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Sample records for acid oxidation defects

  1. Defective [U-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased [U-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation. [1-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

  2. Defects at oxide surfaces

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  3. A Comprehensive Study of Formic Acid Oxidation on Palladium Nanocrystals with Different Types of Facets and Twin Defects

    Choi, Sang; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Scaranto, Jessica; Huang, Hongwen; Wang, Yi; Xia, Xiaohu; Lv, Tian; Park, Jinho; Peng, Hsin-Chieh; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-13

    Palladium has been recognized as the best anodic, monometallic electrocatalyst for the formic acid oxidation (FAO) reaction in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Here we report a systematic study of FAO on a variety of Pd nanocrystals, including cubes, right bipyramids, octahedra, tetrahedra, decahedra, and icosahedra. These nanocrystals were synthesized with approximately the same size, but different types of facets and twin defects on their surfaces. Our measurements indicate that the Pd nanocrystals enclosed by {1 0 0} facets have higher specific activities than those enclosed by {1 1 1} facets, in agreement with prior observations for Pd single-crystal substrates. If comparing nanocrystals predominantly enclosed by a specific type of facet, {1 0 0} or {1 1 1}, those with twin defects displayed greatly enhanced FAO activities compared to their single-crystal counterparts. To rationalize these experimental results, we performed periodic, self-consistent DFT calculations on model single-crystal substrates of Pd, representing the active sites present in the nanocrystals used in the experiments. The calculation results suggest that the enhancement of FAO activity on defect regions, represented by Pd(2 1 1) sites, compared to the activity of both Pd(1 0 0) and Pd(1 1 1) surfaces, could be attributed to an increased flux through the HCOO-mediated pathway rather than the COOH-mediated pathway on Pd(2 1 1). Since COOH has been identified as a precursor to CO, a site-poisoning species, a lower coverage of CO at the defect regions will lead to a higher activity for the corresponding nanocrystal catalysts, containing those defect regions.

  4. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  5. Genetic defects in fatty acid beta-oxidation and acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Molecular pathogenesis and genotype-phenotype relationships

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter; Andresen, Brage S

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation deficiencies are due to genetic defects in enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation and transport proteins. Genetic defects have been identified in most of the genes where nearly all types of sequence variations (mutation types) have been associated with disease. In...... on biogenesis, stability and kinetic properties for this variant enzyme will be discussed in detail and used as a paradigm for the study of other mis-sense variant proteins. We conclude that the total effect of mis-sense sequence variations may comprise an invariable--sequence variation specific...

  6. Antisite defects at oxide interfaces

    Chen, Hanghui; Millis, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    We use ab initio calculations to estimate the formation energies of cation (transition-metal) antisite defects at oxide interfaces and to understand the basic physical effects that drive or suppress the formation of these defects. Antisite defects are found to be favored in systems with substantial charge transfer across the interface, while Jahn-Teller distortions and itinerant ferromagnetism can prevent antisite defects and help stabilize atomically sharp interfaces. Our results enable identification of classes of systems that may be more and less susceptible to the formation of antisite defects, and they motivate experimental studies and further theoretical calculations to elucidate the local structure and stability of oxide interface systems.

  7. Impurity-defect structure of anodic aluminum oxide produced by two-sided anodizing in tartaric acid

    Chernyakova, K. V.; Vrublevsky, I. A.; Ivanovskaya, M. I.; Kotsikau, D. A.

    2012-03-01

    Porous aluminum oxide is prepared in a 0.4 M aqueous solution of tartaric acid by two-sided anodizing. Fourier Transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR) data reveal the presence, in the alumina, of unoxidized tartarate ions, as well as products of their partial (radical organic products and CO) and complete (CO2) oxidation. Carboxylate ions and elemental carbon contained in the anodic oxide impart a gray color to the films.

  8. Atomistic stimulation of defective oxides

    Minervini, L

    2000-01-01

    defect processes. The predominant intrinsic disorder reaction and the mechanism by which excess oxygen is accommodated are established. Furthermore, the most favourable migration mechanism and pathway for oxygen ions is predicted. Chapters 7 and 8 investigate pyrochlore oxides. These materials are candidates for solid oxide fuel cell components and as actinide host phases. Such applications require a detailed understanding of the defect processes. The defect energies, displayed as contour maps, are able to account for structure stability and, given an appropriate partial charge potential model, to accurately determine the oxygen positional parameter. In particular, the dependence of the positional parameter on intrinsic disorder is predicted. It is demonstrated, by radiation damage experiments, that these results are able to predict the radiation performance of pyrochlore oxides. Atomistic simulation calculations based on energy minimization techniques and classical pair potentials are used to study several i...

  9. Folic acid and birth defect prevention

    ... of certain birth defects. These include spina bifida, anencephaly, and some heart defects. Experts recommend women who ... Women who have had a baby with a neural tube defect may need a higher dose of folic acid. ...

  10. Heterologous expression of human carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II in yeast: A model for the molecular analysis of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    Cavadini, P.; Invernizzi, F.; Baratta, S. [Istituto Nazionale Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The CPT enzyme system, which is composed of two distinct mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins (CPT I and CPT II), provides the mechanism whereby long-chain fatty acids are transferred from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix to undergo {beta}-oxidation. Here, we report the development of an expression system for investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in CPT II deficiency and, potentially, other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects. To explore yeast as an expression system, we introduced a cDNA encoding the entire human CPT II precursor into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression was programmed by using an inducible galactose operon promoter (GAL1). Following induction, human CPT II was expressed at high levels, with activity 4- to 16-fold greater than in human fibroblasts. Levels of expression paralleled those of respiration, being higher in cells grown on a nonfermentable carbon source than in those grown on glucose. Immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled transformed cells demonstrated that human CPT II expressed in yeast was targeted to mitochondria with correct proteolytic processing of its 25-residue mitochondrial leader sequence. Preliminary results on the expression of a number of mutant CPT II alleles associated with different clinical phenotypes demonstrated the value of this system for examining the functional consequences of disease-causing mutations and investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with CPT II deficiency.

  11. Modelling the oxidation of defected fuel elements

    Interim dry storage of used fuel is an economical alternative to storage in water pools. The fuel must remain intact during the dry-storage period, otherwise future handling of the fuel will be expensive. Oxidation of defected fuel elements can lead to fuel disintegration. Thus it is important to be able to predict the extent of oxidation of defected fuel elements in a dry-storage facility. In this report, a model is developed for predicting the extent or rate of oxidation of defected fuel elements stored at temperatures up to 170 C. The model employs equivalent porous medium representation of the fuel and described the oxygen concentration in the fuel element using a reaction-diffusion equation. The one- and two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations are solved on the assumption that the oxygen-fuel reaction is either zeroth or first order in the oxygen concentration. Dimensional analysis of the model equations shows that the solution depends explicitly on a single parameter p. The value of p can be calculated using data from the literature, or it can be estimated from the results of the CEX-1 experiments being carried out at Whiteshell Laboratories. The value of p, estimated from the CEX-1 results, is more than two orders of magnitude larger than the value of p calculated from literature data. Although some reasons for this large difference are suggested, further work is needed to resolve this discrepancy. (author). 16 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  12. Hyaluronic acid in calves defects correction

    Lorenzo Rosset; Mario Goisis

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Since the advent of fillers, new techniques are continuously developed for different uses. In this study, we evaluated the use of hyaluronic acid for calf augmentation. Methods: A total of 42 patients were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent augmentation procedure in our centers under local anesthesia, the operations were completed within 1 h with a prompt correction of the defects. Results: Thirty-nine patients were satisfied with the treatment (93%), while three had complicat...

  13. Neural Tube Defects, Folic Acid and Methylation

    Henk J. Blom

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects.

  14. Hyaluronic acid in calves defects correction

    Lorenzo Rosset

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Since the advent of fillers, new techniques are continuously developed for different uses. In this study, we evaluated the use of hyaluronic acid for calf augmentation. Methods: A total of 42 patients were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent augmentation procedure in our centers under local anesthesia, the operations were completed within 1 h with a prompt correction of the defects. Results: Thirty-nine patients were satisfied with the treatment (93%, while three had complications, local infection, and lumps, that were resolved quickly (7%. Conclusion: Macrofillers can be injected into the calf to correct any defects. The advantages include short duration of treatment; the procedure performed under local anesthesia and limited side-effects that resolve promptly. This study suggests the use of biocompatible macrofillers for the augmentation of not only calves, but also for augmentation of breast and buttocks.

  15. Regularities of radiation defects build up on oxide materials surface

    Analysis of experimental data by radiation defects study on different oxide elements (silicon, beryllium, aluminium, rare earth elements) irradiated by the photo-, gamma-, neutron-, alpha- radiation, protons and helium ions show, that gas adsorption process on the surface centers and radiation defects build up in metal oxide correlated between themselves. These processes were described by the equivalent kinetic equations for analysis of radiation defects build up in the different metal oxides. It was revealed in the result of the analysis: number of radiation defects are droningly increasing up to limit value with the treatment temperature growth. Constant of radicals death at ionizing radiation increases as well. Amount of surface defects in different oxides defining absorbing activity of these materials looks as: silicon oxide→beryllium oxide→aluminium oxide. So it was found, that most optimal material for absorbing system preparation is silicon oxide by it power intensity and berylium oxide by it adsorption efficiency

  16. Defect Engineering in Plasmonic Metal Oxide Nanocrystals.

    Runnerstrom, Evan L; Bergerud, Amy; Agrawal, Ankit; Johns, Robert W; Dahlman, Clayton J; Singh, Ajay; Selbach, Sverre M; Milliron, Delia J

    2016-05-11

    Defects may tend to make crystals interesting but they do not always improve performance. In doped metal oxide nanocrystals with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), aliovalent dopants and oxygen vacancies act as centers for ionized impurity scattering of electrons. Such electronic damping leads to lossy, broadband LSPR with low quality factors, limiting applications that require near-field concentration of light. However, the appropriate dopant can mitigate ionized impurity scattering. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of a novel doped metal oxide nanocrystal material, cerium-doped indium oxide (Ce:In2O3). Ce:In2O3 nanocrystals display tunable mid-infrared LSPR with exceptionally narrow line widths and the highest quality factors observed for nanocrystals in this spectral region. Drude model fits to the spectra indicate that a drastic reduction in ionized impurity scattering is responsible for the enhanced quality factors, and high electronic mobilities reaching 33 cm(2)V(-1) s(-1) are measured optically, well above the optical mobility for tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanocrystals. We investigate the microscopic mechanisms underlying this enhanced mobility with density functional theory calculations, which suggest that scattering is reduced because cerium orbitals do not hybridize with the In orbitals that dominate the bottom of the conduction band. Ce doping may also reduce the equilibrium oxygen vacancy concentration, further enhancing mobility. From the absorption spectra of single Ce:In2O3 nanocrystals, we determine the dielectric function and by simulation predict strong near-field enhancement of mid-IR light, especially around the vertices of our synthesized nanocubes. PMID:27111427

  17. Delay Testing Viability of Gate Oxide Short Defects

    J. M. Gallière; M. Renovell; F.Aza(i)s; Y. Bertrand

    2005-01-01

    Gate Oxide Short (GOS) defects are becoming predominant as technology is scaling down. Boolean and IDDQ testing of this defect has been widely studied but there is no paper dedicated to delay testing of this defect. So, this paper studies the delay behavior of Gate Oxide Short faults due to pinhole in the gate oxide. The objective of this paper is to give a detailed analysis of the behavior of the GOS defect taking into account the random parameter of the defect such as the GOS resistance and the GOS location. Because an accurate analysis is desired, the bi-dimensional array will be used.Because a complete analysis is desired, we derive the dynamic characteristic of the GOS as a function of the GOS resistance and location. It is demonstrated that i) GOS has a significant impact on gate delay, ii) GOS located close to the source of the transistor and with small resistance has very high impact.

  18. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    Kovačević, Goran; Pivac, Branko

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, f...

  19. Partial thermodynamic properties and defective structure of oxide phases

    Partial thermodynamic properties and defective structure of oxide phases have been considered and evaluation of the properties is made, using various correlations to create a correct statisticothermodynamic model of the defective structure. The dependences OEHsub(Osub(2)) deg, ΔSsub(Osub(2)) deg and ΔSsub(Osub(2)) deg (ΔHsub(Osub(2)) deg) are presented for such oxides as VOsub(1+-x), VOsub(3/2+x), VOsub(2+-x), ZrOsub(2-x), HfOsub(2-x), WOsub(2+x), Wosub(3-x). Ways to evaluate the type of defects using the thermodynamic dependences are shown: 1) the use of thermodynamic data in the method of quasichemical equilibrium of defects; 2) the method, based on the establishment of defective structure according to linear dependence of oxygen activity on x in MOsub(s+-x) in the case of certain types of defects; 3) the method of model selection of a compound defective structure comparing the reduced dependences of partial thermodynamic functions of the phase composition with the ones, obtained experimentally. Models of complex types of defective structure during partial ordering of the defects for CeOsub(2-x) and UOsub(2+x) are analyzed. Despite the multiplicity of assumptions and insufficiency of application limits study the model of energy levels is admitted to be the most perpective statistical model to determine partial thermodynamic properties of nonstoichiometric compounds with a complex defective structure, experimental determination of which is hampered

  20. Metastable defects in beryllium oxide crystals

    The metastable luminescence centers of regular lattice are investigated in binary beryllium oxide crystals. Beryllium oxide hexagonal crystals are the simplest among low-symmetry oxide scintillators and serve as a model system. The anisotropy of energy transformation and transfer is analyzed

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2

    ... DEFECT, CONGENITAL, 2 Sources for This Page Clayton PT. Disorders of bile acid synthesis. J Inherit Metab ... J, Duran M, Overmars H, Scambler PJ, Clayton PT. Mutations in SRD5B1 (AKR1D1), the gene encoding delta( ...

  2. The primary prevention of birth defects: Multivitamins or folic acid?

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Periconceptional use of folic acid alone or in multivitamin supplements is effective for the primary prevention of neural-tube defects. The Hungarian randomized and two-cohort controlled trials showed that periconceptional multivitamin supplementation can reduce the occurrence of some other structural birth defects, i.e. congenital abnormalities. These findings were supported by many, but not all observational studies. Recently there have been two main debated questions. The first one is whether the use of folic acid alone or folic acid-containing multivitamins is better. The second one is connected with the dilemma of whether high dose of folic acid (e.g. 5 mg might be better than a daily multivitamin with 0.4 – 0.8 mg of folic acid. Comparison of the pooled data of two Hungarian trials using a multivitamin containing 0.8 mg folic acid and the data of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities using high dose of folic acid seemed to be appropriate to answer these questions. Multivitamins containing 0.4 – 0.8 mg of folic acid were more effective for the reduction of neural-tube defects than high dose of folic acid. Both multivitamins and folic acid can prevent some part of congenital cardiovascular malformations. Only multivitamins were able to reduce the prevalence at birth of obstructive defects of urinary tract, limb deficiencies and congenital pyloric stenosis. However, folic acid was effective in preventing some part of rectal/anal stenosis/atresia, and high dose of folic acid had effect in preventing some orofacial clefts. The findings are consistent that periconceptional multivitamin and folic acid supplementation reduce the overall occurrence of congenital abnormalities in addition to the demonstrated effect on neural-tube defects.

  3. The primary prevention of birth defects: Multivitamins or folic acid?

    Czeizel, Andrew E

    2004-01-01

    Periconceptional use of folic acid alone or in multivitamin supplements is effective for the primary prevention of neural-tube defects. The Hungarian randomized and two-cohort controlled trials showed that periconceptional multivitamin supplementation can reduce the occurrence of some other structural birth defects, i.e. congenital abnormalities. These findings were supported by many, but not all observational studies. Recently there have been two main debated questions. The first one is whether the use of folic acid alone or folic acid-containing multivitamins is better. The second one is connected with the dilemma of whether high dose of folic acid (e.g. 5 mg) might be better than a daily multivitamin with 0.4 - 0.8 mg of folic acid. Comparison of the pooled data of two Hungarian trials using a multivitamin containing 0.8 mg folic acid and the data of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities using high dose of folic acid seemed to be appropriate to answer these questions. Multivitamins containing 0.4 - 0.8 mg of folic acid were more effective for the reduction of neural-tube defects than high dose of folic acid. Both multivitamins and folic acid can prevent some part of congenital cardiovascular malformations. Only multivitamins were able to reduce the prevalence at birth of obstructive defects of urinary tract, limb deficiencies and congenital pyloric stenosis. However, folic acid was effective in preventing some part of rectal/anal stenosis/atresia, and high dose of folic acid had effect in preventing some orofacial clefts. The findings are consistent that periconceptional multivitamin and folic acid supplementation reduce the overall occurrence of congenital abnormalities in addition to the demonstrated effect on neural-tube defects. PMID:15912190

  4. Diffusion of Point Defects in Non-Stoichiometric Oxides

    The defect structure and properties of non-stoichiometric oxides are inter-related by thermodynamic equilibria which exist at the interfaces between oxides and adjacent phases as well as within the oxides themselves. The purpose of this paper is to show that diffusive mass transport in non-stoichiometric oxides may be related specifically to (a) the equilibria between oxides and metallic phases, (b) the equilibria between oxides and the vapour phase, and (c) internal equilibria between various crystal defects within the oxide phase. Model equilibria for high temperature oxidation, diffusion of radioisotopes and crystal defects, and extrinsic electrical conductivity are described in detail for chromic oxide, Cr2O3, and strontium titanate, SrTiO3, Experimental measurements of diffusive mass transfer in Cr2O3 are shown to be in substantial agreement with predicted thermodynamic equilibria. The kinetics of oxidation of high-purity electrolytic chromium in damp hydrogen were studied using a torsion microbalance. A range of temperatures from 700 to 1000°C and hydrogen dew points from - 48 to 23°C were investigated. Damp hydrogen permitted the exploration of oxidizing conditions which were just perceptibly oxidizing with respect to the over-all equilibrium between Cr, Cr2O3 and the vapour phase. Samples, freshly abraded with 4/0 metailographic polish, exhibited a brief period of linear oxidation (∼20 min) followed by a lengthy period of diffusion-controlled parabolic oxidation (∼400 min.). The variation of the parabolic rate constant with H2O/H2 pressure ratio was found to agree with the pressure dependence predicted for Cr2O3 having a defect structure of cation vacancies and electron holes. The results were confirmed by self diffusion studies in single crystals of Cr2O3. Crystals and damp hydrogen vapour were equilibrated and Cr51 was used as a tracer. The results show that the tracer diffusion coefficient varies as the three-eighths power of the H2O/H2 pressure

  5. Differential diagnosis in patients with suspected bile acid synthesis defects

    Dorothea Haas; Hongying Gan-Schreier; Claus-Dieter Langhans; Tilman Rohrer; Guido Engelmann; Maura Heverin; David W Russell

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the clinical presentations associated with bile acid synthesis defects and to describe identification of individual disorders and diagnostic pitfalls.METHODS:Authors describe semiquantitative determination of 16 urinary bile acid metabolites by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.Sample preparation was performed by solid-phase extraction.The total analysis time was 2 min per sample.Authors determined bile acid metabolites in 363 patients with suspected defects in bile acid metabolism.RESULTS:Abnormal bile acid metabolites were found in 36 patients.Two patients had bile acid synthesis defects but presented with atypical presentations.In 2 other patients who were later shown to be affected by biliary atresia and cystic fibrosis the profile of bile acid metabolites was initially suggestive of a bile acid synthesis defect.Three adult patients suffered from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.Nineteen patients had peroxisomal disorders,and 10 patients had cholestatic hepatopathy of other cause.CONCLUSION:Screening for urinary cholanoids should be done in every infant with cholestatic hepatopathy as well as in children with progressive neurological disease to provide specific therapy.

  6. The primary prevention of birth defects: Multivitamins or folic acid?

    Andrew E. Czeizel

    2004-01-01

    Periconceptional use of folic acid alone or in multivitamin supplements is effective for the primary prevention of neural-tube defects. The Hungarian randomized and two-cohort controlled trials showed that periconceptional multivitamin supplementation can reduce the occurrence of some other structural birth defects, i.e. congenital abnormalities. These findings were supported by many, but not all observational studies. Recently there have been two main debated questions. The first one is whet...

  7. Defects generated by oxidation of BF2+ implanted silicon

    Oxidation of silicon implanted with doses of 1014 BF2+ cm-2 and above generated a high density (about 108 cm-2) of stacking faults and dislocations. There is a critical BF2+ dose between 5 x 1013 and 1014 cm-2 for stacking fault generation. The density of stacking faults generated during 950 deg C oxidation was found to be lower than that from 900 deg C oxidation. TEM studies revealed this to be due to fault annihilation by the interaction of orthogonal stacking faults. EBIC studies showed the implantation induced defects to be electrically active. Pre-oxidation annealing was found to be effective in reducing the density of implantation induced defects. (author)

  8. Nitrogen defects in wide band gap oxides: defect equilibria and electronic structure from first principles calculations.

