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Sample records for acid rescues endoplasmic

  1. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation rescues native folding in loss of function protein misfolding diseases.

    Wang, Fan; Song, Wensi; Brancati, Giovanna; Segatori, Laura

    2011-12-16

    Lysosomal storage disorders are often caused by mutations that destabilize native folding and impair trafficking of secretory proteins. We demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) prevents native folding of mutated lysosomal enzymes in patient-derived fibroblasts from two clinically distinct lysosomal storage disorders, namely Gaucher and Tay-Sachs disease. Prolonging ER retention via ERAD inhibition enhanced folding, trafficking, and activity of these unstable enzyme variants. Furthermore, combining ERAD inhibition with enhancement of the cellular folding capacity via proteostasis modulation resulted in synergistic rescue of mutated enzymes. ERAD inhibition was achieved by cell treatment with small molecules that interfere with recognition (kifunensine) or retrotranslocation (eeyarestatin I) of misfolded substrates. These different mechanisms of ERAD inhibition were shown to enhance ER retention of mutated proteins but were associated with dramatically different levels of ER stress, unfolded protein response activation, and unfolded protein response-induced apoptosis. PMID:22006919

  2. Microbes Promote Amino Acid Harvest to Rescue Undernutrition in Drosophila

    Ryuichi Yamada

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbes play an important role in the pathogenesis of nutritional disorders such as protein-specific malnutrition. However, the precise contribution of microbes to host energy balance during undernutrition is unclear. Here, we show that Issatchenkia orientalis, a fungal microbe isolated from field-caught Drosophila melanogaster, promotes amino acid harvest to rescue the lifespan of undernourished flies. Using radioisotope-labeled dietary components (amino acids, nucleotides, and sucrose to quantify nutrient transfer from food to microbe to fly, we demonstrate that I. orientalis extracts amino acids directly from nutrient-poor diets and increases protein flux to the fly. This microbial association restores body mass, protein, glycerol, and ATP levels and phenocopies the metabolic profile of adequately fed flies. Our study uncovers amino acid harvest as a fundamental mechanism linking microbial and host metabolism, and highlights Drosophila as a platform for quantitative studies of host-microbe relationships.

  3. CYP2J2-Derived Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Suppress Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Heart Failure

    Wang, Xingxu; Ni, Li; Yang, Lei; Duan, Quanlu; Chen, Chen; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; WANG, DAO WEN

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes apoptosis and is associated with heart failure. Whether CYP2J2 and its arachidonic acid metabolites [epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs)] have a protective influence on ER stress and heart failure has not been studied. Assays of myocardial samples from patients with end-stage heart failure showed evidence of ER stress. Chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO) or angiotensin II (AngII) by osmotic mini-pump induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart fai...

  4. α-Linolenic acid prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of stearic acid lipotoxicity on primary rat hepatocytes

    Shi Hongyang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims Lipid accumulation in non-adipose tissues leads to cell dysfunction and apoptosis, a phenomenon known as lipotoxicity. Unsaturated fatty acids may offset the lipotoxicity associated with saturated fatty acids. Stearic acid induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and caused apoptotic and necrotic cell death in the primary rat hepatocytes. Methods Cell viability was investigated using MTT assay, and apoptosis was evaluated with Hoechst 33342 staining. Western blot analysis was used to examine the changes in the expression levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78, glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP. Caspase-3 activity was evaluated using a Caspase-3 substrate kit. Results We have studied the ability of α-linolenic acid to prevent endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of rat hepatocytes elicited by stearic acid and thapsigargin. Incubation of primary rat hepatocytes for 16 h with stearic acid produced a significant increase in cell death. Stearic acid also increased levels of three indicators of ER stress -- GRP78, CHOP, and GRP94. α-Linolenic acid distinctly reduced cell death and levels of all three indicators of ER stress brought about by stearic acid. Thapsigargin, which induces ER stress produced similar effects to those obtained using stearic acid; its effects were partly reversed by α-linolenic acid. Conclusion These results suggest that α-linolenic acid prevents ER stress-mediated apoptosis of stearic acid lipotoxicity on primary rat hepatocytes might become a target to develop new antiapoptotic compounds in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD.

  5. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress in the chondrocytes of patients with osteoarthritis.

    Liu, Chao; Cao, Yongping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Pengcheng; Liu, Heng

    2015-10-01

    The main pathogenic events in osteoarthritis (OA) include loss and abnormal remodeling of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Articular cartilage tissues were collected from 18 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and were analyzed histologically. Subsequently, chondrocyte apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were employed to evaluate gene and protein expression, respectively, of ER stress markers, including glucose‑regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest and DNA‑damage‑inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and caspase‑12 along with type II collagen. Chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritis patients at different stages were cultured in three conditions including: No treatment (CON group), tunicamycin treatment to induce ER stress (ERS group) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment after 4 h of tunicamycin (TDA group); and cell proliferation, apoptosis, function and ER stress level were assessed. Degradation of cartilage resulted in histological damage with more apoptotic cartilage cells observed. Of note, GRP78, GADD153 and caspase‑12 mRNA and protein expression increased gradually from grade I to III cartilage tissue, while type II collagen expression decreased. Tunicamycin induced ER stress, as shown by a high expression of ER stress markers, reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased synthesis of type II collagen. Notably, tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment resulted in the improvement of tunicamycin‑induced ER stress. These results indicated that ER stress is highly involved in the tunicamycin‑induced apoptosis in chondrocytes, which can be prevented by tauroursodeoxycholic acid. PMID:26238983

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid and palmitic acid reciprocally modulate monocyte activation in part through endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Snodgrass, Ryan G; Huang, Shurong; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Jandali, Ola; Shao, Tiffany; Sama, Spandana; Brüne, Bernhard; Hwang, Daniel H

    2016-06-01

    Palmitic acid (C16:0) and TLR2 ligand induce, but docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibits monocyte activation. C16:0 and TLR2 or TLR4 ligand induce certain ER stress markers; thus, we determined whether ER stress induced by these agonists is sufficient to induce monocyte activation, and whether the ER stress is inhibited by DHA which is known to inhibit C16:0- or ligand-induced TLR activation. Monocyte activation and ER stress were assessed by TLR/inflammasome-induced IL-1β production, and phosphorylation of IRE-1 and eIF2 and expression of CHOP, respectively in THP-1 cells. TLR2 ligand Pam3CSK4 induced phosphorylation of eIF2, but not phosphorylation of IRE-1 and CHOP expression. LPS also induced phosphorylation of both IRE-1 and eIF2 but not CHOP expression suggesting that TLR2 or TLR4 ligand, or C16:0 induces different ER stress responses. C16:0-, Pam3CSK4-, or LPS-induced IL-1β production was inhibited by 4-phenylbutyric acid, an inhibitor of ER stress suggesting that IL-1β production induced by these agonists is partly mediated through ER stress. Among two ER stress-inducing molecules, thapsigargin but not tunicamycin led to the expression of pro-IL-1β and secretion of IL-1β. Thus, not all types of ER stress are sufficient to induce inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in monocytes. Although both C16:0 and thapsigargin-induced IL-1β secretion was inhibited by DHA, only C16:0-mediated ER stress was responsive to DHA. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of DHA are at least in part mediated through modulating ER homeostasis and that the propensity of ER stress can be differentially modulated by the types of dietary fat we consume. PMID:27142735

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Thiol Oxidase Deficiency Leads to Ascorbic Acid Depletion and Noncanonical Scurvy in Mice

    Zito, Ester; Hansen, Henning Gram; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Fujii, Junichi; Ron, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) thiol oxidases initiate a disulfide relay to oxidatively fold secreted proteins. We found that combined loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding the ER thiol oxidases ERO1α, ERO1β, and PRDX4 compromised the extracellular matrix in mice and interfered with the intracellular maturation of procollagen. These severe abnormalities were associated with an unexpectedly modest delay in disulfide bond formation in secreted proteins but a profound, 5-fold lower pr...

  8. Differential Contribution of Endoplasmic Reticulum and Chloroplast ω-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes to the Linolenic Acid Content of Olive (Olea europaea) Fruit.

    Hernández, M Luisa; Sicardo, M Dolores; Martínez-Rivas, José M

    2016-01-01

    Linolenic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in plant lipids, which plays key roles in plant metabolism as a structural component of storage and membrane lipids, and as a precursor of signaling molecules. The synthesis of linolenic acid is catalyzed by two different ω-3 fatty acid desaturases, which correspond to microsomal- (FAD3) and chloroplast- (FAD7 and FAD8) localized enzymes. We have investigated the specific contribution of each enzyme to the linolenic acid content in olive fruit. With that aim, we isolated two different cDNA clones encoding two ω-3 fatty acid desaturases from olive (Olea europaea cv. Picual). Sequence analysis indicates that they code for microsomal (OepFAD3B) and chloroplast (OepFAD7-2) ω-3 fatty acid desaturase enzymes, different from the previously characterized OekFAD3A and OekFAD7-1 genes. Functional expression in yeast of the corresponding OepFAD3A and OepFAD3B cDNAs confirmed that they encode microsomal ω-3 fatty acid desaturases. The linolenic acid content and transcript levels of olive FAD3 and FAD7 genes were measured in different tissues of Picual and Arbequina cultivars, including mesocarp and seed during development and ripening of olive fruit. Gene expression and lipid analysis indicate that FAD3A is the gene mainly responsible for the linolenic acid present in the seed, while FAD7-1 and FAD7-2 contribute mostly to the linolenic acid present in the mesocarp and, therefore, in the olive oil. These results also indicate the relevance of lipid trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast in determining the linolenic acid content of membrane and storage lipids in oil-accumulating photosynthetic tissues. PMID:26514651

  9. Rescuing the duty to rescue.

    Rulli, Tina; Millum, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Clinicians and health researchers frequently encounter opportunities to rescue people. Rescue cases can generate a moral duty to aid those in peril. As such, bioethicists have leveraged a duty to rescue for a variety of purposes. Yet, despite its broad application, the duty to rescue is underanalysed. In this paper, we assess the state of theorising about the duty to rescue. There are large gaps in bioethicists' understanding of the force, scope and justification of the two most cited duties to rescue-the individual duty of easy rescue and the institutional rule of rescue. We argue that the duty of easy rescue faces unresolved challenges regarding its force and scope, and the rule of rescue is indefensible. If the duty to rescue is to help solve ethical problems, these theoretical gaps must be addressed. We identify two further conceptions of the duty to rescue that have received less attention-an institutional duty of easy rescue and the professional duty to rescue. Both provide guidance in addressing force and scope concerns and, thereby, traction in answering the outstanding problems with the duty to rescue. We conclude by proposing research priorities for developing accounts of duties to rescue in bioethics. PMID:24790055

  10. Nonesterified Fatty Acid-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Cattle Cumulus Oocyte Complexes Alters Cell Metabolism and Developmental Competence.

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Wu, Linda L Y; Purdey, Malcolm; Abell, Andrew D; Goldys, Ewa M; MacMillan, Keith L; Thompson, Jeremy G; Robker, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Reduced oocyte quality has been associated with poor fertility of high-performance dairy cows during peak lactation, due to negative energy balance. We examined the role of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), known to accumulate within follicular fluid during under- and overnutrition scenarios, in causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress of in vitro maturated cattle cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). NEFA concentrations were: palmitic acid (150 μM), oleic acid (200 μM), and steric acid (75 μM). Abattoir-derived COCs were randomly matured for 24 h in the presence of NEFAs and/or an ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal. Total and hatched blastocyst yields were negatively impacted by NEFA treatment compared with controls, but this was reversed by salubrinal. ER stress markers, activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) and heat shock protein 5 (Hspa5), but not Atf6, were significantly up-regulated by NEFA treatment within whole COCs but reversed by coincubation with salubrinal. Likewise, glucose uptake and lactate production, measured in spent medium samples, showed a similar pattern, suggesting that cumulus cell metabolism is sensitive to NEFAs via an ER stress-mediated process. In contrast, while mitochondrial DNA copy number was recovered in NEFA-treated oocytes, oocyte autofluorescence of the respiratory chain cofactor, FAD, was lower following NEFA treatment of COCs, and this was not reversed by salubrinal, suggesting the negative impact was via reduced mitochondrial function. These results reveal the significance of NEFA-induced ER stress on bovine COC developmental competence, revealing a potential therapeutic target for improving oocyte quality during peak lactation. PMID:26658709

  11. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes

    Chang-Xiang Shi; Ming-Xia Zhao; Xiao-Dong Shu; Xiao-Qing Xiong; Jue-Jin Wang; Xing-Ya Gao; Qi Chen; Yue-Hua Li; Yu-Ming Kang; Guo-Qing Zhu

    2016-01-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis a...

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress involved in high-fat diet and palmitic acid-induced vascular damages and fenofibrate intervention

    Fenofibrate (FF) is widely used to lower blood lipids in clinical practice, but whether its protective effect on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) in thoracic aorta is related with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unknown. In this study, female Sprauge Dawley rats were divided into standard chow diets (SCD), high-fat diets (HFD) and HFD plus FF treatment group (HFD + FF) randomly. The rats of latter two groups were given HFD feeding for 5 months, then HFD + FF rats were treated with FF (30 mg/kg, once daily) via gavage for another 2 months. The pathological and tensional changes, protein expression of eNOS, and ER stress related genes in thoracic aorta were measured. Then impacts of palmitic acid (PA) and FF on EDV of thoracic aorta from normal female SD rats were observed. Ultimately the expression of ER stress related genes were assessed in primary mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAEC) treated by fenofibric acid (FA) and PA. We found that FF treatment improved serum lipid levels and pathological changes in thoracic aorta, accompanied with decreased ER stress and increased phosphorylation of eNOS. FF pretreatment also improved EDV impaired by different concentrations of PA treatment. The dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation by PA were inverted by FA pretreatment. Phosphorylation of eNOS and expression of ER stress related genes were all inverted by FA pretreatment in PA-treated MAEC. Our findings show that fenofibrate recovers damaged EDV by chronic HFD feeding and acute stimulation of PA, this effect is related with decreased ER stress and increased phosphorylation of eNOS. - Highlights: • Fenofibrate treatment improved pathological changes in thoracic aorta by chronic high-fat-diet feeding. • Fenofibrate pretreatment improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation impaired by different concentrations of palmitic acid. • The inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells by palmitic acid were inverted by fenofibric

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress involved in high-fat diet and palmitic acid-induced vascular damages and fenofibrate intervention

    Lu, Yunxia, E-mail: wwwdluyx@sina.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); The Comprehensive Laboratory, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Cheng, Jingjing [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Chen, Li [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Department of Medical Laboratory, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Hefei, Anhui 230001 (China); Li, Chaofei; Chen, Guanjun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Gui, Li [The Comprehensive Laboratory, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Shen, Bing [Department of Physiology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Zhang, Qiu [Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China)

    2015-02-27

    Fenofibrate (FF) is widely used to lower blood lipids in clinical practice, but whether its protective effect on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) in thoracic aorta is related with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unknown. In this study, female Sprauge Dawley rats were divided into standard chow diets (SCD), high-fat diets (HFD) and HFD plus FF treatment group (HFD + FF) randomly. The rats of latter two groups were given HFD feeding for 5 months, then HFD + FF rats were treated with FF (30 mg/kg, once daily) via gavage for another 2 months. The pathological and tensional changes, protein expression of eNOS, and ER stress related genes in thoracic aorta were measured. Then impacts of palmitic acid (PA) and FF on EDV of thoracic aorta from normal female SD rats were observed. Ultimately the expression of ER stress related genes were assessed in primary mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAEC) treated by fenofibric acid (FA) and PA. We found that FF treatment improved serum lipid levels and pathological changes in thoracic aorta, accompanied with decreased ER stress and increased phosphorylation of eNOS. FF pretreatment also improved EDV impaired by different concentrations of PA treatment. The dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation by PA were inverted by FA pretreatment. Phosphorylation of eNOS and expression of ER stress related genes were all inverted by FA pretreatment in PA-treated MAEC. Our findings show that fenofibrate recovers damaged EDV by chronic HFD feeding and acute stimulation of PA, this effect is related with decreased ER stress and increased phosphorylation of eNOS. - Highlights: • Fenofibrate treatment improved pathological changes in thoracic aorta by chronic high-fat-diet feeding. • Fenofibrate pretreatment improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation impaired by different concentrations of palmitic acid. • The inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells by palmitic acid were inverted by fenofibric

  14. Anti-diabetic effect of 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone.

    Park, Sun-Mi; Choi, Jungsook; Nam, Tae-Gyu; Ku, Jin-Mo; Jeong, Kwiwan

    2016-05-15

    Lots of experimental and clinical evidences indicate that chronic exposure to saturated fatty acids and high level of glucose is implicated in insulin resistance, beta cell failure and ultimately type 2 diabetes. In this study, we set up cell-based experimental conditions to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and insulin resistance using high concentration of palmitate (PA). Hydroxynaphthoic acids (HNAs) were formerly identified as novel chemical chaperones to resolve ER stress induced by tunicamycin. In this study, we found the compounds have the same suppressive effect on PA-induced ER stress in HepG2 cells. The representing compound, 3-HNA reduced PA-induced phosphorylation of JNK, IKKβ and IRS1 (S307) and restored insulin signaling cascade which involves insulin receptor β, IRS1 and Akt. The insulin sensitizing effect of 3-HNA was confirmed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the compound augmented insulin signaling and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) membrane translocation. 3-HNA also protected the pancreatic beta cells from PA-induced apoptosis by reducing ER stress. Upon 3-HNA treatment to ob/ob mice at 150mg/kg/day dosage, the diabetic parameters including glucose tolerance and systemic insulin sensitivity were significantly improved. Postmortem examination showed that 3-HNA markedly reduced ER stress and insulin resistance in the liver tissues and it sensitized insulin signaling in the liver and the skeletal muscle. Our results demonstrated that 3-HNA can sensitize insulin signaling by coping with lipotoxicity-induced ER stress as a chemical chaperone and suggested it holds therapeutic potential for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26983645

  15. WRINKLED1 Rescues Feedback Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthesis in Hydroxylase-Expressing Seeds.

    Adhikari, Neil D; Bates, Philip D; Browse, John

    2016-05-01

    Previous attempts at engineering Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to produce seed oils containing hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) have resulted in low yields of HFA compared with the native castor (Ricinus communis) plant and caused undesirable effects, including reduced total oil content. Recent studies have led to an understanding of problems involved in the accumulation of HFA in oils of transgenic plants, which include metabolic bottlenecks and a decrease in the rate of fatty acid synthesis. Focusing on engineering the triacylglycerol assembly mechanisms led to modest increases in the HFA content of seed oil, but much room for improvement still remains. We hypothesized that engineering fatty acid synthesis in the plastids to increase flux would facilitate enhanced total incorporation of fatty acids, including HFA, into seed oil. The transcription factor WRINKLED1 (WRI1) positively regulates the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and controls seed oil levels. We overexpressed Arabidopsis WRI1 in seeds of a transgenic line expressing the castor fatty acid hydroxylase. The proportion of HFA in the oil, the total HFA per seed, and the total oil content of seeds increased to an average of 20.9%, 1.26 µg, and 32.2%, respectively, across five independent lines, compared with 17.6%, 0.83 µg, and 27.9%, respectively, for isogenic segregants. WRI1 and WRI1-regulated genes involved in fatty acid synthesis were up-regulated, providing for a corresponding increase in the rate of fatty acid synthesis. PMID:27208047

  16. WRINKLED1 Rescues Feedback Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthesis in Hydroxylase-Expressing Seeds1[OPEN

    Browse, John

    2016-01-01

    Previous attempts at engineering Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to produce seed oils containing hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) have resulted in low yields of HFA compared with the native castor (Ricinus communis) plant and caused undesirable effects, including reduced total oil content. Recent studies have led to an understanding of problems involved in the accumulation of HFA in oils of transgenic plants, which include metabolic bottlenecks and a decrease in the rate of fatty acid synthesis. Focusing on engineering the triacylglycerol assembly mechanisms led to modest increases in the HFA content of seed oil, but much room for improvement still remains. We hypothesized that engineering fatty acid synthesis in the plastids to increase flux would facilitate enhanced total incorporation of fatty acids, including HFA, into seed oil. The transcription factor WRINKLED1 (WRI1) positively regulates the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and controls seed oil levels. We overexpressed Arabidopsis WRI1 in seeds of a transgenic line expressing the castor fatty acid hydroxylase. The proportion of HFA in the oil, the total HFA per seed, and the total oil content of seeds increased to an average of 20.9%, 1.26 µg, and 32.2%, respectively, across five independent lines, compared with 17.6%, 0.83 µg, and 27.9%, respectively, for isogenic segregants. WRI1 and WRI1-regulated genes involved in fatty acid synthesis were up-regulated, providing for a corresponding increase in the rate of fatty acid synthesis. PMID:27208047

  17. A high-affinity Ca{sup 2+} pump, ECA1, from the endoplasmic reticulum is inhibited by cyclopiazonic acid but not by thapsigargin

    Feng Liang; Sze, H. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics

    1998-11-01

    To identify and characterize individual Ca{sup 2+} pumps, the authors have expressed an Arabidopsis ECA1 gene encoding an endoplasmic reticulum-type Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase homolog in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant K616. The mutant (pmc1pmr1cnb1) lacks a Golgi and a vacuolar membrane Ca{sup 2+} pump and grows very poorly on Ca{sup 2+}-depleted medium. Membranes isolated from the mutant showed high H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-antiport but no Ca{sup 2+}-pump activity. Expression of ECA1 in endomembranes increased mutant growth by 10- to 20-fold in Ca{sup 2+}-depleted medium. {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} pumping into vesicles from ECA1 transformants was detected after the H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-antiport activity was eliminated with bafilomycin A{sub 1} and gramicidin D. The pump had a high affinity for Ca{sup 2+} (K{sub m} = 30 nM) and displayed two affinities for ATP. Cyclopiazonic acid, a specific blocker of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase, inhibited Ca{sup 2+} transport but thapsigargin did not. Transport was insensitive to calmodulin. These results suggest that this endoplasmic reticulum-type Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase could support cell growth in plants as in yeast by maintaining submicromolar levels of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} and replenishing Ca{sup 2+} in endomembrane compartments. This study demonstrates that the yeast K616 mutant provides a powerful expression system to study the structure/function relationships of Ca{sup 2+} pumps from eukaryotes.

  18. BACE1 activity impairs neuronal glucose oxidation: rescue by beta-hydroxybutyrate and lipoic acid

    Findlay, John A.; Hamilton, David L.; Ashford, Michael L J

    2015-01-01

    Glucose hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial function in neurons have been suggested to play early and perhaps causative roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Activity of the aspartic acid protease, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), responsible for beta amyloid peptide generation, has recently been demonstrated to modify glucose metabolism. We therefore examined, using a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line, whether increased BACE1 activity...

  19. Bace1 activity impairs neuronal glucose metabolism: rescue by beta-hydroxybutyrate and lipoic acid

    John A Findlay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial function in neurons have been suggested to play early and perhaps causative roles in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis. Activity of the aspartic acid protease, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, responsible for beta amyloid peptide generation, has recently been demonstrated to modify glucose metabolism. We therefore examined, using a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cell line, whether increased BACE1 activity is responsible for a reduction in cellular glucose metabolism. Overexpression of active BACE1, but not a protease-dead mutant BACE1, protein in SH-SY5Y cells reduced glucose oxidation and the basal oxygen consumption rate, which was associated with a compensatory increase in glycolysis. Increased BACE1 activity had no effect on the mitochondrial electron transfer process but was found to diminish substrate delivery to the mitochondria by inhibition of key mitochondrial decarboxylation reaction enzymes. This BACE1 activity-dependent deficit in glucose oxidation was alleviated by the presence of beta hydroxybutyrate or α-lipoic acid. Consequently our data indicate that raised cellular BACE1 activity drives reduced glucose oxidation in a human neuronal cell line through impairments in the activity of specific tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Because this bioenergetic deficit is recoverable by neutraceutical compounds we suggest that such agents, perhaps in conjunction with BACE1 inhibitors, may be an effective therapeutic strategy in the early-stage management or treatment of AD.

  20. Triggering Apoptotic Death of Human Epidermal Keratinocytes by Malic Acid: Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress- and Mitochondria-Dependent Signaling Pathways

    Yu-Ping Hsiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malic acid (MA has been commonly used in cosmetic products, but the safety reports in skin are sparse. To investigate the biological effects of MA in human skin keratinocytes, we investigated the potential cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of MA in human keratinocyte cell lines (HaCaT. The data showed that MA induced apoptosis based on the observations of DAPI staining, DNA fragmentation, and sub-G1 phase in HaCaT cells and normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs. Flow cytometric assays also showed that MA increased the production of mitochondrial superoxide (mito-SOX but decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. Analysis of bioenergetics function with the XF 24 analyzer Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR was significantly decreased whereas extracellular acidification rate (ECAR was increased in MA-treated keratinocytes. The occurrence of apoptosis was proved by the increased expressions of FasL, Fas, Bax, Bid, caspases-3, -8, -9, cytochrome c, and the declined expressions of Bcl-2, PARP. MA also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress associated protein expression such as GRP78, GADD153, and ATF6α. We demonstrated that MA had anti-proliferative effect in HaCaT cell through the inhibition of cell cycle progression at G0/G1, and the induction of programmed cell death through endoplasmic reticulum stress- and mitochondria-dependent pathways.

  1. Nitrite Treatment Rescues Cardiac Dysfunction in Aged Mice Treated with Conjugated Linoleic Acid

    Piell, Kellianne M.; Kelm, Natia Qipshidze; Caroway, Megan P.; Aman, Masarath; Cole, Marsha P.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (cLA) is a commercially available weight loss supplement that is not currently regulated by the FDA. Numerous studies suggest that cLA mediates protection in diseases including cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis, immune function, and obesity. Based upon these reports, it was hypothesized that supplementation of cLA would improve heart function in aged wild-type (WT) mice. At 10 months of age, mice were treated with cLA, nitrite, or the combination of the two. Echocardi...

  2. Maritime Rescue

    Constantin Anechitoae

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The maritime rescue, as any other legal institution related to maritime events - collision, crash, etc.- has its distinctive features. The maritime rescue may be considered as the operation that arises frommaritime collision, because, while collision stems from a breach of a negative duty necessary in maritimenavigation, i.e. of not harming the other, the maritime rescue is the implementation of positive obligationsrequired to vessel captains by the material requirements of the marine life that adds to the elements of thelegal concept which can be summed up as follows: to go to the aid of a vessel in danger, provided that thevessel does not expose itself, through this action, to a serious danger. The institution of maritime rescueencourages maritime commercial activities by the fact that, thus, there are governed such clear rights andobligations saving life at sea and shipping goods.

  3. Oil sands to the rescue: oil sand microbial communities can degrade recalcitrant alkyl phenyl alkanoic acids

    Whitby, Corinne [University of Essex (Canada)], email: cwhitby@essex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Almost half of all global oil reserves are found as biodegraded heavy oils found in vast tar sand deposits located in North and South America and these account for 47% of Canadian oil production. Oil sand extraction generates large amounts of toxic waste water, known as oil sand process waters (OSPW), that are stored in large tailing ponds that contain toxic compounds like naphthenic acids (NAs). The presence of NAs creates problems like toxicity, corrosion, and the formation of calcium napthenate deposits which block pipelines and other infrastructure and need to be removed. This paper presents oil sand microbial communities that can degrade these NAs. The approach is to apply new aliphatic and aromatic NAs as substrates to supplement and identify NA degrading microbes and also to identify the metabolites produced and explain NA degradation pathways and the functional genes involved. The chemistry and the processes involved are explained. From the results, it is suggested that pure cultures of P. putida KT2440 be used against NAs.

  4. Cytoprotective role of the fatty acid binding protein 4 against oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Kazuaki Kajimoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4, one of the most abundant proteins in adipocytes, has been reported to have a proinflammatory function in macrophages. However, the physiological role of FABP4, which is constitutively expressed in adipocytes, has not been fully elucidated. Previously, we demonstrated that FABP4 was involved in the regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of FABP4 silencing on the oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and 8-nitro-cyclic GMP levels were significantly elevated in the differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA against Fabp4, although the intracellular levels or enzyme activities of antioxidants including reduced glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione S-transferase A4 (GSTA4 were not altered. An in vitro evaluation using the recombinant protein revealed that FABP4 itself functions as a scavenger protein against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. FABP4-knockdown resulted in a significant lowering of cell viability of 3T3-L1 adipocytes against H2O2 treatment. Moreover, four kinds of markers related to the ER stress response including the endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1 (Ern1, the signal sequence receptor α (Ssr1, the ORM1-like 3 (Ormdl3, and the spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s, were all elevated as the result of the knockdown of FABP4. Consequently, FABP4 might have a new role as an antioxidant protein against H2O2 and contribute to cytoprotection against oxidative and ER stress in adipocytes.

  5. MIRACLE RESCUE

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Atotal of 115 workers had been miraculously retrieved from the flooded Wangjialing Coal Mine in north China's Shanxi Province by the afternoon of April 5, after being trapped underground for more than a week. "It is a miracle in the history of Chinese mining rescues," said Luo Lin, Director of the State Administration of Work Safety, who stood waiting at the pit entrance. "The trapped miners displayed an unwavering determination to survive for eight days and eight nights."

  6. Palmitic Acid-Induced Neuron Cell Cycle G2/M Arrest and Endoplasmic Reticular Stress through Protein Palmitoylation in SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Yung-Hsuan Hsiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related neurodegenerative diseases are associated with elevated saturated fatty acids (SFAs in the brain. An increase in SFAs, especially palmitic acid (PA, triggers neuron cell apoptosis, causing cognitive function to deteriorate. In the present study, we focused on the specific mechanism by which PA triggers SH-SY5Y neuron cell apoptosis. We found that PA induces significant neuron cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase in SH-SY5Y cells. Our data further showed that G2/M arrest is involved in elevation of endoplasmic reticular (ER stress according to an increase in p-eukaryotic translation inhibition factor 2α, an ER stress marker. Chronic exposure to PA also accelerates beta-amyloid accumulation, a pathological characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, SFA-induced ER stress, G2/M arrest and cell apoptosis were reversed by treatment with 2-bromopalmitate, a protein palmitoylation inhibitor. These findings suggest that protein palmitoylation plays a crucial role in SFA-induced neuron cell cycle G2/M arrest, ER stress and apoptosis; this provides a novel strategy for preventing SFA-induced neuron cell dysfunction.

  7. Lactic acid induces aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing by promoting its interaction with endoplasmic reticulum chaperone proteins.

    Yiwen Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lactic acid, a natural by-product of glycolysis, is produced at excess levels in response to impaired mitochondrial function, high-energy demand, and low oxygen availability. The enzyme involved in the production of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ of Alzheimer's disease, BACE1, functions optimally at lower pH, which led us to investigate a potential role of lactic acid in the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lactic acid increased levels of Aβ40 and 42, as measured by ELISA, in culture medium of human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y, whereas it decreased APP metabolites, such as sAPPα. In cell lysates, APP levels were increased and APP was found to interact with ER-chaperones in a perinuclear region, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy studies. Lactic acid had only a very modest effect on cellular pH, did increase the levels of ER chaperones Grp78 and Grp94 and led to APP aggregate formation reminiscent of aggresomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that sustained elevations in lactic acid levels could be a risk factor in amyloidogenesis related to Alzheimer's disease through enhanced APP interaction with ER chaperone proteins and aberrant APP processing leading to increased generation of amyloid peptides and APP aggregates.

  8. Alpha-lipoic acid attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced insulin resistance by improving mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells.

    Lei, Lin; Zhu, Yiwei; Gao, Wenwen; Du, Xiliang; Zhang, Min; Peng, Zhicheng; Fu, Shoupeng; Li, Xiaobing; Zhe, Wang; Li, Xinwei; Liu, Guowen

    2016-10-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) has been reported to have beneficial effects for improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the beneficial effects remains poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are considered causal factors that induce insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated the effect of ALA on the modulation of insulin resistance in ER-stressed HepG2 cells, and we explored the potential mechanism of this effect. HepG2 cells were incubated with tunicamycin (Tun) for 6h to establish an ER stress cell model. Tun treatment induced ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Interestingly, ALA had no significant effect on ER stress signals. Pretreatment of the ER stress cell model with ALA for 24h improved insulin sensitivity, restored the expression levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and increased intracellular ATP production. Moreover, ALA augmented the β-oxidation capacity of the mitochondria. Importantly, ALA treatment could decrease oligomycin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and then improved insulin resistance. Taken together, our data suggest that ALA prevents ER stress-induced insulin resistance by enhancing mitochondrial function. PMID:27377964

  9. Rescue and Stabilization of Acetylcholinesterase in Skeletal Muscle by N-terminal Peptides Derived from the Noncatalytic Subunits.

    Ruiz, Carlos A; Rossi, Susana G; Rotundo, Richard L

    2015-08-21

    The vast majority of newly synthesized acetylcholinesterase (AChE) molecules do not assemble into catalytically active oligomeric forms and are rapidly degraded intracellularly by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation pathway. We have previously shown that AChE in skeletal muscle is regulated in part post-translationally by the availability of the noncatalytic subunit collagen Q, and others have shown that expression of a 17-amino acid N-terminal proline-rich attachment domain of collagen Q is sufficient to promote AChE tetramerization in cells producing AChE. In this study we show that muscle cells, or cell lines expressing AChE catalytic subunits, incubated with synthetic proline-rich attachment domain peptides containing the endoplasmic reticulum retrieval sequence KDEL take up and retrogradely transport them to the endoplasmic reticulum network where they induce assembly of AChE tetramers. The peptides act to enhance AChE folding thereby rescuing them from reticulum degradation. This enhanced folding efficiency occurs in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis and in turn increases total cell-associated AChE activity and active tetramer secretion. Pulse-chase studies of isotopically labeled AChE molecules show that the enzyme is rescued from intracellular degradation. These studies provide a mechanistic explanation for the large scale intracellular degradation of AChE previously observed and indicate that simple peptides alone can increase the production and secretion of this critical synaptic enzyme in muscle tissue. PMID:26139603

  10. Dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids decrease retinal neovascularization by adipose–endoplasmic reticulum stress reduction to increase adiponectin1234

    Fu, Zhongjie; Lofqvist, Chatarina A; Shao, Zhuo; Sun, Ye; Joyal, Jean-Sebastien; Hurst, Christian G.; Cui, Ricky Z; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chen, Jing; Ley, David; Hansen Pupp, Ingrid; Hellstrom, Ann; Smith, Lois EH

    2015-01-01

    Background: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vision-threatening disease in premature infants. Serum adiponectin (APN) concentrations positively correlate with postnatal growth and gestational age, important risk factors for ROP development. Dietary ω-3 (n–3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 LCPUFAs) suppress ROP and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in a mouse model of human ROP, but the mechanism is not fully understood.

  11. Glucose amplifies fatty acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in pancreatic beta-cells via activation of mTORC1.

    Etti Bachar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palmitate is a potent inducer of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in beta-cells. In type 2 diabetes, glucose amplifies fatty-acid toxicity for pancreatic beta-cells, leading to beta-cell dysfunction and death. Why glucose exacerbates beta-cell lipotoxicity is largely unknown. Glucose stimulates mTORC1, an important nutrient sensor involved in the regulation of cellular stress. Our study tested the hypothesis that glucose augments lipotoxicity by stimulating mTORC1 leading to increased beta-cell ER stress. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that glucose amplifies palmitate-induced ER stress by increasing IRE1alpha protein levels and activating the JNK pathway, leading to increased beta-cell apoptosis. Moreover, glucose increased mTORC1 activity and its inhibition by rapamycin decreased beta-cell apoptosis under conditions of glucolipotoxicity. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin did not affect proinsulin and total protein synthesis in beta-cells incubated at high glucose with palmitate. However, it decreased IRE1alpha expression and signaling and inhibited JNK pathway activation. In TSC2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, in which mTORC1 is constitutively active, mTORC1 regulated the stimulation of JNK by ER stressors, but not in response to anisomycin, which activates JNK independent of ER stress. Finally, we found that JNK inhibition decreased beta-cell apoptosis under conditions of glucolipotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our findings suggest that mTORC1 mediates glucose amplification of lipotoxicity, acting through activation of ER stress and JNK. Thus, mTORC1 is an important transducer of ER stress in beta-cell glucolipotoxicity. Moreover, in stressed beta-cells mTORC1 inhibition decreases IRE1alpha protein expression and JNK activity without affecting ER protein load, suggesting that mTORC1 regulates the beta-cell stress response to glucose and fatty acids by modulating the synthesis and activity of specific

  12. [Induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress in conditions of acid-base imbalance in human cells of T-lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Mesitov, M V; Ignashkova, T I; Meshcherskiĭ, M E; Akopov, A S; Sokolovskaia, A A; Moskovtsev, A A; Kubatiev, A A

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress - typical molecular pathophysiological process that underlies many cardiovascular, endocrine and other diseases. Violations of the protein conformational maturation processes in the endoplasmic reticulum can cause proteotoxic stress. Compensatory mechanisms are activated in response to ER stress include increased expression of enzymes involved in the formation of disulfide bonds in proteins. The sulfhydryl groups oxidation in the electron transport chain (PDI-ERO1-O2) is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Increased activity of oxidoreductase ERO1 could be one of the mechanisms of oxidative stress - however, a direct relationship of ER stress with the overproduction of ROS remains a subject of debate. In this study we have shown that induced by dithiothreitol (DTT) violation of the redox balance with low ROS production leads to the endoplasmic reticulum stress in Jurkat cells. ER-stress in these cells is not associated with increased ROS production, DTT treatment leads to induction of apoptosis. Modulation of intracellular levels of ROS can influence the apoptosis-inducing effects of ER-stress. Given the possible involvement of ROS in the generation of disulfide bonds, the role of ROS in ER stress may be a modulation of disulfide proteome including client proteins. PMID:23072118

  13. Reexpression of glial fibrillary acidic protein rescues the ability of astrocytoma cells to form processes in response to neurons

    1994-01-01

    Astroglial cells play an important role in orchestrating the migration and positioning of neurons during central nervous system development. Primary astroglia, as well as astrocytoma cells will extend long stable processes when co-cultured with granule neurons. In order to determine the function of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the major intermediate filament protein in astroglia and astrocytoma cells, we suppressed the expression of GFAP by stable transfection of an anti- sense...

  14. Subchronic Treatment of Donepezil Rescues Impaired Social, Hyperactive, and Stereotypic Behavior in Valproic Acid-Induced Animal Model of Autism

    Ji-Woon Kim; Hana Seung; Kyung Ja Kwon; Mee Jung Ko; Eun Joo Lee; Hyun Ah Oh; Chang Soon Choi; Ki Chan Kim; Edson Luck Gonzales; Jueng Soo You; Dong-Hee Choi; Jongmin Lee; Seol-Heui Han; Sung Min Yang; Jae Hoon Cheong

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of pervasive developmental disorders with core symptoms such as sociability deficit, language impairment, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Although worldwide prevalence of ASD has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the core symptoms especially social deficits, are very limited. In this study, we investigated therapeutic potential of donepezil for ASD using valproic acid-induced autistic animal model (VPA animal model). W...

  15. Mead acid supplementation does not rescue rats from cataract and retinal degeneration induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Hamazaki, Kei; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Tsubura, Airo

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids and their derivatives play a role in the response to ocular disease. Our current study investigated the effects of dietary mead acid (MA, 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid) supplementation on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced cataract and retinal degeneration in Sprague-Dawley rats. Experiment 1 was designed to inhibit cataract formation, with the dams fed a 2.4% MA or basal (<0.01% MA) diet during lactational periods. On postnatal day 7, male pups received a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 50 mg/kg MNU or vehicle. Lens opacity and morphology were examined 7 and 14 days after the MNU injection. Experiment 2 was designed to inhibit retinal degeneration and was performed with female postweaning rats. In this experiment, dams were fed the 2.4% MA or basal diet during the lactational periods. Thereafter, the female pups were continuously fed the same diets during their postweaning periods. On postnatal day 21 (at weaning), pups received a single ip injection of 50 mg/kg MNU. Retinal morphology was examined 7 days after the MNU injection. In experiment 3, six-week-old female rats were fed the 2.4% MA or basal diet starting at one week before the MNU injection and were then continuously fed the same diets until sacrifice. Rats at 7 weeks of age were given a single ip injection of 40 mg/kg MNU, and the retina was then examined morphologically one week after the MNU injection. In experiment 1, mature cataract was found in all of the MNU-treated groups, with or without MA supplementation. In experiments 2 and 3, atrophy of both the peripheral and central outer retina occurred in all rats exposed to MNU, with or without MA supplementation, respectively. The severities of the cataracts and retinal atrophy in the rats were similar regardless of MA supplementation. Dietary mead acid, which is used as a substitute in essential fatty acid deficiency in the body, does not modify MNU-induced cataract and retinal degeneration in rat models. PMID:26023256

  16. Subchronic treatment of donepezil rescues impaired social, hyperactive, and stereotypic behavior in valproic acid-induced animal model of autism.

    Ji-Woon Kim

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a group of pervasive developmental disorders with core symptoms such as sociability deficit, language impairment, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Although worldwide prevalence of ASD has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the core symptoms especially social deficits, are very limited. In this study, we investigated therapeutic potential of donepezil for ASD using valproic acid-induced autistic animal model (VPA animal model. We found that prenatal exposure of valproic acid (VPA induced dysregulation of cholinergic neuronal development, most notably the up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE in the prefrontal cortex of affected rat and mouse offspring. Similarly, differentiating cortical neural progenitor cell in culture treated with VPA showed increased expression of AChE in vitro. Chromatin precipitation experiments revealed that acetylation of histone H3 bound to AChE promoter region was increased by VPA. In addition, other histone deacetyalse inhibitors (HDACIs such as trichostatin A and sodium butyrate also increased the expression of AChE in differentiating neural progenitor cells suggesting the essential role of HDACIs in the regulation of AChE expression. For behavioral analysis, we injected PBS or donepezil (0.3 mg/kg intraperitoneally to control and VPA mice once daily from postnatal day 14 all throughout the experiment. Subchronic treatment of donepezil improved sociability and prevented repetitive behavior and hyperactivity of VPA-treated mice offspring. Taken together, these results provide evidence that dysregulation of ACh system represented by the up-regulation of AChE may serve as an effective pharmacological therapeutic target against autistic behaviors in VPA animal model of ASD, which should be subjected for further investigation to verify the clinical relevance.

  17. Single Amino Acid Deletion in Kindlin-1 Results in Partial Protein Degradation Which Can Be Rescued by Chaperone Treatment.

    Maier, Kristin; He, Yinghong; Esser, Philipp R; Thriene, Kerstin; Sarca, Daniela; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Dengjel, Jörn; Martin, Ludovic; Has, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Kindler syndrome, a distinct type of epidermolysis bullosa, is a rare disorder caused by mutations in FERMT1, encoding kindlin-1. Most FERMT1 mutations lead to premature termination codons and absence of kindlin-1. Here we investigated the molecular and cellular consequences of a naturally occurring FERMT1 mutation, c.299_301del resulting in a single amino acid deletion, p.R100del. The mutation led to a 50% reduction of FERMT1 mRNA and 90% reduction of kindlin-1 protein in keratinocytes derived from the patient, as compared with control cells. The misfolded p.R100del kindlin-1 mutant was lysosomally degraded and launched a homeostatic unfolded protein response. Sodium-phenylbutyrate significantly increased kindlin-1 mRNA and protein levels and the area of mutant cells, acting as a chemical chaperone and probably also as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In a recombinant system, low levels of wild-type or p.R100del mutant kindlin-1 were sufficient to improve the cellular phenotype in respect of spreading and proliferation as compared with kindlin-1 negative keratinocytes. The study of this hypomorphic mutation provides evidence that low amounts of kindlin-1 are sufficient to improve the epidermal architecture and Kindler syndrome cellular phenotype and proposes a personalized chaperone therapy for the patient. PMID:26827766

  18. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  19. Liver-specific Aquaporin 11 knockout mice show rapid vacuolization of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in periportal hepatocytes after amino acid feeding

    Rojek, Aleksandra; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Füchtbauer, Annette C.;

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin 11 (AQP11) is a protein channel expressed intracellularly in multiple organs, yet its physiological function is unclear. Aqp11 knockout (KO) mice die early due to malfunction of the kidney, a result of hydropic degeneration of proximal tubule cells. Here we report the generation of liver......-specific Aqp11 KO mice, allowing us to study the role of AQP11 protein in liver of mice with normal kidney function. The unchallenged liver-specific Aqp11 KO mice have normal longevity, their livers appeared normal, and the plasma biochemistries revealed only a minor defect in lipid handling. Fasting of the...... mice (24 h) induced modest dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in the periportal hepatocytes. Refeeding with standard mouse chow induced rapid generation of large RER-derived vacuoles in Aqp11 KO mice hepatocytes. Similar effects were observed following oral administration of pure...

  20. Hi-tech Rescue

    2008-01-01

    Following the May 12 earthquake in Sichuan Province,rescue teams from across China have been racing against time to save as many people in the disaster area as possible.Among them is a squad clad in eye-catching orange uniforms whose members are better equipped than other rescuers and demonstrate higher levels of skill. It is the country’s best- trained earthquake emergency response team—the China National Earthquake Disaster Emergency Response and Rescue Team,also known as the China International Search and Rescue Team when it performs missions abroad.

  1. Rescue of vasopressin V2 receptor mutants by chemical chaperones: specificity and mechanism.

    Robben, J.H.; Sze, M.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Because missense mutations in genetic diseases of membrane proteins often result in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention of functional proteins, drug-induced rescue of their cell surface expression and understanding the underlying mechanism are of clinical value. To study this, we tested chemical ch

  2. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26616142

  3. Bile-acid-mediated decrease in endoplasmic reticulum stress: a potential contributor to the metabolic benefits of ileal interposition surgery in UCD-T2DM rats

    Bethany P. Cummings

    2013-03-01

    Post-operative increases in circulating bile acids have been suggested to contribute to the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery; however, their mechanistic contributions remain undefined. We have previously reported that ileal interposition (IT surgery delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats and increases circulating bile acids, independently of effects on energy intake or body weight. Therefore, we investigated potential mechanisms by which post-operative increases in circulating bile acids improve glucose homeostasis after IT surgery. IT, sham or no surgery was performed on 2-month-old weight-matched male UCD-T2DM rats. Animals underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT and serial oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT. Tissues were collected at 1.5 and 4.5 months after surgery. Cell culture models were used to investigate interactions between bile acids and ER stress. IT-operated animals exhibited marked improvements in glucose and lipid metabolism, with concurrent increases in postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 secretion during the OFTT and OGTTs, independently of food intake and body weight. Measurement of circulating bile acid profiles revealed increases in circulating total bile acids in IT-operated animals, with a preferential increase in circulating cholic acid concentrations. Gut microbial populations were assessed as potential contributors to the increases in circulating bile acid concentrations, which revealed proportional increases in Gammaproteobacteria in IT-operated animals. Furthermore, IT surgery decreased all three sub-arms of ER stress signaling in liver, adipose and pancreas tissues. Amelioration of ER stress coincided with improved insulin signaling and preservation of β-cell mass in IT-operated animals. Incubation of hepatocyte, adipocyte and β-cell lines with cholic acid decreased ER stress. These results suggest that postoperative increases in circulating cholic acid concentration contribute to improvements in

  4. Bile-acid-mediated decrease in endoplasmic reticulum stress: a potential contributor to the metabolic benefits of ileal interposition surgery in UCD-T2DM rats

    Cummings, Bethany P.; Ahmed Bettaieb; Graham, James L.; Jaehyoung Kim; Fangrui Ma; Noreene Shibata; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Cecilia Giulivi; Frederik Hansen; Jacob Jelsing; Niels Vrang; Mark Kowala; Chouinard, Michael L.; Haj, Fawaz G.; Havel, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-operative increases in circulating bile acids have been suggested to contribute to the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery; however, their mechanistic contributions remain undefined. We have previously reported that ileal interposition (IT) surgery delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats and increases circulating bile acids, independently of effects on energy intake or body weight. Therefore, we investigated potential mechanisms by which post-operative increas...

  5. Acidic phospholipid-independent interaction of Yas3p, an Opi1-family transcriptional repressor of Yarrowia lipolytica, with the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Tezaki, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2015-12-01

    In the n-alkane-assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, the transcription of ALK1, encoding cytochrome P450, that catalyses n-alkane hydroxylation is activated by a complex composed of Yas1p and Yas2p via a promoter element, ARE1, in response to n-alkanes. An Opi1-family transcription factor, Yas3p, represses the transcription by binding to Yas2p in the nucleus when cultured in glucose-containing medium, but it is localized to the ER, presumably through interaction with acidic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid and/or phospho inositides, when cultured in n-alkane-containing medium. Here, to elucidate the mechanisms regulating the localization of Yas3p, point and deletion mutants of Yas3p were constructed and analysed. The substitution of Trp(360) and Cys(361) by Arg abrogated the localization of Yas3p to the ER and decreased ARE1-mediated transcriptional activation by n-alkane. A Yas3p truncation mutant consisting of residues 259-422 did not bind to acidic phospholipids, but it was localized to the ER in the presence of n-alkane, implying the acidic-phospholipid-independent recruitment of this mutant to the ER in response to n-alkane. The W360R and C361R substitutions in this truncation mutant abolished its localization to the ER. The results suggest that these residues are implicated in the acidic phospholipid-independent interaction of Yas3p to the ER. PMID:26284565

  6. Critical Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Cognitive Impairment Induced by Microcystin-LR

    Fei Cai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies showed that cyanobacteria-derived microcystin-leucine-arginine (MCLR can cause hippocampal pathological damage and trigger cognitive impairment; but the underlying mechanisms have not been well understood. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of MCLR-induced cognitive deficit; with a focus on endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. The Morris water maze test and electrophysiological study demonstrated that MCLR caused spatial memory injury in male Wistar rats; which could be inhibited by ER stress blocker; tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA. Meanwhile; real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expression level of the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78; C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and caspase 12 were significantly up-regulated. These effects were rescued by co-administration of TUDCA. In agreement with this; we also observed that treatment of rats with TUDCA blocked the alterations in ER ultrastructure and apoptotic cell death in CA1 neurons from rats exposed to MCLR. Taken together; the present results suggested that ER stress plays an important role in potential memory impairments in rats treated with MCLR; and amelioration of ER stress may serve as a novel strategy to alleviate damaged cognitive function triggered by MCLR.

