was based on the physical interaction of a responsive organic probe with silica pore surfaces followed by strong and selective binding Hg(II–probe interactions under specific sensing conditions, particularly at pH 5. Ultra-trace concentrations of Hg(II ions were easily detected with the naked eye using the OSM. The remarkable ion spectral response of Hg(II ion–OSM ensured the excellent quantification of the OSM for Hg(II ion sensing over a wide range of concentrations with a detection limit of 1.75 × 10−9 M. This result indicated that low concentrations of Hg(II ions can be detected with a high sensitivity. One of the key issues of OSM is the Hg(II ion-selective workability even in the presence of high doses of competitive matrices and species. The OSM design showed significant Hg(II ion-sensing capability despite the number of reuse/recycles using simple decomplexation. Given its high selectivity, fast response, and sensitivity, the OSM could be developed into a specific Hg(II ion-sensing kit in aqueous solutions.

  11. Nanoliter-scale, regenerable ion sensor: sensing with surface functionalized microstructured optical fiber

    Heng, Sabrina; Nguyen, Mai-Chi; Kostecki, Roman; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2013-05-01

    The first nanoliter-scale regenerable ion sensor based on microstructured optical fiber (MOF) is reported. The air holes of the MOF are functionalized with a monoazacrown bearing spiropyran to give a switchable sensor that detects lithium ions down to 100 nM in nanoliter-scale volumes. Ion binding is turned on and off on upon irradiation with light, with the sensor being unaffected by multiple rounds of photoswitching. Unbound ions are flushed from the fiber in the `off' state to allow the sensor to be reused. The integration of an ionophore into the sensor paves the way for the development of highly specific light-based sensing platforms that are readily adaptable to sense a particular ion simply by altering the ionophore design.

  12. Ion-beam assisted laser fabrication of sensing plasmonic nanostructures

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Milichko, Valentin; Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Simple high-performance two-stage hybrid technique was developed for fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures, including nanorods, nanorings, as well as more complex structures on glass substrates. In this technique a thin noble metal film on a dielectric substrate is irradiated by a tightly focused single nanosecond laser pulse and then the modified region is slowly polished by an accelerated argon ion (Ar+) beam. As a result, each nanosecond laser pulse locally modifies the initial metal film through initiation of fast melting and subsequent hydrodynamic processes, while the following Ar+-ion polishing removes the rest of the film, revealing the hidden topography features and fabricating separate plasmonic structures on the glass substrate. We demonstrate that the shape and lateral size of the resulting functional plasmonic nanostructures depends on the laser pulse energy and metal film thickness, while subsequent Ar+-ion polishing enables to vary height of the resulting nanostructures. The plasmon...

  13. Complexation of the uranyl ion with aquatic humic acid

    The complexation of the uranyl(VI) ion with aquatic humic acid from Gorleben groundwater (Gohy-573) is studied in 0.1 M NaClO4 at pH 4 under argon atmosphere. The concentration range investigated is from 1 x 10-7 to 1 x 10-5 mol/l for the uranyl ion and from 1 x 10-6 to 1.12 x 10-5 mol/l for the humic acid. Three different experimental methods are applied to separate the uncomplexed uranyl ion from the uranyl humate complex, using differences of the two species in size by ultrafiltration at the pore size of about 1 nm, in charge by anion exchange separation and in spectroscopic properties by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). No reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is observed in the course of the humate complexation process. The experimental results confirm that the prevailing complexation reaction is charge neutralization of the UO2+2 ion with two proton exchanging sites of humic acid. At pH 4 in 0.1 M NaClO4, where the hydrolysis of the uranyl ion appears negligible, the fraction of proton exchanging sites of the humic acid that can be occupied by the uranyl ion (called the loading capacity (LC) of the uranyl ion) is determined to be 0.185±0.003. The complexation constant evaluated by taking the loading capacity into account is found to be logβ = 6.16±0.13, which is a grand average of all values determined by the three experimental procedures under consideration. This value is valid for the humate complexation of the non-hydrolyzed uranyl ion, being independent of pH and ionic strength. (orig.)

  14. Electrochemical, optical and metal ion sensing properties of dithizone derivatised electrodes

    Mirkhalaf, F

    1998-01-01

    studied. Possible applications of these modified electrodes with potential control in metal ion detection are described. The electrochemical and SPR responses for the metal ion sensing by the monolayer films were compared with those of polymer films containing the same ligand. Derivatisation of electrode surfaces with ultra-thin films of organic molecules has been extensively studied for many applications in recent years. The present study is based on a new approach in the preparation and use of these electrodes for metal ion sensing. Modification of electrode surfaces with a ligand specific to heavy metal ions has been described. A new derivative of dithizone (DDz) and its secondary metal complexes have been synthesised and attached onto indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold electrodes. This was achieved by covalent bonding between carboxyl groups in DDz and terminal amine groups of molecules self-assembled on the electrode surfaces. These monolayer films were characterised by cyclic voltammetry, by in situ and ex...

  15. Ion-beam assisted laser fabrication of sensing plasmonic nanostructures

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Gurbatov, Stanislav; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Milichko, Valentin; Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Simple high-performance, two-stage hybrid technique was developed for fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures, including nanorods, nanorings, as well as more complex structures on glass substrates. In this technique, a thin noble-metal film on a dielectric substrate is irradiated by a single tightly focused nanosecond laser pulse and then the modified region is slowly polished by an accelerated argon ion (Ar+) beam. As a result, each nanosecond laser pulse locally modifies the initial metal film through initiation of fast melting and subsequent hydrodynamic processes, while the following Ar+-ion polishing removes the rest of the film, revealing the hidden topography features and fabricating separate plasmonic structures on the glass substrate. We demonstrate that the shape and lateral size of the resulting functional plasmonic nanostructures depend on the laser pulse energy and metal film thickness, while subsequent Ar+-ion polishing enables to vary height of the resulting nanostructures. Plasmonic properties of the fabricated nanostructures were characterized by dark-field micro-spectroscopy, Raman and photoluminescence measurements performed on single nanofeatures, as well as by supporting numerical calculations of the related electromagnetic near-fields and Purcell factors. The developed simple two-stage technique represents a new step towards direct large-scale laser-induced fabrication of highly ordered arrays of complex plasmonic nanostructures.

  16. A novel start algorithm for CNG engines using ion sense technology

    Bie, T. de; Ericsson, M.; Rask, P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a start algorithm that is able to control the air/fuel ratio (AFR) during the cranking phase and immediately hereafter, where the ordinary ?-control is not yet enabled. The control is based on the ion sense principle, which means that a current through the spark plug is measured

  17. Adsorption Assisted Ion Exchanger Catalyst for Fatty Acid Esterification

    Jeřábek, Karel; Holub, Ladislav; Hanková, Libuše; Corain, B.; Centomo, P.

    - : -, 2011, s. 18. ISBN N. [IUPAC International Conference on Chemical Research Applied to World Needs /19./. Kuala Lumpur (MY), 27.09.2011-29.09.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ion exchanger * catalysts * acid esterification Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  18. Luminescence enhancement of uranyl ion by benzoic acid in acetonitrile

    Uranyl ion is known for its characteristic green luminescence and therefore luminescence spectroscopy is a suitable technique for characterizing different uranyl species. In aqueous medium, luminescence of uranyl ion is generally weak due to its quenching by water molecules and therefore in order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H3PO4, H2SO4, HCIO4 have been widely used. The other method to enhance the uranyl luminescence is by ligand sensitized luminescence, a method well established for lanthanides. In this work, luminescence of uranyl ion is found to be enhanced by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium. In aqueous medium benzoic acid does not enhance the uranyl luminescence although it forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with uranyl ion. Luminescence spectra of uranyl benzoate revealed that enhancement is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by benzoate ions. UV-Vis spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the specie formed in the in acetonitrile medium. UV-Vis spectroscopy along with luminescence spectra revealed that the specie to be tribenzoate complex of uranyl (UO2 (C6H5COO)3)- having D3h symmetry. (author)

  19. Barbituric acid as a substituent at aryl methylium ions.

    Spange, Stefan; Bauer, Mirko; Walfort, Bernhard; Lang, Heinrich

    2006-09-29

    Activation of different benzophenone derivatives with triflic anhydride for electrophilic aromatic substitution of 5-phenylbarbituric acids leads to regioselective formation of the ortho-substituted product. The resulting triphenylmethylium salt can be isolated when the Michlers ketone is used. More electrophilic cations form cyclic enol ethers such as 1-n-butyl-9,9-diaryl-1,9-dihydro-10-oxa-1,3-diazaphenanthrene-2,4-diones. Alternatively, supramolecular complex formation with 2,6-diacetamido pyridine as well as carbenium ion generation have been studied. Although in dilute acid only protonation of one of the carbonyl oxygens occurs, ring opening of the cyclic enol ether toward the carbenium ion is observed in 96% sulfuric acid. PMID:16995696

  20. Bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles for selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial studies

    Vinod Kumar, V.; Anbarasan, S.; Christena, Lawrence Rene; SaiSubramanian, Nagarajan; Philip Anthony, Savarimuthu

    2014-08-01

    Hibiscus Sabdariffa (Gongura) plant extracts (leaves (HL) and stem (HS) were used for the first time in the green synthesis of bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The bio-functionality of AgNPs has been successfully utilized for selective colorimetric sensing of potentially health and environmentally hazardous Hg2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ metal ions at ppm level in aqueous solution. Importantly, clearly distinguishable colour for all three metal ions was observed. The influence of extract preparation condition and pH were also explored on the formation of AgNPs. Both selectivity and sensitivity differed for AgNPs synthesized from different parts of the plant. Direct correlation between the stability of green synthesized AgNPs at different pH and its antibacterial effects has been established. The selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial effect of green synthesized AgNPs demonstrated the multifunctional applications of green nanotechnology.

  1. Ion flotation behaviour of thirty-one metal ions in mixed hydrochloric/nitric acid solutions.

    Hualing, D; Zhide, H

    1989-06-01

    The ion flotation of 31 metal ions in hydrochloric/nitric acid solution with the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride was investigated. A 25-ml portion of 0.27-2.87 x 10(-4)M metal ion and 1.8-6.0 x 10(-4)M cetylpyridinium chloride solution in 0.17-3.4M acid mixture ([HCl]:[HNO(3)] = 2.4:1) was subjected to flotation in a cell, 22.5 cm high and 4.0 cm in diameter, for 5 min, with nitrogen bubbles. Ir(IV), Pt(IV), Ge(IV), Sn(IV), Bi(III), Au(III), Tl(III), Pd(II) and Sn(II) were floated from solution in 95-100% yield; Ru(III), Rh(III), Ir(III), Hg(II), Ag(I) and Tl(I) were partly floated, while Cr(VI), Ti(IV), Zr(IV), Ga(III), In(III), Fe(III), Sb(III), Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), CD(II) and Pb(II) were floated with less than 20% yield. The flotation behaviour of these metal ions in the mixed acid system was compared with that in hydrochloric acid. The flotation is more efficient in the mixed acid system. PMID:18964771

  2. Catalytic protection of stannous ion by ascorbic acid in diphosphonic acids solutions

    LiuGuo-Zheng; LiuFei; 等

    1998-01-01

    The protective ability of ascorbic acid(Vc) on stannous ion and the influence of light irradiation on the stability of stannous ion in diphosphonate medium at pH=5 have been examined in order to attain minimal loss of stannous ion during the production of lyophilized radiopharmaceutical kits.The sum of stanous ion and Vc was determined with iodometric method.It was shown that the protective ability of Vc was still strong at Vc concentration much lower than that of stannous ion and the illumination by fluorescent lamp was unfavorable to the stability of stannous ion.The change of pH in the range 3-9 did not affect the action of Vc significantly.

  3. Reactivity of the cadmium ion in concentrated phosphoric acid solutions.

    De Gyves, J; Gonzales, J; Louis, C; Bessiere, J

    1989-07-01

    The solvation transfer coefficients which characterize the changes of ion reactivity with phosphoric acid concentration have been calculated for cadmium from the constants of the successive chloride complexes, and for silver and diethyldithiophosphate from potentiometric measurements. They evidence the strong desolvation of the cadmium species in concentrated phosphoric acid media, causing a remarkable increase of its reactivity. They allow the results of liquid-liquid extraction, precipitation and flotation reactions to be correctly interpreted and their changes to be foreseen when the reagents are modified. PMID:18964794

  4. Esterification of levulinic acid with butanol over ion exchange resins

    Tejero Iborra, M. Àngels; Ramírez Rangel, Eliana; Fité Piquer, Carles; Tejero Salvador, Xavier; Cunill García, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl levulinates are biobased chemicals with a great number of applications and great biofuel potential for blending to conventional diesel or gasoline. The present work focuses on the liquid-phase synthesis of butyl levulinate (BL) by esterification of levulinic acid (LA) with 1-butanol (BuOH) using a set of acidic ion-exchange resins. Experiments were performed at 80 °C and 2.5 MPa in a batch reactor by using an initial molar ratio AL/BuOH of 1/3 and a catalyst loading of 0.8%. It has been...

  5. Sensing behavior and logic operation of a colorimetric fluorescence sensor for Hg(2+)/Cu(2+) ions.

    He, Tian; Lin, Cuiling; Gu, Zhengye; Xu, Luonan; Yang, Anle; Liu, Yuanyuan; Fang, Huajun; Qiu, Huayu; Zhang, Jing; Yin, Shouchun

    2016-10-01

    A BODIPY-based 1 as a colorimetric fluorescence sensor was synthesized, and its metal sensing property was investigated. 1 displayed high selectivity and sensitivity towards Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) ions among 15 different metal cations. The addition of Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) ions into 1 in CH3CN resulted in a significant bathochromic shift of the UV absorption spectra from 533nm to 560nm and 593nm, respectively, changing the corresponding colors from pink to purple and blue. When excited at 530nm, the fluorescence intensity of 1 was quenched over 75% upon addition of Hg(2+) ions, while 1 with Cu(2+) ions exhibited significant fluorescence enhancement with a 23nm red-shift. Based on these results, three logic gates (OR, IMPLICATION, and INHIBIT) were obtained by controlling the chemical inputs. PMID:27239948

  6. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  7. Electropolymerized Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Film for Sensing of Clofibric Acid

    Bianca Schweiger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueous ethanol solution, which was further optimized by using PAD. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements revealed differences between molecularly imprinted (MIP and non-imprinted polymer (NIP layers. Binding experiments with clofibric acid and other substances showed a pronounced selectivity of the MIP for clofibric acid vs. carbamazepine, but the response of MIP and NIP to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was higher than that for clofibric acid. A smooth surface, revealed by AFM measurements, with roughness of 6–8 nm for imprinted and non-imprinted layers, might be a reason for an excessively low density of specific binding sites for clofibric acid. Furthermore, the decreased polymerization rate in the presence of clofibric acid might not result in well-defined polymer structures, which could be the reason for the lower sensitivity.

  8. Screen-printed back-to-back electroanalytical sensors: heavy metal ion sensing.

    Ruas de Souza, Ana P; Foster, Christopher W; Kolliopoulos, Athanasios V; Bertotti, Mauro; Banks, Craig E

    2015-06-21

    Screen-printed back-to-back microband electroanalytical sensors are applied to the quantification of lead(II) ions for the first time. In this configuration the electrodes are positioned back-to-back with a common electrical connection to the two working electrodes with the counter and reference electrodes for each connected in the same manner as a normal "traditional" screen-printed sensor. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated for the electroanalytical sensing of lead(II) ions utilising square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry where an increase in the electroanalytical sensitivity is observed by a factor of 5 with the back-to-back microband configuration at a fixed lead(II) ion concentration of 5 μg L(-1) utilising a deposition potential and time of -1.2 V and 30 seconds respectively, compared to a conventional (single) microband electrode. The back-to-back microband configuration allows for the sensing of lead(II) ions with a linear range from 5 to 110 μg L(-1) with a limit of detection (based on 3σ) corresponding to 3.7 μg L(-1). The back-to-back microband configuration is demonstrated to quantify the levels of lead(II) ions within drinking water corresponding to a level of 2.8 (±0.3) μg L(-1). Independent validation was performed using ICP-OES with the levels of lead(II) ions found to correspond to 2.5 (±0.1) μg L(-1); the excellent agreement between the two methods validates the electroanalytical procedure for the quantification of lead(II) ions in drinking water. This back-to-back configuration exhibits an excellent validated analytical performance for the determination of lead(II) ions within drinking water at World Health Organisation levels (limited to 10 μg L(-1) within drinking water). PMID:25902942

  9. Colorimetric and fluorescent sensor for selective sensing of Hg2+ ions in semi aqueous medium

    A highly sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ ion with simple salophen probe was developed. In DMSO: water (40:60, v/v) solution, Hg2+ ions coordinate with imine and shows color turn-off from yellow to colorless. Receptor 1 showed its ability for sensing Hg2+ cations sensitively through three channels: colorimetric, UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Hg2+ ions coordinate to the imine (Receptor 1) through NONO binding site forming 1:1 complex. It exhibits fluorescent 'Turn-on' behavior based on solvent polarity. The detection limit of our receptor with mercury is 1 μg L−1. -- Graphical abstract: A highly sensitive and rapid detection of Hg2+ with simple salophen probe was developed. In DMSO: water (40:60, v/v) solution, Hg2+ ions coordinate with imine and shows color turn-off from yellow to colorless. Receptor 1 showed its ability for sensing Hg2+ cations sensitively through three channels: colorimetric, UV–vis and Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Hg2+ ions coordinate to the imine (Receptor 1) through the NONO binding site forming 1:1 complex. It exhibits fluorescent 'Turn-on' behavior based on solvent polarity. The detection limit of our receptor with mercury is 1 μg L−1. Highlights: ► Hg2+ ions coordinate with imine and shows color turn-off from yellow to colorless. ► The binding constant of the receptor 1 (DMSO) with Hg2+ ion (DMSO) is 1.35×105. ► Hg2+ ions coordinate to the imine through NONO binding site forming 1:1 complex. ► The receptor 1 shows fluorescent 'Turn-on' behavior based on solvent polarity. ► The detection limit of receptor 1 with mercury is 1 μg L−1

  10. Fluorogenic ratiometric dipodal optode containing imine-amide linkages: Exploiting subtle thorium (IV) ion sensing

    Tayade, Kundan [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India); Kaur, Amanpreet [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Tetgure, Sandesh [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India); Chaitanya, G. Krishana [School of Chemical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Tirth Marathawada University, Nanded (India); Singh, Narinder [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Ropar, Punjab (India); Kuwar, Anil, E-mail: kuwaras@gmail.com [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • A highly selective, simple, noncyclic, imine-amide based dipodal off–on fluorescence chemosensor for Th{sup 4+} ion is reported. • Sensing mechanism is based upon twisted plane intramolecular charge–transfer upon interaction with cations. • Th{sup 4+} ion on detection limit (as low as 0.1 μM) is reported. • This system can also be applied in real samples. - Abstract: The (13E,19E)-N1′,N3′-bis[4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylidene]malonohydrazide (L) has been developed for the detection of Th{sup 4+} ions using dual channel signalling system. The UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed the formation of L–Th{sup 4+} complex in 1:1 equilibrium. The density functional theory (DFT) also confirms the optimum binding cavity for the recognition of metal ion. The binding constant computed from different mathematical models for an assembly of L–Th{sup 4+}. The detection limit of L for Th{sup 4+} recognition is to a concentration down to 0.1 μM (0.023 μg g{sup −1}). The present sensing system is also successfully applied for the detection of Th{sup 4+} ion present in soil near nuclear atomic plants.