    Polfus, Jonathan M; Bjørheim, Tor S; Norby, Truls; Haugsrud, Reidar

    2012-09-01

    The nitrogen related defect chemistry and electronic structure of wide band gap oxides are investigated by density functional theory defect calculations of N(O)(q), NH(O)(×), and (NH2)(O)(·) as well as V(O)(··) and OH(O)(·) in MgO, CaO, SrO, Al(2)O(3), In(2)O(3), Sc(2)O(3), Y(2)O(3), La(2)O(3), TiO(2), SnO(2), ZrO(2), BaZrO(3), and SrZrO(3). The N(O)(q) acceptor level is found to be deep and the binding energy of NH(O)(×) with respect to N(O)' and (OH(O)(·) is found to be significantly negative, i.e. binding, in all of the investigated oxides. The defect structure of the oxides was found to be remarkably similar under reducing and nitriding conditions (1 bar N(2), 1 bar H(2) and 1 × 10(-7) bar H(2)O): NH(O)(×) predominates at low temperatures and [N(O)'] = 2[V(O)(··) predominates at higher temperatures (>900 K for most of the oxides). Furthermore, we evaluate how the defect structure is affected by non-equilibrium conditions such as doping and quenching. In terms of electronic structure, N(O)' is found to introduce isolated N-2p states within the band gap, while the N-2p states of NH(O)(×) are shifted towards, or overlap with the VBM. Finally, we assess the effect of nitrogen incorporation on the proton conducting properties of oxides and comment on their corrosion resistance in nitriding atmospheres in light of the calculated defect structures. PMID:22828729

  9. Radiation defects and metal ions of iron group in oxides

    The effect of transition ion impurities (iron group) upon optical properties and radiation defect production has been studied for alkaline earth metal oxides. Basic physical and chemical properties of the latters have been compared to those of transition metal (iron group) oxides. Original results of magnesium oxide monocrystal growth have been obtained by the method of chemical transport reactions in a narrow gap for various cobalt, nickel and manganese ion concentrations. For transition metal ions the dependences of optical absorption, luminescence and ESR on ion concentration in magnesium oxide have been found. Basing on those dependences and in terms of the ligand field theory the crystal field parameters have been calculated for cobalt and nickel ions. Characteristics of electron and hole center creation in oxides of alkaline earth metals stated for various concentrations of transition metal ions are the following: the change of the ions' electron state, their participation in the radiation defect creation and decay, the interaction between transition metal ions and radiation defects

  10. Modelling of fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel rods

    A fuel oxidation model is proposed for operating defective nuclear fuel rods. The present model is based on adsorption theory and accounts for high pressure effects. This model is in agreement with the fuel oxidation kinetics observed in high temperature annealing experiments conducted at 1 473 to 1 623 K in steam over a range of pressure from 0.001 to 0.1 MPa. Using a Freundlich adsorption isotherm, the current model is also consistent with recent experiments conducted at a higher pressure of 7 MPa. The model also considers radiolytic effects as a consequence of fission fragment bombardment in the fuel-to-clad gap. This treatment suggests that radiolysis-assisted oxidation is insignificant in operating defective rods (as compared to thermal effects), as supported by limited in-reactor data. The effects of diffusion of the interstitial oxygen ions in the solid in the operating rod is further discussed. (authors)

  11. Oxide-based protonic conductors: Point defects and transport properties

    Bonanos, N.

    , hydrogen pumps, fuel cells, etc. The extent to which protonic defects form depends mainly on the partial pressure of water vapour, temperature and basicity of the constituent oxides, while their mobility depends, among other factors, on the metal-oxygen bond length and bond energy. The defect equilibria...... that determine the protonic concentrations are considered, with emphasis on the regime of low oxygen partial pressure. The measurement of the thermoelectric power (TEP) and of the H+/D+ isotope effect in conductivity are discussed as a means of characterising the conduction process. (C) 2001 Elsevier...

  12. Oxide-based protonic conductors: Point defects and transport properties

    Bonanos, N.

    2001-01-01

    , hydrogen pumps, fuel cells, etc. The extent to which protonic defects form depends mainly on the partial pressure of water vapour, temperature and basicity of the constituent oxides, while their mobility depends, among other factors, on the metal-oxygen bond length and bond energy. The defect equilibria...... that determine the protonic concentrations are considered, with emphasis on the regime of low oxygen partial pressure. The measurement of the thermoelectric power (TEP) and of the H+/D+ isotope effect in conductivity are discussed as a means of characterising the conduction process. (C) 2001 Elsevier...

  13. Defects and properties of cadmium oxide based transparent conductors

    Yu, Kin Man; Detert, D. M.; Chen, Guibin; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Chaoping; Grankowska, S.; Hsu, L.; Dubon, O. D.; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2016-05-01

    Transparent conductors play an increasingly important role in a number of semiconductor technologies. This paper reports on the defects and properties of Cadmium Oxide, a transparent conducting oxide which can be potentially used for full spectrum photovoltaics. We carried out a systematic investigation on the effects of defects in CdO thin films undoped and intentionally doped with In and Ga under different deposition and annealing conditions. We found that at low growth temperatures (1 Ω cm due to incorporation of excess O in the form of O-related acceptor defects, likely to be O interstitials. Intentional doping with In and Ga donors leads to an increase of both the electron concentration and the mobility. With proper doping CdO films with electron concentration of more than 1021 cm-3 and electron mobility higher than 120 cm2/V s can be achieved. Thermal annealing of doped CdO films in N2 ambient can further improve the electrical properties by removing native acceptors and improving film crystallinity. Furthermore, the unique doping behavior and electrical properties of CdO were explored via simulations based on the amphoteric defect model. A comparison of the calculations and experimental results show that the formation energy of native donors and acceptors at the Fermi stabilization energy is ˜1 eV and that the mobility of sputtered deposited CdO is limited by a background acceptor concentration of ˜5-6 × 1020/cm3. The calculations offer an insight into understanding of the effects of defects on electrical properties of undoped and doped CdO and offer a potential to use similar methods to analyze doping and defect properties of other semiconductor materials.

  14. Folic acid sensitive birth defects in association with intrauterine exposure to folic acid antagonists

    Meijer, W.M.; Walle, H.E.K.de; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W.S; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    2005-01-01

    Since the protective effect of folic acid (FA) on birth defects is well known, it is reasonable to assume intrauterine exposure to FA antagonists increases the risk on these defects. We have therefore performed case-control analyses to investigate the risk of intrauterine exposure to FA antagonists,

  15. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  16. Understanding the defect structure of solution grown zinc oxide

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconducting oxide with many potential applications in various optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and field effect transistors (FETs). Much effort has been made to understand the ZnO structure and its defects. However, one major issue in determining whether it is Zn or O deficiency that provides ZnO its unique properties remains. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an ideal, atom specific characterization technique that is able to probe defect structure in many materials, including ZnO. In this paper, comparative studies of bulk and aqueous solution grown (≤90 °C) ZnO powders using XAS and x-ray pair distribution function (XPDF) techniques are described. The XAS Zn–Zn correlation and XPDF results undoubtedly point out that the solution grown ZnO contains Zn deficiency, rather than the O deficiency that were commonly reported. This understanding of ZnO short range order and structure will be invaluable for further development of solid state lighting and other optoelectronic device applications. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: ► ZnO powders have been synthesized through an aqueous solution method. ► Defect structure studied using XAS and XPDF. ► Zn–Zn correlations are less in the ZnO powders synthesized in solution than bulk. ► Zn vacancies are present in the powders synthesized. ► EXAFS and XPDF, when used complementary, are useful characterization techniques.

  17. Space charges and defect concentration profiles at complex oxide interfaces

    Gunkel, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Ramadan, Amr H. H.; De Souza, Roger A.; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Dittmann, Regina

    2016-06-01

    We discuss electronic and ionic defect concentration profiles at the conducting interface between the two wide-band-gap insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (STO). The profiles are deduced from a thermodynamic model considering a local space charge layer (SCL) originating from charge transfer to the interface region, thus combining electronic and ionic reconstruction mechanisms. We show that the electrical potential confining the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface modifies the equilibrium defect concentrations in the SCL. For the n -conducting interface, positively charged oxygen vacancies are depleted within the SCL, while negatively charged strontium vacancies accumulate. Charge compensation within the SCL is achieved by a mixed ionic-electronic interface reconstruction, while the competition between 2DEG and localized ionic defects is controlled by ambient p O2 . The concentration of strontium vacancies increases drastically in oxidizing conditions and exhibits a steep depth profile towards the interface. Accounting for the low cation diffusivity in STO, we also discuss kinetic limitations of cation defect formation and the effect of a partial equilibration of the cation sublattice. We discuss the resulting implications for low temperature transport.

  18. Theoretical studies of defects in binary and ternary oxides

    In the past decade, there has been an explosive development of computational techniques utilizing high-speed computers to study the electronic and atomic structural properties of solids. These techniques form an important compliment to laboratory experiments for providing a better understanding of spectroscopic properties, as well as the energetics of the solid systems. For ideal metallic and semiconducting crystal lattice with translational symmetry, the conventional energy band structure approaches are capable to provide a good degree of precision in both electronic structure and system energies. On the other hand the molecular-cluster model represents a convenient method of studying those properties that are primarily a function of the local environment of the system, such as vacancy, substitutional and interstitial defects. In this paper, the authors present some preliminary results of electronic structure of substitutional defects and vacancy in binary and ternary cubic zirconium oxides obtained by the embedded molecular-cluster model calculation. The importance of electronic charge redistribution in the solids where the defect is introduced into the perfect lattice is highlighted and the effect of electron polarization of the surrounding ions of the defect is discussed

  19. Towards precise defect control in layered oxide structures by using oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Federico Baiutti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the atomic-layer-by-layer oxide molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-oxide MBE which has been recently installed in the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research and we report on its present status, providing some examples that demonstrate its successful application in the synthesis of different layered oxides, with particular reference to superconducting La2CuO4 and insulator-to-metal La2−xSrxNiO4. We briefly review the ALL-oxide MBE technique and its unique capabilities in the deposition of atomically smooth single-crystal thin films of various complex oxides, artificial compounds and heterostructures, introducing our goal of pursuing a deep investigation of such systems with particular emphasis on structural defects, with the aim of tailoring their functional properties by precise defects control.

  20. A metal-oxide-semiconductor radiation dosimeter with a thick and defect-rich oxide layer

    Enhancing the density of defects in the oxide layer is the main factor in improving the sensitivity of a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) radiation dosimeter. This paper reports a novel MOS dosimeter with a very thick and defect-rich oxide layer fabricated by MEMS technology. The category of defects in SiO2 and their possible effect on the radiation dose sensing was analyzed. Then, we proposed combining deep-reactive-ion etching, thermal oxidation and low pressure chemical vapor deposition to realize an oxide layer containing multiple and large interfaces which can increase defects significantly. The trench-and-beam structure of silicon was considered in detail. The fabrication process was developed for obtaining a thick and compact MEMS-made SiO2. Our devices were irradiated by γ-rays of 60Co at 2 Gy per minute for 2 h and a thermally stimulated current (TSC) method was used to determine the readout of the dosimeters. Results show that there is a peak current of about 450 nA, indicating a total TSC charge of 158 μC and sensitivity of 1.1 μC mm−3·Gy, which is 40 times the sensitivity of previous MOS dosimeters. (paper)

  1. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-[14C]palmitate to 14CO2 and total [14C]acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO2 and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 μM). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 μM and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine

  2. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C)palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C)acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO/sup 2/ and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ..mu..M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ..mu..M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine.

  3. Controlled Defects of Zinc Oxide Nanorods for Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenol

    Jamal Al-Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution from human and industrial activities has received much attention as it adversely affects human health and bio-diversity. In this work we report efficient visible light photocatalytic degradation of phenol using supported zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods and explore the role of surface defects in ZnO on the visible light photocatalytic activity. ZnO nanorods were synthesized on glass substrates using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, while the surface defect states were controlled by annealing the nanorods at various temperatures and were characterized by photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used for the evaluation of phenol photocatalytic degradation. ZnO nanorods with high surface defects exhibited maximum visible light photocatalytic activity, showing 50% degradation of 10 ppm phenol aqueous solution within 2.5 h, with a degradation rate almost four times higher than that of nanorods with lower surface defects. The mineralization process of phenol during degradation was also investigated, and it showed the evolution of different photocatalytic byproducts, such as benzoquinone, catechol, resorcinol and carboxylic acids, at different stages. The results from this study suggest that the presence of surface defects in ZnO nanorods is crucial for its efficient visible light photocatalytic activity, which is otherwise only active in the ultraviolet region.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves gastrointestinal motility defects in gallstone patients

    A Colecchia; G Mazzella; L Sandri; F Azzaroli; M Magliuolo; P Simoni; ML Bacchi-Reggiani; E Roda; D Festi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To simultaneously evaluate the presence of defects in gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as in intestinal transit in gallstone patients (GS) and the effect of chronic ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration on these parameters and on serum bile acids and clinical outcome in GS and controls (CTR).METHODS: After a standard liquid test meal, gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound), oroileal transit time (OI∏) (by an immunoenzymatic technique)and serum bile acids (by HPLC) were evaluated before and after 3 mo of UDCA (12 mg/kg bw/d) or placebo administration in 10 symptomatic GS and 10 matched healthy CTR.RESULTS: OI∏ was longer in GS than in CTR (P <0.0001); UDCA significantly reduced OI∏ in GS (P <0.0001), but not in CTR. GS had longer gastric halfemptying time (t1/2) than CTR (P < 0.0044) at baseline;after UDCA, t1/2 significantly decreased (P < 0.006) in GS but not in CTR. Placebo administration had no effect on gastric emptying and intestinal transit in both GS and CTR.CONCLUSION: The gallstone patient has simultaneous multiple impairments of gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as of intestinal transit. UDCA administration restores these defects in GS, without any effect in CTR. These results confirm the pathogenetic role of gastrointestinal motility in gallstone disease and suggest an additional mechanism of action for UDCA in reducing bile cholesterol supersaturation.

  5. Defect controlled ferromagnetism in xenon ion irradiated zinc oxide

    Satyarthi, P.; Ghosh, S. [Nanostech Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Mishra, P.; Sekhar, B.R. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Singh, F.; Kumar, P.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Dhaka, R.S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Srivastava, P., E-mail: pankajs@physics.iitd.ac.in [Nanostech Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-07-01

    We report evolution of magnetic properties in zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals and polycrystalline films induced by 500 KeV xenon ion (Xe{sup 3+}) irradiation. Room temperature ferromagnetism (RT-FM) behavior is observed in as deposited polycrystalline ZnO film and strength of FM enhances with ion fluence up to 2×10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} and then decreases. However, RT-FM is not observed in ZnO single crystals even after irradiation with fluence up to 3.5×10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman measurements of ZnO single crystal reveal slightly disordered hexagonal wurtzite structure after irradiation. However, as deposited and irradiated polycrystalline ZnO films indicate excessive lattice defects in the wurtzite structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals that Zn vacancy/interstitial defects are absent in all samples, although oxygen vacancy lattice defects are present. Density of oxygen vacancies is much higher in as deposited and irradiated polycrystalline ZnO films as compared to single crystals. This seems to be the determining factor for the presence and absence of RT-FM in ZnO films and single crystals respectively. The observed FM behavior in as deposited and irradiated polycrystalline ZnO films is explained on the basis of spin split impurity band formation from singly and doubly occupied oxygen vacancies which initiates d{sup 0} ferromagnetism. - Highlights: • We report defect controlled ferromagnetism in inert xenon ion irradiated ZnO. • Threshold concentration of O vacancies is essential to trigger ferromagnetism. • Spin imbalance of singly and doubly occupied oxygen vacancies induces ferromagnetism. • We reveal importance of d{sup 0} ferromagnetism in ZnO for future spintronics devices.

  6. Folate Deficiency and Folic Acid Supplementation: The Prevention of Neural-Tube Defects and Congenital Heart Defects

    Andrew E. Czeizel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Diet, particularly vitamin deficiency, is associated with the risk of birth defects. The aim of this review paper is to show the characteristics of common and severe neural-tube defects together with congenital heart defects (CHD as vitamin deficiencies play a role in their origin. The findings of the Hungarian intervention (randomized double-blind and cohort controlled trials indicated that periconceptional folic acid (FA-containing multivitamin supplementation prevented the major proportion (about 90% of neural-tube defects (NTD as well as a certain proportion (about 40% of congenital heart defects. Finally the benefits and drawbacks of three main practical applications of folic acid/multivitamin treatment such as (i dietary intake; (ii periconceptional supplementation; and (iii flour fortification are discussed. The conclusion arrived at is indeed confirmation of Benjamin Franklin’s statement: “An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of care”.

  7. The Arabidopsis male-sterile mutant dde2-2 is defective in the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene encoding one of the key enzymes of the jasmonic acid biosynthesis pathway

    von Malek, Bernadette; van der Graaff, Eric; Schneitz, Kay; Keller, Beat

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. mutant delayed-dehiscence2-2 (dde2-2) was identified in an En1/Spm1 transposon-induced mutant population screened for plants showing defects in fertility. The dde2-2 mutant allele is defective in the anther dehiscence process and filament elongation and thus e...

  8. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  9. Direct Oxidation of Ethene to Acetic Acid

    2001-01-01

    Direct oxidation of ethene to acetic acid over Pd-SiW12/SiO2 catalysts prepared by several methods was studied. A better method for reducing palladium composition of the catalysts was found. Acetic acid was obtained with selectivity of 82.7% and once-through space time yield (STY) of 257.4 g/h×L.

  10. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  11. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in astrocytes

    Astrocytes were derived from cortex of two-day-old rat brain and grown in primary culture to confluence. The metabolism of the fatty acids, octanoate and palmitate, to CO2 in oxidative respiration and to the formation of ketone bodies was examined by radiolabeled tracer methodology. The net production of acetoacetate was also determined by measurement of its mass. The enzymes in the ketogenic pathway were examined by measuring enzymic activity and/or by immunoblot analyses. Labeled CO2 and labeled ketone bodies were produced from the oxidation of fatty acids labeled at carboxy- and ω-terminal carbons, indicating that fatty acids were oxidized by β-oxidation. The results from the radiolabeled tracer studies also indicated that a substantial proportion of the ω-terminal 4-carbon unit of the fatty acids bypassed the β-ketothiolase step of the β-oxidation pathway. The [14C]acetoacetate formed from the [1-14C]labeled fatty acids, obligated to pass through the acetyl-CoA pool, contained 50% of the label at carbon 3 and 50% at carbon 1. In contrast, the [14C]acetoacetate formed from the (ω-1)labeled fatty acids contained 90% of the label at carbon 3 and 10% at carbon 1

  12. Folic acid and primary prevention of birth defects.

    Taruscio, Domenica; Carbone, Pietro; Granata, Orietta; Baldi, Francesca; Mantovani, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Birth defects (BDs) are an important public health problem, due to their overall incidence, occurring in 2-3% of live births in European Union. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among major NTDs, due to their severity and relatively high incidence; in the meanwhile NTDs are also the most effectively preventable BDs to date. In particular, an adequate folic acid (FA) intake reduces both the occurrence and the recurrence of NTDs; FA is the synthetic form of folates, naturally occurring vitamins in a number of foods, especially vegetables. The daily intake of 0.4 mg of FA should be recommended to all women of childbearing age who plan to become pregnant. The Italian Network for Primary Prevention of BDs through FA Promotion has achieved a significant improvement in FA awareness and use in the periconceptional period. Nevertheless, primary prevention of BDs needs to make further progress; the Italian National Centre for Rare Diseases participates in european sureveillance of congenital anomalies (EUROCAT) Joint Action as coordinator of activities on the effectiveness of BDs prevention. Mandatory food fortification with FA has not been introduced in any European country. The health benefits of FA in reducing the risk of NTDs are undisputed; however mechanistic and animal studies suggest a relationship between high FA intakes and increased cancer promotion, while human studies are still inconsistent and inconclusive. A Working Group organized by the European Food Safety Authority pointed out significant uncertainties about fortification safety and the need for more studies; currently, FA intake from fortified foods and supplements should not exceed 1 mg/day in adults. In conclusion, based on up-to-date scientific evidence, the Italian Network strategy pivots on periconceptional supplementation integrated with promotion of healthy eating habits, support to health education, enhancing the role of women in managing life choices about their health and pregnancy and increasing

  13. Formation and dissolution behaviour of niobium oxide in phosphoric acid solutions

    The effect of phosphoric acid concentration and temperature on the formation and dissolution process of niobium oxide was investigated using capacitance, potential and galvanostatic measurements. The formation rate of the niobium oxide increases with increasing phosphoric acid concentration and decreases with increasing temperature. The dissolution rate of the niobium oxide is accelerated by increasing phosphoric acid concentration and temperature. The activation energy was calculated for both the formation and dissolution process and found to be 8.93 and 16.65 kJ/mol respectively. The effect of formation voltage on the dissolution process of niobium oxide was also investigated. The oxide film formed at high-formation voltage has a more defective character than that formed at lower voltage. This enhances the dissolution process of the oxide. The effect of current density on the formation rate and the thickness during the oxide film growth was measured. (orig.)

  14. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO2, highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO4/2.5M H3PO4 solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO2 (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation

  15. Salmonella typhimurium mutants defective in acetohydroxy acid synthases I and II.

    Shaw, K J; Berg, C M; Sobol, T J

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of transposon-induced mutants shows that Salmonella typhimurium possesses two major isozymes of acetohydroxy acid synthase, the enzymes which mediate the first common step in isoleucine and valine biosynthesis. A third (minor) acetohydroxy acid synthase is present, but its significance in isoleucine and valine synthesis may be negligible. Mutants defective in acetohydroxy acid synthase II (ilvG::Tn10) require isoleucine, alpha-ketobutyrate, or threonine for growth, a mutant defect...

  16. Oxide film defects in Al alloys and the formation of hydrogen- related porosity

    Griffiths, W. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Yue, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Double oxide film defects have also been held responsible for the origins of hydrogen porosity, where hydrogen dissolved in the Al melt passes into the interior atmosphere of the double oxide film defect causing it to inflate. However, this is in opposition to long- established evidence that H cannot readily diffuse through aluminium oxide. To investigate this further, samples of commercial purity Al were first degassed to remove their initial H content, and then heated to above their melting point and held in atmospheres of air and nitrogen respectively, to determine any differences in H pick-up. The experiment showed that samples held in an oxidising atmosphere, and having an oxide skin, picked up significantly less H than when the samples were held in a nitrogen atmosphere, which resulted in the formation of AlN in cracks in the oxide skin of the sample. It is suggested that double oxide film defects can give rise to hydrogen-related porosity, but this occurs more quickly when the oxygen in the original oxide film defect has been consumed by reaction with the surrounding melt and nitrogen reacts to form AlN, which is more permeable to H than alumina, more easily allowing the oxide film defect to give rise to a hydrogen pore. This is used to interpret results from an earlier synchrotron experiment, in which a small pore was seen to grow into a larger pore, while an adjacent large pore remained at a constant size.