  7. Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mechanistically Distinguishes the Saline-Intake and Hypertensive Response to DOCA-Salt

    Jo, Fusakazu; Jo, Hiromi; Hilzendeger, Aline M.; Thompson, Anthony P.; Cassell, Martin D.; Rutkowski, D. Thomas; Davisson, Robin L.; Grobe, Justin L.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress has become an important mechanism in hypertension. We examined the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in mediating the increased saline intake and hypertensive effects in response to DOCA-salt. Intracerebroventricular delivery of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone Tauroursodeoxycholic acid did not affect the magnitude of hypertension, but markedly decreased saline intake in response to DOCA-salt. Increased saline intake returned after T...

  8. Perturbation of intestinal microvillar enzyme biosynthesis by amino acid analogs. Evidence that dimerization is required for the transport of aminopeptidase N out of the endoplasmic reticulum

    Danielsen, E M

    1990-01-01

    The amino acid analogs canavanine, 3-hydroxynorvaline, thialysine, 6-fluorotryptophan, m-fluorotyrosine, and 2-fluorophenylalanine were incorporated into proteins, synthesized in pig intestinal mucosal explants, and their effect on molecular processing and intracellular transport of microvillar...... enzymes studied. Unless they were used in combination, none of the analogs drastically reduced the expression of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) or sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48, EC 3.2.1.10), but to a varying extent, they all slowed the rate of transport to the apical surface. In contrast, the cellular...... export of a secretory protein, apolipoprotein A-1, was largely unaffected. For the microvillar enzymes, all six analogs caused an accumulation of the transient, high mannose-glycosylated form, indicating an analog-sensitive stage prior to the Golgi-associated processing. For aminopeptidase N, this arrest...

  9. Improved proteostasis in the secretory pathway rescues Alzheimer's disease in the mouse.

    Peng, Yajing; Kim, Mi Jin; Hullinger, Rikki; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Burger, Corinna; Pehar, Mariana; Puglielli, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    See Duran-Aniotz et al. (doi:10.1093/brain/awv401) for a scientific commentary on this article.The aberrant accumulation of toxic protein aggregates is a key feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. As such, improving normal proteostatic mechanisms is an active target for biomedical research. Although they share common pathological features, protein aggregates form in different subcellular locations. Nε-lysine acetylation in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum has recently emerged as a new mechanism to regulate the induction of autophagy. The endoplasmic reticulum acetylation machinery includes AT-1/SLC33A1, a membrane transporter that translocates acetyl-CoA from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, and ATase1 and ATase2, two acetyltransferases that acetylate endoplasmic reticulum cargo proteins. Here, we used a mutant form of α-synuclein to show that inhibition of the endoplasmic reticulum acetylation machinery specifically improves autophagy-mediated disposal of toxic protein aggregates that form within the secretory pathway, but not those that form in the cytosol. Consequently, haploinsufficiency of AT-1/SLC33A1 in the mouse rescued Alzheimer's disease, but not Huntington's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In fact, intracellular toxic protein aggregates in Alzheimer's disease form within the secretory pathway while in Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis they form in different cellular compartments. Furthermore, biochemical inhibition of ATase1 and ATase2 was also able to rescue the Alzheimer's disease phenotype in a mouse model of the disease. Specifically, we observed reduced levels of soluble amyloid-β aggregates, reduced amyloid-β pathology, reduced phosphorylation of tau, improved synaptic plasticity, and increased lifespan of the animals. In conclusion, our results indicate that Nε-lysine acetylation in the endoplasmic

  10. The rule of rescue.

    McKie, John; Richardson, Jeff

    2003-06-01

    Jonsen coined the term "Rule of Rescue"(RR) to describe the imperative people feel to rescue identifiable individuals facing avoidable death. In this paper we attempt to draw a more detailed picture of the RR, identifying its conflict with cost-effectiveness analysis, the preference it entails for identifiable over statistical lives, the shock-horror response it elicits, the preference it entails for lifesaving over non-lifesaving measures, its extension to non-life-threatening conditions, and whether it is motivated by duty or sympathy. We also consider the measurement problems it raises, and argue that quantifying the RR would probably require a two-stage procedure. In the first stage the size of the individual utility gain from a health intervention would be assessed using a technique such as the Standard Gamble or the Time Trade-Off, and in the second the social benefits arising from the RR would be quantified employing the Person Trade-Off. We also consider the normative status of the RR. We argue that it can be defended from a utilitarian point of view, on the ground that rescues increase well-being by reinforcing people's belief that they live in a community that places great value upon life. However, utilitarianism has long been criticised for failing to take sufficient account of fairness, and the case is no different here: fairness requires that we do not discriminate between individuals on morally irrelevant grounds, whereas being "identifiable" does not seem to be a morally relevant ground for discrimination. PMID:12742604

  11. AIR / SEA RESCUE LAUNCHES

    W.H. Rice

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Motor Boat Wing of the South African Air Force was inaugurated some thirty eight years ago.With its main base at Gordon's Bay, the wing was formed to operate the various marine craft used to provide a service to the flying component of the South African Air Force. Its main function was to be air/sea rescue, but it also had to man and maintain armoured target boats, seaplane tenders, marine tenders and the 'bomb scows', used for recovering practise bombs and missiles and for laying and lifting moorings.

  12. Rescue of vasopressin V2 receptor mutants by chemical chaperones: specificity and mechanism.

    Robben, J.H.; Sze, M.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Deen, P. M. T.

    2006-01-01

    Because missense mutations in genetic diseases of membrane proteins often result in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention of functional proteins, drug-induced rescue of their cell surface expression and understanding the underlying mechanism are of clinical value. To study this, we tested chemical chaperones and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase pump inhibitors on Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing nine ER-retained vasopressin type-2 receptor (V2R) mutants involved in nephrogeni...

  13. Rescue vehicle Stirling engine

    David Hainsworth; Pete Nicolay [CSIRO Exploration & Mining (Australia)

    2001-03-15

    The aim of this project was to develop a proof-of-concept Stirling engine and heat cell for use in the mining industry, primarily for underground applications. In particular, the Stirling engine, being an external combustion engine, offers the potential to operate on stored heat in low-oxygen or inert underground atmospheres. This makes it attractive for rescue vehicles, which are required to operate in such environments. A prototype Stirling engine with power output in the 15kW range was constructed and tested. Experimental measurements showed that this output was not achieved. While the basic thermodynamic principles of the design were valid, achieved output was well below the required value. The conclusion is that, because of the lack of commercial Stirling cycle-based products and the difficulty experienced in this project in overcoming the problem of high temperature seal implementation to produce a working prototype, the short term potential of the Stirling engine for mine rescue applications is limited.

  14. [Importance of helicopter rescue].

    Hofer, G; Voelckel, W G

    2014-03-01

    Helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) have become a main part of prehospital emergency medical services over the last 40 years. Recently, an ongoing discussion about financial shortage and personal shortcomings question the role of cost-intensive air rescue. Thus, the value of HEMS must be examined and discussed appropriately. Since the number of physician-staffed ground ambulances may decrease due to the limited availability of qualified physicians, HEMS may fill the gap. In addition patient transfer to specialized hospitals will require an increasing number of air transports in order to minimize prehospital time. The higher risk ratio for HEMS missions when compared with ground rescue requires a rigorous quality management system. When it comes to missions in remote and exposed areas, the scope of medical treatment must be adjusted to the individual situation. Medical competence is key in order to balance guideline compliant or maximal care versus optimal care characterized as a mission-specific, individualized emergency care concept. Although, medical decision making and treatment is typically based on the best scientific evidence, personal skills, competence, and the mission scenario will determine the scope of interventions suitable to improve outcome. Thus, the profile of requirements for the HEMS medical crew is high. PMID:24618925

  15. Taurine Rescues Cisplatin-Induced Muscle Atrophy In Vitro: A Morphological Study

    Alessandra Stacchiotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug whose side effects include muscle weakness and cachexia. Here we analysed CisPt-induced atrophy in C2C12 myotubes by a multidisciplinary morphological approach, focusing on the onset and progression of autophagy, a protective cellular process that, when excessively activated, may trigger protein hypercatabolism and atrophy in skeletal muscle. To visualize autophagy we used confocal and transmission electron microscopy at different times of treatment and doses of CisPt. Moreover we evaluated the effects of taurine, a cytoprotective beta-amino acid able to counteract oxidative stress, apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in different tissues and organs. Our microscopic results indicate that autophagy occurs very early in 50 μM CisPt challenged myotubes (4 h–8 h before overt atrophy but it persists even at 24 h, when several autophagic vesicles, damaged mitochondria, and sarcoplasmic blebbings engulf the sarcoplasm. Differently, 25 mM taurine pretreatment rescues the majority of myotubes size upon 50 μM CisPt at 24 h. Taurine appears to counteract atrophy by restoring regular microtubular apparatus and mitochondria and reducing the overload and the localization of autophagolysosomes. Such a promising taurine action in preventing atrophy needs further molecular and biochemical studies to best define its impact on muscle homeostasis and the maintenance of an adequate skeletal mass in vivo.

  16. Novel 14S,21-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid Rescues Wound Healing and Associated Angiogenesis Impaired by Acute Ethanol Intoxication/Exposure

    Tian, Haibin; Lu, Yan; Shah, Shraddha P.; Hong, Song

    2010-01-01

    Acute ethanol intoxication and exposure (AE) has been known to impair wound healing and associated angiogenesis. Here we found that AE diminished the formation of novel reparative lipid mediator 14S,21-dihydroxy-docosa-4Z,7Z,10Z,12E,16Z,19Z-hexaenoic acid (14S,21-diHDHA) and its biosynthetic intermediate 14S-hydroxy-DHA (14S-HDHA) from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in murine wounds. However, AE did not reduce the formation of DHA and the intermediate 21-HDHA. These results indicate that in the b...

  17. Sex, Deportation and Rescue

    Plambech, Sine

    2016-01-01

    This contribution explores the economies interlinked by the migration of Nigerian women sex workers. The literature and politics of sex work migration and human trafficking economies are commonly relegated to the realm that focuses on profits for criminal networks and pimps, in particular...... recirculating the claim that human trafficking is the “third largest” criminal economy after drugs and weapons. Based on ethnographic fieldwork among Nigerian sex worker migrants conducted in Benin City, Nigeria, in 2011 and 2012, this study brings together four otherwise isolated migration economies...... – facilitation, remittances, deportation, and rescue – and suggests that we have to examine multiple sites and relink these in order to more fully understand the complexity of sex work migration. Drawing upon literature within transnational feminist analysis, critical human trafficking studies, and migration...

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in mouse decidua during early pregnancy.

    Gu, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Jia-Qi; Dou, Hai-Ting; Liu, Jie; Liu, Li; Zhao, Meng-Long; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2016-10-15

    Unfolded or misfolded protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress). Although it is known that ER stress is crucial for mammalian reproduction, little is known about its physiological significance and underlying mechanism during decidualization. Here we show that Ire-Xbp1 signal transduction pathway of unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in decidual cells. The process of decidualization is compromised by ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid sodium (TUDCA) and Ire specific inhibitor STF-083010 both in vivo and in vitro. A high concentration of ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM) suppresses stromal cells proliferation and decidualization, while a lower concentration is beneficial. We further show that ER stress induces DNA damage and polyploidization in stromal cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the GRP78/Ire1/Xbp1 signaling pathway of ER stress-UPR is activated and involved in mouse decidualization. PMID:27283502

  19. How competition affects evolutionary rescue

    Osmond, Matthew Miles; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Populations facing novel environments can persist by adapting. In nature, the ability to adapt and persist will depend on interactions between coexisting individuals. Here we use an adaptive dynamic model to assess how the potential for evolutionary rescue is affected by intra- and interspecific competition. Intraspecific competition (negative density-dependence) lowers abundance, which decreases the supply rate of beneficial mutations, hindering evolutionary rescue. On the other hand, inters...

  20. Lipoic acid improves neuronal insulin signalling and rescues cognitive function regulating VGlut1 expression in high-fat-fed rats: Implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Rodriguez-Perdigon, Manuel; Solas, Maite; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria Jesús; Ramirez, Maria Javier

    2016-04-01

    The concept of central insulin resistance and dysfunctional insulin signalling in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now widely accepted and diabetes is recognized as one of the main risk factors for developing AD. Moreover, some lines of evidence indicated that VGlut1 is impaired in frontal regions of AD patients and this impairment is correlated with the progression of cognitive decline in AD. The present work hypothesizes that ketosis associated to insulin resistance could interfere with the normal activity of VGlut1 and its role in the release of glutamate in the hippocampus, which might ultimately lead to cognitive deficits. High fat diet (HFD) rats showed memory impairments and both peripheral (as shown by increased fasting plasma insulin levels and HOMA index) and hippocampal (as shown by decreased activation of insulin receptor, IRS-1 and pAkt) insulin pathway alterations, accompanied by increased ketone bodies production. All these effects were counteracted by α-lipoic acid (LA) administration. VGlut1 levels were significantly decreased in the hippocampus of HFD rats, and this decrease was reversed by LA. Altogether, the present results suggest that HFD induced alterations in central insulin signalling could switch metabolism to produce ketone bodies, which in turn, in the hippocampus, might lead to a decreased expression of VGlut1, and therefore to a decreased release of glutamate and hence, to the glutamatergic deficit described in AD. The ability of LA treatment to prevent the alterations in insulin signalling in this model of HFD might represent a possible new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:26769360

  1. Joseph Conrad's tormented Rescue (fantasy).

    Freedman, William

    2014-02-01

    Joseph Conrad was a notoriously tormented writer for whom the creative act was often a punishment severe enough to drive him into paralyzing depressions that delayed the completion of his novels, sometimes for years. By far the most agonizing of these projects was The Rescue, a novel he began in 1898, abandoned a year later, tried unsuccessfully to continue several times over the next two decades, but was only able to resume in 1918 and to complete, after another tortured two-year struggle, in 1920. An explanation for this incapacity, that is powerfully suggested by the novel's evocative title and perhaps unintentionally ironic subtitle (A Romance of the Shallows) has not yet been explored. Using Freud's 1910 essay on the rescue fantasy, "Contributions to the Psychology of Love: A Special Type of Choice of Object Made by Men," and Emanuel Berman's instructive revision and expansion of the concept in his 2003 American Imago essay, "Ferenczi, Rescue, and Utopia," I argue that a substantial explanation for Conrad's tormented history with The Rescue is ascribable to its quite remarkably faithful treatment of a rescue fantasy with deep and disabling resonance for its author. More specifically, the difficulty was compounded by the novel's dramatization of the soul-crushing conflict between two such fantasies: one in the service of the masculine ideal of unflinching dedication to a heroic purpose, the other promising satisfaction to the equally potent demands of emotional and sexual desire. Features of Conrad's narrative fit so tightly and consistently with the theory as Freud (and Abraham) proposed and as Berman elaborated it that The Rescue offers itself as one of those rare and reinforcing instances wherein the literary text seems to validate the psychoanalytic theory at least as persuasively as the theory "understands" the text. PMID:24555549

  2. CERN Fire Brigade rescue simulation

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Fire Brigade is made up of experienced firemen from all of the 20 Member States. In these images they are seen at a 'Discovery Monday' held at the Microcosm exhibition. Here visitors learn how the Fire Brigade deal with various situations, including a simulated cave rescue performed by the Hazardous Environments Response Team.

  3. Self-Rescue Mask Training

    2013-01-01

    Nine new self-rescue mask instructors have been trained since early 2013, which provides CERN with a total of 26 self-rescue mask instructors to date. This will allow us to meet the increasing training needs caused by the Long Shut Down LS1.   The self-rescue mask instructors have trained 1650 persons in 2012 and about 500 persons since the beginning of the year on how to wear the masks properly. We thank all the instructors and all the persons that made this training possible. Please remember that the self-rescue masks training sessions are scheduled as follows: Basic course: Tuesday and Thursday mornings (2 sessions – 8.30 AM and 10.30 AM), duration:  1.30 hour, in French and English – registration via CERN online training catalogue – Course code 077Y00. Refresher training : Monday mornings (2 sessions – 8.30 AM and 10.30 AM), duration: 1.30 hour , in French and English – registration via CERN online training catalogue &...

  4. 78 FR 39531 - Mine Rescue Teams

    2013-07-01

    ... Rescue Teams; CFR Correction #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 126 / Monday, July 1, 2013 / Rules... Rescue Teams CFR Correction In Title 30 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 to 199, revised as of... Miner Act Requirements for Underground Coal Mine Operators and Mine Rescue Teams Type of mine...

  5. Molecular Characterization of Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 from Bombyx mori

    Minchul Seo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA clone encoding endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 (bERO1, a specific oxidant of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI from Bombyx mori. This protein has a putative open reading frame (ORF of 489 amino acids and a predicted size of 57.4 kDa. Although bERO1 protein shares less than 57% amino acid sequence homology with other reported ERO1s, it contains two conserved redox active motifs, a Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys motif of N-terminal and Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motif of C-terminal. Both motifs are typically present in ERO1 protein family members. The bEro1 mRNA expression was highest in posterior silk gland on the sixth day of the 5th instar larvae. Expression of bEro1 mRNA also markedly increased during endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress induced by stimulation with antimycin, calcium ionophore A23187, dithiothreitol, H2O2, monencin, and tunicamycin. In addition, expression levels of bEro1 exactly coincided with that of bPdi. This is the first result suggesting that bERO1 plays an essential role in ER quality control through the combined activities of bERO1 and bPDI as a catalyst of protein folding in the ER and sustaining cellular redox homeostasis.

  6. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the loss of retinal ganglion cells in diabetic retinopathy

    Liping Yang; Lemeng Wu; Dongmei Wang; Ying Li; Hongliang Dou; Mark OMTso; Zhizhong Ma

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is closely involved in the early stage of diabetic retinopathy. In the present study, a streptozotocin-induced diabetic animal model was given an intraperitoneal injection of tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Results from immunofluorescent co-localization experiments showed that both caspase-12 protein and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 phosphorylation levels significantly in-creased, which was associated with retinal ganglion celldeath in diabetic retinas. The C/ERB ho-mologous protein pathway directly contributed to glial reactivity, and was subsequently responsible for neuronal loss and vascular abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. Our experimental findings in-dicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role in diabetes-induced retinal neu-ronal loss and vascular abnormalities, and that inhibiting the activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway provides effective protection against diabetic retinopathy.

  7. CO{sub 2} in underground openings and mine rescue training

    Weyer, J. [Freiburg Univ. of Mining and Technology (Germany). Inst. of Mining Engineering and Special Civil Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Mine rescue training procedures related to dangerous gases in mines were discussed. Methods of detecting carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in abandoned opening and old adits were presented. High concentrations of CO{sub 2} combine with hemoglobin and lead to a lack of oxygen supply to the inner organs. Nitric acid forms in the alveoli and can lead to injuries or death after a period of 4 to 12 hours. Exposure to very high concentrations of CO{sub 2} can cause people to immediately lose consciousness. CO{sub 2} concentrations in the blood can change pH blood values. Members of mine rescue teams should be equipped with breathing equipment and be between 18 and 40 years old. Training rescue operations should be conducted 4 times per year. While larger mines have their own rescue teams, smaller mines must ensure that guest rescue teams are familiar with their mines. Various mine training activities were reviewed. 5 refs.

  8. GIS Support for Flood Rescue

    Liang, Gengsheng; Mioc, Darka; Anton, François

    2007-01-01

    Under flood events, the ground traffic is blocked in and around the flooded area due to damages to roads and bridges. The traditional transportation network may not always help people to make a right decision for evacuation. In order to provide dynamic road information needed for flood rescue, we...... developed an adaptive web-based transportation network application using Oracle technology. Moreover, the geographic relationships between the road network and flood areas are taken into account. The overlay between the road network and flood polygons is computed on the fly. This application allows users to...... retrieve the shortest and safest route in Fredericton road network during flood event. It enables users to make a timely decision for flood rescue. We are using Oracle Spatial to deal with emergency situations that can be applied to other constrained network applications as well....

  9. Toward a behavioral ecology of rescue behavior.

    Hollis, Karen L; Nowbahari, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Although the study of helping behavior has revolutionized the field of behavioral ecology, scientific examination of rescue behavior remains extremely rare, except perhaps in ants, having been described as early as 1874. Nonetheless, recent work in our laboratories has revealed several new patterns of rescue behavior that appear to be much more complex than previously studied forms. This precisely-directed rescue behavior bears a remarkable resemblance to what has been labeled empathy in rats, and thus raises numerous philosophical and theoretical questions: How should rescue behavior (or empathy) be defined? What distinguishes rescue from other forms of altruism? In what ways is rescue behavior in ants different from, and similar to, rescue in other non-human animals? What selection pressures dictate its appearance? In this paper, we review our own experimental studies of rescue in both laboratory and field, which, taken together, begin to reveal some of the behavioral ecological conditions that likely have given rise to rescue behavior in ants. Against this background, we also address important theoretical questions involving rescue, including those outlined above. In this way, we hope not only to encourage further experimental analysis of rescue behavior, but also to highlight important similarities and differences in very distant taxa. PMID:23864298

  10. Collaboration mechanism of intercity emergency rescue ecosystem

    Jiang Yiping; Zhao Lindu

    2009-01-01

    With the development of metropolitan regions and the appearance of urban agglomerations,cities have been more closely related.For the restricted emergency rescue resource in a single city,it has become more and more imminent for the demand of the intercity collaborative resistance to major accident,so as to improve the protection capacity of urban security.In order to find an effective intercity emergency rescue collaborative system,this paper introduces the concept and analysis method of ecosystem theory into intercity emergency rescue.Based on theanalysis of the formation-process of emergency rescue individual,population and community,a three-level intercity emergency rescue collaborative system is constructed according to the characteristics of dynamics and structure of intercity emergency rescue ecosystem,then the collaboration mechanism of information,resource and process in the intercity emergency rescue ecosystem is also studied in this paper,so as to offer available strategy and method for the ecosystem theory applied to intercity emergency rescue.Through the studies of intercity emergency rescue eco,system,it illuminates that the proposed emergency system can not only cope with the major accident more timely and effectively,but also integrate the intercity information resources and emergency rescue resource and process optimi,zation.

  11. The Data Rescue @ Home Project

    Stickler, A.; Allan, R.; Valente, M. A.; Tinz, B.; Brönnimann, S.

    2012-04-01

    Climate science as a whole as well as reanalyses as a special case can significantly profit from the recovery, imaging and digitisation of historical observations. The importance of this fact is reflected in large, global data rescue projects and initiatives such as the Atmospheric Circulation Reconstructions over the Earth (ACRE, www.met-acre.org) or the EU FP7 ERA-CLIM project (www.era-clim.eu). From the time before 1957, there are still large amounts of surface data e.g. from former colonies and from overseas territories of European countries )e.g. Portugal, France and Germany) that need to be rescued. Also in case of the very early upper-air observations before the 1930s, even Europe and North America still hold an important quantity of data to be recovered in digital form. Here, we present the web platform "Data Rescue @ Home" (www.data-rescue-at-home.org), which has been developed at ETH Zurich and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, and which has been designed to take advantage of the voluntary assistance of the thousands of people on the web who are interested in climate or old weather data. On the website, these volunteers can enter meteorological data shown on digital images into entry masks that resemble the original. By registering, the users get access to their personal digitisation statistics and help optimising the project. At the moment, 4 digitisation projects are online: One project is dealing with German upper-air data from the Second World War period. In a second project, station data from Tulagi (Solomon Islands) is being digitised. Finally, two collaborative projects have been included: One in cooperation with the Instituto Dom Luiz (Univ. Lisbon, Portugal), where Portuguese station data from Angra (Azores) is digitised, and a further one in cooperation with the German Meteorological Service (DWD), in which precipitation data from former German colonies is being digitised. On our poster, we will report on the status of the projects

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    Hafiz Maher Ali Zeeshan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO-1, glutathione (GSH/glutathione disuphide (GSSG, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4, NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR, and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    Lu Cai; Wei Xu; Jiancheng Xu; Qi Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle entrusted with lipid synthesis, calcium homeostasis, protein folding, and maturation. Perturbation of ER-associated functions results in an evolutionarily conserved cell stress response, the unfolded protein response (UPR) that is also called ER stress. ER stress is aimed initially at compensating for damage but can eventually trigger cell death if ER stress is excessive or prolonged. Now the ER stress has been associated with numerous diseases. ...

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Genome Damage, and Cancer

    Dicks, Naomi; Gutierrez, Karina; Michalak, Marek; Bordignon, Vilceu; Agellon, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to many diseases, including cancer. A large body of work has focused on the activation of the ER stress response in cancer cells to facilitate their survival and tumor growth; however, there are some studies suggesting that the ER stress response can also mitigate cancer progression. Despite these contradictions, it is clear that the ER stress response is closely associated with cancer biology. The ER stress response classically encompasses ac...

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, genome damage and cancer

    Naomi eDicks; Karina eGutierrez; Marek eMichalak; Vilceu eBordignon; Agellon, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to many diseases, including cancer. A large body of work has focused on the activation of the ER stress response in cancer cells to facilitate their survival and tumor growth, however, there are some studies suggesting that the ER stress response can also mitigate cancer progression. Despite these contradictions, it is clear that the ER stress response is closely associated with cancer biology. The ER stress response classically encompasses ...

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in periimplantation embryos

    Michalak, Marek; Gye, Myung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Stress coping mechanisms are critical to minimize or overcome damage caused by ever changing environmental conditions. They are designed to promote cell survival. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway is mobilized in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins, ultimately in order to regain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Various elements of coping responses to ER stress including Perk, Ask1, Bip, Chop, Gadd34, Ire1, Atf4, Atf6, and Xbp1 have been identified and were found...

  17. Nonvesicular Lipid Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Lev, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The transport of lipids from their synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to different target membranes could be mediated by both vesicular and nonvesicular transport mechanisms. Nonvesicular lipid transport appears to be the major transport route of certain lipid species, and could be mediated by either spontaneous lipid transport or by lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). Although nonvesicular lipid transport has been extensively studied for more than four decades, its underlying mecha...

  18. 30 CFR 49.18 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.18 Section... TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.18 Training for mine rescue teams. (a) Prior to serving on a mine rescue team each member shall complete, at a minimum, an...

  19. Failure of bone morphogenetic protein receptor trafficking in pulmonary arterial hypertension: potential for rescue.

    Sobolewski, Anastasia; Rudarakanchana, Nung; Upton, Paul D; Yang, Jun; Crilley, Trina K; Trembath, Richard C; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2008-10-15

    Heterozygous germline mutations in the gene encoding the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor cause familial pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We previously demonstrated that the substitution of cysteine residues in the ligand-binding domain of this receptor prevents receptor trafficking to the cell membrane. Here we demonstrate the potential for chemical chaperones to rescue cell-surface expression of mutant BMPR-II and restore function. HeLa cells were transiently transfected with BMPR-II wild type or mutant (C118W) receptor constructs. Immunolocalization studies confirmed the retention of the cysteine mutant receptor mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Co-immunoprecipitation studies of Myc-tagged BMPR-II confirmed that the cysteine-substituted ligand-binding domain mutation, C118W, is able to associate with BMP type I receptors. Furthermore, following treatment with a panel of chemical chaperones (thapsigargin, glycerol or sodium 4-phenylbutyrate), we demonstrated a marked increase in cell-surface expression of mutant C118W BMPR-II by FACS analysis and confocal microscopy. These agents also enhanced the trafficking of wild-type BMPR-II, though to a lesser extent. Increased cell-surface expression of mutant C118W BMPR-II was associated with enhanced Smad1/5 phosphorylation in response to BMPs. These findings demonstrate the potential for rescue of mutant BMPR-II function from the endoplasmic reticulum. For the C118W mutation in the ligand-binding domain of BMPR-II, cell-surface rescue leads to at least partial restoration of BMP signalling. We conclude that enhancement of cell-surface trafficking of mutant and wild-type BMPR-II may have therapeutic potential in familial PAH. PMID:18647753

  20. Rescue coronary stenting in acute myocardial infarction

    Barbieri, Enrico; Meneghetti, Paolo; Molinari, Gionata; Zardini, Piero

    1996-01-01

    Failed rescue coronary angioplasty is a high risk situation because of high mortality. Coronary stent has given us the chance of improving and maintaining the patency of the artery. We report our preliminary experience of rescue stenting after unsuccessful coronary angioplasty.

  1. Teaching Holocaust Rescue: A Problematic Pedagogy

    Lindquist, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Determining how to teach about rescue during the Holocaust presents many dilemmas to teachers as they plan Holocaust curricula. Rescue is often overemphasized, and faulty perspectives about rescuers and their actions may cause students to develop distorted views about this aspect of Holocaust history. This article explores several factors that…

  2. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  3. Cytochrome P450 System Proteins Reside in Different Regions of the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Ji Won PARK; Reed, James R.; Brignac-Huber, Lauren M.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 function is dependent on the ability of these enzymes to successfully interact with their redox partners, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Because the ER is heterogeneous in lipid composition, membrane microdomains with different characteristics are formed. Ordered microdomains are more tightly packed, and enriched in saturated fatty acids, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, whereas disordered regions contain higher levels...

  4. Absence of adipose triglyceride lipase protects from hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice

    Fuchs, Claudia D.; Claudel, Thierry; Kumari, Pooja; Haemmerle, Guenter; Pollheimer, Marion J.; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Halilbasic, Emina; Gumhold, Judith; Silbert, Dagmar; Koefeler, Harald; Trauner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by triglyceride (TG) accumulation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because fatty acids (FAs) may trigger ER stress, we hypothesized that the absence of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL/PNPLA2)-the main enzyme for intracellular lipolysis, releasing FAs, and closest homolog to adiponutrin (PNPLA3) recently implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD-protects against hepatic ER stress. Wild-type (WT) and ATGL knockout (KO) mice were ch...

  5. Dual function of cTAGE5 in collagen export from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Tanabe, Tomoya; Maeda, Miharu; Saito, Kota; Katada, Toshiaki

    2016-07-01

    Two independent functions of cTAGE5 have been reported in collagen VII export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). cTAGE5 not only forms a cargo receptor complex with TANGO1, but it also acts as a scaffold to recruit Sec12, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Sar1 GTPase, to ER exit sites. However, the relationship between the two functions remains unclear. Here we isolated point mutants of cTAGE5 that lost Sec12-binding ability but retained binding to TANGO1. Although expression of the mutant alone could not rescue the defects in collagen VII secretion mediated by cTAGE5 knockdown, coexpression with Sar1, but not with the GTPase-deficient mutant, recovered secretion. The expression of Sar1 alone failed to rescue collagen secretion in cTAGE5-depleted cells. Taken together, these results suggest that two functionally irreplaceable and molecularly separable modules in cTAGE5 are both required for collagen VII export from the ER. The recruitment of Sec12 by cTAGE5 contributes to efficient activation of Sar1 in the vicinity of ER exit sites. In addition, the GTPase cycle of Sar1 appears to be responsible for collagen VII exit from the ER. PMID:27170179

  6. Analysis of endoplasmic reticulum by confocal microscopy

    Janáček, Jiří; Radochová, Barbora; Demjénová, E.; Schwarzerová, K.; Tomori, Z.; Karen, Petr; Kubínová, Lucie

    Prague : Czech Pattern Recognition Society, 2005 - (Hlaváč, V.), s. 22-23 ISBN 80-01-03239-6. [Prague Post Genome Technology Workshop 2005. Prague (CZ), 06.06.2005-07.06.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6011309; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100110502 Grant ostatní: CZ-SK(CZ) KONTAKT 139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal microscopy * endoplasmic reticulum * image analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  9. A New Antibiotic to the Rescue?

    ... the Rescue? Experimental drug shows promise against MRSA superbug in animal trials To use the sharing features ... successfully treated animals infected with the so-called "superbug" MRSA -- methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus . The results are " ...

  10. Hyperhomocysteinemia,endoplasmic reticulum stress,and alcoholic liver injury

    Cheng Ji; Neil Kaplowitz

    2004-01-01

    Deficiencies in vitamins or other factors (B6, B12, folic acid,betaine) and genetic disorders for the metabolism of the non-protein amino acid-homocysteine (Hcy) lead to hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy). Hhcy is an integral component of several disorders including cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, diabetes and alcoholic liver disease. Hhcy unleashes mediators of inflammation such as NFκB, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, increases production of intracellular superoxide anion causing oxidative stress and reducing intracellular level of nitric oxide (NO), and induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which can explain many processes of Hcy-promoted cell injury such as apoptosis,fat accumulation, and inflammation. Animal models have played an important role in determining the biological effects of Hhcy. ER stress may also be involved in other liver diseases such as α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) deficiency and hepatitis C and/or B virus infection. Future research should evaluate the possible potentiative effects of alcohol and hepatic virus infection on ER stress-induced liver injury, study potentially beneficial effects of lowering Hcy and preventing ER stress in alcoholic humans,and examine polymorphism of Hcy metabolizing enzymes as potential risk-factors for the development of Hhcy and liver disease.

  11. Search and Rescue Mission Using Multicopters

    Steen, Thor Audun

    2014-01-01

    Search and rescue operations can greatly benefit from the use of autonomous unmanned aerial systems to survey the environment and collect evidence about the positions of missing persons. This thesis considers the design of an autonomous multicopter system for use in a search and rescue mission. The ArduPilot Mega is used as the autopilot and is presented together with detailed information about the utilized hardware and software. The design of a low- level control interface is implemented as ...

  12. RoboCupRescue - Robot League Team RescueRobots Freiburg (Germany)

    Kleiner, Alexander; Dornhege, Christian; Kümmerle, Rainer; Ruhnke, Michael; Steder, Bastian; Nebel, Bernhard; Doherty, Patrick; Wzorek, Mariusz; Rudol, Piotr; Conte, Gianpaolo; Duranti, Simone; Lundström, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the approach of the RescueRobots Freiburg team. RescueRobots Freiburg is a team of students from the university of Freiburg, that originates from the former CS Freiburg team (RoboCupSoccer) and the ResQ Freiburg team (RoboCupRescue Simulation). Due to the high versatility of the RoboCupRescue competition we tackle the three arenas by a a twofold approach: On the one hand we want to introduce robust vehicles that can safely be teleoperated through rubble and building debri...

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Crew Rescue Analysis

    Hamlin, Teri L.; Canga, Michael A.; Cates, Grant R.

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of the 2003 Columbia accident, NASA removed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) from the Space Shuttle manifest. Reasons cited included concerns that the risk of flying the mission would be too high. The HST SM4 was subsequently reinstated and flown as Space Transportation System (STS)-125 because of improvements in the ascent debris environment, the development of techniques for astronauts to perform on orbit repairs to damaged thermal protection, and the development of a strategy to provide a viable crew rescue capability. However, leading up to the launch of STS-125, the viability of the HST crew rescue capability was a recurring topic. For STS-125, there was a limited amount of time available to perform a crew rescue due to limited consumables (power, oxygen, etc.) available on the Orbiter. The success of crew rescue depended upon several factors, including when a problem was identified; when and what actions, such as powering down, were begun to conserve consumables; and where the Launch on Need (LON) vehicle was in its ground processing cycle. Crew rescue success also needed to be weighed against preserving the Orbiter s ability to have a landing option in case there was a problem with the LON vehicle. This paper focuses on quantifying the HST mission loss of crew rescue capability using Shuttle historical data and various power down strategies. Results from this effort supported NASA s decision to proceed with STS-125, which was successfully completed on May 24th 2009.

  14. 30 CFR 49.8 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.8 Section 49... TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.8 Training for mine rescue teams. (a) Prior to serving on a mine rescue team each member shall complete, at a minimum, an initial 20-hour course of instruction as...

  15. 30 CFR 49.12 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of mine rescue teams. 49.12... TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.12 Availability of mine rescue teams. (a) Except where alternative compliance is permitted for small and remote mines (§ 49.13),...

  16. Rescue of deficient amygdala tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic currents in the Fmr(-/y) mouse model of fragile X syndrome by a novel γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-positive allosteric modulator.

    Martin, Brandon S; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Loya, Carlos M; Salituro, Francesco G; Robichaud, Albert J; Huntsman, Molly M; Ackley, Mike A; Doherty, James J; Corbin, Joshua G

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory transmission are emerging as a common component of many nervous system disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission provided by peri- and extrasynaptic GABA type A (GABAA ) receptors powerfully controls neuronal excitability and plasticity and, therefore, provides a rational therapeutic target for normalizing hyperexcitable networks across a variety of disorders, including ASDs. Our previous studies revealed tonic GABAergic deficits in principal excitatory neurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the Fmr1(-/y) knockout (KO) mouse model fragile X syndrome. To correct amygdala deficits in tonic GABAergic neurotransmission in Fmr1(-/y) KO mice, we developed a novel positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, SGE-872, based on endogenously active neurosteroids. This study shows that SGE-872 is nearly as potent and twice as efficacious for positively modulating GABAA receptors as its parent molecule, allopregnanolone. Furthermore, at submicromolar concentrations (≤1 μM), SGE-872 is selective for tonic, extrasynaptic α4β3δ-containing GABAA receptors over typical synaptic α1β2γ2 receptors. We further find that SGE-872 strikingly rescues the tonic GABAergic transmission deficit in principal excitatory neurons in the Fmr1(-/y) KO BLA, a structure heavily implicated in the neuropathology of ASDs. Therefore, the potent and selective action of SGE-872 on tonic GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits may represent a novel and highly useful therapeutic avenue for ASDs and related disorders involving hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26308557

  17. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum: mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum interplay in type 2 diabetes pathophysiology.

    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    International audience Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are two important metabolic organelles for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and their functional defects are suspected to participate to the aetiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Particularly, excessive lipid intake and/or ectopic lipid accumulation in tissues (referred as lipotoxicity) are involved in alterations of both organelles and are closely linked to peripheral insulin resistance and defective insulin secretion...

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in brain ischemia.

    Su, Yingchao; Li, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an intricate mechanism that mediates numerous responses during brain ischemia, thus being essential to determine the fate of neurons. In recent years, studies of the mechanisms of brain ischemic injury have centered on ER stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, dysfunction of mitochondria, inflammatory reactions, calcium overload and death receptor pathways. The role of ER stress is highly important. In addition to resulting in neuronal cell death through calcium toxicity and apoptotic pathways, ER stress also triggers a series of adaptive responses including unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy, the expression of pro-survival proteins and the enhancement of ER self-repair ability, leading to less ischemic brain damage. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in understanding of the relations between ER stress and brain ischemia. PMID:26289799

  19. Nonvesicular lipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Lev, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The transport of lipids from their synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to different target membranes could be mediated by both vesicular and nonvesicular transport mechanisms. Nonvesicular lipid transport appears to be the major transport route of certain lipid species, and could be mediated by either spontaneous lipid transport or by lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). Although nonvesicular lipid transport has been extensively studied for more than four decades, its underlying mechanism, advantage and regulation, have not been fully explored. In particular, the function of LTPs and their involvement in intracellular lipid movement remain largely controversial. In this article, we describe the pathways by which lipids are synthesized at the ER and delivered to different cellular membranes, and discuss the role of LTPs in lipid transport both in vitro and in intact cells. PMID:23028121

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and cardiovascular diseases

    Xiaohui Duan; Yongfen Qi; Chaoshu Tang

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves several important functions, mainly post-translational modification, folding and assembly of newly synthesized secretary proteins, synthesizing lipids and cellular calcium storage. Various factors can disrupt ER homeostasis and disturb its functions, which leads to the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins and to potential cellular dysfunction and pathological consequences, collectively termed ER stress. Recent progress suggests that ER stress plays a key role in the immune response, diabetes, tumor growth, and some neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, ER stress is involved in several processes of cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and atherosclerosis. Further research on the relation of ER stress to cardiovascular diseases will greatly enhance the understanding of these pathological processes and provide novel avenues to potential therapies.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase 1 of Arabidopsis (AtCEP1 is involved in pathogen defense

    Timo eHöwing

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a genetically determined process in all multicellular organisms. Plant PCD is effected by a unique group of papain-type cysteine endopeptidases (CysEP with a C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum (ER retention signal (KDEL CysEP. KDEL CysEPs can be stored as pro-enzymes in ER-derived endomembrane compartments and are released as mature CysEPs in the final stages of organelle disintegration. KDEL CysEPs accept a wide variety of amino acids at the active site, including the glycosylated hydroxyprolines of the extensins that form the basic scaffold of the cell wall. In Arabidopsis, three KDEL CysEPs (AtCEP1, AtCEP2, and AtCEP3 are expressed. Cell- and tissue-specific activities of these three genes suggest that KDEL CysEPs participate in the abscission of flower organs and in the collapse of tissues in the final stage of PCD as well as in developmental tissue remodelling.We observed that AtCEP1 is expressed in response to biotic stress stimuli in the leaf. atcep1 knockout mutants showed enhanced susceptibility to powdery mildew caused by the biotrophic ascomycete Erysiphe cruciferarum. A translational fusion protein of AtCEP1 with a three-fold hemaglutinin-tag and the green fluorescent protein under control of the endogenous AtCEP1 promoter (PCEP1::pre-pro-3xHA-EGFP-AtCEP1-KDEL rescued the pathogenesis phenotype demonstrating the function of AtCEP1 in restriction of powdery mildew. The spatiotemporal AtCEP1-reporter expression during fungal infection together with microscopic inspection of the interaction phenotype suggested a function of AtCEP1 in controlling late stages of compatible interaction including late epidermal cell death. Additionally, expression of stress response genes appeared to be deregulated in the interaction of atcep1 mutants and E. cruciferarum. Possible functions of AtCEP1 in restricting parasitic success of the obligate biotrophic powdery mildew fungus are discussed.

  2. The quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a trip from trypanosomes to mammals

    A.J. Parodi

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review deals with the stages of synthesis and processing of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides occurring in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and their relationship to the acquisition by glycoproteins of their proper tertiary structures. Special emphasis is placed on reactions taking place in trypanosomatid protozoa since their study has allowed the detection of the transient glucosylation of glycoproteins catalyzed by UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase and glucosidase II. The former enzyme has the unique property of covalently tagging improperly folded conformations by catalyzing the formation of protein-linked Glc1Man7GlcNAc2, Glc1Man8GlcNac2 and Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 from the unglucosylated proteins. Glucosyltransferase is a soluble protein of the endoplasmic reticulum that recognizes protein domains exposed in denatured but not in native conformations (probably hydrophobic amino acids and the innermost N-acetylglucosamine unit that is hidden from macromolecular probes in most native glycoproteins. In vivo, the glucose units are removed by glucosidase II. The influence of oligosaccharides in glycoprotein folding is reviewed as well as the participation of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin that recognize monoglucosylated species in the same process. A model for the quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, i.e., the mechanism by which cells recognize the tertiary structure of glycoproteins and only allow transit to the Golgi apparatus of properly folded species, is discussed. The main elements of this control are calnexin and calreticulin as retaining components, the UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase as a sensor of tertiary structures and glucosidase II as the releasing agent.

  3. VEGETATIVE RESCUE OF Anadenanthera macrocarpa TREES

    Poliana Coqueiro Dias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the vegetative rescue of adult Anadenanthera macrocarpa trees through the induction of epicormic shoots from tree severance and stem ringing, as well as the efficiency of cutting technique on the propagation of the species. The experimental design used was random plots, in a 2 X 2 factorial arrangement, constituted by two techniques for the induction of basal shoots (tree severance and stem ringing and cuttings types (herbaceous cuttings and semihardwoods cuttings, in four replicates and plots of 12 cuttings per repetition. The tree severance and stem ringing were efficient in the induction of basal shoots in adult A. macrocarpa trees. However, the tree severance provided higher emission of basal shoots. The herbaceous cuttings presented higher rooting percentages, independent of vegetative rescue technique. In general, we conclude that the vegetative rescue and the vegetative propagation of A. macrocarpa adult trees are technically efficient.

  4. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  5. "Rescue" regimens after Helicobacter pylori treatment failure

    Javier P Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)infection is the main cause of gastritis,gastroduodenal ulcer disease,and gastric cancer.After more than 20 years of experience in Hpylori treatment,in my opinion,the ideal regimen to treat this infection is still to be found.Currently,apart from having to know first-line eradication regimens well,we must also be prepared to face lyeatment failures.Therefore,in designing a treatment strategy we should not focus on the results of primary therapy alone,but also on the final (overall) eradication rate.The choice of a "rescue" treatment depends on which treatment is used initially.If a clarithromycinbased regimen was used initially,a subsequent metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy)may be used afterwards,and then a levofloxacinbased combination would be a third "rescue" option.Alternatively,it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based rescue therapy constitutes an encouraging second-line strategy,representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure,with the advantage of efficacy,simplicity and safety.In this case,a quadruple regimen may be reserved as a third-line rescue option.Finally,rifabutin-based rescue therapy constitutes an encouraging empirical fourthline strategy after multiple previous eradication failures with key antibiotics such as amoxicillin,clarithromycin,metronidazole,tetracycline,and levofloxacin.Even after two consecutive failures,several studies have demonstrated that H pylor/eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several rescue therapies are consecutively given.Therefore,the attitude in H pylori eradication therapy failure,even after two or more unsuccessful attempts,should be to fight and not to surrender.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum redox state is not perturbed by pharmacological or pathological endoplasmic reticulum stress in live pancreatic β-cells.

    Irmgard Schuiki

    Full Text Available Accumulation of unfolded, misfolded and aggregated proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causes ER stress. ER stress can result from physiological situations such as acute increases in secretory protein biosynthesis or pathological conditions that perturb ER homeostasis such as alterations in the ER redox state. Here we monitored ER redox together with transcriptional output of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR in INS-1 insulinoma cells stably expressing eroGFP (ER-redox-sensor and mCherry protein driven by a GRP78 promoter (UPR-sensor. Live cell imaging, flow cytometry and biochemical characterization were used to examine these parameters in response to various conditions known to induce ER stress. As expected, treatment of the cells with the reducing agent dithiothreitol caused a decrease in the oxidation state of the ER accompanied by an increase in XBP-1 splicing. Unexpectedly however, other treatments including tunicamycin, thapsigargin, DL-homocysteine, elevated free fatty acids or high glucose had essentially no influence on the ER redox state, despite inducing ER stress. Comparable results were obtained with dispersed rat islet cells expressing eroGFP. Thus, unlike in yeast cells, ER stress in pancreatic β-cells is not associated with a more reducing ER environment.

  7. Presenilins Are Enriched in Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes Associated with Mitochondria

    Area-Gomez, Estela; de Groof, Ad J. C.; Boldogh, Istvan; Bird, Thomas D.; Gibson, Gary E.; Koehler, Carla M.; Yu, Wai Haung; Duff, Karen E.; Yaffe, Michael P.; Liza A Pon; Schon, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Presenilin-1 (PS1) and -2 (PS2), which when mutated cause familial Alzheimer disease, have been localized to numerous compartments of the cell, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, nuclear envelope, endosomes, lysosomes, the plasma membrane, and mitochondria. Using three complementary approaches, subcellular fractionation, γ-secretase activity assays, and immunocytochemistry, we show that presenilins are highly enriched in a subcompartment of the endoplasmic reticulum that is associate...

  8. Shaping the endoplasmic reticulum in vitro.

    Ferencz, Csilla-Maria; Guigas, Gernot; Veres, Andreas; Neumann, Brigitte; Stemmann, Olaf; Weiss, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Organelles in eukaryotic cells often have complex shapes that deviate significantly from simple spheres. A prime example is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that forms an extensive network of membrane tubules in many mammalian cell types and in reconstitution assays in vitro. Despite the successful hunt for molecular determinants of ER shape we are still far from having a comprehensive understanding of ER network morphogenesis. Here, we have studied the hitherto neglected influence of the host substrate when reconstituting ER networks in vitro as compared to ER networks in vivo. In culture cells we observed cytoplasm-spanning ER networks with tubules being connected almost exclusively by three-way junctions and segment lengths being narrowly distributed around a mean length of about 1μm. In contrast, networks reconstituted from purified ER microsomes on flat glass or gel substrates of varying stiffness showed significantly broader length distributions with an up to fourfold larger mean length. Self-assembly of ER microsomes on small oil droplets, however, yielded networks that resembled more closely the native ER network of mammalian cells. We conclude from these observations that the ER microsomes' inherent self-assembly capacity is sufficient to support network formation with a native geometry if the influence of the host substrate's surface chemistry becomes negligible. We hypothesize that under these conditions the networks' preference for three-way junctions follows from creating 'starfish-shaped' vesicles when ER microsomes with a protein-induced spontaneous curvature undergo fusion. PMID:27287725

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Pancreatic Cancer

    Kemal Ergin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, which results from different stimuli, is an important cellular event. There are different types of response to ER stress. One of them is evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response (UPR. UPR has three sensors for further activation of molecules. These sensors are inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6, and ER-resident protein kinase RNA (PKR-like ER kinase (PERK. In the absence of ER stress, these sensors are maintained in an inactive state. However, under ER stress conditions, they became activated and induce the downstream targets. As a consequence of ER stress, the cell may stay alive or became dead. Several studies have shown that ER stress is associated with different types of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease, prion disease, and cancer. As a cancer type, it has been shown that pancreatic cancer is also associated with ER stress. Pancreatic cancer has a low cure potential with its late diagnosis. Its association with ER stress is seen as a new therapeutic approach. The aim of this is review is to provide an overview of the mechanisms of ER stress and its relationship with pancreatic cancer, one of the diseases in which ER stress affects pathogenesis.

  10. Glycoprotein Quality Control and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Qian Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER supports many cellular processes and performs diverse functions, including protein synthesis, translocation across the membrane, integration into the membrane, folding, and posttranslational modifications including N-linked glycosylation; and regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis. In mammalian systems, the majority of proteins synthesized by the rough ER have N-linked glycans critical for protein maturation. The N-linked glycan is used as a quality control signal in the secretory protein pathway. A series of chaperones, folding enzymes, glucosidases, and carbohydrate transferases support glycoprotein synthesis and processing. Perturbation of ER-associated functions such as disturbed ER glycoprotein quality control, protein glycosylation and protein folding results in activation of an ER stress coping response. Collectively this ER stress coping response is termed the unfolded protein response (UPR, and occurs through the activation of complex cytoplasmic and nuclear signaling pathways. Cellular and ER homeostasis depends on balanced activity of the ER protein folding, quality control, and degradation pathways; as well as management of the ER stress coping response.