  11. Gadolinium(III) ion selective sensor using a new synthesized Schiff's base as a sensing material

    According to a solution study which showed a selective complexation between N,N′-bis(methylsalicylidene)-2-aminobenzylamine (MSAB) and gadolinium ions, MSAB was used as a sensing element in construction of a gadolinium(III) ion selective electrode. Acetophenon (AP) was used as solvent mediator and sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB) as an anion excluder. The electrode showed a good selectivity towards Gd(III) ions over a wide variety of cations tested. The constructed sensor displayed a Nernstian behavior (19.7 ± 0.3 mV/decade) in the concentration range of 1.0 × 10−6 to 1.0 × 10−2 mol L−1 with detection limit of 5.0 × 10−7 mol L−1 and a short response time (3+–PVC membrane sensor based on an ion carrier as sensing material is introduced. ► This technique is very simple and it's not necessary to use sophisticated equipment. ► This sensor shows good selectivity against other metal ions.

  12. Oleic Acid and Octanoic Acid Sensing Capacity in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Is Direct in Hypothalamus and Brockmann Bodies

    Librán-Pérez, Marta; López-Patiño, Marcos A.; Míguez, Jesús M.; Soengas, José L.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we provided evidence for the presence in hypothalamus and Brockmann bodies (BB) of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss of sensing systems responding to changes in levels of oleic acid (long-chain fatty acid, LCFA) or octanoic acid (medium-chain fatty acid, MCFA). Since those effects could be attributed to an indirect effect, in the present study, we evaluated in vitro if hypothalamus and BB respond to changes in FA in a way similar to that observed in vivo. In a first set o...

  13. 18-Crown[6]ether functionalized reduced graphene oxide for membrane-free ion selective sensing

    Olsen, Gunnar; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    The focus of this work is on the synthesis of a 1-Aza-18-crown[6]ether functionalized reduced graphene oxide (RGO-crown[6]) with specific K+ binding sites on the RGO surface. Glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) functionalized with RGO-crown[6] weretested for selective potentiometric sensing of K+ , with...... a detection limit of 10-5 M without inference from other ions (Na+ , Li+ , NH4+ and Ca2+) in concentrations up to 2.5 × 10-2 M. Similar sensing was achieved with functionalized disposable SPE electrodes. The results demonstrate that RGO-crown[6] is a conductive material full of promise for...... application in fabrication of new types of ion selective sensors....

  14. Acidic Tumor Microenvironment and pH-Sensing G protein-Coupled Receptors

    Calvin R. Justus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8, GPR68 (OGR1, and GPR132 (G2A, regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

  15. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors.

    Justus, Calvin R; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), GPR68 (OGR1), and GPR132 (G2A), regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:24367336

  16. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. PMID:27465850

  17. Colorimetric and fluorescent sensing of transition metal ions in aqueous medium by salicylaldimine based chemosensor

    The cation sensing property of highly sensitive chromogenic receptor N, N′-bis (salicylidine)-o-phenylene diamine (receptor 1) was studied by visual observation, UV–vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The proposed study has been targeted to sense the first transition series metal cations like Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+ and Cu2+. Binding affinity toward Cu2+ is found to be of higher magnitude compared to the other three cations mentioned. Receptor 1 on binding with Fe3+, Co2+ Ni2+ and Cu2+ ions shows fluorescence enhancement which is due to the inhibition of PET mechanism. - Graphical abstract: The cation sensing property of highly sensitive chromogenic receptor N, N′-bis (salicylidine)-o-phenylene diamine was studied by naked eye observation, UV–vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The proposed study has been targeted to sense the first transition series metal cations like Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+ and Cu2+. Binding affinity toward Cu2+ is found to be of higher magnitude compared to the other three cations mentioned. Receptor 1 on binding with Fe3+, Co2+ Ni2+ and Cu2+ ions shows fluorescence enhancement which is due to the inhibition of PET mechanism. Highlights: ► Receptor 1 serves as a multi channel probe for different transition metal cations. ► Binding constant for Cu2+ is of higher magnitude compared to the other cations. ► The ions bind to the receptor through NONO centers forming 2:1 and 1:1 complexes. ► Paramagnetic ions show fluorescent enhancement due to the inhibition of PET mechanism.

  18. Recent Advances in Fluorescent Arylboronic Acids for Glucose Sensing

    Jon Stefan Hansen; Jørn Bolstad Christensen

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is crucial in order to avoid complications caused by change in blood glucose for patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. The long-term consequences of high blood glucose levels include damage to the heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves and other organs, among others, caused by malign glycation of vital protein structures. Fluorescent monitors based on arylboronic acids are promising candidates for optical CGM, since arylboronic acids are capable of forming aryl...

  19. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors for pH and potassium ion concentration sensing: towards detection of myocardial ischemia

    Rai, Pratyush; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2008-03-01

    Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) for sensing change in ionic concentration in biological systems can be used for detecting critical conditions like Myocardial Ischemia. Having the ability to yield steady signal characteristics can be used to observe the ionic concentration gradients which mark the onset of ischemia. Two ionic concentrations, pH and [K +], have been considered as the indicator for Myocardial Ischemia in this study. The ISFETs in this study have an organic semi-conductor film as the electronically active component. Poly-3 hexylthiophene was chosen for its compatibility to the solution processing, which is a simple and economical method of thin film fabrication. The gate electrode, which regulates the current in the active layer, has been employed as the sensor element. The devices under study here were fabricated on a flexible substrate PEN. The pH sensor was designed with the Tantalum Oxide gate dielectric as the ion selective component. The charge accumulated on the surface of the metal oxide acts as the source of the effecter electric field. The device was tested for pH values between 6.5 and 7.5, which comprises the variation observed during ischemic attack. The potassium ion sensor has got a floating gate electrode which is functionalized to be selective to potassium ion. The device was tested for potassium ion concentration between 5 and 25 mM, which constitutes the variation in extra cellular potassium ion concentration during ischemic attack. The device incorporated a monolayer of Valinomycin, a potassium specific ionophore, on top of the gate electrode.

  20. Luminescent silver nanoclusters acting as a label-free photoswitch in metal ion sensing.

    Ghosh, Subhadip; Anand, Uttam; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2014-03-18

    In this work, we report the application of protein-templated Ag nanoclusters as a luminescent photoswitch for the detection of metal ions. Ag nanoclusters were synthesized using the circulatory protein human serum albumin (HSA) as a template, whose synthetic procedure can be tuned to make them toggle between blue-emitting (Ag9:HSA) and red-emitting (Ag14:HSA) nanoclusters. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of Ag9:HSA was quenched significantly in the presence of 1 mM Co(II) ions. However, the PL of these quenched nanoclusters was completely restored in the presence of 3 mM Zn(II) ions. This enables them to be used as dual sensors and can serve as luminescent turn "on" and "off" metal switches. In contrast, the Ag14:HSA did not exhibit any photoswitchable properties but was able to detect Hg(II) selectively and to a high detection limit (10 nM). The luminescent-based sensing properties of these Ag:NCs were further supported by our time-resolved studies. The present study exhibits a promising step toward the application of luminescent metal nanoclusters as potential metal sensors since by tuning their luminescent properties we were able to detect and quantify metal ions selectively and simultaneously switch their sensing behaviors. PMID:24528116

  1. Fluorogenic ratiometric dipodal optode containing imine-amide linkages: exploiting subtle thorium (IV) ion sensing.

    Tayade, Kundan; Kaur, Amanpreet; Tetgure, Sandesh; Chaitanya, G Krishana; Singh, Narinder; Kuwar, Anil

    2014-12-10

    The (13E,19E)-N1',N3'-bis[4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylidene]malonohydrazide (L) has been developed for the detection of Th(4+) ions using dual channel signalling system. The UV-vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed the formation of L-Th(4+) complex in 1:1 equilibrium. The density functional theory (DFT) also confirms the optimum binding cavity for the recognition of metal ion. The binding constant computed from different mathematical models for an assembly of L-Th(4+). The detection limit of L for Th(4+) recognition is to a concentration down to 0.1 μM (0.023 μg g(-1)). The present sensing system is also successfully applied for the detection of Th(4+) ion present in soil near nuclear atomic plants. PMID:25441898

  2. Carbon Dot Based Sensing of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid

    Upama Baruah; Neelam Gogoi; Achyut Konwar; Manash Jyoti Deka; Devasish Chowdhury; Gitanjali Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate carbon dot based sensor of catecholamine, namely, dopamine and ascorbic acid. Carbon dots (CDs) were prepared from a green source: commercially available Assam tea. The carbon dots prepared from tea had particle sizes of ∼0.8 nm and are fluorescent. Fluorescence of the carbon dots was found to be quenched in the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid with greater sensitivity for dopamine. The minimum detectable limits were determined to be 33 μM and 98 μM for dopamine and ascor...

  3. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of nucleic acids: A review

    Šípová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    -, č. 773 (2013), s. 9-23. ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Nucleic acid * Biosensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 4.517, year: 2013

  4. Recent Advances in Fluorescent Arylboronic Acids for Glucose Sensing

    Jon Stefan Hansen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM is crucial in order to avoid complications caused by change in blood glucose for patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. The long-term consequences of high blood glucose levels include damage to the heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves and other organs, among others, caused by malign glycation of vital protein structures. Fluorescent monitors based on arylboronic acids are promising candidates for optical CGM, since arylboronic acids are capable of forming arylboronate esters with 1,2-cis-diols or 1,3-diols fast and reversibly, even in aqueous solution. These properties enable arylboronic acid dyes to provide immediate information of glucose concentrations. Thus, the replacement of the commonly applied semi-invasive and non-invasive techniques relying on glucose binding proteins, such as concanavalin A, or enzymes, such as glucose oxidase, glucose dehydrogenase and hexokinases/glucokinases, might be possible. The recent progress in the development of fluorescent arylboronic acid dyes will be emphasized in this review.

  5. Drosophila fatty acid taste signals through the PLC pathway in sugar-sensing neurons.

    Pavel Masek

    Full Text Available Taste is the primary sensory system for detecting food quality and palatability. Drosophila detects five distinct taste modalities that include sweet, bitter, salt, water, and the taste of carbonation. Of these, sweet-sensing neurons appear to have utility for the detection of nutritionally rich food while bitter-sensing neurons signal toxicity and confer repulsion. Growing evidence in mammals suggests that taste for fatty acids (FAs signals the presence of dietary lipids and promotes feeding. While flies appear to be attracted to fatty acids, the neural basis for fatty acid detection and attraction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a range of FAs are detected by the fly gustatory system and elicit a robust feeding response. Flies lacking olfactory organs respond robustly to FAs, confirming that FA attraction is mediated through the gustatory system. Furthermore, flies detect FAs independent of pH, suggesting the molecular basis for FA taste is not due to acidity. We show that low and medium concentrations of FAs serve as an appetitive signal and they are detected exclusively through the same subset of neurons that sense appetitive sweet substances, including most sugars. In mammals, taste perception of sweet and bitter substances is dependent on phospholipase C (PLC signaling in specialized taste buds. We find that flies mutant for norpA, a Drosophila ortholog of PLC, fail to respond to FAs. Intriguingly, norpA mutants respond normally to other tastants, including sucrose and yeast. The defect of norpA mutants can be rescued by selectively restoring norpA expression in sweet-sensing neurons, corroborating that FAs signal through sweet-sensing neurons, and suggesting PLC signaling in the gustatory system is specifically involved in FA taste. Taken together, these findings reveal that PLC function in Drosophila sweet-sensing neurons is a conserved molecular signaling pathway that confers attraction to fatty acids.

  6. TRPV1 senses both acidic and basic pH

    Dhaka, Ajay; Uzzell, Valerie; Dubin, Adrienne; Mathur, Jayanti; Petrus, Matt; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining physiological pH is required for survival, and exposure to alkaline chemicals such as ammonia (smelling salts) elicits severe pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, is an integrator of noxious stimuli including heat and extracellular acidic pH. Here we report that ammonia activates TRPV1, TRPA1 (another polymodal nocisensor), and other unknown receptor(s) expressed in sensory neurons. Ammonia and intracellular alkalization activate TRPV1 t...

  7. Fe doped hydroxyapatite thick films modified via swift heavy ion irradiation for CO and CO2 gas sensing application

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: • We report improved gas sensing properties of Fe-HAp films via heavy ion irradiation. • HAp films are tailored by addition of Fe ion as well as irradiation with variable ion fluence. • SHI irradiated substrate sense the CO and CO2 gases at relatively lower temperature. • Response and gas uptake capacity of sensors is improved for appropriate fluence 3 × 1011 ions/cm2. • The enhanced sensor properties are attributed due to the surface modification by SHI. -- Abstract: Swift Heavy Ion irradiation (SHI) technique is utilized to modify the structure and surface morphology of Fe doped Hydroxyapatite (Fe-HAp) thick films for CO and CO2 gas sensing applications. Nano-crystalline HAp is synthesized by wet chemical precipitation route and ion exchange process is employed to replace of Ca ion with Fe ions. Thick film Fe-HAp sensors, having variable Fe doping concentrations, are prepared by using screen printing technique. The Fe-HAp thick films are irradiated using Ag7+ ion (100 MeV) with variable ion fluences ranging from 3 × 1010 to 3 × 1013 ions/cm2 for modifying the sensor surface. Structural and morphological changes with respect to ion fluence are observed by means of XRD, SEM and AFM analysis. The parameters such as operating temperature, response/recovery time, and uptake capacity for pristine and modified Fe-HAp sensors are experimentally determined. The investigations reveal that the SHI irradiated Fe-HAp film (3 × 1011 ions/cm2) shows improved gas sensing characteristics at relatively lower operating temperature in comparison to pristine film. It is concluded that Fe-HAp film can be a potential candidate for developing low cost, energy saver and high performance CO and CO2 sensor

  8. Surface plasmon resonance sensing detection of mercury and lead ions based on conducting polymer composite.

    Mahnaz M Abdi

    Full Text Available A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb(2+ and Hg(2+ ions. The Pb(2+ ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb(2+ compared to Hg(2+. The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system.

  9. Ammonia Gas Sensing Behavior of Tanninsulfonic Acid Doped Polyaniline-TiO2 Composite

    Venu Gopal Bairi; Bourdo, Shawn E.; Nicolas Sacre; Dev Nair; Berry, Brian C.; Biris, Alexandru S; Tito Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO2 composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO2 in TANIPAN...

  10. Conformational Transition of Poly (Acrylic Acid) Detected by Microcantilever Sensing

    LI Kai; LIU Hong; ZHANG Qing-Chuan; XUE Chang-Guo; WU Xiao-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) chains are grafted on one side of a microcantilever by the self-assembled method and the deflections of the microcantilever are detected as a function of medium pH from 3 to 11. It is found that when the pH varies, the microcantilever deflects because of the changing surface stress. By analysing the electrostatic repulsive effect, the surface stress change is related to the conformation transition of PAA from a collapse state to a swelling state. This method offers the interaction information among the polymer chains during the conformational transition and affords an alternative way to study conformational change of polymers.

  11. INTERACTION OF AMINO ACID WITH ION EXCHANGE RESIN Ⅲ.FURTHER INVESTIGA TION OF SUPEREQUIVALENT ADSORPTION MECHANISM OF AMINO ACID ON ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    ZHANGHui; SHAOTong; 等

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of glycine,alanine and oxidized glutathion on strong acid cation and strong base anion exchange resins from aqueous solutions were measured and the superequivalent adsorptions of glycine and alanine observed.The infrared spectra of glycine adsorbed on the cation and the anion exchange resins,001×7 and 201×7,were measured.From these results,it is concluded that the amino acid adsorption on the ion exchange resin proceeds not only through ion exchange and proton transfer mechanisms,but also through aminecarboxylate interaction between the adsorbed amino acid molecules,and the formation of second layer of amino acid molecules is the mechanism of superequivalent adsorption of amino acid,the carboxylate or amine groups of the first layer of amino acid molecules on the ion exchange resin act as the exchange sites for the second layer of amino acid molecules.

  12. DMPD: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 18641647 Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases... (.csml) Show Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases....iral infection andautoimmune diseases. Authors Gilliet M, Cao W, Liu YJ. Publication Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 A

  13. Complexation and extraction of series 4f, 5f and 4d ions by dialkyldithiophosphoric acids

    A study was carried out on the complexing and extracting properties of various dialkyldithiophosphoric acids towards ions of the 4f, 5f and 4d series. Sulphurated donors complex and extract ions of the 4f and 5f series less strongly than their oxygenated homologues. However the affinity of trivalent actinide ions for dialkythiophosphate ions is shown to be greater than that of lanthanides. The conditions of ruthenium extraction from nitric acid are defined

  14. Sodium and potassium benzoate and benzoic acid as eluents for ion chromatography

    Gjerde, D.T.; Fritz, J.S.

    1981-12-01

    Benzoic acid is introduced as an eluent and is compared with benzoate salt eluents. Detector response to sample ions in single-column ion chromatogrphy is compared with dual-column (suppressed) ion chromatography. Benzoic acid has a higher background conductance; however, samples separated with benzoate salt eluents. Comparable sample peak areas are found with suppressor column treated benzoate eluents and benzoic acid eluents. Equations are described which predict detector response for a variety of conditions.

  15. Ion exchange properties of poly-vanadium and poly-vanadium-molybdenum acids

    Present work is devoted to ion exchange properties of poly-vanadium acid depending on rate of substitution of vanadium on molybdenum. Poly vanadium acid was studied by means of paramagnetic resonance method.

  16. Bio-Sensing of Cadmium(II Ions Using Staphylococcus aureus

    Jindrich Kynicky

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium, as a hazardous pollutant commonly present in the living environment, represents an important risk to human health due to its undesirable effects (oxidative stress, changes in activities of many enzymes, interactions with biomolecules including DNA and RNA and consequent potential risk, making its detection very important. New and unique technological and biotechnological approaches for solving this problems are intensely sought. In this study, we used the commonly occurring potential pathogenic microorganism Staphylococcus aureus for the determination of markers which could be used for sensing of cadmium(II ions. We were focused on monitoring the effects of different cadmium(II ion concentrations (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 25 and 50 µg mL−1 on the growth and energetic metabolism of Staphylococcus aureus. Highly significant changes have been detected in the metabolism of thiol compounds—specifically the protein metallothionein (0.79–26.82 mmol/mg of protein, the enzyme glutathione S-transferase (190–5,827 µmol/min/mg of protein, and sulfhydryl groups (9.6–274.3 µmol cysteine/mg of protein. The ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione indicated marked oxidative stress. In addition, dramatic changes in urease activity, which is connected with resistance of bacteria, were determined. Further, the effects of cadmium(II ions on the metabolic pathways of arginine, β-glucosidase, phosphatase, N-acetyl β-D-glucosamine, sucrose, trehalose, mannitol, maltose, lactose, fructose and total proteins were demonstrated. A metabolomic profile of Staphylococcus aureus under cadmium(II ion treatment conditions was completed seeking data about the possibility of cadmium(II ion accumulation in cells. The results demonstrate potential in the application of microorganisms as modern biosensor systems based on biological components.