  17. Neural tube defects in Costa Rica, 1987-2012: origins and development of birth defect surveillance and folic acid fortification.

    Barboza-Argüello, María de la Paz; Umaña-Solís, Lila M; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica-through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas-CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987-2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992-1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987-1991; 1996-1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999-2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003-2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1-10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3-5.3) for the post-fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease of 51 % in the prevalence of neural tube defects from the pre-fortification period to the post-fortification period. Folic acid fortification via several basic food sources has shown to be a successful public health intervention for Costa Rica. Costa Rica's experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs. PMID:24952876

  18. Defect Mediated Ferromagnetism in Zinc Oxide Thin Film Heterostructures

    Mal, Siddhartha

    Recent developments in the field of spintronics (spin based electronics) have led to an extensive search for materials in which semiconducting properties can be integrated with magnetic properties to realize the objective of successful fabrication of spin-based devices. Since zinc oxide (ZnO) posits a promising player, it is important to elucidate the critical issues regarding the origin and nature of magnetism in ZnO thin film heterostructures. Another critical issue in the development of practical devices based on metal oxides is the integration of high quality epitaxial thin films on the existing technology based on Si (100) substrates, which requires appropriate substrate templates. The present research work is focused on the study of room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) caused by intrinsic defects and precise control of RTFM using thermal treatments and laser and ion irradiation. We performed a systematic study of the structural, chemical, electrical, optical and magnetic properties of undoped ZnO films grown under different conditions as well as the films that were annealed in various environments. Oxygen annealed films displayed a sequential transition from ferromagnetism to diamagnetism as a function of the annealing temperature. An increase in the green band intensity has been observed in oxygen annealed ZnO films. Reversible switching of room-temperature ferromagnetism and n-type conductivity have been demonstrated by oxygen and vacuum annealing. Detailed electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy studies have been presented to rule out the possibility of external source of magnetism. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements indicate the presence of a broad peak at g=2.01. This would be most consistent with the magnetic moment arising from the oxygen vacancies (g=1.996), although the possible contribution from Zn vacancies (g=2.013) cannot be entirely ruled out. The magnetic moment in these films may arise from the

  19. The prevention of neural tube defects by folic acid supplementation

    H. W. Hitzeroth

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects, in particular spina bifida and anencephaly, are serious and relatively common congenital abnormalities worldwide. They also occur in South Africa and affect all population groups to varying degrees. The overall incidence in South Africa is approximately 1-2 per 1000 newborns. Higher incidences, up to 6 per 1000 newborns have been recorded in certain parts, especially in some rural areas of the country. In total as many as 1500 newborns could be affected by a neural tube defect each year. The precise aetiology of neural tube defects is still unknown.

  20. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  1. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.

    2016-06-03

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  2. Adding Folic Acid to Corn Masa Flour May Prevent Birth Defects

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Adding Folic Acid to Corn Masa Flour May Prevent Birth Defects Share Tweet ... mainstay of their regular diets—which often are corn masa-based.” This could be a reason why ...

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenyl Acetic Acid and Dl-Mandelic Acid by Permanganate in Acid Medium

    B. Syama Sundar; P.S.Radhakrishna murti

    2014-01-01

    Kinetics of oxidation of phenyl acetic acid and DL- Mandelic acid by potassium permanganate in aqueous acetic acid and perchloric acid mixture reveals that the kinetic orders are first order in oxidant, first order in H+ and zero order in substrate for phenyl acetic acid. DL-Mandelic acid exhibits first order in oxidant and zero order in substrate. The results are rationalised by a mechanism involving intermediate formation of mandelic acid in case of Phenyl acetic acid and ester formation wi...

  4. Interplay between strain, defect charge state, and functionality in complex oxides

    Aschauer, Ulrich; Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2016-07-01

    We use first-principles calculations to investigate the interplay between strain and the charge state of point defect impurities in complex oxides. Our work is motivated by recent interest in using defects as active elements to provide novel functionality in coherent epitaxial films. Using oxygen vacancies as model point defects, and CaMnO3 and MnO as model materials, we calculate the changes in internal strain caused by changing the charge state of the vacancies, and conversely the effect of strain on charge-state stability. Our results show that the charge state is a degree of freedom that can be used to control the interaction of defects with strain and hence the concentration and location of defects in epitaxial films. We propose the use of field-effect gating to reversibly change the charge state of defects and hence the internal strain and corresponding strain-induced functionalities.

  5. Final report. Defects and transport in mixed oxides

    Dieckmann, R{umlt u}diger

    2001-12-13

    New results on the point defect chemistry of (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}){sub 3-delta}O{sub 4} and on the cation tracer diffusion in this spinel solid solution are presented and discussed. The equation system for the defect chemistry of perovskites of the type A{sub 1-x}B{sub 1+x}O{sub 3-delta} have been worked out and used to derive Kr{umlt o}ger-Vink diagrams. The deviation from stoichiometry, delta, in LA{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 1+x}O{sub 3-delta} has been measured at 1100, 1200, and 1300 degrees Celsius as a function of the oxygen activity and the composition variable x. At high and low oxygen activities, the data were fit by taking into account the electrostatic interaction between the charge defects by making use of the Debye H{umlt u}ckel theory.

  6. The influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon

    Kulinich O. A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface silicon layers in silicon – dioxide silicon systems with modern methods of research are investigated. It is shown that these layers have compound structure and their parameters depend on oxidation and initial silicon parameters. It is shown the influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon.

  7. Complex oxide scintillators: material defects and scintillation performace

    Nikl, Martin; Laguta, Valentyn; Vedda, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 245, č. 9 (2008), 1701-1722. ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : scintillator * structural defects * impurities * trapping states * electron paramagnetic resonance * thermoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.166, year: 2008

  8. Fatty acid oxidation in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    The biochemical investigations described in this thesis deal with two aspects of fatty acid oxidation in muscle: a comparison of the use of cell-free and cellular systems for oxidation measurements, and studies on the assay and the role of the fatty acid binding protein in fatty acid metabolism. The fatty acid oxidation rates are determined radiochemically by the sum of 14CO2 and 14C-labeled acid-soluble products formed during oxidation of [14C]-fatty acids. A radiochemical procedure for the assay of fatty acid binding by proteins is described. (Auth.)

  9. International retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations : are the recommendations working?

    Botto, LD; Lisi, A; Robert-Gnansia, E; Erickson, JD; Vollset, SE; Mastroiacovo, P; Botting, B; Cocchi, G; de Vigan, C; de Walle, H; Feijoo, M; Irgens, LM; McDonnell, B; Merlob, P; Ritvanen, A; Scarano, G; Siffel, C; Metneki, J; Stoll, C; Smithells, R; Goujard, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of policies and recommendations on folic acid aimed at reducing the occurrence of neural tube defects. Design Retrospective cohort study of births monitored by birth defect registries. Setting 13 birth defects registries monitoring rates of neural tube defects

  10. Defect structure of indium tin oxide and its relationship to conductivity

    Gonzalez, G. B.; Cohen, J. B.; Hwang, J.-H.; Mason, T. O.; Hodges, J. P.; Jorgensen, J. D.

    2000-05-09

    Doping In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with tin results in an improved transparent conducting oxide (TCO). Although indium tin oxide (ITO) is the most frequently used commercial TCO, its defect structure is still uncertain. Previously, its defect chemistry has been inferred based on the conductivity of the material. To directly study the defect structure of ITO, the authors prepared powders under different processing environments and performed neutron powder diffraction. Structural information was obtained by performing Rietveld analysis. The results include positions of the atoms, their thermal displacements, the fractional occupancy of the defect oxygen site, and the fractional occupancies of Sn on each of the two nonequivalent cation sites, showing a strong preference for the b site. These structural results are correlated with the measured electrical properties of the same samples.

  11. CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION AND OXIDATION OF BIOMASS-DERIVED LEVULINIC ACID

    Yan Gong; Lu Lin; Zhipei Yan

    2011-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA), 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, is a new platform chemical with various potential uses. In this paper, catalytic hydrogenation and oxidation of levulinic acid were studied. It was shown from experiments that levulinic acid can be hydrogenated to γ-valerolactone (GVL) over transition metal catalysts and oxidative-decarboxylated to 2-butanone (methyl-ethyl-ketone, MEK) and methyl-vinyl-ketone (MVK) by cupric oxide (CuO), cupric oxide/cerium oxide (CuO/CeO2), cupric oxide/ alumina (Cu...

  12. CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION AND OXIDATION OF BIOMASS-DERIVED LEVULINIC ACID

    Yan Gong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Levulinic acid (LA, 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, is a new platform chemical with various potential uses. In this paper, catalytic hydrogenation and oxidation of levulinic acid were studied. It was shown from experiments that levulinic acid can be hydrogenated to γ-valerolactone (GVL over transition metal catalysts and oxidative-decarboxylated to 2-butanone (methyl-ethyl-ketone, MEK and methyl-vinyl-ketone (MVK by cupric oxide (CuO, cupric oxide/cerium oxide (CuO/CeO2, cupric oxide/ alumina (CuO/ Al2O3, and silver(I/ peroxydisulfate (Ag(I/S2O82-.

  13. Methanol adsorption on magnesium oxide surface with defects: a DFT study

    Branda, M. M.; Ferullo, R. M.; Belelli, P. G.; Castellani, N. J.

    2003-03-01

    The methanol adsorption on several defects of the magnesium oxide surface were studied. Structural and electronic study with geometrical optimization and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis were performed using a density functional theory (DFT) method. Oxygen and magnesium with different coordination numbers have very different reactivity in this surface producing dissociated and non-dissociated species. These results are in agreement with infrared spectroscopy observations where CH 3OH, OCH 3 and OH species were found in defective MgO surfaces.

  14. Multivitamins, Folic Acid and Birth Defects: Knowledge, Beliefs and Behaviors of Hispanic Women in North Carolina

    deRosset, Leslie; Mullenix, Amy; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Background: Consumption of folic acid prior to conception can prevent up to 70% of neural tube defect (NTD)-affected pregnancies. In 1992, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) issued a recommendation that all women of childbearing age capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 [mu]g of folic acid daily to reduce their risk for a NTD-affected…

  15. How surface reparation prevents catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on atomic gold at defective magnesium oxide surfaces.

    Töpfer, Kai; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-07-21

    In this contribution, we study using first principles the co-adsorption and catalytic behaviors of CO and O2 on a single gold atom deposited at defective magnesium oxide surfaces. Using cluster models and point charge embedding within a density functional theory framework, we simulate the CO oxidation reaction for Au1 on differently charged oxygen vacancies of MgO(001) to rationalize its experimentally observed lack of catalytic activity. Our results show that: (1) co-adsorption is weakly supported at F(0) and F(2+) defects but not at F(1+) sites, (2) electron redistribution from the F(0) vacancy via the Au1 cluster to the adsorbed molecular oxygen weakens the O2 bond, as required for a sustainable catalytic cycle, (3) a metastable carbonate intermediate can form on defects of the F(0) type, (4) only a small activation barrier exists for the highly favorable dissociation of CO2 from F(0), and (5) the moderate adsorption energy of the gold atom on the F(0) defect cannot prevent insertion of molecular oxygen inside the defect. Due to the lack of protection of the color centers, the surface becomes invariably repaired by the surrounding oxygen and the catalytic cycle is irreversibly broken in the first oxidation step. PMID:27345190

  16. Defects in the oxidative killing of microorganisms by phagocytic leukocytes.

    Roos, D; Weening, R S

    One of the most important mechanisms of phagocytic killing of ingested microorganisms by leukocytes is the generation of toxic oxygen products. During phagocytosis, neutrophils, as well as monocytes and macrophages, display a strongly increased cell respiration. Quantitatively the most important product of this reaction is hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide is also generated in large amounts, probably as an intermediate in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Indications exist that singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are also formed in this process. Some of these oxygen products have microbicidal properties by themselves. The effect of hydrogen peroxide is greatly enhanced by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Several dysfunctions of this sytem are known. In chronic granulomatous disease the enzyme system that produces superoxide is not operative. Thus, no superoxide or hydrogen peroxide is generated, leading to a severely decreased bacterial killing capacity. The exact molecular defects in the X-linked and the autosomal form are as yet undefined. Two variants are also known: lipochrome histiocytosis, with different clinical and histological manifestations, and a 'triggering defect' where only strongly opsonized particles trigger the respiratory burst. Myeloperoxidase deficiency leads to slightly decreased killing capacity, especially for yeasts. In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency no oxygen radicals or hydrogen peroxide are produced because no equivalents for oxygen reduction can be generated in the hexose-monophosphate shunt. Deficiencies in the glutathione redox system also result in impaired phagocyte function, probably because the cells have to be protected against their own toxic oxygen products. PMID:225141

  17. Study of defect generated visible photoluminescence in zinc oxide nano-particles prepared using PVA templates

    Intrinsic defect generated photoluminescence (PL) in zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a PVA template based wet-chemical process has been studied. A good controllability was achieved on the surface defects, structure and the morphology of ZnO NPs through the variation of solvents used in synthesis. The PL emission strongly depended on the defect structure and morphology. SEM, XRD, annealing and PL excitation studies were used to analyze the types of defects involved in the visible emission as well as the defect concentration. The mechanism for the blue, green and yellow emissions was proposed. The spectral content of the visible emission was controlled through generation/removal of defects through the shape transformation or annealing by focusing on defect origins and broad controls. - Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized using poly-vinyl alcohol template in various solvents. • The structure and morphology of ZnO nanoparticles were depended on dielectric constant and boiling point of solvents. • Photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanoparticles were studied. • Maximum optical absorbance and Photoluminescence intensity were found in ethanolic preparation. • ZnO nanoparticles were annealed at different temperatures for detection of defect emission

  18. Study of defect generated visible photoluminescence in zinc oxide nano-particles prepared using PVA templates

    Oudhia, A. [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Choudhary, A., E-mail: aarti.bhilai@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Sharma, S.; Aggrawal, S. [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Dhoble, S.J. [RTM University Nagpur, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-10-15

    Intrinsic defect generated photoluminescence (PL) in zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a PVA template based wet-chemical process has been studied. A good controllability was achieved on the surface defects, structure and the morphology of ZnO NPs through the variation of solvents used in synthesis. The PL emission strongly depended on the defect structure and morphology. SEM, XRD, annealing and PL excitation studies were used to analyze the types of defects involved in the visible emission as well as the defect concentration. The mechanism for the blue, green and yellow emissions was proposed. The spectral content of the visible emission was controlled through generation/removal of defects through the shape transformation or annealing by focusing on defect origins and broad controls. - Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized using poly-vinyl alcohol template in various solvents. • The structure and morphology of ZnO nanoparticles were depended on dielectric constant and boiling point of solvents. • Photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanoparticles were studied. • Maximum optical absorbance and Photoluminescence intensity were found in ethanolic preparation. • ZnO nanoparticles were annealed at different temperatures for detection of defect emission.

  19. Genetic defects in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system.

    Janssen, R.J.R.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system consists of five multiprotein complexes and two mobile electron carriers embedded in the lipid bilayer of the mitochondrial inner membrane. With the exception of complex II and the mobile carriers, the other parts of the OXPHOS system are under dual gene

  20. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress

    Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  1. Quinolinic Acid: Neurotoxin or Oxidative Stress Modulator?

    Lenka Kubicova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, QUIN is a well-known neurotoxin. Consequently, QUIN could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS are generated in reactions catalyzed by transition metals, especially iron (Fe. QUIN can form coordination complexes with iron. A combination of differential pulse voltammetry, deoxyribose degradation and Fe(II autoxidation assays was used for explorating ROS formation in redox reactions that are catalyzed by iron in QUIN-Fe complexes. Differential pulse voltammetry showed an anodic shift of the iron redox potential if iron was liganded by QUIN. In the H2O2/FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant of the deoxyribose degradation assay, the dose-response curve was U-shaped. In the FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant, QUIN unambiguously showed antioxidant effects. In the Fe(II autoxidation assay, QUIN decreased the rate of ROS production caused by Fe(II oxidation. Our study confirms that QUIN toxicity may be caused by ROS generation via the Fenton reaction. This, however, applies only for unnaturally high concentrations that were used in attempts to provide support for the neurotoxic effect. In lower concentrations, we show that by liganding iron, QUIN affects the Fe(II/Fe(III ratios that are beneficial to homeostasis. Our results support the notion that redox chemistry can contribute to explaining the hormetic dose-response effects.

  2. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  3. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Thomas König

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001 and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110, respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS. On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F0, F+, F2+ and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F2+-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    ... 88(4):1833-41. Citation on PubMed Clayton PT. Disorders of bile acid synthesis. J Inherit Metab ... 13. Review. Citation on PubMed Subramaniam P, Clayton PT, Portmann BC, Mieli-Vergani G, Hadzić N. Variable ...

  5. Investigating the Defect Structures in Transparent Conducting Oxides Using X-ray and Neutron Scattering Techniques

    Gabriela B. González

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Transparent conducting oxide (TCO materials are implemented into a wide variety of commercial devices because they possess a unique combination of high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity. Created during the processing of the TCOs, defects within the atomic-scale structure are responsible for their desirable optical and electrical properties. Therefore, studying the defect structure is essential to a better understanding of the behavior of transparent conductors. X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are powerful tools to investigate the atomic lattice structural defects in these materials. This review paper presents some of the current developments in the study of structural defects in n-type TCOs using x-ray diffraction (XRD, neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS, pair distribution functions (PDFs, and x-ray fluorescence (XRF.

  6. Photoluminescence emission of nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide films prepared in phosphoric acid

    Nourmohammadi, Abolghasem; Asadabadi, Saeid Jalali; Yousefi, Mohammad Hasan; Ghasemzadeh, Majid

    2012-12-01

    The photoluminescence emission of nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide films formed in phosphoric acid is studied in order to explore their defect-based subband electronic structure. Different excitation wavelengths are used to identify most of the details of the subband states. The films are produced under different anodizing conditions to optimize their emission in the visible range. Scanning electron microscopy investigations confirm pore formation in the produced layers. Gaussian analysis of the emission data indicates that subband states change with anodizing parameters, and various point defects can be formed both in the bulk and on the surface of these nanoporous layers during anodizing.

  7. d0 Ferromagnetism in Oxide Nanowires: Role of Intrinsic Defects

    Mandal Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we have investigated the origin of defect-induced room-temperature d0 ferromagnetism in pure SnO2 and ZnO nanowires (NWs with average diameter ~ 50 nm, prepared by template assisted route. Photoluminescence (PL and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopic measurements show the singly ionized oxygen vacancy is inducing ferromagnetism in pure SnO2 NWs whereas cation (Zn vacancy is found to responsible for the ferromagnetic behaviour in pure ZnO NWs. Besides, it is found that the Zn vacancy-induced ferromagnetism in ZnO can be tuned by substituting few percentage of nonmagnetic alkali metal like potassium (K at Zn site. Saturation moment as well as Curie temperature has found to increase significantly with K-doping up to 4 at.% but a decrease of ferromagnetic response is observed for higher K-doping. X-ray photoelectron spectra show that K+1 ions substitute at Zn site and thus introduce hole through which a ferromagnetic interaction between Zn vacancies can be mediated. The direct correlation between the Zn vacancy concentration and the corresponding saturation moment indicates that Zn vacancyinduced ferromagnetism in ZnO can be successfully tuned by K-doping that can an exciting approach to prepare ZnO-based dilute magnetic semiconductors for modern spintronic technology.

  8. Mutation analysis in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Corydon, M J;

    2001-01-01

    systems may help to assess the balance between genetic and environmental factors in the clinical expression of a given mutation. The realization that the effect of the monogene, such as disease-causing mutations in the VLCAD, MCAD, and SCAD genes, may be modified by variations in other genes presages the...

  9. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  10. Advanced oxidation of acid and reactive dyes

    Arslan-Alaton, I.; Gursoy, B.H.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    The effect of untreated and Fenton-treated acid dyes (C.I. Acid Red 183 and C.I. Acid Orange 51) and a reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Blue 4) on aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic processes was investigated. The optimum Fe2+:H2O2 molar ratio was selected as 1:5 (4:hsp sp="0.25" mM:20:hsp sp="0.25"mM) for...... 10:hsp sp="0.25" min Fenton treatment at pH 3, resulting in reduced chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon removal efficiencies; only acetate was detected as a stable dye oxidation end product. During anaerobic digestion, 100, 29% and no inhibition in methane production was observed for...... the untreated blue, red and orange dyes, respectively. The inhibitory effect of the blue reactive dye on methane production was ∼21% after Fenton treatment. Neither untreated nor treated dyes exhibited an inhibitory effect on denitrification. Aerobic glucose degradation was inhibited by 23-29% by...

  11. The nature of paramagnetic defects in tin (IV) oxide

    Ivanovskaya, M., E-mail: ivanovskaya@bsu.by [Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems, Belarusian State University, Leningradskaya Str., 14, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Ovodok, E., E-mail: ovodokea@gmail.com [Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems, Belarusian State University, Leningradskaya Str., 14, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Golovanov, V. [South-Ukrainian University, Staroportofrankovskaya Str., 26, 65008 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2015-08-18

    Highlights: • EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 (D) was studied in SnO{sub 2} prepared under different conditions. • Conditions appropriate for detection of D signal and parameters of them were defined. • Structure of paramagnetic center (PC) attributed to the D signal was proposed. • The PC is a complex of oxygen vacancies with entrapped electrons near SnO{sub 2} surface. - Abstract: The nature of paramagnetic centers which are responsible for the EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 in tin (IV) oxide was studied. Polycrystalline SnO{sub 2} samples were obtained by sol–gel method and by thermal treatment of the precursors containing tin atoms in different oxidation states. The parameters of the EPR spectra recorded after heat treatment of the samples in air, oxygen and hydrogen atmospheres, and in vacuum were analyzed. The observed parameters of the EPR spectra do not allow to assign the paramagnetic center with g = 1.8–1.9 to Sn{sup 3+} center. The structure of the paramagnetic center attributed to the EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 was proposed. The proposed structure of the paramagnetic center includes a complex of oxygen vacancies at (1 0 1) plane of rutile-type SnO{sub 2} lattice.