  11. SSI1 encodes a novel Hsp70 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae endoplasmic reticulum.

    Baxter, B K; James, P; Evans, T.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK); Craig, E A

    1996-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a well-characterized, essential member of the Hsp70 family of molecular chaperones, Kar2p. Kar2p has been shown to be involved in the translocation of proteins into the ER as well as the proper folding of proteins in that compartment. We report the characterization of a novel Hsp70 of the ER, Ssi1p. Ssi1p, which shares 24% of the amino acids of Kar2p, is not essential for growth under normal conditions. Howe...

  12. Gateway for migrant rescue in the Mediterranean

    Zarb Adami, Kris; Duca, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Malta should set up a coastal over-the-horizon radar (developed at ISSA-Institute of Space Science and Astronomy) with the capability of detecting small fast-moving vessels within a 1000km radius. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/gateway-for-migrant-rescue-in-the-mediterranean/

  13. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-09-14

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions.

  14. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions

  15. Minimizing extinction risk through genetic rescue

    Waite, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the genetic rescue hypothesis, immigrants can improve population persistence through their genetic contribution alone. We investigate the potential for such rescue using small, inbred laboratory populations of the bean beetle (Callosobruchus maculatus. We ask how many migrants per generation (MPG are needed to minimize the genetic component of extinction risk. During Phase 1, population size was made to fluctuate between 6 and 60 (for 10 generations. During this phase, we manipulated the number of MPG, replacing 0, 1, 3, or 5 females every generation with immigrant females. During Phase 2, we simply set an upper limit on population size (.10. Compared with the 0-MPG treatment, the other treatments were equivalently effective at improving reproductive success and reducing extinction risk. A single MPG was sufficient for genetic rescue, apparently because effective migration rate was inflated dramatically during generations when population size was small. An analysis of quasi-extinction suggests that replicate populations in the 1-MPG treatment benefited from initial purging of inbreeding depression. Populations in this treatment performed so well apparently because they received the dual benefit of purging followed by genetic infusion. Our results suggest the need for further evaluation of alternative schemes for genetic rescue.

  16. Point-of-care ultrasonography during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter.

    Darocha, Tomasz; Gałązkowski, Robert; Sobczyk, Dorota; Żyła, Zbigniew; Drwiła, Rafał

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound examination has been increasingly widely used in pre-hospital care. The use of ultrasound in rescue medicine allows for a quick differential diagnosis, identification of the most important medical emergencies and immediate introduction of targeted treatment. Performing and interpreting a pre-hospital ultrasound examination can improve the accuracy of diagnosis and thus reduce mortality. The authors' own experiences are presented in this paper, which consist in using a portable, hand-held ultrasound apparatus during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter. The possibility of using an ultrasound apparatus during helicopter rescue service allows for a full professional evaluation of the patient's health condition and enables the patient to be brought to a center with the most appropriate facilities for their condition. PMID:26674604

  17. VEGETATIVE RESCUE AND CUTTINGS PROPAGATION OF Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze

    Ivar Wendling

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian pine or araucaria (Araucaria angustifolia is a coniferous tree with great economic, social and environmental importance in southern Brazil, being exploited for both wood production and for its edible pine nuts. However, no efficient cloning techniques are available and, therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of vegetative rescue methods for cuttings propagation of the species. Shoots/cuttings were generated in two ways: 26 years old trees underwent coppicing and 20 years old trees had the primary branches on the upper third of crown pruned at 2, 20 and 50 cm from the main trunk. Orthotropic shoots were rooted after application of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA at 0, 2, 4 and 6 g.L-1. Coppicing produced 47 cuttings per plant with 90% orthotropic shoots, while pruning resulted in 182 cuttings per plant with 44% orthotropic shoots. Rooting success indexes were low with no influence of IBA, although they are slightly superior to the ones available in the literature for the species, ranging from 12 to 30% for the coppice shoots and from 0 to 28% for the branches shoots. We conclude that both vegetative rescue techniques are viable and have potentially important applications. Coppicing is recommended for the propagation aiming the production of wood, while shoots derived from the side branches of the crown are more appropriate for seeds orchards formation.

  18. Influencing factors of embryo rescue in seedless grape

    In this study, we investigated the impact of inoculating stage, medium type and concentration of plant growth regulators on embryo rescue effectiveness by L25(5)6 orthogonal design using selfed ovules of Venus Seedless as the testing material. The main results were as follows. The most important factor influencing ovule germination was inoculating stage. Ovule germinating rate gradually increased as inoculating being postponed. The highest germinating rate appeared when inoculation was done 55d after flowering. Other influencing factors were IBA concentration, exogenous amino acid, 6-BA concentration, GA3 concentration and medium type in descending order. The best embryo rescue result was based on Nitsch medium including 1.0 mg/L IBA, 0.1 mg/L GA3, 0.7 mg /L 6-BA and 2.0 mmol/L glutamine using ovules inoculated 55d after flowering. The highest germinating rate reached 41.25%, and a batch of seedlings was also obtained. (author)

  19. Chronic inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation prevents ischaemia-induced vascular pathology in type II diabetic mice

    Amin, Ali; Choi, Soo-Kyoung; Galan, Maria; Kassan, Modar; Partyka, Megan; Kadowitz, Philip; Henrion, Daniel; Trebak, Mohamed; Belmadani, Souad; Matrougui, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation are important mechanisms that underlie many of the serious consequences of type II diabetes. However, the role of ER stress and inflammation in impaired ischaemia-induced neovascularization in type II diabetes is unknown. We studied ischaemia-induced neovascularization in the hind-limb of 4-week-old db−/db− mice and their controls treated with or without the ER stress inhibitor (tauroursodeoxycholic acid, TUDCA, 150 mg/kg per day) and interle...

  20. Fusion of the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Outer Membrane in Rats Brown Adipose Tissue: Activation of Thermogenesis by Ca2+

    de Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A.; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Benchimol, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria thermogenesis is regulated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP 1), GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we observed fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane with the mitochondrial outer membrane of rats BAT. Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA 1) was identified by immunoelectron microscopy in both ER and mitochondria. This finding led us to test the Ca2+ effect in BAT mitochondria thermogenesis. We found that Ca2+ increased the rate of respiration and heat production ...

  1. 30 CFR 49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of mine rescue teams. 49.2 Section... TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.2 Availability of mine rescue teams. (a) Except where alternative... teams which are available at all times when miners are underground; or (2) Enter into an arrangement...

  2. 78 FR 58567 - Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams

    2013-09-24

    ... Safety and Health Administration Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams AGENCY: Mine Safety and... mine rescue team training. MSHA prescribes training materials through the issuance of instruction guides. Existing standards for coal mine rescue teams include criteria for mine operators to certify...

  3. Substrate-dependent nitric oxide synthesis by secreted endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 in macrophages.

    Goto, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we examined the role of aminopeptidases with reference to endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) in nitric oxide (NO) synthesis employing murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-γ and LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages derived from ERAP1 knockout mouse. When NO synthesis was measured in the presence of peptides having N-terminal Arg, comparative NO synthesis was seen with that measured in the presence of Arg. In the presence of an aminopeptidase inhibitor amastatin, NO synthesis in activated RAW264.7 cells was significantly decreased. These results suggest that aminopeptidases are involved in the NO synthesis in activated RAW264.7 cells. Subsequently, significant reduction of NO synthesis was observed in ERAP1 knockdown cells compared with wild-type cells. This reduction was rescued by exogenously added ERAP1. Furthermore, when peritoneal macrophages prepared from ERAP1 knockout mouse were employed, reduction of NO synthesis in knockout mouse macrophages was also attributable to ERAP1. In the presence of amastatin, further reduction was observed in knockout mouse-derived macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that several aminopeptidases play important roles in the maximum synthesis of NO in activated macrophages in a substrate peptide-dependent manner and ERAP1 is one of the aminopeptidases involved in the NO synthesis. PMID:25577645

  4. Test Report : GS battery, EPC power HES RESCU.

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. GS Battery and EPC Power have developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the GS Battery, EPC Power HES RESCU.

  5. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    Siamwala, Jamila H; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated lim...

  6. SARMApp: Search and Rescue Mapping Application

    Burkinshaw, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    In Search and Rescue (SAR) operations, the search team must know how to scan their search area efficiently with limited resources. Advances in mobile technology are driving the rapid growth of location based services (LBS) and this dissertation project investigates the feasibility of an LBS to support SAR operations. The LBS requires the ability to locate search team members, perform visibility analysis on-the-fly, and dynamically convey this information back to the user on a variety of mobil...

  7. Rescuing Political Theory From Fact-Insensitivity

    Kai Nielsen

    2012-01-01

    G. A. Cohen, in his Rescuing Justice and Equality, argues that fundamental moral principles do not rest on factual grounds. I contest that and argue instead that all fundamental moral principles (indeed, all moral principles) are fact-sensitive. They are the most deeply embedded principles in an interdependent web of beliefs—beliefs which include factual beliefs. Indeed, all functioning moral beliefs, moral principles and moral practices are in such interdependent webs. There are no fundament...

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    Malhi, Harmeet; Kaufman, Randal J

    2011-04-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated upon the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are sensed by the binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP)/glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). The accumulation of unfolded proteins sequesters BiP so it dissociates from three ER-transmembrane transducers leading to their activation. These transducers are inositol requiring (IRE) 1α, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), and activating transcription factor (ATF) 6α. PERK phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) resulting in global mRNA translation attenuation, and concurrently selectively increases the translation of several mRNAs, including the transcription factor ATF4, and its downstream target CHOP. IRE1α has kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) activities. IRE1α autophosphorylation activates the RNase activity to splice XBP1 mRNA, to produce the active transcription factor sXBP1. IRE1α activation also recruits and activates the stress kinase JNK. ATF6α transits to the Golgi compartment where it is cleaved by intramembrane proteolysis to generate a soluble active transcription factor. These UPR pathways act in concert to increase ER content, expand the ER protein folding capacity, degrade misfolded proteins, and reduce the load of new proteins entering the ER. All of these are geared toward adaptation to resolve the protein folding defect. Faced with persistent ER stress, adaptation starts to fail and apoptosis occurs, possibly mediated through calcium perturbations, reactive oxygen species, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. The UPR is activated in several liver diseases; including obesity associated fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, and alcohol-induced liver injury, all of which are associated with steatosis, raising the possibility that ER stress-dependent alteration in lipid homeostasis is the mechanism that underlies the steatosis. Hepatocyte apoptosis is a pathogenic event in several liver

  9. Disaster Prevention and Rescue Information Service Platforms

    Wen-Ray Su

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of its special hydrology and physiographic environmental conditions, Taiwan experiences a wide range of natural disasters, such as typhoons, floods, slope collapses, debris flows, and earthquakes, resulting in the loss of many lives and properties. Integration of disaster-related information, such as data and models, and the analysis and application of the information are crucial to reduce the damage caused by natural disasters. Therefore, the National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction introduced the information service platform technology of the Research Development and Evaluation Commission to integrate the information of related ministerial departments for added value and use. Related technologies have integrated information of disaster prevention and rescues, assisted the government in disaster prevention and rescue, and effectively reduced the time required for information integration. Additionally, the added value of information applications enabled situational analysis and process handling during natural disasters. This study uses responses to typhoons as examples, and describes how the service application platform of disaster prevention and rescue is used to integrate various data in the response processes and employs related systems to provide users real-time information as a reference for subsequent decision-making.

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation and Lipid Homeostasis.

    Stevenson, Julian; Huang, Edmond Y; Olzmann, James A

    2016-07-17

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the port of entry for proteins into the secretory pathway and the site of synthesis for several important lipids, including cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and phospholipids. Protein production within the endoplasmic reticulum is tightly regulated by a cohort of resident machinery that coordinates the folding, modification, and deployment of secreted and integral membrane proteins. Proteins failing to attain their native conformation are degraded through the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway via a series of tightly coupled steps: substrate recognition, dislocation, and ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal destruction. The same ERAD machinery also controls the flux through various metabolic pathways by coupling the turnover of metabolic enzymes to the levels of key metabolites. We review the current understanding and biological significance of ERAD-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism in mammalian cells. PMID:27296502

  11. Endoplasmic motility spectral characteristics in plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    Avsievich, T. I.; Ghaleb, K. E. S.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Spectral Fourier analysis of experimentally acquired velocity time dependencies, V(t), of shuttle endoplasmic motility in an isolated strand of plasmodium of slime mold Physarum Polycephalum has been realized. V(t) registration was performed in normal conditions and after the treatment by respiration inhibitors, which lead to a complete cessation of endoplasmic motion in the strand. Spectral analysis of the velocity time dependences of the endoplasm allows obtaining two distinct harmonic components in the spectra. Their ratio appeared to be constant in all cases, ν2/ν1=1.97±0.17. After the inhibitors are washed out respiratory system becomes normal, gradually restoring the activity of both harmonic oscillatory sources with time. Simulated velocity time dependences correspond to experimental data with good accuracy.

  12. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  13. Close encounter: mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and Alzheimer's disease

    De Strooper, Bart; Scorrano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is linked to loss of presenilins, components of γ-secretase. Presenilins are located at MAM, a membrane domain at the interface of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Presenilin loss alters ER–mitochondrial communication, linking it to AD pathogenesis.

  14. Rescue MIKE: An Automatic Commentary System for Disaster Simulation

    Kubo, Takenori; Morishita, Takuya; Shimora, Hiroki; Kawarabayashi, Tomomi; Odaka, Tomohiro; Ogura, Hisakazu; Frank, Ian; Tanaka-Ishii, Kumiko; Tadokoro, Satoshi; Matsubara, Hitoshi

    We designed the system, Rescue-MIKE, and implemented to the RoboCup Rescue Simulation System. The Rescue MIKE system aims to communicate with large numbers of relief workers and controllers working in a rescue domain. The system has an ability to report the situation of the domain like a newscaster. Our system consists of multiple agents. The system collects information from a simulated disaster scenario, and then produces a dialogue that fits to the actions of the agents in the domain. We described the design policy, implementation of our system, and Rescue-MIKE's facility. Rescue-MIKE initial version can provide aural information that helps to explain the unfolding scenarios to onlookers. We discussed the future applications of our system, including knowledge elicitation about disaster relief control methods, automated relief support systems, and public education about the dangers of large natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods or volcanic eruptions.

  15. Lipid rescue in children: The prompt decision.

    Eizaga Rebollar, Ramón; García Palacios, María V; Morales Guerrero, Javier; Torres Morera, Luis M

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of a 17-month-old child who underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia and caudal block. Electrocardiogram ST-T changes were observed after local anesthetic injection. The prompt use of Intralipid 30% was successful in normalizing ECG alterations. Our experience is consistent with previous literature, mainly carried out in adults. Thereby, we conduct a brief review of the subject in pediatrics. As a major conclusion, we strongly recommend the "fast-track" lipid rescue as soon as this severe complication is detected. PMID:27290983

  16. Cloning, expression, and functional characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent endoplasmic reticulum nucleoside diphosphatase.

    Failer, Bernd U; Braun, Norbert; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2002-10-01

    We have isolated and characterized the cDNA encoding a Ca(2+)-dependent nucleoside diphosphatase (EC ) related to two secreted ATP- and ADP-hydrolyzing apyrases of the bloodsucking insects, Cimex lectularius and Phlebotomus papatasi. The rat brain-derived cDNA has an open reading frame of 1209 bp encoding a protein of 403 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 45.7 kDa. The mRNA was expressed in all tissues investigated, revealing two major transcripts with varying preponderance. The immunohistochemical analysis of the Myc-His-tagged enzyme expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells revealed its association with the endoplasmic reticulum and also with pre-Golgi intermediates. Ca(2+)-dependent nucleoside diphosphatase is a membrane protein with its catalytic site facing the organelle lumen. It hydrolyzes nucleoside 5'-diphosphates in the order UDP >GDP = IDP >CDP but not ADP. Nucleoside 5'-triphosphates were hydrolyzed to a minor extent, and no hydrolysis of nucleoside 5'-monophosphates was observed. The enzyme was strongly activated by Ca(2+), insensitive to Mg(2+), and had a K(m) for UDP of 216 microm. Ca(2+)-dependent nucleoside diphosphatase may support glycosylation reactions related to quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:12167635

  17. A competency framework for the business rescue practitioner profession

    Marius Pretorius

    2014-01-01

    Orientation: Business Rescue Practitioner (BRP) tasks are complex and involve a wide range of knowledge, tacit skills and experience not accessible to novices.Research purpose: Competencies required by business rescue practitioners (BRPs) to navigate a distressed venture were investigated. What BRPs actually ‘do’ during a rescue guided the development of a competency framework to inform future qualification guidelines for BRP education and accreditation.Motivation for the study: To investigat...

  18. Rheological properties of living cytoplasm: endoplasm of Physarum plasmodium.

    Sato, M; Wong, T Z; Allen, R D

    1983-10-01

    Magnetic sphere viscoelastometry, video microscopy, and the Kamiya double chamber method (Kamiya, N., 1940, Science [Wash. DC], 92:462-463.) have been combined in an optical and rheological investigation of the living endoplasm of Physarum polycephalum. The rheological properties examined were yield stress, viscosity (as a function of shear), and elasticity. These parameters were evaluated in directions perpendicular; (X) and parallel (Y) to the plasmodial vein. Known magnetic forces were used for measurements in the X direction, while the falling ball technique was used in the Y direction (Cygan, D.A., and B. Caswell, 1971, Trans. Soc. Rheol. 15:663-683; MacLean-Fletcher, S.D., and T.D. Pollard, 1980, J. Cell Biol., 85:414-428). Approximate yield stresses were calculated in the X and Y directions of 0.58 and 1.05 dyn/cm2, respectively. Apparent viscosities measured in the two directions (eta x and eta y) were found to fluctuate with time. The fluctuations in eta x and eta y were shown, statistically, to occur independently of each other. Frequency correlation with dynamoplasmograms indicated that these fluctuations probably occur independently of the streaming cycle. Viscosity was found to be a complex function of shear, indicating that the endoplasm is non-Newtonian. Plots of shear stress vs. rate of shear both parallel and perpendicular to the vein, showed that endoplasm is not a shear thinning material. These experiments have shown that living endoplasm of Physarum is an anisotropic viscoelastic fluid with a yield stress. The endoplasm appears not to be a homogeneous material, but to be composed of heterogeneous domains. PMID:6619187

  19. The Pain and the Gain of Rescuing Historic Science Data: The Nimbus Data Rescue Project

    Gallaher, D. W.; Campbell, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    While technology of our satellite systems have greatly improved the quality of observations over the past 50 years, it is the legacy of the first global coverage environment satellites, the Nimbus systems launched by NASA in the mid-1960s, that marks the beginning of a unique perspective from space. Such early data can extend our climate record and provide important context in longer-term climate changes. Unfortunately, the Nimbus data nearly disappeared before its value was recognized and attempts to recover the data were undertaken. While the Nimbus data was never truly lost, it was in a form that could not be read and was not organized in a way that could be accessed with modern computer systems. The rescue and recovery of the Nimbus data began in 2007 with an initiative by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Without the Goddard efforts, the early Nimbus data might be forever dark. The Nimbus Rescue Project has just completed processing and archival of the Nimbus 4 visible and infrared observations from 1970 and 1971. This adds to our rescue efforts from Nimbus 1, 2 and 3 for 1964, 1966 and 1969. The procedures to recover the Nimbus data, from both film and tape, could be used by other data rescue projects, however the algorithms presented will tend to be Nimbus specific. The compositing of the mapped minimum brightness over weekly intervals resulted in never before seen views of the Polar Regions, such as a visible light view of the Antarctic ice extent from October 1970 (Figure 1). The Nimbus data recovery and reprocessing into modern formats was important, however it was the utility of the data as a part of the satellite climate record that made it valuable. Data rescue projects are often both difficult and time consuming but the data they bring back to the science community makes these efforts worthwhile.

  20. Leadership lessons from the Chilean mine rescue.

    Rashid, Faaiza; Edmondson, Amy C; Leonard, Herman B

    2013-01-01

    Three years ago, when a cave-in at the San José mine in Chile trapped 33 men under 700,000 metric tons of rock, experts estimated the probability of getting them out alive at less than 1%. Yet, after spending a record 69 days underground, all 33 were hoisted up to safety. The inspiring story of their rescue is a case study in how to lead in situations where the stakes, risk, and uncertainty are incredibly high and time pressure is intense. Today executives often find themselves in similar straits. When they do, many feel torn. Should they be directive, taking charge and commanding action? Or should they be empowering, enabling innovation and experimentation? As the successful example of André Sougarret, the chief of the mine rescue operation, shows, the answer is yes--to both. The choice is a false dichotomy. Implementing this dual approach involves three key tasks. Each has directive and enabling components. The first task is envisioning, which requires instilling both realism and hope. The second task is enrolling, which means setting clear boundaries for who is on and off the team, but inviting in helpful collaborators. The third task is engaging--leading disciplined execution while encouraging innovation and experimentation. The authors of this article describe how Sougarret ably juggled all of these tasks, orchestrating the efforts of hundreds of people from different organizations, areas of expertise, and countries in an extraordinary mission that overcame impossible odds. PMID:24730174

  1. 30 CFR 49.17 - Physical requirements for mine rescue team.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physical requirements for mine rescue team. 49... EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.17 Physical requirements for mine rescue team. (a) Each member of a mine rescue team shall be examined annually by...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4362 - Underground rescue and firefighting operations.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground rescue and firefighting operations... METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4362 Underground rescue...

  3. 46 CFR 108.565 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    2010-10-01

    ... operation of any survival craft at any other launching station. (4) Each rescue boat that is also a lifeboat... rescue boat batteries from the unit's power supply at a supply voltage not exceeding 50 volts. (c) Each... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS...

  4. 46 CFR 133.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    2010-10-01

    ... survival craft at any other launching station. (b) Each rescue boat must be provided a means for recharging the rescue boat batteries from the OSV's power supply at a supply voltage not exceeding 50 volts. (c... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS...

  5. 78 FR 79010 - Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams

    2013-12-27

    ... training. MSHA published a notice in the Federal Register (78 FR 58567) announcing the availability of the... Safety and Health Administration Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams AGENCY: Mine Safety and... Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has updated the coal mine rescue team certification criteria....

  6. Evolution of rescue personnel recovery for a new environment

    Meggett, David C.

    2007-01-01

    R missions in support of a variety of customers. This thesis examines the changing environment in which Combat Rescue forces are employed; evaluates the ability of these forces to perform PR tasks within an Irregular Warfare campaign; and makes recommendations regarding where and under whose control rescue assets should be employed.

  7. Chemical chaperones improve protein secretion and rescue mutant factor VIII in mice with hemophilia A.

    Stefanie D Roth

    Full Text Available Inefficient intracellular protein trafficking is a critical issue in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases and in recombinant protein production. Here we investigated the trafficking of factor VIII (FVIII, which is affected in the coagulation disorder hemophilia A. We hypothesized that chemical chaperones may be useful to enhance folding and processing of FVIII in recombinant protein production, and as a therapeutic approach in patients with impaired FVIII secretion. A tagged B-domain-deleted version of human FVIII was expressed in cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary cells to mimic the industrial production of this important protein. Of several chemical chaperones tested, the addition of betaine resulted in increased secretion of FVIII, by increasing solubility of intracellular FVIII aggregates and improving transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Similar results were obtained in experiments monitoring recombinant full-length FVIII. Oral betaine administration also increased FVIII and factor IX (FIX plasma levels in FVIII or FIX knockout mice following gene transfer. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo applications of betaine were also able to rescue a trafficking-defective FVIII mutant (FVIIIQ305P. We conclude that chemical chaperones such as betaine might represent a useful treatment concept for hemophilia and other diseases caused by deficient intracellular protein trafficking.

  8. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity.

    Siamwala, Jamila H; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Pradeep, T; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  9. Air and sea rescue via satellite systems

    Scales, W. C.; Swanson, R.

    1984-03-01

    Two approaches to a satellite system for air and sea rescue to be put into use by the 1990s, one employing polar-orbiting satellites and the other using fixed geosynchronous satellites over the equator, are discussed. A battery-powered transmitter on a ship or aircraft would be activated in an accident to emit a low-power omnidirectional signal that would be relayed by a satellite to an earth station. The polar-orbiting approach, now being evaluated on a small-scale with the Cospas-Sarsat system, allows complete coverage of the earth, including the poles, and provides a fix on the origin of the distress signals by means of the Doppler shift. A parallel effort for the testing of geostationary satellites to measure system sensitivity to various interference sources, to optimize design, and to measure land and sea performance is reviewed.

  10. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A;

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) fragments, cartilage and blood from four patients were used for morphological and molecular analysis. Controls included articular cartilage and blood samples from healthy individuals. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed abnormalities in...... chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of cartilage from OCD patients. Abnormal type II collagen heterofibrils in "bundles" and chondrocytes with abnormal accumulation of matrix proteins in distended rough endoplasmic reticulum were typical findings. Further, Von Kossa staining and TEM showed empty lacunae...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  11. Disaster Rescue Simulation based on Complex Adaptive Theory

    Feng Jiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Disaster rescue is one of the key measures of disaster reduction. The rescue process is a complex process with the characteristics of large scale, complicate structure, non-linear. It is hard to describe and analyze them with traditional methods. Based on complex adaptive theory, this paper analyzes the complex adaptation of the rescue process from seven features: aggregation, nonlinearity, mobility, diversity, tagging, internal model and building block. With the support of Repast platform, an agent-based model including rescue agents and victim agents was proposed. Moreover, two simulations with different parameters are employed to examine the feasibility of the model. As a result, the proposed model has been shown that it is efficient in dealing with the disaster rescue simulation and can provide the reference for making decisions.

  12. Research of Insertion Mechanism of Flexible Search and Rescue Robot

    Shen Linyong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to various factors, the global scope disaster events occur inevitably every year. Terrorism, natural disasters or destructive earthquakes tend to cause a large number of people buried in the ruins of buildings. The research of search and rescue instruments research is mainly focused on snake-like robot and life detector both at home and abroad. The endoscopic search and rescue robot in this paper combines the characteristics of these two kinds of search and rescue equipment. This thesis mainly studies the insertion mechanism of endoscopic flexible search and rescue robot. Based on the mechanics characteristics of the flexible robot body, this paper analyzes several common failure modes during the insertion into the ruins. This article puts forward the scheme of segmented gradual pulling-pushing, which plays an important role in promoting search and rescue work.

  13. Posture manipulation for rescue activity via small traction robots

    We discuss a conceptual design of rescue robots against nuclear-power plant accidents. We claim that the rescue robots in nuclear-power plants should have the following properties. (1) The size is small. (2) The structure is simple. (3) The number of the robots is large. This paper studies the rescue robots to rescue people in an area polluted with radioactive leakage in nuclear power institutions. In particular, we propose a rescue system which consists of a group of small mobile robots. First, small traction robots set the posture of the fainted victims to carry easily, and carry them to the safety space with the mobile robots for the stretcher composition. In this paper, we describe the produced small traction robots. And, we confirm that the robots can manipulate a 40 kg dummy doll's posture. We also examine the optimal number of robots from a perspective of working efficiency in the assumption spot. (author)

  14. Rescue of marker phenotypes mediated by somatic cell hybridization

    The effect of irradiation prior to virus-induced cell fusion on the frequency of hybrid production has been measured as a function of radiation dose. The Chinese hamster line wg3h (HGPRT-) was crossed with the TK- mutants; Chinese hamster A23 or mouse 3T34E, and hybrids were selected in HAT medium. Irradiation of one (marker rescue) or both (mutual rescue) partners before fusion yielded qualitatively different results. After X-irradiation, marker rescue curves were of single-hit type, with D0 values about five-fold greater than the irradiated parent cell. Mutual rescue curves were of the multi-hit type, with zero-dose extrapolation value (n) greater than that of the more resistant partner, but no significant alteration in D0. Qualitatively similar results were obtained after U.V.- irradiation, but the probability of rescue per surviving parent cell was

  15. Dithiothreitol and the translocation of preprolactin across mammalian endoplasmic reticulum

    1987-01-01

    The translocation mode of preprolactin (pPL) across mammalian endoplasmic reticulum was reinvestigated in light of recent findings that nascent secretory polypeptides synthesized in the presence of a highly reducing environment could be translocated posttranslationally and independently of their attachment to the ribosome (Maher, P. A., and S. J. Singer, 1986, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83:9001-9005). The effects of the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) on pPL synthesis and translocation w...

  16. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A;

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) fragments, cartilage and blood from four patients were used for morphological and molecular analysis. Controls included articular cartilage and blood samples from healthy individuals. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed abnormalities ...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  17. Fluvoxamine Attenuated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Leptin Resistance

    Hosoi, Toru; Miyahara, Tsuyoshi; Kayano, Takaaki; Yokoyama, Shota; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) is involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. However, pharmacological treatments targeting ER stress are not well understood. In the present study, we found that fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used for depression, can attenuate ER stress-induced “leptin resistance,” i.e., insensitivity to the anti-obesity hormone leptin. Treatment with tunicamycin, an ER stress-inducing reagent, caused ...

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Jianming eLi; Yidan eLiu

    2014-01-01

    A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC) mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis...

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum anchored heme-oxygenase 1 faces the cytosol

    Gottlieb, Yehonatan; Truman, Marianna; Cohen, Lyora A.; Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G.

    2012-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-anchored enzyme that breaks down heme into iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. Heme is a hydrophobic co-factor in many proteins, including hemoglobin. Free heme is highly cytotoxic and, therefore, both heme synthesis and breakdown are tightly regulated. During turnover of heme proteins, heme is released in the phago-lysosomal compartment or the cytosol. The subcellular location of the heme-oxygenase 1 active site has not been clarified. Using con...

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat liver cancer

    Xiao, Bin; Cui, Li-Min; MA, DONG-JIE; LIU, SHUANG-PING; ZHANG, XUE-WU

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the significance of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in the development of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced liver cancer in rats, critical regulatory factors in ERS signaling pathways were investigated in the present study. The results showed that the expression of ERS-related proteins gradually increased in the early and mid-term stages of carcinogenesis, while in the later stages, the expression of these proteins did not change significantly after reaching a peak. ERS is involv...

  1. Acrolein Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Causes Airspace Enlargement

    Kitaguchi, Yoshiaki; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Hanaoka, Masayuki; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Norbert F. Voelkel

    2012-01-01

    Background Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. Methods Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alve...

  2. ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS AS A PRO-FIBROTIC STIUMULUS

    Tanjore, Harikrishna; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence suggests a prominent role for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in fibrotic conditions affecting a number of internal organs, including the lungs, liver, GI tract, kidney, and heart. ER stress enhances the susceptibility of structural cells, in most cases the epithelium, to pro-fibrotic stimuli. Studies suggest that ER stress facilitates fibrotic remodeling through activation of pro-apoptotic pathways, induction of epithel...

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Insulin Biosynthesis: A Review

    Mi-Kyung Kim; Hye-Soon Kim; In-Kyu Lee; Keun-Gyu Park

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction are major contributors to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Various conditions play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and are correlated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Pancreatic beta cells are susceptible to ER stress. Many studies have shown that increased ER stress induces pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and diabetes mellitus using genetic models of ER stress and by various stimuli. There are many re...

  4. Activation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Following Trauma-Hemorrhage

    Jian, Bixi; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Jianguo; Choudhry, Mashkoor; Bland, Kirby; Chaudry, Irshad; Raju, Raghavan

    2008-01-01

    Hemorrhagic trauma leads to organ dysfunction, sepsis and death. There is abnormal production of proinflammatory cytokines by Kupffer cells, tissue hypoxia and liver injury following trauma-hemorrhage. The physiological conditions consequent to trauma-hemorrhage are consistent with factors necessary to initiate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response. However, the contribution of ER stress to apoptosis and liver injury after trauma-hemorrhage is not known. In the prese...

  5. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    International audience Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to...

  6. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Namrata eChaudhari; Priti eTalwar; Avinash eParimisetty; Christian eLefebvre d'Hellencourt; Palaniyandi eRavanan

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse b...

  7. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse b...

  8. Role of endoplasmic reticular stress in aortic endothelial apoptosis induced by intermittent/persistent hypoxia

    YANG Yuan-yuan; SHANG Jin; LIU Hui-guo

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence shows that hypoxia can induce endothelial apoptosis,however the mechanism is still unknown.We hypothesized whether intermittent or persistent hypoxia could induce endoplasmic reticular stress,leading to endothelial apoptosis.Methods Twenty-four 8-week male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups:normoxia (NC) group,intermittent hypoxia (IH) group and persistent hypoxia (PH) group.TUNEL staining was performed to detect aortic arch endotheliar apoptosis,and immunohistochemistry for BIP,CHOP and caspase12 to test protein expression;human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) of the line ECV304 were cultured (with or without taurodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) 10 mmol/L,100 mmol/L) and divided into four groups:NC group (20.8% O2 for 4 hours),PH1 group (5% O2 for 4 hours),PH2 group (5% O2 for 12 hours) and IH group (20.8% O2 and 5% O2 alternatively for 8 hours).Annexin V-fluorescein-isothiocyanate/propidium iodide flow cytometry was used to assess apoptosis in each group.The expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12 were detected by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR.Result Intermittent and persistent hypoxia could increase the rate of endothelium apoptosis and the expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12 compared with the control,induction by intermittent hypoxia was slightly higher than persistent hypoxia.In the HUVEC experiment,TUDCA significantly reduced apoptosis and the expressions of GRP78,CHOP and caspase12.Conclusion Hypoxia,especially intermittent,can induce endothelial cell apoptosis possibly through endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway,which can be attenuated by taurodeoxycholic acid.

  9. Medical rescue of naval combat:challenge and future

    Hai Jin; Li-Jun Hou; Xiao-Bing Fu

    2015-01-01

    There has been no large-scale naval combat in the last 30 years. With the rapid development of battleships, weapons manufacturing and electronic technology, naval combat will present some new characteristics. Additionally, naval combat is facing unprecedented challenges. In this paper, we discuss the topic of medical rescue at sea: what chal-lenges we face and what we could do. The contents discussed in this paper contain battlefield self-aid buddy care, clinical skills, organized health services, medical training and future medical research programs. We also discuss the characteristics of modern naval combat, medical rescue challenges, medical treatment highlights and future develop-ments of medical rescue at sea.

  10. Guidance of Autonomous Amphibious Vehicles for Flood Rescue Support

    Shankarachary Ragi; ChingSeong Tan; Chong, Edwin K. P.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a path-planning algorithm to guide autonomous amphibious vehicles (AAVs) for flood rescue support missions. Specifically, we develop an algorithm to control multiple AAVs to reach/rescue multiple victims (also called targets) in a flood scenario in 2D, where the flood water flows across the scene and the targets move (drifted by the flood water) along the flood stream. A target is said to be rescued if an AAV lies within a circular region of a certain radius around the target. The ...

  11. Computer Security: DNS to the rescue!

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2016-01-01

    Why you should be grateful to the Domain Name System at CERN.   Incidents involving so-called “drive-by” infections and “ransomware” are on the rise. Whilst an up-to-date and fully patched operating system is essential; whilst running anti-virus software with current virus signature files is a must; whilst “stop --- think --- don’t click” surely helps, we can still go one step further in better protecting your computers: DNS to the rescue. The DNS, short for Domain Name System, translates the web address you want to visit (like “http://cern.ch”) to a machine-readable format (the IP address, here: “188.184.9.234”). For years, we have automatically monitored the DNS translation requests made by your favourite web browser (actually by your operating system, but that doesn’t matter here), and we have automatically informed you if your computer tried to access a website known to hos...

  12. Equipment of medical backpacks in mountain rescue.

    Elsensohn, Fidel; Soteras, Inigo; Resiten, Oliver; Ellerton, John; Brugger, Hermann; Paal, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a survey of equipment in medical backpacks for mountain rescuers and mountain emergency physicians. The aim was to investigate whether there are standards for medical equipment in mountain rescue organizations associated with the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR MEDCOM). A questionnaire was completed by 18 member organizations from 14 countries. Backpacks for first responders are well equipped to manage trauma, but deficiencies in equipment to treat medical emergencies were found. Paramedic and physicians' backpacks were well equipped to provide advanced life support and contained suitable drugs. We recommend that medical backpacks should be equipped in accordance with national laws, the medical emergencies in a given region, and take into account the climate, geography, medical training of rescuers, and funding of the organization. Automated external defibrillator provision should be improved. The effects of temperature on the drugs and equipment should be considered. Standards for training in the use and maintenance of medical tools should be enforced. First responders and physicians should only use familiar tools and drugs. PMID:22206560

  13. Lipid transport mediated by Arabidopsis TGD proteins is unidirectional from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid

    Xu, C.; Moellering, E. R., Muthan, B.; Fan, J.; Benning, C.

    2010-06-01

    The transfer of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plastid in Arabidopsis involves the TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL (TGD) proteins. Lipid exchange is thought to be bidirectional based on the presence of specific lipid molecular species in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in the desaturation of fatty acids of membrane lipids in the ER and plastid. However, it was unclear whether TGD proteins were required for lipid trafficking in both directions. This question was addressed through the analysis of double mutants of tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 in genetic mutant backgrounds leading to a defect in lipid fatty acid desaturation either in the ER (fad2) or the plastid (fad6). The fad6 tgd1-1 and fad6 tgd4-3 double mutants showed drastic reductions in the relative levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and of galactolipids. The growth of these plants and the development of photosynthetic membrane systems were severely compromised, suggesting a disruption in the import of polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing lipid species from the ER. Furthermore, a forward-genetic screen in the tgd1-2 dgd1 mutant background led to the isolation of a new fad6-2 allele with a marked reduction in the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. In contrast, the introduction of fad2, affecting fatty acid desaturation of lipids in the ER, into the two tgd mutant backgrounds did not further decrease the level of fatty acid desaturation in lipids of extraplastidic membranes. These results suggest that the role of TGD proteins is limited to plastid lipid import, but does not extend to lipid export from the plastid to extraplastidic membranes.

  14. Search and Rescue Plan: Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan will provide guidance to help efficiently handle a search and rescue (SAR) operation on Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The purpose of this plan is to...

  15. The Cognitive Dissonance between Child Rescue and Child Protection

    K.E. Cheney (Kristen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstract‘Saving orphans’ has become an industry that irrevocably harms children and undermines the development of child welfare systems. We must replace the drive to rescue with the desire to protect.

  16. Modulation of NF-KB in rescued irradiated cells

    Studies by different groups on the rescue effect, where unirradiated bystander cells mitigated the damages in the irradiated cells, since its discovery by the authors' group in 2011 were first reviewed. The properties of the rescue effect were then examined using a novel experimental set-up to physically separate the rescue signals from the bystander signals. The authors' results showed that the rescue effect was mediated through activation of the nuclear factor-KB (NF-KB) response pathway in the irradiated cells, and that the NF-KB activation inhibitor BAy-11-7082 did not affect the activation of this response pathway in the irradiated cells induced by direct irradiation. (authors)

  17. Proplatelet formation in megakaryocytes is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Morishima, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    Although previous studies suggest that proplatelet formation in megakaryocytes involves caspase-3, the mechanism underlying the activation of caspase-3 is unknown. Here, we analyzed caspase activation in a human megakaryoblastic cell line, MEG-01, which forms proplatelets spontaneously. Specific activation of caspase-3 and caspase-4 was found in proplatelets. Consistent with previous observations of caspase-4 autoactivation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, several ER stress marker proteins were expressed during proplatelet formation. A pharmacological ER stressor enhanced platelet production via proplatelet formation, whereas inhibition of caspase-4 caused suppression. These results suggest that ER stress is a mechanism underlying the maturation of megakaryocytes. PMID:27296088

  18. A luminal flavoprotein in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation

    Riemer, Jan; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Johansson, Linda; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Ellgaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) discriminates between native and nonnative proteins. The latter are degraded by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Whereas many cytosolic and membrane components of this system are known, only few luminal players have been...... identified. In this study, we characterize ERFAD (ER flavoprotein associated with degradation), an ER luminal flavoprotein that functions in ERAD. Upon knockdown of ERFAD, the degradation of the ERAD model substrate ribophorin 332 is delayed, and the overall level of polyubiquitinated cellular proteins is...

  19. Search and Rescue Radar Transponder under Dynamic Operating Conditions

    Ivančić, Paško; Kasum, Josip; Peraković, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    The Search and Rescue Radar Transponder (SART) operates in the frequency range from 9.2 GHz to 9.5 GHz. The SART is used on conventional and, partly, nonconventional vessels in search and rescue operations at sea. It is also used, to a certain extent, on inland waterways, rivers and lakes. As for their construction and design, SART transponders are self-contained, portable units. With regard to their technical characteristics and design requirements, they comply with the regulations of local ...

  20. PHENOMENON OF RESCUING VICTIMS OF NAZI REGIME UNDER THE HOLOCAUST

    Stets, Oleg; Kovtun, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this article problems devoted to participation of the local Ukrainian population at the rescue of Jewry victims of the Nazi occupation regime is examined. Question of violation of human rights is analyzed and it is given description a concept «the phenomenon of rescuing». It was concluded on social and legal support rescuers Jewish people during the Second World War on the territory of modern Ukraine.

  1. 30 CFR Appendix to Subpart B - Optional Form for Certifying Mine Rescue Teams

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Optional Form for Certifying Mine Rescue Teams... EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines Pt. 49, Subpt. B, App. Appendix to Subpart B—Optional Form for Certifying Mine Rescue Teams ER08FE08.000 ER08FE08.001...

  2. 78 FR 35974 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Rescue Teams; Arrangements for...

    2013-06-14

    ... Safety and Health Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Rescue Teams... protecting the safety and health of miners. 30 CFR Part 49, Mine Rescue Teams, Subpart B--Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines, sets standards related to the availability of mine rescue teams;...

  3. 30 CFR 49.7 - Physical requirements for mine rescue team.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physical requirements for mine rescue team. 49... EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.7 Physical requirements for mine rescue team. (a) Each member of a mine rescue team shall be examined annually by a physician who shall certify that each person...

  4. 30 CFR 49.60 - Requirements for a local mine rescue contest.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for a local mine rescue contest... for a local mine rescue contest. (a) A local mine rescue contest is one that— (1) Is conducted in the... apparatus while participating in a simulated mine rescue team exercise; and (6) Includes contest judges...

  5. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: NO to the rescue

    Wallace, John L

    2004-01-01

    Severe liver injury as a result of overdose or chronic use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) remains a significant clinical problem, accounting for as much as 40% of cases of acute liver failure. The mechanisms underlying the liver injury caused by acetaminophen have become much better understood in recent years. In this issue, Fiorucci et al. report that delivery of nitric oxide (NO) in small amounts to the liver, via a novel derivative of the bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid, results in signific...

  6. [Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in solid organ transplantation].

    Pallet, Nicolas; Bouvier, Nicolas; Beaune, Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Anglicheau, Dany; Thervet, Eric

    2010-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a situation caused by the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, triggering an evolutionary conserved adaptive response termed the unfolded protein response. When adaptation fails, excessive and prolonged ER stress triggers cell suicide. Important roles for ER-initiated cell death pathways have been recognized for several diseases, including diabetes, hypoxia, ischemia/reperfusion injury, neurodegenerative and heart diseases. The implication of the ER stress is not well recognized in solid organ transplantation, but increasing evidence suggests its implication in mediating allograft injury. The purpose of this review is to summarize the mechanisms of ER stress and to discuss its implication during tissue injury in solid organ transplantation. The possible implications of the ER stress in the modifications of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes are also discussed beyond the scope of adaptation and cell death. Increasing the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of acute and chronic allograft damages could lead to the development of new biomarkers and to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies to prevent the initiation of graft dysfunction or to promote the tissue regeneration after injury. PMID:20412745

  7. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS. PMID:26282323

  8. Ricin A chain reaches the endoplasmic reticulum after endocytosis

    Ricin is a potent ribosome inactivating protein and now has been widely used for synthesis of immunotoxins. To target ribosome in the mammalian cytosol, ricin must firstly retrograde transport from the endomembrane system to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the ricin A chain (RTA) is recognized by ER components that facilitate its membrane translocation to the cytosol. In the study, the fusion gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-RTA was expressed with the pET-28a (+) system in Escherichia coli under the control of a T7 promoter. The fusion protein showed a green fluorescence. The recombinant protein can be purified by metal chelated affinity chromatography on a column of NTA. The rabbit anti-GFP antibody can recognize the fusion protein of EGFP-RTA just like the EGFP protein. The cytotoxicity of EGFP-RTA and RTA was evaluated by the MTT assay in HeLa and HEP-G2 cells following fluid-phase endocytosis. The fusion protein had a similar cytotoxicity of RTA. After endocytosis, the subcellular location of the fusion protein can be observed with the laser scanning confocal microscopy and the immuno-gold labeling Electro Microscopy. This study provided important evidence by a visualized way to prove that RTA does reach the endoplasmic reticulum

  9. An evaluation of coordination relationships during earthquake emergency rescue using entropy theory

    Huang Rong; Liang Xuedong; Zeng Guizhi; Ye Yulin; Wang Da

    2015-01-01

    Emergency rescue after an earthquake is complex work which requires the participation of relief and social organizations. Studying earthquake emergency coordination efficiency can not only help rescue organizations to define their own rescue missions, but also strengthens inter-organizational communication and collaboration tasks, improves the efficiency of emergency rescue, and reduces loss. In this paper, collaborative entropy is introduced to study earthquake emergency rescue operations. T...

  10. Advances in the mechanisms of atherosclerosis vulnerable plague and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Zhong Zhang; Ruo-Lan Huang; Ru Mo; Ling Wang; Xiao Chang; Mu-Juan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease occupy the first two place of world health economic burden, atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque rupture as the common factor of these diseases, is thought to be a key target of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease control. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is one of the classical pathway of cell apoptosis. More and more studies have indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway was involved in the development of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In this paper, the three main signal pathways of endoplasmic reticulum stress, including Protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and Inositol-requiring protein 1αα(IRE1α) were reviewed. The relationship between the risk factors of atherosclerosis (including hyperlipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia) and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the relationship between major cellular components (macrophages, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and vascular smooth muscle cells) of vulnerable plaque and endoplasmic reticulum stress were reviewed.

  11. Inhibition of Calcium Influx Reduces Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Lipotoxic Pancreatic β-Cells via Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Yuren Zhou

    Full Text Available Lipotoxicity plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell failure during the development of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to elevated free fatty acids level could cause deterioration of β-cell function and induce cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of fatty acids-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis might provide benefit for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. The present study examined whether regulation of fatty acids-triggered calcium influx could protect pancreatic β-cells from lipotoxicity. Two small molecule compounds, L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine and potassium channel activator diazoxide were used to inhibit palmitic acid-induced calcium influx. And whether the compounds could reduce palmitic acid-induced β-cell failure and the underlying mechanism were also investigated. It was found that both nifedipine and diazoxide protected MIN6 pancreatic β-cells and primary cultured murine islets from palmitic acid-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, the impaired insulin secretion was also recovered to varying degrees by these two compounds. Our results verified that nifedipine and diazoxide could reduce palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress to generate protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. More importantly, it suggested that regulation of calcium influx by small molecule compounds might provide benefits for the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Rescue of newborn ants by older Cataglyphis cursor adult workers.

    Nowbahari, Elise; Amirault, Céline; Hollis, Karen L

    2016-05-01

    Cataglyphis cursor worker ants are capable of highly sophisticated rescue behaviour in which individuals are able to identify what has trapped a nestmate and to direct their behaviour towards that obstacle. Nonetheless, rescue behaviour is constrained by workers' subcaste: whereas foragers, the oldest workers, are able both to give and to receive the most help, the youngest workers, inactives, neither give nor receive any help whatsoever; nurses give and receive intermediate levels of aid, reflecting their intermediate age. Such differences in rescue behaviour across subcastes suggest that age and experience play a critical role. In this species, as in many others in which a sensitive period for nestmate recognition exists, newly enclosed ants, called callows, are adopted by ants belonging not only to different colonies but also to different species; foreign callows receive nearly the same special care provided to resident newborns. Because callows are younger than inactives, which are incapable of soliciting rescue, we wondered whether entrapped callows would receive such aid. In the present study, we artificially ensnared individual callows from their own colony (homocolonial), from a different colony (heterocolonial), and from a different species (heterospecific), and tested each one with groups of five potential C. cursor rescuers, either all foragers or all nurses. Our results show that all three types of callows are able to elicit rescue behaviour from both foragers and nurses. Nonetheless, nurse rescuers are better able to discriminate between the three types of callow victims than are foragers. PMID:26846232

  13. Development of a Mine Rescue Drilling System (MRDS) :

    Raymond, David W.; Gaither, Katherine N.; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven D.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Costin, Laurence S.

    2014-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has a long history in developing compact, mobile, very high-speed drilling systems and this technology could be applied to increasing the rate at which boreholes are drilled during a mine accident response. The present study reviews current technical approaches, primarily based on technology developed under other programs, analyzes mine rescue specific requirements to develop a conceptual mine rescue drilling approach, and finally, proposes development of a phased mine rescue drilling system (MRDS) that accomplishes (1) development of rapid drilling MRDS equipment; (2) structuring improved web communication through the Mine Safety & Health Administration (MSHA) web site; (3) development of an improved protocol for employment of existing drilling technology in emergencies; (4) deployment of advanced technologies to complement mine rescue drilling operations during emergency events; and (5) preliminary discussion of potential future technology development of specialized MRDS equipment. This phased approach allows for rapid fielding of a basic system for improved rescue drilling, with the ability to improve the system over time at a reasonable cost.

  14. BAT3 guides misfolded glycoproteins out of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Jasper H L Claessen

    Full Text Available Secretory and membrane proteins that fail to acquire their native conformation within the lumen of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER are usually targeted for ubiquitin-dependent degradation by the proteasome. How partially folded polypeptides are kept from aggregation once ejected from the ER into the cytosol is not known. We show that BAT3, a cytosolic chaperone, is recruited to the site of dislocation through its interaction with Derlin2. Furthermore, we observe cytoplasmic BAT3 in a complex with a polypeptide that originates in the ER as a glycoprotein, an interaction that depends on the cytosolic disposition of both, visualized even in the absence of proteasomal inhibition. Cells depleted of BAT3 fail to degrade an established dislocation substrate. We thus implicate a cytosolic chaperone as an active participant in the dislocation of ER glycoproteins.