  17. Label-free and selective sensing of uric acid with gold nanoclusters as optical probe.

    Wang, Jian; Chang, Yong; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhang, Pu; Lie, Shao Qing; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-05-15

    Clinically, the amount of uric acid (UA) in biological fluids is closely related to some diseases such as hyperuricemia and gout, thus it is of great significance to sense UA in clinical samples. In this work, red gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with relatively high fluorescence quantum yield and strong fluorescence emission were facilely available using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as template. The fluorescence of BSA-protected AuNCs can be sensitively quenched by H2O2, which is further capable of sensing UA through the specific catalytic oxidation with uricase, since it generates stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 by-product. The proposed assay allows for the selective detection of UA in the range of 10-800 μM with a detection limit of 6.6 μM, which is applicable to sense UA in clinical samples with satisfactory results, suggesting its great potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26992526

  18. Luminescent sub-nanometer clusters for metal ion sensing: A new direction in nanosensors

    Highlights: ► Quantum cluster sensors. ► Mercury detection. ► Nanotechnology and water quality. - Abstract: We describe the application of a recently discovered family of materials called quantum clusters, which are sub-nanometer particles composed of a few atoms with well-defined molecular formulae, exhibiting intense absorption and emission in the visible region in metal ion sensing, taking Ag25 as an example. The changes in the optical properties of the cluster, in both absorption and emission upon exposure to various metal ions in aqueous medium are explored. The cluster can detect Hg2+ down to ppb levels. It can also detect 5d block ions (Pt2+, Au3+ and Hg2+) down to ppm limits. Hg2+ interacts with the metal core as well as the functional groups of the capping agents and the interaction is concentration-dependent. To understand the mechanism behind this type of specific interaction, we have used spectroscopic and microscopic techniques such as UV–vis spectroscopy, luminescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Specific reasons responsible for the interaction of Hg2+ have been proposed.

  19. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies. PMID:26732761

  20. Electrochemical sensing of tumor suppressor protein p53-deoxyribonucleic acid complex stability at an electrified interface

    Paleček, Emil; Černocká, Hana; Ostatná, Veronika; Navrátilová, Lucie; Brázdová, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 828, MAY2014 (2014), s. 1-8. ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00956S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-36108S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Deoxyribonucleic acid-protein binding * Tumor suppressor protein p53 * Electrochemical sensing Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.513, year: 2014

  1. The evolution of bat nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors.

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Zepeda-Mendoza, M Lisandra; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L; Arias, Carlos F; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLR) of a New World bat species, the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), and through a comparative molecular evolutionary approach searched for general adaptation patterns among the nucleic acid-sensing TLRs of eight different bats species belonging to three families (Pteropodidae, Vespertilionidae and Phyllostomidae). We found that the bat TLRs are evolving slowly and mostly under purifying selection and that the divergence pattern of such receptors is overall congruent with the species tree, consistent with the evolution of many other mammalian nuclear genes. However, the chiropteran TLRs exhibited unique mutations fixed in ligand-binding sites, some of which involved nonconservative amino acid changes and/or targets of positive selection. Such changes could potentially modify protein function and ligand-binding properties, as some changes were predicted to alter nucleic acid binding motifs in TLR 9. Moreover, evidence for episodic diversifying selection acting specifically upon the bat lineage and sublineages was detected. Thus, the long-term adaptation of chiropterans to a wide variety of environments and ecological niches with different pathogen profiles is likely to have shaped the evolution of the bat TLRs in an order-specific manner. The observed evolutionary patterns provide evidence for potential functional differences between bat and other mammalian TLRs in terms of resistance to specific pathogens or recognition of nucleic acids in general. PMID:26503258

  2. Dissociative CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Molecule Complex for Luminescent Sensing of Metal Ions in Aqueous Solutions

    Baranov, A. V.; Orlova, A. O.; Maslov, V. G.; Toporova, Yu. A.; Ushakova, E. V.; Federov, A.; Artemyev, M. V.; Perova, T. S.; Berwick, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The optical properties of dissociative luminescent sensors based on a complex consisting of highly luminescent hydrophobic core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and 1-(2-pyridilazo)-2-naphtol (PAN) molecules in organic solutions and a polymer film are reported. It is demonstrated, using Ni2+ and Co2+ ions as an illustrative example, that the QD/PAN sensor may have applications in the quantitative luminescent sensing of metal ions in aqueous solutions.

  3. Sensing of fatty acids for octanoylation of ghrelin involves a gustatory G-protein.

    Sara Janssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ghrelin is an important regulator of energy--and glucose homeostasis. The octanoylation at Ser(3 is essential for ghrelin's biological effects but the mechanisms involved in the octanoylation are unknown. We investigated whether the gustatory G-protein, α-gustducin, and the free fatty acid receptors GPR40 and GPR120 are involved in the fatty acid sensing mechanisms of the ghrelin cell. METHODS: Wild-type (WT and α-gustducin knockout (gust(-/- mice were fed a glyceryl trioctanoate-enriched diet (OD during 2 weeks. Ghrelin levels and gastric emptying were determined. Co-localization between GPR40, GPR120 and ghrelin or α-gustducin/α-transducin was investigated by immunofluorescence staining. The role of GPR120 in the effect of medium and long chain fatty acids on the release of ghrelin was studied in the ghrelinoma cell line, MGN3-1. The effect of the GPR40 agonist, MEDICA16, and the GPR120 agonist, grifolic acid, on ghrelin release was studied both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: Feeding an OD specifically increased octanoyl ghrelin levels in the stomach of WT mice but not of gust(-/- mice. Gastric emptying was accelerated in WT but not in gust(-/- mice. GPR40 was colocalized with desoctanoyl but not with octanoyl ghrelin, α-gustducin or α-transducin positive cells in the stomach. GPR120 only colocalized with ghrelin in the duodenum. Addition of octanoic acid or α-linolenic acid to MGN3-1 cells increased and decreased octanoyl ghrelin levels, respectively. Both effects could not be blocked by GPR120 siRNA. MEDICA16 and grifolic acid did not affect ghrelin secretion in vitro but oral administration of grifolic acid increased plasma ghrelin levels. CONCLUSION: This study provides the first evidence that α-gustducin is involved in the octanoylation of ghrelin and shows that the ghrelin cell can sense long- and medium-chain fatty acids directly. GPR120 but not GPR40 may play a role in the lipid sensing cascade of the ghrelin cell.

  4. Formation and Characterization of Self-Assembled Phenylboronic Acid Derivative Monolayers toward Developing Monosaccaride Sensing-Interface

    Kwangnak Koh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We designed and synthesized phenylboronic acid as a molecular recognitionmodel system for saccharide detection. The phenylboronic acid derivatives that haveboronic acid moiety are well known to interact with saccharides in aqueous solution; thus,they can be applied to a functional interface of saccharide sensing through the formation ofself-assembled monolayer (SAM. In this study, self-assembled phenylboronic acidderivative monolayers were formed on Au surface and carefully characterized by atomicforce microscopy (AFM, Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy(FTIR-RAS, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, and surface electrochemicalmeasurements. The saccharide sensing application was investigated using surface plasmonresonance (SPR spectroscopy. The phenylboronic acid monolayers showed goodsensitivity of monosaccharide sensing even at the low concentration range (1.0 × 10-12 M.The SPR angle shift derived from interaction between phenylboronic acid andmonosaccharide was increased with increasing the alkyl spacer length of synthesizedphenylboronic acid derivatives.

  5. Extruded polymer films pigmented with a heterogeneous ion-pair based lumophore for O2 sensing.

    Mills, Andrew; Graham, Ashleigh

    2013-11-01

    A novel approach to polymeric Ru(II)-diimine luminescent O2 sensors is described. The Ru(II)-diimine, tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride ([Ru(dpp)3](2+)), is first ion-paired to the surface of heterogeneous TiO2 particles, rendered negatively charged due to the alkali nature of the aqueous solution, to produce an O2 sensitive pigment with a strikingly high oxygen sensitivity (i.e. PO2 (S = 1/2) = 0.002 atm, where PO2 (S = 1/2) is defined as the amount of oxygen required to reduce the initial, oxygen free luminescence by 50%), and a rapid response to oxygen. The pigment is extruded in low density polyethylene (LDPE) to produce a thin (60 μm), flexible, O2 sensing plastic film, with an O2 sensitivity (PO2 (S = 1/2) = 0.84 atm) comparable to the more traditional homogeneous lumophore ion-pair based O2 sensor ink films reported in the literature. PMID:24040643

  6. Adsorption of Cu2+ ions on humic acids

    Cláudio Pereira Jordão

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Commercial samples of humic acids (Fluka AG were used to evaluate the adsorption behaviour of Cu2+ ions. The mathematical model described by Langmuir's adsorption equation was applied and the values of the maximum adsorption capacity b and those of the constant related to the bonding energy a were obtained. Aliquots of copper nitrate solutions with different copper concentrations were added to the humic acid suspensions at constant pH values (4.0 and 5.0. The Langmuir isotherms presented two distinct adsorption regions, showing that the adsorptive phenomenon occurs in two distinct steps according to the copper-humic site interaction. Samples of humic acids showed higher maximum adsorption capacity at pH 5 than at pH 4, while the constant a related to bonding energy was higher at pH 4.Amostras de ácidos húmicos de origem comercial (Fluka AG foram usadas na avaliação do comportamento de adsorção de íons Cu2+. O modelo matemático descrito pela equação de adsorção de Langmuir em sua forma linear foi aplicado, obtendo-se os valores da capacidade máxima de adsorção b e da constante relacionada à energia de ligação a. Alíquotas de soluções de nitrato de cobre contendo várias concentrações desse metal foram adicionadas às amostras de suspensões de ácidos húmicos a pH constante. As isotermas apresentaram duas regiões distintas de adsorção, tanto a pH 4 como a pH 5, mostrando que o fenômeno adsortivo ocorre em duas etapas distintas, de acordo com o tipo de interação entre os ácidos húmicos e o cobre. As amostras de ácidos húmicos mostraram maior capacidade máxima de adsorção ao pH 5 do que ao pH 4, enquanto que a constante relacionada à energia de ligação foi maior em pH 4.

  7. Synthesis of a stable gold hydrosol by the reduction of chloroaurate ions by the amino acid, aspartic acid

    Saikat Mandal; P R Selvakannan; Sumant Phadtare; Renu Pasricha; Murali Sastry

    2002-10-01

    Development of reliable protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles of well-defined sizes and good monodispersity is an important aspect of nanotechnology. In this paper, we present details of the synthesis of gold nanoparticles of good monodispersity by the reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions by the amino acid, aspartic acid. The colloidal gold solution thus formed is extremely stable in time, indicating electrostatic stabilization via nanoparticle surface-bound amino acid molecules. This observation has been used to modulate the size of the gold nanoparticles in solution by varying the molar ratio of chloroaurate ions to aspartic acid in the reaction medium. Characterization of the aspartic acid-reduced gold nanoparticles was carried out by UV-visible spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The use of amino acids in the synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticle in water has important implications in the development of new protocols for generation of bioconjugate materials.

  8. Silver-gold alloy nanoclusters as a fluorescence-enhanced probe for aluminum ion sensing.

    Zhou, Ting-yao; Lin, Li-ping; Rong, Ming-cong; Jiang, Ya-qi; Chen, Xi

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the development of a simple method is described for preparing highly red fluorescent mercaptosuccinic acid stabilized AgAu alloy nanoclusters (MSA-AgAu NCs) through the core etching of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and a galvanic exchange reaction using nonorganic solvent and no multistep centrifuge washing. The as-prepared MSA-AgAu NCs were characterized using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. After covalently attaching methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-NH2 (m-PEG-NH2), PEGylated MSA-AgAu NCs were still stable even in 1 M NaCl. Probably based on the deposition of Al(3+)-enhanced fluorescence, the PEGylated MSA-AgAu NCs offered highly selective and sensitive sensing of Al(3+) in aqueous solution with a detection limit of 0.8 μM. PMID:24016136

  9. EDTA assisted synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for electrochemical sensing of uric acid

    Kanchana, P.; Sekar, C., E-mail: Sekar2025@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have been synthesized using EDTA as organic modifier by a simple microwave irradiation method and its application for the selective determination of uric acid (UA) has been demonstrated. Electrochemical behavior of uric acid at HA nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode (E-HA/GCE) has been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and amperometry. The E-HA modified electrode exhibits efficient electrochemical activity towards uric acid sensing without requiring enzyme or electron mediator. Amperometry studies revealed that the fabricated electrode has excellent sensitivity for uric acid with the lowest detection limit of 142 nM over a wide concentration range from 1 × 10{sup −7} to 3 × 10{sup −5} M. Moreover, the studied E-HA modified GC electrode exhibits a good reproducibility and long-term stability and an admirable selectivity towards the determination of UA even in the presence of potential interferents. The analytical performance of this sensor was evaluated for the detection of uric acid in human urine and blood serum samples. - Highlights: • EDTA- hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles have been synthesized by microwave irradiation method. • A novel amperometric Uric Acid biosensor has been fabricated using E-HA/GCE. • The fabricated sensor exhibits a wide linear range, good stability and high reproducibility. • The sensor was applied for the detection of UA in human blood serum and urine.

  10. EDTA assisted synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for electrochemical sensing of uric acid

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have been synthesized using EDTA as organic modifier by a simple microwave irradiation method and its application for the selective determination of uric acid (UA) has been demonstrated. Electrochemical behavior of uric acid at HA nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode (E-HA/GCE) has been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and amperometry. The E-HA modified electrode exhibits efficient electrochemical activity towards uric acid sensing without requiring enzyme or electron mediator. Amperometry studies revealed that the fabricated electrode has excellent sensitivity for uric acid with the lowest detection limit of 142 nM over a wide concentration range from 1 × 10−7 to 3 × 10−5 M. Moreover, the studied E-HA modified GC electrode exhibits a good reproducibility and long-term stability and an admirable selectivity towards the determination of UA even in the presence of potential interferents. The analytical performance of this sensor was evaluated for the detection of uric acid in human urine and blood serum samples. - Highlights: • EDTA- hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles have been synthesized by microwave irradiation method. • A novel amperometric Uric Acid biosensor has been fabricated using E-HA/GCE. • The fabricated sensor exhibits a wide linear range, good stability and high reproducibility. • The sensor was applied for the detection of UA in human blood serum and urine

  11. A procedure for reducing the concentration of hydrogen ions in acid anionic eluate and equipment therefore

    The method is described of reducing the concentration of hydrogen ions in acid anionic eluate produced in the separation of uranium or other metals, in which anion exchanger elution, precipitation, filtration and precipitate and anion exchanger washing are used. The technological line for such elution comprises at least one ion exchange column and at least one container. They together form the first and the second stages of preparation of the acid anion elution solution, the sorption-elution separation of hydrogen ions on an cation exchanger being inserted between them. The preparation of the solution is divide into two stages. In the first stage, the acid and part of the solution for the preparation of the acid anion elution solution are supplied. The resulting enriched acid elution solution is fe onto the cation exchanger where the hydrogen ion concentration i reduced. It is then carried into the second stage where it is mixed with the remaining part of the solution. (B.S.)

  12. Effect of Ni7+ Ion Irradiation on Structure and Ammonia Sensing Properties of Thermally Oxidized Zinc and Indium Films

    Amandeep Kaur Bal; Rafinder Singh; R.K. Bedi

    2012-01-01

    ZnO and In203 films were prepared by thermal oxidation of vacuum deposited zinc and indium films, respec- tively onto the glass substrate at 30 ℃. The fabricated films have been irradiated with 100-MeV Ni7+ ions at different fluences ranging from 5×1011 to 5×1013 ions/cm2. The structural and gas sensing properties of pristine and irradiated films have been discussed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of pristine and irradiated films reveal that the films are polycrystalline in nature and crystallinity increases after irradiation. In this study, highly porous In203 nanorods evolved when being irradiated at a fluence of 5×1013 ions/cm2 while ZnO film shows decrease in number of nanowires. The ammonia sensing performance of the Ni^7+ irradiated In203 films shows an improvement as compared to its pristine counterpart.

  13. Chelation Properties of Modified Humic Acids Toward Some Trivalent Lanthanide Ions

    Three kinds of humic acids, Fluka (I), Fluka (II), and Ega-chemie (III) were modified through condensation with formaldehyde to afford polymers I, II, and III, respectively. The chelation behavior of these modified humic acids polymers towards the trivalent lanthanide metal-ions, La3+, Ce3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, and Gd3+ was studied by a batch equilibration technique at 25 deg. C as a function of contact time, pH, counter ion and counter ion concentration. The highest metal-ion uptake of the three polymers was achieved at pH 7.0 and by using perchlorate as a counter ion. Results of the study have revealed that polymer II has the highest metal-ion uptake capacity, and that the metal-ion uptake falls in the order: Gd3+ > Sm3+ > Nd3+ > La3+ ≅ Ce3+

  14. Removal of corper(II) Ions from aqueous solution by a lactic acid bacterium

    M. Yilmaz(Department of Physics, Gazi University, Ankara); T. Tay; M. Kivanc; H. Turk

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium, a lactic acid bacterium (LAB), was evaluated for its ability to remove copper(II) ions from water. The effects of the pH, contact time, initial concentration of copper(II) ions, and temperature on the biosorption rate and capacity were studied. The initial concentrations of copper(II) ions used to determine the maximum amount of biosorbed copper(II) ions onto lyophilised lactic acid bacterium varied from 25 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1. Maximum biosorption capacities were attain...

  15. Polyamine/salt-assembled microspheres coated with hyaluronic acid for targeting and pH sensing.

    Zhang, Pan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Guojun; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-06-01

    The poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/trisodium citrate aggregates were fabricated and further covalently crosslinked via the coupling reaction of carboxylic sites on trisodium citrate with the amine groups on polyamine, onto which poly-L-lysine and hyaluronic acid were sequentially assembled, forming stable microspheres. The pH sensitive dye and pH insensitive dye were further labeled to enable the microspheres with pH sensing property. Moreover, these microspheres could be specifically targeted to HeLa tumor cells, since hyaluronic acid can specifically recognize and bind to CD44, a receptor overexpressed on many tumor cells. Quantitative pH measurement by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the microspheres were internalized into HeLa cells, and accumulated in acidic compartments. By contrast, only a few microspheres were adhered on the NIH 3T3 cells surface. The microspheres with combined pH sensing property and targeting ability can enhance the insight understanding of the targeted drug vehicles trafficking after cellular internalization. PMID:26954089

  16. Sorption of uranyl and thorium(IV) ions by dodecavanadium acid from diluted nitric acid solutions

    Sorption of uranyl by dodecavanadium acid (DDVA) proceeds according to ion exchange mechanism in the region of relatively low values of its concentration - (0.8-2.0) x 10-3 mol/l. Th(IV) sorption practically not depends on solution pH value in interval of pH 1.5-2.5 and changes significantly in dependence on its initial concentration. Maximal values of DDVA capacity differ for Th(IV) and UO22+ (9 and 6.3 mg-equi/g) respectively. X-ray phase analysis establishes the composition of uranyl compounds obtained during DDVA contact with concentrated solutions of uranyl nitrate that is UO2(VO3)2·nH2O

  17. Simultaneous Chronoamperometric Sensing of Ascorbic Acid and Acetaminophen at a Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode

    Ciprian Radovan; Codruţa Cofan

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) have been used to sense and determine simultaneously L-ascorbic acid (AA) and acetaminophen (AC) at a boron-doped diamond electrode (BDDE) in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution. The calibration plots of anodic current peak versus concentration obtained from CV and CA data for both investigated compounds in single and di-component solutions over the concentration range 0.01 mM – 0.1 mM proved to be linear, with very good correlation param...