  12. The nature of paramagnetic defects in tin (IV) oxide

    Highlights: • EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 (D) was studied in SnO2 prepared under different conditions. • Conditions appropriate for detection of D signal and parameters of them were defined. • Structure of paramagnetic center (PC) attributed to the D signal was proposed. • The PC is a complex of oxygen vacancies with entrapped electrons near SnO2 surface. - Abstract: The nature of paramagnetic centers which are responsible for the EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 in tin (IV) oxide was studied. Polycrystalline SnO2 samples were obtained by sol–gel method and by thermal treatment of the precursors containing tin atoms in different oxidation states. The parameters of the EPR spectra recorded after heat treatment of the samples in air, oxygen and hydrogen atmospheres, and in vacuum were analyzed. The observed parameters of the EPR spectra do not allow to assign the paramagnetic center with g = 1.8–1.9 to Sn3+ center. The structure of the paramagnetic center attributed to the EPR signal at g = 1.8–1.9 was proposed. The proposed structure of the paramagnetic center includes a complex of oxygen vacancies at (1 0 1) plane of rutile-type SnO2 lattice

  13. Nitrous oxides desorption from nitric acid (58–60 wt. %)

    Литвиненко, Олександр Олександрович; Печенко, Тамара Ивановна; Подустов, Михаил Алексеевич; Букатенко, Алексей Иванович

    2015-01-01

    The process of nitrous oxides desorption from nitric acid solutions (in domestic schemes) was considered. It is shown that in the process of desorption (or stripping), the nitrous oxides are not removed from solutions completely, so, the nitric acid does not satisfy the technical requirements in Ukraine.The research objective was to bring the quality of nitric acid to technological standards by removing (stripping) nitrous oxides from its solutions.To achieve the research objective, the balan...

  14. Interfacial strain and defects in asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles

    Mayence, Arnaud; Wéry, Madeleine; Tran, Dung Trung; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-07-01

    Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds.Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials characterization, powder X-ray diffraction, EFTEM images, EELS spectra, HAADF-STEM. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01373b

  15. Loss of adipose fatty acid oxidation does not potentiate obesity at thermoneutrality

    Jieun Lee; Joseph Choi; Susan Aja; Susanna Scafidi; Michael J. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Ambient temperature affects energy intake and expenditure to maintain homeostasis in a continuously fluctuating environment. Here, mice with an adipose-specific defect in fatty acid oxidation (Cpt2A−/−) were subjected to varying temperatures to determine the role of adipose bioenergetics in environmental adaptation and body weight regulation. Microarray analysis of mice acclimatized to thermoneutrality revealed that Cpt2A−/− interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) failed to induce the expres...

  16. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials. PMID:27351805

  17. Tailoring defect structure and optical absorption of porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes

    Defects influence the optical and electronic properties of nanostructured materials that may be relevant for applications. In self-organized anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates we have investigated the effect of annealing, doping and nanoscale metal deposition. Optical absorption spectroscopy has been used as a sensitive probe for the defect density in AAO templates. The electronic spectra are found to be dominated by bands which originate from oxygen-deficient color centers (F+, F and F2). In annealing studies, the integrated absorption of the bands changes non-monotonically with annealing temperature and annealing time. This demonstrates that the concentration of defects can be optimized to tailor the optical properties of the AAO. Metallic Au wires are deposited in the template to establish a plasmonic template or array. The investigations provide an interesting insight into the interplay of reactivity and diffusivity on nanoscales. - Highlights: ► Preparation of metal wire arrays in oxide templates with tailored plasmonic properties. ► Oxygen defects are characterized using optical absorption and fluorescence. ► Optical absorption spectra are assigned to energy levels of oxygen vacancies (color centers). ► Annealing and electrodeposition of Au wires minimize defects maintaining the morphology.

  18. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-01-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentr...

  19. Acrylic acid obtaining from methanol and acetic acid in the presence of complex oxide catalysts

    Небесний, Роман Володимирович; Піх, Зорян Григорович; Шпирка, Ірина Іванівна; Івасів, Володимир Васильович; Небесна, Юлія Віталіївна; Фуч, Уляна Василівна

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to research process of single-stage acrylic acid obtaining from methanol and acetic acid, namely: to develop effective catalysts for the process of methanol oxidation to formaldehyde with its further aldol condensation with acetic acid to acrylic acid, and to determine optimum conditions for the process. Complex oxide catalysts consisting of oxides of boron, phosphorus, tungsten and vanadium supported on the silica gel have been investigated. The effect of vanadium...

  20. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid into the aldehydes nonanal and 9-oxo-nonanoic acid or into pelargonic and azelaic acid. Considerable hazards, including explosion risks, are associated with the use of ozone, and alternative processes...

  1. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid int

  2. Pyrrhotite oxidation in weakly acidic solutions

    Chirita, P. [Univ Cariova, Craiova 200440 (Romania); Descostes, M. [CEA/DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR Lab Radionuclides Migrat Measurements and Modelling, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Schlegel, M.L. [CEA/DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP Lab Reactiv Surfaces and Interfaces, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2007-08-15

    Complete text of publication follows: The kinetics and mechanism of pyrrhotite (for simplicity noted FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen was investigated in weakly acidic solutions as a function of pH (2.75 to 3.45) and temperature (25 to 45 C). The changes in Eh, pH and total dissolved iron were monitored to quantify the reaction progress. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the oxidation products of FeS. The experimental results demonstrate the importance of temperature and initial pH for the FeS oxidative dissolution. The amounts of dissolved iron (n{sub Fe}) and removed H{sup +} (n{sub H}) increase with temperature and initial [H{sup +}]. The activation energy of FeS oxidative dissolution is 41.6 {+-} 10.7 kJ mol{sup -1} at initial pH=3.00 suggesting that the kinetic regime is controlled by a mix of diffusion and surface reaction (De Guidici et al., 2005). It was found that the reaction order of oxidative dissolution of FeS is 1.0 {+-} 0.02 (25 C) with respect to initial [H{sup +}]. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of several sulfur species (S{sup 0}, S{sub n}{sup 2-}, S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2-}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and ferric hydroxides or oxyhydroxide (Fe(OH){sub 3} and goethite) on residual FeS surface. It is important to note that the experimental ratios of n{sub H} over n{sub Fe} (n{sub H}:n{sub Fe}) observed at 25 C decrease over a first period of time (0-4 h) of FeS oxidative dissolution from 7.97 down to 2.01. Afterwards, the n{sub H}:n{sub Fe} ratio becomes lower than 2 and remains roughly constant (4-72 h). At higher temperatures (35 and 45 C) and pH 3.00, n{sub H}:n{sub Fe}{<=}2 and is quasi-invariant over the reaction time. The experimental observations suggest a mechanism based on the protonation of FeS surface (Chirita and Descostes, 2006) followed by oxidation of FeS by dissolved oxygen to produce Fe{sup 2+}, S{sup 0} and S{sub n}{sup 2-}. Fe{sup 2+} is unstable in

  3. Pyrrhotite oxidation in weakly acidic solutions

    Complete text of publication follows: The kinetics and mechanism of pyrrhotite (for simplicity noted FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen was investigated in weakly acidic solutions as a function of pH (2.75 to 3.45) and temperature (25 to 45 C). The changes in Eh, pH and total dissolved iron were monitored to quantify the reaction progress. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the oxidation products of FeS. The experimental results demonstrate the importance of temperature and initial pH for the FeS oxidative dissolution. The amounts of dissolved iron (nFe) and removed H+ (nH) increase with temperature and initial [H+]. The activation energy of FeS oxidative dissolution is 41.6 ± 10.7 kJ mol-1 at initial pH=3.00 suggesting that the kinetic regime is controlled by a mix of diffusion and surface reaction (De Guidici et al., 2005). It was found that the reaction order of oxidative dissolution of FeS is 1.0 ± 0.02 (25 C) with respect to initial [H+]. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of several sulfur species (S0, Sn2-, S2O32-, SO32- and SO42-) and ferric hydroxides or oxyhydroxide (Fe(OH)3 and goethite) on residual FeS surface. It is important to note that the experimental ratios of nH over nFe (nH:nFe) observed at 25 C decrease over a first period of time (0-4 h) of FeS oxidative dissolution from 7.97 down to 2.01. Afterwards, the nH:nFe ratio becomes lower than 2 and remains roughly constant (4-72 h). At higher temperatures (35 and 45 C) and pH 3.00, nH:nFe≤2 and is quasi-invariant over the reaction time. The experimental observations suggest a mechanism based on the protonation of FeS surface (Chirita and Descostes, 2006) followed by oxidation of FeS by dissolved oxygen to produce Fe2+, S0 and Sn2-. Fe2+ is unstable in oxidative conditions (Descostes et al., 2002) and transforms into Fe(OH)3(s) and goethite after approximately 30 h of reaction. References:1) De Guidici G., Rossi A., Fanfani L., Lattanzi P

  4. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenyl Acetic Acid and Dl-Mandelic Acid by Permanganate in Acid Medium

    B.Syama Sundar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of oxidation of phenyl acetic acid and DL- Mandelic acid by potassium permanganate in aqueous acetic acid and perchloric acid mixture reveals that the kinetic orders are first order in oxidant, first order in H+ and zero order in substrate for phenyl acetic acid. DL-Mandelic acid exhibits first order in oxidant and zero order in substrate. The results are rationalised by a mechanism involving intermediate formation of mandelic acid in case of Phenyl acetic acid and ester formation with Mn (VII in case of DL-Mandelic acid. The following order of reactivity is observed: DL-Mandelic acid > Phenyl acetic acid. The high reactivity of DL-Mandelic acid over phenyl acetic acid may be due to different mechanisms operating with the two substrates and benzaldehyde is the final product in both the cases.

  5. A method to study the history of a double oxide film defect in liquid aluminum alloys

    Raiszadeh, R.; Griffiths, W. D.

    2006-12-01

    Entrained double oxide films have been held responsible for reductions in mechanical properties in aluminum casting alloys. However, their behavior in the liquid metal, once formed, has not been studied directly. It has been proposed that the atmosphere entrapped in the double oxide film defect will continue to react with the liquid metal surrounding it, perhaps leading to its elimination as a significant defect. A silicon-nitride rod with a hole in one end was plunged into liquid aluminum to hold a known volume of air in contact with the liquid metal at a constant temperature. The change in the air volume with time was recorded by real-time X-ray radiography to determine the reaction rates of the trapped atmosphere with the liquid aluminum, creating a model for the behavior of an entrained double oxide film defect. The results from this experiment showed that first oxygen, and then nitrogen, was consumed by the aluminum alloy, to form aluminum oxide and aluminum nitride, respectively. The effect of adding different elements to the liquid aluminum and the effect of different hydrogen contents were also studied.

  6. The Effect of Strontium on the Strength of Layers of Double Oxide Film Defects

    Bartar Esfahani, Hosein; Raiszadeh, Ramin; Doostmohammadi, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    The change in the strength of layers of oxide film (bifilm) defects when held in Al-0.05 and 0.1 wt pct melts was evaluated indirectly by comparing the porosity, average pore roundness, and pore number density results obtained from a reduced pressure test of the commercial purity and Sr-containing Al melts subjected to different holding and vibration regimes. Any changes in the composition of the pores were also studied using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the Al2O3 layers of a newly formed oxide film defect, when held in Al-0.05 or 0.1 wt pct Sr melt, transformed gradually into an Sr-containing oxide. This transformation caused the strength of the oxide layers to increase and the rate of the expansion of its atmosphere and removal of the defect from the melt to decrease. This might influence the increase in the porosity of Sr-modified Al castings.

  7. Retinoic acid induction of genes associated with neural tube developmental defects

    Xinjun Li; Zhong Yang; Yi Zeng; Hong Xu; Hongli Li; Yangyun Han; Xiaodong Long; Chao You

    2010-01-01

    To date, little information has been available regarding genes involved in the regulation of embryonic cell development, which participate in retinoic acid-induced neural tube defects in mice.Previous studies have revealed seven differentially expressed genes involved in neural tube developmental defects. However, gene expression and regulation is a complex process. Therefore,gene expression differences between normal and defective neural tubes at 9.5 and 10.5 days were compared. A total of eight differentially expressed genes exhibited coincident alterations at embryonic 9.5 and 10.5 days. In mice with retinoic acid-induced neural tube defects, NeK7, IGFBP5,ZW10, Csf3r, PSMC6, Cdk5, and Rb1 expressions were downregulated, but Apoa-4 expression was upregulated. These results were confirmed by Northern blot hybridization. Results suggested that NeK7, IGFBP5, ZW10, Csf3r, PSMC6, Cdk5, Rb1, and Apoa-4 are important regulatory factors involved in neural tube defects.

  8. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP+ accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [14C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [14C]O2 release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency

  9. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Iacobazzi, Francesco [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Bari, Piazza Giulio Cesare 11, Policlinico, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Liu, Aiping [ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Longo, Nicola, E-mail: Nicola.Longo@hsc.utah.edu [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  10. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines inhibits microtubule polymerization

    Clark, Hillary M; Hagedorn, Tara D.; Landino, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. In addition, protein thiol redox reactions are increasingly identified as a mechanism to regulate protein structure and function. We assessed the effect of hypothiocyanous acid on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by hypothiocyanous and hypochlorous acids was monitored by labeling tubulin with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein and by detecting higher molecula...

  11. Defects evolution and their impacts on conductivity of indium tin oxide thin films upon thermal treatment

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The influence of annealing temperature on the crystallite, surface morphology, defects evolution, and electrical property of the thin films was studied. The conductivity of the ITO films was significantly enhanced by two orders of magnitude by increasing the annealing temperature up to 600 °C, which was interpreted in point view of defects evolution in ITO films as revealed by positron annihilation. It was interesting to find that positron diffusion length was amazingly comparable to crystallite size in ITO films annealed below 300 °C, indicating positrons were preferentially localized and annihilated in defects around crystallite boundaries. By further increasing the temperature, positron diffusion length was far beyond the grain size with little increment. This demonstrated that defects were effectively removed around grain boundaries. The results indicated defect structure around crystallite/grain boundaries played an important role on carrier transportation in nanocrystal ITO films

  12. Numerical study of metal oxide hetero-junction solar cells with defects and interface states

    Further to our previous work on ideal metal oxide (MO) hetero-junction solar cells, a systematic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of defects and interface states on the cells. Two structures of the window/absorber (WA) and window/absorber/voltage-enhancer (WAV) were modelled with defect concentration, defect energy level, interface state (ISt) density and ISt energy level as parameters. The simulation showed that the defects in the window layer and the voltage-enhancer layer have very limited effects on the performance of the cells, but those in the absorption layer have profound effects on the cell performance. The interface states at the W/A interface have a limited effect on the performance even for a density up to 1013 cm−2, while those at the A/V interface cause the solar cell to deteriorate severely even at a low density of lower than 1 × 1011 cm−2. It also showed that the back surface field (BSF) induced by band gap off-set in the WAV structure loses its function when defects with a modest concentration exist in the absorption layer and does not improve the open voltage at all. (paper)

  13. Final Technical Report for DE-SC0001878 [Theory and Simulation of Defects in Oxide Materials

    Chelikowsky, James R. [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-04-14

    We explored a wide variety of oxide materials and related problems, including materials at the nanoscale and generic problems associated with oxide materials such as the development of more efficient computational tools to examine these materials. We developed and implemented methods to understand the optical and structural properties of oxides. For ground state properties, our work is predominantly based on pseudopotentials and density functional theory (DFT), including new functionals and going beyond the local density approximation (LDA): LDA+U. To study excited state properties (quasiparticle and optical excitations), we use time dependent density functional theory, the GW approach, and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) methods based on a many-body Green function approaches. Our work focused on the structural, electronic, optical and magnetic properties of defects (such as oxygen vacancies) in hafnium oxide, titanium oxide (both bulk and clusters) and related materials. We calculated the quasiparticle defect states and charge transition levels of oxygen vacancies in monoclinic hafnia. we presented a milestone G0W0 study of two of the crystalline phases of dye-sensitized TiO{sub 2} clusters. We employed hybrid density functional theory to examine the electronic structure of sexithiophene/ZnO interfaces. To identify the possible effect of epitaxial strain on stabilization of the ferromagnetic state of LaCoO{sub 3} (LCO), we compare the total energy of the magnetic and nonmagnetic states of the strained theoretical bulk structure.

  14. Band alignment and defects of the diamond zinc oxide heterojunction; Bandstruktur und Defekte der Diamant-Zinkoxid-Heterostruktur

    Geithner, Peter

    2008-09-12

    Zinc oxide films were grown on diamond single crystals by rf sputtering of zinc oxide. The valence and conduction band offset was determined by photoelectron spectroscopy. A deep defect occurring in the zinc oxide films on diamond was characterized by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  15. Platinum nanoparticles–manganese oxide nanorods as novel binary catalysts for formic acid oxidation

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2012-01-01

    The current study proposes a novel binary catalyst system (composed of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles) as a promising electrocatalyst in formic acid oxidation. The electro-catalytic oxidation of formic acid is carried out with binary catalysts of Pt nanoparticles (nano-Pt) and manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx) electrodeposited onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) measurements showed that unmodified GC and nano-MnOx/GC electrodes have no catalytic activity. While tw...

  16. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by bromate in aqueous hydrochloric acid medium

    R S Yalgudre; G S Gokavi

    2012-07-01

    Selenium dioxide catalysed acetic acid hydrazide oxidation by bromate was studied in hydrochloric acid medium. The order in oxidant concentration, substrate and catalyst were found to be unity. Increasing hydrogen ion concentration increases the rate of the reaction due to protonation equilibria of the oxidant. The mechanism of the reaction involves prior complex formation between the catalyst and substrate, hydrazide, followed by its oxidation by diprotonated bromate in a slow step. Acetic acid was found to be the oxidation product. Other kinetic data like effect of solvent polarity and ionic strength on the reaction support the proposed mechanism.

  17. Non-destructive functionalisation for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on carbon nanotubes: effect of linking agents and defects

    Kemnade, N.; Shearer, C. J.; Dieterle, D. J.; Cherevan, A. S.; Gebhardt, P.; Wilde, G.; Eder, D.

    2015-02-01

    The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and sustainable energy applications. The performance of such hybrids can be further improved by rationally designing interfaces and morphologies. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is among the most powerful techniques for the controlled deposition of inorganic compounds, due to its ability to form conformal coatings on porous substrates at low temperatures with high surface sensitivity and atomic control of film thickness. The hydrophobic nature of the nanocarbon surface has so far limited the applicability of ALD on CNTs. Herein we investigate the role of structural defects in CNTs, both intrinsic and induced by acid treatment, on coverage, uniformity and crystallinity of ZnO coatings. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of small aromatic molecules, including benzyl alcohol (BA), naphthalene carboxylic acid (NA) and pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA), as active nucleation sites and linking agents. Importantly, only PCA exhibits sufficiently strong interactions with the pristine CNT surface to withstand desorption under reaction conditions. Thus, PCA enables a versatile and non-destructive alternative route for the deposition of highly uniform metal oxide coatings onto pristine CNTs via ALD over a wide temperature range and without the typical surface corrosion induced by covalent functionalisation. Importantly, preliminary tests demonstrated that the improved morphology obtained with PCA has indeed considerably increased the hybrid's photocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution via sacrificial water splitting. The concept demonstrated in this work is transferable to a wide range of other inorganic compounds including metal oxides, metal (oxy)nitrides and metal chalcogenides on a variety of nanocarbons.The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and

  18. Mechanisms of hydroxyl radical production from abiotic oxidation of pyrite under acidic conditions

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (radOH) produced from pyrite oxidation by O2 have been recognized, but mechanisms regarding the production under anoxic and oxic conditions are not well understood. In this study, the mechanisms of radOH production from pyrite oxidation under anoxic and oxic conditions were explored using benzoic acid (BA) as an radOH probe. Batch experiments were conducted at pH 2.6 to explore radOH production under anoxic and oxic conditions. The cumulative radOH concentrations produced under anoxic and oxic conditions increased linearly to 7.5 and 52.2 μM, respectively within 10 h at 10 g/L pyrite. Under anoxic conditions, radOH was produced from the oxidation of H2O on the sulfur-deficient sites on pyrite surface, showing an increased production with the increase of pyrite surface exposure due to oxidation. Under oxic conditions, the formation of radOH proceeds predominantly via the two-electron reduction of O2 on pyrite surface along with a minor contribution from the oxidation of H2O on surface sulfur-defects and the reactions of Fe2+/sulfur intermediates with O2. For both O2 reduction and H2O oxidation on the surface sulfur-defects, H2O2 was the predominant intermediate, which subsequently transformed to radOH through Fenton mechanism. The radOH produced had a significant impact on the transformation of contaminants in the environment. Anoxic pyrite suspensions oxidized 13.9% As(III) (C0 = 6.67 μM) and 17.6% sulfanilamide (C0 = 2.91 μM) within 10 h at pH 2.6 and 10 g/L pyrite, while oxic pyrite suspensions improved the oxidation percentages to 55.4% for As(III) and 51.9% for sulfanilamide. The ratios of anoxic to oxic oxidation are consistent with the relative contribution of surface sulfur-defects to radOH production. However, Fe2+ produced from pyrite oxidation competed with the contaminants for radOH, which is of particular significance with the increase of time in a static environment. We conclude that radOH can be produced from abiotic oxidation of

  19. Investigation of products of molybdenite oxidation by nitric acid

    Physicochemical study of products of oxidation by nitric acid of molybdenum concentrate containing 98% MoS2 is carried out. It is shown that appearing molybdenum oxide forms block oxidizer access to the surface of sulfide phase and hinder its complete oxidation. When complexing reagents (H2SO4, H3PO4, HCl) are introduced in the solution the bulk of oxidized molybdenum transfers into solution in the form of a stable complex, at that. The effect of internal diffusion decreases and a considerable increase of MoS2 oxidation rate and completeness is achieved

  20. Towards precise defect control in layered oxide structures by using oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Federico Baiutti; Georg Christiani; Gennady Logvenov

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the atomic-layer-by-layer oxide molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-oxide MBE) which has been recently installed in the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research and we report on its present status, providing some examples that demonstrate its successful application in the synthesis of different layered oxides, with particular reference to superconducting La2CuO4 and insulator-to-metal La2−xSrxNiO4. We briefly review the ALL-oxide MBE technique and its unique capabilities...