  15. Cytoprotective small molecule modulators of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Munshi, Soumyabrata; Dahl, Russell

    2016-06-01

    Cellular health depends on the normal function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to fold, assemble, and modify critical proteins to maintain viability. When the ER cannot process proteins effectively, a condition known as ER stress ensues. When this stress is excessive or prolonged, cell death via apoptotic pathways is triggered. Interestingly, most major diseases have been shown to be intimately linked to ER stress, including diabetes, stroke, neurodegeneration, and many cancers. Thus, controlling ER stress presents a significant strategy for drug development for these diseases. The goal of this review is to present various small molecules that alleviate ER stress with the intention that they may serve as useful starting points for therapeutic agent development. PMID:27091069

  16. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    Kenna, Tony J; Robinson, Philip C; Haroon, Nigil

    2015-09-01

    There has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. The advent of genome-wide association studies has increased the known loci associated with AS to more than 40. The endoplasmic reticulum resident aminopeptidases (ERAP) 1 and 2 were identified in this manner and are of particular interest. There appears to be a genetic as well as a functional interaction of ERAP1 and 2 with HLA-B27 based on the known functions of these molecules. Recent studies on the structure, immunological effects and the peptide-trimming properties of ERAP 1 and 2 have helped to provide insight into their pathogenic potential in AS. In this review, we explore the role of ERAP 1 and 2 in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:26070942

  18. Fluvoxamine attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced leptin resistance

    Toru eHosoi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress is involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. However, pharmacological treatments targeting ER stress are not well understood. In the present study, we found that fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used for depression, can attenuate ER stress-induced leptin resistance, i.e. insensitivity to the anti-obesity hormone leptin. Treatment with tunicamycin, an ER stress-inducing reagent, caused cell death which was significantly inhibited by fluvoxamine. Leptin activates JAK2-STAT3 signaling. ER stress caused an impairment of leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation which was reversed by fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine would be a novel leptin-sensitizing drug, which targets ER stress.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Sensing in the Unfolded Protein Response

    Gardner, Brooke M.; Pincus, David; Gotthardt, Katja; Gallagher, Ciara M.; Walter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Secretory and transmembrane proteins enter the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as unfolded proteins and exit as either folded proteins in transit to their target organelles or as misfolded proteins targeted for degradation. The unfolded protein response (UPR) maintains the protein-folding homeostasis within the ER, ensuring that the protein-folding capacity of the ER meets the load of client proteins. Activation of the UPR depends on three ER stress sensor proteins, Ire1, PERK, and ATF6. Although the consequences of activation are well understood, how these sensors detect ER stress remains unclear. Recent evidence suggests that yeast Ire1 directly binds to unfolded proteins, which induces its oligomerization and activation. BiP dissociation from Ire1 regulates this oligomeric equilibrium, ultimately modulating Ire1’s sensitivity and duration of activation. The mechanistic principles of ER stress sensing are the focus of this review. PMID:23388626

  20. An unmanned search and rescue mission

    Novaro Mascarello, Laura; Quagliotti, Fulvia; Bertini, Mario

    2016-04-01

    The Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) are becoming more and more powerful and innovative and they have an increased interest in civil applications, in particular, after natural hazard phenomena. The RPAS is useful in search and rescue missions in high mountain where scenarios are unfriendly and the use of helicopters is often not profitable. First, the unmanned configuration is safer because there is no hazards for human life that is not on board. Moreover, it is cheaper due to the use of electric propulsion instead of internal combustion engine and to its small dimensions and weights. Finally, the use of the RPAS is faster while the helicopter is often not available because is involved in other missions or it cannot be used if the search mission is in impervious scenario, such as forests with thick vegetation. For instance, the RPAS can be used after an avalanche when victims have little time to be saved before the death by hypothermia. In most conditions, the body maintains a healthy temperature. However, if it is exposed to cold temperatures, especially with a high cooling factor from wind and high humidity, for extended periods, the control mechanisms of the body may not be able to maintain a normal body temperature. When you lose more heat than the body can generate, it takes over hypothermia, defined as a body temperature below 35° C. Wet clothing, fall into cold water or not adequately cover themselves during the cold season, are all factors that can increase the chances of hypothermia. Signs and symptoms (tremor, slurred speech, breathing abnormally slow, cold and pale skin, loss of coordination, fatigue, lethargy or apathy, confusion or memory loss) usually develop slowly. People with hypothermia typically experience a gradual loss of mental acuity and physical capacity, and realize that you have need of emergency medical care. For these reasons, the use of an RPAS could be crucial for the survival of disappeared people in high mountain. In

  1. The evolutionary history of sarco(endoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA.

    Ianina Altshuler

    Full Text Available Investigating the phylogenetic relationships within physiologically essential gene families across a broad range of taxa can reveal the key gene duplication events underlying their family expansion and is thus important to functional genomics studies. P-Type II ATPases represent a large family of ATP powered transporters that move ions across cellular membranes and includes Na(+/K(+ transporters, H(+/K(+ transporters, and plasma membrane Ca(2+ pumps. Here, we examine the evolutionary history of one such transporter, the Sarco(endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA, which maintains calcium homeostasis in the cell by actively pumping Ca(2+ into the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum. Our protein-based phylogenetic analyses across Eukaryotes revealed two monophyletic clades of SERCA proteins, one containing animals, fungi, and plants, and the other consisting of plants and protists. Our analyses suggest that the three known SERCA proteins in vertebrates arose through two major gene duplication events after the divergence from tunicates, but before the separation of fishes and tetrapods. In plants, we recovered two SERCA clades, one being the sister group to Metazoa and the other to Apicomplexa clade, suggesting an ancient duplication in an early eukaryotic ancestor, followed by subsequent loss of one copy in Opisthokonta, the other in protists, and retention of both in plants. We also report relatively recent and independent gene duplication events within invertebrate taxa including tunicates and the leech Helobdella robusta. Thus, it appears that both ancient and recent gene duplication events have played an important role in the evolution of this ubiquitous gene family across the eukaryotic domain.

  2. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F. [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Luecke, Hartmut, E-mail: hudel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Universidad del Pais Vasco, 48940 Leioa (Spain)

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  3. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol−1 (15.1 kJ mol−1). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the β-sandwich scaffold. On the

  4. Synthetic Aperture Radar: The NCCS Enables Search and Rescue

    2002-01-01

    For as long as planes have gone down, dedicated men and women have used ever-improving technologies to aid their search for survivors. Nearly 2,000 general aviation crashes occur each year in U.S.-and many, like the Montana incident, occur without witnesses. On average, every day in the U.S. one airplane is reported missing. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) organizes search missions for about 100 aircraft each year. Some of these are not found before the searches called off, and are discovered only by chance long after the crash. In some cases, the crash site is never found. NASA Search and Rescue Mission is using NCCS rescues to develop tools for processing radar data that can help these effort

  5. Molecular genetics of vaccinia virus: demonstration of marker rescue.

    Nakano, E.; Panicali, D; E. Paoletti

    1982-01-01

    Two genomic variants of vaccinia virus isolated from serially propagated stocks were used to demonstrate marker rescue. The smaller (S variant) virus contains a 6.3 megadalton (MDal) deletion of unique DNA sequences present in the 123-MDal larger (L variant) virus. The deletion was mapped at 6.85 MDal from the left terminus of the genome, just outside of the inverted terminal repetition. Rescue of the unique deleted DNA sequences by infectious S variant virus was obtained in CV-1 cells by usi...

  6. A Practice of Rescue Robot Contest in Junior High Schools

    Kawada, Kazuo; Nagamatsu, Masayasu; Yamamoto, Toru

    The rescue robot contest for junior high school students was created to give students an opportunity to design a robot to rescue the victims under large scale disasters. The activity was not only intended as an humanitarian project but also aiming at students to : (1) take the role of victims and imagining the situation from his or her perspective, (2) enhance thinking skills, creativity through the problem solving processes and, (3) work cooperatively in groups. From results of questionnaire for the participated students, important factors for further implementation as curriculum of technology education are implied.

  7. Protective equipment for emergency rescue in alpine-cold region

    Ma Tian; Feng Xinxing; Wang Qizhi; Hao Limin

    2013-01-01

    Alpine-cold regions are characterized as hypoxia,strong wind,heavy rain,cold climate,huge temperature difference between day and night,and vertical climate.All these make it difficult for an emergency rescue when a natural disaster such as earthquake happens.Based on the characteristics of emergency rescue in alpinecold region,several multifunctional protective equipments have been developed by the Quartermaster Equipment Institute of General Logistics Department (GLD) of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army (CPLA).These equipments are lightweight,durable and environment adaptable.

  8. Spectral characteristics of sign-alternating self-oscillatory endoplasm mobility in a myxomycete plasmodium

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a short time Fourier transform of the time dependences of the self-oscillatory endoplasm velocity in an isolated strand of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium recorded using a sign-sensitive laser Doppler microscope are described. Unlike the mode recording an absolute velocity, a sign-sensitive mode makes it possible to detect the pairs of equidistant harmonic components in the time dependence spectra of endoplasm movement. The resulting frequency and amplitude values are used to construct a model adequately describing the alternating endoplasm mobility.

  9. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death.

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1(+/-)) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1(+/-) mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1(+/-) mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  10. Z α-1 antitrypsin deficiency and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    Catherine; M; Greene; Noel; G; McElvaney

    2010-01-01

    The serine proteinase inhibitor α-1 antitrypsin(AAT) is produced principally by the liver at the rate of 2 g/d.It is secreted into the circulation and provides an antiprotease protective screen throughout the body but most importantly in the lung,where it can neutralise the activity of the serine protease neutrophil elastase.Mutations leading to def iciency in AAT are associated with liver and lung disease.The most notable is the Z AAT mutation,which encodes a misfolded variant of the AAT protein in which the glutamic acid at position 342 is replaced by a lysine.More than 95% of all individuals with AAT def iciency carry at least one Z allele.ZAAT protein is not secreted effectively and accumulates intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum(ER) of hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells.This results in a loss of function associated with decreased circulating and intrapulmonary levels of AAT.However,the misfolded protein acquires a toxic gain of function that impacts on the ER.A major function of the ER is to ensure correct protein folding.ZAAT interferes with this function and promotes ER stress responses and inflammation.Here the signalling pathways activated during ER stress in response to accumulation of ZAAT are described and therapeutic strategies that can potentially relieve ER stress are discussed.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress regulates inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pregnant women.

    Liong, Stella; Lappas, Martha

    2016-04-15

    Sterile inflammation and infection are key mediators of inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Studies have shown endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to induce inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, however is paucity of studies investigating the effects of ER stress in skeletal muscle on inflammation and insulin resistance associated with GDM. ER stress proteins IRE1α, GRP78 and XBP-1s were upregulated in skeletal muscle of obese pregnant women, whereas IRE1α was increased in GDM women. Suppression of ER stress, using ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) or siRNA knockdown of IRE1α and GRP78, significantly downregulated LPS-, poly(I:C)- or IL-1β-induced production of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and MCP-1. Furthermore, LPS-, poly(I:C)- or TNF-α-induced insulin resistance was improved following suppression of ER stress, by increasing insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IR-β, IRS-1, GLUT-4 expression and glucose uptake. In summary, our inducible obesity and GDM-like models suggests that the development of GDM may be involved in activating ER stress-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle. PMID:26902174

  12. Elimination of endoplasmic reticulum stress and cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic, and other metabolic diseases.

    Luoma, Pauli V

    2013-03-01

    Multiple factors including unhealthy living habits influence the life-maintaining functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and induce ER stress and metabolic abnormalities. The ER responds to the disturbances by activating mechanisms that increase the capacity to eliminate ER stress. This article elucidates the effects of ER activation that eliminates both ER stress and associated cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic (DM2), and other metabolic diseases. ER-activating compounds eliminate ER stress by lowering elevated cholesterol, regress atherosclerosis, decrease cardiovascular mortality, reduce blood glucose and insulin, and, together with the normalization of glucose-insulin homeostasis, remove insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell failure, and DM2. A deficient cytochrome P450 activity in hepatic ER leads to cholesterol accumulation that induces stress and xanthoma formation, whereas P450-activating therapy up-regulates apolipoprotein AI and LDLR genes, down-regulates apolipoprotein B gene, and produces an antiatherogenic plasma lipoprotein profile. The ER activation reduces the stress also by eliminating hepatic fat and converting saturated fatty acids (FAs) to unsaturated FAs. Cognitive processes require gene expression modification, and preclinical studies indicate that ER-activating therapy improves cognition. Promotion of healthy lifestyle choices and indicated therapies are key factors in the prevention and elimination of ER stress and associated global health problems. PMID:22928964

  13. Berberine prevents progression from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis by reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Li, Bo; Meng, Xiangjian; Yao, Shuangshuang; Jin, Lina; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jiqiu; Zhang, Huizhi; Zhang, Zhijian; Cai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yifei; Ning, Guang

    2016-01-01

    The histological spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) ranges from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Berberine (BBR) is known for its therapeutic effect on obesity, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia; however, its effect on NAFLD has yet to be thoroughly explored. Db/db mice and methionine-choline-deficient diet-fed mice were administered BBR via gavage. We found that BBR-treated mice were more resistant to steatosis in the liver than vehicle-treated mice and that BBR significantly reduced hepatic inflammation, fibrosis and lipid peroxides. The beneficial effect of BBR was associated with suppressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Additionally, BBR decreased the free fatty acid-induced lipid accumulation and tunicamycin-induced ER stress in primary hepatocytes and hepatocyte cell lines. We demonstrated that BBR exhibited chaperone activity, reduced protein aggregation in vitro and alleviated tunicamycin-induced triglyceride and collagen deposition in vivo. Finally, we showed that BBR could reverse ER stress-activated lipogenesis through the ATF6/SREBP-1c pathway in vitro. These results indicated that BBR may be a new therapeutic strategy against hepatic steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26857750

  14. The Hsp110 molecular chaperone stabilizes apolipoprotein B from endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD).

    Hrizo, Stacy L; Gusarova, Viktoria; Habiel, David M; Goeckeler, Jennifer L; Fisher, Edward A; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2007-11-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) is the most abundant protein in low density lipoproteins and plays key roles in cholesterol homeostasis. The co-translational degradation of apoB is controlled by fatty acid levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is mediated by the proteasome. To define the mechanism of apoB degradation, we employed a cell-free system in which proteasome-dependent degradation is recapitulated with yeast cytosol, and we developed an apoB yeast expression system. We discovered that a yeast Hsp110, Sse1p, associates with and stabilizes apoB, which contrasts with data indicating that select Hsp70s and Hsp90s facilitate apoB degradation. However, the Ssb Hsp70 chaperones have no effect on apoB turnover. To determine whether our results are relevant in mammalian cells, Hsp110 was overexpressed in hepatocytes, and enhanced apoB secretion was observed. This study indicates that chaperones within distinct complexes can play unique roles during ER-associated degradation (ERAD), establishes a role for Sse1/Hsp110 in ERAD, and identifies Hsp110 as a target to lower cholesterol. PMID:17823116

  15. Syntaxin 5 regulates the endoplasmic reticulum channel-release properties of polycystin-2.

    Geng, Lin; Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Maeda, Yoshiko; Okuhara, Dayne Y; Tian, Xin; Yu, Zhiheng; Choe, Chi-un; Anyatonwu, Georgia I; Ehrlich, Barbara E; Somlo, Stefan

    2008-10-14

    Polycystin-2 (PC2), the gene product of one of two genes mutated in dominant polycystic kidney disease, is a member of the transient receptor potential cation channel family and can function as intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) release channel. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen by using the NH(2) terminus of PC2 and identified syntaxin-5 (Stx5) as a putative interacting partner. Coimmunoprecipitation studies in cell lines and kidney tissues confirmed interaction of PC2 with Stx5 in vivo. In vitro binding assays showed that the interaction between Stx5 and PC2 is direct and defined the respective interaction domains as the t-SNARE region of Stx5 and amino acids 5 to 72 of PC2. Single channel studies showed that interaction with Stx5 specifically reduces PC2 channel activity. Epithelial cells overexpressing mutant PC2 that does not bind Stx5 had increased baseline cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, decreased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores, and reduced Ca(2+) release from ER stores in response to vasopressin stimulation. Cells lacking PC2 altogether had reduced cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Our data suggest that PC2 in the ER plays a role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and that Stx5 functions to inactivate PC2 and prevent leaking of Ca(2+) from ER stores. Modulation of the PC2/Stx5 interaction may be a useful target for impacting dysregulated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling associated with polycystic kidney disease. PMID:18836075

  16. [Physiological functions of endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca pump and pharmacology of inhibitors of the pump].

    Watanabe, M; Shigekawa, M

    1993-09-01

    This review is derived from the symposium held at the 66th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Pharmacological Society (March, 1993). The symposium consisted of six invited papers whose general theme was the application of recently found ATPase inhibitors selective to SR- and ER-Ca(2+)-ATPase to the analyses of the physiological and pharmacological roles of endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca stores. Inhibitors used were: thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, 2,5-di-(t-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone and 3',3",5',5"-tetraiodosulfophthalein. Gingerol was found to facilitate the action of the ATPase. In either smooth, cardiac or skeletal muscle, sympathetic neurons or several cell lines these inhibitors affected a variety of cell functions and conditions such as contraction, ionic conductance and excitability of the plasma membrane, regulation of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, transport of viral glycoprotein to the cell surface. Many of these studies utilized either single or cultured cell preparations or skinned muscle. These inhibitors were shown to be useful tools for investigating the SR and ER functioning as Ca sources or Ca sequestrating pumps, and further for estimating the contribution of ER or SR to regulating the flux of Ca2+ and other ions through the plasma membrane. Results of analyses using these inhibitors are discussed. PMID:8406230

  17. Molecular determinants that mediate the sorting of human ATG9A from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Staudt, Catherine; Gilis, Florentine; Boonen, Marielle; Jadot, Michel

    2016-09-01

    ATG9A is a multispanning membrane protein required for autophagosome formation. Under basal conditions, neosynthesized ATG9A proteins travel to the Golgi apparatus and cycle between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. In the present work, we searched for molecular determinants involved in the subcellular trafficking of human ATG9A in HeLa cells using sequential deletions and point mutations. Deletion of amino acids L(340) to L(354) resulted in the retention of ATG9A in the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, we found that substitution of the L(711)YM(713) sequence (located in the C-terminal region of ATG9A) by alanine residues severely impaired its transport through the Golgi apparatus. This defect could be corrected by oligomerization of the mutant protein with co-transfected wild-type ATG9A, suggesting that ATG9A oligomerization may help its sorting through biosynthetic compartments. Lastly, the study of the consequences of the LYM/AAA mutation on the intracellular trafficking of ATG9A highlighted that some newly synthesized ATG9A can bypass the Golgi apparatus to reach the plasma membrane. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the intracellular pathways followed by ATG9A to reach different subcellular compartments, and into the intramolecular determinants that drive the sorting of this protein. PMID:27316455

  18. Z α-1 antitrypsin deficiency and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-10-06

    The serine proteinase inhibitor α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is produced principally by the liver at the rate of 2 g\\/d. It is secreted into the circulation and provides an antiprotease protective screen throughout the body but most importantly in the lung, where it can neutralise the activity of the serine protease neutrophil elastase. Mutations leading to deficiency in AAT are associated with liver and lung disease. The most notable is the Z AAT mutation, which encodes a misfolded variant of the AAT protein in which the glutamic acid at position 342 is replaced by a lysine. More than 95% of all individuals with AAT deficiency carry at least one Z allele. ZAAT protein is not secreted effectively and accumulates intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells. This results in a loss of function associated with decreased circulating and intrapulmonary levels of AAT. However, the misfolded protein acquires a toxic gain of function that impacts on the ER. A major function of the ER is to ensure correct protein folding. ZAAT interferes with this function and promotes ER stress responses and inflammation. Here the signalling pathways activated during ER stress in response to accumulation of ZAAT are described and therapeutic strategies that can potentially relieve ER stress are discussed.

  19. Exogenous taurine attenuates mitochondrial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat cardiomyocytes

    Yujie Yang; Yue Zhang; Xiaoyu Liu; Ji Zuo; Keqiang Wang; Wen Liu; Junbo Ge

    2013-01-01

    Taurine,a conditionally essential amino acid,plays a critical role in cardiovascular function.Here we examined the effect of taurine on mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in rat cardiomyocytes during glucose deprivation (GD).Data showed that cell viability,intracellular taurine contents,and taurine transporter expression were decreased during GD.In contrast,an increase in reactive oxygen species and intracellular Ca2+ contents was observed.GD also caused disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential,apoptotic cell death,and dissociation of unfolded protein response (UPR)-relative proteins in cardiomyocytes.Signal transduction analysis showed that Bcl-2 family protein balance was disturbed,caspase-12 was activated and UPR-relative protein levels were up-regulated.Moreover,pre-treatment with 80 mM exogenous taurine attenuated GD effect in cardiomyocytes.Our results suggest that taurine have beneficial effects on inhibiting mitochondria-dependent cell apoptosis and UPR-associated cell apoptosis and might have clinical impfications on acute myocardial infarction in future.

  20. First steps towards rescuing Las-infected citrus germplasm

    Huanglongbing (HLB) disease is having significant impact on the USDA citrus breeding program as it has shown up in a number of trees which exist only in a virtually irreplaceable collection of diverse citrus types. It is critical that we rescue HLB-free budwood from elite germplasm that is HLB-patho...

  1. Instructional Alternatives: Rescue Strategies for At-Risk Students.

    Wircenski, Jerry L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An instructional plan to rescue at-risk students must be based on a curriculum intended to serve all students. The creation of a functional curriculum, the promotion of employability skills, and an emphasis on improving study skills are instructional patterns that seem to be effective in reducing the number of student dropouts. Two alternatives…

  2. Evaluating a multimodal interface for firefighting rescue tasks

    Streefkerk, J.W.; Vos, W.K.; Smets, N.J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Firefighters searching for victims work in hazardous environments with limited visibility, obstacles and uncertain navigation paths. In rescue tasks, extra sensor information from infrared cameras, indoor radar and gas sensors could improve vision, orientation and navigation. A visual and tactile in

  3. Intelligent Robot-assisted Humanitarian Search and Rescue System

    Henry Y. K. Lau

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented scale and number of natural and man-made disasters in the past decade has urged international emergency search and rescue communities to seek for novel technology to enhance operation efficiency. Tele-operated search and rescue robots that can navigate deep into rubble to search for victims and to transfer critical field data back to the control console has gained much interest among emergency response institutions. In response to this need, a low-cost autonomous mini robot equipped with thermal sensor, accelerometer, sonar, pin-hole camera, microphone, ultra-bright LED and wireless communication module is developed to study the control of a group of decentralized mini search and rescue robots. The robot can navigate autonomously between voids to look for living body heat and can send back audio and video information to allow the operator to determine if the found object is a living human. This paper introduces the design and control of a low-cost robotic search and rescue system based on an immuno control framework developed for controlling decentralized systems. Design and development of the physical prototype and the immunity-based control system are described in this paper.

  4. Bezpieczeństwo i ratownictwo = Security and rescue

    Red. Telak, Jerzy; Red. Zieliński, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Wyższa Szkoła Nauk o Zdrowiu w Bydgoszczy University of Health Sciences in Bydgoszcz                                       BEZPIECZEŃSTWO I RATOWNICTWO Security and rescue             Redakcja naukowa Edited by   Jerzy Telak Ewa Zieliń...

  5. "Denmark 1943": Using Music to Teach Holocaust Rescue

    Lindquist, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the topic of rescue efforts poses particular challenges for teachers planning Holocaust curricula. While the issue leads many students to develop an engaged empathy with rescuers, teachers must avoid overemphasizing what was a limited occurrence within the overall Holocaust. This article presents a plan for using music to teach about…

  6. Organization and implementation of mass medical rescue after an earthquake.

    Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2014-01-01

    On May 12, 2008, an 8.0-magnitude earthquake occurred in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province. In this disaster, 69,000 people were killed, 18,000 people were reported missing, and 37,000 people were injured, including more than 10,000 who were seriously injured. Trauma was the most commonly observed type of injury, with fractures accounting for 74% of all injury cases. On April 14, 2010, a 7.1-magnitude earthquake occurred in Yushu of Qinghai Province. In this disaster, 2,698 people were killed, 270 people were reported missing, and 11,000 people were injured, including more than 3,100 who were seriously injured. Fracture injury accounted for 58.4% of all injury cases. After each earthquake, the Chinese Army Medical Services responded promptly, according to the previously established guidelines, and sent out elite forces to the disaster areas, with the objectives of organizing, coordinating and participating in an efficient and evidence-based medical rescue effort. After the Wenchuan earthquake, 397 mobile medical service teams including 7,061 health workers were sent to the disaster areas. A total of 69,000 casualties were treated, and 22,000 surgeries were performed. After the Yushu earthquake, 25 mobile medical service teams involving 2,025 health workers were sent. They performed 1,635 surgeries and created an astounding outcome of "zero deaths" in the aftermath of the earthquake during their treatment of casualties in a high-altitude region. Within a week after each earthquake, the military teams rescued approximately 60% of the total number of rescued casualties and evacuated approximately 80% of the total number of evacuated sick or wounded victims, playing a critical role and making invaluable contributions to earthquake relief. The experience and lessons learned from the rescue efforts of the Chinese military after the two earthquakes have highlighted several key aspects in emergency medical rescue: (1) medical rescue theories must be updated; (2) military

  7. An evaluation of coordination relationships during earthquake emergency rescue using entropy theory

    Huang Rong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Emergency rescue after an earthquake is complex work which requires the participation of relief and social organizations. Studying earthquake emergency coordination efficiency can not only help rescue organizations to define their own rescue missions, but also strengthens inter-organizational communication and collaboration tasks, improves the efficiency of emergency rescue, and reduces loss. In this paper, collaborative entropy is introduced to study earthquake emergency rescue operations. To study the emergency rescue coordination relationship, collaborative matrices and collaborative entropy functions are established between emergency relief work and relief organizations, and the collaborative efficiency of the emergency rescue elements is determined based on this entropy function. Finally, the Lushan earthquake is used as an example to evaluate earthquake emergency rescue coordination efficiency.

  8. Creation of the program to rescue data from NTFS partition with Linux

    Březina, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the topic of data rescue from NTFS partition under Linux. The BASH program for data rescue from Windows partitions is created and tested in different live Linux distributions.

  9. Development of Space Shuttle Rescue and Recovery Operations

    Chandler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As the first Space Shuttle launch was still in our future, many from NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA contractors were busy planning for not only a nominal launch and return, but contingency operations at the launch pad and landing sites. Prior to the first launch, detailed coordination, planning and simulations were conducted at all three locations and internal rescue procedures were taught at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Later in the Program, the Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) sites were added in Europe and Africa. For the 51L mission a new TAL site was brought on line in Morocco. However, upon launch, the Shuttle Program experienced it's first lost. During the following months a complete review of all contingency operations (launch and landing) was completed. Many enhancements were made based on the reviews following. A Mode VIII water rescue was developed for NASA by the DoD before the STS-26 launch. Different concepts were explored and being debated by NASA. Training of the contingency forces was required before final decisions were made forcing the teaching of two different sets of procedures. To assist with training, a video was developed for the fire/crash/rescue personnel. This accompanied the detailed extraction procedures that were developed by a combination of KSC and DoD firemen. Training for the fire/crash/rescue personnel at Vandenberg AFB was also being planned before the accident happen. The fire/crash/rescue mockup that was being built at Chanute AFB was diverted to Edwards AFB. Educational Objectives: With the emphasis on Commercial Crew Programs for Space flight it is important that all involved understand what is required to prepare for contingencies. Cost effective means of being prepared for contingencies are needed. Questions: 1. When should planning for nominal and contingency operations begin? 2. What type of training aids are needed for contingency operations? 3. Who were the major contributors to Shuttle contingency

  10. Mapping and Exploration for Search and Rescue with Humans and Mobile Robots

    Kleiner, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Urban Search And Rescue (USAR) is a time critical task since all survivors have to be rescued within the first 72 hours. One goal in Rescue Robotics is to support emergency response by mixed-initiative teams consisting of humans and robots. Their task is to explore the disaster area rapidly while reporting victim locations and hazardous areas to a central station, which then can be utilized for planning rescue missions. To fulfill this task efficiently, humans and robots have to map disaster ...

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in vertebrate mutant rhodopsin models of retinal degeneration

    Kroeger, H.; LaVail, MM; Lin, JH

    2014-01-01

    © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2014. Rhodopsin mutations cause many types of heritable retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Biochemical and in vitro studies have demonstrated that many RPlinked mutant rhodopsins produce misfolded rhodopsin proteins, which are prone to aggregation and retention within the endoplasmic reticulum, where they cause endoplasmic reticulum stress and activate the Unfolded Protein Response signaling pathways. Many vertebrate models of retinal degeneration have been crea...

  12. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    Emma Folch-Puy; Arnau Panisello; Joan Oliva; Alexandre Lopez; Carlos Castro Benítez; René Adam; Joan Roselló-Catafau

    2016-01-01

    International audience The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), which comprise...

  13. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates hepatic fibrosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice

    Liver fibrosis is a pathological condition in which chronic inflammation and changes to the extracellular matrix lead to alterations in hepatic tissue architecture and functional degradation of the liver. Inhibitors of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce fibrosis in the heart, pancreas and kidney in several disease models. In this study, we assess the effect of sEH inhibition on the development of fibrosis in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mouse model by monitoring changes in the inflammatory response, matrix remolding and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The sEH inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU) was administered in drinking water. Collagen deposition in the liver was increased five-fold in the CCl4-treated group, and this was returned to control levels by TPPU treatment. Hepatic expression of Col1a2 and 3a1 mRNA was increased over fifteen-fold in the CCl4-treated group relative to the Control group, and this increase was reduced by 50% by TPPU treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress observed in the livers of CCl4-treated animals was attenuated by TPPU treatment. In order to support the hypothesis that TPPU is acting to reduce the hepatic fibrosis and ER stress through its action as a sEH inhibitor we used a second sEH inhibitor, trans-4-(4-[3-(4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy)-benzoic acid (t-TUCB), and sEH null mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the sEH may play an important role in the development of hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4, presumably by reducing endogenous fatty acid epoxide chemical mediators acting to reduce ER stress. - Highlights: • We administer an inhibitor of sEH in a CCl4 murine model. • sEH inhibition reduces liver collagen deposition and pro-fibrotic gene expression. • sEH inhibition induces MMP-1a activity

  14. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in acrolein-induced endothelial activation

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and an endogenous product of lipid peroxidation. It is also generated during the metabolism of several drugs and amino acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acrolein on endothelial cells. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 2 to 10 μM acrolein led to an increase in the phosphorylation of eIF-2α within 10 to 30 min of exposure. This was followed by alternate splicing of XBP-1 mRNA and an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone genes Grp78 and Herp. Within 2-4 h of treatment, acrolein also increased the abundance and the nuclear transport of the transcription factors ATF3, AFT4, and CHOP. Acrolein-induced increase in ATF3 was prevented by treating the cells with the chemical chaperone - phenylbutyric acid (PBA). Treatment with acrolein increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK. The increase in JNK phosphorylation was prevented by PBA. Acrolein treatment led to activation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-κB and an increase in TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8, but not MCP-1, mRNA. Increased expression of cytokine genes and NF-κB activation were not observed in cells treated with PBA. These findings suggest that exposure to acrolein induces ER stress and triggers the unfolded protein response and that NF-κB activation and stimulation of cytokine production by acrolein could be attributed, in part, to ER stress. Chemical chaperones of protein-folding may be useful in treating toxicological and pathological states associated with excessive acrolein exposure or production

  15. The overexpression of nuclear envelope protein Lap2β induces endoplasmic reticulum reorganisation via membrane stacking

    Ekaterina G. Volkova

    2012-06-01

    Some nuclear envelope proteins are localised to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum; therefore, it seems plausible that even small amounts of these proteins can influence the organisation of the endoplasmic reticulum. A simple method to study the possible effects of nuclear envelope proteins on endoplasmic reticulum organisation is to analyze nuclear envelope protein overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that Lap2β overexpression can induce the formation of cytoplasmic vesicular structures derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Correlative light and electron microscopy demonstrated that these vesicular structures were composed of a series of closely apposed membranes that were frequently arranged in a circular fashion. Although stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae were highly ordered, Lap2β could readily diffuse into and out of these structures into the surrounding reticulum. It appears that low-affinity interactions between cytoplasmic domains of Lap2β can reorganise reticular endoplasmic reticulum into stacked cisternae. Although the effect of one protein may be insignificant at low concentrations, the cumulative effect of many non-specialised proteins may be significant.

  16. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition induces endoplasmic-reticulum-stress response in human colorectal tumor cells.

    Evelyn Zeindl-Eberhart

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are stressed by unfavorable environmental conditions like hypoxia or starvation. Driven by the resulting cellular stress tumor cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Additionally, cellular stress is accompanied by endoplasmic reticulum-stress which induces an unfolded protein response. It is unknown if epithelial-mesenchymal transition and endoplasmic reticulum-stress are occurring as independent parallel events or if an interrelationship exists between both of them. Here, we show that in colorectal cancer cells endoplasmic reticulum-stress depends on the induction of ZEB-1, which is a main factor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In the absence of ZEB-1 colorectal cancer cells cannot mount endoplasmic reticulum-stress as a reaction on cellular stress situations like hypoxia or starvation. Thus, our data suggest that there is a hierarchy in the development of cellular stress which starts with the presence of environmental stress that induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition which allows finally endoplasmic reticulum-stress. This finding highlights the central role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition during the process of tumorigenesis as epithelial-mesenchymal transition is also associated with chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Consequently, endoplasmic reticulum-stress might be a well suited target for chemotherapy of colorectal cancers.

  17. Aggregation and retention of human urokinase type plasminogen activator in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum

    Smirnov Vladimir N

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretion of recombinant proteins in yeast can be affected by their improper folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequent elimination of the misfolded molecules via the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway. Recombinant proteins can also be degraded by the vacuolar protease complex. Human urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA is poorly secreted by yeast but the mechanisms interfering with its secretion are largely unknown. Results We show that in Hansenula polymorpha overexpression worsens uPA secretion and stimulates its intracellular aggregation. The absence of the Golgi modifications in accumulated uPA suggests that aggregation occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletion analysis has shown that the N-terminal domains were responsible for poor uPA secretion and propensity to aggregate. Mutation abolishing N-glycosylation decreased the efficiency of uPA secretion and increased its aggregation degree. Retention of uPA in the endoplasmic reticulum stimulates its aggregation. Conclusions The data obtained demonstrate that defect of uPA secretion in yeast is related to its retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accumulation of uPA within the endoplasmic reticulum disturbs its proper folding and leads to formation of high molecular weight aggregates.

  18. Direct observation of molecular arrays in the organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum

    Korkhov Vladimir M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tubules and sheets of endoplasmic reticulum perform different functions and undergo inter-conversion during different stages of the cell cycle. Tubules are stabilized by curvature inducing resident proteins, but little is known about the mechanisms of endoplasmic reticulum sheet stabilization. Tethering of endoplasmic reticulum membranes to the cytoskeleton or to each other has been proposed as a plausible way of sheet stabilization. Results Here, using fluorescence microscopy we show that the previously proposed mechanisms, such as membrane tethering via GFP-dimerization or coiled coil protein aggregation – do not explain the formation of the calnexin-induced organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum membrane stacks. We also show that the LINC complex proteins known to serve a tethering function in the nuclear envelope are excluded from endoplasmic reticulum stacks. Finally, using cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections methodology that preserves cellular architecture in a hydrated, native-like state, we show that the sheet stacks are highly regular and may contain ordered arrays of macromolecular complexes. Some of these complexes decorate the cytosolic surface of the membranes, whereas others appear to span the width of the cytosolic or luminal space between the stacked sheets. Conclusion Our results provide evidence in favour of the hypothesis of endoplasmic reticulum sheet stabilization by intermembrane tethering.

  19. 77 FR 64360 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal...

    2012-10-19

    ... Safety and Health Administration Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Mine Rescue Teams...) to publish regulations which provide that mine rescue teams be available for rescue and recovery work... arrangements for such teams are to be borne by the operator of each such mine. II. Desired Focus of...

  20. Current research, key performances and future development of search and rescue robots

    LIU Jinguo; WANG Yuechao; LI Bin; MA Shugen

    2007-01-01

    Frequent natural disasters and man-made catastrophes have threatened the safety of citizens and have attracted much more attention. The rescue mission under disaster environment is very complicated and dangerous for a rescue team. Search and rescue (SAR) robots can not only improve the efficiency of rescue operations but also reduce the casualty of rescuers. Robots can help rescue teams and even replace rescuers to perform dangerous missions. Search and rescue robots will play a more and more important role in the rescue operations. A survey of the research status of search and rescue robots in Japan, USA, China and other countries has been provided. According to current research,experiences and the lessons learned from applications, the five key performances of a search and rescue robot are survivability, mobility, sensing, communicability and operability.Multi-technique fusion and multi-agent intelligent network are considered to be requirements for the future development of the search and rescue robot. Disaster prevention, disaster reduction and disaster rescue are the important parts of national public safety. They are also crucial for the safety of citizens and their estates. Search and rescue robotic technique is an urgent needed, strategic and core technique for national development. It will be important and strategic for national economy and safety.

  1. The Endoplasmic Reticulum: A Social Network in Plant Cells

    Jun Chen; Caitlin Doyle; Xingyun Qi; Huanquan Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an interconnected network comprised of ribosome-studded sheets and smooth tubules.The ER plays crucial roles in the biosynthesis and transport of proteins and lipids,and in calcium (Ca2+) regulation in compartmentalized eukaryotic cells including plant cells.To support its well-segregated functions,the shape of the ER undergoes notable changes in response to both developmental cues and outside influences.In this review,we will discuss recent findings on molecular mechanisms underlying the unique morphology and dynamics of the ER,and the importance of the interconnected ER network in cell polarity.In animal and yeast cells,two family proteins,the reticulons and DP1/Yop1,are required for shaping high-curvature ER tubules,while members of the atlastin family of dynamin-like GTPases are involved in the fusion of ER tubules to make an interconnected ER network.In plant cells,recent data also indicate that the reticulons are involved in shaping ER tubules,while RHD3,a plant member of the atlastin GTPases,is required for the generation of an interconnected ER network.We will also summarize the current knowledge on how the ER interacts with other membrane-bound organelles,with a focus on how the ER and Golgi interplay in plant cells.

  2. Terasaki Ramps in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Structure, Function and Formation

    Huber, Greg; Guven, Jemal; Valencia, Dulce-Maria

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has long been considered an exceedingly important and complex cellular organelle in eukaryotes (like you). It is a membrane structure, part folded lamellae, part tubular network, that both envelopes the nucleus and threads its way outward, all the way to the cell's periphery. Despite the elegant mechanics of bilayer membranes offered by the work of Helfrich and Canham, as far as the ER is concerned, theory has mostly sat on the sidelines. However, refined imaging of the ER has recently revealed beautiful and subtle geometrical forms - simple geometries, from the mathematical point of view - which some have called a ``parking garage for ribosomes.'' I'll review the discovery and physics of Terasaki ramps and discuss their relation to cell-biological questions, such as ER and nuclear-membrane re-organization during mitosis. Rather than being a footnote in a textbook on differential geometry, these structures suggest answers to a number of the ER's structure-function problems.

  3. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  4. Protein Bodies in Leaves Exchange Contents through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Saberianfar, Reza; Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Joensuu, Jussi J.; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Menassa, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Protein bodies (PBs) are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP), or hydrophobin-I (HFBI). In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles. PMID:27242885

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  6. Protein bodies in leaves exchange contents through the endoplasmic reticulum

    Reza eSaberianfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein bodies (PBs are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP, or hydrophobin-I (HFBI. In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles.

  7. Proper symmetric and asymmetric endoplasmic reticulum partitioning requires astral microtubules.

    Smyth, Jeremy T; Schoborg, Todd A; Bergman, Zane J; Riggs, Blake; Rusan, Nasser M

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that regulate partitioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during cell division are largely unknown. Previous studies have mostly addressed ER partitioning in cultured cells, which may not recapitulate physiological processes that are critical in developing, intact tissues. We have addressed this by analysing ER partitioning in asymmetrically dividing stem cells, in which precise segregation of cellular components is essential for proper development and tissue architecture. We show that in Drosophila neural stem cells, called neuroblasts, the ER asymmetrically partitioned to centrosomes early in mitosis. This correlated closely with the asymmetric nucleation of astral microtubules (MTs) by centrosomes, suggesting that astral MT association may be required for ER partitioning by centrosomes. Consistent with this, the ER also associated with astral MTs in meiotic Drosophila spermatocytes and during syncytial embryonic divisions. Disruption of centrosomes in each of these cell types led to improper ER partitioning, demonstrating the critical role for centrosomes and associated astral MTs in this process. Importantly, we show that the ER also associated with astral MTs in cultured human cells, suggesting that this centrosome/astral MT-based partitioning mechanism is conserved across animal species. PMID:26289801

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    Kim, Hong Pyo [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Pae, Hyun-Ock [Department of Immunology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Je Moon [Department of Opthalmology, Ulasn University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Son, Yong [Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun-Taeg, E-mail: chung@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  9. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity.

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to other key mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Indeed, drug-induced ER stress could lead to several deleterious effects within cells and tissues including accumulation of lipids, cell death, cytolysis, and inflammation. After recalling important information regarding drug-induced adverse reactions and ER stress in diverse pathophysiological situations, this review summarizes the main data pertaining to drug-induced ER stress and its potential involvement in different adverse effects. Drugs presented in this review are for instance acetaminophen (APAP), arsenic trioxide and other anticancer drugs, diclofenac, and different antiretroviral compounds. We also included data on tunicamycin (an antibiotic not used in human medicine because of its toxicity) and thapsigargin (a toxic compound of the Mediterranean plant Thapsia garganica) since both molecules are commonly used as prototypical toxins to induce ER stress in cellular and animal models. PMID:26977301

  10. Supramolecular architecture of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2016-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms membrane contact sites (MCS) with most other cellular organelles and the plasma membrane (PM). These ER-PM MCS, where the membranes of the ER and PM are closely apposed, were discovered in the early days of electron microscopy (EM), but only recently are we starting to understand their functional and structural diversity. ER-PM MCS are nowadays known to mediate excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) in striated muscle cells and to play crucial roles in Ca(2+)and lipid homoeostasis in all metazoan cells. A common feature across ER-PM MCS specialized in different functions is the preponderance of cooperative phenomena that result in the formation of large supramolecular assemblies. Therefore, characterizing the supramolecular architecture of ER-PM MCS is critical to understand their mechanisms of function. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is a powerful EM technique uniquely positioned to address this issue, as it allows 3D imaging of fully hydrated, unstained cellular structures at molecular resolution. In this review I summarize our current structural knowledge on the molecular organization of ER-PM MCS and its functional implications, with special emphasis on the emerging contributions of cryo-ET. PMID:27068966

  11. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  12. CDIP1-BAP31 Complex Transduces Apoptotic Signals from Endoplasmic Reticulum to Mitochondria under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Takushi Namba

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Resolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response is essential for intracellular homeostatic balance, but unsettled ER stress can lead to apoptosis. Here, we show that a proapoptotic p53 target, CDIP1, acts as a key signal transducer of ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. We identify B-cell-receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31 as an interacting partner of CDIP1. Upon ER stress, CDIP1 is induced and enhances an association with BAP31 at the ER membrane. We also show that CDIP1 binding to BAP31 is required for BAP31 cleavage upon ER stress and for BAP31-Bcl-2 association. The recruitment of Bcl-2 to the BAP31-CDIP1 complex, as well as CDIP1-dependent truncated Bid (tBid and caspase-8 activation, contributes to BAX oligomerization. Genetic knockout of CDIP1 in mice leads to impaired response to ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the CDIP1/BAP31-mediated regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway represents a mechanism for establishing an ER-mitochondrial crosstalk for ER-stress-mediated apoptosis signaling.

  13. Muskmelon embryo rescue techniques using in vitro embryo culture.

    Nuñez-Palenius, Hector Gordon; Ramírez-Malagón, Rafael; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2011-01-01

    Among the major cucurbit vegetables, melon (Cucumis melo) has one of the greatest polymorphic fruit types and botanical varieties. Some melon fruits have excellent aroma, variety of flesh colors, deeper flavor, and more juice compared to other cucurbits. Despite numerous available melon cultivars, some of them are exceedingly susceptible to several diseases. The genetic background carrying the genes for tolerance and/or resistance for those diseases is found in wild melon landraces. Unfortunately, the commercial melon varieties are not able to produce viable hybrids when crossed with their wild melon counterparts. Plant tissue culture techniques are needed to surpass those genetic barriers. In vitro melon embryo rescue has played a main role to obtain viable hybrids originated from commercial versus wild melon crosses. In this chapter, an efficient and simple embryo rescue melon protocol is thoroughly described. PMID:21207265

  14. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice

    Cubells, Joseph F.; Schroeder, Jason P.; Barrie, Elizabeth S.; Manvich, Daniel F.; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A.; Liles, L. Cameron; Squires, Katherine E.; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L.; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a “C” or a “T” at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh

  15. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice.

    Cubells, Joseph F; Schroeder, Jason P; Barrie, Elizabeth S; Manvich, Daniel F; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A; Liles, L Cameron; Squires, Katherine E; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a "C" or a "T" at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh deficiency

  16. Secretion of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 Is Involved in the Activation of Macrophages Induced by Lipopolysaccharide and Interferon-γ*

    Goto, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Kenji; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) is a multifunctional enzyme with an important role in processing antigenic peptides presented to class I major histocompatibility complex in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we found that endoplasmic reticulum-retained ERAP1 was secreted from macrophages in response to activation by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-γ and enhanced their phagocytic activity. Enhancement of the phagocytic activity of murine macro...

  17. Designing allosteric control into enzymes by chemical rescue of structure

    Deckert, Katelyn; Budiardjo, S. Jimmy; Brunner, Luke C.; Lovell, Scott; Karanicolas, John

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activity has been engineered into enzymes for purposes ranging from controlling cell morphology to reprogramming cellular signaling pathways. Where these successes have typically fused a naturally allosteric domain to the enzyme of interest, here we instead demonstrate an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruptio...

  18. Impacted and Fractured Biliary Basket: A Second Basket Rescue Technique

    Mohammed Amine Benatta; Ariane Desjeux; Marc Barthet; Jean Charles Grimaud; Mohamed Gasmi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was treated with ERCP, ES, and biliary plastic stent, for large and multiple common bile duct stones. During a second ERCP basket extraction was impacted with a round entrapped stone. The basket handle was cut off; a metal sheath of extraendoscopic lithotriptor was advanced over the basket. The mechanical lithotripsy was complicated with basket traction wires fracturing, without breakage of the stone. A rescue standard basket was pushed until it caught the basket/stone com...

  19. A change of attitude: From rescue to prevention

    The qualitative and quantitative leap recorded by economical companies after the Romanian Revolution occurred in 1989, has positively influenced the functioning of the workplaces and working environment by increasing the employees' occupational safety, well being, health and results of their activities. In fact it has determined a new approach of safety culture. This has resulted in a change of attitude: from rescue to prevention. (author)

  20. Medical rescue of naval combat: challenges and future

    Jin, Hai; Hou, Li-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    There has been no large-scale naval combat in the last 30 years. With the rapid development of battleships, weapons manufacturing and electronic technology, naval combat will present some new characteristics. Additionally, naval combat is facing unprecedented challenges. In this paper, we discuss the topic of medical rescue at sea: what challenges we face and what we could do. The contents discussed in this paper contain battlefield self-aid buddy care, clinical skills, organized health servi...

  1. Fitness small fire-rescue vehicles to fire rescuers action

    Кропивницький, Віталій Станіславович

    2016-01-01

    In connection with the development of coastal infrastructure becomes increasingly important task of ensuring domestic small fleet of specialized vessels working, especially those that can quickly to help everyone who needs help in emergency situations at these sites. These emergencies related to fire and other possible industrial accidents and disasters, which are designed to eliminate a number of modern innovative complexes, among which should be mentioned fire rescue boat UMS-1000. There is...

  2. An analysis of leadership characteristics of search and rescue volunteers

    Gurer, Burak; ADILOGULLARI, Ilhan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the leadership behaviors of volunteer leaders in search and rescue field. 118 volunteer leaders attended this study on a volunteer basis. Data were collected through the use of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, which was developed by Bass & Avolio (1985) and adapted into Turkish by Demir & Okan. 20 items were used to measure transformational leadership while 16 of them were applied for transactional leadership. One Way Anova and T-...

  3. Anchoring secreted proteins in endoplasmic reticulum by plant oleosin: the example of vitamin B12 cellular sequestration by transcobalamin.