  18. Effect of ions on the measurement of sulphuric acid in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    L. Rondo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ternary aerosol nucleation experiments were conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN in order to investigate the influence of ions on new particle formation. Neutral and ion-induced nucleation experiments, i.e., with and without the presence of ions, were carried out under precisely controlled conditions. The sulphuric acid concentration was measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS during the new particle formation experiments. The added ternary trace gases were ammonia (NH3, dimethylamine (DMA, C2H7N or oxidised products of pinanediol (PD, C10H18O2. When pinanediol was introduced into the chamber, an increase in the mass spectrometric signal used to determine the sulphuric acid concentration (m/z 97, i.e., HSO4− was observed due to ions from the CLOUD chamber. The enhancement was only observed during ion-induced nucleation measurements by using either galactic cosmic rays (GCR or the proton synchrotron (PS pion beam for the ion generation, respectively. The ion effect typically involved an increase in the apparent sulphuric acid concentration by a factor of ~2 to 3 and was qualitatively verified by the ion measurements by an Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF mass spectrometer. By applying a high voltage (HV clearing field inside the CLOUD chamber the ion effect on the CIMS measurement was completely eliminated since, under these conditions, small ions are swept from the chamber in about one second. In order to exclude the ion effect and to provide corrected sulphuric acid concentrations during the GCR and PS beam nucleation experiments, a parameterisation was derived that utilizes the trace gas concentrations and the UV light intensity as input parameters. Atmospheric sulphuric acid measurements with a CIMS showed an insignificant ion effect.

  19. Surface modified hydroxyapatite thick films for CO 2 gas sensing application: Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation

    Mene, Ravindra U.; Mahabole, Megha P.; Khairnar, Rajendra S.

    2011-06-01

    Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is used to modify the structural and gas sensing properties of Hydroxyapatite (HAp) thick films. The HAp thick films, prepared by screen printing technique, are irradiated with a variable fluence (3×10 10 to 3×10 13 ions/cm 2) of Ag 7+ ions of 100 MeV energy. XRD shows gradual change in crystallinity of the matrix with increase in ion fluence. Atomic force microscopy reveals the agglomeration of grains with pronounced cluster type structure at relatively higher ion fluence. For confirmation of efficient gas sensing of pristine and irradiated HAp thick films, repeatability and reproducibility tests are conducted in a carbon dioxide atmosphere. The parameters responsible for device applications such as, gas uptake capacity, response to test gas and recovery time of HAp film sensor are also investigated. SHI modified HAp films show the maximum enhancement in the gas response and also in increased gas uptake capacity for the fluence 3×10 11 ions/cm 2. Moreover, SHI has resulted in modification of gas response and recovery time for CO 2 gas. The remarkable observation is to note that SHI irradiation improves the sensor characteristics of the HAp films without affecting the working temperature (165 °C) of gas sensor.

  20. Surface modified hydroxyapatite thick films for CO{sub 2} gas sensing application: Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation

    Mene, Ravindra U.; Mahabole, Megha P. [School of Physical Sciences, S.R.T.M. University, Nanded 431 606 (India); Khairnar, Rajendra S., E-mail: rskhairnarsps@gmail.co [School of Physical Sciences, S.R.T.M. University, Nanded 431 606 (India)

    2011-06-15

    Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is used to modify the structural and gas sensing properties of Hydroxyapatite (HAp) thick films. The HAp thick films, prepared by screen printing technique, are irradiated with a variable fluence (3x10{sup 10} to 3x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) of Ag{sup 7+} ions of 100 MeV energy. XRD shows gradual change in crystallinity of the matrix with increase in ion fluence. Atomic force microscopy reveals the agglomeration of grains with pronounced cluster type structure at relatively higher ion fluence. For confirmation of efficient gas sensing of pristine and irradiated HAp thick films, repeatability and reproducibility tests are conducted in a carbon dioxide atmosphere. The parameters responsible for device applications such as, gas uptake capacity, response to test gas and recovery time of HAp film sensor are also investigated. SHI modified HAp films show the maximum enhancement in the gas response and also in increased gas uptake capacity for the fluence 3x10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}. Moreover, SHI has resulted in modification of gas response and recovery time for CO{sub 2} gas. The remarkable observation is to note that SHI irradiation improves the sensor characteristics of the HAp films without affecting the working temperature (165 {sup o}C) of gas sensor.

  1. Selective Improvement of NO2 Gas Sensing Behavior in SnO2 Nanowires by Ion-Beam Irradiation.

    Kwon, Yong Jung; Kang, Sung Yong; Wu, Ping; Peng, Yuan; Kim, Sang Sub; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2016-06-01

    We irradiated SnO2 nanowires with He ions (45 MeV) with different ion fluences. Structure and morphology of the SnO2 nanowires did not undergo noticeable changes upon ion-beam irradiation. Chemical equilibrium in SnO2/gas systems was calculated from thermodynamic principles, which were used to study the sensing selectivity of the tested gases, demonstrating the selective sensitivity of the SnO2 surface to NO2 gas. Being different from other gases, including H2, ethanol, acetone, SO2, and NH3, the sensor response to NO2 gas significantly increases as the ion fluence increases, showing a maximum under an ion fluence of 1 × 10(16) ions/cm(2). Photoluminescence analysis shows that the relative intensity of the peak at 2.1 eV to the peak at 2.5 eV increases upon ion-beam irradiation, suggesting that structural defects and/or tin interstitials have been generated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the ionic ratio of Sn(2+/)Sn(4+) increases by the ion-beam irradiation, supporting the formation of surface Sn interstitials. Using thermodynamic calculations, we explained the observed selective sensing behavior. A molecular level model was also established for the adsorption of NO2 on ion-irradiated SnO2 (110) surfaces. We propose that the adsorption of NO2-related species is considerably enhanced by the generation of surface defects that are comprised of Sn interstitials. PMID:27167241

  2. The Candida albicans GAP Gene Family Encodes Permeases Involved in General and Specific Amino Acid Uptake and Sensing

    Kraidlová, Lucie; Van Zeebroeck, G.; Van Dijck, P.; Sychrová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2011), s. 1219-1229. ISSN 1535-9778 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : GAP1 * Candida albicans * amino-acid permease * amino-acid sensing * transceptor Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.604, year: 2011

  3. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling. PMID:24068326

  4. The use of ion chromatography for the determination of impurities in crude phosphoric acid

    The determination of fluoride, nitrate, sulphate and phosphate ions in crude phosphoric acid by means of ion chromatography is described. A previous separation of interferent cations was made by using a cationic resin or EDTA complexation. The last alternative allowed more reproductible results. The technique described is very quick and is being applied for the simultaneous determination of impurities in phosphoric acid and its own phosphospate concentration. The method is quick and has good reprodutibility. (author)

  5. Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics using complex compounds of chromotropic acid bisazoderivatives with rare earth ions

    Studies of complex formation of bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid with rare earth ions and aminoglycoside antibiotics have made it possible to choose carboxyarsenazo, orthanyl R and carboxynitrazo as highly sensitive reagents for determining aminoglycoside antibiotics. Conditions have been found for the formation of precipitates of different-ligand complexes containing rare earth ions, bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid and aminogylcoside antibiotics. A procedure has been worked out of determining the antibiotics in biological samples with carboxyarsenazo

  6. Effect of ions on the measurement of sulphuric acid in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    L. Rondo; A. Kürten; S. Ehrhart; Schobesberger, S.; A. Franchin; Junninen, H.; T. Petäjä; Sipilä, M.; Worsnop, D.R.; J. Curtius

    2014-01-01

    Ternary aerosol nucleation experiments were conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN in order to investigate the influence of ions on new particle formation. Neutral and ion-induced nucleation experiments, i.e., with and without the presence of ions, were carried out under precisely controlled conditions. The sulphuric acid concentration was measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) during the new particle formation experiments. The added ternar...

  7. Laboratory evaluation of an ion exchange process for removing cesium from Purex acid waste solutions

    A laboratory investigation was made of an ion exchange process for removing radioactive cesium from acidic Purex waste. Twenty-seven laboratory ion exchanger runs are reported. Parameters investigated include comparison of Zeolon-900, AW-500 and Duolite ARC-359 ion exchangers, pH of feed solutions, composition of sodium scrub solutions, composition of eluting solutions and overflow versus downflow elution. The cause and rate of zeolite degradation was investigated

  8. Method of producing weakly acidic cation exchange resin particles charged with uranyl ions

    Abdelmonem, N.; Ringel, H.; Zimmer, E.

    1981-07-21

    Weakly acidic cationic ion exchange resin particles are charged with uranyl ions by contacting the particles step wise with aqueous uranyl nitrate solution at higher uranium concentrations from stage to stage. An alkaline medium is added to the uranyl nitrate solution in each stage to increase the successive pH values of the uranyl nitrate solution contacting the particles in dependence upon the uranium concentration effective for maximum charging of the particles with uranyl ions.

  9. Equilibrium studies on interactions of rare earth ions with phytic acid

    The interaction between phytic acid and trivalent rare earth metal ions, viz., Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Gd3+, Tb3+, Dy3+ and HO3+ has been investigated potentiometrically at 25degC. The proton-ligand stability constants (pKYH) of phytic acid and the stability constants (logK) of metal complexes formed in aqueous medium (μ = 0.1 M NaClO4) have been evaluated. The results indicate that eight protons of phytic acid are highly acidic, two are weakly acidic and two very weakly acidic, titrable in the pH ranges 1.2-4.9, 5.0-8.15 and 8.3-11.0 respectively. The stability of each phytic acid-lanthanide ion complex decreases with an increase in pH and follows the usual trend through the series. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27220844

  11. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  12. Facile Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles by Amino Acid Asparagine: Selective Sensing of Arsenic.

    Ghodake, Gajanan; Vassiliadis, Vassilios S; Choi, Jeong-Hak; Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2015-09-01

    The amino acid asparagine (ASP) was used as a benign reducing and stabilizing agent for the production of monodisperse gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using green chemistry principles. With an increasing concentration of ASP (0.5 to 10 mM), the absorbance intensity at 525 nm increased; however, no effects on the color, size, or shape of the AuNPs were observed. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images showed that the AuNPs were either hexagonal or spherical in shape and had an average size of approximately 10 ± 5 nm. Facile colorimetric assays of the AuNPs were applied to detect a variety of heavy metal ion species in water. In this study, the selective detection of arsenic ions (As (III) ions) by quenching, aggregation, and/or red-shifting of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was successfully achieved. The AuNPs sensor was sustainable as a visual colorimetric detection system and spectral assay of hazardous As (III) ions in the reaction medium; thus, it will be useful for aqueous assessment without using any sophisticated or expensive instruments. PMID:26716315

  13. Trace determination of cobalt ion by using malic acid-malonic acid double substrate oscillating chemical system

    Jie Wang; Wu Yang; Jie Ren; Miao Guo; Xiao Dong Chen; Wen Bin Wang; Jin Zhang Gao

    2008-01-01

    A novel kinetic method for determination of trace amounts of cobalt ion was proposed and validated. The method is based on adding malic acid into classical Belousov-Zhabotinskii (B-Z) oscillating chemical system to form a double substrate one. The results showed that when the concentration of cobalt ion was in the range of 5.27× 10-8 to 5.37×10-12mol L-1 the change of the oscillating period was directly proportional to the negative logarithm of cobalt ion concentration. The sensitivity and precision of the developed method were quite satisfactory. The limit of detection was down to 5.20 x 10-13 mol L-1 which was a highest sensitivity found for determination of metal ions using oscillating chemical reaction so far. Some factors influencing the determination were also examined. The method has been successfully used to determine cobalt ion in vitamin B12 injection.

  14. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles as fluorescent probe for sensing of folic acid

    Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Yanhuan; Li, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A novel fluorescent nanosensor for detecting folic acid (FA) in aqueous media has been developed based on 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (ANTS) anchored to the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-layered double hydroxides (LDH) particles. The nanosensor showed high fluorescence intensity and good photostability due to a strong coordination interaction between surface Zn2+ ions of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH and N atoms of ANTS, which were verified by result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH restricted the intra-molecular rotation leading to ANTS-anchored J-type aggregation emission enhancement. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles exhibited highly sensitive and selective response to FA over other common metal ions and saccharides present in biological fluids. The proposed mechanism was that oxygen atoms of -SO3 groups in ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH were easily collided by FA molecules to form potential hydrogen bonds between ANTS-anchored and FA molecules, which could effectively quench the ANTS-anchored fluorescence. Under the simulated physiological conditions (pH of 7.4), the fluorescence quenching was fitted to Stern-Volmer equation with a linear response in the concentration range of 1 μM to 200 μM with a limit of detection of 0.1 μM. The results indicate that ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles can afford a very sensitive system for the sensing FA in aqueous solution.

  15. Application of chromatographic techniques in the preparation of phosphoric acid from superphosphate fertilizer as phosphate ions source

    Ion exchange and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods of analysis have been applied for the preparation of phosphoric acid from phosphate fertilizer as a source of phosphate ions. Amberlite IRA-400 (C1) has been used in ion-exchange separation. In HPLC an indirect spectrophotometric method of detection using phthalic acid in the mobile phase has been applied to detect the separated phosphoric acid. The phosphoric acid produced has been well characterized and compared with a standard. (author)

  16. Elevation of antidermatophytic action of mefenamic acid by cobalt ions

    AL-Janabi Ali Abdul Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the antifungal property of mefenamic acid, which is a member of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs group. Materials and Methods: In order to evaluate the antifungal property of mefenamic acid on dermatophytes, it was mixed with cobalt (Co in culture media. Two species related to two genera of dermatophytes were tested for their susceptibility to mefenamic acid and its complex with Co by using colony diameter measurement method. Results: The inhibitory action of mefenamic acid on fungal strains was increased in the presence of Co. Epidermophyton floccosum showed more susceptibly to either mefenamic acid or its complex with Co than Trichophyton mentagrophytes variant mentagrophytes. Conclusions: Mefenamic acid showed potential ability to prevent growth of dermatophytes. This ability increased due to the presence of Co.

  17. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    This project was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the hydration behaviors of gas phase ions from solutions containing amino acids and peptides. In order to characterize their hydration behavior, the molecules of interest in solutions were first converted into gas phase ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). The completely desolvated ions were then deliberately dispersed into an inert bath gas, usually nitrogen, containing accurately known concentrations of solvent vapor. The resulting mixtures of ions and bath gas were subsequently passed into a vacuum chamber by way of an adiabatic supersonic free jet expansion. The cooling during that expansion caused solvation of the ions, the extent of which was determined by a quadrupole mass analyzer. Mass analysis of the solute ions in the absence of vapor showed peaks with the mass to charge ratios corresponding to the desolvated ions. On the other hand, mass spectrometric analyses of ions in the presence of solvent vapor showed sequences of peaks corresponding to the solvated ions with varying numbers of water molecules. The extent of the ion solvation was controlled by varying the concentration of solvent vapor in the bath gas. Two different scales were proposed for the evaluation of the relative affinities of amino acids for water molecules. One was based primarily on the assumption that the affinities of amino acids for water molecules are directly proportional to their gas phase solvation rate constants ( k). An alternative approach produced an affinity scale based on the extent of ion hydration occurred during the free jet expansion. It was found that the addition of a polar solvent vapor to the bath gas at low concentrations substantially enhanced the production of the bare solute ions from the evaporating charged droplets. This remarkable result not only provided a means to increase the ion production and thus detection sensitivity of mass spectrometric analyses, but also yielded important information

  18. Study on complex formation of cadmium(II) ions, 8. Identification of the precipitates formed in the solutions containing cadmium(II) ion and amino acid

    Matsui, Haruo; Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro (Government Industrial Research Inst., Nagoya (Japan))

    1984-02-01

    In the potentiometric titration of the solution containing a cadmium(II) ion and an amino acid, white precipitates often appear in the test solution, and they disturb the emf measurements. Such precipitates were formed in the solutions, pH ranging 7.5--8.5, during the course of titrations of the test solutions containing cadmium(II) ion and amino acid such as glycine, ..cap alpha..-alanine. 2-aminobutanoic acid, 3-aminobutanoic acid, 4-aminobutanoic acid, 2-aminopentanoic acid, 5-aminopentanoic acid, 2-aminohexanoic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, or glutamine. The identification of the precipitates obtained from the solutions containing cadmium(II) ion and L-aspartic acid, 4-aminobutanoic acid, or 6-aminohexanoic acid were carried out by elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. These results indicated that the precipitate obtained from the solution containing cadmium(II) ion and L-aspartic acid was 1:1 cadmium(II)-L-aspartic acid complex and did not contain any cadmium(II) hydroxide, and other two precipitates were mostly cadmium(II) hydroxide and contained a little cadmium(II)-amino acid complexes.

  19. Decontamination efficiency of citric acid and dissolution reaction of Fe3+ ion on TRIGA soil artificially contaminated with Co2+ ion

    A series of batch scale experiments was conducted to investigated the decontamination efficiency of citric acid on TRIGA soil artificially contaminated with Co2+ ion in the concentration range from 0.005M to 0.1M, under the pH solution of 3.0 to 10.0. The fraction diagram was calculated by equilibrium constant of Co2+ ion, Fe3+ ion and citric acid. The desorption rate of Co2+ ion was increased at low pH, but it was decreased at base zone. The dissolution rate of Fe3+ ion was same result against the various pH. The desorption reaction of Co2+ ion and the dissolution reaction of Fe3+ ion by citric acid both in acid solution and in base solution were suggested

  20. Charting molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines by fatty acid scanning and ion trap MS3 fragmentation

    Ekroos, Kim; Ejsing, Christer S.; Bahr, Ute;

    2003-01-01

    preliminary separation of lipid classes or of individual molecular species, enzymatic digestion, or chemical derivatization. The approach was validated by the comparative analysis of the molecular composition of PCs from human red blood cells. In the total lipid extract of Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells......The molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) in total lipid extracts was characterized by a combination of multiple precursor ion scanning on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and MS3 fragmentation on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Precursor ion spectra for 50 acyl...... anion fragments of fatty acids (fatty acid scanning) acquired in parallel increased the specificity and the dynamic range of the detection of PCs and identified the fatty acid moieties in individual PC species. Subsequent analysis of detected PC peaks by MS3 fragmentation on an ion trap mass...

  1. Experiments in connection with control of boron acid concentration by ion exchange in Hungary

    The results obtained with an experimental nuclear power plant output control with boron acid ion exchange technology are presented. The dependence of the ability of the ion exchanger to bind boron acid on the concentration of the boron acid solution, the temperature and the degree of the alkalinity of the resin has been studied. The results obtained for Hungarian resins are compared with those for some Duolite-type ones. Some results for a control system realized in big laboratory size are outlined. (K.A.)

  2. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  3. Ion flotation application for rare earths recovery from the products of apatite processing with sulfuric acid

    The possibility was proved experimentally of ion flotation applicability for REE recovery from phosphogypsum leaching solutions and extractional phosphoric acid. On treating leaching solutions with dialkylphosphoric acids a solid sublate was formed whose extraction degree was as high as 95 %. Treatment of extractional phosphoric acid with alkyl sulfates resulted in twice as high as high REE concentration in foam product that in the residue. 17 refs

  4. Warmth suppresses and desensitizes damage-sensing ion channel TRPA1

    Wang Sen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute or chronic tissue damage induces an inflammatory response accompanied by pain and alterations in local tissue temperature. Recent studies revealed that the transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1 channel is activated by a wide variety of substances that are released following tissue damage to evoke nociception and neurogenic inflammation. Although the effects of a noxious range of cold temperatures on TRPA1 have been rigorously studied, it is not known how agonist-induced activation of TRPA1 is regulated by temperature over an innocuous range centred on the normal skin surface temperature. This study investigated the effect of temperature on agonist-induced currents in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells transfected with rat or human TRPA1 and in rat sensory neurons. Results Agonist-induced TRPA1 currents in HEK293 cells were strongly suppressed by warm temperatures, and almost abolished at 39°C. Such inhibition occurred when TRPA1 was activated by either electrophilic or non-electrophilic agonists. Warming not only decreased the apparent affinity of TRPA1 for mustard oil (MO, but also greatly enhanced the desensitization and tachyphylaxis of TRPA1. Warming also attenuated MO-induced ionic currents in sensory neurons. These results suggest that the extent of agonist-induced activity of TRPA1 may depend on surrounding tissue temperature, and local hyperthermia during acute inflammation could be an endogenous negative regulatory mechanism to attenuate persistent pain at the site of injury. Conclusion These results indicate that warmth suppresses and desensitizes damage-sensing ion channel TRPA1. Such warmth-induced suppression of TRPA1 may also explain, at least in part, the mechanistic basis of heat therapy that has been widely used as a supplemental anti-nociceptive approach.