  1. Modeling doped and defective oxides in catalysis with density functional theory methods: room for improvements.

    Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2008-05-14

    Due to the well-known problem of the self-interaction, standard density functional theory (DFT) methods tend to produce delocalized holes and electrons in defective oxide materials even when there is ample experimental evidence of a strong localization. For late transition metal compounds or rare earth oxides, this results in the incorrect description of the electronic structure of the system (e.g., magnetic insulators are predicted to be metallic). Practical ways to correct this deficiency are based on the use of hybrid functionals or of the DFT+U approach. In this way, most of the limitations related to the self-interaction are removed, and the electronic structure is properly described. What is less clear is to what extent hybrid functionals, DFT+U approaches, or standard DFT functionals can properly describe the strength of the chemical bonds at the surface of an oxide. This is a crucial question if one is interested in the catalytic properties of oxide surfaces. Oxidation reactions often involve oxygen detachment from the surface and incorporation into an organic substrate. Oxides are doped with heteroatoms to create defects and facilitate oxygen removal from the surface, with formation of oxygen vacancies. Do standard DFT calculations provide a good binding energy of the missing oxygen despite the failure in giving the right electronic structure? Can hybrid functionals or the DFT+U approach provide a simple yet reliable way to get accurate reaction enthalpies and energy barriers? In this essay, we discuss these problems by analyzing some case histories and the relatively scarce data existing in the literature. The conclusion is that while modern electronic structure methods accurately reproduce and predict a wide range of electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of oxides, the description of the strength of chemical bonds still needs considerable improvements. PMID:18532790

  2. Field-Induced Point Defect Redistribution in Metal Oxides: Mesoscopic Length Scale Phenomena

    Moballegh, Ali

    The spatial redistribution of charged point defects under direct-current (DC) biasing can have significant implications for electroceramic device performance and lifetime. The transport behavior of point defects is regulated by the boundary conditions of the electrodes, which can block electronic charge and/or ion transfer across the interface to varying degrees. When the electrodes are impermeable to mass transport, there will be an accumulation of point defects in the near-electrode region that can lead to significant modifications in the local electronic carrier concentrations. Such defect redistribution is responsible for the long-term increases in leakage current in many capacitor devices via modification of the interface Schottky barrier at the reverse-biased cathode. While this leakage current enhancement is detrimental in capacitor devices, the phenomenon of lattice defect migration can be utilized to form novel functional behaviors, such as resistive switching in metal-oxides via modulation of the Schottky barrier or formation of nonstoichiometric filaments oriented along the applied field direction. The present work aims to understand the phenomenon of defect redistribution as a function of the initial defect chemistry state and electrode boundary conditions under the degradation process, using single-crystal rutile TiO 2 as a model material. Experiments are performed as a function of degradation voltage and crystallographic orientation since the self-diffusion coefficients of oxygen vacancies and titanium interstitials are known to be highly anisotropic in rutile. Rutile single crystals are equilibrated at specific oxygen partial pressures and temperatures to define the initial defect chemistry state. Platinum electrodes, which form Schottky contacts and are largely impermeable to oxygen transfer, are deposited on opposite faces of the crystal. The samples are then subjected to up to 200 V/cm electric field at 200¢ªC while the leakage current is

  3. Defects in fatty acid amide hydrolase 2 in a male with neurologic and psychiatric symptoms

    Sirrs, Sandra; van Karnebeek, Clara DM; Peng, Xiaoxue; Shyr, Casper; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Mandal, Rupasri; Testa, Daniel; Dubin, Devin; Carbonetti, Gregory; Glynn, Steven E.; Sayson, Bryan; Robinson, Wendy P.; Han, Beomsoo; Wishart, David; Ross, Colin J

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatty acid amide hydrolase 2 (FAAH2) is a hydrolase that mediates the degradation of endocannabinoids in man. Alterations in the endocannabinoid system are associated with a wide variety of neurologic and psychiatric conditions, but the phenotype and biochemical characterization of patients with genetic defects of FAAH2 activity have not previously been described. We report a male with autistic features with an onset before the age of 2 years who subsequently developed additional f...

  4. Nondestructive covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by selective oxidation of the original defects with K2FeO4

    Zhang, Zhao-yang; Xu, Xue-cheng

    2015-08-01

    Chemical oxidation is still the major approach to the covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Theoretically, the defects on CNTs are more reactive than skeletal hexagons and should be preferentially oxidized, but conventional oxidation methods, e.g., HNO3/H2SO4 treatment, have poor reaction selectivity and inevitably consume the Cdbnd C bonds in the hexagonal lattices, leading to structural damage, π-electrons loss and weight decrease. In this work, we realized the nondestructive covalent functionalization of CNTs by selective oxidation of the defects. In our method, potassium ferrate K2FeVIO4 was employed as an oxidant for CNTs in H2SO4 medium. The CNT samples, before and after K2FeO4/H2SO4 treatment, were characterized with colloid dispersibility, IR, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM and XPS. The results indicated that (i) CNTs could be effectively oxidized by Fe (VI) under mild condition (60 °C, 3 h), and hydrophilic CNTs with abundant surface sbnd COOH groups were produced; and (ii) Fe (VI) oxidation of CNTs followed a defect-specific oxidation process, that is, only the sp3-hybridized carbon atoms on CNT surface were oxidized while the Cdbnd C bonds remained unaffected. This selective/nondestructive oxidation afforded oxidized CNTs in yields of above 100 wt%. This paper shows that K2FeO4/H2SO4 is an effective, nondestructive and green oxidation system for oxidative functionalization of CNTs and probably other carbon materials as well.

  5. Anodic luminescence, structural, photoluminescent, and photocatalytic properties of anodic oxide films grown on niobium in phosphoric acid

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Tadić, Nenad; Radić, Nenad; Stefanov, Plamen; Grbić, Boško; Vasilić, Rastko

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on properties of oxide films obtained by anodization of niobium in phosphoric acid before and after the dielectric breakdown. Weak anodic luminescence of barrier oxide films formed during the anodization of niobium is correlated to the existence of morphological defects in the oxide layer. Small sized sparks generated by dielectric breakdown of formed oxide film cause rapid increase of luminescence intensity. The luminescence spectrum of obtained films on niobium under spark discharging is composed of continuum radiation and spectral lines caused by electronic spark discharging transitions in oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Oxide films formed before the breakdown are amorphous, while after the breakdown oxide films are partly crystalline and mainly composed of Nb2O5 hexagonal phase. The photocatalytic activity of obtained oxide films after the breakdown was investigated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange. Increase of the photocatalytic activity with time is related to an increase of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films formed during the process. Also, higher concentration of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films results in higher photoluminescence intensity.

  6. Folic acid supplement use in the prevention of neural tube defects.

    Delany, C

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, planned folic acid fortification for the prevention of Neural Tube Defects (NTD) was postponed. Concurrently, the economic recession may have affected dietary folic acid intake, placing increased emphasis on supplement use. This study examined folic acid supplement use in 2009. A cross-sectional survey of 300 ante-natal women was undertaken to assess folic acid knowledge and use. Associations between demographic, obstetric variables and folic acid knowledge and use were examined. A majority, 284\\/297 (96%), had heard of folic acid, and 178\\/297 (60%) knew that it could prevent NTD. Most, 270\\/297 (91%) had taken it during their pregnancy, but only 107\\/297 (36%) had used it periconceptionally. Being older, married, planned pregnancy and better socioeconomic status were associated with periconceptional use. Periconceptional folic acid use in 2009 was very low, little changed from economic status were associated with periconceptional use. Periconceptional folic acid use in 2009 was very low, little changed from earlier years. Continuous promotion efforts are necessary. Close monitoring of folic acid intake and NTD rates is essential, particularly in the absence of fortification.

  7. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-07-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentrations increased only modestly and briefly after an oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of oral L-tryptophan, reflecting the absorptive defect. An oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of tryptophan ethyl ester resulted in a prompt increase in serum tryptophan to a peak of 555 microM. Sustained treatment with 20 mg/kg q6h resulted in normalization of serum (66 +/- 15 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid tryptophan concentrations (mean = 2.3 microM). Cerebrospinal fluid 5-HIAA increased to more normal concentrations (mean = 33 ng/ml). No toxicity was observed over an 8-mo period of treatment, chronic diarrhea resolved, and body weight, which had remained unchanged for 7 mo before ester therapy, increased by approximately 26%. We concluded that tryptophan ethyl ester is effective at circumventing defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport and may be useful in the treatment of Hartnup disease. PMID:2472426

  8. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Stevanovic, R. M.; Popovic, K. Dj.; Jovanovic, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid oxidation was studied on platinum-bismuth deposits on glassy carbon (GC) substrate. The catalysts of equimolar ratio were prepared by potentiostatic deposition using chronocoulometry. Bimetallic structures obtained by two-step process, comprising deposition of Bi followed by deposition...... dissolution, deposits were subjected to electrochemical oxidation, in the relevant potential range and supporting electrolyte, prior to use as catalysts for HCOOH oxidation. Anodic striping charges indicated that along oxidation procedure most of deposited Bi was oxidized. ICP mass spectroscopy analysis of...... latter. Catalysts prepared in this way exhibit about 10 times higher activity for formic acid oxidation in comparison to pure Pt, as revealed both by potentiodynamic and quasy-potentiostatic measurements. This high activity is the result of well-balanced ensemble effect induced by Bi-oxide species...

  9. Intrinsic point defects in zinc oxide. Modeling of structural, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Erhart, P.

    2006-07-01

    The present dissertation deals with the modeling of zinc oxide on the atomic scale employing both quantum mechanical as well as atomistic methods. The first part describes quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory of intrinsic point defects in ZnO. To begin with, the geometric and electronic structure of vacancies and oxygen interstitials is explored. In equilibrium oxygen interstitials are found to adopt dumbbell and split interstitial configurations in positive and negative charge states, respectively. Semi-empirical self-interaction corrections allow to improve the agreement between the experimental and the calculated band structure significantly; errors due to the limited size of the supercells can be corrected by employing finite-size scaling. The effect of both band structure corrections and finite-size scaling on defect formation enthalpies and transition levels is explored. Finally, transition paths and barriers for the migration of zinc as well as oxygen vacancies and interstitials are determined. The results allow to interpret diffusion experiments and provide a consistent basis for developing models for device simulation. In the second part an interatomic potential for zinc oxide is derived. To this end, the Pontifix computer code is developed which allows to fit analytic bond-order potentials. The code is subsequently employed to obtain interatomic potentials for Zn-O, Zn-Zn, and O-O interactions. To demonstrate the applicability of the potentials, simulations on defect production by ion irradiation are carried out. (orig.)

  10. Tuning the reactivity of Ru nanoparticles by defect engineering of the reduced graphene oxide support

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We systematically investigated the electronic structure of Ru nanoparticles supported on various local structures on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) by first-principles-based calculations. We showed that Ru nanoparticles prefer to nucleate at these localized defect structures on rGO, which act as strong trapping sites for Ru nanoparticles and inhibit their aggregation. The binding of Ru nanoparticles to rGO, which is dependent on these local defect structures and correlates with the interfacial charge transfer, determines the electronic structure of the composites. Further study reveals that the performance of these composites against oxygen adsorption changes proportionally with the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticles. The correlation between the defect structures on rGO and the reactivity of the composites suggests that controlled modification of the graphenic support by defect engineering would be an efficient way to fabricate new transition metal/rGO composites with high stability and desired reactivity. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  11. Chemical oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    The oxidation of six phenolic acids by soil Fe and Mn oxides was demonstrated by changes in phenolic acid extractability from soil with time, by production of Fe(II) and soluble Mn from the oxidation reaction, by quantitative recoveries of added phenolic acids from soil pretreated with dithionite-citrate to remove Fe and Mn oxides, and by the reactivity of phenolic acids in the presence of pure Mn and Fe oxides. The reactivities of phenolic acids were associated with the structures of the chemicals. Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring increased reactivity, and cinnamic acid derivatives were more reactive than benzoic acid derivatives. Oxidation products of 14C labeled ferulic acid were sorbed to MnO2 within minutes and were unextractable by organic solvents unless the mineral was pretreated with 6 M HCl or 0.5 M NaOH. The oxidation rate of ferulic acid by MnO2 approached zero after four days even with a surplus of reactants

  12. Zinc self-diffusion, electrical properties, and defect structure of undoped, single crystal zinc oxide

    Zinc self-diffusion was measured in single crystal zinc oxide using nonradioactive 70Zn as the tracer isotope and secondary ion mass spectrometry for data collection. Crystal mass was closely monitored to measure ZnO evaporation. Diffusion coefficients were isotropic with an activation energy of 372 kJ/mol. Zinc self-diffusion is most likely controlled by a vacancy mechanism. Electrical property measurements exhibit a plateau in conductivity at intermediate pO2 with an increase in reducing atmospheres. An analysis of the defect structure is presented that indicates that oxygen vacancies are probably the intrinsic ionic defects responsible for n-type conductivity in reducing atmospheres. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  13. Defect engineered d0 ferromagnetism in tin-doped indium oxide nanostructures and nanocrystalline thin-films

    Origin of unexpected defect engineered room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanostructures (Nanowires, Nano-combs) and nanocrystalline thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition has been investigated. It is found that the ITO nanostructures prepared under argon environment exhibit strongest ferromagnetic signature as compared to that nanocrystalline thin films grown at oxygen. The evidence of singly ionized oxygen vacancy (V0+) defects, obtained from various spectroscopic measurements, suggests that such V0+ defects are mainly responsible for the intrinsic ferromagnetic ordering. The exchange interaction of the defects provides extensive opportunity to tune the room-temperature d0 ferromagnetism and optical properties of ITOs

  14. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  15. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  16. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans.

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils Joakim

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has during the past decade proven to be a valuable model organism to identify and examine molecular mechanisms regulating lipid storage and metabolism. While the primary approach has been to identify genes and pathways conferring alterations in lipid accumulation, only a few recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in live C. elegans by examining oxidation of tritium-labeled fatty acids to tritiated H2O that can be measured by scintillation counting. Treating animals with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the electron transport chain, reduced (3)H2O production to approximately 15%, while boiling of animals prior to assay completely blocked the production of labeled water. We demonstrate that worms fed different bacterial strains exhibit different fatty acid oxidation rates. We show that starvation results in increased fatty acid oxidation, which is independent of the transcription factor NHR-49. On the contrary, fatty acid oxidation is reduced to approximately 70% in animals lacking the worm homolog of the insulin receptor, DAF-2. Hence, the present methodology can be used to delineate the role of specific genes and pathways in the regulation of β-oxidation in C. elegans. PMID:24058820

  17. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by the oxidation of nucleic acids.

    Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Animals;chemistry;deficiency;DNA Damage;DNA Glycosylases;DNA Repair;DNA Repair Enzymes;Enzymes;genetics;Genomics;Guanine;Hydrolases;Intestinal Neoplasms;Japan;Liver Neoplasms;metabolism;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Mice;Mutagenesis;Mutation;Neoplasms;Nucleic Acids;Oxidation-Reduction;Oxidative Stress;Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases;Skin Neoplasms;Ultraviolet Rays.

  18. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements

  19. Ghrelin reduces hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation.

    Rigault, C; Le Borgne, F; Georges, B; Demarquoy, J

    2007-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide secreted during starvation by gastric cells. Ghrelin physiologically induces food intake and seems to alter lipid and glucid metabolism in several tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. Liver has a key position in lipid metabolism as it allows the metabolic orientation of fatty acids between oxidation and esterification. We investigated the effects of peripheral ghrelin administration on 2 crucial parameters of fatty acid oxidation: the levocarnitine (L-carnitine)-dependent entry of the fatty acids in the mitochondria and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Ghrelin was either given to rats prior to the hepatocyte preparation and culture or used to treat hepatocytes prepared from control animals. Direct incubation of ghrelin to raw hepatocytes did not induce any change in the studied parameters. In hepatocytes prepared from 3 nmol ghrelin-treated rats, a 44% reduction of the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation while no alteration of the L-carnitine-related parameters were observed. These results suggested (a) that ghrelin has no direct effect on liver, and (b) that when administrated to a whole organism, ghrelin may alter the lipid metabolism and the energy balance through a marked decrease in liver fatty acid oxidation. PMID:17556859

  20. Investigation of the radiation defect in aluminum oxide by the spectrum of diffuse reflection

    Full text : The results of investigation of radiation defects in the γ irradiated disperse aluminum oxide by the spectrum of diffuse reflection were given in this work. It was shown that, γ irradiation Al2O3 guides absorption in and around tied assistance generation of electron (F+) and hole (V) centers. Multicomponent structure was observed in V centers under hv=2,5-3,2 with maximum under γ=375,390 and 410 nm, appropriated hole centers of V, V= and VOH types. The study of kinetic regularity of capital of the V centers depending on absorbed dose. General concentration of the hole centers was calculated

  1. Defects and characteristics of the structure and properties of aluminum oxides

    Kopylov, V. B.; Aleksandrov, K. A.; Sergeev, E. V.

    2008-07-01

    Based on IR spectroscopy data, it was established that nonstoichiometry defects in the structure of aluminum oxides were components of the Wannier-Mott exciton states and included the Al-O, Al-Al, O2, O{2/+}, O{2/-}, O{2/2-}, O3, and O2 n isolated oscillators in the ground and electronically excited states. It was shown that their presence manifested itself by thermoemission of molecular oxygen singlet forms, excess heat capacity, and anomalous diamagnetism at elevated temperatures.

  2. Identification and Characterization of Arabidopsis Indole-3-Butyric Acid Response Mutants Defective in Novel Peroxisomal Enzymes

    Zolman, Bethany K.; Martinez, Naxhiely; Millius, Arthur; Adham, A. Raquel; Bartel, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Genetic evidence suggests that indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) is converted to the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by removal of two side-chain methylene units in a process similar to fatty acid β-oxidation. Previous studies implicate peroxisomes as the site of IBA metabolism, although the enzymes that act in this process are still being identified. Here, we describe two IBA-response mutants, ibr1 and ibr10. Like the previously described ibr3 mutant, which disrupts a putative peroxisomal ...

  3. Hafnium oxide gate dielectrics grown from an alkoxide precursor: structure and defects

    We present an infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction study of hafnium oxide gate dielectric films deposited from hafnium tetra-tert-butoxide, Hf(OC(CH3)3)4. We characterize the crystal phase as a function of thickness and detect the chemical state of impurities in this high-permittivity (high-κ) material. The HfO2 films are composed of monoclinic crystallites in an amorphous matrix. The crystalline fraction increases with increasing film thickness. Infrared spectroscopy is used to obtain information about impurities, which may help to uncover the nature of electrical defects. We detect and quantify for instance the presence of incorporated hydroxyl groups or water that may be responsible for the deviation from ideal HfO2 stoichiometry. The concentration of residual C-H bonds is low. However, carbon is incorporated in an oxidized form, possibly as carbonate

  4. Modulating fatty acid oxidation in heart failure

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Stanley, William C.; Recchia, Fabio A.

    2011-01-01

    In the advanced stages of heart failure, many key enzymes involved in myocardial energy substrate metabolism display various degrees of down-regulation. The net effect of the altered metabolic phenotype consists of reduced cardiac fatty oxidation, increased glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and rigidity of the metabolic response to changes in workload. Is this metabolic shift an adaptive mechanism that protects the heart or a maladaptive process that accelerates structural and functional dera...

  5. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in live C. elegans by examining oxidation of tritium-labeled fatty acids to tritiated H2O that can be measured by...... scintillation counting. Treating animals with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the electron transport chain, reduced (3)H2O production to approximately 15%, while boiling of animals prior to assay completely blocked the production of labeled water. We demonstrate that worms fed different bacterial strains exhibit...

  6. Charged defects during alpha-irradiation of actinide oxides as revealed by Raman and luminescence spectroscopy

    Mohun, R.; Desgranges, L.; Léchelle, J.; Simon, P.; Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Duval, F.; Jegou, C.; Magnin, M.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.; Valot, C.; Vauchy, R.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently evidenced an original Raman signature of alpha irradiation-induced defects in UO2. In this study, we aim to determine whether the same signature also exists in different actinide oxides, namely ThO2 and PuO2. Sintered UO2 and ThO2 were initially irradiated with 21 MeV He2+ ions using a cyclotron device and were subjected to an in situ luminescence experiment followed by Raman analysis. In addition, a PuO2 sample which had accumulated self-irradiation damage due to alpha particles was investigated only by Raman measurement. Results obtained for the initially white ThO2 showed that a blue color appeared in the irradiated areas as well as luminescence signals during irradiation. However, Raman spectroscopic analysis showed the absence of Raman signature in ThO2. In contrast, the irradiated UO2 and PuO2 confirmed the presence of the Raman signature but no luminescence peaks were observed. The proposed mechanism involves electronic defects in ThO2, while a coupling between electronic defects and phonons is required to explain the Raman spectra for UO2 and PuO2.