    Laurent Pons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oleosin is a plant protein localized to lipid droplets and endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. Our idea was to use it to target functional secretory proteins of interest to the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian cells, through expressing oleosin-containing chimeras. We have designed this approach to create cellular models deficient in vitamin B12 (cobalamin because of the known problematics associated to the obtainment of effective vitamin B12 deficient cell models. This was achieved by the overexpression of transcobalamin inside cells through anchoring to oleosin. METHODOLOGY: chimera gene constructs including transcobalamin-oleosin (TC-O, green fluorescent protein-transcobalamin-oleosin (GFP-TC-O and oleosin-transcobalamin (O-TC were inserted into pAcSG2 and pCDNA3 vectors for expression in sf9 insect cells, Caco2 (colon carcinoma, NIE-115 (mouse neuroblastoma, HEK (human embryonic kidney, COS-7 (Green Monkey SV40-transfected kidney fibroblasts and CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells. The subcellular localization, the changes in vitamin B12 binding activity and the metabolic consequences were investigated in both Caco2 and NIE-115 cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: vitamin B12 binding was dramatically higher in TC-O than that in O-TC and wild type (WT. The expression of GFP-TC-O was observed in all cell lines and found to be co-localized with an ER-targeted red fluorescent protein and calreticulin of the endoplasmic reticulum in Caco2 and COS-7 cells. The overexpression of TC-O led to B12 deficiency, evidenced by impaired conversion of cyano-cobalamin to ado-cobalamin and methyl-cobalamin, decreased methionine synthase activity and reduced S-adenosyl methionine to S-adenosyl homocysteine ratio, as well as increases in homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: the heterologous expression of TC-O in mammalian cells can be used as an effective strategy for investigating the cellular

  4. Advanced glycation end products inhibit testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Qi, Ya-Wei; Hu, Chuan-Yin; Chen, Shao-Hong; Liu, You

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes severely impairs male reproduction. The present study assessed the effects and mechanisms of action of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play an important role in the development of diabetes complications, on testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells. Primary rat Leydig cells were cultured and treated with AGEs (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml). Testosterone production induced by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was determined by ELISA. The mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), which are involved in testosterone biosynthesis, were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analyssi, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Leydig cells was measured using the dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) probe. The expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins [C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78)] in the Leydig cells were measured by western blot analysis. We found that the AGEs markedly suppressed testosterone production by rat Leydig cells which was induced by hCG in a concentration-dependent manner compared with the control (PStAR, 3β-HSD and P450scc were downregulated by the AGEs in a dose-dependent manner compared with the control (P<0.01). The antioxidant agent, N-acetyl‑L‑cysteine (NAC), and the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), reversed the inhibitory effects of AGEs. In addition, the content of ROS in Leydig cells treated with AGEs increased significantly. The expression levels of CHOP and GRP78 were markedly upregulated by the AGEs in the Leydig cells. From these findings, it can be concluded that AGEs inhibit testosterone production by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:27315604

  5. Diverse roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress sensors in bacterial infection.

    Pillich, Helena; Loose, Maria; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial infection often leads to cellular damage, primarily marked by loss of cellular integrity and cell death. However, in recent years, it is being increasingly recognized that, in individual cells, there are graded responses collectively termed cell-autonomous defense mechanisms that induce cellular processes designed to limit cell damage, enable repair, and eliminate bacteria. Many of these responses are triggered not by detection of a particular bacterial effector or ligand but rather by their effects on key cellular processes and changes in homeostasis induced by microbial effectors when recognized. These in turn lead to a decrease in essential cellular functions such as protein translation or mitochondrial respiration and the induction of innate immune responses that may be specific to the cellular deficit induced. These processes are often associated with specific cell compartments, e.g., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Under non-infection conditions, these systems are generally involved in sensing cellular stress and in inducing and orchestrating the subsequent cellular response. Thus, perturbations of ER homeostasis result in accumulation of unfolded proteins which are detected by ER stress sensors in order to restore the normal condition. The ER is also important during bacterial infection, and bacterial effectors that activate the ER stress sensors have been discovered. Increasing evidence now indicate that bacteria have evolved strategies to differentially activate different arms of ER stress sensors resulting in specific host cell response. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms used by bacteria to activate the ER stress sensors and discuss their role during infection. PMID:26883353

  6. Disulfide Mispairing During Proinsulin Folding in the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    Haataja, Leena; Manickam, Nandini; Soliman, Ann; Tsai, Billy; Liu, Ming; Arvan, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Proinsulin folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remains incompletely understood, but it is clear that in mutant INS gene-induced diabetes of youth (MIDY), progression of the (three) native disulfide bonds of proinsulin becomes derailed, causing insulin deficiency, β-cell ER stress, and onset of diabetes. Herein, we have undertaken a molecular dissection of proinsulin disulfide bond formation, using bioengineered proinsulins that can form only two (or even only one) of the native proinsulin disulfide bonds. In the absence of preexisting proinsulin disulfide pairing, Cys(B19)-Cys(A20) (a major determinant of ER stress response activation and proinsulin stability) preferentially initiates B-A chain disulfide bond formation, whereas Cys(B7)-Cys(A7) can initiate only under oxidizing conditions beyond that existing within the ER of β-cells. Interestingly, formation of these two "interchain" disulfide bonds demonstrates cooperativity, and together, they are sufficient to confer intracellular transport competence to proinsulin. The three most common proinsulin disulfide mispairings in the ER appear to involve Cys(A11)-Cys(A20), Cys(A7)-Cys(A20), and Cys(B19)-Cys(A11), each disrupting the critical Cys(B19)-Cys(A20) pairing. MIDY mutations inhibit Cys(B19)-Cys(A20) formation, but treatment to force oxidation of this disulfide bond improves folding and results in a small but detectable increase of proinsulin export. These data suggest possible therapeutic avenues to ameliorate ER stress and diabetes. PMID:26822090

  7. Transcriptional analysis implicates endoplasmic reticulum stress in bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Yue Tang

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a fatal, transmissible, neurodegenerative disease of cattle. To date, the disease process is still poorly understood. In this study, brain tissue samples from animals naturally infected with BSE were analysed to identify differentially regulated genes using Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome Arrays. A total of 230 genes were shown to be differentially regulated and many of these genes encode proteins involved in immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, stress response and transcription. Seventeen genes are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and 10 of these 17 genes are involved in stress related responses including ER chaperones, Grp94 and Grp170. Western blotting analysis showed that another ER chaperone, Grp78, was up-regulated in BSE. Up-regulation of these three chaperones strongly suggests the presence of ER stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR in BSE. The occurrence of ER stress was also supported by changes in gene expression for cytosolic proteins, such as the chaperone pair of Hsp70 and DnaJ. Many genes associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagy-lysosome system were differentially regulated, indicating that both pathways might be activated in response to ER stress. A model is presented to explain the mechanisms of prion neurotoxicity using these ER stress related responses. Clustering analysis showed that the differently regulated genes found from the naturally infected BSE cases could be used to predict the infectious status of the samples experimentally infected with BSE from the previous study and vice versa. Proof-of-principle gene expression biomarkers were found to represent BSE using 10 genes with 94% sensitivity and 87% specificity.

  8. Full-length Ebola glycoprotein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Bhattacharyya Suchita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Filoviridae family comprises of Ebola and Marburg viruses, which are known to cause lethal hemorrhagic fever. However, there is no effective anti-viral therapy or licensed vaccines currently available for these human pathogens. The envelope glycoprotein (GP of Ebola virus, which mediates entry into target cells, is cytotoxic and this effect maps to a highly glycosylated mucin-like region in the surface subunit of GP (GP1. However, the mechanism underlying this cytotoxic property of GP is unknown. To gain insight into the basis of this GP-induced cytotoxicity, HEK293T cells were transiently transfected with full-length and mucin-deleted (Δmucin Ebola GP plasmids and GP localization was examined relative to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, Golgi, early and late endosomes using deconvolution fluorescent microscopy. Full-length Ebola GP was observed to accumulate in the ER. In contrast, GPΔmucin was uniformly expressed throughout the cell and did not localize in the ER. The Ebola major matrix protein VP40 was also co-expressed with GP to investigate its influence on GP localization. GP and VP40 co-expression did not alter GP localization to the ER. Also, when VP40 was co-expressed with the nucleoprotein (NP, it localized to the plasma membrane while NP accumulated in distinct cytoplasmic structures lined with vimentin. These latter structures are consistent with aggresomes and may serve as assembly sites for filoviral nucleocapsids. Collectively, these data suggest that full-length GP, but not GPΔmucin, accumulates in the ER in close proximity to the nuclear membrane, which may underscore its cytotoxic property.

  9. Cortisol promotes endoplasmic glucose production via pyridine nucleotide redox.

    Wang, Zengmin; Mick, Gail J; Xie, Rongrong; Wang, Xudong; Xie, Xuemei; Li, Guimei; McCormick, Kenneth L

    2016-04-01

    Both increased adrenal and peripheral cortisol production, the latter governed by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), contribute to the maintenance of fasting blood glucose. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the pyridine nucleotide redox state (NADP/NADPH) is dictated by the concentration of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and the coordinated activities of two enzymes, hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) and 11β-HSD1. However, luminal G6P may similarly serve as a substrate for hepatic glucose-6-phophatase (G6Pase). A tacit belief is that the G6P pool in the ER is equally accessible to both H6PDH and G6Pase. Based on our inhibition studies and kinetic analysis in isolated rat liver microsomes, these two aforesaid luminal enzymes do share the G6P pool in the ER, but not equally. Based on the kinetic modeling of G6P flux, the ER transporter for G6P (T1) preferentially delivers this substrate to G6Pase; hence, the luminal enzymes do not share G6P equally. Moreover, cortisol, acting through 11β-HSD1, begets a more reduced pyridine redox ratio. By altering this luminal redox ratio, G6P flux through H6PDH is restrained, allowing more G6P for the competing enzyme G6Pase. And, at low G6P concentrations in the ER lumen, which occur during fasting, this acute cortisol-induced redox adjustment promotes glucose production. This reproducible cortisol-driven mechanism has been heretofore unrecognized. PMID:26860459

  10. Topography of glycosylation reactions in the rough endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    The translocation of UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose from an external to a luminal compartment has been examined in rat liver vesicles derived from the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). RER vesicles with the same topographical orientation as in vivo were incubated with a mixture of [3H]UDP-glucose and UDP-[14C]glucose to demonstrate that the intact sugar nucleotide was translocated into the lumen of the vesicles. The translocation of UDP-glucose was dependent on temperature and was saturable at high concentrations of the sugar nucleotide. The transfer of glucose to endogenous acceptors was dependent on the translocation of UDP-glucose into the lumen of the RER since leaky vesicles resulted in both a decrease in transport and transfer of glucose to endogenous acceptors. Preliminary results suggest that the mechanism of UDP-glucose transport into RER-derived vesicles is via a coupled exchange with luminal UMP. Using the same experimental approach to detect translocation of UDP-glucose into the lumen of RER vesicles, we were unable to detect transport of GDP-mannose. Incubation of leaky vesicles with GDP-mannose resulted in stimulation of the amount of mannose transferred to endogenous acceptors, in marked contrast to that observed for UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. These results suggest that whereas UDP-glucose is translocated across the RER membrane in vitro, GDP-mannose is not transported. In addition, these results tentatively suggest that there is asymmetric synthesis of the lipid-linked oligosaccharides within the membrane of the RER

  11. Vulture rescue and rehabilitation in South Africa: An urban perspective

    V. Naidoo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available SouthAfrica is home to 9 vulture species, of which 7 are endangered. While the cause of the population declines remains largely speculative, a vast amount of effort has been dedicated towards the protection of populations by ensuring sustainable and safe food sources for the various colonies. Limited focus was placed in the past on efforts related to the rescue and/or rehabilitation (R&R of injured birds and the release of these birds back into the wild. This paper provides an overview of the causes, the impact and success of 3 organisations involved in R&R efforts of vultures in the Magaliesberg mountain range and surrounding areas over a period of 10 years. Study material included 162 Cape griffon (CGV and 38 African white-backed (AWBV vultures. Datasets include the number, sex and age of birds received, the reason the vultures were brought in for R&R, surgical interventions performed and outcomes of rescue efforts. The CGV dominated the rehabilitation attempts. Results further show that a large number of apparently healthy birds were presented for veterinary treatment. The R&R data clearly indicate that the major cause of injuries was birds colliding with overhead pylons, as a high number of soft tissue and skeletal injuries were observed. The study also shows that successful releases of rescued birds are possible. It is concluded that urbanisation has had a major negative impact on vultures around the Magaliesberg mountain range.

  12. Efficient transgenesis mediated by pigmentation rescue in zebrafish.

    Harrold, Itrat; Carbonneau, Seth; Moore, Bethany M; Nguyen, Gina; Anderson, Nicole M; Saini, Amandeep S; Kanki, John P; Jette, Cicely A; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish represents a revolutionary tool in large-scale genetic and small-molecule screens for gene and drug discovery. Transgenic zebrafish are often utilized in these screens. Many transgenic fish lines are maintained in the heterozygous state due to the lethality associated with homozygosity; thus, their progeny must be sorted to ensure a population expressing the transgene of interest for use in screens. Sorting transgenic embryos under a fluorescence microscope is very labor-intensive and demands fine-tuned motor skills. Here we report an efficient transgenic method of utilizing pigmentation rescue of nacre mutant fish for accurate naked-eye identification of both mosaic founders and stable transgenic zebrafish. This was accomplished by co-injecting two constructs with the I-SceI meganuclease enzyme into pigmentless nacre embryos: I-SceI-mitfa:mitfa-I-SceI to rescue the pigmentation and I-SceI-zpromoter:gene-of-interest-I-SceI to express the gene of interest under a zebrafish promoter (zpromoter). Pigmentation rescue reliably predicted transgene integration. Compared with other transgenic techniques, our approach significantly increases the overall percentage of founders and facilitates accurate naked-eye identification of stable transgenic fish, greatly reducing laborious fluorescence microscope sorting and PCR genotyping. Thus, this approach is ideal for generating transgenic fish for large-scale screens. PMID:26757807

  13. Space safety and rescue 1979-1981: Worldwide disaster response, rescue and safety employing space-borne systems

    Brown, J. W. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Selected papers from the 1979, 1980, and 1981 IAA symposia on space safety and rescue and on worldwide disaster response, safety, and rescue employing spaceborne systems are presented. Available papers published elsewhere and those presented at the 1976, 1977, and 1978 symposia are presented in abstract form. Subjects discussed include man-made space debris, nuclear-waste disposal in space, space-station safety design, psychological training, the introduction of female crewmembers, analysis of the November 23, 1980 earthquake as a design basis for satellite emergency communication, disaster warning using the GOES satellite, and satellite communications for disaster relief operations. Three reviews of the application of space technology to emergency and disaster relief and prevention, given at other symposia in 1981, are presented in an appendix. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  14. Effect of gibberellin and heat shock on the lipid composition of endoplasmic reticulum in barley aleurone layers

    The heat-shock responses of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) aleurone layers incubated with or without gibberellic acid (GA3) were compared. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that heat shock blocked the synthesis and secretion of secretory proteins from GA3-treated layers but not untreated layers. This suppression of secretory protein synthesis has been correlated with changes in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes (F.C. Belanger, M.R. Brodl, T.-h.D. Ho [1986] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 83: 1354-1358; L. Sticher, A.K. Biswas, D.S. Bush, R.L. Jones [1990] Plant Physiol 92: 506-513). Our secretion data suggested that the ER membranes of aleurone layers incubated without GA3 may be more heat shock tolerant. To investigate this, the lipid profiles of membrane extracts in aleurone layers labeled with [14C]glycerol were examined. Heat shock markedly increased [14C]glycerol incorporation into phosphatidylcholine (PC), and gas chromatography revealed an increase in the amount of saturated fatty acids associated with thin layer chromatography-purified PC in GA3-treated layers. In contrast, aleurone layers incubated without GA3 at normal temperature contained PC-associated fatty acids with a greater degree of saturation than GA3-treated layers. Heat shock modestly increased the degree of fatty acid saturation in untreated aleurone layers. This same trend was noted in fatty acids isolated from ER membranes purified by continuous sucrose density centrifugation. We propose that increased fatty acid saturation may help sustain ER membrane function in heat-shocked aleurone layers incubated in the absence of GA3

  15. Stress of endoplasmic reticulum modulates differentiation and lipogenesis of human adipocytes

    Background: Adipocytes are cells specialized for storage of neutral lipids. This storage capacity is dependent on lipogenesis and is diminished in obesity. The reason for the decline in lipogenic activity of adipocytes in obesity remains unknown. Recent data show that lipogenesis in liver is regulated by pathways initiated by endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Thus, we aimed at investigating the effect of ERS on lipogenesis in adipose cells. Methods: Preadipocytes were isolated from subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue from obese volunteers and in vitro differentiated into adipocytes. ERS was induced pharmacologically by thapsigargin (TG) or tunicamycin (TM). Activation of Unfolded Protein Response pathway (UPR) was monitored on the level of eIF2α phosphorylation and mRNA expression of downstream targets of UPR sensors. Adipogenic and lipogenic capacity was evaluated by Oil Red O staining, measurement of incorporation of radio-labelled glucose or acetic acid into lipids and mRNA analysis of adipogenic/lipogenic markers. Results: Exposition of adipocytes to high doses of TG (100 nM) and TM (1 μg/ml) for 1–24 h enhanced expression of several UPR markers (HSPA5, EDEM1, ATF4, XBP1s) and phosphorylation of eIF2α. This acute ERS substantially inhibited expression of lipogenic genes (DGAT2, FASN, SCD1) and glucose incorporation into lipids. Moreover, chronic exposure of preadipocytes to low dose of TG (2.5 nM) during the early phases of adipogenic conversion of preadipocytes impaired both, lipogenesis and adipogenesis. On the other hand, chronic low ERS had no apparent effect on lipogenesis in mature adipocytes. Conclusions: Acute ERS weakened a capacity of mature adipocytes to store lipids and chronic ERS diminished adipogenic potential of preadipocytes. - Highlights: • High intensity ERS inhibits lipogenic capacity of adipocytes. • ERS impairs adipogenesis when present in early stages of adipogenesis. • Lipogenesis in mature adipocytes is not

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum sorting and kinesin-1 command the targeting of axonal GABAB receptors.

    Viviana Valdés

    Full Text Available In neuronal cells the intracellular trafficking machinery controls the availability of neurotransmitter receptors at the plasma membrane, which is a critical determinant of synaptic strength. Metabotropic γ amino-butyric acid (GABA type B receptors (GABA(BRs are neurotransmitter receptors that modulate synaptic transmission by mediating the slow and prolonged responses to GABA. GABA(BRs are obligatory heteromers constituted by two subunits, GABA(BR1 and GABA(BR2. GABA(BR1a and GABA(BR1b are the most abundant subunit variants. GABA(BR1b is located in the somatodendritic domain whereas GABA(BR1a is additionally targeted to the axon. Sushi domains located at the N-terminus of GABA(BR1a constitute the only difference between both variants and are necessary and sufficient for axonal targeting. The precise targeting machinery and the organelles involved in sorting and transport have not been described. Here we demonstrate that GABA(BRs require the Golgi apparatus for plasma membrane delivery but that axonal sorting and targeting of GABA(BR1a operate in a pre-Golgi compartment. In the axon GABA(BR1a subunits are enriched in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and their dynamic behavior and colocalization with other secretory organelles like the ER-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC suggest that they employ a local secretory route. The transport of axonal GABA(BR1a is microtubule-dependent and kinesin-1, a molecular motor of the kinesin family, determines axonal localization. Considering that progression of GABA(BRs through the secretory pathway is regulated by an ER retention motif our data contribute to understand the role of the axonal ER in non-canonical sorting and targeting of neurotransmitter receptors.

  17. The liver isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 is not targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Broadway, Neil M; Pease, Richard J; Birdsey, Graeme; Shayeghi, Majid; Turner, Nigel A; David Saggerson, E

    2003-01-01

    Liver microsomal fractions contain a malonyl-CoA-inhibitable carnitine acyltransferase (CAT) activity. It has been proposed [Fraser, Corstorphine, Price and Zammit (1999) FEBS Lett. 446, 69-74] that this microsomal CAT activity is due to the liver form of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (L-CPT1) being targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as well as to mitochondria, possibly by an N-terminal signal sequence [Cohen, Guillerault, Girard and Prip-Buus (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 5403-5411]. COS-1 cells were transiently transfected to express a fusion protein in which enhanced green fluorescent protein was fused to the C-terminus of L-CPT1. Confocal microscopy showed that this fusion protein was localized to mitochondria, and possibly to peroxisomes, but not to the ER. cDNAs corresponding to truncated (amino acids 1-328) or full-length L-CPT1 were transcribed and translated in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes. However, there was no evidence of authentic insertion of CPT1 into the ER membrane. Rat liver microsomal fractions purified by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation contained an 88 kDa protein (p88) which was recognized by an anti-L-CPT1 antibody and by 2,4-dinitrophenol-etomoxiryl-CoA, a covalent inhibitor of L-CPT1. Abundance of p88 and malonyl-CoA-inhibitable CAT activity were increased approx. 3-fold by starvation for 24 h. Deoxycholate solubilized p88 and malonyl-CoA-inhibitable CAT activity from microsomes to approximately the same extent. The microsomal fraction contained porin, which, relative to total protein, was as abundant as in crude mitochondrial outer membranes fractions. It is concluded that L-CPT1 is not targeted to the ER membrane and that malonyl-CoA CAT in microsomal fractions is L-CPT1 that is derived from mitochondria, possibly from membrane contact sites. PMID:12401113

  18. Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Reduces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Lipid-Treated Hepatocytes.

    Liao, Bing M; McManus, Sophie A; Hughes, William E; Schmitz-Peiffer, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Isoforms of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) are involved in xenobiotic metabolism but have also been implicated in the regulation of glucose and lipid homeostasis and in the development of atherosclerosis. However, we have recently shown that improved insulin action is associated with increased FMO expression in livers of protein kinase C-deficient mice. Here, we investigated whether FMO3 expression affected insulin signaling, glucose metabolism, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in hepatocytes. HepG2 and IHH hepatocytes were transfected with FMO3 cDNA for overexpression, or small interfering RNA for knockdown. Cells were treated with palmitate to induce insulin resistance and insulin signaling, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene expression and ER stress markers were examined by immunoblotting and RT-PCR. Glycogen synthesis was measured using [(14)C]glucose. Palmitate treatment reduced insulin signaling at the level of Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis, which were little affected by FMO3 overexpression. However, the fatty acid also increased the levels of several ER stress markers and activation of caspase 3, which were counteracted by FMO3 overexpression and exacerbated by FMO3 knockdown. Although FMO3 expression did not reverse lipid effects on protein thiol redox in hepatocytes, it did prevent up-regulation of the gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK by pharmacological ER stress inducers or by palmitate. ER stress and PEPCK levels were also reduced in livers of fat-fed protein kinase Cδ-deficient mice. Our data indicate that FMO3 can contribute to the regulation of glucose metabolism in the liver by reducing lipid-induced ER stress and the expression of PEPCK, independently of insulin signal transduction. PMID:26886171

  19. Pathologic endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by glucotoxic insults inhibits adipocyte differentiation and induces an inflammatory phenotype.

    Longo, Michele; Spinelli, Rosa; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Zatterale, Federica; Fiory, Francesca; Nigro, Cecilia; Raciti, Gregory A; Miele, Claudia; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco; Di Jeso, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is critical in obesity. By controlling new adipocyte recruitment, adipogenesis contrasts adipocyte hypertrophy and its adverse consequences, such as insulin resistance. Contrasting data are present in literature on the effect of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and subsequent unfolded protein response (UPR) on adipocyte differentiation, being reported to be either necessary or inhibitory. In this study, we sought to clarify the effect of ER stress and UPR on adipocyte differentiation. We have used two different cell lines, the widely used pre-adipocyte 3T3-L1 cells and a murine multipotent mesenchymal cell line, W20-17 cells. A strong ER stress activator, thapsigargin, and a pathologically relevant inducer of ER stress, glucosamine (GlcN), induced ER stress and UPR above those occurring in the absence of perturbation and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Very low concentrations of 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA, a chemical chaperone) inhibited only the overactivation of ER stress and UPR elicited by GlcN, leaving unaltered the part physiologically activated during differentiation, and reversed the inhibitory effect of GlcN on differentiation. In addition, GlcN stimulated proinflammatory cytokine release and PBA prevented these effects. An inhibitor of NF-kB also reversed the effects of GlcN on cytokine release. These results indicate that while ER stress and UPR activation is "physiologically" activated during adipocyte differentiation, the "pathologic" part of ER stress activation, secondary to a glucotoxic insult, inhibits differentiation. In addition, such a metabolic insult, causes a shift of the preadipocyte/adipocyte population towards a proinflammatory phenotype. PMID:26940722

  20. Stress of endoplasmic reticulum modulates differentiation and lipogenesis of human adipocytes

    Koc, Michal; Mayerová, Veronika; Kračmerová, Jana [Franco-Czech Laboratory for Clinical Research on Obesity, Third Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Sport Medicine, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, CZ-100 00 (Czech Republic); Mairal, Aline [Franco-Czech Laboratory for Clinical Research on Obesity, Third Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Inserm, UMR1048, Obesity Research Laboratory, Institute of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases, 31432 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Mališová, Lucia; Štich, Vladimír [Franco-Czech Laboratory for Clinical Research on Obesity, Third Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Sport Medicine, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, CZ-100 00 (Czech Republic); Langin, Dominique [Franco-Czech Laboratory for Clinical Research on Obesity, Third Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Inserm, UMR1048, Obesity Research Laboratory, Institute of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases, 31432 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); University of Toulouse, UMR1048, Paul Sabatier University, 31432 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Toulouse University Hospitals, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, 31059 Toulouse, Cedex 9 (France); Rossmeislová, Lenka, E-mail: Lenka.Rossmeislova@lf3.cuni.cz [Franco-Czech Laboratory for Clinical Research on Obesity, Third Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Sport Medicine, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, CZ-100 00 (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-08

    Background: Adipocytes are cells specialized for storage of neutral lipids. This storage capacity is dependent on lipogenesis and is diminished in obesity. The reason for the decline in lipogenic activity of adipocytes in obesity remains unknown. Recent data show that lipogenesis in liver is regulated by pathways initiated by endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Thus, we aimed at investigating the effect of ERS on lipogenesis in adipose cells. Methods: Preadipocytes were isolated from subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue from obese volunteers and in vitro differentiated into adipocytes. ERS was induced pharmacologically by thapsigargin (TG) or tunicamycin (TM). Activation of Unfolded Protein Response pathway (UPR) was monitored on the level of eIF2α phosphorylation and mRNA expression of downstream targets of UPR sensors. Adipogenic and lipogenic capacity was evaluated by Oil Red O staining, measurement of incorporation of radio-labelled glucose or acetic acid into lipids and mRNA analysis of adipogenic/lipogenic markers. Results: Exposition of adipocytes to high doses of TG (100 nM) and TM (1 μg/ml) for 1–24 h enhanced expression of several UPR markers (HSPA5, EDEM1, ATF4, XBP1s) and phosphorylation of eIF2α. This acute ERS substantially inhibited expression of lipogenic genes (DGAT2, FASN, SCD1) and glucose incorporation into lipids. Moreover, chronic exposure of preadipocytes to low dose of TG (2.5 nM) during the early phases of adipogenic conversion of preadipocytes impaired both, lipogenesis and adipogenesis. On the other hand, chronic low ERS had no apparent effect on lipogenesis in mature adipocytes. Conclusions: Acute ERS weakened a capacity of mature adipocytes to store lipids and chronic ERS diminished adipogenic potential of preadipocytes. - Highlights: • High intensity ERS inhibits lipogenic capacity of adipocytes. • ERS impairs adipogenesis when present in early stages of adipogenesis. • Lipogenesis in mature adipocytes is not

  1. Amsterdam Oxford joint rescue forces - Team description paper - Virtual Robot competition - Rescue Simulation league - RoboCup 2011

    Dijkshoorn, N.; Flynn, H.; Formsma, O.; Noort, van, F.R.; Weelden, van, C.; Bastiaan, C.; Out, N.; Zwennes, O.; Otárola, S.S.; Hoog, de, R.; Cameron, S.; Visser, A.

    2011-01-01

    With the progress made in active exploration, the robots of the Joint Rescue Forces are capable of making deliberative decisions about the distribution of exploration locations over the team. Experiments have been done which include information exchange between team-members at rendez-vous points and dynamic role switching between relays and explorers. In the previous competition exploration was demonstrated with large robots with advanced mobility, such as the Kenaf and the AirRobot. This yea...

  2. PARM-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum molecule involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Koji Isodono

    Full Text Available To identify novel transmembrane and secretory molecules expressed in cardiac myocytes, signal sequence trap screening was performed in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. One of the molecules identified was a transmembrane protein, prostatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1. While PARM-1 has been identified as a gene induced in prostate in response to castration, its function is largely unknown. Our expression analysis revealed that PARM-1 was specifically expressed in hearts and skeletal muscles, and in the heart, cardiac myocytes, but not non-myocytes expressed PARM-1. Immunofluorescent staining showed that PARM-1 was predominantly localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, high-salt diet resulted in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent heart failure, and significantly stimulated PARM-1 expression in the hearts, with a concomitant increase in ER stress markers such as GRP78 and CHOP. In cultured cardiac myocytes, PARM-1 expression was stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines, but not by hypertrophic stimuli. A marked increase in PARM-1 expression was observed in response to ER stress inducers such as thapsigargin and tunicamycin, which also induced apoptotic cell death. Silencing PARM-1 expression by siRNAs enhanced apoptotic response in cardiac myocytes to ER stresses. PARM-1 silencing also repressed expression of PERK and ATF6, and augmented expression of CHOP without affecting IRE-1 expression and JNK and Caspase-12 activation. Thus, PARM-1 expression is induced by ER stress, which plays a protective role in cardiac myocytes through regulating PERK, ATF6 and CHOP expression. These results suggested that PARM-1 is a novel ER transmembrane molecule involved in cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  3. [Role of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease].

    Zhao, Ming; Jia, Hang-Huan; Xu, Man; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Liu, Long-Zhu; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2016-08-25

    Calcium overload is one of the important mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. Endoplasmic reticulum is an important organelle which regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis by uptake, storage and mobilization of calcium. So it plays a critical role in regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum, which is widely distributed in cytoplasm, has a large number of membrane junction sites. Recent studies have reported that these junction sites are distributed on plasma membrane and organelle membranes (mitochondria, lysosomes, Golgi apparatus, etc.), separately. They could form complexes to regulate calcium transport. In this review, we briefly outlined the recent research progresses of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease, which may offer a new strategy for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27546511

  4. A simulated avalanche search and rescue mission induces temporary physiological and behavioural changes in military dogs.

    Diverio, Silvana; Barbato, Olimpia; Cavallina, Roberta; Guelfi, Gabriella; Iaboni, Martina; Zasso, Renato; Di Mari, Walter; Santoro, Michele Matteo; Knowles, Toby G

    2016-09-01

    Saving human lives is of paramount importance in avalanche rescue missions. Avalanche military dogs represent an invaluable resource in these operations. However, their performance can be influenced by several environmental, social and transport challenges. If too severe, these are likely to activate a range of responses to stress, which might put at risk the dogs' welfare. The aim of this study was to assess the physiological and behavioural responses of a group of military dogs to a Simulated Avalanche Search and Rescue mission (SASR). Seventeen avalanche dogs from the Italian Military Force Guardia di Finanza (SAGF dogs) were monitored during a simulated search for a buried operator in an artificial avalanche area (SASR). Heart rate (HR), body temperature (RBT) and blood samples were collected at rest the day before the trial (T0), immediately after helicopter transport at the onset of the SASR (T1), after the discovery of the buried operator (T2) and 2h later (T3). Heart rate (HR), rectal body temperature (RBT), cortisol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured. During the search mission the behaviour of each SAGF dog was measured by focal animal sampling and qualitatively assessed by its handler and two observers. Inter-rater agreement was evaluated. Snow and environmental variables were also measured. All dogs successfully completed their search for the buried, simulated victim within 10min. The SASR was shown to exert significant increases on RBT, NEFA and cortisol (Pstress probably induced by the addition of factors such as helicopter transport, disembarking, and the search and rescue exercise. However, changes were moderate and limited over time, progressively decreasing with complete recovery at T3 except for sera cortisol that showed a slightly slower decline. More time walking within the search was related to lower RBT, conversely to walking. Standing still

  5. The density of the cell sap and endoplasm of Nitellopsis and Chara

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    We measured the densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall of Nitellopsis obtusa and Chara corallina using interference microscopy, refractometry, immersion refractometry, equilibrium sedimentation and chemical microanalysis techniques. These values are important for the determination of many rheological properties of the cytoplasm as well as for understanding buoyancy regulation, dispersal mechanisms and how cells respond to gravity. The average densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall are 1,006.9, 1,016.7 and 1,371 kg m-3 for Nitellopsis and 1,005.0, 1,013.9, and 1,355.3 kg m-3 for Chara.

  6. Tactical mobile robots for urban search and rescue

    Blitch, John; Sidki, Nahid; Durkin, Tim

    2000-07-01

    Few disasters can inspire more compassion for victims and families than those involving structural collapse. Video clips of children's bodies pulled from earthquake stricken cities and bombing sties tend to invoke tremendous grief and sorrow because of the totally unpredictable nature of the crisis and lack of even the slightest degree of negligence (such as with those who choose to ignore storm warnings). Heartbreaking stories of people buried alive for days provide a visceral and horrific perspective of some of greatest fears ever to be imagined by human beings. Current trends toward urban sprawl and increasing human discord dictates that structural collapse disasters will continue to present themselves at an alarming rate. The proliferation of domestic terrorism, HAZMAT and biological contaminants further complicates the matter further and presents a daunting problem set for Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) organizations around the world. This paper amplifies the case for robot assisted search and rescue that was first presented during the KNOBSAR project initiated at the Colorado School of Mines in 1995. It anticipates increasing technical development in mobile robot technologies and promotes their use for a wide variety of humanitarian assistance missions. Focus is placed on development of advanced robotic systems that are employed in a complementary tool-like fashion as opposed to traditional robotic approaches that portend to replace humans in hazardous tasks. Operational challenges for USAR are presented first, followed by a brief history of mobiles robot development. The paper then presents conformal robotics as a new design paradigm with emphasis on variable geometry and volumes. A section on robot perception follows with an initial attempt to characterize sensing in a volumetric manner. Collaborative rescue is then briefly discussed with an emphasis on marsupial operations and linked mobility. The paper concludes with an emphasis on Human Robot Interface

  7. Lanthionine ketimine ethyl ester partially rescues neurodevelopmental defects in unc-33 (DPYSL2/CRMP2) mutants.

    Hubbard, Caleb; Benda, Erica; Hardin, Tyler; Baxter, Taylor; St John, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Sean; Hensley, Kenneth; Holgado, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Lanthionine ketimine (LK) is a natural sulfur amino acid metabolite with potent neurotrophic activity. Proteomics indicate that LK interacts with collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2/DPYSL2/UNC-33), a brain-enriched protein that was shown to regulate cytoskeletal remodeling, neuronal morphology, and synaptic function. To elucidate further the molecular interplay and biological action of LK and UNC-33, we began examining the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes in which both LK concentrations and UNC-33 protein were manipulated. To this end, a cell-permeable LK-ester (LKE) was administered to developing C. elegans engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in cholinergic neurons (strain RM3128) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) in GABAergic neurons (strain CZ1200), and neural morphology was assessed. Fluorescent imaging analyses show that LKE exposure to wild-type animals induced neural commissure outgrowth, crossing over, and bundling in both neurites from GABAergic and cholinergic motor neurons. Additionally, when unc-33(e204) hypomorph mutant nematodes (D389N substitution mutants) were exposed to LKE, both the neuroanatomical defects of incomplete dorsoventral neural commissures and the ventral nerve cord gaps were partially rescued. In contrast, LKE did not rescue ventral nerve cord gaps found in unc-33(mn407) null mutant. Together these data suggest possible functions for LK as a regulator of neuritic elongation, corroborate roles for UNC-33/CRMP2 in the mechanism of LKE activity, and suggest the potential of LKE as a therapeutic molecule for neurological diseases involving CRMP2 dysfunction. PMID:23825043

  8. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligonucleotides.

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections and early death. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical-pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question that we addressed was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we propose that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. By generating and characterizing a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model, here we show that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reverses the behavioural, molecular and electrophysiological deficits. We also reduced MeCP2 using an antisense oligonucleotide strategy, which has greater translational potential. Antisense oligonucleotides are small, modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with messenger RNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models. We find that antisense oligonucleotide treatment induces a broad phenotypic rescue in adult

  9. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  10. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Mohammad, Mohammad K. [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Avila, Diana [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Zhang, Jingwen [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Barve, Shirish [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Arteel, Gavin [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Robley Rex VAMC, Louisville, KY (United States); Joshi-Barve, Swati, E-mail: s0josh01@louisville.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  11. Impacted and Fractured Biliary Basket: A Second Basket Rescue Technique

    Mohammed Amine Benatta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old woman was treated with ERCP, ES, and biliary plastic stent, for large and multiple common bile duct stones. During a second ERCP basket extraction was impacted with a round entrapped stone. The basket handle was cut off; a metal sheath of extraendoscopic lithotriptor was advanced over the basket. The mechanical lithotripsy was complicated with basket traction wires fracturing, without breakage of the stone. A rescue standard basket was pushed until it caught the basket/stone complex. Using this method disengagement of the whole fractured basket/stone complex was achieved without need of surgery. It is the third case reported in the English literature.

  12. Impacted and Fractured Biliary Basket: A Second Basket Rescue Technique.

    Benatta, Mohammed Amine; Desjeux, Ariane; Barthet, Marc; Grimaud, Jean Charles; Gasmi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was treated with ERCP, ES, and biliary plastic stent, for large and multiple common bile duct stones. During a second ERCP basket extraction was impacted with a round entrapped stone. The basket handle was cut off; a metal sheath of extraendoscopic lithotriptor was advanced over the basket. The mechanical lithotripsy was complicated with basket traction wires fracturing, without breakage of the stone. A rescue standard basket was pushed until it caught the basket/stone complex. Using this method disengagement of the whole fractured basket/stone complex was achieved without need of surgery. It is the third case reported in the English literature. PMID:27293442

  13. Impacted and Fractured Biliary Basket: A Second Basket Rescue Technique

    Benatta, Mohammed Amine; Desjeux, Ariane; Barthet, Marc; Grimaud, Jean Charles; Gasmi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was treated with ERCP, ES, and biliary plastic stent, for large and multiple common bile duct stones. During a second ERCP basket extraction was impacted with a round entrapped stone. The basket handle was cut off; a metal sheath of extraendoscopic lithotriptor was advanced over the basket. The mechanical lithotripsy was complicated with basket traction wires fracturing, without breakage of the stone. A rescue standard basket was pushed until it caught the basket/stone complex. Using this method disengagement of the whole fractured basket/stone complex was achieved without need of surgery. It is the third case reported in the English literature. PMID:27293442

  14. ECMO for Cardiac Rescue after Accidental Intravenous Mepivacaine Application

    Michael Froehle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mepivacaine is a potent local anaesthetic and used for infiltration and regional anaesthesia in adults and pediatric patients. Intoxications with mepivacaine affect mainly the CNS and the cardiovascular system. We present a case of accidental intravenous mepivacaine application and intoxication of an infant resulting in seizure, broad complex bradyarrhythmia, arterial hypotension and finally cardiac arrest. The patient could be rescued by prolonged resuscitations and a rapid initiation of ECMO and survived without neurological damage. The management strategies of this rare complication including promising other treatment options with lipid emulsions are discussed.

  15. Kriisiopas Finn Rescue -muodostelman pelastuskoiraryhmälle

    Palmu, Timo-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Opinnäytetyöni käsittelee katastrofialueilla tehtävää etsintä- ja pelastustyötä ja tähän työskentelyyn liittyvää palvelusstressiä ja traumaattisten tilanteiden kohtaamista ja niiden käsittelyä. Projektin varsinainen kohderyhmä ovat Finn Rescue (FRF) -muodostelman CMC-koiraryhmän (Crisis Management Center) hälytysvalmiudessa olevat pelastuskoiran ohjaajat ja ryhmänjohtajat. Projektin tarkoitus on parantaa CMC-koiraryhmän mahdollisuuksia varautua kokonaisvaltaisesti työskentelyyn katastrofialue...

  16. Establishment of a Rescue System for Canine Distemper Virus

    Gassen, Uta; Collins, Fergal M.; Duprex, W. Paul; Rima, Bert K.

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) has been rescued from a full-length cDNA clone. Besides Measles virus (MV) and Rinderpest virus, a third morbillivirus is now available for genetic analysis using reverse genetics. A plasmid p(+)CDV was constructed by sequential cloning using the Onderstepoort vaccine strain large-plaque-forming variant. The presence of a T7 promoter allowed transcription of full-length antigenomic RNA by a T7 RNA polymerase, which was provided by a host range mutant of vaccinia v...

  17. Launch-Off-Need Shuttle Hubble Rescue Mission: Medical Issues

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Ilcus, Linda; Perchonok, Michele; Polk, James; Brandt, Keith; Powers, Edward; Stepaniak, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Hubble repair mission (STS-125) is unique in that a rescue mission (STS-400) has to be ready to launch before STS-125 life support runs out should the vehicle become stranded. The shuttle uses electrical power derived from fuel cells that use cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen (CRYO) to run all subsystems including the Environmental Control System. If the STS-125 crew cannot return to Earth due to failure of a critical subsystem, they must power down all nonessential systems and wait to be rescued by STS-400. This power down will cause the cabin temperature to be 60 F or less and freeze the rest of the vehicle, preventing it from attempting a reentry. After an emergency has been declared, STS-125 must wait at least 7 days to power down since that is the earliest that STS-400 can be launched. Problem The delayed power down of STS-125 causes CYRO to be consumed at high rates and limits the survival time after STS-400 launches to 10 days or less. CRYO will run out sooner every day that the STS-400 launch is delayed (weather at launch, technical issues etc.). To preserve CRYO and lithium hydroxide (LiOH - carbon dioxide removal) the crew will perform no exercise to reduce their metabolic rates, yet each deconditioned STS-125 crewmember must perform an EVA to rescue himself. The cabin may be cold for 10 days, which may cause shivering, increasing the metabolic rate of the STS-125 crew. Solution To preserve LiOH, the STS-125 manifest includes nutrition bars with low carbohydrate content to maintain crew respiratory quotient (RQ) below 0.85 as opposed to the usual shuttle galley food which is rich in carbohydrates and keeps the RQ at approximately 0.95. To keep the crew more comfortable in the cold vehicle warm clothing also has been included. However, with no exercise and limited diet, the deconditioned STS-125 crew returning on STS-400 may not be able to egress the vehicle autonomously requiring a supplemented crash-and-rescue capability.

  18. Protein kinase RNA- like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling pathway plays a major role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)- mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress- induced apoptosis in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Liu, Zhong-Wei; Zhu, Hai-Tao; Chen, Kun-Lun; Dong, Xin; Wei, Jin; Qiu, Chuan; Xue, Jia-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is considered one of the mechanisms contributing to reactive oxygen species (ROS)- mediated cell apoptosis. In diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), cell apoptosis is generally accepted as the etiological factor and closely related to cardiac ROS generation. ER stress is proposed the link between ROS and cell apoptosis; however, the signaling pathways and their roles in participating ER stress- induced apoptosis in DCM are still unclear. Methods In this s...

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin-1α (Ero1α) improves folding and secretion of mutant proinsulin and limits mutant proinsulin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Wright, Jordan; Birk, Julia; Haataja, Leena; Liu, Ming; Ramming, Thomas; Weiss, Michael A.; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Arvan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Upon chronic up-regulation of proinsulin synthesis, misfolded proinsulin can accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of pancreatic β-cells, promoting ER stress and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In Mutant Ins-gene-induced Diabetes of Youth (MIDY), misfolded mutant proinsulin impairs ER exit of co-expressed wild-type proinsulin, limiting insulin production and leading to eventual β-cell death. In this study we have investigated the hypothesis that increased expression of ER oxidoreductin-1α (E...

  20. A homologous cell-free system for studying protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in fission yeast.

    Brennwald, P; Wise, J A

    1994-02-01

    We report the development of a homologous in vitro assay system for analysing translocation of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our protocol for preparing an S. pombe extract capable of translating natural messenger RNAs was modified from a procedure previously used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which cells are lysed in a bead-beater. However, we were unable to prepare fission yeast microsomes active in protein translocation using existing budding yeast protocols. Instead, our most efficient preparations were isolated by fractionating spheroplasts, followed by extensive washing and size exclusion chromatography of the crude membranes. Translocation of two ER-targeted proteins, pre-acid phosphatase from S. pombe and prepro-alpha-factor from S. cerevisiae, was monitored using two distinct assays. First, evidence that a fraction of both proteins was sequestered within membrane-enclosed vesicles was provided by resistance to exogenously added protease. Second, the protected fraction of each protein was converted to a higher molecular weight, glycosylated form; attachment of carbohydrate to the translocated proteins was confirmed by their ability to bind Concanavalin A-Sepharose. Finally, we examined whether proteins could be translocated across fission yeast microsomal membranes after their synthesis was complete. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae prepro-alpha-factor can be post-translationally imported into the fission yeast ER, while S. pombe pre-acid phosphatase crosses the membrane only by a co-translational mechanism. PMID:8203158

  1. Post-traumatic stress disorder status in a rescue group after the Wenchuan earthquake relief

    Huang, Junhua; Liu, Qunying; Li, Jinliang (Eric); Li, Xuejiang; You, Jin; Zhang, Liang; Tian, Changfu; Luan, Rongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder in earthquake rescue workers is relatively high. Risk factors for this disorder include demographic characteristics, earthquake-related high-risk factors, risk factors in the rescue process, personality, social support and coping style. This study examined the current status of a unit of 1 040 rescue workers who participated in earthquake relief for the Wenchuan earthquake that occurred on May 12th, 2008. Pos...

  2. Research on problems in nuclear accident emergency rescue for nuclear power submarine

    This paper presents a description of nuclearpowered submarine accident types and an analysis of accident emergency rescue characteristics, including a special number of problems associated with emergencyrescue, such as emergency situation and emergency planning zone, technical rescue resources and task, protection against compound radiation inside and outside port plume zone, on-sea nuclear rescue equipment and technical assurance capacity, and other problesms related to in-accident nuclear submarine disposal. (authors)

  3. A critical review of the Mediterranean sea turtle rescue network: a web looking for a weaver

    Judith Ullmann; Michael Stachowitsch

    2015-01-01

    A key issue in conservation biology is recognizing and bridging the gap between scientific results and specific action. We examine sea turtles—charismatic yet endangered flagship species—in the Mediterranean, a sea with historically high levels of exploitation and 22 coastal nations. We take sea turtle rescue facilities as a visible measure for implemented conservation action. Our study yielded 34 confirmed sea turtle rescue centers, 8 first-aid stations, and 7 informal rescue institutions cu...

  4. Decision Making and Emergency Communication System in Rescue Simulation for People with Disabilities

    Kohei Arai; Tran Xuan Sang

    2013-01-01

    Decision making and emergency communication system play important roles in rescue process when emergency situations happen. The rescue process will be more effective if we have appropriate decision making method and accessible emergency communication system. In this paper, we propose a centralized rescue model for people with disabilities. The decision making method to decide which volunteers should help which disabled persons is proposed by utilizing the auction mechanism. The GIS data are u...

  5. National First-Aid and Mine Rescue Contest, Buffalo, NY, October 5-7, 1959

    Weaver, H.F.; Alden, D.M.

    1960-01-01

    Report describes the National First-Aid and Mine Rescue Contest, the fifth after a lapse of 21 years, held in the Memorial Auditorium in Buffalo, under auspices of Bureau and Joseph A. Holmes Safety Association. Nine teams from 4 States participated in the mine rescue contest, and 43 teams from 8 States in the first-aid contest. Six teams entered as combination teams, participating in both mine rescue and first-aid contests.

  6. The clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins

    Barbara Choromańska; Piotr Myśliwiec; Jacek Dadan; Hady Razak Hady; Adrian Chabowski

    2011-01-01

    Excessive levels of free fatty acids are toxic to cells. The human body has evolved a defense mechanism in the form of small cytoplasmic proteins called fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), and then refer them to appropriate intracellular disposal sites (oxidation in mitochondria and peroxisomes or storage in the endoplasmic reticulum). So far, nine types of these proteins have been described, and their name refers to the place in which they were first ...

  7. Model and algorithm for optimization of rescue center location of emergent catastrophe

    WANG Ding-wei; ZHANG Guo-xiang

    2006-01-01

    The location of rescue centers is a key problem in optimal resource allocation and logistics in emergency response.We propose a mathematical model for rescue center location with the considerations of emergency occurrence probability,catastrophe diffusion function and rescue function.Because the catastrophe diffusion and rescue functions are both nonlinear and time-variable,it cannot be solved by common mathematical programming methods.We develop a heuristic embedded genetic algorithm for the special model solution.The computation based on a large number of examples with practical data has shown us satisfactory results.

  8. AAV exploits subcellular stress associated with inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum expansion, and misfolded proteins in models of cystic fibrosis.

    Jarrod S Johnson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to infection act at multiple levels to prevent viruses, bacteria, and parasites from commandeering host cells for their own purposes. An intriguing hypothesis is that if a cell experiences stress, such as that elicited by inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER expansion, or misfolded proteins, then subcellular barriers will be less effective at preventing viral infection. Here we have used models of cystic fibrosis (CF to test whether subcellular stress increases susceptibility to adeno-associated virus (AAV infection. In human airway epithelium cultured at an air/liquid interface, physiological conditions of subcellular stress and ER expansion were mimicked using supernatant from mucopurulent material derived from CF lungs. Using this inflammatory stimulus to recapitulate stress found in diseased airways, we demonstrated that AAV infection was significantly enhanced. Since over 90% of CF cases are associated with a misfolded variant of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ΔF508-CFTR, we then explored whether the presence of misfolded proteins could independently increase susceptibility to AAV infection. In these models, AAV was an order of magnitude more efficient at transducing cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR than in cells expressing wild-type CFTR. Rescue of misfolded ΔF508-CFTR under low temperature conditions restored viral transduction efficiency to that demonstrated in controls, suggesting effects related to protein misfolding were responsible for increasing susceptibility to infection. By testing other CFTR mutants, G551D, D572N, and 1410X, we have shown this phenomenon is common to other misfolded proteins and not related to loss of CFTR activity. The presence of misfolded proteins did not affect cell surface attachment of virus or influence expression levels from promoter transgene cassettes in plasmid transfection studies, indicating exploitation occurs at the level of virion trafficking or processing. Thus

  9. GIS plays key role in NYC Rescue and Relief Operation

    Showstack, Randy

    New York City, Sept. 17—The posters of missing loved ones are pasted onto New York City walls and street signs six days after 2 hijacked commercial airlines destroyed the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan on September 11. Several miles uptown from “ground zero,” heightened security hovers around the city's Office of Emergency Management rescue and relief command center, an around-the-clock operation. Police, firefighters, military, officials with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, communications technicians, and a beehive of others work in controlled chaos in this cavernous, convention center-sized hall, lined with computers and adorned with several American flags.After the original command center at 7 World Trade Center collapsed to rubble as an after-effect of the plane strikes, city officials scrambled to recreate it. Alan Leidner, director of New York's citywide geographic information systems (GIS), and who is with the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications, knew that maps would be an integral component of the rescue and relief efforts. Maps provide emergency workers and others with accurate and detailed scientific data in the form of visual aids upon which they can make informed decisions.