  5. Photodegradation of bisphenol A in simulated lake water containing algae, humic acid and ferric ions

    The photodegradation of bisphenol A (BPA), a suspected endocrine disruptor (ED), in simulated lake water containing algae, humic acid and Fe3+ ions was investigated. Algae, humic acid and Fe3+ ions enhanced the photodegradation of BPA. Photodegradation efficiency of BPA was 36% after 4 h irradiation in the presence of 6.5 x 109 cells L-1 raw Chlorella vulgaris, 4 mg L-1 humic acid and 20 μmol L-1 Fe3+. The photodegradation efficiency of BPA was higher in the presence of algae treated with ultrasonic than that without ultrasonic. The photodegradation efficiency of BPA in the water only containing algae treated with ultrasonic was 37% after 4 h irradiation. The algae treated with heating can also enhance the photodegradation of BPA. This work helps environmental scientists to understand the photochemical behavior of BPA in lake water. - Algae, humic acid and ferric ions can induce the photodegradation of bisphenol A in an aqueous environment

  6. Selenium speciation in urine by ion-pairing chromatography with perfluorinated carboxylic acids and ICP-MS detection

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Bendahl, L.; Sidenius, U.; Jons, O.

    2002-01-01

    Five aqueous standards, selenomethionine (SeMet), methylselenomethionine (MeSeMet), methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), selenogammaaminobutyric acid (SeGaba) and the trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe), were separated in ion-pairing chromatographic systems based on perfluorinated carboxylic acids in...... methanol. Two different perfluorinated carboxylic acids, heptafluorobutanoic acid (HFBA) and nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA), were used as ion-pairing agents in the separation. The selectivities of the ion-pairing agents were different. The separation was performed on a microbore column, which was...

  7. Systematic Design of a Quorum Sensing-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Detection of Metal Ion in Escherichia Coli.

    Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Bing-Kun; Hu, Rei-Hsing; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-06-01

    With the recent industrial expansion, heavy metals and other pollutants have increasingly contaminated our living surroundings. The non-degradability of heavy metals may lead to accumulation in food chains and the resulting toxicity could cause damage in organisms. Hence, detection techniques have gradually received attention. In this study, a quorum sensing (QS)-based amplifier is introduced to improve the detection performance of metal ion biosensing. The design utilizes diffusible signal molecules, which freely pass through the cell membrane into the environment to communicate with others. Bacteria cooperate via the cell-cell communication process, thereby displaying synchronous behavior, even if only a minority of the cells detect the metal ion. In order to facilitate the design, the ability of the engineered biosensor to detect metal ion is described in a steady state model. The design can be constructed according to user-oriented specifications by selecting adequate components from corresponding libraries, with the help of a genetic algorithm (GA)-based design method. The experimental results validate enhanced efficiency and detection performance of the quorum sensing-based biosensor of metal ions. PMID:26800545

  8. Oxidation-reduction reactions of simple hydroxamic acids and plutonium(IV) ions in nitric acid

    Carrott, M. J.; Fox, O. D.; LeGurun, G.; Jones, C J; Mason, C; Taylor, Robin; Andrieux, Fabrice; Boxall, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Simple hydroxamic acids such as formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids have been proposed as suitable reagents for the separation of either Pu and/or Np from U in modified or single cycle Purex based solvent extraction processes designed to meet the emerging requirements of advanced fuel cycles. The stability of these hydroxamic acids is dominated by their decomposition through acid hydrolysis. Kinetic studies of the acid hydrolysis of formo- and acetohydroxamic acids are reported in the absence a...

  9. Fundamental Study on the Segmented Flow Injection - Multiphase Flow Formation Towards Microchip-Based Multi-Ion Sensing

    Hisamoto, Hideaki; Horiuchi, Takayuki; Hibara, Akihide; Tokeshi, Manabu; Kitamori, Takehiko

    A new fluid flow inside the microchannel was successfully developed. The flow created here involves segmented flow injection of plural organic phases into a microchannel followed by contact with a single aqueous phase to form stable organic-aqueous two-layer flow inside the microchannel. Fundamental study on the developed flow inside the microchannel was performed by monitoring the dye-doped segmented organic phases by thermal lens microscopy (TLM). Excellent repeatability and very small injection volume in developing segmented flow were realized. The new fluid flow created here is expected to allow us multi-ion sensing, which is not easily demonstrated by conventional ion sensor technology using a solvent polymeric membrane, by combining with neutral ionophore-based ion pair extraction using plural numbers of organic phases containing different ionophore molecules.

  10. Ferric ion mediated photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by 254 nm UV light

    The great enhancement of ferric ion on the photochemical decomposition of environmentally persistent perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) under 254 nm UV light was reported. In the presence of 10 μM ferric ion, 47.3% of initial PFOA (48 μM) was decomposed and the defluorination ratio reached 15.4% within 4 h reaction time. While the degradation and defluorination ratio greatly increased to 80.2% and 47.8%, respectively, when ferric ion concentration increased to 80 μM, and the corresponding half-life was shortened to 103 min. Though the decomposition rate was significantly lowered under nitrogen atmosphere, PFOA was efficiently decomposed too. Other metal ions like Cu2+ and Zn2+ also slightly improved the photochemical decomposition of PFOA under irradiation of 254 nm UV light. Besides fluoride ion, other intermediates during PFOA decomposition including formic acid and five shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with C7, C6, C5, C4 and C3, respectively, were identified and quantified by IC or LC/MS. The mixture of PFOA and ferric ion had strong absorption around 280 nm. It is proposed that PFOA coordinates with ferric ion to form a complex, and its excitation by 254 nm UV light leads to the decomposition of PFOA in a stepwise way

  11. Potentiometric determination of free acidity in presence of hydrolysable ions and a sequential determination of hydrazine.

    Ganesh, S; Khan, Fahmida; Ahmed, M K; Pandey, S K

    2011-08-15

    A simple potentiometric method for the determination of free acidity in presence of hydrolysable ions and sequential determination of hydrazine is developed and described. Both free acid and hydrazine are estimated from the same aliquot. In this method, free acid is titrated with standard sodium carbonate solution after the metal ions in solutions are masked with EDTA. Once the end point for the free acid is determined at pH 3.0, an aliquot of formaldehyde is added to liberate the acid equivalent to hydrazine which is then titrated with the same standard sodium carbonate solution using an automatic titration system. The described method is simple, accurate and reproducible. This method is especially applicable to all ranges of nitric acid and heavy metal ion concentration relevant to Purex process used for nuclear fuel reprocessing. The overall recovery of nitric acid is 98.9% with 1.2% relative standard deviation. Hydrazine content has also been determined in the same aliquot with a recovery of nitric acid is 99% with 2% relative standard deviation. The major advantage of the method is that generation of corrosive analytical wastes containing oxalate or sulphate is avoided. Valuable metals like uranium and plutonium can easily be recovered from analytical waste before final disposal. PMID:21726724

  12. Preparation and adsorption behavior for metal ions and humic acid of chitosan derivatives crosslinked by irradiation

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the determination of the adsorption properties of metal ions and humic acid in water on crosslinked chitosan derivatives (carboxymethylchitosan) which were formed using the irradiation technique without any additives. The solubility test of these crosslinked materials were investigated in acidic, alkaline media,distilled water, and certain organic solvents. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images showed that the crosslinked chitosan derivatives possessed a porous morphological structure. Charged characteristic analyses demonstrated typically pH-dependent properties of the crosslinked materials. The adsorption studies were carried out by the batch method at room temperature. Adsorption of heavy metal ions (such as Cu2+, Cd2+) and humic acid onto crosslinked samples was found to be strongly pH-dependent. Adsorption kinetic studies indicated the rapid removal of metal ions, and humic acid from the aqueous solutions. Moreover, isothermal adsorption data revealed that Cu2+, Cd2+,and humic acid were removed by these crosslinked materials with high efficiency. Adsorption isothermal data were interpreted well by the Langmuir equation. These crosslinked carboxymethylated chitosan derivatives indicate favorable adsorption of metal ions and humic acid.

  13. Formic and acetic acid: Valence threshold photoelectron and photoionisation total ion yield studies

    Highlights: ► High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of formic acid. ► High-resolution total photo-ion yield spectrum of formic acid. ► High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acetic acid. ► High-resolution total photo-ion yield spectrum of acetic acid. -- Abstract: The carboxylic acids (formic and acetic) have been studied using threshold photoelectron (TPE) and total photoion yield (TPIY) spectroscopies; simultaneously obtained spectra of formic acid (HCOOH) were recorded over the entire valence ionisation region from 11–21 eV at a resolution of ∼12 meV. Higher resolution spectra (∼6 meV) were also obtained in the energy region of the lowest two cationic states. Analysis of the TPE spectrum in this energy range agreed very favorably with the best available conventional photoelectron (PE) spectrum of formic acid. Autoionising Rydberg structure was observed in the TPIY spectrum of formic acid and is attributed primarily to the presence of the npa′ ← 8a′ Rydberg series converging on to the 32A′ ionic state of formic acid. Preliminary results, at a resolution of ∼8 meV, were obtained for acetic acid (CH3COOH) over the onset of the ionisation energy region. The TPE spectrum was found to be very similar to the best published photoelectron spectrum, but no Rydberg structure was observed in the TPIY spectrum.

  14. Ion Exchange Study of Some New Copolymer Resins Derived from 8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic Acid, Biuret and Formaldehyde

    Dhakite, P. A.; W. B. Gurnule

    2011-01-01

    Copolymer resins (8-HQSABF) were synthesized by the condensation of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid and biuret with formaldehyde in the presence of hydrochloric acid as catalyst, proved to be selective chelation ion exchange copolymer resins for certain metals. Chelation ion exchange properties to these polymers were studied for Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the poly...

  15. POLY(AMINOMETHYLENEPHOSPHONIC ACID FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS

    M’hamed Kaid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaminododecyltetramethylenetetraphosphonic acid (DADTMTPA has been investigated in liquid - liquid extraction of Zn (II and Cu (II in acetate media. The extraction of both cations was carried out in different media with the addition of CH3COONa, CH3COOH, HCl and H2SO4 at different pH values. The maximum extraction yield for copper is 70% after addition of 10 mg of sodium acetate and for zinc is 30% after addition of acetic acid at pHi = 5.5, in one step.

  16. Weak-acid ion exchange for removing barium, radium, and hardness

    Weak-acid resin in the hydrogen form was found to effectively remove barium, radium, and hardness, without increasing the sodium content of the product water. The maximum capacity of the weak-acid resin was about 2.3 times that of strong-acid resin, and much less spent regenerant per unit volume of water treated was produced from a weak-acid column than from a strong-acid column. There are, however, some disadvantages to weak-acid ion exchange: swelling of the resin during exhaustion; the need to use acid-resistant materials; the inability to remove noncarbonate hardness; the necessity of stripping carbon dioxide from the product water and adjusting the pH; and the probable higher cost

  17. Fe doped hydroxyapatite thick films modified via swift heavy ion irradiation for CO and CO{sub 2} gas sensing application

    Mene, Ravindra U. [PDEA’s Annasaheb Waghire College of Science, Arts and Commerce, Otur 412409, M.S. (India); School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mahabole, Megha P. [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mohite, K.C. [Haribhai V. Desai College, Pune 411 002, M.S. (India); Khairnar, Rajendra S., E-mail: rskhairnarsps@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India)

    2014-01-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: • We report improved gas sensing properties of Fe-HAp films via heavy ion irradiation. • HAp films are tailored by addition of Fe ion as well as irradiation with variable ion fluence. • SHI irradiated substrate sense the CO and CO{sub 2} gases at relatively lower temperature. • Response and gas uptake capacity of sensors is improved for appropriate fluence 3 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}. • The enhanced sensor properties are attributed due to the surface modification by SHI. -- Abstract: Swift Heavy Ion irradiation (SHI) technique is utilized to modify the structure and surface morphology of Fe doped Hydroxyapatite (Fe-HAp) thick films for CO and CO{sub 2} gas sensing applications. Nano-crystalline HAp is synthesized by wet chemical precipitation route and ion exchange process is employed to replace of Ca ion with Fe ions. Thick film Fe-HAp sensors, having variable Fe doping concentrations, are prepared by using screen printing technique. The Fe-HAp thick films are irradiated using Ag{sup 7+} ion (100 MeV) with variable ion fluences ranging from 3 × 10{sup 10} to 3 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} for modifying the sensor surface. Structural and morphological changes with respect to ion fluence are observed by means of XRD, SEM and AFM analysis. The parameters such as operating temperature, response/recovery time, and uptake capacity for pristine and modified Fe-HAp sensors are experimentally determined. The investigations reveal that the SHI irradiated Fe-HAp film (3 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}) shows improved gas sensing characteristics at relatively lower operating temperature in comparison to pristine film. It is concluded that Fe-HAp film can be a potential candidate for developing low cost, energy saver and high performance CO and CO{sub 2} sensor.

  18. H +, Na +, and K + ion sensing properties of sodium and aluminum coimplanted LPCVD silicon oxynitride thin films

    Shin, Paik-Kyun; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2003-02-01

    Three different silicon oxynitride layers were fabricated by varying NH 3/N 2O flow rate ratios in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) process. Sodium and aluminum were then coimplanted by implanting sodium ions with the energy of 100 keV and dose of 5×10 16 cm -2 into an aluminum buffer layer on silicon dioxide and three different silicon oxynitride layers. The composition of the as-deposited silicon oxynitride layers was analyzed by sputtered neutral mass spectroscopy (SNMS). Sodium, potassium and pH-sensing properties of the layers were investigated on an electrolyte-isolator-silicon (EIS) structure using high frequency capacitance-voltage (HF-CV) measurements. Differences of pH, sodium and potassium sensing properties between the as-deposited silicon oxynitride layers and the coimplanted silicon oxynitride layers were investigated. The sodium and aluminum coimplanted layers showed better sodium and potassium sensitivity as well as a lower sensitivity towards hydrogen ions. The effect is more pronounced for higher oxygen concentration in the layers. On the other hand the stability of ion response of the layers, in contrast, is better for the higher nitrogen content of the layers.

  19. Electrochemical membrane reactor: In situ separation and recovery of chromic acid and metal ions

    An electrochemical membrane reactor with three compartments (anolyte, catholyte and central compartment) based on in-house-prepared cation- and anion-exchange membrane was developed to achieve in situ separation and recovery of chromic acid and metal ions. The physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the ion-exchange membrane under standard operating conditions reveal its suitability for the proposed reactor. Experiments using synthetic solutions of chromate and dichromate of different concentrations were carried out to study the feasibility of the process. Electrochemical reactions occurring at the cathode and anode under operating conditions are proposed. It was observed that metal ion migrated through the cation-exchange membrane from central compartment to catholyte and OH- formation at the cathode leads to the formation of metal hydroxide. Simultaneously, chromate ion migrated through the anion-exchange membrane from central compartment to the anolyte and formed chromic acid by combining H+ produced their by oxidative water splitting. Thus a continuous decay in the concentration of chromate and metal ion was observed in the central compartment, which was recovered separately in the anolyte and catholyte, respectively, from their mixed solution. This process was completely optimized in terms of operating conditions such as initial concentration of chromate and metal ions in the central compartment, the applied cell voltage, chromate and metal ion flux, recovery percentage, energy consumption, and current efficiency. It was concluded that chromic acid and metal ions can be recovered efficiently from their mixed solution leaving behind the uncharged organics and can be reused as their corresponding acid and base apart from the purifying water for further applications

  20. Selective removal of Ag+ ions from nitric acid medium by alginate microcapsules, Lewatite TP 214 chelating resin, and 200 CT strongly acidic ion exchanger

    Alginate microcapsules containing bis (2, 4, 4-trimethylpenthyl) monothiophosphinic acid (Cyanex 302) were prepared for the selective removal of Ag+ ions from the reprocessing effluents of FBR-MOX fuel. The Ag+ ions are added for the adjustment of oxidation state of Plutonium. We compared uptake properties of aforementioned microcapsules with those of 200 CT a strongly acidic resin, and Lewatite TP 214, a very selective chelating resin for the Ag+ ions. Most of the uptake properties of the microcapsules were amid the 200 CT and Lewatite, and rather similar to the later. The order of uptake kinetic and breakthrough capacity were the same as: 200 CT > Microcapsules > Lewatite; and for selectivity: Lewatite > Microcapsules > 200 CT. However, high selectivity of Lewatite is rather disadvantageous because it makes the elution operation complicated. Advantages of microcapsules include simple preparation procedure, relatively high selectivity and ease of elution even with 3M nitric acid. However, their total capacity is low. For enhancing the total capacity only increasing the active component is not enough since it deteriorates the kinetics, and the new preparation techniques are necessary which are under study. (author)

  1. Elucidating the role of ferrous ion cocatalyst in enhancing dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    Wei Hui

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechanisms that result in this enhancement. Results During dilute acid and ferrous ion cocatalyst pretreatments, we observed concomitant increases in solubilized sugars in the hydrolysate and reducing sugars in the (insoluble biomass residues. We also observed enhancements in sugar release during subsequent enzymatic saccharification of iron cocatalyst-pretreated biomass. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy showed that major peaks representing the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose are significantly attenuated by iron cocatalyst pretreatment. Imaging using Prussian blue staining indicated that Fe2+ ions associate with both cellulose/xylan and lignin in untreated as well as dilute acid/Fe2+ ion-pretreated corn stover samples. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed structural details of biomass after dilute acid/Fe2+ ion pretreatment, in which delamination and fibrillation of the cell wall were observed. Conclusions By using this multimodal approach, we have revealed that (1 acid-ferrous ion-assisted pretreatment increases solubilization and enzymatic digestion of both cellulose and xylan to monomers and (2 this pretreatment likely targets multiple chemistries in plant cell wall polymer networks, including those represented by the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose.

  2. Potentiometric studies on mixed-ligand chelates of uranyl ion with carboxylic acid phenolic acids

    Mixed ligand complexes of UO22+ with bidentate carboxylic and phenolic acids have been studied potentiometrically at 30 ± 0.1degC and μ=0.2M (NaClO4). 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of UO22+ with phthalic acid (PTHA), maleic acid (MAE), malonic acid (MAL), quinolinic acid (QA), 5-sulphosalicylic acid (5-SSA), salicylic acid (SA), and only 1:1 complexes in the case of mandelic acid (MAD) have been detected. The formation of 1:1:1 mixed ligand complexes has been inferred from simultaneous equilibria in the present study. The values of ΔlogK, Ksub(DAL), Ksub(2LA) or Ksub(2AL) for the ternary complexes have been calculated. The stabilities of mixed ligand complexes depend on the size of the chelate ring and the stabilities of the binary complexes. (author). 15 refs

  3. Ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection of aliphatic carboxylic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin by elution with benzoic acid-beta-cyclodextrin.

    Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Helaleh, Murad I H; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Fritz, James S; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    In this study, an aqueous solution consisting of benzoic acid with low background conductivity and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) of hydrophilic nature and the inclusion effect to benzoic acid were used as eluent for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids with different pKa values and hydrophobicity on a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+ form. With increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in the eluent, the retention times of the carboxylic acids decreased due to the increased hydrophilicity of the polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resin surface from the adsorption of OH groups of beta-cyclodextrin. Moreover, the eluent background conductivity decreased with increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in 1 mM benzoic acid, which could result in higher sensitivity for conductimetric detection. The ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids with high resolution and sensitivity was accomplished successfully by elution with a 1 mM benzoic acid-10 mM cyclodextrin solution without chemical suppression. PMID:12830884

  4. On mechanism of flotation of heavy metal ions with fatty acid collectors

    Kinetics investigation of flotation separation of heavy metal ions (scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium) from their chloride solutions is conducted. 1.2% aqueous solution of potassium caprinate is taken as collector, which is introduced in rare earth chloride solutions in amount stoichiometrically necessary for formation of compounds of the Me[CH3(CH2)8COO]3 type. It is shown that the order od kinetic equation, characterizing flotation process of rare earth ions, collected with an aid of fatty acid collectors, is determined by the nature and concentration of the ions separated

  5. SNL-1, a highly selective inorganic crystalline ion exchange material for Sr2+ in acidic solutions

    A new inorganic ion exchange material, called SNL-1, has been prepared at Sandia National Laboratories. Developmental samples of SNL-1 have been determined to have high selectivity for the adsorption of Strontium from highly acidic solutions (1 M HNO3). This paper presents results obtained for the material in batch ion exchange tests conducted at various solution pH values and in the presence of a number of competing cations. Results from a continuous flow column ion exchange experiment are also presented

  6. Analysis of a series of chlorogenic acid isomers using differential ion mobility and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Willems, Jamie L; Khamis, Mona M; Mohammed Saeid, Waleed; Purves, Randy W; Katselis, George; Low, Nicholas H; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-08-24

    Chlorogenic acids are among the most abundant phenolics found in the human diet. Of these, the mono-caffeoylquinic acids are the predominant phenolics found in fruits, such as apples and pears, and products derived from them. In this research, a comprehensive study of the electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) dissociation behavior of the three most common mono-caffeoylquinic acids, namely 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA) and 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4-CQA), were determined using both positive and negative ionization. All proposed structures of the observed product ions were confirmed with second-generation MS(3) experiments. Similarities and differences between the dissociation pathways in the positive and negative ion modes are discussed, confirming the proposed structures and the established MS/MS fingerprints. MS/MS dissociation was primarily driven via the cleavage of the ester bond linking the quinic acid moiety to the caffeic acid moiety within tested molecules. Despite being structural isomers with the same m/z values and dissociation behaviors, the MS/MS data in the negative ion mode was able to differentiate the three isomers based on ion intensity for the major product ions, observed at m/z 191, 179 and 173. This differentiation was consistent among various MS instruments. In addition, ESI coupled with high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-FAIMS-MS) was employed for the separation of these compounds for the first time. By combining MS/MS data and differential ion mobility, a method for the separation and identification of mono-caffeoylquinic in apple/pear juice samples was developed with a run time of less than 1 min. It is envisaged that this methodology could be used to identify pure juices based on their chlorogenic acid profile (i.e., metabolomics), and could also be used to detect juice-to-juice adulteration (e.g., apple juice addition to pear juice

  7. Effect of ions on the measurement of sulphuric acid in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    Rondo, L; Ehrhart, S; Schobesberger, S; Franchin, A; Junninen, H; Petäjä, T; Sipilä, M; Worsnop, D R; Curtius, J

    2014-01-01

    Ternary aerosol nucleation experiments were conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN in order to investigate the influence of ions on new particle formation. Neutral and ion-induced nucleation experiments, i.e., with and without the presence of ions, were carried out under precisely controlled conditions. The sulphuric acid concentration was measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) during the new particle formation experiments. The added ternary trace gases were ammonia (NH3), dimethylamine (DMA, C2H7N) or oxidised products of pinanediol (PD, C10H18O2). When pinanediol was introduced into the chamber, an increase in the mass spectrometric signal used to determine the sulphuric acid concentration (m/z 97, i.e., HSO4−) was observed due to ions from the CLOUD chamber. The enhancement was only observed during ion-induced nucleation measurements by using either galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or the proton synchrotron (PS) pion beam for the ion generation, respectively. The ion effect typically invo...

  8. Ion-pair chromatography of acidic drug metabolites and endogenic compounds.

    Fransson, B; Wahlund, K G; Johansson, I M; Schill, G

    1976-09-29

    Liquid-liquid chromatographic systems based on ion-pair partition with silica microparticles as the support for the stationary phase have been used for the separation of anionic compounds of biochemical and pharmacological interest. A high separating efficiency can be obtained with both aqueous and organic mobile phases and the retention is easily regulated by the nature and the concentration of the quaternary ammonium counter ion, present in the aqueous phase. The influence of the composition of the liquid phases on the selectivity and separating efficiency has been studied, as well as equilibration methods and the stability of the systems. Examples are given of separations of sulphonamides, barbiturates, glucuronic and sulphuric acid conjugates of steroidal compounds and phenols glycine conjugates of carboxylic acids (hippuric, nicotinuric and salicyluric acid) and anionic metabolites of biogenic amines (indoleacetic, benzoic, mandelic and phenylacetic acid derivatives). PMID:10314

  9. The removal of uranium from acidic media using ion exchange and/or extraction chromatography

    The separation and purification of uranium from either nitric acid or hydrochloric acid media can be accomplished by using either solvent extraction or ion-exchange. Over the past two years at Los Alamos, emerging programs are focused on recapturing the expertise required to do limited, small-quantity processing of enriched uranium. During this period of time, we have been investigating ion-addition, waste stream polishing is associated with this effort in order to achieve more complete removal of uranium prior to recycle of the acid. Extraction chromatography has been demonstrated to further polish the uranium from both nitric and hydrochloric acid media thus allowing for a more complete recovery of the actinide material and creation of less waste during the processing steps

  10. The removal of uranium from acidic media using ion exchange and/or extraction chromatography

    FitzPatrick, J.R.; Schake, B.S.; Murphy, J.; Holmes, K; West, M.H.

    1996-06-01

    The separation and purification of uranium from either nitric acid or hydrochloric acid media can be accomplished by using either solvent extraction or ion-exchange. Over the past two years at Los Alamos, emerging programs are focused on recapturing the expertise required to do limited, small-quantity processing of enriched uranium. During this period of time, we have been investigating ion-addition, waste stream polishing is associated with this effort in order to achieve more complete removal of uranium prior to recycle of the acid. Extraction chromatography has been demonstrated to further polish the uranium from both nitric and hydrochloric acid media thus allowing for a more complete recovery of the actinide material and creation of less waste during the processing steps.

  11. A sensitive and selective sensing platform based on CdTe QDs in the presence of l-cysteine for detection of silver, mercury and copper ions in water and various drinks.

    Gong, Tingting; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Xinxin; Liu, Jie; Xiang, Jinkun; Wu, Yiwei

    2016-12-15

    Water soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs) have been prepared simply by one-pot method using potassium tellurite as stable tellurium source and thioglycolic acid (TGA) as stabilizer. The fluorescence of CdTe QDs can be improved 1.3-fold in the presence of l-cysteine (Cys), however, highly efficiently quenched in the presence of silver or mercury or copper ions. A sensitive and selective sensing platform for analysis of silver, mercury and copper ions has been simply established based on CdTe QDs in the presence of l-cysteine. Under the optimum conditions, excellent linear relationships exist between the quenching degree of the sensing platform and the concentrations of Ag(+), Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) ranging from 0.5 to 40ngmL(-1). By using masking agents of sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) for Ag(+) and Cu(2+), NH4OH for Ag(+) and Hg(2+) and 1-(2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) for Hg(2+) and Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Ag(+) can be exclusively detected in coexistence with other two ions, and the detection limits (3σ) were 0.65, 0.063 and 0.088ngmL(-1) for Ag(+), Hg(2+) and Cu(2+), respectively. This effective sensing platform has been used to detection of Ag(+), Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) in water and various drinks with satisfactory results. PMID:27451185

  12. Elucidating the role of ferrous ion cocatalyst in enhancing dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    Wei Hui; Donohoe Bryon S; Vinzant Todd B; Ciesielski Peter N; Wang Wei; Gedvilas Lynn M; Zeng Yining; Johnson David K; Ding Shi-You; Himmel Michael E; Tucker Melvin P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechan...

  13. Influence of the environment on the fragmentation of amino acids provoked by low-energy ions

    With highly charged ions at low energy, molecules can be ionised on fs timescale at large distances without appreciable energy transfer. Their interaction with small amino acids leads to the fragmentation by cleavage of the weakest bond similarly to the other radiation induced fragmentation. A protective effect of the environment is observed when the molecules are embedded in a cluster of amino acids. The molecular cluster acts as a 'buffer' dissipating the excess energy.

  14. Theoretical modeling of the metal ion effects on NMR parameters in nucleic acid backbone

    Benda, Ladislav; Schneider, Bohdan; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    Florence: -, 2010. s. 420-420. [WWMR2010. Joint EUROMAR 2010 and ISMAR Conference /17./. 04.07.2010-09.07.2010, Florence] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0228 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : nucleic acid phosphate * nucleic acids solvation * magnesium ion Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. Electrocatalytic protection against hydrogen embrittlement of tantalum in strong acids by platinum ion implantation

    As a result of corrosion in strong mineral acids, tantalum takes up high amounts of hydrogen which leads to embrittlement by hydride formation and to mechanical failure. Electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in hot concentrated sulphuric acid show that ion implantation of platinum considerably reduces embrittlement. This is attributed to the strong catalytic activity of platinum which reduces hydrogen adsorption on tantalum and decreases corrosion reactions including hydrogen evolution. (orig.)

  16. ATR-FTIR characterization of transport properties of benzoic acid ion-pairs in silicone membranes.

    Tantishaiyakul, Vimon; Phadoongsombut, Narubodee; Wongpuwarak, Wibul; Thungtiwachgul, Jatupit; Faroongsarng, Damrongsak; Wiwattanawongsa, Kamonthip; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2004-09-28

    A novel technique based on Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the transport of benzoic acid ion-pairs/salts in silicone membranes. The benzoic acid ion-pairs were prepared using various counter-ions with different degrees of lipophilicity, e.g. triethylamine (TA), diethylamine (DE), tert-butylamine (t-BA), 2-amino-2-methyl-propanol (AMP), and 2-amino-2-methyl-propanediol (AMPD). Silicone membrane, treated or untreated with propylene glycol (PG), was placed on the surface of a ZnSe crystal and the transport solution was applied to the upper surface of the membrane. A mathematical model, based on Fick's second law describing the build up of permeant concentration at the membrane/crystal interface with time was applied to determine diffusion coefficients. Absorption due to the acid (1700 cm(-1)) or benzoate anion (1555 cm(-1)) was observed at different regions without the interference from PG or silicone membrane. Benzoate anion, a charged species, was observed to permeate the membrane. The permeation of benzoate anion from sodium benzoate and polar ion-pairs of AMP and AMPD was very low in contrast to their high-saturated concentrations in PG as compared to the t-BA ion-pair. This indicated that benzoate anion preferentially permeates the membrane as an ion-pair rather than a single anion; otherwise its permeation should correspond to its concentration in PG instead of the lipophilicity of the ion-pairs. Additionally, the diffusion coefficient values of benzoic acid and benzoate anions through the treated and untreated membranes were not statistically different. PMID:15363507

  17. Ligand Induced Anionic Cuprous Cyanide Framework for Cupric Ion Turn on Luminescence Sensing and Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Dyes.

    Xu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Qiu-Cheng; Yu, Ya-Dong; Huang, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    A new microporous luminescent coordination polymer [(CH3)2NH2]·[Cu2(CN)3] (1) with channels occupied by dimethylamine cations was synthesized due to the inducing effect of 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole. Complex 1 exhibits bright-green emission in the solid state, and its emission intensity would be significantly enhanced, especially by DMAc and cupric ion after immersing the as-synthesized crystals of 1 into common organic solvents or methanol solutions of various metal ions. In addition, 1 exhibits photocatalytic activity for the degradation of RhB and MB under natural light and is stable during the photocatalysis process. Thus, 1 can act as a multifunctional material for selectively sensing of Cu(2+) and effectively photocatalytic degradation of dyes. PMID:26671534

  18. Hydrogen ion-selective electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for pH sensing

    Kofler, Johannes; Schmoltner, Kerstin; Klug, Andreas; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2014-05-01

    A H+ ion-selective electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor (IS-EGOFET) with a broad detection range between pH 3 and pH 12, is presented. This pH sensor relies on an integrated EGOFET used as a transducer in combination with an ionophore-doped polymeric ion-selective membrane serving as a sensing element. The broad detection range was possible through a dynamic measurement protocol comprising a readjustment of the gate voltage, which ensures a stable device operation at a constant working point. The effectiveness of this dynamic approach is confirmed by stability investigations. On the basis of this pH sensor concept, the importance of an appropriate gating electrolyte is highlighted, giving insights into the working mechanism of EGOFETs.

  19. Carbon dots with tunable emission, controllable size and their application for sensing hypochlorous acid

    Huang, Zhaoxia; Lin, Feng; Hu, Ming; Li, Chunxiang; Xu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Guo, Xiangqun, E-mail: xqguo@xmu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Optically tunable carbon dots (CDs) were fabricated through a simple one-step microwave-assisted procedure. These carbonaceous nanoparticles exhibited tunable emission under a single wavelength excitation, controllable size without any tedious separation process and stabilities towards photobleaching and high ionic strength. The effects of size difference and surface property on the fluorescence behaviors of CDs were explored through a post-reduction/oxidation method. Experimental results also demonstrated the fluorescence of CDs could be tuned when exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/AcOH solutions. Moreover, the use of as-synthesized CDs as a chemical sensor for the quantification of hypochlorous acid (HClO) has been preliminarily tested, showing high sensitivity and selectivity towards HClO over other common ions. The superior optical properties would enable the use of CDs in multiplexed optical coding of biomolecules, light-emitting devices and biological applications. - Highlights: • Carbon dots exhibited multiple colors under a single wavelength excitation. • Microwave or post-oxidation methods were employed to tune the emission wavelengths. • The as-prepared particles had controllable size without tedious separation process. • High sensitivity and selectivity towards hypochlorous acid were demonstrated.

  20. Sequential determination of free acidity and hydrazine in presence of hydrolysable ions

    A simple method for the sequential determination of free acidity and hydrazine in presence of hydrolysable ions is developed and described. In this method, free acid is titrated with standard sodium carbonate solution after the metal ions in solutions are masked with EDTA. Once the end point for the free acid is determined at pH 3.0, an aliquot of formaldehyde is added to liberate the acid equivalent to hydrazine which is then titrated with the same standard sodium carbonate solution using an automatic titration system. The described method is simple, accurate and reproducible. This method is especially applicable to all ranges of nitric acid and heavy metal ion concentration relevant to Purex process used for nuclear fuel reprocessing. The overall recovery of nitric acid is 98.9% with 3% relative standard deviation. The major advantage of the method is that it uses sodium carbonate a primary standard as titrant and generation of corrosive analytical wastes containing oxalate or sulphate is avoided. Valuable metals like uranium and plutonium can easily be recovered from analytical waste before final disposal. (orig.)

  1. Flotation of uranyl ions by alkylcarboxylic acid salts of potassium

    Physical and chemical features of uranyl cation flotation by potassium salts of fatty acids from diluted solutions are presented. Maximum degree of uranyl flotation is shown to occur in the range of pH=5-6 which corresponds to flotoactive forms of UO22+(OH)+ and to the form of collector as RCOO-. Efficiency of collector first increases with the length of hydrocarbon radical (due to decreasing sublate solubility) and then declines (due to increasing electrokinetic potential). Increase of the temperature of solutions leads to an increase in sublate solubility and to a decrease in the extent of uranyl flotation. 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Structural basis for regulation of human calcium-sensing receptor by magnesium ions and an unexpected tryptophan derivative co-agonist.

    Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tuo; Zou, Juan; Miller, Cassandra Lynn; Gorkhali, Rakshya; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Schilmiller, Anthony; Wang, Shuo; Huang, Kenneth; Brown, Edward M; Moremen, Kelley W; Hu, Jian; Yang, Jenny J

    2016-05-01

    Ca(2+)-sensing receptors (CaSRs) modulate calcium and magnesium homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes by responding to extracellular stimuli, including divalent cations and amino acids. We report the first crystal structure of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human CaSR bound with Mg(2+) and a tryptophan derivative ligand at 2.1 Å. The structure reveals key determinants for cooperative activation by metal ions and aromatic amino acids. The unexpected tryptophan derivative was bound in the hinge region between two globular ECD subdomains, and represents a novel high-affinity co-agonist of CaSR. The dissection of structure-function relations by mutagenesis, biochemical, and functional studies provides insights into the molecular basis of human diseases arising from CaSR mutations. The data also provide a novel paradigm for understanding the mechanism of CaSR-mediated signaling that is likely shared by the other family C GPCR [G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor] members and can facilitate the development of novel CaSR-based therapeutics. PMID:27386547

  3. A library-screening approach for developing a fluorescence sensing array for the detection of metal ions.

    Smith, David G; Sajid, Naveed; Rehn, Simone; Chandramohan, Ramya; Carney, Isaac J; Khan, Misbahul A; New, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-01

    Detection of individual metal ions is of importance across a range of fields of chemistry including environmental monitoring, and health and disease. Fluorescence is a highly sensitive technique and small fluorescent molecules are widely used for the detection and quantification of metal ions in various applications. Achieving specificity for a single metal from a single sensor is always a challenge. An alternative to selective sensing is the use of a number of non-specific sensors, in an array, which together respond in a unique pattern to each analyte. Here we show that screening a library of compounds can give a small sensor set that can be used to identify a range of metal ions following PCA and LDA. We explore a method for screening the initial compounds to identify the best performing sensors. We then present our method for reducing the size of the sensor array, resulting in a four-membered system, which is capable of identifying nine distinct metal ion species in lake water. PMID:27291513

  4. Effect of Li+ ion sensitization and optical temperature sensing in Gd2O3: Ho3+/Yb3+

    Singh, Priyam; Shahi, P. K.; Rai, Anita; Bahadur, A.; Rai, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    Ho3+/Yb3+ codoped Gd2O3 phosphor has been synthesized by solution combustion method. The concentrations of Ho3+ and Yb3+ were optimized to be 0.3 and 2.0 mol% respectively for maximum emission intensity. The effect of Li+ ion co-doping on phase structure and photo luminescence were investigated. It is found that there is no change in phase of the sample due to Li+ ion co-doping. However the Upconversion (UC) and Downshifting (DS) emission show a remarkable enhancement in intensity. It is concluded that, this enhancement in the emission intensity is mainly due to the change in crystal field around the Ho3+ ion and reduction in quenching centers. The optimum doping concentration of Li+ ion was found to be 20 mol%. We have further explored the temperature sensing behavior using the FIR technique. The maximum sensitivity is found to be 0.0092 K-1 at 505 K.

  5. Role of ion transporters in the bile acid-induced esophageal injury.

    Laczkó, Dorottya; Rosztóczy, András; Birkás, Klaudia; Katona, Máté; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Róka, Richárd; Wittmann, Tibor; Hegyi, Péter; Venglovecz, Viktória

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is considered to be the most severe complication of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which the prolonged, repetitive episodes of combined acidic and biliary reflux result in the replacement of the squamous esophageal lining by columnar epithelium. Therefore, the acid-extruding mechanisms of esophageal epithelial cells (EECs) may play an important role in the defense. Our aim was to identify the presence of acid/base transporters on EECs and to investigate the effect of bile acids on their expressions and functions. Human EEC lines (CP-A and CP-D) were acutely exposed to bile acid cocktail (BAC) and the changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were measured by microfluorometry. mRNA and protein expression of ion transporters was investigated by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We have identified the presence of a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC), and a Cl(-)-dependent HCO3 (-) secretory mechanism in CP-A and CP-D cells. Acute administration of BAC stimulated HCO3 (-) secretion in both cell lines and the NHE activity in CP-D cells by an inositol triphosphate-dependent calcium release. Chronic administration of BAC to EECs increased the expression of ion transporters compared with nontreated cells. A similar expression pattern was observed in biopsy samples from BE compared with normal epithelium. We have shown that acute administration of bile acids differently alters ion transport mechanisms of EECs, whereas chronic exposure to bile acids increases the expression of acid/base transporters. We speculate that these adaptive processes of EECs represent an important mucosal defense against the bile acid-induced epithelial injury. PMID:27198194

  6. Analyses on Radiation Effects in Solid Amino Acids Induced by Low Energy Fe~+ Ion Beams

    2001-01-01

    Radiation effects in Solid samples of L(+)-cysteine and L(+)-cysteine hydroehloride monohydrate induced by 110 keV Fe~+ion implantation were characterized with FTIR, ESR,HPLC and ESI-FTMS.It was validated that solid samples of the irradiated amino acids were damaged to a certain extent,and some new groups or molecular products formed.