  7. Reactive oxygen species in sarcopenia: Should we focus on excess oxidative damage or defective redox signalling?

    Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-08-01

    Physical frailty in the elderly is driven by loss of muscle mass and function and hence preventing this is the key to reduction in age-related physical frailty. Our current understanding of the key areas in which ROS contribute to age-related deficits in muscle is through increased oxidative damage to cell constituents and/or through induction of defective redox signalling. Recent data have argued against a primary role for ROS as a regulator of longevity, but studies have persistently indicated that aspects of the aging phenotype and age-related disorders may be mediated by ROS. There is increasing interest in the effects of defective redox signalling in aging and some studies now indicate that this process may be important in reducing the integrity of the aging neuromuscular system. Understanding how redox-signalling pathways are altered by aging and the causes of the defective redox homeostasis seen in aging muscle provides opportunities to identify targeted interventions with the potential to slow or prevent age-related neuromuscular decline with a consequent improvement in quality of life for older people. PMID:27161871

  8. Gene expression in retinoic acid-induced neural tube defects A cDNA mieroarray analysis

    Xiaodong Long; Zhong Yang; Yi Zeng; Hongli Li; Yangyun Han; Chao You

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects can be induced by abnormal factors in vivo or in vitro during development. However, the molecular mechanisms of neural tube defect induction, and the related gene expression and regulation are still unknown.OBJECTIVE: To compare the differences in gene expression between normal embryos and those with neural tube defects.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A neural development study was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Third Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between January 2006 and October 2007.MATERIALS: Among 120 adult Kunming mice, 60 pregnant mice were randomly and evenly divided into a retinoic acid group (n = 30) and a normal control group (n =30). The retinoic acid was produced by Sigma, USA, the gene microarray by the Amersham Pharmacia Company, Hong Kong, and the gene sequence was provided by the Incyte database, USA.METHODS: Retinoic acid was administered to prepare models of neural tube defects, and corn oil was similady administered to the normal control group. Total RNA was extracted from embryonic tissue of the two groups using a Trizol kit, and a cDNA microarray containing 1 100 known genes was used to compare differences in gene expression between the normal control group and the retinoic acid group on embryonic (E) clay 10.5 and 11.5. Several differentially expressed genes were randomly selected from the two groups for Northern blotting, to verify the results of the cDNA microarray.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Morphological changes and differential gene expression between the normal control group and the retinoic acid group.RESULTS: Anatomical microscopy demonstrated that an intact closure of the brain was formed in the normal mouse embryos by days E10.5 and E11.5. The cerebral appearance was full and smooth, and the surface of the spine was intact. However, in the retinoic acid group on days E10.5 and E11.5, there were more dead embryos. Morphological malformations typically included non-closure at the top of

  9. Platinum nanoparticles–manganese oxide nanorods as novel binary catalysts for formic acid oxidation

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study proposes a novel binary catalyst system (composed of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles as a promising electrocatalyst in formic acid oxidation. The electro-catalytic oxidation of formic acid is carried out with binary catalysts of Pt nanoparticles (nano-Pt and manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx electrodeposited onto glassy carbon (GC electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV measurements showed that unmodified GC and nano-MnOx/GC electrodes have no catalytic activity. While two oxidation peaks were observed at nano-Pt/GC electrode at ca. 0.2 and 0.55 V (corresponding to the direct oxidation of formic acid and the oxidation of the poisoning CO intermediate, respectively. The combined use of nano-MnOx and nano-Pt results in superb enhancement of the direct oxidation pathway. Nano-MnOx is shown to facilitate the oxidation of CO (to CO2 by providing oxygen at low over-potential. This leads to retrieval of Pt active sites necessary for the direct oxidation of formic acid. The higher catalytic activity of nano-MnOx/nano-Pt/GC electrode (with Pt firstly deposited compared to its mirror image electrode (i.e., with MnOx firstly deposited, nano-Pt/nano-MnOx/GC reveals that the order of the electrodeposition is an essential parameter.

  10. Lack of periconceptional vitamins or supplements that contain folic acid and diabetes mellitus–associated birth defects

    Correa, Adolfo; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Moore, Cynthia A.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Cleves, Mario A.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Waller, D. Kim; Reece, E. Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of birth defects in relation to diabetes mellitus and the lack of use of periconceptional vitamins or supplements that contain folic acid. STUDY DESIGN The National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997-2004) is a multicenter, population-based case-control study of birth defects (14,721 cases and 5437 control infants). Cases were categorized into 18 types of heart defects and 26 noncardiac birth defects. We estimated odds ratios for independent and joint effects of preexisting diabetes mellitus and a lack of periconceptional use of vitamins or supplements that contain folic acid. RESULTS The pattern of odds ratios suggested an increased risk of defects that are associated with diabetes mellitus in the absence vs the presence of the periconceptional use of vitamins or supplements that contain folic acid. CONCLUSION The lack of periconceptional use of vitamins or supplements that contain folic acid may be associated with an excess risk for birth defects due to diabetes mellitus. PMID:22284962

  11. The Biochemistry and Physiology of Mitochondrial Fatty Acid β-Oxidation and Its Genetic Disorders.

    Houten, Sander M; Violante, Sara; Ventura, Fatima V; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) is the major pathway for the degradation of fatty acids and is essential for maintaining energy homeostasis in the human body. Fatty acids are a crucial energy source in the postabsorptive and fasted states when glucose supply is limiting. But even when glucose is abundantly available, FAO is a main energy source for the heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney. A series of enzymes, transporters, and other facilitating proteins are involved in FAO. Recessively inherited defects are known for most of the genes encoding these proteins. The clinical presentation of these disorders may include hypoketotic hypoglycemia, (cardio)myopathy, arrhythmia, and rhabdomyolysis and illustrates the importance of FAO during fasting and in hepatic and (cardio)muscular function. In this review, we present the current state of knowledge on the biochemistry and physiological functions of FAO and discuss the pathophysiological processes associated with FAO disorders. PMID:26474213

  12. The oxidation of acid azo dye AY 36 by a manganese oxide containing mine waste

    Highlights: ► This study looks at the oxidative breakdown of the amine containing dye acid yellow 36 by a Mn oxide containing mine waste. ► The oxidation proceeds by successive one electron transfers between the dye molecule and the Mn oxide minerals. ► The initial decolorization of the dye is rapid, but does not involve the cleavage of the azo bond. -- Abstract: The oxidative breakdown of acid azo dye acid yellow 36 (AY 36) by a Mn oxide containing mine tailings is demonstrated. The oxidation reaction is pH dependent with the rate of decolorization increasing with decreasing pH. The oxidation reaction mechanism is initiated at the amino moiety and proceeds via successive, one electron transfers from the dye to the Mn oxide minerals. The reaction pathway involves the formation of a number of colorless intermediate products, some of which hydrolyze in a Mn oxide-independent step. Decolorization of the dye is rapid and is observed before the cleavage of the azo-bond, which is a slower process. The terminal oxidation products were observed to be p-benzoquinone and 3-hydroxybenzenesulfonate. The reaction order of the initial decolorization was determined to be pseudo fractional order with respect to pH and pseudo first order with respect to dye concentration and Mn tailings’ surface area

  13. Oxidative stability of fatty acid alkyl esters: a review.

    Michal Angelovič

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate and to process the current literary knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of vegetable oil raw used for biodiesel production in terms of its qualitative stability. An object of investigation was oxidative stability of biodiesel. In the study, we focused on the qualitative physico-chemical properties of vegetable oils used for biodiesel production, oxidative degradation and its mechanisms, oxidation of lipids, mechanisms of autooxidation, effectivennes of different synthetic antioxidants in relation to oxidative stability of biodiesel and methods of oxidative stability determination. Knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of vegetable oil as raw material and the factors affecting these properties is critical for the production of quality biodiesel and its sustainability. According to the source of oilseed, variations in the chemical composition of the vegetable oil are expressed by variations in the molar ratio among different fatty acids in the structure. The relative ratio of fatty acids present in the raw material is kept relatively constant after the transesterification reaction. The quality of biodiesel physico-chemical properties is influenced by the chain length and the level of unsaturation of the produced fatty acid alkyl esters. A biodiesel is thermodynamically stable. Its instability primarily occurs from contact of oxygen present in the ambient air that is referred to as oxidative instability. For biodiesel is oxidation stability a general term. It is necessary to distinguish ‘storage stability' and ‘thermal stability', in relation to oxidative degradation, which may occur during extended periods of storage, transportation and end use. Fuel instability problems can be of two related types, short-term oxidative instability and long-term storage instability. Storage instability is defined in terms of solid formation, which can plug nozzles, filters, and degrade engine

  14. Folic acid supplements to prevent neural tube defects: trends in East of Ireland 1996-2002.

    Ward, M

    2004-10-01

    Promotion of folic acid to prevent neural Tube Defects (NTD) has been ongoing for ten years in Ireland, without a concomitant reduction in the total birth prevalence of NTD. The effectiveness of folic acid promotion as the sole means of primary prevention of NTD is therefore questionable. We examined trends in folic acid knowledge and peri-conceptional use from 1996-2002 with the aim of assessing the value of this approach. From 1996-2002, 300 women attending ante-natal clinics in Dublin hospitals annually were surveyed regarding their knowledge and use of folic acid. During the period the proportion who had heard of folic acid rose from 54% to 94% between 1996 and 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Knowledge that folic acid can prevent NTD also rose from 21% to 66% (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Although the proportion who took folic acid during pregnancy increased from 14% to 83% from 1996 to 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001), peri-conceptional intake did not rise above 24% in any year. There is a high awareness of folic acid and its relation to NTD, which is not matched by peri-conceptional uptake. The main barrier to peri-conceptional uptake is the lack of pregnancy planning. To date promotional campaigns appear to have been ineffective in reducing the prevalence of NTD in Ireland. Consequently, fortification of staple foodstuffs is the only practical and reliable means of primary prevention of NTD.

  15. Oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Ascorbic acid and low pH increase oxidative deterioration

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Timm Heinrich, Maike; Meyer, Anne S.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid (0-4000 ppm) and pH (3.8-6.2) on oxidation and levels of iron and copper in various fractions of mayonnaise enriched with 16% fish oil was investigated. Ascorbic acid induced release of iron from the assumed oil- water interface into the aqueous phase at all pH levels......H promoted oxidation. It is proposed that iron bridges between the egg yolk proteins low-density lipoproteins, lipovitellin, and phosvitin at the oil-water interface are broken at low pH values, whereby iron ions become accessible as oxidation initiators. In the presence of ascorbic acid, oxidation is...... further enhanced due to the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ that rapidly catalyzes lipid oxidation via lipid hydroperoxide decomposition at the oil-water interface in mayonnaise...

  16. Defect modelling

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  17. Ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid as reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Lack of post-sampling stability of ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid and failure to block their in vivo equilibrium have lowered their value as biomarkers of oxidative stress and limited the ability to further investigate their possible role in disease prevention. In the present paper, the...... analytical reproducibility was tested by repeated analysis of plasma aliquots from one individual over four years. The plasma was subjected to acidic deproteinization with an equal volume of 10% meta-phosphoric acid containing 2 mM EDTA and analyzed for ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid by high-performance...

  18. Nondestructive covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by selective oxidation of the original defects with K2FeO4

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nondestructive covalent CNT functionalization is realized by defect oxidation. • A green oxidant K2FeVIO4 is used for CNT oxidation for the first time. • Effective CNT oxidation can be achieved at 60 °C in 3 h. • Oxidized CNTs are obtained in yields of above 100 wt%. • FeO3, an unusual Fe (VI) specie, is produced when K2FeO4 is dissolved in H2SO4. - Abstract: Chemical oxidation is still the major approach to the covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Theoretically, the defects on CNTs are more reactive than skeletal hexagons and should be preferentially oxidized, but conventional oxidation methods, e.g., HNO3/H2SO4 treatment, have poor reaction selectivity and inevitably consume the C=C bonds in the hexagonal lattices, leading to structural damage, π-electrons loss and weight decrease. In this work, we realized the nondestructive covalent functionalization of CNTs by selective oxidation of the defects. In our method, potassium ferrate K2FeVIO4 was employed as an oxidant for CNTs in H2SO4 medium. The CNT samples, before and after K2FeO4/H2SO4 treatment, were characterized with colloid dispersibility, IR, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM and XPS. The results indicated that (i) CNTs could be effectively oxidized by Fe (VI) under mild condition (60 °C, 3 h), and hydrophilic CNTs with abundant surface −COOH groups were produced; and (ii) Fe (VI) oxidation of CNTs followed a defect-specific oxidation process, that is, only the sp3-hybridized carbon atoms on CNT surface were oxidized while the C=C bonds remained unaffected. This selective/nondestructive oxidation afforded oxidized CNTs in yields of above 100 wt%. This paper shows that K2FeO4/H2SO4 is an effective, nondestructive and green oxidation system for oxidative functionalization of CNTs and probably other carbon materials as well

  19. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle

  20. Translucent tissue defect in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is associated with oxidative stress accompanying an accelerated aging phenotype.

    Zommick, Daniel H; Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2013-12-01

    Translucent tissue defect (TTD) is an undesirable postharvest disorder of potato tubers characterized by the development of random pockets of semi-transparent tissue containing high concentrations of reducing sugars. Translucent areas turn dark during frying due to the Maillard reaction. The newly released cultivar, Premier Russet, is highly resistant to low temperature sweetening, but susceptible to TTD. Symptoms appeared as early as 170 days after harvest and worsened with time in storage (4-9 °C, 95 % RH). In addition to higher concentrations of glucose, fructose and sucrose, TTD resulted in lower dry matter, higher specific activities of starch phosphorylase and glc-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, higher protease activity, loss of protein, and increased concentrations of free amino acids (esp. asparagine and glutamine). The mechanism of TTD is unknown; however, the disorder has similarities with the irreversible senescent sweetening that occurs in tubers during long-term storage, where much of the decline in quality is a consequence of progressive increases in oxidative stress with advancing age. The respiration rate of non-TTD 'Premier Russet' tubers was inherently higher (ca. 40 %) than that of 'Russet Burbank' tubers (a non-TTD cultivar). Moreover, translucent tissue from 'Premier Russet' tubers had a 1.9-fold higher respiration rate than the average of non-translucent tissue and tissue from non-TTD tubers. Peroxidation of membrane lipids during TTD development resulted in increased levels of malondialdehyde and likely contributed to a measurable increase in membrane permeability. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione were substantially higher in translucent tissue. TTD tubers also contained twofold less ascorbate than non-TTD tubers. TTD appears to be a consequence of oxidative stress associated with accelerated aging of 'Premier Russet' tubers. PMID:24037414

  1. Engineering the defect state and reducibility of ceria based nanoparticles for improved anti-oxidation performance

    Wang, Yan-Jie; Dong, Hao; Lyu, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Huai-Yuan; Ke, Jun; Kang, Li-Qun; Teng, Jia-Li; Sun, Ling-Dong; Si, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Yun-Hui; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Due to their excellent anti-oxidation performance, CeO2 nanoparticles receive wide attention in pharmacological application. Deep understanding of the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles is extremely important to develop potent CeO2 nanomaterials for anti-oxidation application. Here, we report a detailed study on the anti-oxidation process of CeO2 nanoparticles. The valence state and coordination structure of Ce are characterized before and after the addition of H2O2 to understand the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles. Adsorbed peroxide species are detected during the anti-oxidation process, which are responsible for the red-shifted UV-vis absorption spectra of CeO2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, the coordination number of Ce in the first coordination shell slightly increased after the addition of H2O2. On the basis of these experimental results, the reactivity of coordination sites for peroxide species is considered to play a key role in the anti-oxidation performance of CeO2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, we present a robust method to engineer the anti-oxidation performance of CeO2 nanoparticles through the modification of the defect state and reducibility by doping with Gd3+. Improved anti-oxidation performance is also observed in cell culture, where the biocompatible CeO2-based nanoparticles can protect INS-1 cells from oxidative stress induced by H2O2, suggesting the potential application of CeO2 nanoparticles in the treatment of diabetes.Due to their excellent anti-oxidation performance, CeO2 nanoparticles receive wide attention in pharmacological application. Deep understanding of the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles is extremely important to develop potent CeO2 nanomaterials for anti-oxidation application. Here, we report a detailed study on the anti-oxidation process of CeO2 nanoparticles. The valence state and coordination structure of Ce are characterized before and after the addition of H2O2 to understand the anti-oxidation

  2. Studies of oxide/ZnO near-interfacial defects by photoluminescence and deep level transient spectroscopy

    Ling, CC; Wang, RS; Gu, QL; Ong, HC

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of near-interfacial defects from Al2 O3 ZnO and MgOZnO upon thermal annealing has been studied by photoluminescence, deep level transient spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. We find that all the results are strongly connected and that they point to the direction that Zn outdiffuses from ZnO to the oxide layer during annealing and creates deep level defects near the interfacial region. These defects reduce the band-edge emission and increase the deep level emission...

  3. Peroxisomal beta-oxidation defect with detectable peroxisomes: a case with neonatal onset and progressive course.

    Barth, P G; Wanders, R J; Schutgens, R B; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E M; van Heemstra, D

    1990-07-01

    A progressive demyelinating cerebral disorder is described in a normally-appearing female infant with neonatal seizures, progressive psychomotor deterioration, deafness, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy and loss of myelin observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. MRI also showed the absence of macroscopic neocortical dysplasia which is usually found in Zellweger syndrome (ZS). Adrenal cortical function was normal. The patient died at the age of 37 months. Extensive biochemical investigations of peroxisomal functions in the patient revealed an impairment of peroxisomal beta-oxidation resulting in elevated levels of very long (greater than C22) chain fatty acids in plasma and fibroblasts. Moreover, elevated plasma levels of intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis such as tri- and dihydroxycholestanoic acid were found. Other peroxisomal functions were normal. Immunoblotting of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzyme proteins in liver from the patient revealed normal responses with antisera against acyl-CoA oxidase, bifunctional protein and thiolase respectively. From these data we conclude that the patient had a deficiency of a single peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzyme at the level of either the bifunctional protein or peroxisomal thiolase with retained immunoreactivity against these enzymes. PMID:2209666

  4. Acid-catalyzed kinetics of indium tin oxide etching

    We report the kinetic characterization of indium tin oxide (ITO) film etching by chemical treatment in acidic and basic electrolytes. It was observed that film etching increased under more acidic conditions, whereas basic conditions led to minimal etching on the time scale of the experiments. Quartz crystal microbalance was employed in order to track the reaction kinetics as a function of the concentration of hydrochloric acid and accordingly solution pH. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy experiments determined that acid treatment increases surface hydrophilicity and porosity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments identified that film etching is primarily caused by dissolution of indium species. A kinetic model was developed to explain the acid-catalyzed dissolution of ITO surfaces, and showed a logarithmic relationship between the rate of dissolution and the concentration of undisassociated hydrochloric acid molecules. Taken together, the findings presented in this work verify the acid-catalyzed kinetics of ITO film dissolution by chemical treatment, and support that the corresponding chemical reactions should be accounted for in ITO film processing applications. - Highlights: • Acidic conditions promoted indium tin oxide (ITO) film etching via dissolution. • Logarithm of the dissolution rate depended linearly on the solution pH. • Acid treatment increased ITO surface hydrophilicity and porosity. • ITO film etching led to preferential dissolution of indium species over tin species

  5. Phase Relations and Defect Chemistry of Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide Superconducting Oxides at Elevated Temperature

    Hong, Byungsun

    1992-01-01

    Subsolidus phase relations in the system (Bi-Sr -Ca-Cu)-O at 800^circC were investigated via powder X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis of solid-state reaction products. The only truly quaternary compound detected is the superconducting phase of n = 2 in Bi_2(Sr _{rm x}Ca_ {rm 1-x})_{ rm n+1}Cu_{rm n}O_{rm y} . The n = 2 phase is compatible with eight different binary or ternary phases. Tie lines, tie triangles, and compatibility tetrahedra involving superconducting phases were determined. The cation solubility limits of the n = 2 and n = 3 superconducting phases were established along tie lines with compatible phases via EPMA on bi- (or poly -) phasic samples prepared at 860^circ C. In each case football-shaped volumes in composition space were established as the solubility limits which bordered on the nominal compositions 2212 or 2223 with the long axis parallel to the Sr-Ca side of the quaternary but also extending toward Bi and Cu. T_{rm c} variations could be correlated with variations in Sr or (Bi+Sr) content and the length of the c-axis parameter. Via in-situ high temperature (550-650 ^circC) electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements in Bi_ {2.1}Sr_{1.9} (Ca_{rm 1-x}Y _{rm x})Cu _2O_{rm y} , a point defect model/diagram is presented which explains the variation of thermopower with composition in the system. The reference, insulating composition should be between Bi_{2.1}Sr _{1.9}Ca_ {0.2}Y_{0.8} Cu_2O_{8.45 } and Bi_{2.1}Sr _{1.9}Ca_ {0.3}Y_{0.7} Cu_2O_{8.4 }. Y-contents higher than x = 0.8 result in a second phase. A structural phase transition from pseudo -tetragonal to orthorhombic takes place at x = 0.5, and plays a major role in determining the physical properties. Oxygen transfer from the Bi-O block to the Cu-O based perovskite block is suggested at the phase boundary of x = 0.5. Jonker analysis and oxygen pressure dependence of carrier concentration confirm p-type behavior despite the change in sign of the thermopower

  6. Modelling of liquid metal flow and oxide film defects in filling of aluminium alloy castings

    Dai, X.; Jolly, M.; Yang, X.; Campbell, J.