  10. Biobotic insect swarm based sensor networks for search and rescue

    Bozkurt, Alper; Lobaton, Edgar; Sichitiu, Mihail; Hedrick, Tyson; Latif, Tahmid; Dirafzoon, Alireza; Whitmire, Eric; Verderber, Alexander; Marin, Juan; Xiong, Hong

    2014-06-01

    The potential benefits of distributed robotics systems in applications requiring situational awareness, such as search-and-rescue in emergency situations, are indisputable. The efficiency of such systems requires robotic agents capable of coping with uncertain and dynamic environmental conditions. For example, after an earthquake, a tremendous effort is spent for days to reach to surviving victims where robotic swarms or other distributed robotic systems might play a great role in achieving this faster. However, current technology falls short of offering centimeter scale mobile agents that can function effectively under such conditions. Insects, the inspiration of many robotic swarms, exhibit an unmatched ability to navigate through such environments while successfully maintaining control and stability. We have benefitted from recent developments in neural engineering and neuromuscular stimulation research to fuse the locomotory advantages of insects with the latest developments in wireless networking technologies to enable biobotic insect agents to function as search-and-rescue agents. Our research efforts towards this goal include development of biobot electronic backpack technologies, establishment of biobot tracking testbeds to evaluate locomotion control efficiency, investigation of biobotic control strategies with Gromphadorhina portentosa cockroaches and Manduca sexta moths, establishment of a localization and communication infrastructure, modeling and controlling collective motion by learning deterministic and stochastic motion models, topological motion modeling based on these models, and the development of a swarm robotic platform to be used as a testbed for our algorithms.

  11. SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT FOR A BAND : Case: Husky Rescue

    Koskinen, Sampo

    2010-01-01

    The  goal  of  the  project  thesis  was  to  create,  produce  and  manage  the social  media  presence  of  a   Finnish  band  called  Husky  Rescue.  Husky Rescue  is  a  band  that  has  had  moderate  international   success.  The  thesis also  discusses  the  feasibility  of  starting  a  business  that  would  provide social   media  and  online  marketing  services  to  Finnish  artists. The  development  of  the  Internet  from  a  network  of  static  websites  to  a dynamic  co...

  12. Native flora rescue program: GASENE project case study

    Serricchio, Claudio; Caldas, Flaviana V. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Akahori, Lisa [Telsan, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Jacomelli Junior, Jose Almir [AGF Engenharia, Araucaria, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Concerning the surrounding flora, the implementation of pipelines may cause fragmentation and isolation of the remaining natural vegetation, possibly changing the forest structure; thus raising the border effect; modifying the ratio of species and life forms, decreasing the vegetal diversity and/or causing a lack of connectivity among the remaining indigenous forest resources. In the case of pipelines, the most important environmental measure intended to mitigate the damage caused to the flora is the adoption of Indigenous Flora Rescue Programs. This paper is aimed at analyzing the programs currently applied during the implementation of the GASENE project, by conducting a case study. The main targets of such program are obtaining seeds and fruits with a view to subsidize the potential production of sapling to be further employed in the recovery of areas impacted by the pipeline works; and then relocate the most significant samples of species rescued from the suppressed areas in order to comprise forest areas adjacent to the pipeline's right-of-way. The programs had little differences in their methodology while being implemented, however, we consider that up to the present moment the results obtained in the preservation of species of native flora have been satisfactory. (author)

  13. Mountain Search and Rescue with Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems

    Silvagni, Mario; Tonoli, Andrea; Zenerino, Enrico; Chiaberge, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) also known as Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are nowadays becoming more and more popular in several applications. Even though a complete regulation is not yet available all over the world, researches, tests and some real case applications are wide spreading. These technologies can bring many benefits also to the mountain operations especially in emergencies and harsh environmental conditions, such as Search and Rescue (SAR) and avalanche rescue missions. In fact, during last decade, the number of people practicing winter sports in backcountry environment is increased and one of the greatest hazards for recreationists and professionals are avalanches. Often these accidents have severe consequences leading, mostly, to asphyxia-related death, which is confirmed by the hard drop of survival probability after ten minutes from the burying. Therefore, it is essential to minimize the time of burial. Modern avalanche beacon (ARTVA) interface guides the rescuer during the search phase reducing its time. Even if modern avalanche beacons are valid and reliable, the seeking range influences the rescue time. Furthermore, the environment and morphologic conditions of avalanches usually complicates the rescues. The recursive methodology of this kind of searching offers the opportunity to use automatic device like drones (RPAS). These systems allow performing all the required tasks autonomously, with high accuracy and without exposing the rescuers to additional risks due to secondary avalanches. The availability of highly integrated electronics and subsystems specifically meant for the applications, better batteries, miniaturized payload and, in general, affordable prices, has led to the availability of small RPAS with very good performances that can give interesting application opportunities in unconventional environments. The present work is one of the outcome from the experience made by the authors in RPAS fields and in Mechatronics

  14. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates hepatic fibrosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice

    Harris, Todd R. [Department of Entomology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bettaieb, Ahmed [Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Kodani, Sean; Dong, Hua [Department of Entomology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Myers, Richard; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan [Department of Internal Medicine: Cardiovascular, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Haj, Fawaz G. [Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine: Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hammock, Bruce D., E-mail: bdhammock@ucdavis.edu [Department of Entomology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Liver fibrosis is a pathological condition in which chronic inflammation and changes to the extracellular matrix lead to alterations in hepatic tissue architecture and functional degradation of the liver. Inhibitors of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce fibrosis in the heart, pancreas and kidney in several disease models. In this study, we assess the effect of sEH inhibition on the development of fibrosis in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced mouse model by monitoring changes in the inflammatory response, matrix remolding and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The sEH inhibitor 1-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-3-(1-propionylpiperidin-4-yl) urea (TPPU) was administered in drinking water. Collagen deposition in the liver was increased five-fold in the CCl{sub 4}-treated group, and this was returned to control levels by TPPU treatment. Hepatic expression of Col1a2 and 3a1 mRNA was increased over fifteen-fold in the CCl{sub 4}-treated group relative to the Control group, and this increase was reduced by 50% by TPPU treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress observed in the livers of CCl{sub 4}-treated animals was attenuated by TPPU treatment. In order to support the hypothesis that TPPU is acting to reduce the hepatic fibrosis and ER stress through its action as a sEH inhibitor we used a second sEH inhibitor, trans-4-(4-[3-(4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy)-benzoic acid (t-TUCB), and sEH null mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the sEH may play an important role in the development of hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl{sub 4}, presumably by reducing endogenous fatty acid epoxide chemical mediators acting to reduce ER stress. - Highlights: • We administer an inhibitor of sEH in a CCl4 murine model. • sEH inhibition reduces liver collagen deposition and pro-fibrotic gene expression. • sEH inhibition induces MMP-1a activity.

  15. Water-mediated interactions influence the binding of thapsigargin to sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosinetriphosphatase

    Paulsen, Eleonora S.; Villadsen, Jesper; Tenori, Eleonora;

    2013-01-01

    A crystal structure suggests four water molecules are present in the binding cavity of thapsigargin in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Computational chemistry indicates that three of these water molecules mediate an extensive hydrogen-bonding network between thapsigargin...

  16. Accumulation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in Alzheimer's disease: new morphological evidence of axoplasmic flow disturbances.

    Richard, S; Brion, Jean Pierre; Couck, A. M.; Flament Durand, Jacqueline

    1989-01-01

    Numerous enlarged neurites and presynaptic terminals containing tubulovesicular profiles of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) were observed in frontal biopsies from six patients with Alzheimer's disease. These accumulations of SER probably reflect disturbances of axoplasmic flows. In addition, curvilinear tubular inclusions similar to those characteristic of Farber's disease were found in one patient. Finally, accumulation of glycogen within neurites and enlarged mitochondria were observed i...

  17. Chlorhexidine-induced apoptosis or necrosis in L929 fibroblasts: A role for endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), widely used as antiseptic and therapeutic agent in medicine and dentistry, has a toxic effect both in vivo and in vitro. The intrinsic mechanism underlying CHX-induced cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells is, however, still unknown. A recent study from our laboratory has suggested that CHX may induce death in cultured L929 fibroblasts via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This hypothesis was further tested by means of light and electron microscopy, quantification of apoptosis and necrosis by flow cytometry, fluorescence visualization of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum, and evaluation of the expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78), a marker of activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cultured L929 fibroblasts. Our finding showing increased Grp 78 expression in CHX-treated cells and the results of flow cytometry, cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum fluorescence visualization, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to suggest that CHX elicits accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, which causes ER overload, resulting in ER stress and cell death either by necrosis or apoptosis. It must be pointed out, however, that this does not necessarily mean that ER stress is the only way that CHX kills L929 fibroblasts, but rather that ER stress is an important target or indicator of cell death induced by this drug

  18. Membrane protein targeting to the outskirts of the endoplasmic reticulum : A characterization of sorting signals

    Kralt, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The majority of membrane proteins synthesized in the cell is inserted into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER forms a network that extends from the nuclear envelope (NE), a double membrane surrounding the nucleus, to the cortical ER that underlies the plasma membrane (PM). Locali

  19. Evidence of a Continuous Endoplasmic Reticulum in the Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica▿ †

    Teixeira, Jose E; Huston, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the cause of amebiasis, is believed to have no continuous endoplasmic reticulum (ER), with ER functions occurring in vesicles. Here, using an ER-targeted green fluorescent protein fusion protein and fluorescence loss in photobleaching, we have unambiguously demonstrated the presence of a continuous ER compartment in living E. histolytica trophozoites.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to the selective transcriptional downregulation of the glucoamylase gene in Aspergillus niger

    Al-Sheikh, H.; Watson, A.J.; Lacey, G.A.; Punt, P.J.; MacKenzie, D.A.; Jeenes, D.J.; Pakula, T.; Penttilä, M.; Alcocer, M.J.C.; Archer, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated stress response in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The inhibition of protein folding within the ER leads to cellular responses known collectively as the unfolded protein response (UPR) and we show that the selective transcriptional do

  1. A lentivirally delivered photoactivatable GFP to assess continuity in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurones and glia

    Jones, V. C.; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Jones, O. T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 458, č. 4 (2009), s. 809-818. ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/08/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : endoplasmic reticulum * calcium store * neurone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.695, year: 2009

  2. A plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase of 120 kilodaltons on the endoplasmic reticulum from carrot (Daucus carota) cells

    Chen, F.H.; Ratterman, D.M.; Sze, H. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Cytosolic Ca[sup 2+] levels are regulated in part by Ca[sup 2+]-pumping ATPases that export Ca[sup 2+] from the cytoplasm; The types and properties of Ca[sup 2+] pumps in plants are not well understood. The kinetic properties of a 120-kD phosphoenzyme (PE) intermediate formed during the reaction cycle of a Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase from suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells are characterized. Only one Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was formed when carrot membrane vesicles were incubated with [[gamma]-[sup 32]P]ATP. Formation of this 120-kD phosphoprotein was inhibited by vanadate, enhanced by La[sup 3+], and decreased by hydroxylamine, confirming its identification as an intermediate of a phosphorylated-type Ca[sup 2+]-translocating ATPase. The 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was most abundant in endoplasmic reticulum-enriched fractions, in which the Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was estimated to be 0.1% of membrane protein. Direct quantitation of Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was used to examine the kinetics of PE formation. PE formation exhibited a K[sub m] for Ca[sup 2+] of 1 to 2 [mu]m and a K[sub m] for ATP of 67 nm. Relative affinities of substrates, determined by competition experiments, were 0.075 [mu]m for ATP, 1 [mu]m for ADP, 100 [mu]m for ITP, and 250 [mu]m for GTP. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, specific inhibitors of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase, had no effect on PE formation; erythrosin B inhibited with 50% inhibition at <0.1 [mu]m. Calmodulin (1 [mu]m) stimulated PE formation by 25%. The results indicate that the carrot 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase is similar but not identical to animal plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase and yet is located on endomembranes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. This type of Ca[sup 2+] pump may reside on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum, thought to play a major role in anchoring the cytoskeleton and in facilitating secretion. 34 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Tributyltin induces apoptotic signaling in hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    Tri-n-butyltin is a widespread environmental toxicant, which accumulates in the liver. This study investigates whether tri-n-butyltin induces pro-apoptotic signaling in rat liver hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Tri-n-butyltin activated the endoplasmic reticulum pathway of apoptosis, which was demonstrated by the activation of the protease calpain, its translocation to the plasma membrane, followed by cleavage of the calpain substrates, cytoskeletal protein vinculin, and caspase-12. Caspase-12 is localized to the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in apoptosis mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum. Tri-n-butyltin also caused translocation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, events which can activate the mitochondrial death pathway. Tri-n-butyltin induced downstream apoptotic events in rat hepatocytes at the nuclear level, detected by chromatin condensation and by confocal microscopy using acridine orange. We investigated whether the tri-n-butyltin-induced pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes could be linked to perturbation of intracellular calcium homeostasis, using confocal microscopy. Tri-n-butyltin caused changes in intracellular calcium distribution, which were similar to those induced by thapsigargin. Calcium was released from a subcellular compartment, which is likely to be the endoplasmic reticulum, into the cytosol. Cytosolic acidification, which is known to trigger apoptosis, also occurred and involved the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger. Pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes were inhibited by the calcium chelator, Bapta-AM, and by a calpain inhibitor, which suggests that changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis are involved in tri-n-butyltin-induced apoptotic signaling in rat hepatocytes

  4. Failure of Amino Acid Homeostasis Causes Cell Death following Proteasome Inhibition

    Suraweera, Amila; Münch, Christian; Hanssum, Ariane; Bertolotti, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets many cellular proteins for degradation and thereby controls most cellular processes. Although it is well established that proteasome inhibition is lethal, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that proteasome inhibition results in a lethal amino acid shortage. In yeast, mammalian cells, and flies, the deleterious consequences of proteasome inhibition are rescued by amino acid supplementation. In all three systems, this rescuing effe...

  5. A Place to Call Home——Rescued moon bears get to live a decent life

    2006-01-01

    On February 8, 2006, a piece of sad news came out of the Moon Bear Rescue Center in Chengdu, capital city of southwest China's Sichuan Province. Andrew, the first moon bear rescued by the Animals Asia Foundation, which sponsors the center, died of liver cancer, thought to have arisen from the massive infec-

  6. 75 FR 18888 - Mine Rescue Teams and Arrangements for Emergency Medical Assistance and Transportation for...

    2010-04-13

    ... Safety and Health Administration Mine Rescue Teams and Arrangements for Emergency Medical Assistance and... teams for underground coal mines on February 8, 2008. The United Mine Workers of America challenged the... revised its requirements for mine rescue teams for underground coal mines on June 17, 2009. The 2008...

  7. Rescue for sexually abused girls in Costa Rica.

    Treguear, T; Peters, L

    1995-01-01

    In San Jose, Costa Rica, the nongovernmental organization PROCAL has established two rescue homes for sexually abused girls 10-15 years of age. One of these homes is devoted to the care of pregnant girls. In almost all cases, the perpetrator was a male relative. Since girls are taught they must obey older male relatives, they are powerless to stop the abuse. When girls become pregnant as a result of sexual abuse, they face social ostracism and are blamed for their participation in sexual activity. PROCAL counsels the girls that they are victims of their own lack of power and provides them with skills and education they need to return to society and start a new life. The stories of two young girls who became pregnant as a result of sexual abuse and were helped by PROCAL are presented. PMID:12319363

  8. Scene recognition for mine rescue robot localization based on vision

    CUI Yi-an; CAI Zi-xing; WANG Lu

    2008-01-01

    A new scene recognition system was presented based on fuzzy logic and hidden Markov model(HMM) that can be applied in mine rescue robot localization during emergencies. The system uses monocular camera to acquire omni-directional images of the mine environment where the robot locates. By adopting center-surround difference method, the salient local image regions are extracted from the images as natural landmarks. These landmarks are organized by using HMM to represent the scene where the robot is, and fuzzy logic strategy is used to match the scene and landmark. By this way, the localization problem, which is the scene recognition problem in the system, can be converted into the evaluation problem of HMM. The contributions of these skills make the system have the ability to deal with changes in scale, 2D rotation and viewpoint. The results of experiments also prove that the system has higher ratio of recognition and localization in both static and dynamic mine environments.

  9. Financing Corporate Rescues, Where Does the UK Stand?

    Akpareva Aruoriwo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Akpareva Aruoriwo aims to evaluate the adequacy of the framework available for the financing of corporate rescues in the UK. She examines the legal provision made for prioritising creditors who get involved after an insolvency has been declared, with reference to examples from America and Canada. Without post-insolvency funding, companies may find it very difficult to survive, and without protection for post-insolvency creditors, those creditors may not wish to provide this sort of funding. The author examines the arguments for and against this kind of creditor protection, looking at past calls for reforms to the law and the preparedness of the UK to adopt any reforms.

  10. Multi-robot Task Allocation for Search and Rescue Missions

    Many researchers from academia and industry are attracted to investigate how to design and develop robust versatile multi-robot systems by solving a number of challenging and complex problems such as task allocation, group formation, self-organization and much more. In this study, the problem of multi-robot task allocation (MRTA) is tackled. MRTA is the problem of optimally allocating a set of tasks to a group of robots to optimize the overall system performance while being subjected to a set of constraints. A generic market-based approach is proposed in this paper to solve this problem. The efficacy of the proposed approach is quantitatively evaluated through simulation and real experimentation using heterogeneous Khepera-III mobile robots. The results from both simulation and experimentation indicate the high performance of the proposed algorithms and their applicability in search and rescue missions

  11. Robot-Assisted Risky Intervention, Search, Rescue and Environmental Surveillance

    Maki K. Habib

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Technology has become the solution to many long-standing problems, and while current technologies may be effective, it is far from fully addressing the hug, complex, difficult and challenging tasks associated with disaster missions and risky intervention. The challenge is in finding creative, reliable and applicable technical solutions in such highly constrained and uncertain environment. In addition, it is necessary to overcome constrains on resources by developing innovative, cost effective and practical technology. Robotics can play important intelligent and technological roles that support first response equipment in harsh and dangerous environments while replacing rescue personnel from entering unreachable or unsafe places. Robotics solutions that are well adapted to local conditions of unstructured and unknown environment can greatly improve safety and security of personnel as well as work efficiency, productivity and flexibility. Solving and fulfilling the needs of such tasks presents challenges in robotic mechanical structure and mobility, sensors and sensor fusion, autonomous and semi autonomous control, planning and navigation, and machine intelligence. This paper categorizes the source of disasters and associated missions, and highlights the needs for suitable and reliable technology and technical and functional requirements of robotic systems to fulfill task objectives. In addition, it shows that robotic technologies can be used for disasters prevention or early warning, intervention and recovery efforts during disasters with all possible kinds of relevant missions while ensuring quality of service and safety of human beings. Some of these missions may include: demining, search and rescue, surveillance, reconnaissance and risk assessment, evacuation assistance, intrusion/victim detection and assessment, etc.

  12. Fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial outer membrane in rats brown adipose tissue: activation of thermogenesis by Ca2+.

    de Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Benchimol, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria thermogenesis is regulated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP 1), GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we observed fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane with the mitochondrial outer membrane of rats BAT. Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA 1) was identified by immunoelectron microscopy in both ER and mitochondria. This finding led us to test the Ca(2+) effect in BAT mitochondria thermogenesis. We found that Ca(2+) increased the rate of respiration and heat production measured with a microcalorimeter both in coupled and uncoupled mitochondria, but had no effect on the rate of ATP synthesis. The Ca(2+) concentration needed for half-maximal activation varied between 0.08 and 0.11 microM. The activation of respiration was less pronounced than that of heat production. Heat production and ATP synthesis were inhibited by rotenone and KCN. Liver mitochondria have no UCP1 and during respiration synthesize a large amount of ATP, produce little heat, GDP had no effect on mitochondria coupling, Ca(2+) strongly inhibited ATP synthesis and had little or no effect on the small amount of heat released. These finding indicate that Ca(2+) activation of thermogenesis may be a specific feature of BAT mitochondria not found in other mitochondria such as liver. PMID:20209153

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress May Play a Pivotal Role in Lipid Metabolic Disorders in a Novel Mouse Model of Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Zhou, Lingyan; Ding, Shuyan; Li, Yujie; Wang, Laicheng; Chen, Wenbin; Bo, Tao; Wu, Kunpeng; Li, Congcong; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhao, Jiajun; Xu, Chao; Gao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is becoming a global health problem due to its increasing prevalence and potential deleterious effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the lipid metabolic disorders in SCH have not been fully clarified. Additionally, progress in elucidating the exact pathogenesis of SCH has been hampered by the lack of optimized mouse models. Methimazole (MMI) was applied to construct a noninvasive SCH mouse model. Eight-week-old C57BL/6 mice were administrated MMI through the drinking water. After 12 weeks, the MMI-treated mice showed the diagnostic criteria for SCH: increased serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels with constant thyroid hormone levels that persisted for approximately 8 weeks. Notably, SCH mice presented evident lipid metabolic disturbances, including dyslipidemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. Further analysis showed that hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) was induced in the SCH mice or by the elevation of TSH in vitro, likely via the IRE1α/XBP-1 pathway. Interestingly, when we used 4-phenyl butyric acid to repress ER stress in SCH mice for 4 weeks, dyslipidemia and hepatic lipid accumulation were both significantly alleviated. Our findings indicate that an optimized SCH mouse model could be established using MMI, and ER stress may play a pivotal role in the lipid metabolic abnormalities in SCH. PMID:27539723

  14. VAP, a Versatile Access Point for the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Review and analysis of FFAT-like motifs in the VAPome.

    Murphy, Sarah E; Levine, Tim P

    2016-08-01

    Dysfunction of VAMP-associated protein (VAP) is associated with neurodegeneration, both Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. Here we summarize what is known about the intracellular interactions of VAP in humans and model organisms. VAP is a simple, small and highly conserved protein on the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It is the sole protein on that large organelle that acts as a receptor for cytoplasmic proteins. This may explain the extremely wide range of interacting partners of VAP, with components of many cellular pathways binding it to access the ER. Many proteins that bind VAP also target other intracellular membranes, so VAP is a component of multiple molecular bridges at membrane contact sites between the ER and other organelles. So far approximately 100 proteins have been identified in the VAP interactome (VAPome), of which a small minority have a "two phenylalanines in an acidic tract" (FFAT) motif as it was originally defined. We have analyzed the entire VAPome in humans and yeast using a simple algorithm that identifies many more FFAT-like motifs. We show that approximately 50% of the VAPome binds directly or indirectly via the VAP-FFAT interaction. We also review evidence on pathogenesis in genetic disorders of VAP, which appear to arise from reduced overall VAP levels, leading to ER stress. It is not possible to identify one single interaction that underlies disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26898182

  15. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in Alzheimer's disease-assocated neuronal and endothelial dysfunction

    Fernandes, Ana Isabel Plácido

    2015-01-01

    A ativação crónica da resposta a proteínas sem a conformação tridimensional correta induzida pelo stresse do retículo endoplasmático (UPRER, do inglês Unfolded Protein Response e Endoplasmic Reticulum) para além de ser frequentemente associada à disfunção e perda celular é considerada um evento patogénico primordial na doença de Alzheimer (AD, do inglês Alzheimer´s disease). A ativação exagerada da UPRER poderá contribuir para a degenerescência da unidade cerebrovascular (NVU, do inglês Ne...

  16. An Involvement of Oxidative Stress in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Its Associated Diseases

    Bidur Bhandary

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the major site of calcium storage and protein folding. It has a unique oxidizing-folding environment due to the predominant disulfide bond formation during the process of protein folding. Alterations in the oxidative environment of the ER and also intra-ER Ca2+ cause the production of ER stress-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Protein disulfide isomerases, endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin-1, reduced glutathione and mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins also play crucial roles in ER stress-induced production of ROS. In this article, we discuss ER stress-associated ROS and related diseases, and the current understanding of the signaling transduction involved in ER stress.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of atorvastatin against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Jian-wen Yang; Zhi-ping Hu

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers secondary ischemia/reperfusion injury and endoplasmic reticulum stress initiates cell apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the signaling pathway remains unclear. We hypothesize that the regulatory mechanisms are mediated by the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway. To verify this hypothesis, we occluded the middle cere-bral artery in rats to establish focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Results showed that the expression levels of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and caspase-3, as well as the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, were increased after ischemia/reperfusion. Administration of atorvastatin decreased the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, reduced the infarct volume and improved ultrastructure in the rat brain. After salubrinal, the speciifc inhibitor of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α was given into the rats in-tragastrically, the expression levels of caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the were decreased, a reduction of the infarct volume and less ultrastructural damage were observed than the untreated, ischemic brain. However, salubrinal had no impact on the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Experimental ifndings indi-cate that atorvastatin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress and exerts neuroprotective effects. The underlying mechanisms of attenuating ischemia/reperfusion injury are associated with the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α/caspase-3 pathway.

  18. Selective Modulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Markers in Prostate Cancer Cells by a Standardized Mangosteen Fruit Extract

    Gongbo Li; Petiwala, Sakina M.; Dana R Pierce; Larisa Nonn; Jeremy J Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The increased proliferation of cancer cells is directly dependent on the increased activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) machinery which is responsible for protein folding, assembly, and transport. In fact, it is so critical that perturbations in the endoplasmic reticulum can lead to apoptosis. This carefully regulated organelle represents a unique target of cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. In this study, a standardized mangosteen fruit extract (MFE) was evaluated for modulating...

  19. A Cluster of Thin Tubular Structures Mediates Transformation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum to Autophagic Isolation Membrane

    Uemura, Takefumi; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kametaka, Ai; Sou, Yu-shin; Yabashi, Atsuko; Yamada, Akane; Annoh, Hiromichi; Kametaka, Satoshi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Waguri, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings have suggested that the autophagic isolation membrane (IM) might originate from a domain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) called the omegasome. However, the morphological relationships between ER, omegasome, and IM remain unclear. In the present study, we found that hybrid structures composed of a double FYVE domain-containing protein 1 (DFCP1)-positive omegasome and the IM accumulated in Atg3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Moreover, correlative light and elect...

  20. Severe Burn–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Hepatic Damage in Mice

    Song, Juquan; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N; Boehning, Darren; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2009-01-01

    Severe burn injury results in liver dysfunction and damage, with subsequent metabolic derangements contributing to patient morbidity and mortality. On a cellular level, significant postburn hepatocyte apoptosis occurs and likely contributes to liver dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms of hepatocyte apoptosis are poorly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway can lead to hepatocyte apoptosis under conditions of liver dysfun...

  1. Emerging evidence for endoplasmic reticulum stress in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Tanjore, Harikrishna; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2012-01-01

    While the factors that regulate the onset and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are incompletely understood, recent investigations have revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) are prominent in alveolar epithelial cells in this disease. Initial observations linking ER stress and IPF were made in cases of familial interstitial pneumonia (FIP), the familial form of IPF, in a family with a mutation in surfactant protei...

  2. Robust Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Rhodopsin Precedes Retinal Degeneration

    Chiang, WC; Kroeger, H.; Sakami, S; Messah, C; Yasumura, D; Matthes, MT; Coppinger, JA; Palczewski, K; LaVail, MM; Lin, JH

    2014-01-01

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor essential for vision and rod photoreceptor viability. Disease-associated rhodopsin mutations, such as P23H rhodopsin, cause rhodopsin protein misfolding and trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, activating the unfolded protein response (UPR). The pathophysiologic effects of ER stress and UPR activation on photoreceptors are unclear. Here, by examining P23H rhodopsin knock-in mice, we found that th...

  3. Chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by T17M rhodopsin

    Jiang, Haibo; Xiong, Siqi; Xia, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin mutations are associated with the autosomal dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa. T17M mutation in rhodopsin predisposes cells to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induces cell death. This study aimed to examine whether chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate prevents ER stress induced by rhodopsin T17M. Results ARPE-19 cells were transfected with myc-tagged wild-type (WT) and T17M rhodopsin constructs. Turnover of WT and T17M rhodopsin was measured by cycloheximide chas...

  4. Neural dysregulation of peripheral insulin action and blood pressure by brain endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wang, Yi; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was recently revealed to affect hypothalamic neuroendocrine pathways that regulate feeding and body weight. However, it remains unexplored whether brain ER stress could use a neural route to rapidly cause the peripheral disorders that underlie the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the metabolic syndrome. Using a pharmacologic model that delivered ER stress inducer thapsigargin into the brain, this study demonstrated that a short-term brain ER s...

  5. DsbA-L Alleviates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Induced Adiponectin Downregulation

    Zhou, Lijun; Liu, Meilian; Zhang, Jingjing; Chen, Hongzhi; Dong, Lily Q.; Liu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Obesity impairs adiponectin expression, assembly, and secretion, yet the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The aims of this study were 1) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which obesity impairs adiponectin multimerization and stability, and 2) to determine the potential role of disulfide-bond-A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L), a recently identified adiponectin interactive protein that promotes adiponectin multimerization and stability in obesity-induced endoplasmic r...

  6. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidases in Health and Disease: from Infection to Cancer

    Doriana Fruci; Franco Locatelli; Paolo Romania; Silvia Lorenzi; Loredana Cifaldi

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2 (ERAPs) are essential for the maturation of a wide spectrum of proteins involved in various biological processes. In the ER, these enzymes work in concert to trim peptides for presentation on MHC class I molecules. Loss of ERAPs function substantially alters the repertoire of peptides presented by MHC class I molecules, critically affecting recognition of both NK and CD8+ T cells. In addition, these enzymes are ...

  7. The Specificity of Trimming of MHC Class I-Presented Peptides in the Endoplasmic Reticulum1

    Hearn, Arron; Ian A York; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Aminopeptidases in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can cleave antigenic peptides and in so doing either create or destroy MHC class I-presented epitopes. However the specificity of this trimming process overall and of the major ER aminopeptidase ERAP1 in particular is not well understood. This issue is important because peptide trimming influences the magnitude and specificity of CD8 T cell responses. By systematically varying the N-terminal flanking sequences of peptides in a cell free bioche...

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase-1 Functions Regulate Key Aspects of the Innate Immune Response

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Seregin, Sergey S.; Rastall, David P. W.; Charles F Aylsworth; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Busuito, Christopher J.; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Kim, Sungjin; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) is a multifunctional, ubiquitously expressed enzyme whose peptide-trimming role during antigen processing for presentation by MHC I molecules is well established, however, a role for ERAP1 in modulating global innate immune responses has not been described to date. Here we demonstrate that, relative to wild type mice, mice lacking ERAP1 exhibit exaggerated innate immune responses early during pathogen recognition, as characterized by increased ac...

  9. p53 increases MHC class I expression by upregulating the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1

    Wang, Bei; Niu, Dandan; Lai, Liyun; Ren, Ee Chee

    2013-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor has an important role in cancer cells. Here we show that p53 regulates expression of major histocompatibility complex I on the cell surface. We show that the tumour cell line HCT116, which lacks p53 exhibits significantly lower major histocompatibility complex I expression than its wild-type counterpart. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and gene expression analysis, we demonstrate that p53 upregulates expression of endoplasmic reticulum...

  10. Structural insights into the molecular ruler mechanism of the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1

    Amit Gandhi; Damodharan Lakshminarasimhan; Yixin Sun; Hwai-Chen Guo

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) is an essential component of the immune system, because it trims peptide precursors and generates the N--restricted epitopes. To examine ERAP1's unique properties of length- and sequence-dependent processing of antigen precursors, we report a 2.3 Å resolution complex structure of the ERAP1 regulatory domain. Our study reveals a binding conformation of ERAP1 to the carboxyl terminus of a peptide, and thus provides direct evidence for the molecular...

  11. Linking cocaine to endoplasmic reticulum in striatal neurons: role of glutamate receptors

    Choe, Eun Sang; Ahn, Sung Min; Yang, Ju Hwan; Go, Bok Soon; WANG, John Q.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) controls protein folding. Accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an ER stress response to accelerate normal protein folding or if failed to cause apoptosis. The ER stress response is a conserved cellular response in mammalian cells and is sensitive to various physiological or pathophysiological stimuli. Recent studies unravel that this response in striatal neurons is subject to the tight modulation by psychostimulants. Cocaine and amp...

  12. Elimination of endoplasmic reticulum stress and cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic, and other metabolic diseases

    Luoma, Pauli V

    2012-01-01

    Multiple factors including unhealthy living habits influence the life-maintaining functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and induce ER stress and metabolic abnormalities. The ER responds to the disturbances by activating mechanisms that increase the capacity to eliminate ER stress. This article elucidates the effects of ER activation that eliminates both ER stress and associated cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic (DM2), and other metabolic diseases. ER-activating compounds eliminate ER stre...

  13. Proinsulin Misfolding and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress During the Development and Progression of Diabetes1

    Sun, Jinhong; Cui, Jingqiu; He, Qing; Chen, Zheng; Arvan, Peter; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    To maintain copious insulin granule stores in the face of ongoing metabolic demand, pancreatic beta cells must produce large quantities of proinsulin, the insulin precursor. Proinsulin biosynthesis can account for up to 30–50% of total cellular protein synthesis of beta cells. This puts pressure on the beta cell secretory pathway, especially the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where proinsulin undergoes its initial folding, including the formation of three evolutionarily conserved disulfide bonds...

  14. Release of Ca2+ from the Endoplasmic Reticulum Contributes to Ca2+ Signaling in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Wilczynska, Zofia; Happle, Kathrin; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Schlatterer, Christina; Malchow, Dieter; Fisher, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Ca2+ responses to two chemoattractants, folate and cyclic AMP (cAMP), were assayed in Dictyostelium D. discoideum mutants deficient in one or both of two abundant Ca2+-binding proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), calreticulin and calnexin. Mutants deficient in either or both proteins exhibited enhanced cytosolic Ca2+ responses to both attractants. Not only were the mutant responses greater in amplitude, but they also exhibited earlier onsets, faster rise rates, earlier peaks, and faste...

  15. Psychological Stress, Cocaine and Natural Reward Each Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Genes in Rat Brain

    Pavlovsky, Ashly A.; Boehning, Darren; Li, Dingge; Zhang, Yafang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Green, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Our prior research has shown that the transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transcription factors Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) and ATF4 are induced by amphetamine and restraint stress in rat striatum. However, presently it is unknown the full extent of ER stress responses to psychological stress or cocaine, and which of the three ER stress pathways is activated. The current study examines transcriptional responses of key ER stress target genes subsequent to psychologi...

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Is Increased in Adipose Tissue of Women with Gestational Diabetes

    Liong, Stella; Lappas, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are two increasingly common and important obstetric complications that are associated with severe long-term health risks to mothers and babies. IL-1β, which is increased in obese and GDM pregnancies, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of these two pregnancy complications. In non-pregnant tissues, endoplasmic (ER) stress is increased in diabetes and can induce IL-1β via inflammasome activation. The aim of this study was to de...

  17. Biting the Iron Bullet: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Adds the Pain of Hepcidin to Chronic Liver Disease

    Messner, Donald J.; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2010-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that is secreted by the liver and controls body iron homeostasis. Hepcidin overproduction causes anemia of inflammation, whereas its deficiency leads to hemochromatosis. Inflammation and iron are known extracellular stimuli for hepcidin expression. We found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress also induces hepcidin expression and causes hypoferremia and spleen iron sequestration in mice. CREBH (cyclic AMP response element-binding protein H), an ER stress-activa...

  18. Critical Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Cognitive Impairment Induced by Microcystin-LR

    Fei Cai; Jue Liu; Cairong Li; Jianghua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showed that cyanobacteria-derived microcystin-leucine-arginine (MCLR) can cause hippocampal pathological damage and trigger cognitive impairment; but the underlying mechanisms have not been well understood. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of MCLR-induced cognitive deficit; with a focus on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The Morris water maze test and electrophysiological study demonstrated that MCLR caused spatial memory injury in male Wis...

  19. Biochemical, immunological, and immunocytochemical evidence for the association of chalcone synthase with endoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    Hrazdina, G; Zobel, A M; Hoch, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    Chalcone synthase [naringenin-chalcone synthase; malonyl-CoA:4-coumaroyl-CoA malonyltransferase (cyclizing), E.C. 2.3.1.74], the key enzyme of flavonoid pathways that was believed to be soluble, has been localized on ribosome-bearing endoplasmic reticulum membranes in the epidermis of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum M.) hypocotyls. Enzyme activity measurement and immunoblots of buckwheat hypocotyl homogenates that were fractionated on linear sucrose density gradients and developed with a spec...

  20. Exercise copes with prolonged stress-induced impairment of spatial memory performance by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Kang, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study demonstrates that prolonged restraint administration for 21 days caused memory impairment and induced hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis. On the contrary, this change was revered by treadmill running for 8 weeks. Repeated psychological stress caused an increase in escape latency time in the water maze test, accompanied by the induction of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and ...

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Neurodegeneration in Rats Neonatally Infected with Borna Disease Virus

    Williams, B L; Lipkin, W. I.

    2006-01-01

    Borna disease virus infection of neonatal rats results in a characteristic behavioral syndrome and apoptosis of subsets of neurons in the hippocampus and cerebellum (neonatal Borna disease [NBD]). The cellular mechanisms leading to neurodevelopmental damage in NBD have not been fully elucidated. Insights into this model may have general implications for understanding the pathogenesis of virus-associated neurodevelopmental damage. Here we report the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stres...

  2. Interaction between Mitochondria and the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Jaechan Leem; Eun Hee Koh

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are closely associated with β -cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance. Thus, each of these factors contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The accumulated evidence reveals structural and functional communications between mitochondria and the ER. It is now well established that ER stress causes apoptotic cell death by disturbing mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, recent studies have s...

  3. Role of autophagy in diabetes and endoplasmic reticulum stress of pancreatic β-cells

    Quan, Wenying; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin resistance and failure of pancreatic β-cells producing insulin. Autophagy plays a crucial role in cellular homeostasis through degradation and recycling of organelles such as mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we discussed the role of β-cell autophagy in development of diabetes, based on our own studies using mice with β-cell-specific deletion of Atg7 (autophagy-related 7), an important autophagy gene, and studies by others. β...

  4. A Molecular Fluorescent Probe for Targeted Visualization of Temperature at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Satoshi Arai; Sung-Chan Lee; Duanting Zhai; Madoka Suzuki; Young Tae Chang

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of cellular heat production and propagation remains elusive at a subcellular level. Here we report the first small molecule fluorescent thermometer selectively targeting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER thermo yellow), with the highest sensitivity reported so far (3.9%/°C). Unlike nanoparticle thermometers, ER thermo yellow stains the target organelle evenly without the commonly encountered problem of aggregation, and successfully demonstrates the ability to monitor intracellular te...

  5. Mechanisms of Alcohol-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Organ Injuries

    Cheng Ji

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol is readily distributed throughout the body in the blood stream and crosses biological membranes, which affect virtually all biological processes inside the cell. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathological stress responses, part of which is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. ER stress, a condition under which unfolded/misfolded protein accumulates in the ER, contributes to alcoholic disorders of major organs such as liver, pancreas, heart, and brain. Potential...

  6. Study on the Programming Standard for Ecological Rescue in General Land Use Planning

    Bai Wei; Hao Jinmin; Zhang Qiuping

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims at establishing the operation idea based on the analysis of the connotation, principles and reference indexes for programming standard for ecological rescue. The paper puts forward that the programming standard should take into account the natural, social and economic reference indexes, and modifies the scale and distribution of the ecological rescue according to the order of ecological safety, social safety and economic development. The paper suggests that the land planning department should strengthen the study and datum accumulation in order to establish the technology regulations of programming standard of the ecological rescue.

  7. [Model and enlightenment from rescue of August 2nd Kunshan explosion casualty].

    Tan, Q; Qiu, H B; Sun, B W; Shen, Y M; Nie, L J; Zhang, H W

    2016-01-01

    On August 2nd, 2014, a massive dust explosion occurred in a factory of Kunshan, resulting in a mass casualty involving 185 burn patients. They were transported to 20 medical institutions in Jiangsu province and Shanghai. More than one thousand of medical personnel of our country participated in this emergency rescue, and satisfactory results were achieved. In this paper, the characteristics of this accident were analyzed, the positive effects of interdisciplinary cooperation were affirmed, and the contingency plan, rescue process and pattern, and reserve, organization and management of talents during this rescue process were reviewed retrospectively. PMID:27426066

  8. Mission requirements: Skylab rescue mission SL-R

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab Program includes three low earth orbit missions. These missions are designated SL-1/SL-2,SL-3 and SL-4. In addition to the three nominal Skylab missions, the program includes the Skylab Rescue Mission (SL-R). The SL-R mission is designed to provide a safe return of the Skylab crew in the event the Command Service Module (CSM) becomes disabled while docked to the Saturn Workshop (SWS). Mission requirements for the SL-R mission only are presented. SL-R mission configuration will be a CSM (modified with a field installed kit) manned by two crewmen launched on a Saturn IB Launch Vechicle. The SL-R CSM will rendezvous and dock with the SWS (or Orbital Assembly (OA), consisting of the SWS and disabled CSM, if the disabled CSM has not previously been jettisoned). The SWS configuration includes a Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA), Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), Airlock Module (AM), and an S-IVB stage (modified as an Orbital Workshop (OWS), previously launched and inserted into orbit on a two-stage Saturn V Launch Vehicle for the SL-1/SL-2 mission.

  9. Adenosine Amine Congener as a Cochlear Rescue Agent

    Srdjan M. Vlajkovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that adenosine amine congener (ADAC, a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, can ameliorate noise- and cisplatin-induced cochlear injury. Here we demonstrate the dose-dependent rescue effects of ADAC on noise-induced cochlear injury in a rat model and establish the time window for treatment. Methods. ADAC (25–300 μg/kg was administered intraperitoneally to Wistar rats (8–10 weeks old at intervals (6–72 hours after exposure to traumatic noise (8–16 kHz, 110 dB sound pressure level, 2 hours. Hearing sensitivity was assessed using auditory brainstem responses (ABR before and 12 days after noise exposure. Pharmacokinetic studies investigated ADAC concentrations in plasma after systemic (intravenous administration. Results. ADAC was most effective in the first 24 hours after noise exposure at doses >50 μg/kg, providing up to 21 dB protection (averaged across 8–28 kHz. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated a short (5 min half-life of ADAC in plasma after intravenous administration without detection of degradation products. Conclusion. Our data show that ADAC mitigates noise-induced hearing loss in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but further studies are required to establish its translation as a clinical otological treatment.

  10. Performance standards for urban search and rescue robots

    Messina, Elena; Jacoff, Adam

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we describe work in performance standards for urban search and rescue (USAR) robots begun in 2004 by the Department of Homeland Security. This program is being coordinated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and will result in consensus standards developed through ASTM International, under the Operational Equipment Subcommittee of their Homeland Security Committee. The first phase of the program involved definition of requirements by subject matter experts. Responders participated in a series of workshops to identify deployment categories for robots, performance categories, and ranges of acceptable or target performance in the various categories. Over one hundred individual requirements were identified, within main categories such as Human-System Interaction, Logistics, Operating Environment, and System (which includes Chassis, Communications, Mobility, Payload, Power, and Sensing). To ensure that the robot developers and eventual end users work closely together, "responders meet robots" events at situationally relevant sites are being held to refine and extend the performance requirements and develop standard test methods. The results of these standard performance tests will be captured in a compendium of existing and developmental robots with classifications and descriptors to differentiate particular robotic capabilities. This, along with ongoing efforts to categorize situational USAR constraints such as building collapse types or the presence of hazardous materials, will help responders match particular robotic capabilities to response needs. In general, these efforts will enable responders to effectively use robotic tools to enhance their effectiveness while reducing risk to personnel during disasters.

  11. Propagation of elite rescue dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the efficiency of two oocyte activation culture media to produce cloned dogs from an elite rescue dog and to analyze their behavioral tendencies. In somatic cell nuclear transfer procedure, fused couplets were activated by calcium ionophore treatment for 4 min, cultured in two media: modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) with 1.9 mmol/L 6-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) (SOF-DMAP) or porcine zygote medium (PZM-5) with 1.9 mmol/L DMAP (PZM-DMAP) for 4 h, and then were transferred into recipients. After embryo transfer, pregnancy was detected in one out of three surrogate mothers that received cloned embryos from the PZM-DMAP group (33.3%), and one pregnancy (25%) was detected in four surrogate mothers receiving cloned embryos from the SOF-DMAP group. Each pregnant dog gave birth to one healthy cloned puppy by cesarean section. We conducted the puppy aptitude test with two cloned puppies; the two cloned puppies were classified as the same type, accepting humans and leaders easily. The present study indicated that the type of medium used in 6-DMAP culture did not increase in cloning efficiency and dogs cloned using donor cells derived from one elite dog have similar behavioral tendencies. PMID:26387964

  12. Knowledge of Glasgow coma scale by air-rescue physicians

    Heim Catherine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the theoretical and practical knowledge of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS by trained Air-rescue physicians in Switzerland. Methods Prospective anonymous observational study with a specially designed questionnaire. General knowledge of the GCS and its use in a clinical case were assessed. Results From 130 questionnaires send out, 103 were returned (response rate of 79.2% and analyzed. Theoretical knowledge of the GCS was consistent for registrars, fellows, consultants and private practitioners active in physician-staffed helicopters. The clinical case was wrongly scored by 38 participants (36.9%. Wrong evaluation of the motor component occurred in 28 questionnaires (27.2%, and 19 errors were made for the verbal score (18.5%. Errors were made most frequently by registrars (47.5%, p = 0.09, followed by fellows (31.6%, p = 0.67 and private practitioners (18.4%, p = 1.00. Consultants made significantly less errors than the rest of the participating physicians (0%, p Conclusion Although the theoretical knowledge of the GCS by out-of-hospital physicians is correct, significant errors were made in scoring a clinical case. Less experienced physicians had a higher rate of errors. Further emphasis on teaching the GCS is mandatory.

  13. Strategic Step for Environmental Rescue: A Theoretical Legal Studies

    Bambang Sutrisno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is among the developing countries that are struggling to develop in the field of industrial development. The logical consequence of any development process, especially industrial development is the emergence of associated impacts that greatly affect the durability and sustainability of the environment. Developing the equitable industry in order to create public welfare is important. However, maintaining the security and preservation of the environment is also very important, because it is only with the availability of a good environment and healthy living that human beings can perform daily living. The availability of good and healthy environment is the constitutional responsibility of the government, as well as part of the human rights of all citizens which must be given by the State. Efforts to create a good environment and healthy living will be effective if controlled by State government and institutions who understand the objective conditions on the ground. In this regard, the granting of the authority on environmental control to regional government autonomously is the right, very smart policy choice. How To Cite: Sutrisno, B. (2016. Strategic Step for Environmental Rescue: A Theoretical Legal Studies. Rechtsidee, 1(1, 27-58. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21070/jihr.v1i1.98

  14. Fish Health Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. All fresh mortalities larger than 100 mm are sent to Fish Health for...

  15. Fish Culture Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. Raw data on rearing density, loading density, water temperature, ration,...

  16. Production Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. Information on the number of smolts received into the program is...

  17. Broodyear Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. Data is collected by broodyear on % survival to adult, % maturity as two...

  18. 15 CFR 270.202 - Coordination with search and rescue efforts.

    2010-01-01

    ... efforts being undertaken at the site of the building failure, including FEMA urban search and rescue teams, local emergency management agencies, and local emergency response groups. Upon arrival at a...

  19. Wearing properties of flameproof clothing for mine rescue and gas protection personnel

    Mueller, R.; Tejmar, J.

    1981-04-01

    Apart from the safety requirements stated in DIN 23320 for flameproof clothing for mine rescue and gas protection personnel, also the wearing properties of these suits is important. Flameproof suits must be worn either for an 8-hour shift under normal working conditions or for the periods stated in the relevant regulations under unfavourable conditions in order to qualify as flame protection clothing. The wearing characteristics of flameproof suits for mine rescue and gas protection personnel according to DIN 23320 (2) under unfavourable climatic conditions were investigated at the Saar Central Office for Mine Rescue; the flameproof suits Proban, FPT, Nomex, and Pyrovatex were tested. Methods of measurement and criteria of assessment are described in detail. The findings suggest that the Nomex-III suit should be recommended as flameproof suit for mine rescue and gas protection personnel.

  20. Growth Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. The fork length to the nearest mm and weight to the nearest gram of a...

  1. Research on preferences for participation in search and rescue activities: “Akut” search and rescue association sample

    Burak Gürer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Current study aimed to identify why AKUT Search and Rescue (SAR Association Members participate in SAR, specify expectations and examine activities in terms of various demographics. 126 AKUT members (103 male, 23 female participated in the study. Data with .84 reliability coefficient was collected with a survey. Data analysis included frequencies, percentage distribution, t-test and ANOVA. Level of statistical significance was .05. Although results didn’t pinpoint distinctive reasons for participating in SAR, prominent elements affecting members were identified as “Existence of trainers in immediate vicinity” (19% and “Impact of friends/peer groups” (17.5%. Results showed that impact of family (73% was not important but age was. It was also found that single individuals inclined towards SAR to a higher extent. Reasons for continuing activities were “Caring for SAR” (50% and “Awareness of positive contributions” (48.4%. Contributing to financial income was found to have no relationship with SAR (90.5%. No relationship was detected between reasons participating in SAR and demographic characteristics. Expectations from SAR were mostly related to “being a trainer” (53.2%. Expectations and age were found to be related. Younger and single members had higher expectations for being trainers in future. Results showed that volunteerism had important implications in current study.

  2. Dynamics of evolutionary rescue in changing environments and the emergence of antibiotic resistance.

    Wu, Yue; Saddler, Clare A; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2014-01-01

    Populations can go extinct when their environments deteriorate, but evolutionary rescue occurs when a shrinking population adapts to the new environmental conditions. The emergence of resistance from a drug sensitive bacterial population under treatment can be regarded as an instance of evolutionary rescue. Understanding evolutionary rescue in a particular context such as drug resistance requires knowledge of how the environment changes and how selection coefficients change as a result. In this study, we propose a model for evolutionary rescue under three different scenarios of environmental change: abrupt change, periodic fluctuation and gradual decay. The model makes use of the notion of reaction norms to describe fitness values that depend on both genotype and environmental state. We find that although drug sensitive bacterial populations may be large, allowing them to generate resistant mutants frequently, a harsh abrupt change due to the drug usually drives them extinct. Evolutionary rescue occurs far more frequently under the milder forms of environmental change we investigated. Rescue is favoured when the absolute fitnesses of individuals remain sufficiently high over the range of environment qualities experienced by the population. The minimum environment quality, which is inversely related to drug dose in the antibiotic context, is thus an important factor. Interestingly, in the periodic fluctuation model, the inter-dose period is less influential in promoting rescue through resistance unless the minimum environment quality is in a particular range. We also investigated fitness trade-offs across environments including the case of a resistant allele not subject to any trade-off (a "superbug"). This fitness trade-off affects the probability of rescue in decaying environments, but surprisingly has only a weak effect in the periodic fluctuation scenario. Finally, we use the model to show how niche construction, whereby organisms are the source of environmental

  3. Surviving Rescue: A Feminist Reading of Scott O'Dell's "Island of the Blue Dolphins"

    Baecker, Diann L.