  7. Influence of the Functionalization Degree of Acidic Ion-Exchange Resins on Ethyl Octyl Ether Formation

    Guilera, J.; Hanková, Libuše; Jeřábek, Karel; Ramírez, E.; Tejero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 78, MAY (2014), s. 14-22. ISSN 1381-5148 Grant ostatní: SEURDO(ES) CTQ2010-16047 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : acidic ion-exchange resin * sulfonation degree * ISEC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.515, year: 2014

  8. Formation and fragmentation of unsaturated fatty acid [M - 2H + Na]- ions: stabilized carbanions for charge-directed fragmentation.

    Thomas, Michael C; Kirk, Benjamin B; Altvater, Jens; Blanksby, Stephen J; Nette, Geoffrey W

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acids are long-chain carboxylic acids that readily produce [M - H](-) ions upon negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and cationic complexes with alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals in positive ion ESI. In contrast, only one anionic monomeric fatty acid-metal ion complex has been reported in the literature, namely [M - 2H  +  Fe(II)Cl](-). In this manuscript, we present two methods to form anionic unsaturated fatty acid-sodium ion complexes (i.e., [M - 2H  +  Na](-)). We find that these ions may be generated efficiently by two distinct methods: (1) negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium fluoride forming an [M - H  +  NaF](-) ion. Subsequent collision-induced dissociation (CID) results in the desired [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ion via the neutral loss of HF. (2) Direct formation of the [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ion by negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate. In addition to deprotonation of the carboxylic acid moiety, formation of [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ions requires the removal of a proton from the fatty acid acyl chain. We propose that this deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic position(s) of polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in the formation of a resonance-stabilized carbanion. This proposal is supported by ab initio calculations, which reveal that removal of a proton from the bis-allylic position, followed by neutral loss of HX (where X = F(-) and (-)OH), is the lowest energy dissociation pathway. PMID:24338213

  9. Simultaneous Chronoamperometric Sensing of Ascorbic Acid and Acetaminophen at a Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode

    Ciprian Radovan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic voltammetry (CV and chronoamperometry (CA have been used to sense and determine simultaneously L-ascorbic acid (AA and acetaminophen (AC at a boron-doped diamond electrode (BDDE in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution. The calibration plots of anodic current peak versus concentration obtained from CV and CA data for both investigated compounds in single and di-component solutions over the concentration range 0.01 mM – 0.1 mM proved to be linear, with very good correlation parameters. Sensitivity values and RSD of 2-3% were obtained for various situations, involving both individual and simultaneous presence of AA and AC. The chronoamperometric technique associated with standard addition in sequential one step and/or two successive and continuous chronoamperograms at two characteristic potential levels represented a feasible option for the simultaneous determination of AA and AC in real sample systems such as pharmaceutical formulations. The average values indicated by the supplier were confirmed to a very close approximation from chronoamperomgrams by using several additions with the application of suitable current correction factors.

  10. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry-based Sensing: Pyrenyl Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acid for Saccharide and Formaldehyde

    Chang, Xingmao; Fan, Jiayun; Wang, Min; Wang, Zhaolong; Peng, Haonan; He, Gang; Fang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    We synthesized two specially designed pyrenyl (Py) derivatives of phenylboronic acid, PSNB1 and PSNB2, of which PSNB2 self-assemble to form dynamic aggregate in methanol-water mixture (1:99, v/v) via intermolecular H-bonding and pi-pi stacking. Interestingly, the dynamic aggregate shows smart response to presence of fructose (F) as evidenced by fluorescence color change from green to blue. More interestingly, the fluorescence emission of the resulted PSNB2-F changes from blue to green with the addition of formaldehyde (FA). The reason behind is formation of a PSNB2-F dimer via FA cross-linking. Based upon the reactions as found, sensitive and fast sensing of F and FA in water was realized, of which the experimental DLs could be significantly lower than 10 μM for both analytes, and the response times are less than 1 min. It is believed that not only the materials as created may have the potential to find real-life applications but also the strategy as developed can be adopted to develop other dynamic materials.

  11. The reduction process of phytic acid silver ion system: A pulse radiolysis study

    Joshi, Ravi; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2007-05-01

    Reduction of silver ion in a silver-phytic acid (1:1 ratio) system has been studied using pulse radiolysis technique. Time-resolved transformation of the intermediates, Ag +→Ag 0→Ag 2+→Ag 32+, has been clearly observed in the reduction of silver-phytic acid (1:1) system. The effect of phytic acid on the formation and decay of initial silver clusters has been also studied. The surface plasmon absorption band of stable silver nanoparticle (410 nm) and dynamic light scattering technique has been used to characterize the nanoparticles and measure the average size ( Rav=100 nm).

  12. The reduction process of phytic acid-silver ion system: A pulse radiolysis study

    Reduction of silver ion in a silver-phytic acid (1:1 ratio) system has been studied using pulse radiolysis technique. Time-resolved transformation of the intermediates, Ag+→Ag0→Ag2+→Ag32+, has been clearly observed in the reduction of silver-phytic acid (1:1) system. The effect of phytic acid on the formation and decay of initial silver clusters has been also studied. The surface plasmon absorption band of stable silver nanoparticle (410 nm) and dynamic light scattering technique has been used to characterize the nanoparticles and measure the average size (R av=100 nm)

  13. Breeding of citric acid-producing bacteria by 15 keV N+ ion implantation

    Aspergillus niger strains CK1-16, the bacteria commonly used in industrial production of citric acid, were implanted with 3.10 x 1014 to 2.58 x 1015 ions/cm2 of 15 keV N+ ions. Survival rate of the bacteria at different doses was investigated, and mutagenic effects of the microbe were studied. From the ion-implanted specimens, authors were able to obtain three mutant strains that produce increased yield of citric acid. The 71 hours yield of Mutant Strain 4 hash-8-1 incubated in cassava and corn flour media is 14% higher than the CK1-16 strain, while Mutant Strains 4hash-8-7and 4hash-8-7, incubated in corn flour media are 15.9% and 17.0% higher than the CK1-16 strain, respectively. The results also show that the mutant strains have high genetic stability. (authors)

  14. Scandium and zirconium ion complexing with salicylic acid

    A study has been made of the extraction of complexes containing scandium and zirconium compounds and salicylic acid by using benzene, nitrobenzene, chloroform and isoamyl alcohol. It is shown that in the metal concentration range 10-5-10-3 mole/l scandium forms mononuclear complexes composed of Sc(HSal)3 (pH2 (pH>4), zirconium - polynuclear complexes Zrsub(x)(OH)sub(y)(HSal)sub(n), where the x:n ratio varies from 0.5 to 1.5. Stability constants have been calculated for the salicylate scandium complexes in aqueous solution, equal to β1=(3+-1)x102; β2=(5.0+-0.6)x104; β3=(5.3+-0.3)x106

  15. Using poly(3-aminophenylboronic acid) thin film with binding-induced ion flux blocking for amperometric detection of hemoglobin A1c.

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2015-01-15

    This study reports a novel enzyme-free, label-free amperometric method for direct detection of hemoglobin A1c (Hb(A1c)), a potent biomarker for diabetes diagnosis and prognosis. The method relies on an electrode modified with poly(3-aminophenylboronic acid) (PAPBA) nanoparticles (20-50 nm) and a sensing scheme named "binding-induced ion flux blocking." The PAPBA nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, XPS, TEM, and SEM. Being a polyaniline derivative, PAPBA showed an ion-dependent redox behavior, in which insertion or extraction of ions into or out of PABPA occurred for charge balance during the electron transfer process. The polymer allowed Hb(A1c) selectively bound to its surface via forming the cis-diol linkage between the boronic acid and sugar moieties. Voltammetric analyses showed that Hb(A1c) binding decreased the redox current of PAPBA; however, the binding did not alter the redox potentials and the apparent diffusivities of ions. This suggests that the redox current of PAPBA decreased due to an Hb(A1c) binding-induced ion flux blocking mechanism, which was then verified and characterized through an in situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) study. Assay with Hb(A1c) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) indicates that the peak current of a PAPBA electrode has a linear dependence on the logarithm of Hb(A1c) concentration ranging from 0.975 to 156 μM. The Hb(A1c) assay also showed high selectivity against ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, glucose and bovine serum albumin. This study has demonstrated a new method for developing an electrochemical Hb(A1c) biosensor and can be extended to other label-free, indicator-free protein biosensors based on a similar redox polymer electrode. PMID:25113050

  16. PERVAPORATION SEPARATION OF WATER-ACETIC ACID MIXTURES THROUGH AN-co-AA MEMBRANES TREATED WITH RARE EARTH METAL IONS

    SHEN Zhiquan; ZHANG Fuyao; ZHANG Yifeng

    1995-01-01

    Pervaporation separation of water-acetic acid mixtures through Poly (AN-co-AA)membranes and rare earth metal ions treated Poly(AN-co-AA)membranes was investigated for the first time. The results showed that the treatment with rare earth metal ions could greatly improve the characteristics of the separation of water-acetic acid mixtures.

  17. Regioisomers of octanoic acid-containing structured triacylglycerols analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using ammonia negative ion chemical ionization

    Kurvinen, J.P.; Mu, Huiling; Kallio, H.;

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ammonia negative ion chemical ionization and sample introduction via direct exposure probe was applied to analysis of regioisomeric structures of octanoic acid containing structured triacylglycerols (TAG) of type MML, MLM, MLL, and LML (M, medium-chain fatty acid......; L, long-chain fatty acid). Collision-induced dissociation of deprotonated parent TAG with argon was used to produce daughter ion spectra with appropriate fragmentation patterns for structure determination. Fatty acids constituting the TAG molecule were identified according to [RCO2](-) ions in the...... daughter ion spectra. With the standard curve for ratios of [M - H - RCO2H - 100](-) ions corresponding to each [RCO2](-) ion, determined with known mixtures of sn-1/3 and sn-2 regioisomers of structured TAG, it was possible to determine the proportions of different regioisomers in unknown samples. The...

  18. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  19. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode.

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low pK a1 and pK a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (logP ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27044024

  20. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-04-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low pK a1 and pK a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (logP ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions.

  1. Fast removal of heavy metal ions and phytic acids from water using new modified chelating fiber

    Li Xu; Jin Nan Wang; Ying Meng; Ai Min Li

    2012-01-01

    The graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto polyethylene glycol terephthalate (PET) fiber initiated by benzoy peroxide (BPO) was carried out in heterogeneous media.Moreover,modification of the grafted PET fiber (PET-AA) was done by changing the carboxyl group into acylamino group through the reaction with dimethylamine.The modified chelating fiber (NDWJN 1) was characterized using elementary analysis,SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy.Adsorption kinetic curves indicated that NDWJN1 could fast remove heavy metal ions and phytic acids from water effectively.Furthermore,batch kinetic studies indicated that heavy metal ions adsorbed to NDWJN1 could be fitted well by both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order adsorption equations,but the intra-particle diffusion plaved a dominant role in the adsorption of phvtic acids.

  2. Kinetic studies for sorption of some metal ions from aqueous acid solutions onto TDA impregnated resin

    Kinetic studies for sorption of uranium, thorium and cobalt ions from hydrochloric acid solutions using tri-dodecyl amine (TDA) loaded on Amberlite XAD4 (polystyrene resin supplied by Rohm and Haas) using the batch technique, have been evaluated and assessed. Analysis of the respective data in accordance with three kinetic models revealed that the particle diffusion mechanism is the rate determining step, and the sorption for each metal ion on the impregnated sorbent follows the first order reversible kinetics. Values of the first order rate constants, rate constants of intraparticle transport, and the particle diffusion coefficients for the studied ions were determined. Sorption isotherms, which have been evaluated from the distribution coefficients for these ions, were found in good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. (author)

  3. Stability of ion exchangers against treatment with nitric acid and radiation. Pt. 2

    The change in the sorption properties of chelating ion exchangers with amino acetic acid and amino diacetic acid groups of the type Wof MC 50, Chelex 100 and Dowex A-1 after treatment with nitric acid is examined. The nitric acid concentration is varied in the range 1-10.5 N; the reaction time varied from 0.5 to 25 h. The reaction temperature was 680C. By destruction of the amino diacetic acid groups the sorption properties are changed. The sorption of cations (Cs+ -0.019 N NH4C1) decreases, goes through a minimum and increases again when the COOH capacity is increased. The sorption of anions (TcO-4 -1 N HNO3) and anionic complexes (PdC142- -1 N HC1) decreases in correlation with the N-content. (orig.)

  4. The stability of ion exchangers towards nitric acid and radiation. 1

    The behaviour of the chelating ion exchangers Wofatit MC 50, Dowex A 1 and Chelex 100 with aminoacetic acid - and iminodiacetic acid-groups towards nitric in the range of the concentration 1 ... 10.5 mol/l and at temperatures 0C was determined. It is found that the COOH capacity and the N content are rapidly reduced leading to the formation of CO2 and N2. If the exposure to HNO3 continues there is again a rise in the COOH capacity. The i.r.- and mass spectra show that the iminodiacetic acid-groups are destroyed by nitrosative cleavage and CHO groups result, which are then oxidized to COOH groups. The mass spectrum shows that the aminoacetic acid-groups of the resin are nitrosated, which has also been confirmed by the use of nitric acid labelled with 15N. (author)

  5. Luminescent properties of [UO2(TFA)2(DMSO)3], a promising material for sensing and monitoring the uranyl ion

    An uranyl complex [UO2(TFA)2(DMSO)3] (TFA=deprotonated trifluoroacetic acid; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide) has been successfully synthesized by reacting UO2(CH3COO)2 ·H2 O with one equivalent of (CF3 CO)2 O and DMSO. The complex has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and absorption and emission spectroscopies. The spectroscopic properties of the material make it suitable for its application in the sensing and monitoring of uranyl in the PUREX process. (author)

  6. Flotation separation of rare earth ions with the acid of citric acid and hexadecylamine

    The possibilities of the flotation method of rare earth ion separation by their transfer in citrate complexes and their following binding into slightly soluble well-floated compounds-sublates with the aid of hexadecylamine are studied. The dependences of the degree of neodymium, samarium and europium flotation separation on hexadecylamine consumption, on solution pH and temperature are presented. Free energies of sublate formation cntaining neodymium, samarium and europium are presented. The research has shown the possibility of flotation separation of rare earth ions by the above method

  7. Influence of metal ions binding on free radical concentration in humic acids. A quantitative electron paramagnetic resonance study

    Jerzykiewicz, M.; Jezierski, A. [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Chemistry; Czechowski, F. [Wroclaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Biotechnology; Drozd, J. [Agricultural Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. of Soil Science and Agricultural Environment Protection

    2002-07-01

    The influence of metal ions, e.g. Co(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), on free radical concentration in humic acids isolated from soil, peat and compost was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The results show that metal ions with unfilled d-shell exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions with semiquinone radicals. Moreover, coordinated metals shift the quinone-semiquinone-hydroquinone equilibrium in the macromolecular matrix of humic acids. A strong decrease of semiquinone radical concentration in humic acid-metal complexes is observed. This effect is caused by interactions of metal ions with oxygen-containing stable radicals occurring in the aromatic systems of humic acids. Furthermore, the effect of metal coordination on free radical concentration in humic acids-metal complexes depends on the humic acid origin. FTIR spectroscopy was also used as an additional tool for studies of the metal ions interactions with carboxylic groups. [author].

  8. Proton and metal ion binding to natural organic polyelectrolytes-II. Preliminary investigation with a peat and a humic acid

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    We summarize here experimental studies of proton and metal ion binding to a peat and a humic acid. Data analysis is based on a unified physico-chemical model for reaction of simple ions with polyelectrolytes employing a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Peat exhibited an apparent intrinsic acid dissociation constant of 10-4.05, and an apparent intrinsic metal ion binding constant of: 400 for cadmium ion; 600 for zinc ion; 4000 for copper ion; 20000 for lead ion. A humic acid was found to have an apparent intrinsic proton binding constant of 10-2.6. Copper ion binding to this humic acid sample occurred at two types of sites. The first site exhibited reaction characteristics which were independent of solution pH and required the interaction of two ligands on the humic acid matrix to simultaneously complex with each copper ion. The second complex species is assumed to be a simple monodentate copper ion-carboxylate species with a stability constant of 18. ?? 1984.

  9. Analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography

    Kazuaki ITO; Kazuhiko TANAKA; Jun SAKAMOTO; Kazuya NAGAOKA; Yohichi TAKAYAMA; Takashi KANAHORI; Hiroshi SUNAHARA; Tsuneo HAYASHI; Shinji SATO; Takeshi HIROKAWA

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids ( formic,acetic,propionic,iso-butyric,n-butyric,iso-valeric and n-valeric acid) in anaerobic digestion process waters for biogas production was examined by ion-exclusion chromatography with dilute acidic eluents (benzoic acid,perfluorobutyric acid (PFBA) and sulfuric acid) and non-suppressed conductivity/ultraviolet (UV) detection.The columns used were a styrene/divinylbenzene-based strongly acidic cation-exchange resin column ( TSKgel SCX) and a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column ( TSKgel Super IC-A/C ).Good separation was performed on the TSKgel SCX in shorter retention times.For the TSKgel Super IC-A/C,peak shape of the acids was sharp and symmetrical in spite of longer retention times.In addition,the mutual separation of the acids was good except for iso- and n-butyric acids.The better separation and good detection was achieved by using the two columns (TSKgel SCX and TSKgel Super IC-A/C connected in series),lower concentrations of PFBA and sulfuric acid as eluents,non-suppressed conductivity detection and UV detection at 210 nm.This analysis was applied to anaerobic digestion process waters.The chromatograms with conductivity detection were relatively simpler compared with those of UV detection.The use of two columns with different selectivities for the aliphatic carboxylic acids and the two detection modes was effective for the determination and identification of the analytes in anaerobic digestion process waters containing complex matrices.

  10. Determination of haloacetic acids concentrations in hospital effluent after chlorination by ion chromatography

    SUN Ying-xue; GU Ping

    2007-01-01

    The ion chromatography combined solid phase extraction (SPE) method was developed for the analysis of low concentration haloacetic acids(HAAs),a calss of disinfection by-products formed as a result of chlorination of hospital wastewater. The monitored HAAs included monochloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid. The method employed a sodium hydroxide eluent at a flow rate of 0.8 ml/min, electrolytically generated gradients, and suppressed conductivity detection. To analyze the HAAs in real hospital wastewater samples, C18 pretreatment cartridge was utilized to reduce samples' turbidity. Preconcentration with SPE and matrix elimination with treatment cartridges were investigated and were found to be able to obtain acceptable detection limits. Linearity, repeatability and detection limits of the above method were evaluated. The detection limits of monobromoacetic acid and dibromoacetic acid were 2.61 μg/L and 1.30 μg/L respectively, and the other three are ranging from 0.48 to 0.82 μg/L under 25-fold preconcentration. When the above optimization procedure was applied to three hospital wastewater samples with different treatment processes in Tianjin, it was found that the dichloroacetic acid is the major compound, and the growth ratios of the HAAs after disinfection by sodium hypochlorite were 91.28%, 63.61% and 79.50%, respectively.