    2012-07-01

    The liquid metal flow behaviours in different runner system designs have important effects on the mechanical strength of aluminium alloy castings. In this paper, a new model has been developed which is a two-dimensional program using a finite difference technique and the Marker and Cell (MAC) method to simulate the flow of liquid metal during filling a mould. In the program the Eulerian method has been used for the liquid metal flow, while the Oxide Film Entrainment Tracking Algorithm (OFET) method (a Lagrangian method) has been used to simulate the movement of the oxide film on the liquid metal surface or in the liquid metal flow. Several examples have been simulated and tested and the relevant results were obtained. These results were compared with measured bending strengths. It was found that the completed program was capable of simulating effectively the filling processes of different runner systems. The simulation results are consistent with the experiment. In addition, the program is capable of providing clearer images for predicting the distribution of the oxide film defects generated during filling a mould.

  7. Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials

    A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NOx vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180 degrees C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200 degrees C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time

  8. Loss of Adipose Fatty Acid Oxidation Does Not Potentiate Obesity at Thermoneutrality

    Jieun Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperature affects energy intake and expenditure to maintain homeostasis in a continuously fluctuating environment. Here, mice with an adipose-specific defect in fatty acid oxidation (Cpt2A−/− were subjected to varying temperatures to determine the role of adipose bioenergetics in environmental adaptation and body weight regulation. Microarray analysis of mice acclimatized to thermoneutrality revealed that Cpt2A−/− interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT failed to induce the expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1 and Pgc1α in response to adrenergic stimulation, and increasing ambient temperature exacerbated these defects. Furthermore, thermoneutral housing induced mtDNA stress in Cpt2A−/− BAT and ultimately resulted in a loss of interscapular BAT. Although the loss of adipose fatty acid oxidation resulted in clear molecular, cellular, and physiologic deficits in BAT, body weight gain and glucose tolerance were similar in control and Cpt2A−/− mice in response to a high-fat diet, even when mice were housed at thermoneutrality.

  9. Loss of Adipose Fatty Acid Oxidation Does Not Potentiate Obesity at Thermoneutrality.

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Aja, Susan; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2016-02-16

    Ambient temperature affects energy intake and expenditure to maintain homeostasis in a continuously fluctuating environment. Here, mice with an adipose-specific defect in fatty acid oxidation (Cpt2(A-/-)) were subjected to varying temperatures to determine the role of adipose bioenergetics in environmental adaptation and body weight regulation. Microarray analysis of mice acclimatized to thermoneutrality revealed that Cpt2(A-/-) interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) failed to induce the expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1 and Pgc1α in response to adrenergic stimulation, and increasing ambient temperature exacerbated these defects. Furthermore, thermoneutral housing induced mtDNA stress in Cpt2(A-/-) BAT and ultimately resulted in a loss of interscapular BAT. Although the loss of adipose fatty acid oxidation resulted in clear molecular, cellular, and physiologic deficits in BAT, body weight gain and glucose tolerance were similar in control and Cpt2(A-/-) mice in response to a high-fat diet, even when mice were housed at thermoneutrality. PMID:26854223

  10. Prevention of neural tube defects with folic acid: The Chinese experience.

    Ren, Ai-Guo

    2015-08-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations of the central nervous system that are caused by the closure failure of the embryonic neural tube by the 28(th) day of conception. Anencephaly and spina bifida are the two major subtypes. Fetuses with anencephaly are often stillborn or electively aborted due to prenatal diagnosis, or they die shortly after birth. Most infants with spina bifida are live-born and, with proper surgical treatment, can survive into adulthood. However, these children often have life-long physical disabilities. China has one of the highest prevalence of NTDs in the world. Inadequate dietary folate intake is believed to be the main cause of the cluster. Unlike many other countries that use staple fortification with folic acid as the public health strategy to prevent NTDs, the Chinese government provides all women who have a rural household registration and who plan to become pregnant with folic acid supplements, free of charge, through a nation-wide program started in 2009. Two to three years after the initiation of the program, the folic acid supplementation rate increased to 85% in the areas of the highest NTD prevalence. The mean plasma folate level of women during early and mid-pregnancy doubled the level before the program was introduced. However, most women began taking folic acid supplements when they knew that they were pregnant. This is too late for the protection of the embryonic neural tube. In a post-program survey of the women who reported folic acid supplementation, less than a quarter of the women began taking supplements prior to pregnancy, indicating that the remaining three quarters of the fetuses remained unprotected during the time of neural tube formation. Therefore, staple food fortification with folic acid should be considered as a priority in the prevention of NTDs. PMID:26261765

  11. The comparison of gamma-radiation and electrical stress influences on oxide and interface defects in power VDMOSFET

    Đorić-Veljković Snežana M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of oxide and interface defects in n-channel power vertical double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, firstly degraded by the gamma-irradiation and electric field and subsequently recovered and annealed, is presented. By analyzing the transfer characteristic shifts, the changes of threshold voltage and underlying changes of gate oxide and interface trap densities during the stress (recovery, annealing of investigated devices, it is shown that these two types of stress influence differently on the gate oxide and the SiO2-Si interface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI171026

  12. The influence of interfacial defects on fast charge trapping in nanocrystalline oxide-semiconductor thin film transistors

    Kim, Taeho; Hur, Jihyun; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-05-01

    Defects in oxide semiconductors not only influence the initial device performance but also affect device reliability. The front channel is the major carrier transport region during the transistor turn-on stage, therefore an understanding of defects located in the vicinity of the interface is very important. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of charge transport in a nanocrystalline hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor (TFT) by short pulse I-V, transient current and 1/f noise measurement methods. We found that the fast charging behavior of the tested device stems from defects located in both the front channel and the interface, following a multi-trapping mechanism. We found that a silicon-nitride stacked hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide TFT is vulnerable to interfacial charge trapping compared with silicon-oxide counterpart, causing significant mobility degradation and threshold voltage instability. The 1/f noise measurement data indicate that the carrier transport in a silicon-nitride stacked TFT device is governed by trapping/de-trapping processes via defects in the interface, while the silicon-oxide device follows the mobility fluctuation model.

  13. Structure, Raman spectra and defect chemistry modelling of conductive pyrochlore oxides

    Poulsen, F.W.; Glerup, M.; Holtappels, P.

    2000-01-01

    Mixed ionic-electronic conducting pyrochlore structure oxides, with Pr and Gd on the A site and Zr, Mn, Ce, Sn, In, Mo, and Ti on the B site, were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Mn and In have a solubility around x = 0.1-0.2 in Pr2Zr2-xMnxO7 and Pr2Sn2-xInxO7......-O(x) and V-O on the O site, interstitial oxygens O-i", and delocalised electrons and electron holes. Four mass action law expressions govern such a model. The defect model can rationalise why home-valent doping, i.e. substitution of Zr(4+) by Ce(4+), can lead to an increase in ionic conductivity...

  14. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils Joakim

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has during the past decade proven to be a valuable model organism to identify and examine molecular mechanisms regulating lipid storage and metabolism. While the primary approach has been to identify genes and pathways conferring alterations in lipid accumulation, only a few recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in liv...

  15. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

    Pohl, Carolina H.; Johan L. F. Kock

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; ...

  16. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Claude Daneault; Saïd Barazzouk

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, th...

  17. Expression of the Ciona intestinalis alternative oxidase (AOX) in Drosophila complements defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    Fernandez-Ayala, Daniel J M; Sanz, Alberto; Vartiainen, Suvi; Kemppainen, Kia K; Babusiak, Marek; Mustalahti, Eero; Costa, Rodolfo; Tuomela, Tea; Zeviani, Massimo; Chung, Jongkyeong; O'Dell, Kevin M C; Rustin, Pierre; Jacobs, Howard T

    2009-05-01

    Defects in mitochondrial OXPHOS are associated with diverse and mostly intractable human disorders. The single-subunit alternative oxidase (AOX) found in many eukaryotes, but not in arthropods or vertebrates, offers a potential bypass of the OXPHOS cytochrome chain under conditions of pathological OXPHOS inhibition. We have engineered Ciona intestinalis AOX for conditional expression in Drosophila melanogaster. Ubiquitous AOX expression produced no detrimental phenotype in wild-type flies. However, mitochondrial suspensions from AOX-expressing flies exhibited a significant cyanide-resistant substrate oxidation, and the flies were partially resistant to both cyanide and antimycin. AOX expression was able to complement the semilethality of partial knockdown of both cyclope (COXVIc) and the complex IV assembly factor Surf1. It also rescued the locomotor defect and excess mitochondrial ROS production of flies mutated in dj-1beta, a Drosophila homolog of the human Parkinson's disease gene DJ1. AOX appears to offer promise as a wide-spectrum therapeutic tool in OXPHOS disorders. PMID:19416715

  18. Mechanism of catalytic action of oxide systems in reactions of aldehyde oxidation to carboxylic acids

    Mechanism of selective action of oxide catalysts (on the base of V2O4, MoO3) of aldehyde oxidation to acids is considered, reaction acrolein oxidation to acrylic acid is taken as an example. Multistage mechanism of the process is established; it involves consequent transformation of coordination-bonded aldehyde into carbonyl-bonded aldehyde and symmetric carboxylate. Principles of active surface construction are formulated, they take into account the activity of stabilization center of concrete intermediate compound and bond energy of oxygen with surface. (author)

  19. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  20. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation and limitations to fatty acid oxidation during exercise

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Kiens, Bente

    2012-01-01

    turn is trapped by carnitine. This will lead to less availability of free carnitine for fatty acid transport into mitochondria. This review summarizes our present view on how FA metabolism is regulated during exercise with a special focus on the limitations in FA oxidation in the transition from...

  2. Oxidation of coal-based raw materials by nitric acid

    Novák, J.; Novák, František; Madronová, L.; Machovič, V.; Kozler, J.

    New York : Nova Science Publisher, 2011 - (Madronová, L.), s. 105-123 ISBN 978-1-61668-965-0. - ( Chemistry Research and Applications ) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : oxidation * coal-based raw materials * nitric acid Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation

  3. Role of biologically assisted pyrrhotite oxidation in acid mine drainage

    Water contaminated by acidic mine drainage (AMD) from base metal tailings and waste rock is a serious environmental problem. Previous studies have focused on pyrite as the principal acid producing mineral. In this work, the significance of pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) oxidation, both chemical and biochemical, on the acid generation process is discussed. Chemical and biochemical kinetic studies of pyrrhotite oxidation were conducted in pneumatically mixed, internal split flow reactors. Controlling variables included the specific surface area, temperature, pH, partial pressure of oxygen, and co-oxidation with pyrite. Bacterial oxidations, using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans as inoculant. included the inherent metabolic rate and cell sorption equilibria on the ore surface. Mathematical models were derived to couple the kinetics with oxygen mass transfer. The mass transport model combined mechanisms based on the shrinking radius (fine particles) and the shrinking reactive front (massive sulfides) concepts. The objective of the research was the application of fundamental kinetic and physical data to field conditions for simulating both the rate of mineral oxidation and simulating pore water quality

  4. Administration with Bushenkangshuai Tang alleviates UV irradiation- and oxidative stress-induced lifespan defects in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Qi RUI; Qin LU; Dayong WANG

    2009-01-01

    During normal metabolism, oxidative bypro-ducts will inevitably generate and damage molecules thereby impairing their biological functions, including the is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used for clini-cally treating premature ovarian failure. In the present study, BT administration at high concentrations signifi-cantly increased lifespan, slowed aging-related decline, and delayed accumulation of aging-related cellular damage in wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. BT admin-istration could further largely alleviate the aging defects induced by UV and oxidative stresses, and BT administra-tion at different concentrations could largely rescue the aging defects in mev-1 mutant animals. The protective effects of BT administration on aging process were at least partially dependent on the Ins/IGF-like signaling pathway. Moreover, BT administration at different concentrations obviously altered the expression patterns of antioxidant genes and suppressed the severe stress responses induced by UV and oxidative stresses, suggesting that BT-induced tolerance to UV or oxidative stress might result from reactive oxygen species scavenging. BT administration during development was not necessarily a requirement for UV and oxidative stress resistance, and the concentrations of administrated BT examined were not toxic for nematodes. Therefore, BT administration could effectively retrieve the aging defects induced by UV irradiation and oxidative stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

  5. Solid state electrochemical techniques for studies on nonstoichiometry and defect structure of metal oxides

    The equilibrium oxygen partial pressures of several nonstoichiometric oxides were determined as a function of composition and temperature. The defect structures of nonstoichiometric phases are discussed. Thermodynamic properties of UO2+x were determined by using a stacked pellet-type cell and the variation of Δ bar SO2 with x was explained on the basis of the 2:2:2 Willis model. The phase relations and nonstoichiometry in V2O5-x, LiVO3-x, BaBiO3-x, PrOx and Ba2HoCu3O7-y were studied by coulometric titration and the results are discussed on the basis of the mass-action law and statistical models. The electrical conductivity measurements were made under the condition of constant oxygen content or temperature in-situ using a modified coulometric titration technique. Coulometric titration has proved to be very useful to study the phase relations particularly in the oxides with small deviations from the stoichiometric composition

  6. Complexes of low oxidated /sup 99/Tc with salicylic acid

    While several complexes of technetium with hydroxycarboxylic acids in solution are well known, little has been done about complexes of technetium with phenolcarboxylic acids. M.A. Kayssi suggested the use of sulphosalicylic acid as a reagent for the quantitative determination of technetium. The resulting complex shows a spectrophotometric maximum at 460 nm; the author supposes that the complex could contain technetium in the (V) oxidation state. In this paper the reaction between technetium and salicylic acid at concentrations between 10/sup -4/ and 5 x 10/sup -2/ M, in a pH range of 2 to 4.5, has been studied. The pH does not seem to influence the reaction, while the salicylic acid concentration is particularly significant

  7. Defect engineered d{sup 0} ferromagnetism in tin-doped indium oxide nanostructures and nanocrystalline thin-films

    Khan, Gobinda Gopal, E-mail: gobinda.gk@gmail.com, E-mail: sghoshphysics@gmail.com; Sarkar, Ayan [Centre for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Calcutta, Technology Campus, Block JD-2, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Ghosh, Shyamsundar, E-mail: gobinda.gk@gmail.com, E-mail: sghoshphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Bejoy Narayan Mahavidyalaya, P.O. Itachuna, Hooghly 712 147 (India); Mandal, Guruprasad; Mukherjee, Goutam Dev [Department of Physical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, BCKV Campus Main Office, Nadia 741 252 (India); Manju, Unnikrishnan [Materials Characterization Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 2A & 2B Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Banu, Nasrin; Dev, Bhupendra Nath [Department of Material Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A & 2B Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2015-08-21

    Origin of unexpected defect engineered room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanostructures (Nanowires, Nano-combs) and nanocrystalline thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition has been investigated. It is found that the ITO nanostructures prepared under argon environment exhibit strongest ferromagnetic signature as compared to that nanocrystalline thin films grown at oxygen. The evidence of singly ionized oxygen vacancy (V{sub 0}{sup +}) defects, obtained from various spectroscopic measurements, suggests that such V{sub 0}{sup +} defects are mainly responsible for the intrinsic ferromagnetic ordering. The exchange interaction of the defects provides extensive opportunity to tune the room-temperature d{sup 0} ferromagnetism and optical properties of ITOs.

  8. Riboflavin-responsive oxidative phosphorylation complex I deficiency caused by defective ACAD9: new function for an old gene

    M. Gerards; B.J.C. van den Bosch; K. Danhauser; V. Serre; M. van Weeghel; R.J.A. Wanders; G.A.F. Nicolaes; W. Sluiter; K. Schoonderwoerd; H.R. Scholte; H. Prokisch; A. Rötig; I.F.M. de Coo; H.J.M. Smeets

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I deficiency is the most common oxidative phosphorylation defect. Mutations have been detected in mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but the genetics of many patients remain unresolved and new genes are probably involved. In a consanguineous family, patients presented easy fatiga

  9. Studies of Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    The oxidation state of Tc is an important aspect of the speciation in groundwater which contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg/L and the Tc (VII) concentration is about 10-8 mol/L. The radiocounting of 99Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl3 coagulation method was carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (IV) and Tc (VII) for the availability of the LaCl3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentration are well agreement with the LaCl3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (VII) is very stable in the Tc (VII)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (IV) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (VII) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  10. Application of the integral method to modelling the oxidation of defected fuel elements

    The starting point for this report is the discrepancy reported in previous work between the reaction-diffusion calculations and the CEX-1 experiment, which involves storage of defected fuel elements in air at 150 deg C. This discrepancy is considerably diminished here by a more critical choice of theoretical parameters, and by taking into account the fact that different CEX-1 fuel elements were oxidized at very different rates and that the fuel element used previously for comparison with theoretical calculations actually underwent two limited-oxygen-supply cycles. Much better agreement is obtained here between the theory and the third, unlimited-air, storage period of the CEX-1 experiment. The approximate integral method is used extensively for the solution of the one-dimensional diffusion moving-boundary problems that may describe various storage periods of the CEX-1 experiment. In some cases it is easy to extend this method to arbitrary precision by using higher moments of the diffusion equation. Using this method, the validity of quasi-steady-state approximation is verified. Diffusion-controlled oxidation is also studied. In this case, for the unlimited oxygen supply, the integral method leads to an exact analytical solution for linear geometry, and to a good analytical approximation of the solution for the spherically symmetric geometry. These solutions may have some application in the analysis of experiments on the oxidation of small UO2 fragments or powders when the individual UO2 grains may be considered to be approximately spherical. (author). 23 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs

  11. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 μM concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with [U-1$C]oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of 14C label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine

  12. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 M concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with (U- $C)oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of UC label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine.

  13. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic -amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide

    Raghvendra Shukla; Pradeep K Sharma; Kalyan K Banerji

    2004-03-01

    The oxidation of eleven amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid results in the formation of the corresponding carbonyl compounds and ammonia. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with some of the amino acids while others exhibit second-order dependence. It failed to induce polymerization of acrylonitrile. The effect of solvent composition indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increase in the polarity of the medium. Addition of tetrabutylammonium chloride has no effect on the rate of oxidation. Addition of bromide ion causes decrease in the oxidation rate but only to a limiting value. The reaction is susceptible to both polar and steric effects of the substituents. A suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  15. Selection and properties of Escherichia coli mutants defective in the synthesis of cyclopropane fatty acids.

    Taylor, F; Cronan, J E

    1976-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 defective in the synthesis of cyclopropane fatty acids (CFA) have been selected and isolated by a L-[methyl-3H]methionine suicide procedure. Two mutants were isolated. Stationary-phase cultures of both mutants contain less than 0.7% of the CFA content found in the parental strain. The CFA deficiency is attributed to a deficiency of CFA synthetase activity. Extracts of both mutants contain less than 10% of the CFA synthetase activity found in extracts of the parental strain. Experiments in which parental and mutant extracts were mixed indicate that the lack of activity in the mutant strains is not due to an inhibitor of CFA synthetase present in the mutant extracts. We have not yet detected a physiological phenotype for these mutants. These strains grow normally at various temperatures in a variety of media. We have tested survival (colony-forming ability) in response to (i) prolonged incubation in stationary phase, (ii) exposure to drying, and (iii) exposure to detergents, heavy metals, low pH, high salt concentration, and a variety of other environmental conditions. The survival of both mutants is identical to that of the parental strain under all conditions tested. The compositions (excepting the CFA deficiency) and metabolic turnover rates of the phospholipids of both mutant strains are indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. The transport of several amino acids also seems normal in these mutants. PMID:1107324

  16. Radiolytical oxidation of ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions

    Complete text of publication follows. Ascorbic acid, AsA (vitamin c), has been widely studied as an antioxidant or as an initiator of some technological processes, for example polymerization or nanoparticles formation. AsA can be easily oxidized to ascorbyl radical, in the first stage, and to dehydroascorbic acid, DHA, in the second stage. It has been found that several different ascorbyl radicals are formed during AsA oxidation but the main radical exists as the anion with the unpaired electron delocalized on a highly conjugated tricarbonyl system. Absorption spectrum of ascorbyl radical shows two bands with maxima at 300 and 360 nm, however only that at 360 nm is proportional to the dose and thus this wavelength was chosen for observations. We studied the oxidation of AsA by the following oxidizing radicals generated by the pulse radiolysis method ·OH, (SCN)2-·, Cl2-·, N3· and NO2·. The observed dependence of the yield and the formation rate of the AsA radical on the reduction potential of the oxidizing radical is discussed. The results obtained in water are compared with those obtained with AsA enclosed in the water pools of reverse micelles formed by AOT in n-heptane or by Igepal CO-520 in c-hexane. Somewhat surprising observation of different ascorbyl radical in pulse irradiated reverse micelles containing DHA is also commented.

  17. Impacts of acid gases on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst

    A series of bench-scale experiments were completed to evaluate acid gases of HCl, SO2, and SO3 on mercury oxidation across a commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. The SCR catalyst was placed in a simulated flue gas stream containing O2, CO2, H2O, NO, NO2, and NH3, and N2. HCl, SO2, and SO3 were added to the gas stream either separately or in combination to investigate their interactions with mercury over the SCR catalyst. The compositions of the simulated flue gas represent a medium-sulfur and low- to medium-chlorine coal that could represent either bituminous or subbituminous. The experimental data indicated that 5-50 ppm HCl in flue gas enhanced mercury oxidation within the SCR catalyst, possibly because of the reactive chlorine species formed through catalytic reactions. An addition of 5 ppm HCl in the simulated flue gas resulted in mercury oxidation of 45% across the SCR compared to only 4% mercury oxidation when 1 ppm HCl is in the flue gas. As HCl concentration increased to 50 ppm, 63% of Hg oxidation was reached. SO2 and SO3 showed a mitigating effect on mercury chlorination to some degree, depending on the concentrations of SO2 and SO3, by competing against HCl for SCR adsorption sites. High levels of acid gases of HCl (50 ppm), SO2 (2000 ppm), and SO3 (50 ppm) in the flue gas deteriorate mercury adsorption on the SCR catalyst. (author)

  18. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  19. Selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid over mixed metal oxide catalysts

    Wei Zheng; Zhenxing Yu; Ping Zhang; Yuhang Zhang; Hongying Fu; Xiaoli Zhang; Qiquan Sun; Xinguo Hu

    2008-01-01

    The effects of metal atomic ratio, water content, oxygen content, and calcination temperature on the catalytic perfor-mances of MoVTeNbO mixed oxide catalyst system for the selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid have been investigated and discussed. Among the catalysts studied, it was found that the MoVTeNbO catalyst calcined at a temperature of 600 ℃ showed the best performance in terms of propane conversion and selectivity for acrylic acid under an atmosphere of nitrogen. An effective MoVTeNbO oxide catalyst for propane selective oxidation to acrylic acid was obtained with a combination of a preferred metal atomic ratio (Mo1 V0.31Te0.23Nb0.12). The optimum reaction condition for the selective oxidation of propane was the molar ratio of C3H81 :O2 : H2O : N1 = 4.4 : 12.8 : 15.3 : 36.9. Under such conditions, the conversion of propane and the maximum yield of acrylic acid reached about 50% and 21%, respectively.