    2007-01-01

    Scott O'Dell's "Island of the Blue Dolphins" tells the archetypal story of the young, virgin, orphan girl who is vulnerable to either debauchery or rescue. That such a girl must succumb to either one or the other is a necessary element of the archetype. In O'Dell's work--one intended, after all, for children--the heroine is rescued by a…

  4. Helicopter emergency medical rescue for the traumatized: experience in the metropolitan region of Campinas, Brazil

    Ricardo Galesso Cardoso; Carina Fontana Francischini; Jorge Michel Ribera; Ricardo Vanzetto; Gustavo Pereira Fraga

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the profile of patients served by the air medical rescue system in the Metropolitan Region of Campinas, evaluating: triage and mobilization criteria; response time; on-site care and transport time; invasive procedures performed in the Pre-Hospital Care (PHC); severity of patients; morbidity and mortality. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, descriptive study in which we analyzed medical records of patients rescued between July 2010 and December 2012. During this pe...

  5. Rescue of end fragments of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination in yeast.

    Hermanson, G G; Hoekstra, M F; McElligott, D. L.; Evans, G A

    1991-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) provide a powerful tool for the isolation and mapping of large regions of mammalian chromosomes. We developed a rapid and efficient method for the isolation of DNA fragments representing the extreme ends of YAC clones by the insertion of a rescue plasmid into the YAC vector by homologous recombination. Two rescue vectors were constructed containing a yeast LYS2 selectable gene, a bacterial origin of replication, an antibiotic resistance gene, a polylinker c...

  6. Search and Rescue Operations using a Fixed-Wing UAV Equipped with an Automatically Controlled Gimbal

    Mathisen, Carl Magnus

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of methods to be used in search and rescue operations when using fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with a controllable gimbal, including methods for using the gimbal in an object-tracking scenario. A complete payload system to be used on a wide range of different UAVs has been developed and thoroughly tested. The level of autonomy of the system reduces the need for onsite personnel, and encourages increased effort in the rescue part of the operati...

  7. Pain, health perception and sleep: impact on the quality of life of firefighters/rescue professionals

    Rafael Silva Marconato; Maria Ines Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the quality of life of firefighters and rescue professionals, and characterize their socio-demographic, health, work and lifestyle profile. Methods: cross-sectional study that used a socio-demographic, lifestyle, health, work data questionnaire and the WHOQOL-BREF quality of life aspects, in Fire Department bases, Civil Air Patrol Group of the Military Police and Rescue Group of Emergency Services. Results: ninety professionals participated in this study - 71 firef...

  8. [The principles of aviation support for rescue-evacuation operations in eliminating the consequences of disasters].

    Berezhnov, E S; Golovchits, V N

    1993-01-01

    Analysing practical results of an Air Force participation in liquidation of the earthquake consequences in Armenia, 1988, and after technological catastrophe in Bashkiria, 1989, the authors substantiate the role and significance of air transportation in the system of rescue and evacuation measures, define main tasks for aviation, propose methods for calculation of required number of aircraft and its types. The data cited in this article have formed a basis for the principles of air support during rescue and evacuation procedures. PMID:8484227

  9. Burnout selected members of the Integrated Rescue System in South County

    KUBOUŠEK, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis is concerning on the burnout syndrom in particular parts of integrated rescues system. In the theoretical part of the bachelor's thesis is defined the term of burnout syndrom, its causes, subsequent prevention, support and the treatment. The practical part is focused on findings of burnout syndrom among the components of the integrated rescues system, that is the Police, Fire Brigade and Ambulance Service, using the semi-standardized interview, questionnaire and qulitati...

  10. Rescue Operations in Underground Mass Transport Systems at Fires and Deliberate Attacks

    Kumm, Mia; Palm, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Fire and rescue operations in mass transport systems underground often constitute a great challengefor the first responders. In rush-hour traffic at important junctions thousands of people can be locatedat a relatively small area. At underground fires or deliberate attacks in these premises the need forassistance or rescue can be extensive and the possibilities to reach those in distress are limited. In caseof deliberate attacks with explosives the risk for a second delayed attack, aimed at t...

  11. Gas Concentration Prediction Based on the Measured Data of a Coal Mine Rescue Robot

    Xiliang Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coal mine environment is complex and dangerous after gas accident; then a timely and effective rescue and relief work is necessary. Hence prediction of gas concentration in front of coal mine rescue robot is an important significance to ensure that the coal mine rescue robot carries out the exploration and search and rescue mission. In this paper, a gray neural network is proposed to predict the gas concentration 10 meters in front of the coal mine rescue robot based on the gas concentration, temperature, and wind speed of the current position and 1 meter in front. Subsequently the quantum genetic algorithm optimization gray neural network parameters of the gas concentration prediction method are proposed to get more accurate prediction of the gas concentration in the roadway. Experimental results show that a gray neural network optimized by the quantum genetic algorithm is more accurate for predicting the gas concentration. The overall prediction error is 9.12%, and the largest forecasting error is 11.36%; compared with gray neural network, the gas concentration prediction error increases by 55.23%. This means that the proposed method can better allow the coal mine rescue robot to accurately predict the gas concentration in the coal mine roadway.

  12. Air-Q laryngeal airway for rescue and tracheal intubation.

    Ads, Ayman; Auerbach, Frederic; Ryan, Kelly; El-Ganzouri, Abdel R

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful use of the Air-Q laryngeal airway (Air-Q LA) as a ventilatory device and a conduit for tracheal intubation to rescue the airway in a patient with difficult airway and tracheal stenosis. This is the first case report of the device to secure the airway after two episodes of hypoxemia in the operating room and intensive care unit. Consent for submission of this case report was obtained from our institution's human studies institutional review board given that the patient died a few months after his discharge from the hospital before his personal consent could be obtained and before preparation of this report. All personal identifiers that could lead to his identification have been removed from this report. A 59-year-old man was scheduled for a flexible and rigid bronchoscopy with possible laser excision of tracheal stenosis. He had a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes. Assessment of airway revealed a thyromental distance of 6.5 cm, Mallampati class II, and body weight of 110 kg. He had hoarseness and audible inspiratory/expiratory stridor with Spo2 90% breathing room air. After induction and muscle relaxation, tracheal intubation and flexible bronchoscopy were achieved without incident. The patient was then extubated and a rigid bronchoscopy was attempted but failed with Spo2 dropping to 92%; rocuronium 60 mg was given, and reintubation was accomplished with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. A second rigid bronchoscopy attempt failed, with Spo2 dropping to 63%. Subsequent direct laryngoscopy revealed a bloody hypopharynx. A size 4.5 Air-Q LA was placed successfully and confirmed with capnography, and Spo2 returned to 100%. The airway was suctioned through the Air-Q LA device, and the airway was secured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope to place an endotracheal tube of 7.5-mm internal diameter. The case was canceled because of edema of the upper airway from multiple attempts with rigid bronchoscopy. The patient was transported

  13. Does Folic Acid Supplementation Rescue Defects in ECE-1-Deficient Mouse Embryos?

    Haque, A.; Šaňková, Barbora; Kvasilová, A.; Krejčí, Eliška; Sedmera, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 5 (2014), s. 243-251. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : endothelin-converting enzyme * mice * endothelin 1 * cardiac malformations * endothelin receptor Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  14. Simulations suggest pharmacological methods for rescuing long-term potentiation.

    Smolen, Paul; Baxter, Douglas A; Byrne, John H

    2014-11-01

    Congenital cognitive dysfunctions are frequently due to deficits in molecular pathways that underlie the induction or maintenance of synaptic plasticity. For example, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is due to a mutation in cbp, encoding the histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP). CBP is a transcriptional co-activator for CREB, and induction of CREB-dependent transcription plays a key role in long-term memory (LTM). In animal models of RTS, mutations of cbp impair LTM and late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP). As a step toward exploring plausible intervention strategies to rescue the deficits in LTP, we extended our previous model of LTP induction to describe histone acetylation and simulated LTP impairment due to cbp mutation. Plausible drug effects were simulated by model parameter changes, and many increased LTP. However no parameter variation consistent with a effect of a known drug class fully restored LTP. Thus we examined paired parameter variations consistent with effects of known drugs. A pair that simulated the effects of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (slowing cAMP degradation) concurrent with a deacetylase inhibitor (prolonging histone acetylation) restored normal LTP. Importantly these paired parameter changes did not alter basal synaptic weight. A pair that simulated the effects of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and an acetyltransferase activator was similarly effective. For both pairs strong additive synergism was present. The effect of the combination was greater than the summed effect of the separate parameter changes. These results suggest that promoting histone acetylation while simultaneously slowing the degradation of cAMP may constitute a promising strategy for restoring deficits in LTP that may be associated with learning deficits in RTS. More generally these results illustrate how the strategy of combining modeling and empirical studies may provide insights into the design of effective therapies for improving long-term synaptic

  15. Data Management and Rescue at a State Geological Survey

    Hills, D. J.; McIntyre-Redden, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    As new technologies are developed to utilize data more fully, and as shrinking budgets mean more needs to be done with less, well-documented and discoverable legacy data is vital for continued research and economic growth. Many governmental agencies are mandated to maintain scientific data, and the Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) is no different. As part of the mandate to explore for, characterize, and report Alabama's mineral, energy, water, and biological resources for the betterment of Alabama's citizens, communities, and businesses, the GSA has increasingly been called upon to make our data (including samples) more accessible to stakeholders. The GSA has been involved in several data management, preservation, and rescue projects, including the National Geothermal Data System and the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program. GSA staff utilizes accepted standards for metadata, such as those found at the US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN). Through the use of semi-automated workflows, these standards can be applied to legacy data records. As demand for more detailed information on samples increases, especially so that a researcher can do a preliminary assessment prior to a site visit, it has become critical for the efficiency of the GSA to have better systems in place for sample tracking and data management. Thus, GSA is in the process of registering cores and related samples for International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) through the System for Earth Sample Registration. IGSNs allow the GSA to use asset management software to better curate the physical samples and provide more accurate information to stakeholders. Working with other initiatives, such as EarthCube's iSamples project, will ensure that GSA continues to use best practices and standards for sample identification, documentation, citation, curation, and sharing.

  16. How quantum brain biology can rescue conscious free will.

    Hameroff, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Conscious "free will" is problematic because (1) brain mechanisms causing consciousness are unknown, (2) measurable brain activity correlating with conscious perception apparently occurs too late for real-time conscious response, consciousness thus being considered "epiphenomenal illusion," and (3) determinism, i.e., our actions and the world around us seem algorithmic and inevitable. The Penrose-Hameroff theory of "orchestrated objective reduction (Orch OR)" identifies discrete conscious moments with quantum computations in microtubules inside brain neurons, e.g., 40/s in concert with gamma synchrony EEG. Microtubules organize neuronal interiors and regulate synapses. In Orch OR, microtubule quantum computations occur in integration phases in dendrites and cell bodies of integrate-and-fire brain neurons connected and synchronized by gap junctions, allowing entanglement of microtubules among many neurons. Quantum computations in entangled microtubules terminate by Penrose "objective reduction (OR)," a proposal for quantum state reduction and conscious moments linked to fundamental spacetime geometry. Each OR reduction selects microtubule states which can trigger axonal firings, and control behavior. The quantum computations are "orchestrated" by synaptic inputs and memory (thus "Orch OR"). If correct, Orch OR can account for conscious causal agency, resolving problem 1. Regarding problem 2, Orch OR can cause temporal non-locality, sending quantum information backward in classical time, enabling conscious control of behavior. Three lines of evidence for brain backward time effects are presented. Regarding problem 3, Penrose OR (and Orch OR) invokes non-computable influences from information embedded in spacetime geometry, potentially avoiding algorithmic determinism. In summary, Orch OR can account for real-time conscious causal agency, avoiding the need for consciousness to be seen as epiphenomenal illusion. Orch OR can rescue conscious free will. PMID:23091452

  17. How quantum brain biology can rescue conscious free will

    Stuart Hameroff

    2012-10-01

    OR can rescue conscious free will.

  18. Infectious diseases in dogs rescued during dogfighting investigations.

    Cannon, S H; Levy, J K; Kirk, S K; Crawford, P C; Leutenegger, C M; Shuster, J J; Liu, J; Chandrashekar, R

    2016-05-01

    Dogs used for dogfighting often receive minimal preventive health care, and the potential for spread of infectious diseases is high. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of infectious diseases in dogs rescued from fighting operations to guide medical protocols for their immediate and long-term care. A total of 269 pit bull-type dogs were seized in a multi-state investigation. Fleas were present on most dogs, but few ticks were observed. Testing performed at intake included packed cell volume (PCV), serology and PCR for vector-borne pathogens, and fecal analysis. The most common infections were Babesia gibsoni (39%), 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum' (32%), Mycoplasma haemocanis (30%), Dirofilaria immitis (12%), and Ancylostoma (23%). Anemia was associated with B. gibsoni infection (63% of infected dogs, odds ratio = 2.5, P Ancylostoma. Pit bull heritage and dogfighting are known risk factors for B. gibsoni infection, possibly via blood transmission from bites and vertical transmission. Hemotropic mycoplasmas have a similar risk pattern. Empirical care for dogs from dogfighting cases should include broad-spectrum internal and external parasiticides and monitoring for anemia. Dogfighting case responders should be prepared for mass screening and treatment of B. gibsoni and heartworm infections and should implement protocols to prevent transmission of infectious and zoonotic diseases in the shelter and following adoption. Former fighting dogs and dogs with possible dog bite scars should not be used as blood donors due to the risk of vector-borne pathogens that can escape detection and for which curative treatment is difficult to document. PMID:27056107

  19. Mechanism Based Approaches for Rescuing and Enhancing Cognition

    ChristineMGall

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress towards pharmacological means for enhancing memory and cognition has been retarded by the widely discussed failure of behavioral studies in animals to predict human outcomes. As a result, a number of groups have targeted cognition-related neurobiological mechanisms in animal models, with the assumption that these basic processes are highly conserved across mammals. Here we survey one such approach that begins with a form of synaptic plasticity intimately related to memory encoding in animals and likely operative in humans. An initial section will describe a detailed hypothesis concerning the signaling and structural events (a ‘substrate map’ that convert learning associated patterns of afferent activity into extremely stable increases in fast, excitatory transmission. We next describe results suggesting that all instances of intellectual impairment so far tested in rodent models involve a common endpoint failure in the substrate map. This will be followed by a clinically plausible proposal for obviating the ultimate defect in these models. We then take up the question of whether it is reasonable to expect, from either general principles or a very limited set of experimental results, that enhancing memory will expand the cognitive capabilities of high functioning brains. The final section makes several suggestions about how to improve translation of behavioral results from animals to humans. Collectively, the material covered here points to the following: 1 enhancement, in the sense of rescue, is not an unrealistic possibility for a broad array of neuropsychiatric disorders; 2 serendipity aside, developing means for improving memory in normals will likely require integration of information about mechanisms with new behavioral testing strategies; 3 a shift in emphasis from synapses to networks is a next, logical step in the evolution of the cognition enhancement field.

  20. Research progress of inflammation reaction related to endoplasmic reticulum stress in ischemic endoplasmic reticulum stress%缺血性脑中风中与内质网应激相关炎症反应研究进展

    黄志英; 李韶菁; 张晓旭; 孙文利; 陈畅; 李德凤; 方婧; 付梅红; 刘庆山; 颜天华

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum plays a key role in both basic structure formation and function performance of microenviron-ment. Endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis unbalance caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress has become a hot research topic in recent years. This paper focuses on the role of endoplasmic retic-ulum stress in ischemic stroke. Research progress of related sig-naling pathways were reviewed, especially mechanisms through which endoplasmic reticulum stress trigger the inflammatory reac-tion, so as to provide a new research method for prevention of is-chemic stroke.%内质网是机体微环境的重要组成结构和功能单位,内质网内稳态失衡导致的内质网应激成为近年来的一个研究热点。该文主要针对内质网应激在缺血性脑中风中的作用及相关信号通路的研究进展进行综述,特别对内质网应激触发脑中风炎症反应的机制进行了系统的整理和总结,以期为缺血性中风的防治提供新的研究思路。

  1. Evidence of endoplasmic reticulum stress and liver inflammation in the American mink Neovison vison with benign hepatic steatosis.

    Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Pal, Catherine; Martin, Timothy; Harris, Lora; Astatkie, Tessema; Kryzskaya, Darya; Kärjä, Vesa; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Tammi, Raija; Tammi, Markku; Nieminen, Petteri

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the presence of inflammatory signs in the progression of fatty liver disease induced by fasting. Sixty standard black American mink (Neovison vison) were fasted for 0, 1, 3, 5, or 7 days and one group for 7 days followed by re-feeding for 28 days. Liver sections were evaluated histologically and liver mRNA levels indicating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, adipogenic transformation, and inflammation were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. After 3 days of fasting, the mink had developed moderate liver steatosis. Increased hyaluronan reactivity in lymphocytic foci but no Mallory-Denk bodies were seen in livers of the mink fasted for 5-7 days. Up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein, 78 kDa was observed on day 7 indicating ER stress, especially in the females. Liver lipoprotein lipase and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 mRNA levels increased in response to 5-7 days of food deprivation, while tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was the highest in the mink fasted for 5 days. The expression of the genes of interest, except for TNF-α, correlated with each other and with the liver fat content. The mRNA levels were found to change more rapidly below n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio threshold of 0.15. Following re-feeding, hepatocyte morphology and mRNA abundance returned to pre-fasting levels. Within the studied timeframe, evidence for ER stress, adipogenic transformation, and liver inflammation suggested incipient transition from steatosis to steatohepatitis with potential for development of more severe liver disease. This may present a possibility to influence disease progression before histologically observable steatohepatitis. PMID:25079677

  2. Membrane topology of human monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 and identification of regions important for its localization to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    McFie, Pamela J; Izzard, Sabrina; Vu, Huyen; Jin, Youzhi; Beauchamp, Erwan; Berthiaume, Luc G; Stone, Scot J

    2016-09-01

    Acyl CoA:2-monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT)-2 has an important role in dietary fat absorption in the intestine. MGAT2 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and catalyzes the synthesis of diacylglycerol which is then utilized as a substrate for triacylglycerol synthesis. This triacylglycerol is then incorporated into chylomicrons which are released into the circulation. In this study, we determined the membrane topology of human MGAT2. Protease protection experiments showed that the C-terminus is exposed to the cytosol, while the N-terminus is partially buried in the ER membrane. MGAT2, like murine DGAT2, was found to have two transmembrane domains. We also identified a region of MGAT2 associated with the ER membrane that contains the histidine-proline-histidine-glycine sequence present in all DGAT2 family members that is thought to comprise the active site. Proteolysis experiments demonstrated that digestion of total cellular membranes from cells expressing MGAT2 with trypsin abolished MGAT activity, indicating that domains that are important for catalysis face the cytosol. We also explored the role that the five cysteines residues present in MGAT2 have in catalysis. MGAT activity was sensitive to two thiol modifiers, N-ethylmaleimide and 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). Furthermore, mutation of four cysteines resulted in a reduction in MGAT activity. However, when the C-terminal cysteine (C334) was mutated, MGAT activity was actually higher than that of wild-type FL-MGAT2. Lastly, we determined that both transmembrane domains of MGAT2 are important for its ER localization, and that MGAT2 is present in mitochondrial-associated membranes. PMID:27373844

  3. Brucella suis Vaccine Strain 2 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress that Affects Intracellular Replication in Goat Trophoblast Cells In vitro.

    Wang, Xiangguo; Lin, Pengfei; Li, Yang; Xiang, Caixia; Yin, Yanlong; Chen, Zhi; Du, Yue; Zhou, Dong; Jin, Yaping; Wang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Brucella has been reported to impair placental trophoblasts, a cellular target where Brucella efficiently replicates in association with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ultimately trigger abortion in pregnant animals. However, the precise effects of Brucella on trophoblast cells remain unclear. Here, we describe the infection and replication of Brucella suis vaccine strain 2 (B.suis.S2) in goat trophoblast cells (GTCs) and the cellular and molecular responses induced in vitro. Our studies demonstrated that B.suis.S2 was able to infect and proliferate to high titers, hamper the proliferation of GTCs and induce apoptosis due to ER stress. Tunicamycin (Tm), a pharmacological chaperone that strongly mounts ER stress-induced apoptosis, inhibited B.suis.S2 replication in GTCs. In addition, 4 phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA), a pharmacological chaperone that alleviates ER stress-induced apoptosis, significantly enhanced B.suis.S2 replication in GTCs. The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) chaperone molecule GRP78 also promoted B.suis.S2 proliferation in GTCs by inhibiting ER stress-induced apoptosis. We also discovered that the IRE1 pathway, but not the PERK or ATF6 pathway, was activated in the process. However, decreasing the expression of phosphoIRE1α and IRE1α proteins with Irestatin 9389 (IRE1 antagonist) in GTCs did not affect the proliferation of B.suis.S2. Although GTC implantation was not affected upon B.suis.S2 infection, progesterone secretion was suppressed, and prolactin and estrogen secretion increased; these effects were accompanied by changes in the expression of genes encoding key steroidogenic enzymes. This study systematically explored the mechanisms of abortion in Brucella infection from the viewpoint of pathogen invasion, ER stress and reproductive endocrinology. Our findings may provide new insight for understanding the mechanisms involved in goat abortions caused by Brucella infection. PMID:26904517

  4. Curcumin induces apoptotic cell death of activated human CD4+ T cells via increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Lee, Bong Hee; Ryu, Do Gon; Kwon, Kang Beom; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-03-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, exerts well-known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, the latter which can influence the activation of immune cells including T cells. Furthermore, curcumin can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, through suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The beneficial effects of curcumin in diseases such as arthritis, allergy, asthma, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer may be due to its immunomodulatory properties. We studied the potential of curcumin to modulate CD4+ T cells-mediated autoimmune disease, by examining the effects of this compound on human CD4+ lymphocyte activation. Stimulation of human T cells with PHA or CD3/CD28 induced IL-2 mRNA expression and activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The treatment of T cells with curcumin induced the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway, initiated by the phosphorylation of PERK and IRE1. Furthermore, curcumin increased the expression of the ER stress associated transcriptional factors XBP-1, cleaved p50ATF6α and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in human CD4+ and Jurkat T cells. In PHA-activated T cells, curcumin further enhanced PHA-induced CHOP expression and reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, curcumin treatment induced apoptotic cell death in activated T cells via eliciting an excessive ER stress response, which was reversed by the ER-stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid or transfection with CHOP-specific siRNA. These results suggest that curcumin can impact both ER stress and mitochondria functional pathways, and thereby could be used as a promising therapy in the context of Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:23415873

  5. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in alpha-TEA mediated TRAIL/DR5 death receptor dependent apoptosis.

    Richa Tiwary

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha-TEA (RRR-alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog, a derivative of RRR-alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E exhibits anticancer actions in vitro and in vivo in variety of cancer types. The objective of this study was to obtain additional insights into the mechanisms involved in alpha-TEA induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: alpha-TEA induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress as indicated by increased expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP as well as by enhanced expression or activation of specific markers of ER stress such as glucose regulated protein (GRP78, phosphorylated alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (peIF-2alpha, and spliced XBP-1 mRNA. Knockdown studies using siRNAs to TRAIL, DR5, JNK and CHOP as well as chemical inhibitors of ER stress and caspase-8 showed that: i alpha-TEA activation of DR5/caspase-8 induces an ER stress mediated JNK/CHOP/DR5 positive amplification loop; ii alpha-TEA downregulation of c-FLIP (L protein levels is mediated by JNK/CHOP/DR5 loop via a JNK dependent Itch E3 ligase ubiquitination that further serves to enhance the JNK/CHOP/DR5 amplification loop by preventing c-FLIP's inhibition of caspase-8; and (iii alpha-TEA downregulation of Bcl-2 is mediated by the ER stress dependent JNK/CHOP/DR5 signaling. CONCLUSION: Taken together, ER stress plays an important role in alpha-TEA induced apoptosis by enhancing DR5/caspase-8 pro-apoptotic signaling and suppressing anti-apoptotic factors c-FLIP and Bcl-2 via ER stress mediated JNK/CHOP/DR5/caspase-8 signaling.

  6. The involvement of SMILE/TMTC3 in endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    Maud Racapé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The state of operational tolerance has been detected sporadically in some renal transplanted patients that stopped immunosuppressive drugs, demonstrating that allograft tolerance might exist in humans. Several years ago, a study by Brouard et al. identified a molecular signature of several genes that were significantly differentially expressed in the blood of such patients compared with patients with other clinical situations. The aim of the present study is to analyze the role of one of these molecules over-expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients, SMILE or TMTC3, a protein whose function is still unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first confirmed that SMILE mRNA is differentially expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients with drug-free long term graft function compared to stable and rejecting patients. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach and a colocalization study by confocal microscopy we furthermore report an interaction of SMILE with PDIA3, a molecule resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In accordance with this observation, SMILE silencing in HeLa cells correlated with the modulation of several transcripts involved in proteolysis and a decrease in proteasome activity. Finally, SMILE silencing increased HeLa cell sensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a drug that induces ER stress via protein overload, and increased transcript expression of a stress response protein, XBP-1, in HeLa cells and keratinocytes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study we showed that SMILE is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, by modulating proteasome activity and XBP-1 transcript expression. This function of SMILE may influence immune cell behavior in the context of transplantation, and the analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress in transplantation may reveal new pathways of regulation in long-term graft acceptance thereby increasing our understanding of tolerance.

  7. The Endoplasmic Reticulum of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Contains Functional TRPV1 Channels*

    Gallego-Sandín, Sonia; Rodríguez-García, Arancha; Alonso, María Teresa; García-Sancho, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a plasma membrane Ca2+ channel involved in transduction of painful stimuli. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons express ectopic but functional TRPV1 channels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (TRPV1ER). We have studied the properties of TRPV1ER in DRG neurons and HEK293T cells expressing TRPV1. Activation of TRPV1ER with capsaicin or other vanilloids produced an increase of cytosolic Ca2+ due to Ca2+ release from the ER. The decrease of ...

  8. Apolipoprotein E4 Domain Interaction Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Impairs Astrocyte Function*

    Zhong, Ning; Ramaswamy, Gayathri; Weisgraber, Karl H.

    2009-01-01

    Domain interaction, a structural property of apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), is predicted to contribute to the association of apoE4 with Alzheimer disease. Arg-61 apoE mice, a gene-targeted mouse model specific for domain interaction, have lower brain apoE levels and synaptic, functional, and cognitive deficits. We hypothesized that domain interaction elicits an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes and an unfolded protein response that targets Arg-61 apoE for degradation. Primary Arg-61...

  9. Ribosome binding sites visualized on freeze-fractured membranes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    1980-01-01

    Freeze-fracture micrographs of cells of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata stabilized by ultrarapid freezing reveal imprints of polysomes on the rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. The imprints appear as broad, spiral ridges on the P faces and as corresponding wide grooves on the E faces of the membranes. Distinct 110-A particles with a spacing of 270 +/- 45 A are associated with the P-face ridges. Where imprints of individual ribosomes can be discerned, it is seen that there is a 1:1...

  10. Survival and death of endoplasmic-reticulum-stressed cells:Role of autophagy

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in ER stress, which subsequently activates the unfolded protein response that induces a transcriptional program to alleviate the stress. Another cellular process that is activated during ER stress is autophagy, a mechanism of enclosing intracellular compo- nents in a double-membrane autophagosome, and then delivering it to the lysosome for degradation. Here, we discuss the role of autophagy in cellular response to ER stress, the signaling pathways linking ER stress to autophagy, and the possible implication of modulating autophagy in treatment of diseases such as cancer.

  11. ERp57 Modulates STAT3 Signaling from the Lumen of the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    Coe, Helen; Jung, Joanna; Groenendyk, Jody; Prins, Daniel; Michalak, Marek

    2009-01-01

    ERp57 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident thiol disulfide oxidoreductase. Using the gene trap technique, we created a ERp57-deficient mouse model. Targeted deletion of the Pdia3 gene, which encodes ERp57, in mice is embryonic lethal at embryonic day (E) 13.5. β-Galactosidase reporter gene analysis revealed that ERp57 is expressed early on during blastocyst formation with the highest expression in the inner cell mass. In early stages of mouse embryonic development (E11.5) there is a rela...

  12. Selenoprotein S/SEPS1 Modifies Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Z Variant α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency*

    Kelly, Emer; Catherine M. Greene; Carroll, Tomás P; Noel G. McElvaney; O'Neill, Shane J

    2009-01-01

    Z α1-antitrypsin (ZAAT) deficiency is a disease associated with emphysematous lung disease and also with liver disease. The liver disease of AAT deficiency is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. SEPS1 is a selenoprotein that, through a chaperone activity, decreases ER stress. To determine the effect of SEPS1 on ER stress in ZAAT deficiency, we measured activity of the grp78 promoter and levels of active ATF6 as markers of the unfolded protein response in HepG2 cells transfected...

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced in the human placenta during labour

    Veerbeek, J. H. W.; Tissot van Patot, M C; Burton, G J; Yung, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), but its activation remains elusive. Oxidative stress induced by ischaemia/hypoxia-reoxygenation activates ER stress in vitro. Here, we explored whether exposure to labour represents an in vivo model for the study of acute placental ER stress. ER stress markers, GRP78, P-eIF2α and XBP-1, were significantly higher in laboured placentas than in ...

  14. ATP increases within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum upon intracellular Ca2+ release

    Vishnu, Neelanjan; Jadoon Khan, Muhammad; Karsten, Felix; Groschner, Lukas N.; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Rost, Rene; Hallström, Seth; Imamura, Hiromi; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Multiple functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) essentially depend on ATP within this organelle. However, little is known about ER ATP dynamics and the regulation of ER ATP import. Here we describe real-time recordings of ER ATP fluxes in single cells using an ER-targeted, genetically encoded ATP sensor. In vitro experiments prove that the ATP sensor is both Ca2+ and redox insensitive, which makes it possible to monitor Ca2+-coupled ER ATP dynamics specifically. The approach uncovers a c...

  15. The Emp24 complex recruits a specific cargo molecule into endoplasmic reticulum-derived vesicles

    Muniz, M.; Nuoffer, C; Hauri, H P; Riezman, H

    2000-01-01

    Members of the yeast p24 family, including Emp24p and Erv25p, form a heteromeric complex re- quired for the efficient transport of selected proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi ap- paratus. The specific functions and sites of action of this complex are unknown. We show that Emp24p is di- rectly required for efficient packaging of a lumenal cargo protein, Gas1p, into ER-derived vesicles. Emp24p and Erv25p can be directly cross-linked to Gas...

  16. Role of Sec24 isoforms in selective export of membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum

    Wendeler, Markus W; Paccaud, Jean-Pierre; Hauri, Hans-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Sec24 of the COPII (coat protein complex II) vesicle coat mediates the selective export of membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast. Human cells express four Sec24 isoforms, but their role is unknown. Here, we report the differential effects of Sec24 isoform-specific silencing on the transport of the membrane reporter protein ERGIC-53 (ER–Golgi intermediate compartment-53) carrying the cytosolic ER export signals di-phenylalanine, di-tyrosine, di-leucine, di-isoleucine, ...

  17. Environmental enrichment rescues memory in mice deficient for the polysialytransferase ST8SiaIV.

    Zerwas, Meike; Trouche, Stéphanie; Richetin, Kevin; Escudé, Timothé; Halley, Hélène; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Verret, Laure; Rampon, Claire

    2016-04-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM and its association with the polysialic acid (PSA) are believed to contribute to brain structural plasticity that underlies memory formation. Indeed, the attachment of long chains of PSA to the glycoprotein NCAM down-regulates its adhesive properties by altering cell-cell interactions. In the brain, the biosynthesis of PSA is catalyzed by two polysialyltransferases, which are differentially regulated during lifespan. One of them, ST8SiaIV (PST), is predominantly expressed during adulthood whereas the other one, ST8SiaII (STX), dominates during embryonic and post-natal development. To understand the role played by ST8SiaIV during learning and memory and its underlying hippocampal plasticity, we used knockout mice deleted for the enzyme ST8SiaIV (PST-ko mice). At adult age, PST-ko mice show a drastic reduction of PSA-NCAM expression in the hippocampus and intact hippocampal adult neurogenesis. We found that these mice display impaired long-term but not short-term memory in both, spatial and non-spatial behavioral tasks. Remarkably, memory deficits of PST-ko mice were abolished by exposure to environmental enrichment that was also associated with an increased number of PSA-NCAM expressing new neurons in the dentate gyrus of these mice. Whether the presence of a larger pool of immature, likely plastic, new neurons favored the rescue of long-term memory in PST-ko mice remains to be determined. Our findings add new evidence to the role played by PSA in memory consolidation. They also suggest that PSA synthesized by PST critically controls the tempo of new neurons maturation in the adult hippocampus. PMID:25596866

  18. Transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) among cohabiting cats in two cat rescue shelters.

    Litster, Annette L

    2014-08-01

    Conflicting accounts have been published in the veterinary literature regarding transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) between cohabiting cats in mixed households, and the mechanics of possible casual transmission, if it occurs, are poorly understood. Similarly, there are conflicting reports of vertical transmission of FIV. The aim of the present study was to document the FIV serological status of cats taken into two rescue shelters. At rescue shelter 1 (Rescue 1), cats cohabited in a multi-cat household of FIV-negative and naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats. A study was performed that combined a retrospective review of records of FIV serological status at intake (Test 1) and prospective FIV serological testing (Tests 2 and 3). Retrospective records were analyzed at rescue shelter 2 (Rescue 2), where FIV-positive queens with litters of nursing kittens were taken into the shelter, before being rehomed. FIV serology was performed on all kittens after weaning. Initial test results (Test 1) for 138 cohabiting cats from Rescue 1 showed that there were 130 FIV-negative cats and eight FIV-positive cats (six male neutered and two female spayed). A second test (Test 2), performed in 45 of the FIV-negative and five of the FIV-positive cats at median 28 months after Test 1 (range, 1 month to 8.8 years) showed that results were unchanged. Similarly, a third test (Test 3), performed in four of the original FeLV-negative cats and one remaining FIV-positive cat at median 38 months after Test 1 (range, 4 months to 4 years), also showed that results were unchanged. These results show a lack of evidence of FIV transmission, despite years of exposure to naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats in a mixed household. At Rescue 2, records were available from five FIV-positive queens with 19 kittens. All 19 kittens tested FIV-negative, suggesting that vertical transmission had not occurred. PMID:24698667

  19. Inhibition of IRAK-4 activity for rescuing endotoxin LPS-induced septic mortality in mice by lonicerae flos extract

    Park, Sun Hong; Roh, Eunmiri [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo [Pharmaceutical R and D Center, Huons Co., Ltd., Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung-Il [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Nam Song [Pharmaceutical R and D Center, Huons Co., Ltd., Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Narae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Han, Sang-Bae [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngsoo, E-mail: youngsoo@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate, Phase I for sepsis treatment. •Here, HS-23 or its major constituents rescued LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. •As a mechanism, they directly inhibited IRAK-4-catalyzed kinase activity. •Thus, they suppressed LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes. -- Abstract: Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate currently undergoing Phase I trial in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected healthy human volunteers, but its molecular basis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated protective effects of HS-23 or its major constituents on Escherichia coli LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. Intravenous treatment with HS-23 rescued LPS-intoxicated C57BL/6J mice under septic conditions, and decreased the levels of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) in the blood. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) and its isomers were assigned as major constituents of HS-23 in the protection against endotoxemia. As a molecular mechanism, HS-23 or CGA isomers inhibited endotoxin LPS-induced autophosphorylation of the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) in mouse peritoneal macrophages as well as the kinase activity of IRAK-4 in cell-free reactions. HS-23 consequently suppressed downstream pathways critical for LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB or activating protein 1 (AP-1) in the peritoneal macrophages. HS-23 also inhibited various toll-like receptor agonists-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, and down-regulated LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes in the cells. Taken together, HS-23 or CGA isomers exhibited anti-inflammatory therapy against LPS-induced septic mortality in mice, at least in part, mediated through the inhibition of IRAK-4.

  20. Rescuing Food from the Organics Waste Stream to Feed the Food Insecure: An Economic and Environmental Assessment of Australian Food Rescue Operations Using Environmentally Extended Waste Input-Output Analysis

    Christian John Reynolds; Julia Piantadosi; John Boland

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the economic and environmental efficiency of charities and NGO’s “rescuing†food waste, using a 2008 case study of food rescue organisations in Australia. We quantify the tonnages, costs, and environmental impact of food rescued, and then compare food rescue to other food waste disposal methods composting and landfill. To our knowledge this is the first manuscript to comprehend the psychical flows of charity within an Input-Output framework—treating the cha...

  1. Effects of a Sublethal and Transient Stress of the Endoplasmic Reticulum on the Mitochondrial Population.

    Vannuvel, Kayleen; Van Steenbrugge, Martine; Demazy, Catherine; Ninane, Noëlle; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Fransolet, Maude; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria are not discrete intracellular organelles but establish close physical and functional interactions involved in several biological processes including mitochondrial bioenergetics, calcium homeostasis, lipid synthesis, and the regulation of apoptotic cell death pathways. As many cell types might face a transient and sublethal ER stress during their lifetime, it is thus likely that the adaptive UPR response might affect the mitochondrial population. The aim of this work was to study the putative effects of a non-lethal and transient endoplasmic reticulum stress on the mitochondrial population in HepG2 cells. The results show that thapsigargin and brefeldin A, used to induce a transient and sublethal ER stress, rapidly lead to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network associated with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, O2 (•-) production and less efficient respiration. These changes in mitochondrial function are transient and preceded by the phosphorylation of JNK. Inhibition of JNK activation by SP600125 prevents the decrease in O2 (•-) production and the mitochondrial network fragmentation observed in cells exposed to the ER stress but has no impact on the reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, our data show that a non-lethal and transient ER stress triggers a rapid activation of JNK without inducing apoptosis, leading to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and a reduction of O2 (•-) production. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1913-1931, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26680008

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2

    The luminal domain of human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212 and diffracted anisotropically to 3.3 Å resolution in the best direction on an in-house source. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) is a critical enzyme involved in the final processing of MHC class I antigens. Peptide trimming by ERAP2 and the other members of the oxytocinase subfamily is essential to customize longer precursor peptides in order to fit them to the correct length required for presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. While recent structures of ERAP1 have provided an understanding of the ‘molecular-ruler’ mechanism of substrate selection, little is known about the complementary activities of its homologue ERAP2 despite their sharing 49% sequence identity. In order to gain insights into the structure–function relationship of the oxytocinase subfamily, and in particular ERAP2, the luminal region of human ERAP2 has been crystallized in the presence of the inhibitor bestatin. The crystals belonged to an orthorhombic space group and diffracted anisotropically to 3.3 Å resolution in the best direction on an in-house X-ray source. A molecular-replacement solution suggested that the enzyme has adopted the closed state as has been observed in other inhibitor-bound aminopeptidase structures

  3. Methods for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response.

    Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  4. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury.

    Folch-Puy, Emma; Panisello, Arnau; Oliva, Joan; Lopez, Alexandre; Castro Benítez, Carlos; Adam, René; Roselló-Catafau, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), which comprises cellular mechanisms for adaptation and the safeguarding of cell survival or, in cases of excessively severe stress, for the initiation of the cell death program. Recent experimental data suggest the involvement of ERS in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) of the liver graft, which has been considered as one of major problems influencing outcome after liver transplantation. The purpose of this review is to summarize updated data on the molecular mechanisms of ERS/UPR and the consequences of this pathology, focusing specifically on solid organ preservation and liver transplantation models. We will also discuss the potential role of ERS, beyond the simple adaptive response and the regulation of cell death, in the modification of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes. PMID:27231901

  5. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    Emma Folch-Puy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS. This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR, which comprises cellular mechanisms for adaptation and the safeguarding of cell survival or, in cases of excessively severe stress, for the initiation of the cell death program. Recent experimental data suggest the involvement of ERS in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI of the liver graft, which has been considered as one of major problems influencing outcome after liver transplantation. The purpose of this review is to summarize updated data on the molecular mechanisms of ERS/UPR and the consequences of this pathology, focusing specifically on solid organ preservation and liver transplantation models. We will also discuss the potential role of ERS, beyond the simple adaptive response and the regulation of cell death, in the modification of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes.

  6. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Sanvito, Rossella; Magni, Fulvio; Coccetti, Paola; Rocchetti, Marcella; Nielsen, Jens; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully regulated to safeguard the correct folding and processing of secretory proteins. By using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that calcium shortage leads to a slowdown of cell growth and metabolism. Accumulation of unfolded proteins within the calcium-depleted lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) and generates a state of oxidative stress that decreases cell viability. These effects are severe during growth on rapidly fermentable carbon sources and can be mitigated by decreasing the protein synthesis rate or by inducing cellular respiration. Calcium homeostasis, protein biosynthesis and the unfolded protein response are tightly intertwined and the consequences of facing calcium starvation are determined by whether cellular energy production is balanced with demands for anabolic functions. Our findings confirm that the connections linking disturbance of ER calcium equilibrium to ER stress and UPR signaling are evolutionary conserved and highlight the crucial role of metabolism in modulating the effects induced by calcium shortage. PMID:27305947

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Hippocampal Neuron Apoptosis Involved in Diabetic Cognitive Impairment

    Xiaoming Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor management of DM causes cognitive impairment while the mechanism is still unconfirmed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activation of C/EBP Homology Protein (CHOP, the prominent mediator of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-induced apoptosis under hyperglycemia. We employed streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats to explore the ability of learning and memory by the Morris water maze test. The ultrastructure of hippocampus in diabetic rats and cultured neurons in high glucose medium were observed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. TUNEL staining was also performed to assess apoptotic cells while the expression of CHOP was assayed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay in these hippocampal neurons. Six weeks after diabetes induction, the escape latency increased and the average frequency in finding the platform decreased in diabetic rats (P<0.05. The morphology of neuron and synaptic structure was impaired; the number of TUNEL-positive cells and the expression of CHOP in hippocampus of diabetic rats and high glucose medium cultured neurons were markedly altered (P<0.05. The present results suggested that the CHOP-dependent endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-mediated apoptosis may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced hippocampal synapses and neurons impairment and promote the diabetic cognitive impairment.

  8. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  9. Ensemble-based computational approach discriminates functional activity of p53 cancer and rescue mutants.

    Özlem Demir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor protein p53 can lose its function upon single-point missense mutations in the core DNA-binding domain ("cancer mutants". Activity can be restored by second-site suppressor mutations ("rescue mutants". This paper relates the functional activity of p53 cancer and rescue mutants to their overall molecular dynamics (MD, without focusing on local structural details. A novel global measure of protein flexibility for the p53 core DNA-binding domain, the number of clusters at a certain RMSD cutoff, was computed by clustering over 0.7 µs of explicitly solvated all-atom MD simulations. For wild-type p53 and a sample of p53 cancer or rescue mutants, the number of clusters was a good predictor of in vivo p53 functional activity in cell-based assays. This number-of-clusters (NOC metric was strongly correlated (r(2 = 0.77 with reported values of experimentally measured ΔΔG protein thermodynamic stability. Interpreting the number of clusters as a measure of protein flexibility: (i p53 cancer mutants were more flexible than wild-type protein, (ii second-site rescue mutations decreased the flexibility of cancer mutants, and (iii negative controls of non-rescue second-site mutants did not. This new method reflects the overall stability of the p53 core domain and can discriminate which second-site mutations restore activity to p53 cancer mutants.

  10. Search and Rescue Operations of Aircraft in Africa: Some Compelling Issues

    Abeyratne, Ruwantissa I. R.

    2002-01-01

    The world aviation community has felt the compelling need for a well-coordinated global programme for search and rescue operations of aircraft ever since commercial aviation was regulated in 1944. Guidelines and plans of action for search and rescue have therefore been considered critical in the event of an aircraft accident. This fact is eminently brought to bear in the continental regions of Africa and South America in particular, where vast expanses of land are still uninhabited or sparsely populated and controlled flight into terrain (CFIT-where an aircraft may crash on land while still under the control of technical crew) is a common occurrence. There are numerous guidelines that have been adopted under the umbrella of the International Civil Aviation Organization which are already in place for the provision of search and rescue operations pertaining to aircraft. However, when an accident occurs in the territory of a State, there are sensitivities involving the State in which the aircraft concerned was registered and issues of sovereignty which have to be considered. Additionally. issues such as the voluntary nature of the search and rescue services offered. confidentiality, timeliness of such operations, fairness and uniformity all play a critical role. This article addresses the issue of search and rescue operations in Africa and examines in some detail where the world aviation community is right now and where it is headed in this important field of human endeavour.

  11. Persistent organic pollutants in 9/11 World Trade Center rescue workers

    Dahlgren, J. [UCLA School of Medicine, CA (United States); Schecter, A. [Univ. of Texas School of Public Health, Dallas, TX (United States); Takhar, H. [Comprehensive Health Screening Services, Santa Monica, CA (United States); Paepke, O. [ERGO Lab., Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Rescue workers, including firefighters present at the World Trade Center (WTC) following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks were exposed to large quantities of dust, smoke and fumes from the collapse and fire. The fire at the WTC site burned for months. Firefighters, paramedics, police and other personnel labored for weeks and months in the immediate vicinity of the WTC. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) was not available or was ineffective in preventing the rescue workers from absorbing contaminants. This is based on the rescue workers who reported working without any protection from inhalation, ingestion or dermal exposure to the contaminants. In addition many of the rescue workers developed coughs, headaches, memory disturbance and other symptoms while working on the site. USEPA measurements of benzene, dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were elevated in the air in the weeks after the collapse. Dioxins slowly returned to normal background levels after three months. The New York (NY) Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) analyzed dust/ash samples collected close to the WTC site after September 11, 2001. The purpose of this study was to characterize body burdens of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated dioxins (PCDDs) from 11 rescue workers who worked at the WTC the day of the collapse and afterwards.

  12. Complex alpine extrication: case report of mountain and speleological rescue cooperation.

    Sette, Piersandro; Carlini, Mauro; Berti, Damiano; Rucci, Igor; Marchiori, Francesco; Toffali, Fausto; Schonsberg, Alberto; Ricci, Giorgio; Tardivo, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Mountain sporting activities are an increasingly popular practice that exposes mountaineers to a high risk of adverse events. This report describes a unique case of recovery in an austere environment that involved explosives. In June 2012, a 52-year-old man ascended a cliff tower in the Eastern Alps, Italy. A landslide occurred, and a boulder crushed the climber against a large stone located farther down the cliff, causing compression of the lower limbs and the pelvis with consequent severe musculoskeletal trauma. The National Alpine and Cave Rescue Unit (NACRU) arrived and proceeded with stabilization of the injured climber, which took 6 hours and involved a difficult extrication supported by the Cave Rescue division of NACRU. Unfortunately, during transport to the trauma center of Borgo Trento, Verona, the patient exhibited signs of progressive traumatic shock because of crush syndrome, hypovolemia, and acidosis, which led to cardiac arrest and death. Based on an extensive literature review, this report was determined to be the only one of a mountain rescue using explosives for the extrication of a victim in the Northeast Italian Alps. This case describes how a rescue in austere environments can represent a high-risk situation, and it shows how improvisation and cooperation between rescue teams are crucial for a successful recovery. PMID:25747541

  13. ERO1-independent production of H2O2 within the endoplasmic reticulum fuels Prdx4-mediated oxidative protein folding

    Konno, Tasuku; Pinho Melo, Eduardo; Lopes, Carlos; Mehmeti, Ilir; Lenzen, Sigurd; Ron, David; Avezov, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–localized peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4) supports disulfide bond formation in eukaryotic cells lacking endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (ERO1). The source of peroxide that fuels PRDX4-mediated disulfide bond formation has remained a mystery, because ERO1 is believed to be a major producer of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the ER lumen. We report on a simple kinetic technique to track H2O2 equilibration between cellular compartments, suggesting that the ER is relatively iso...

  14. Maternal nicotine exposure leads to impaired disulfide bond formation and augmented endoplasmic reticulum stress in the rat placenta.

    Michael K Wong

    Full Text Available Maternal nicotine exposure has been associated with many adverse fetal and placental outcomes. Although underlying mechanisms remain elusive, recent studies have identified that augmented endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is linked to placental insufficiency. Moreover, ER function depends on proper disulfide bond formation--a partially oxygen-dependent process mediated by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI and ER oxidoreductases. Given that nicotine compromised placental development in the rat, and placental insufficiency has been associated with poor disulfide bond formation and ER stress, we hypothesized that maternal nicotine exposure leads to both placental ER stress and impaired disulfide bond formation. To test this hypothesis, female Wistar rats received daily subcutaneous injections of either saline (vehicle or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg for 14 days prior to mating and during pregnancy. Placentas were harvested on embryonic day 15 for analysis. Protein and mRNA expression of markers involved in ER stress (e.g., phosphorylated eIF2α, Grp78, Atf4, and CHOP, disulfide bond formation (e.g., PDI, QSOX1, VKORC1, hypoxia (Hif1α, and amino acid deprivation (GCN2 were quantified via Western blot and/or Real-time PCR. Maternal nicotine exposure led to increased expression of Grp78, phosphorylated eIF2α, Atf4, and CHOP (p<0.05 in the rat placenta, demonstrating the presence of augmented ER stress. Decreased expression of PDI and QSOX1 (p<0.05 reveal an impaired disulfide bond formation pathway, which may underlie nicotine-induced ER stress. Finally, elevated expression of Hif1α and GCN2 (p<0.05 indicate hypoxia and amino acid deprivation in nicotine-exposed placentas, respectively, which may also cause impaired disulfide bond formation and augmented ER stress. This study is the first to link maternal nicotine exposure with both placental ER stress and disulfide bond impairment in vivo, providing novel insight into the mechanisms underlying

  15. LysoPC acyltransferase/PC transacylase activities in plant plasma membrane and plasma membrane-associated endoplasmic reticulum

    Tjellström Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phospholipids of the plant plasma membrane are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The majority of these lipids reach the plasma membrane independently of the secretory vesicular pathway. Phospholipid delivery to the mitochondria and chloroplasts of plant cells also bypasses the secretory pathway and here it has been proposed that lysophospholipids are transported at contact sites between specific regions of the ER and the respective organelle, followed by lysophospholipid acylation in the target organelle. To test the hypothesis that a corresponding mechanism operates to transport phospholipids to the plasma membrane outside the secretory pathway, we investigated whether lysolipid acylation occurs also in the plant plasma membrane and whether this membrane, like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, is in close contact with the ER. Results The plant plasma membrane readily incorporated the acyl chain of acyl-CoA into phospholipids. Oleic acid was preferred over palmitic acid as substrate and acyl incorporation occurred predominantly into phosphatidylcholine (PC. Phospholipase A2 stimulated the reaction, as did exogenous lysoPC when administered in above critical micellar concentrations. AgNO3 was inhibitory. The lysophospholipid acylation reaction was higher in a membrane fraction that could be washed off the isolated plasma membranes after repeated freezing and thawing cycles in a medium with lowered pH. This fraction exhibited several ER-like characteristics. When plasma membranes isolated from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing green fluorescent protein in the ER lumen were observed by confocal microscopy, membranes of ER origin were associated with the isolated plasma membranes. Conclusion We conclude that a lysoPC acylation activity is associated with plant plasma membranes and cannot exclude a PC transacylase activity. It is highly plausible that the enzyme(s resides in a fraction of the ER, closely

  16. Austrian Daily Climate Data Rescue and Quality Control

    Jurkovic, A.; Lipa, W.; Adler, S.; Albenberger, J.; Lechner, W.; Swietli, R.; Vossberg, I.; Zehetner, S.