  11. Progress towards understanding the interactions between hydroxamic acids and actinide ions

    BNFL has undertaken a wide-ranging research programme to investigate the fundamental properties of hydroxamic acids and, in particular, their reactions with actinide ions. Most work has focussed on simple hydroxamic acids (R=H and CH3) although some comparative data with more complex molecules including di-hydroxamates have been obtained. Properties of hydroxamic acids studied to date include, hydrolysis in nitric acid, decomposition to gases, pKa's and redox potentials. The redox and co-ordination chemistry of actinides by hydroxamic acids has been investigated using a range of techniques and stability constants for both 4f and 5f hydroxamate complexes have been determined. In conjunction with these fundamental studies, more applied work has been carried out to assess the applications of simple hydroxamic acids under process conditions. A large database of solvent extraction distribution data has been accumulated and, from this, extraction logarithms describing how hydroxamic acid modify actinide extraction in to TBP have been derived. Also the effects of hydroxamic acids on U and Np mass transfer have been studied in single stage centrifugal contactors and this has been modeled theoretically. The third stage of our development work so far has looked at the actual design and testing of novel hydroxamic acid based flowsheets which selectively strip Np(IV) and Py(IV) from a uranium loaded TBP stream. (author)

  12. New, enhanced phage-based bacterium detection/identification by COnductance-Noise-Sensing-of-Phage-Triggered-Ion-Cascades (CON-SEPTIC)

    Kish, Laszlo B

    2010-01-01

    We point out the reasons for the problems with the reproducibility and sensitivity of the earlier page-based bacterium detection/identification method SEPTIC (Sensing-of-Phage-Triggered-Ion-Cascades). The main weaknesses originate from the DC field/current nature of the method. Then we propose a new principle and method, CON-SEPTIC (COnductance-Noise-Sensing-of-Phage-Triggered-Ion-Cascades), which, similarly to SEPTIC, also utilizes the ion release during phage infection. However CON-SEPTIC, instead of sensing the electrical field (voltage) during phage infection, uses the measurement of the AC conductivity and its fluctuations (conductance noise) to detect slow fluctuations of the ionic concentration due to infected bacteria. In this way, the effects of electrode material, corrosion, drift, ageing, surface imperfections, 1/f potential fluctuations and even thermal noise (with two-frequency or phase drive) are absent and the detection of a single bacterium maybe possible. Moreover, because no electrical poten...

  13. Elution of nickel ions from alginate beads in an acid media

    Elution of nickel ions from alginate beads was studied in a temperature range of 2 to 80 degree centigrade and a sulfuric acid concentration between 0.005 to 2.5 g L-1. The elution mechanism was established by ion exchange between nickel and ions protons, obtaining a value of 93% elution at a temperature of 80 degree centigrade and a H2SO4 concentration of 0.25 g L-1. The influence of other acids on nickel elution was also studied. The nickel elution rate was significantly influenced by temperature and concentration of H2SO4. Elution kinetics of nickel ions was studied, and the 1-(1-α)1/3=kappt model properly described the kinetics of this reaction. The dependence of nickel elution on the sulfuric acid concentration was of the order of 0.33. Moreover, the intrinsic rate constants were determined and an activation energy value of 54.5 kJ mol-1 was obtained for the temperature range studied. The results indicated that the nickel elution is a process controlled by chemical reactions. (Author)

  14. Formation of complex precursors of amino acids by irradiation of simulated interstellar media with heavy ions

    Kobayashi, K.; Suzuki, N.; Taniuchi, T.; Kaneko, T.; Yoshida, S.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in such extraterrestrial bodies as meteorites and comets Amino acids were identified in the extracts from Murchison meteorite and other carbonaceous chondrites It is hypothesized that these compounds are originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts ISDs in molecular clouds by cosmic rays and ultraviolet light UV Formation of amino acid precursors by high energy protons or UV irradiation of simulated ISDs was reported by several groups The amino acid precursors were however not well-characterized We irradiated a frozen mixture of methanol ammonia and water with heavy ions to study possible organic compounds abiotically formed in molecular clouds by cosmic rays A mixture of methanol ammonia and water was irradiated with carbon beams 290 MeV u from a heavy ion accelerator HIMAC of National Institute of Radiological Sciences Japan Irradiation was performed either at room temperature liquid phase or at 77 K solid phase The products were characterized by gel filtration chromatography GFC FT-IR pyrolysis PY -GC MS etc Amino acids were analyzed by HPLC and GC MS after acid hydrolysis or the products Amino acids such as glycine and alanine were identified in the products in both the cases of liquid phase and solid phase irradiation Energy yields G-values of glycine were 0 014 liquid phase and 0 007 solid phase respectively Average molecular weights of the products were estimated as to 2300 in both the case Aromatic hydrocarbons N-containing heterocyclic

  15. On optimal length of hydrocarbon chain of fatty-acid collectors of rare earth ions

    The mechanism of the effect of the length of alkyl chain in fatty-acid collectors on the efficiency of flotation separation of the ions of rare earth elements (REE) collected by them has been investigated. REE flotation separation was studied on gadolinium chloride. Aqueous solutions of potassium caprinata, indecanate, laurate, tridecanate, myristate, pentadecanate and palmitate were used as collectors of Gd ions. The interaction of Gd ions with these compounds proceeds rapidly and is accompanied by stable colloidal solutions of Gd soaps being formed. Infrared spectra and radiograms of the sublates have been studied. It has been found that, with the number of carbon atoms in the collector molecule increasing from 10 to 16, the rate of flotation separation of Gd ions from solutions with pH 6 and 8 at first practically does not change (for potassium caprinate, undecanate and laurate), then drops sharply (potassium tridecanate and myristate), after which is again increases sharply (potassium pentadecanata and palmitate). The separation rate of Gd ions does not rise in solutions with pH 10. The nature of the sublate is shown to be determined by the solubility of the corresponing fatty acids and gadolinium soaps

  16. Removal of corper(II Ions from aqueous solution by a lactic acid bacterium

    M. Yilmaz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecium, a lactic acid bacterium (LAB, was evaluated for its ability to remove copper(II ions from water. The effects of the pH, contact time, initial concentration of copper(II ions, and temperature on the biosorption rate and capacity were studied. The initial concentrations of copper(II ions used to determine the maximum amount of biosorbed copper(II ions onto lyophilised lactic acid bacterium varied from 25 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1. Maximum biosorption capacities were attained at pH 5.0 and 6.0. Temperature variation between 20°C and 40°C did not affect the biosorption capacity of the bacterial biomass. The highest copper(II ion removal capacity was 106.4 mg per g dry biomass. The correlation regression coefficients show that the biosorption process can be well defined by the Freundlich equation. The change in biosorption capacity with time was found to fit a pseudo-second-order equation.

  17. Ionophore-Based Voltammetric Ion Activity Sensing with Thin Layer Membranes.

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gaston A; Bakker, Eric

    2016-02-01

    As shown in recent work, thin layer ion-selective multi-ionophore membranes can be interrogated by cyclic voltammetry to detect the ion activity of multiple species simultaneously and selectively. Additional fundamental evidence is put forward on ion discrimination with thin multi-ionophore-based membranes with thicknesses of 200 ± 25 nm and backside contacted with poly-3-octylthiophene (POT). An anodic potential scan partially oxidizes the POT film (to POT(+)), thereby initiating the release of hydrophilic cations from the membrane phase to the sample solution at a characteristic potential. Varying concentration of added cation-exchanger demonstrates that it limits the ion transfer charge and not the deposited POT film. Voltammograms with multiple peaks are observed with each associated with the transfer of one type of ion (lithium, potassium, and sodium). Experimental conditions (thickness and composition of the membrane and concentration of the sample) are chosen that allow one to describe the system by a thermodynamic rather than kinetic model. As a consequence, apparent stability constants for sodium, potassium, and lithium (assuming 1:1 stoichiometry) with their respective ionophores are calculated and agree well with the values obtained by the potentiometric sandwich membrane technique. As an analytical application, a membrane containing three ionophores was used to determine lithium, sodium, and potassium in artificial samples at the same location and within a single voltammetric scan. Lithium and potassium were also determined in undiluted human plasma in the therapeutic concentration range. PMID:26712342

  18. Synthesis-modification integration: one-step fabrication of boronic acid functionalized carbon dots for fluorescent blood sugar sensing.

    Shen, Pengfei; Xia, Yunsheng

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we have presented a novel strategy to fabricate fluorescent boronic acid modified carbon dots (C-dots) for nonenzymatic blood glucose sensing applications. The functionalized C-dots are obtained by one-step hydrothermal carbonization, using phenylboronic acid as the sole precursor. Compared with conventional two-step fabrication of nanoparticle-based sensors, the present "synthesis-modification integration" strategy is simpler and more efficient. The added glucose selectively leads to the assembly and fluorescence quenching of the C-dots. Such fluorescence responses can be used for well quantifying glucose in the range of 9-900 μM, which is 10-250 times more sensitive than that of previous boronic acid based fluorescent nanosensing systems. Due to "inert" surface, the C-dots can well resist the interferences from various biomolecules and exhibit excellent selectivity. The proposed sensing system has been successfully used for the assay of glucose in human serum. Due to simplicity and effectivity, it exhibits great promise as a practical platform for blood glucose sensing. PMID:24694081

  19. Photodegradation of bisphenol A in simulated lake water containing algae, humic acid and ferric ions

    Peng Zhang' e [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)]. E-mail: zhepeng@126.com; Wu Feng [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)]. E-mail: fengwu@whu.edu.cn; Deng Nansheng [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)]. E-mail: nsdengwhu@163.com

    2006-12-15

    The photodegradation of bisphenol A (BPA), a suspected endocrine disruptor (ED), in simulated lake water containing algae, humic acid and Fe{sup 3+} ions was investigated. Algae, humic acid and Fe{sup 3+} ions enhanced the photodegradation of BPA. Photodegradation efficiency of BPA was 36% after 4 h irradiation in the presence of 6.5 x 10{sup 9} cells L{sup -1} raw Chlorella vulgaris, 4 mg L{sup -1} humic acid and 20 {mu}mol L{sup -1} Fe{sup 3+}. The photodegradation efficiency of BPA was higher in the presence of algae treated with ultrasonic than that without ultrasonic. The photodegradation efficiency of BPA in the water only containing algae treated with ultrasonic was 37% after 4 h irradiation. The algae treated with heating can also enhance the photodegradation of BPA. This work helps environmental scientists to understand the photochemical behavior of BPA in lake water. - Algae, humic acid and ferric ions can induce the photodegradation of bisphenol A in an aqueous environment.

  20. Removal of copper ions from aqueous solutions by a new sorbent: Polyethyleneiminemethylene phosphonic acid

    Ferrah, Nacer; ABDERRAHIM, Omar; DIDI, Mohamed Amine; VILLEMIN, Didier

    2011-01-01

    The sorption of copper(II) from sulphate medium on an extractant polymer containing phosphonic acid has been studied in batch mode. Since the extraction kinetics were fast, with a mixture of 0.01 g of extractant and 5 mL of copper(II) 31.75 mg/L solution, extraction equilibrium was reached within 20 min of mixing. The sorption process follows a pseudo-second-order kinetics. The influence of some parameters such as initial copper(II) ion concentration, initial pH of aqueous solution, ion stren...

  1. RP-IPC with a lactic acid modified eluent for separation and determination of lanthanide ions

    In this paper, a modified method for the separation and determination of Rare Earth Elements in solution is developed. Lanthanide ions were separated by Reversed-Phase Ion Pair Chromatography using a mobile phase gradient of pH and lactic acid concentration. A post-column reaction with 4-(2 pyridyl)azo resorcinol was carried out for the spectrophotometric detection of solutes. The derivatizing reagent composition was optimized for good solute sensitivity and long-term reagent stability. Method limitations due to inadequate instrumentation are presented and discussed

  2. Spectrophotometric study of ion associate of molybdotunqstophosphoric heteropoly acid with crystal violet

    The ion associates formed by molybdotungstophosphoric acid and Crystal Violet have been studied. The ratio of MTP:CV is 1:3 at P:W=1:1 and 1:4 at P:W=1:11. Conditions for the ion associate formation and flotation with butyl acetate have been found. The molar absorptivities are 2.78x105 and 4.17x105 respectively. A procedure has been developed of spectrophotometric determination of phosphorus in the presence of arsenic

  3. High-performance chelation chromatography of metal ions on sorbents with grafted iminodiacetic acid

    Chromatographic behavior of some alkaline earth, transition, heavy (including uranium) and rare earth metal ions on a group of complexing sorbents, containing surface functional groups of imidodiacetic acid, was studied. Conditions, under which metal retention is determined by complexing on the sorbent surface, were defined and main principles of a new variant of liquid chromatography, i.e. high-performance chelating chromatography of metal ions (HPCCI) were formulated. It is shown that under optimal conditions metal retention correlates linearly in bilogarithmic coordinates with stability constants of the relevant metal complexes. Potentialities of HPCCI analytic application to analysis of objects featuring complex composition were considered

  4. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    Popescu (Hoştuc), Ioana-Carmen; Petru, Filip; Humelnicu, Ionel; Mateescu, Marina; Militaru, Ecaterina; Humelnicu, Doina

    2014-10-01

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  5. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    Popescu, Ioana-Carmen [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Petru, Filip [“C.D. Nenitescu” Institute of Organic Chemistry, Splaiul Independentei 202B, Sector 6, Bucharest 71141 (Romania); Humelnicu, Ionel [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Mateescu, Marina [National R and D Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Splaiul Independenţei No. 202, Bucharest 060021 (Romania); Militaru, Ecaterina [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Humelnicu, Doina, E-mail: doinah@uaic.ro [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2014-10-15

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  6. Ratiometric Organic Fibers for Localized and Reversible Ion Sensing with Micrometer‐Scale Spatial Resolution

    Moffa, Maria; Rinaldi, Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental issue in biomedical and environmental sciences is the development of sensitive and robust sensors able to probe the analyte of interest, under physiological and pathological conditions or in environmental samples, and with very high spatial resolution. In this work, novel hybrid organic fibers that can effectively report the analyte concentration within the local microenvironment are reported. The nanostructured and flexible wires are prepared by embedding fluorescent pH sensors based on seminaphtho‐rhodafluor‐1‐dextran conjugate. By adjusting capsule/polymer ratio and spinning conditions, the diameter of the fibers and the alignment of the reporting capsules are both tuned. The hybrid wires display excellent stability, high sensitivity, as well as reversible response, and their operation relies on effective diffusional kinetic coupling of the sensing regions and the embedding polymer matrix. These devices are believed to be a powerful new sensing platform for clinical diagnostics, bioassays and environmental monitoring. PMID:26539625

  7. Ratiometric Organic Fibers for Localized and Reversible Ion Sensing with Micrometer-Scale Spatial Resolution.

    del Mercato, Loretta L; Moffa, Maria; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-12-22

    A fundamental issue in biomedical and environmental sciences is the development of sensitive and robust sensors able to probe the analyte of interest, under physiological and pathological conditions or in environmental samples, and with very high spatial resolution. In this work, novel hybrid organic fibers that can effectively report the analyte concentration within the local microenvironment are reported. The nanostructured and flexible wires are prepared by embedding fluorescent pH sensors based on seminaphtho-rhodafluor-1-dextran conjugate. By adjusting capsule/polymer ratio and spinning conditions, the diameter of the fibers and the alignment of the reporting capsules are both tuned. The hybrid wires display excellent stability, high sensitivity, as well as reversible response, and their operation relies on effective diffusional kinetic coupling of the sensing regions and the embedding polymer matrix. These devices are believed to be a powerful new sensing platform for clinical diagnostics, bioassays and environmental monitoring. PMID:26539625

  8. Water ICE: Ion Exclusion Chromatography of Very Weak Acids with a Pure Water Eluent.

    Liao, Hongzhu; Shelor, C Phillip; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-05-01

    Separation of ions or ionizable compounds with pure water as eluent and detecting them in a simple fashion has been an elusive goal. It has been known for some time that carbonic acid can be separated from strong acids by ion chromatography in the exclusion mode (ICE) using only water as the eluent. The practice of water ICE was shown feasible for very weak acids like silicate and borate with a dedicated element specific detector like an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), but this is rarely practical in most laboratories. Direct conductometric detection is possible for H2CO3 but because of its weak nature, not especially sensitive; complex multistep ion exchange methods do not markedly improve this LOD. It will clearly be impractical in acids that are weaker still. By using a permeative amine introduction device (PAID, Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 2198 - 2204 ) as a conductometric developing agent, we demonstrate that a variety of weak acids (silicate, borate, arsenite, cyanide, carbonate, and sulfide) cannot only be separated on an ion exclusion column, they can be sensitively detected (LODs 0.2-0.4 μM). We observe that the elution order is essentially the same as that on a nonfunctionalized poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) column using 1-10% acetonitrile as eluent and follows the reverse order of the polar surface area (PSA) of the analyte molecules. PSA values have been widely used to predict biological transport of pharmaceuticals across a membrane but never to predict chromatographic behavior. We demonstrate the application of the technique by measuring the silicate and borate depth profiles in the Pacific Ocean; the silicate results show an excellent match with results from a reference laboratory. PMID:27075932

  9. Ion exchange behaviour of Zr, Hf, Nb and Pa in mixed acid solutions

    A systematic study of the adsorbabilities of zirconium, hafnium, niobium and protactinium, elements with a chemical behaviour very similar, were realised in the systems Dowex 50 - oxalic acid, Dowex 50 - oxalic acid/HCl, Dowex 1 - oxalic acid, Dowex 1 - oxalic acid/HCl, BIO-RAD AGMP1 - oxalic acid/H2SO4 and HDEHP - oxalic acid/H2SO4. These elements exhibited no significant adsorption on Dowex 50, while on the anionic exchange resins (Dowex 1 and BIO-RAD AGMP1) showed strong adsorption, particularly in oxalic acid and in mixed solutions at low concentrations of hydrochloric and sulphuric acids. This trend could be linked to the formation of anionic species of the types M(C2O4)x(n-x), MO(C2O4)x(n-(2+x)), M(C2O4H)x(n-x) and MO(C2O4H)x(n-(2+x)), or mixed complexes of the form M(Y)y(C2O4)x(n-x-y) , MO(Y)y(C2O4)x(n-(2+x+y)), where Mn+ is the metallic cation and Y the ligand. The combination of two complexing agents alter the ion exchange behaviour of the above mentioned elements. In the case of system HDEHP, we suggest a procedure to separate these elements. (author)

  10. Ion chromatographic determination of dibutylphosphoric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing streams

    A rapid method was developed for the determination of dibutylphosphoric acid (DBP), a degradation product of tributylphosphate (TBP), which is used in a solvent extraction process for recovery of uranium. DBP, along with any monobutylphosphoric acid (MBP) and phosphoric acid, are extracted from the organic phase into dilute sodium hydroxide. DBP is separated from MBP and phosphoric acid by ion chromatography (IC) and is determined on a peak height ratio basis. The method required only 30 minutes per analysis as compared to the conventional alumina column separation-colorimetric determination procedure, which requires eight hours to complete. DBP has been quantified to a lower limit of 1.5 mg/l. Relative standard deviations ranging from 5.7 to 0.4% were obtained for DBP concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 500 mg/l, respectively