    2010-09-01

    Checked climate datasets are a "conditio sine qua non" for all projects that are relevant for environment and climate. In the framework of climate change studies and analysis it is essential to work with quality controlled and trustful data. Furthermore these datasets are used as input for various simulation models. In regard to investigations of extreme events, like strong precipitation periods, drought periods and similar ones we need climate data in high temporal resolution (at least in daily resolution). Because of the historical background - during Second World War the majority of our climate sheets were sent to Berlin, where the historical sheets were destroyed by a bomb attack and so important information got lost - only several climate sheets, mostly duplicates, before 1939 are available and stored in our climate data archive. In 1970 the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics in Vienna started a first attempt to digitize climate data by means of punch cards. With the introduction of a routinely climate data quality control in 1984 we can speak of high-class-checked daily data (finally checked data, quality flag 6). Our group is working on the processing of digitization and quality control of the historical data for the period 1872 to 1983 for 18 years. Since 2007 it was possible to intensify the work (processes) in the framework of an internal project, namely Austrian Climate Data Rescue and Quality Control. The aim of this initiative was - and still is - to supply daily data in an outstanding good and uniform quality. So this project is a kind of pre-project for all scientific projects which are working with daily data. In addition to routine quality checks (that are running since 1984) using the commercial Bull Software we are testing our data with additional open source software, namely ProClim.db. By the use of this spatial and statistical test procedure, the elements air temperature and precipitation - for several sites in Carinthia - could

  17. A Stem Cell-rescue Operation in a Nuclear Devastation

    Editorial

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear friends, The aftermath of one of the most devastating post earthquake- tsunamis in the history of mankind, the March 2011 post-earthquake-tsunami-hitnuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, has brought to fore several questions throughout the world on the safety of nuclearinstallations. Such Calamities,which are far beyond our comprehension, has left all nations with such installations and those planning to expand their nuclear power plant programmes in a dilemma. However, the recent news that the Japanese authorities are considering to harvest and store bone marrow stem cells for transfusion to radiation-exposed workers has ushered in a new ray of hope. The hematopoietic stem cells will be harvested before exposure and in case of bone marrow depletion after radiation exposure; these cells can be immediately retrieved from storage and transfused to the radiation-exposed worker so that they have the potential to re-constitute the entire bone marrow in the patient. This will be a great life-saver and game-changer as bone marrow depletion is one of the major consequences of high levels of radiation exposure. This strategy can be prescribed as a routine procedure in all the countries with such nuclear installations, especially for workers at very high risk of radiation exposure. In future, such preventive strategies should be considered for implementation to not only the workers in the facility, but also the rescue team and the vulnerable population in the radiation zone.The regenerative potential of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC is the key factor to be considered now. This is high time that the studies on optimal in vitro expansion of HSCs and ways of successful engraftment of the transfused cells to a niche of radiation-exposed host environment should be attempted in all earnestness by the regenerative medicine community at present. Natural calamities like this help man to realise that the millions of scientific discoveries and inventions can

  18. Persistence in epidemic metapopulations: quantifying the rescue effects for measles, mumps, rubella and whooping cough.

    Metcalf, C Jessica E; Hampson, Katie; Tatem, Andrew J; Grenfell, Bryan T; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2013-01-01

    Metapopulation rescue effects are thought to be key to the persistence of many acute immunizing infections. Yet the enhancement of persistence through spatial coupling has not been previously quantified. Here we estimate the metapopulation rescue effects for four childhood infections using global WHO reported incidence data by comparing persistence on island countries vs all other countries, while controlling for key variables such as vaccine cover, birth rates and economic development. The relative risk of extinction on islands is significantly higher, and approximately double the risk of extinction in mainland countries. Furthermore, as may be expected, infections with longer infectious periods tend to have the strongest metapopulation rescue effects. Our results quantitate the notion that demography and local community size controls disease persistence. PMID:24040325

  19. Research on 3G-based Mobile Self-rescue System for Medical Emergency

    Weihui Dai

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available With the development of economy and society, people become more fluid, and in the meanwhile there is increasing demand for medical service in mobile environment. Especially when an outdoor accident or Paroxysmal disease happens, the earliest and most effective rescue is offered not by the medical staffs, but by people themselves. At that moment, if the first-aid instruction can be provided by medical experts in time, casualties are expected to be minimized.In combination with 3G communication network, streaming media technology, E-expert system as well as the knowledge about medical diagnostics and emergent treatment, this paper explored a mobile self-rescue system for medical emergency. This system can connect the doctors and patients who are physically separated, and thus help the patients realize self-rescue through the 3G-based mobile communications at anytime and anywhere.

  20. Persistence in epidemic metapopulations: quantifying the rescue effects for measles, mumps, rubella and whooping cough.

    C Jessica E Metcalf

    Full Text Available Metapopulation rescue effects are thought to be key to the persistence of many acute immunizing infections. Yet the enhancement of persistence through spatial coupling has not been previously quantified. Here we estimate the metapopulation rescue effects for four childhood infections using global WHO reported incidence data by comparing persistence on island countries vs all other countries, while controlling for key variables such as vaccine cover, birth rates and economic development. The relative risk of extinction on islands is significantly higher, and approximately double the risk of extinction in mainland countries. Furthermore, as may be expected, infections with longer infectious periods tend to have the strongest metapopulation rescue effects. Our results quantitate the notion that demography and local community size controls disease persistence.

  1. Dentistry to the rescue of missing children: A review

    Nitika Vij; Gulsheen Kaur Kochhar; Sanjay Chachra; Taranjot Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Today's society is becoming increasingly unsafe for children: we frequently hear about new incidents of missing children, which lead to emotional trauma for the loved ones and expose systemic failures of law and order. Parents can take extra precautions to ensure the safety of their children by educating them about ways to protect themselves and keep important records of the child such as updated color photographs, fingerprints, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples, etc., handy. However, in sp...

  2. Post-traumatic stress disorder status in a rescue group after the Wenchuan earthquake relief

    Junhua Huang; Qunying Liu; Jinliang Li; Xuejiang Li; Jin You; Liang Zhang; Changfu Tian; Rongsheng Luan

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder in earthquake rescue workers is relatively high. Risk factors for this disorder include demographic characteristics, earthquake-related high-risk factors, risk factors in the rescue process, personality, social support and coping style. This study examined the current status of a unit of 1 040 rescue workers who participated in earthquake relief for the Wenchuan earthquake that occurred on May 12th, 2008. Post-traumatic stress disorder was diagnosed primarily using the Clinician-Administered Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Scale during structured interviews. Univariate and multivariate sta-tistical analyses were used to examine major risk factors that contributed to the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder. Results revealed that the incidence of this disorder in the rescue group was 5.96%. The impact factors in univariate analysis included death of family members, contact with corpses or witnessing of the deceased or seriously injured, near-death experience, severe injury or mental trauma in the rescue process and working at the epicenter of the earthquake. Correlation analysis suggested that post-traumatic stress disorder was positively correlated with psychotic and neurotic personalities, negative coping and low social support. Impact factors in mul-tivariate logistic regression analysis included near-death experience, severe injury or mental trauma, working in the epicenter of the rescue, neurotic personality, negative coping and low social support, among which low social support had the largest odds ratio of 20.42. Findings showed that the oc-currence of post-traumatic stress disorder was the result of the interaction of multiple factors.

  3. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF FUNCTIONAL RESCUE MEDIATED BY P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR MUTATIONS

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Chen, Y. Morris; Ye, Xiang; Lu, Qiang; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Yang, Wei; Senear, Donald F.; Luo, Ray

    2009-01-01

    We have utilized both molecular dynamics simulations and solution biophysical measurements to investigate the rescue mechanism of mutation N235K, which plays a key role in the recently identified global suppressor motif of K235/Y239/R240 in the human p53 DNA-binding domain (DBD). Previous genetic analysis indicates that N235K alone rescues five out of six destabilized cancer mutants. However, the solution biophysical measurement shows that N235K generates only a slight increase to the stabili...

  4. Experience in System Design for Human-Robot Teaming in Urban Search & Rescue

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China; Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China; School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; Physics Department, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China); Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several semi-autonomous robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV operators) and one on-site human (UAV operator). This system has been developed in close cooperation with several rescue organizations, and has been deployed in a real-life tunnel acci...

  5. Advanced Rescue System for Industrial Monitoring Using ZIGBEE GSM and FPGA

    T. Ariyathangam

    2014-01-01

    The increase of greed in people has paved way to civil-wars and natural disasters. A swift action has to betaken in the relief work of the aftermath of earthquake affected areas, such that any delay in the rescue could lead the death toll to rise. The same can be applied to war fields too. The project focuses on human beings who are alive and struggling for their lives either in the war field or due to natural disasters like earthquakes, to be recognized and rescued in a much fast...

  6. Mortality in free range rescued wild animals of Shivalik Hills in Himachal Pradesh, India

    Vijay Kumar; Vipin Kumar; Anshu Raj

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted on 143 free range wild animals of 12 different species rescued from different locations in Shivalik Hills since Jan 2004 to June 2011. Mortality was reported in 79.02% (113) of rescued wild animals. Mortality in Herbivores, Carnivores, Pheasants and Omnivores was 84.74% (50), 79.06% (34) 72.72% (24) and 62.50% (05) respectively. Post mortem was conducted at field level to determine causes of mortality in all the 113 died wild animals. Necropsy findings revealed...

  7. Caring for the injured and otherwise handicapped Raptors (Falconiformes) and owls (Strigiformes) in rescue centers

    DOBIÁŠOVÁ, Kristýna

    2014-01-01

    At least half of our raptors and owls are classified into three categories the list of specially protected animals. Electricity poles, traffic and landscape changes have led to the disappearance many individuals of raptors and owls in the wild. This work evaluates range and success of the return raptors and owls into the wild. All information about adopted raptors and owls were compiled by selected rescue station for animals ČSOP Vlašim. Rescue station records served as basis in the range of ...

  8. Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways cooperate in zearalenone-induced apoptosis of human leukemic cells

    Chokchaichamnankit Daranee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zearalenone (ZEA is a phytoestrogen from Fusarium species. The aims of the study was to identify mode of human leukemic cell death induced by ZEA and the mechanisms involved. Methods Cell cytotoxicity of ZEA on human leukemic HL-60, U937 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was performed by using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Reactive oxygen species production, cell cycle analysis and mitochondrial transmembrane potential reduction was determined by employing 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, propidium iodide and 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide and flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3 and -8 activities were detected by using fluorogenic Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (DEVD-AMC and Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (IETD-AMC substrates, respectively. Protein expression of cytochrome c, Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was performed by Western blot. The expression of proteins was assessed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (PAGE coupled with LC-MS2 analysis and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR approach. Results ZEA was cytotoxic to U937 > HL-60 > PBMCs and caused subdiploid peaks and G1 arrest in both cell lines. Apoptosis of human leukemic HL-60 and U937 cell apoptosis induced by ZEA was via an activation of mitochondrial release of cytochrome c through mitochondrial transmembrane potential reduction, activation of caspase-3 and -8, production of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Bax was up regulated in a time-dependent manner and there was down regulation of Bcl-xL expression. Two-dimensional PAGE coupled with LC-MS2 analysis showed that ZEA treatment of HL-60 cells produced differences in the levels of 22 membrane proteins such as apoptosis inducing factor and the ER stress proteins including endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, heat shock

  9. Initiation of GalNAc-type O-glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum promotes cancer cell invasiveness

    Gill, David J; Tham, Keit Min; Chia, Joanne;

    2013-01-01

    Invasiveness underlies cancer aggressiveness and is a hallmark of malignancy. Most malignant tumors have elevated levels of Tn, an O-GalNAc glycan. Mechanisms underlying Tn up-regulation and its effects remain unclear. Here we show that Golgi-to-endoplasmic reticulum relocation of polypeptide N-a...

  10. Proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and induction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes after ether or halothane.

    Ross, W T; Cardell, R R

    1978-05-01

    Hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and hepatic ultrastructure were studied in rats after two hours of anesthesia with 1 MAC halothane or diethyl ether. Twelve hours after cessation of either anesthetic smooth endoplasmic reticulum was increased in centrilobular but not in periportal hepatocytes. This change persisted at 24- and 36-hour sampling times. Microsomal cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 decreased after halothane anesthesia (by 7 to 20 per cent of control). Diethyl ether caused increased cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 (27 and 18 per cent, respectively) at the 36-hour sampling time. NADPH cytochrome c reductase did not change significantly after either agent. The authors interpret these results to mean that both agents promote conversion of rough endoplasmic reticulum to smooth endoplasmic reticulum or, alternatively, that the anesthetics decrease degradation of smooth endoplasmic membranes. Since only ether caused an increase in the microsomal content of enzymes of the drug-metabolizing enzyme system, it is concluded that these two anesthetics act on hepatic cells by dissimilar mechanisms. PMID:646150

  11. Uterine Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Its Unfolded Protein Response May Regulate Caspase 3 Activation in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus

    Suresh, Arvind; Subedi, Kalpana; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Condon, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously proposed that uterine caspase-3 may modulate uterine contractility in a gestationally regulated fashion. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which uterine caspase-3 is activated and consequently controlled in the pregnant uterus across gestation. Utilizing the mouse uterus as our gestational model we examined the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response as potential activators of uterine caspase-3 at the transcriptional and translational level. Our study revealed robust activation of the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response and its adaptive unfolded protein response during pregnancy coinciding respectively with increased uterine caspase-3 activity and its withdrawal to term. In contrast the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways remained inactive across gestation. We speculate that physiological stimuli experienced by the pregnant uterus likely potentiates the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in elevated caspase-3 activation, which is isolated to the pregnant mouse myometrium. However as term approaches, activation of an elevated adaptive unfolded protein response acts to limit the endoplasmic reticulum stress response inhibiting caspase-3 resulting in its decline towards term. We speculate that these events have the capacity to regulate gestational length in a caspase-3 dependent manner. PMID:24058658

  12. Uterine endoplasmic reticulum stress and its unfolded protein response may regulate caspase 3 activation in the pregnant mouse uterus.

    Arvind Suresh

    Full Text Available We have previously proposed that uterine caspase-3 may modulate uterine contractility in a gestationally regulated fashion. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which uterine caspase-3 is activated and consequently controlled in the pregnant uterus across gestation. Utilizing the mouse uterus as our gestational model we examined the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response as potential activators of uterine caspase-3 at the transcriptional and translational level. Our study revealed robust activation of the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response and its adaptive unfolded protein response during pregnancy coinciding respectively with increased uterine caspase-3 activity and its withdrawal to term. In contrast the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways remained inactive across gestation. We speculate that physiological stimuli experienced by the pregnant uterus likely potentiates the uterine myocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in elevated caspase-3 activation, which is isolated to the pregnant mouse myometrium. However as term approaches, activation of an elevated adaptive unfolded protein response acts to limit the endoplasmic reticulum stress response inhibiting caspase-3 resulting in its decline towards term. We speculate that these events have the capacity to regulate gestational length in a caspase-3 dependent manner.

  13. Electro-optical imaging of F-actin and endoplasmic reticulum in living and fixed plant cells.

    Allen, N S; Bennett, M N

    1996-01-01

    Confocal and video micrographs of living and fixed alfalfa roots, onion epithelial and pear pollen cells illustrate the architecture of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum in plant cells. Fixation of plant tissues to preserve cytoplasmic structure poses special problems. When possible, emphasis should be placed on the imaging of structures in stained living cells over time. The early events that occur when Nod factors or bacteria elicit nodule formation in alfalfa roots will illustrate several approaches to plant cell fixation, staining and imaging. The first observable events after Nod factor stimulation occur in root hairs and are changes in rates of cytoplasmic streaming, nuclear movements, and changes in the shape of the vacuole. Within ten minutes, the endoplasmic reticulum shifts position towards the tip of the root hair. For comparison, the endoplasmic reticulum localization in pollen tubes and onion epithelial cells will be illustrated. The actin cytoskeleton undergoes a series of changes over a twelve hour period. These changes in the cytoskeleton are spatially and temporally correlated with the observed growth changes of the root hairs. This dynamic change of the actin filament and endoplasmic reticulum and associated secretory vesicles in these root hairs suggests a mechanism for the observed root hair growth changes. PMID:9601538

  14. Organelle-cytoskeleton relationships in fibroblasts: mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and endoplasmic reticulum in phases of movement and growth

    Couchman, J R; Rees, D A

    1982-01-01

    actions of both colchicine and dihydrocytochalasin B showing that orientation and translocation depend on a co-ordinate interaction of microtubules and microfilamentous meshwork around the centrioles as origin. The Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum do not rearrange dramatically during the...

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts

    Vonk, Lucienne A.; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, Chun-Ling; Helder, Marco N.; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    2010-01-01

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying

  16. Dissection of the Critical Binding Determinants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II by Mutagenesis and Fluorescence Binding Assay

    Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Crist, Rachael M.; Vaezeslami, Soheila; Goins, Sarah M.; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2009-01-01

    The binding of retinoic acid to mutants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II (CRABPII) was evaluated to better understand the importance of the direct protein/ligand interactions. The important role of Arg111 for the correct structure and function of the protein was verified and other residues that directly affect retinoic acid binding have been identified. Furthermore, retinoic acid binding to CRABPII mutants that lack all previously identified interacting amino acids was rescued by ...

  17. Management of the endoplasmic reticulum stress by activation of the heat shock response in yeast

    Hou, Jin; Tang, Hongting; Liu, Zihe;

    2014-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is mediated by Hac1p. The heat shock response (HSR) mediated by Hsf1p, mainly regulates cytosolic processes and protects......-wide transcriptional response in order to propose regulatory mechanisms that govern the interplay between UPR and HSR and followed up for the hypotheses by experiments in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, we found that the regulation of ER stress response via HSR is (1) only partially dependent on over-expression of...... Kar2p (ER resident chaperone induced by ER stress); (2) does not involve the increase in protein turnover via the proteasome activity; (3) is related to the oxidative stress response. From the transcription data, we also propose that HSR enhances ER stress resistance mainly through facilitation of...

  18. Hyperactivity of the Ero1α Oxidase Elicits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress but No Broad Antioxidant Response

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Schmidt, Jonas Damgard; Soltoft, Cecilie Lutzen;

    2012-01-01

    Oxidizing equivalents for the process of oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of mammalian cells are mainly provided by the Ero1α oxidase. The molecular mechanisms that regulate Ero1α activity in order to harness its oxidative power are quite well understood. However, the...... overall cellular response to oxidative stress generated by Ero1α in the lumen of the mammalian ER is poorly characterized. Here we investigate the effects of overexpressing a hyperactive mutant (C104A/C131A) of Ero1α. We show that Ero1α hyperactivity leads to hyperoxidation of the ER oxidoreductase ERp57...... the cellular glutathione redox buffer, we conclude that the observed effects of Ero1α-C104A/C131A overexpression are likely caused by an oxidative perturbation of the ER glutathione redox buffer. In accordance, we show that Ero1α hyperactivity affects cell viability when cellular glutathione levels...

  19. Trafficking of endoplasmic reticulum-retained recombinant proteins is unpredictable in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Thomas eDe Meyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of recombinant proteins has been produced in the dicot model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Many of these proteins are targeted for secretion by means of an N terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER signal peptide. In addition, they can also be designed for ER retention by adding a C terminal H/KDEL-tag. Despite extensive knowledge of the protein trafficking pathways, the final protein destination, especially of such H/KDEL-tagged recombinant proteins, is unpredictable. In this respect, glycoproteins are ideal study objects. Microscopy experiments reveal their deposition pattern and characterization of their N-glycans aids in elucidating the trafficking. Here, we combine microscopy and N glycosylation data generated in Arabidopsis leaves and seeds, and highlight the lack of a decent understanding of heterologous protein trafficking.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 is highly expressed in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis

    Woo Young Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC is not uncommon. However, prophylactic cervical lymph node dissection in all PTMC is debatable. Molecular markers of predicting CLNM would help to decide to either do or not do cervical lymph node dissection which might increase morbidities. Aims: We aimed to characterize gene expression profiles and molecular markers of CLNM in PTMC. Settings and Design: The thyroid frozen tissues were obtained with from six PTMC patients, who underwent total thyroidectomy. Methods: We performed oligonucleotide microarray analysis with three PTMCs with CLNM and three without CLNM. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to validate the gene. Statistical Analysis Used: We used linear models for microarray data. Results: We identified 12 differentially expressed gene, and most one is endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2. Conclusion: ERAP2 might be associated with CLNM in PTMC.

  1. Regulation of calcium and phosphoinositides at endoplasmic reticulum-membrane junctions.

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Jensen, Jill B; Hille, Bertil

    2016-04-15

    Effective cellular function requires both compartmentalization of tasks in space and time, and coordination of those efforts. The endoplasmic reticulum's (ER) expansive and ramifying structure makes it ideally suited to serve as a regulatory platform for organelle-organelle communication through membrane contacts. These contact sites consist of two membranes juxtaposed at a distance less than 30 nm that mediate the exchange of lipids and ions without the need for membrane fission or fusion, a process distinct from classical vesicular transport. Membrane contact sites are positioned by organelle-specific membrane-membrane tethering proteins and contain a growing number of additional proteins that organize information transfer to shape membrane identity. Here we briefly review the role of ER-containing membrane junctions in two important cellular functions: calcium signalling and phosphoinositide processing. PMID:27068956

  2. Possible Pharmacological Approach Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Ameliorate Leptin Resistance in Obesity

    Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with metabolic syndrome, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Therefore, drug development for the treatment of obesity is needed. Leptin is an anti-obesity hormone that inhibits food intake and increases energy metabolism, and, as such, treatments involving leptin were expected to be beneficial for obesity; however, since most obese patients are in a state of leptin resistance, these treatments may not be useful. Therefore, the amelioration of leptin resistance has recently been attracting interest as a treatment for obesity. The mechanisms underlying the development of leptin resistance need to be elucidated in more detail. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was recently suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of leptin resistance. The molecular mechanisms responsible for leptin resistance and possible pharmacological treatments for obesity have been discussed herein, with a focus on ER stress.

  3. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    Sharoar, M G; Shi, Q; Ge, Y; He, W; Hu, X; Perry, G; Zhu, X; Yan, R

    2016-09-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer's brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains. PMID:26619807

  4. Interaction between Mitochondria and the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Jaechan Leem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress are closely associated with β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance. Thus, each of these factors contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. The accumulated evidence reveals structural and functional communications between mitochondria and the ER. It is now well established that ER stress causes apoptotic cell death by disturbing mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, recent studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction causes ER stress. In this paper, we summarize the roles that mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress play in the pathogenesis of type 2 DM. Structural and functional communications between mitochondria and the ER are also discussed. Finally, we focus on recent findings supporting the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction and the subsequent induction of ER stress play important roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 DM.

  5. Sc65-Null Mice Provide Evidence for a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Complex Regulating Collagen Lysyl Hydroxylation

    Weis, MaryAnn; Rai, Jyoti; Hudson, David M.; Dimori, Milena; Zimmerman, Sarah M.; Hogue, William R.; Swain, Frances L.; Burdine, Marie S.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Tackett, Alan J.; Suva, Larry J.; Eyre, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and its integrity is essential for connective tissue and organ function. The importance of proteins involved in intracellular collagen post-translational modification, folding and transport was recently highlighted from studies on recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Here we describe the critical role of SC65 (Synaptonemal Complex 65, P3H4), a leprecan-family member, as part of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) complex with prolyl 3-hydroxylase 3. This complex affects the activity of lysyl-hydroxylase 1 potentially through interactions with the enzyme and/or cyclophilin B. Loss of Sc65 in the mouse results in instability of this complex, altered collagen lysine hydroxylation and cross-linking leading to connective tissue defects that include low bone mass and skin fragility. This is the first indication of a prolyl-hydroxylase complex in the ER controlling lysyl-hydroxylase activity during collagen synthesis. PMID:27119146

  6. Transit of H2O2 across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is not sluggish.

    Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Bánhegyi, Gabor; Bogeski, Ivan; Davies, Kelvin J A; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès; Forman, Henry Jay; Görlach, Agnes; Kietzmann, Thomas; Laurindo, Francisco; Margittai, Eva; Meyer, Andreas J; Riemer, Jan; Rützler, Michael; Simmen, Thomas; Sitia, Roberto; Toledano, Michel B; Touw, Ivo P

    2016-05-01

    Cellular metabolism provides various sources of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different organelles and compartments. The suitability of H2O2 as an intracellular signaling molecule therefore also depends on its ability to pass cellular membranes. The propensity of the membranous boundary of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to let pass H2O2 has been discussed controversially. In this essay, we challenge the recent proposal that the ER membrane constitutes a simple barrier for H2O2 diffusion and support earlier data showing that (i) ample H2O2 permeability of the ER membrane is a prerequisite for signal transduction, (ii) aquaporin channels are crucially involved in the facilitation of H2O2 permeation, and (iii) a proper experimental framework not prone to artifacts is necessary to further unravel the role of H2O2 permeation in signal transduction and organelle biology. PMID:26928585

  7. A Molecular Fluorescent Probe for Targeted Visualization of Temperature at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Arai, Satoshi; Lee, Sung-Chan; Zhai, Duanting; Suzuki, Madoka; Chang, Young Tae

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of cellular heat production and propagation remains elusive at a subcellular level. Here we report the first small molecule fluorescent thermometer selectively targeting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER thermo yellow), with the highest sensitivity reported so far (3.9%/°C). Unlike nanoparticle thermometers, ER thermo yellow stains the target organelle evenly without the commonly encountered problem of aggregation, and successfully demonstrates the ability to monitor intracellular temperature gradients generated by external heat sources in various cell types. We further confirm the ability of ER thermo yellow to monitor heat production by intracellular Ca2+ changes in HeLa cells. Our thermometer anchored at nearly-zero distance from the ER, i.e. the heat source, allowed the detection of the heat as it readily dissipated, and revealed the dynamics of heat production in real time at a subcellular level.

  8. Analysis of factors related to military training injury and the effect of self-rescue and buddy rescue on the final result of the injury in tank crew of the armored forces

    Rong-bin ZHOU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the factors related to military training injury and the effect of self-rescue and buddy rescue on the result of the injury in the soldiers.Methods All data were statistically classified with cluster sampling according to the diagnosis standard of Chinese PLA for analysis.Investigation was conducted in 1028 soldiers of the armored forces with questionnaire,and non-condition logistic regression analysis was applied.Results The total incidence of military training injury was 40.2%.Of all the injured soldiers,36.80% of them served for one year only,and the incidence of injury was obviously higher than those who had served in armed forces for 2 or 3 years.Unconditioned regression analysis revealed that the main causes related to military training injury in the soldiers were as follows: the items of training,the terrain feature,motion sickness,self-rescue and buddy rescue training,and whether the action consistent with the standards.The rehabilitation rate within one month was significantly higher in those who underwent self-rescue or buddy rescue(93.8% and 94.2%,respectively than those who did not undergo self-rescue or buddy rescue(76.3%,76.7%,respectively,P < 0.001.Conclusions The incidence of military training injury in the armored forces is high.It should be emphysized that soldiers with one year of military service should be partioularly taken care to prevent from injuries.Many factors may influence the military training injury,and protective measures should be taken.Those who have the knowledge of self-rescue or undergo buddy rescue will have higher rehabilitation rate within one month.

  9. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  10. HMGB1 induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells via the RAGE-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway

    Luo, Ying [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Shu-Jun [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Yang, Jian [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Qiu, Yuan-Zhen [Department of Otolaryngology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Chen, Fang-Ping, E-mail: xychenfp@163.com [Department of Hematology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Mechanisms of inflammatory response induced by HMGB1 are incompletely understood. •We found that endoplasmic reticulum stress mediate the inflammatory response induced by HMGB1. •RAGE-mediated ERS pathways are involved in those processes. •We reported a new mechanism for HMGB1 induced inflammatory response. -- Abstract: The high mobility group 1B protein (HMGB1) mediates chronic inflammatory responses in endothelial cells, which play a critical role in atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. The goal of our study was to identify the effects of HMGB1 on the RAGE-induced inflammatory response in endothelial cells and test the possible involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Our results showed that incubation of endothelial cells with HMGB1 (0.01–1 μg/ml) for 24 h induced a dose-dependent activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress transducers, as assessed by PERK and IRE1 protein expression. Moreover, HMGB1 also promoted nuclear translocation of ATF6. HMGB1-mediated ICAM-1 and P-selectin production was dramatically suppressed by PERK siRNA or IRE1 siRNA. However, non-targeting siRNA had no such effects. HMGB1-induced increases in ICAM-1 and P-selectin expression were also inhibited by a specific eIF2α inhibitor (salubrinal) and a specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Importantly, a blocking antibody specifically targeted against RAGE (anti-RAGE antibody) decreased ICAM-1, P-selectin and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecule (PERK, eIF2α, IRE1 and JNK) protein expression levels. Collectively, these novel findings suggest that HMGB1 promotes an inflammatory response by inducing the expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin via RAGE-mediated stimulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  11. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    Brüning, Ansgar, E-mail: ansgar.bruening@med.uni-muenchen.de; Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  12. Severe Burn–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Hepatic Damage in Mice

    Song, Juquan; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Boehning, Darren; Jeschke, Marc G

    2009-01-01

    Severe burn injury results in liver dysfunction and damage, with subsequent metabolic derangements contributing to patient morbidity and mortality. On a cellular level, significant postburn hepatocyte apoptosis occurs and likely contributes to liver dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms of hepatocyte apoptosis are poorly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway can lead to hepatocyte apoptosis under conditions of liver dysfunction. Thus, we hypothesized that ER stress/UPR may mediate hepatic dysfunction in response to burn injury. We investigated the temporal activation of hepatic ER stress in mice after a severe burn injury. Mice received a scald burn over 35% of their body surface and were killed at 1, 7, 14, and 21 d postburn. We found that severe burn induces hepatocyte apoptosis as indicated by increased caspase-3 activity (P < 0.05). Serum albumin levels decreased postburn and remained lowered for up to 21 d, indicating that constitutive secretory protein synthesis was reduced. Significantly, upregulation of the ER stress markers glucose-related protein 78 (GRP78)/BIP, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), p–protein kinase R–like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (p-PERK), and inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE-1α) were found beginning 1 d postburn (P < 0.05) and persisted up to 21 d postburn (P < 0.05). Hepatic ER stress induced by burn injury was associated with compensatory upregulation of the calcium chaperone/storage proteins calnexin and calreticulin (P < 0.05), suggesting that ER calcium store depletion was the primary trigger for induction of the ER stress response. In summary, thermal injury in mice causes long-term adaptive and deleterious hepatic function alterations characterized by significant upregulation of the ER stress response. PMID:19603103

  13. Sarco/Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA contribute to GPCR-mediated taste perception.

    Naoko Iguchi

    Full Text Available The sense of taste is important for providing animals with valuable information about the qualities of food, such as nutritional or harmful nature. Mammals, including humans, can recognize at least five primary taste qualities: sweet, umami (savory, bitter, sour, and salty. Recent studies have identified molecules and mechanisms underlying the initial steps of tastant-triggered molecular events in taste bud cells, particularly the requirement of increased cytosolic free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](c for normal taste signal transduction and transmission. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms controlling the removal of elevated [Ca(2+](c from the cytosol of taste receptor cells (TRCs and how the disruption of these mechanisms affects taste perception. To investigate the molecular mechanism of Ca(2+ clearance in TRCs, we sought the molecules involved in [Ca(2+](c regulation using a single-taste-cell transcriptome approach. We found that Serca3, a member of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase (SERCA family that sequesters cytosolic Ca(2+ into endoplasmic reticulum, is exclusively expressed in sweet/umami/bitter TRCs, which rely on intracellular Ca(2+ release for signaling. Serca3-knockout (KO mice displayed significantly increased aversive behavioral responses and greater gustatory nerve responses to bitter taste substances but not to sweet or umami taste substances. Further studies showed that Serca2 was mainly expressed in the T1R3-expressing sweet and umami TRCs, suggesting that the loss of function of Serca3 was possibly compensated by Serca2 in these TRCs in the mutant mice. Our data demonstrate that the SERCA family members play an important role in the Ca(2+ clearance in TRCs and that mutation of these proteins may alter bitter and perhaps sweet and umami taste perception.

  14. Intermittent selective clamping improves rat liver regeneration by attenuating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Ben Mosbah, I; Duval, H; Mbatchi, S-F; Ribault, C; Grandadam, S; Pajaud, J; Morel, F; Boudjema, K; Compagnon, P; Corlu, A

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent clamping of the portal trial is an effective method to avoid excessive blood loss during hepatic resection, but this procedure may cause ischemic damage to liver. Intermittent selective clamping of the lobes to be resected may represent a good alternative as it exposes the remnant liver only to the reperfusion stress. We compared the effect of intermittent total or selective clamping on hepatocellular injury and liver regeneration. Entire hepatic lobes or only lobes to be resected were subjected twice to 10 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion before hepatectomy. We provided evidence that the effect of intermittent clamping can be damaging or beneficial depending to its mode of application. Although transaminase levels were similar in all groups, intermittent total clamping impaired liver regeneration and increased apoptosis. In contrast, intermittent selective clamping improved liver protein secretion and hepatocyte proliferation when compared with standard hepatectomy. This beneficial effect was linked to better adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) recovery, nitric oxide production, antioxidant activities and endoplasmic reticulum adaptation leading to limit mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Interestingly, transient and early chaperone inductions resulted in a controlled activation of the unfolded protein response concomitantly to endothelial nitric oxide synthase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 MAPK activation that favors liver regeneration. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a central target through which intermittent selective clamping exerts its cytoprotective effect and improves liver regeneration. This procedure could be applied as a powerful protective modality in the field of living donor liver transplantation and liver surgery. PMID:24603335

  15. Docosahexaenoic Acid Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hepatic Steatosis Involving ER Stress Response in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes

    Jinying Zheng; Chuan Peng; Yanbiao Ai; Heng Wang; Xiaoqiu Xiao; Jibin Li

    2016-01-01

    The increase in fructose consumption is considered to be a risk factor for developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-treated primary mouse hepatocytes, and the changes of Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to DHA treatment. The hepatocytes were treated with fructose, DHA, fructose plus DHA, tunicamycin (TM) or fructose plus 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 24 h. Intra...

  16. Triglyceride-rich lipoprotein modulates endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 expression via differential regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Ying I Wang

    Full Text Available Circulating triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRL from hypertriglyceridemic subjects exacerbate endothelial inflammation and promote monocyte infiltration into the arterial wall. We have recently reported that TGRL isolated from human blood after a high-fat meal can elicit a pro- or anti-atherogenic state in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC, defined as up- or down-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in response to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα stimulation, respectively. A direct correlation was found between subjects categorized at higher risk for cardiovascular disease based upon serum triglycerides and postprandial production of TGRL particles that increased VCAM-1-dependent monocyte adhesion to inflamed endothelium. To establish how TGRL metabolism is linked to VCAM-1 regulation, we examined endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR pathways. Regardless of its atherogenicity, the rate and extent of TGRL internalization and lipid droplet formation by HAEC were uniform. However, pro-atherogenic TGRL exacerbated ER membrane expansion and stress following TNFα stimulation, whereas anti-atherogenic TGRL ameliorated such effects. Inhibition of ER stress with a chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased TNFα-induced VCAM-1 expression and abrogated TGRL's atherogenic effect. Activation of ER stress sensors PKR-like ER-regulated kinase (PERK and inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1α, and downstream effectors including eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α, spliced X-box-binding protein 1 (sXBP1 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, directly correlated with the atherogenic activity of an individual's TGRL. Modulation of ER stress sensors also correlated with changes in expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1, a transcription factor of Vcam-1 responsible for regulation of its expression. Moreover, knockdown studies using siRNA defined a causal relationship between the PERK/eIF2α/CHOP pathway and

  17. The 'Rule of Rescue' in Medical Priority Setting: Ethical Plausibilities and Implausibilities

    Bettina Schoene-Seifert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Not infrequently, the so-called Rule of Rescue gets invoked as an allegedly self-evident constraint to the CBE-goal of maximizing health benefit with a given health budget. In this paper this constraint is critically analyzed. It will be argued that some of its implications are worth considering - but not the inherently vague Rule as such.

  18. Self-efficacy moderates the relationship between stress appraisal and quality of life among rescue workers.

    Prati, Gabriele; Pietrantoni, Luca; Cicognani, Elvira

    2010-07-01

    Rescue workers are frequently exposed to highly stressful situations during their everyday work activity. Stress and coping theory emphasizes the interaction between primary and secondary appraisal in determining coping responses to stressful events and quality of life. According to Social Cognitive Theory, stress reactions depend on self-appraisal of coping capabilities. The present study investigated whether self-efficacy moderates the relationship between stress appraisal and professional quality of life. A self-administered questionnaire was submitted to a sample of 451 Italian rescue workers (firefighters, paramedics, and medical technicians), including the Professional Quality of Life Scale, which measures three dimensions of emergency workers' quality of working life: compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the relationship between stress appraisal and professional quality of life was significant only among rescue workers with low levels of self-efficacy but not among those with higher levels of self-efficacy. These results confirmed the expectations based on Social Cognitive Theory that self-efficacy buffers the impact of perceived stressful encounters on professional quality of life. Results suggest the usefulness of interventions aimed at increasing rescue workers' psychosocial skills. PMID:19937503

  19. Real time modeling of the cognitive load of an Urban Search And Rescue robot operator

    Colin, T. R.; Smets, N. J.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Urban Search And Rescue (USAR) robots are used to find and save victims in the wake of disasters such as earthquakes or terrorist attacks. The operators of these robots are affected by high cognitive load; this hinders effective robot usage. This paper presents a cognitive task load model for real-t

  20. New refresher training in the use of self-rescue masks

    HSE Unit

    2012-01-01

    Photos of the training session for self-rescue mask instructors held on 21 March 2012 – 10 new instructors followed the coursePhotos of the training session for self-rescue mask instructors held on 21 March 2012 – 10 new instructors followed the course   A refresher course in the use of self-rescue masks has been added to the CERN training catalogue. Sign up! More than 3500 people have followed the course since it was introduced in 2009. Taking account of the forthcoming long shutdown, requests for follow-up training from course participants and recent changes in the course content, the HSE Unit has decided to place a three-year limit on the validity of the initial training and to introduce a refresher course. The new refresher course is open to all personnel having completed the initial course at least 2 years ago. The course, "Recyclage Formation masque auto-sauveteur » / "Refresher course Self-Rescue Mask Training", (code No. 077...

  1. PSO-Based Robot Path Planning for Multisurvivor Rescue in Limited Survival Time

    N. Geng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the strength of a trapped person often declines with time in urgent and dangerous circumstances, adopting a robot to rescue as many survivors as possible in limited time is of considerable significance. However, as one key issue in robot navigation, how to plan an optimal rescue path of a robot has not yet been fully solved. This paper studies robot path planning for multisurvivor rescue in limited survival time using a representative heuristic, particle swarm optimization (PSO. First, the robot path planning problem including multiple survivors is formulated as a discrete optimization one with high constraint, where the number of rescued persons is taken as the unique objective function, and the strength of a trapped person is used to constrain the feasibility of a path. Then, a new integer PSO algorithm is presented to solve the mathematical model, and several new operations, such as the update of a particle, the insertion and inversion operators, and the rapidly local search method, are incorporated into the proposed algorithm to improve its effectiveness. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate the capacity of our method in generating optimal paths with high quality.

  2. 46 CFR 108.575 - Survival craft and rescue boat equipment.

    2010-10-01

    ... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.575 Survival craft and rescue boat equipment... Fishing kit 1 1 12 Flashlight 1 1 1 1 1 1 13 Hatchet 2 2 14 Heaving line 2 1 2 2 1 2 15 Instruction card 1.... 2 Bilge pumps are not required for boats of self-bailing design. 3 Not required for inflated...

  3. 30 CFR 49.50 - Certification of coal mine rescue teams.

    2010-07-01

    ...(30 CFR) (1) Team is available at all times when miners are underground 49.12(a); 49.12(g) (2) Except... Qualification Criteria(30 CFR) (1) Members are properly trained annually 49.18(b) (2) Members are familiar with... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of coal mine rescue teams....

  4. Phosphodiesterase inhibition rescues chronic cognitive deficits induced by traumatic brain injury.

    Titus, David J; Sakurai, Atsushi; Kang, Yuan; Furones, Concepcion; Jergova, Stanislava; Santos, Rosmery; Sick, Thomas J; Atkins, Coleen M

    2013-03-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) modulates several cell signaling pathways in the hippocampus critical for memory formation. Previous studies have found that the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway is downregulated after TBI and that treatment with a phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram rescues the decrease in cAMP. In the present study, we examined the effect of rolipram on TBI-induced cognitive impairments. At 2 weeks after moderate fluid-percussion brain injury or sham surgery, adult male Sprague Dawley rats received vehicle or rolipram (0.03 mg/kg) 30 min before water maze acquisition or cue and contextual fear conditioning. TBI animals treated with rolipram showed a significant improvement in water maze acquisition and retention of both cue and contextual fear conditioning compared with vehicle-treated TBI animals. Cue and contextual fear conditioning significantly increased phosphorylated CREB levels in the hippocampus of sham animals, but not in TBI animals. This deficit in CREB activation during learning was rescued in TBI animals treated with rolipram. Hippocampal long-term potentiation was reduced in TBI animals, and this was also rescued with rolipram treatment. These results indicate that the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram rescues cognitive impairments after TBI, and this may be mediated through increased CREB activation during learning. PMID:23516287

  5. An Application of the Social Support Deterioration Deterrence Model to Rescue Workers

    Prati, Gabriele; Pietrantoni, Luca

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of social support in promoting quality of life in the aftermath of critical incidents involvement. Participants were a sample of 586 Italian rescue workers. Structural equation modelling was used to test the social support deterioration deterrence model. Results showed that the impact of critical incident involvement…

  6. Collaboration and Interconnectivity: Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Services and Higher Education Institutions in Nottingham

    Murphy, Peter; Greenhalgh, Kirsten; Parkin, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the developing relationship between Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Services and the two higher education institutions in Nottingham. It will chronicle how a very traditional relationship has been transformed, initially by a simple consultancy project, into a much closer working relationship characterised by a much…

  7. New simulated gas detector offers realistic training for mine rescue teams

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, together with LightsOn Safety Solutions, evaluated 2 versions of a multi-gas simulated gas monitor system (GMS) in separate field trials with mine rescue teams. This paper described the GMS wireless simulation tool along with its development and testing. It also described the GMS functions for the initial phase of testing as well as plans for the next phase of research which may introduce tracking and automation features. The GMS requires a personal computer and uses a wireless local area network. The GMS teaches mine rescue members about gas detection and helps them understand the importance of gas concentrations. In addition, it promotes decision-making actions by team members and offers a more realistic method of receiving gas concentration readings using a simulated hand-held gas detector. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine if the electronic placard in the GMS could be used by mine rescue teams instead of the currently used cardboard placards, and if the functionality of the device was suitable, reliable and practical. Results from the second field trial demonstrated improvements with the GMS over the original prototype technology, particularly with regards to wireless and connectivity issues. The GMS was successfully incorporated into the mine rescue exercises as planned, with very few problems encountered. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. A Phenomenological Study of Urban Search and Rescue Members Who Responded to a Disaster

    Kerns, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    The complicated world of disaster management requires urban search and rescue (US&R) members to be well trained to respond to complex, unpredictable, and difficult to manage disasters anywhere in the world on short notice. Disasters are becoming more complex and difficult to manage as was witnessed by the multi-faceted disaster in Japan in…

  9. Revealing unexpected effects of rescue robots’ team-membership in a virtual environment

    Horsch, C.H.G.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cuijpers, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    In urban search and rescue (USAR) situations resources are limited and workload is high. Robots that act as team players instead of tools could help in these situations. A Virtual Reality (VR) experiment was set up to test if team performance of a human-robot team increases when the robot act as suc

  10. The Rescue911 Emergency Response Information System (ERIS): A Systems Development Project Case

    Cohen, Jason F.; Thiel, Franz H.

    2010-01-01

    This teaching case presents a systems development project useful for courses in object-oriented analysis and design. The case has a strong focus on the business, methodology, modeling and implementation aspects of systems development. The case is centered on a fictitious ambulance and emergency services company (Rescue911). The case describes that…

  11. Collaboration between Extension and Industry: Coordination and Assessment of Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue Training

    Porr, C. A. Shea; Shultz, Alyx M.; Gimenez, Rebecca; Splan, Rebecca K.

    2016-01-01

    Rescuing large animals from emergency situations can be fraught with dangers not only to the animals but also to the rescuers. People involved at the scene of such an emergency are most likely to include first responders, horse owners, and veterinarians. These groups need to be aware of how they can best work together to effect a safe and…

  12. Resolving Ethical Dilemmas in Suicide Prevention: The Case of Telephone Helpline Rescue Policies

    Mishara, Brian L.; Weisstub, David N.

    2010-01-01

    The ethical basis of suicide prevention is illustrated by contrasting helpline emergency rescue policies of the Samaritans and the AAS and the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network. We contrast moralist, relativist, and libertarian ethical premises and question whether suicide can be rational. Samaritans respect a caller's right to…

  13. Tracing the origins of rescued chimpanzees reveals widespread chimpanzee hunting in Cameroon

    Gadsby Elizabeth L; Fotso Roger; de Vries Simone; Akih Akih E; Kiyang John A; Lankester Felix; Ghobrial Lora; Jenkins Peter D; Gonder Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While wild chimpanzees are experiencing drastic population declines, their numbers at African rescue and rehabilitation projects are growing rapidly. Chimpanzees follow complex routes to these refuges; and their geographic origins are often unclear. Identifying areas where hunting occurs can help law enforcement authorities focus scarce resources for wildlife protection planning. Efficiently focusing these resources is particularly important in Cameroon because this countr...

  14. An unusual mechanism for EF-Tu activation during tmRNA-mediated ribosome rescue

    Miller, Mickey R; Buskirk, Allen R.

    2014-01-01

    When ribosomes are stalled on truncated mRNAs in prokaryotes, they are rescued by the tmRNA/SmpB complex. It has been unclear how EF-Tu is activated by this complex. This manuscript analyzes this problem, and the results indicate that the normal EF-Tu GTPase cycle does not appear to apply in this specialized situation.

  15. The boat people of Vietnam. Rescue on the South China Sea.

    Hayes, T J; Thomas, D; Dewar, E P

    1990-01-01

    Poor economic conditions in Vietnam have encouraged large numbers of people seeking a better life in the West to join the flow of political refugees leaving the country as "boat people". We report the events surrounding one such group of people who were rescued from the South China Sea by the Outback 88 Task Group. PMID:2374108

  16. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  17. Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm

    Harholt, Jesper; Bach, Inga Christensen; Lind Bouquin, Solveig; Nunan, Kylie J.; Madrid, Susan M.; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben Bach; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2010-01-01

    Endo-xylanase (from Bacillus subtilis) or ferulic acid esterase (from Aspergillus niger) were expressed in wheat under the control of the endosperm-specific 1DX5 glutenin promoter. Constructs both with and without the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu) KDEL were used. Transg...

  18. Dendritic Assembly of Heteromeric γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type B Receptor Subunits in Hippocampal NeuronsS⃞

    Ramírez, Omar A.; Vidal, René L.; Tello, Judith A.; Vargas, Karina J.; Kindler, Stefan; Härtel, Steffen; Couve, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control synaptic efficacy through the availability of neurotransmitter receptors depends on uncovering their specific intracellular trafficking routes. γ-Aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors (GABABRs) are obligatory heteromers present at dendritic excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic sites. It is unknown whether synthesis and assembly of GABABRs occur in the somatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) followed by vesicular transport to ...

  19. Rescue of Long-Tail Data from the Ocean Bottom to the Moon

    Hsu, L.; Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Delano, J. W.; Gill, J. B.; Tivey, M.

    2013-12-01

    IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications, www.iedadata.org), the NSF facility that operates EarthChem, the Marine Geoscience Data System, and the System for Earth Sample Registration, launched a Data Rescue Initiative in 2013 to advance preservation and re-use of valuable legacy datasets that are in danger of being lost. As part of this initiative, IEDA established a competition for Data Rescue Mini-Awards that provide modest funds to investigators to properly compile, document, and transfer legacy data sets to IEDA. Applications from late-career and near-retirement investigators were specifically encouraged. Awardees were given approximately six months to complete their data rescue activities. Three projects were awarded in 2013: (1) Geochemistry of Lunar Glasses: assembly of major element, trace element, volatile element, and isotope ratio data for lunar volcanic glasses and lunar impact glasses, (2) Geochemical and Geochronological data from Fiji, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, and Endeavor segment: assembly of published and unpublished data and metadata from large rock sample collections, and (3) Near-bottom Magnetic Data: curation and archival of 35 years of high-resolution, near-bottom magnetic field data from deeptowed platforms, submersibles, and ROVs. IEDA is working closely with the awardees to guide and support the data rescue effort and to assist with specific challenges related to outdated storage media or technology, diversity of platforms over decades of research, and the lack of established standards for data documentation. In this contribution we describe procedures and tools used for each project, summarize lessons learned and best practices, and present the final output of each data rescue project. Depending on the experiences of this first year and the availability of funds, we plan to continue the competition in future years.

  20. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.