  20. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Claude Daneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS spectroscopic techniques.

  1. Adipose fatty acid oxidation is required for thermogenesis and potentiates oxidative stress induced inflammation

    Jieun Lee; Jessica M. Ellis; Michael J. Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the contribution of adipose tissue fatty acid oxidation to whole-body metabolism, we generated mice with an adipose-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2A−/−), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. CPT2A−/− mice became hypothermic after an acute cold challenge, and CPT2A−/− brown adipose tissue (BAT) failed to upregulate thermogenic genes in response to agonist-induced stimulation. The adipose-specific loss of CPT2 resulted in d...

  2. The Kinetics and Mechanism for the Oxidation of Nicotinic Acid by Peroxomonosulfate in Acidic Aqueous Medium

    The kinetics of oxidation of nicotinic acid by peroxomonosulfate (PMS) has been studied in acetate buffers. Stoichiometry of the reaction corresponds to the reaction of one mole of the oxidant with a mole of nicotinic acid. N→O product has been confirmed both by UV visible and IR spectroscopy. The reaction is second order viz. first order with respect to each reactant. Activation parameters have also been evaluated. A plausible reaction mechanism is mentioned and the derived kinetic rate law accounts for experimental observations

  3. Oxidation of aniline in the presence of phenolic acids

    Janošević Aleksandra M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aniline was oxidized with ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS in aqueous solutions of various phenolic acids: 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNSA and gallic acid (GA. Polymerizations were performed at the constant molar ratios [acid]/[aniline]=0.5 and [APS]/[aniline]=1.25. The conductivity of synthesized polyaniline (PANI is affected by the dopant anion type and decreases in order: PANI-SSA > PANI-DNSA > PANI-GA, the last polymer being nonconducting. This decrease is in accordance with the increase of initial pH value of the reaction mixture. The differences in molecular structure of synthesized PANI have been revealed by FTIR spectroscopy. FTIR spectra of PANI-SSA and PANI-DNSA show typical features of PANI conductive emeraldine salt segments. On the contrary, FTIR spectrum of PANI-GA shows absence of bands typical for conducting PANI polaronic lattice, and indicates the higher oxidation state of this polymer than that of emeraldine, the presence of substituted phenazines as constitutional units, as well as significant content of monosubstituted benzene rings which reflects low polymerization degree and/or pronounced chain branching. The strong hydrogen bonding between GA and PANI can obstruct propagation of oligoanilines and formation of longer conducting PANI chains.

  4. Oxidative stability of Liposomes composed of docosahexaenoic acid-containing phospholipids

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jørgensen, Kent;

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stability of liposomes made of (Docosahexaenoic acid) DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) was examined during preparation and storage. After preparation of the liposomes, the concentration of primary (conjugated dienes) and secondary oxidation products (Thiobarbituric acid-reactive ......Oxidative stability of liposomes made of (Docosahexaenoic acid) DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) was examined during preparation and storage. After preparation of the liposomes, the concentration of primary (conjugated dienes) and secondary oxidation products (Thiobarbituric acid...

  5. Enhanced formic acid oxidation on Cu-Pd nanoparticles

    Dai, Lin; Zou, Shouzhong

    Developing catalysts with high activity and high resistance to surface poisoning remains a challenge in direct formic acid fuel cell research. In this work, copper-palladium nanoparticles were formed through a galvanic replacement process. After electrochemically selective dissolution of surface Cu, Pd-enriched Cu-Pd nanoparticles were formed. These particles exhibit much higher formic acid oxidation activities than that on pure Pd nanoparticles, and they are much more resistant to the surface poisoning. Possible mechanisms of catalytic activity enhancement are briefly discussed.

  6. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...... on calculations with the kinetic model. Formic acid is consumed mainly by reaction with OH, yielding OCHO, which dissociates rapidly to CO2 + H, and HOCO, which may dissociate to CO + OH or CO2 + H, or react with H, OH, or O2 to form more stable products. The branching fraction of the HOCHO + OH...

  7. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ ethylene plant defense pathways

    Mur, Luis A. J.; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra; Hall, Michael A.; Hebelstrup, Kim H

    2013-01-01

    Plant defense against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defense responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signaling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO in...

  8. Bezafibrate in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Preisler, Nicolai;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether bezafibrate increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and lowers heart rate (HR) during exercise in patients with carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiencies. METHODS: This was a 3-month, randomized, double......-blind, crossover study of bezafibrate in patients with CPT II (n = 5) and VLCAD (n = 5) deficiencies. Primary outcome measures were changes in FAO, measured with stable-isotope methodology and indirect calorimetry, and changes in HR during exercise. RESULTS: Bezafibrate lowered low-density lipoprotein......, triglyceride, and free fatty acid concentrations; however, there were no changes in palmitate oxidation, FAO, or HR during exercise. CONCLUSION: Bezafibrate does not improve clinical symptoms or FAO during exercise in patients with CPT II and VLCAD deficiencies. These findings indicate that previous in vitro...

  9. Band-like transport in highly crystalline graphene films from defective graphene oxides

    Negishi, R.; Akabori, M.; Ito, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical transport property of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin-films synthesized from defective GO through thermal treatment in a reactive ethanol environment at high temperature above 1000 °C shows a band-like transport with small thermal activation energy (Ea~10 meV) that occurs during high carrier mobility (~210 cm2/Vs). Electrical and structural analysis using X-ray absorption fine structure, the valence band photo-electron, Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy indicate that a high temperature process above 1000 °C in the ethanol environment leads to an extraordinary expansion of the conjugated π-electron system in rGO due to the efficient restoration of the graphitic structure. We reveal that Ea decreases with the increasing density of states near the Fermi level due to the expansion of the conjugated π-electron system in the rGO. This means that Ea corresponds to the energy gap between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band. The origin of the band-like transport can be explained by the carriers, which are more easily excited into the conduction band due to the decreasing energy gap with the expansion of the conjugated π-electron system in the rGO. PMID:27364116

  10. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  11. Band-like transport in highly crystalline graphene films from defective graphene oxides

    Negishi, R.; Akabori, M.; Ito, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2016-07-01

    The electrical transport property of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin-films synthesized from defective GO through thermal treatment in a reactive ethanol environment at high temperature above 1000 °C shows a band-like transport with small thermal activation energy (Ea~10 meV) that occurs during high carrier mobility (~210 cm2/Vs). Electrical and structural analysis using X-ray absorption fine structure, the valence band photo-electron, Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy indicate that a high temperature process above 1000 °C in the ethanol environment leads to an extraordinary expansion of the conjugated π-electron system in rGO due to the efficient restoration of the graphitic structure. We reveal that Ea decreases with the increasing density of states near the Fermi level due to the expansion of the conjugated π-electron system in the rGO. This means that Ea corresponds to the energy gap between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band. The origin of the band-like transport can be explained by the carriers, which are more easily excited into the conduction band due to the decreasing energy gap with the expansion of the conjugated π-electron system in the rGO.

  12. SHI induced defects in chemically synthesized graphene oxide for hydrogen storage applications

    Sharma, Preetam K.; Sharma, Vinay; Rajaura, Rajveer Singh; Srivastava, Subodh; Sharma, S. S.; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene, due to its unique properties arising from the single carbon layer, is a potential candidate for applications in a variety of fields including sensors, photovoltaics and energy storage. The atomic structure and morphology of the carbon nanomaterials especially graphene can be tailored by energetic ionic irradiation. As graphene sheet is very stable, the surface have less reactivity as compared to the edges of the sheets. By surface modification with energetic ion-beams additional dangling bonds can be formed to enhance the surface activity of the graphene film which could be exploited in a variety of applications. In the present work, graphene oxide was synthesized by improved Hummers' Method. The irradiation was done with Ag+ ions carrying energy 100 MeV with the fluence of 3×1013. Raman spectrum of graphene irradiated by Ag+ beam shows additional disordered peaks of &Dacute; and D+G bands. There is also a decrease in the intensity of D band. AFM images depict the increase in the surface roughness of the films. This can be attributed to the increase in the defects in the flakes and intermixing of adjacent layers by irradiation.

  13. Oxide for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Lam, L. T.; Lim, O. V.; Haigh, N. P.; Rand, D. A. J.; Manders, J. E.; Rice, D. M.

    In order to meet the increasing demand for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, a new soft lead has been produced by Pasminco Metals. In this material, bismuth is increased to a level that produces a significant improvement in battery cycle life. By contrast, other common impurities, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel, antimony and tellurium, that are known to be harmful to VRLA batteries are controlled to very low levels. A bismuth (Bi)-bearing oxide has been manufactured (Barton-pot method) from this soft lead and is characterized in terms of phase composition, particle size distribution, BET surface area, and reactivity. An investigation is also made of the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from the Bi-bearing oxide. For comparison, the characteristics and performance of a Bi-free (Barton-pot) oxide, which is manufactured in the USA, are also examined. Increasing the level of bismuth and lowering those of the other impurities in soft lead produces no unusual changes in either the physical or the chemical properties of the resulting Bi-bearing oxide compared with Bi-free oxide. This is very important because there is no need for battery manufacturers to change their paste formulae and paste-mixing procedures on switching to the new Bi-bearing oxide. There is little difference in the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from Bi-bearing or Bi-free oxides. On the other hand, these rates increase on the former electrodes when the levels of all the other impurities are made to exceed (by deliberately adding the impurities as oxide powders) the corresponding, specified values for the Bi-bearing oxide. The latter behaviour is particularly noticeable for hydrogen evolution, which is enhanced even further when a negative electrode prepared from Bi-bearing oxide is contaminated through the deposition of impurities added to the sulfuric acid solution. The effects of impurities in the positive

  14. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  15. Oxidation of amino acids and proteins by peroxynitrite

    Recent studies suggested that proteins exposed to free radicals and other strong oxidants generated by living organisms may be the source of damage to tissues even at sites distant from the original point of generation of the reactive species. In examining the ability of biologically significant oxidizing agents to generate protein peroxides, the authors have studied protein peroxidation by peroxynitrite (ONOO-), known to be a potential source of tissue damage. Treatment of bovine serum albumin, Iysozyme, apotransferrin, insulin or human serum albumin with peroxynitrous acid (POXNA) led to formation of hydroperoxide groups on the proteins, detected by their reaction with iodide. Under optimum conditions, up to one peroxide group formed on each molecule of protein. Hydroxyl radical scavengers, antioxidants, or metal chelators, were unable to affect the quantities of peroxides generated by POXNA. These findings suggest that the oxidation was not mediated by the hydroxyl free radicals. The iodide assay cannot be applied to the measurement of peroxides in presence of nitrite, which is a contaminant of most solutions of POXNA. Nitrite can be easily removed from proteins by molecular filtration, but this method cannot be applied to amino acids. Therefore an amino acid peroxide test based on chemiluminescence was used, which shows promise for general peroxide detection

  16. Influence of oxidation on fulvic acids composition and biodegradability.

    Kozyatnyk, Ivan; Świetlik, Joanna; Raczyk-Stanisławiak, Ursula; Dąbrowska, Agata; Klymenko, Nataliya; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2013-08-01

    Oxidation is well-known process of transforming natural organic matter during the treatment of drinking water. Chlorine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide are common oxidants used in water treatment technologies for this purpose. We studied the influence of different doses of these oxidants on by-products formation and changes in biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of fulvic acids (FA) with different BDOC content. Chlorination did not significantly change the MWD of FA and disinfection by-products formation. However, higher molecular weight compounds, than those in the initial FA, were formed. It could be a result of chlorine substitution into the FA structure. Chlorine dioxide oxidized FA stronger than chlorine. During ozonation of FA, we found the highest increase of BDOD due to the formation of a high amount of organic acids and aldehydes. FA molecules were transformed into a more biodegradable form. Ozonation is the most preferable process among those observed for pre-treatment of FA before biofiltration. PMID:23746389

  17. Electrocatalysis by nanoparticles: Oxidation of formic acid at manganese oxide nanorods-modified Pt planar and nanohole-arrays

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2010-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of formic acid (an essential reaction in direct formic acid fuel cells) is a challenging process because of the deactivation of anodes by the adsorption of the poisoning intermediate carbon monoxide (CO). Pt electrodes in two geometries (planar and nanohole-array) were modified by the electrodeposition of manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx). The modified Pt electrodes were then tested for their electrocatalytic activity through the electro-oxidation of formic acid in a ...

  18. Adipose Fatty Acid Oxidation Is Required for Thermogenesis and Potentiates Oxidative Stress-Induced Inflammation

    Jieun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the contribution of adipose tissue fatty acid oxidation to whole-body metabolism, we generated mice with an adipose-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2A−/−, an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. CPT2A−/− mice became hypothermic after an acute cold challenge, and CPT2A−/− brown adipose tissue (BAT failed to upregulate thermogenic genes in response to agonist-induced stimulation. The adipose-specific loss of CPT2 resulted in diet-dependent changes in adiposity but did not result in changes in body weight on low- or high-fat diets. Additionally, CPT2A−/− mice had suppressed high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in visceral white adipose tissue (WAT; however, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was not improved. These data show that fatty acid oxidation is required for cold-induced thermogenesis in BAT and high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in WAT.

  19. Updated estimates of neural tube defects prevented by mandatory folic Acid fortification - United States, 1995-2011.

    Williams, Jennifer; Mai, Cara T; Mulinare, Joe; Isenburg, Jennifer; Flood, Timothy J; Ethen, Mary; Frohnert, Barbara; Kirby, Russell S

    2015-01-16

    In 1992, the U.S. Public Health Service recommended that all women capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 µg of folic acid daily to prevent neural tube defects (NTDs). NTDs are major birth defects of the brain and spine that occur early in pregnancy as a result of improper closure of the embryonic neural tube, which can lead to death or varying degrees of disability. The two most common NTDs are anencephaly and spina bifida. Beginning in 1998, the United States mandated fortification of enriched cereal grain products with 140 µg of folic acid per 100 g. Immediately after mandatory fortification, the birth prevalence of NTD cases declined. Fortification was estimated to avert approximately 1,000 NTD-affected pregnancies annually. To provide updated estimates of the birth prevalence of NTDs in the period after introduction of mandatory folic acid fortification (i.e., the post-fortification period), data from 19 population-based birth defects surveillance programs in the United States, covering the years 1999-2011, were examined. After the initial decrease, NTD birth prevalence during the post-fortification period has remained relatively stable. The number of births occurring annually without NTDs that would otherwise have been affected is approximately 1,326 (95% confidence interval = 1,122-1,531). Mandatory folic acid fortification remains an effective public health intervention. There remain opportunities for prevention among women with lower folic acid intakes, especially among Hispanic women, to further reduce the prevalence of NTDs in the United States. PMID:25590678

  20. Nitrate enhances skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation via a nitric oxide-cGMP-PPAR-mediated mechanism

    Ashmore, Tom; Roberts, Lee D.; Morash, Andrea J.; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Finnerty, John; James A. West; Murfitt, Steven A.; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Branco, Cristina, 1960-; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Clarke, Kieran; Johnson, Randall S.; Feelisch, Martin; Griffin, Julian L; Murray, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle is associated with metabolic flexibility, including a high capacity to increase fatty acid (FA) oxidation in response to increased lipid supply. Lipid overload, however, can result in incomplete FA oxidation and accumulation of potentially harmful intermediates where mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle capacity cannot keep pace with rates of β-oxidation. Enhancement of muscle FA oxidation in combination with mitochondrial biogenesis is ther...

  1. DLTS study of annihilation of oxidation induced deep-level defects in Ni/SiO2/-Si MOS structures

    N Shashank; Sanjeev K Gupta; K V Madhu; J Akhtar; R Damle

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of MOS capacitor and DLTS study of annihilation of deeplevel defects upon thermal annealing. Ni/SiO2/-Si MOS structures fabricated on -type Si wafers were investigated for process-induced deep-level defects. The deep-level traps in Si substrates induced during the processing of Ni/SiO2/-Si have been investigated using deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). A characteristic deep-level defect at C = 0.49 eV which was introduced during high-temperature thermal oxidation process was detected. The trap position was found to shift to different energy levels (C = 0.43, 0.46 and 0.34 eV) during thermal annealing process. The deep-level trap completely anneals at 350°C. Significant reduction in trap density with an increase in recombination life time and substrate doping concentration as a function of isochronal annealing were observed.

  2. Effects of a chitosan membrane coated with polylactic and polyglycolic acid on bone regeneration in a rat calvarial defect

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a chitosan membrane coated with polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLGA) on bone regeneration in a rat calvarial defect. Surgical implantation of chitosan membranes resulted in enhanced local bone formation at both 2 and 8 weeks. In conclusion, the chitosan membrane coated with PLGA had a significant potential to induce bone formation in the rat calvarial defect model. Within the selected PLGA dose range and observation intervals, there appeared to be no meaningful differences in bone formation

  3. Effects of a chitosan membrane coated with polylactic and polyglycolic acid on bone regeneration in a rat calvarial defect

    Jung, Ui-Won [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kun-Young [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyoo-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong-Kwan [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a chitosan membrane coated with polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLGA) on bone regeneration in a rat calvarial defect. Surgical implantation of chitosan membranes resulted in enhanced local bone formation at both 2 and 8 weeks. In conclusion, the chitosan membrane coated with PLGA had a significant potential to induce bone formation in the rat calvarial defect model. Within the selected PLGA dose range and observation intervals, there appeared to be no meaningful differences in bone formation.

  4. Riboflavin-responsive oxidative phosphorylation complex I deficiency caused by defective ACAD9: new function for an old gene.

    Gerards, Mike; van den Bosch, Bianca J C; Danhauser, Katharina; Serre, Valérie; van Weeghel, Michel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Sluiter, Wim; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; Scholte, Hans R; Prokisch, Holger; Rötig, Agnès; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Smeets, Hubert J M

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I deficiency is the most common oxidative phosphorylation defect. Mutations have been detected in mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but the genetics of many patients remain unresolved and new genes are probably involved. In a consanguineous family, patients presented easy fatigability, exercise intolerance and lactic acidosis in blood from early childhood. In muscle, subsarcolemmal mitochondrial proliferation and a severe complex I deficiency were observed. Exercise intolerance and complex I activity was improved by a supplement of riboflavin at high dosage. Homozygosity mapping revealed a candidate region on chromosome three containing six mitochondria-related genes. Four genes were screened for mutations and a homozygous substitution was identified in ACAD9 (c.1594 C>T), changing the highly conserved arginine-532 into tryptophan. This mutation was absent in 188 ethnically matched controls. Protein modelling suggested a functional effect due to the loss of a stabilizing hydrogen bond in an α-helix and a local flexibility change. To test whether the ACAD9 mutation caused the complex I deficiency, we transduced fibroblasts of patients with wild-type and mutant ACAD9. Wild-type, but not mutant, ACAD9 restored complex I activity. An unrelated patient with the same phenotype was compound heterozygous for c.380 G>A and c.1405 C>T, changing arginine-127 into glutamine and arginine-469 into tryptophan, respectively. These amino acids were highly conserved and the substitutions were not present in controls, making them very probably pathogenic. Our data support a new function for ACAD9 in complex I function, making this gene an important new candidate for patients with complex I deficiency, which could be improved by riboflavin treatment. PMID:20929961

  5. Advanced oxidation processes of decomposing dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid in water

    WANG Kun-ping; GUO Jin-song; YANG Min; JUNJI Hirotsuji; DENG Rong-sen; LIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the decomposition of two haloacetic acids (HAAs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), in water by single oxidants ozone (O3) and ultraviolet radiation (UV) and the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) constituted by the combinations of O3/UV, H2O2/UV, O3 /H2O2, and O3/H2O2/UV. The concentrations of HAAs were analyzed at specified time intervals to track their decomposition. Except for O3 and UV, the four combined oxidation processes remarkably enhance the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA owing to the generated very reactive hydroxyl radicals. The fastest decomposition process is O3/H2O2/UV, closely followed by O3/UV. DCAA is much easier to decompose than TCAA. The kinetics of HAA decomposition by O3/UV can be described well by a pseudo first-order reaction model under a constant initial dissolved O3 concentration and fixed UV radiation. Humic acids and HCO3- in the reaction system both decrease the decomposition rate constants for DCAA and TCAA. The amount of H2O2 accumulates in the presence of humic acids in the O3/UV process.

  6. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  7. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  8. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  9. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine

    Dimple Garg; Seema Kothari

    2004-11-01

    The oxidation of lactic acid, mandelic acid and ten monosubstituted mandelic acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine (HABR) in glacial acetic acid, leads to the formation of the corresponding oxoacid. The reaction is first order with respect to each of the hydroxy acids and HABR. It is proposed that HABR itself is the reactive oxidizing species. The oxidation of -deuteriomandelic acid exhibits the presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (/ = 5.91 at 298 K). The rates of oxidation of the substituted mandelic acids show excellent correlation with Brown’s + values. The reaction constants are negative. The oxidation exhibits an extensive cross conjugation between the electron-donating substituent and the reaction centre in the transition state. A mechanism involving transfer of a hydride ion from the acid to the oxidant is postulated.

  11. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  12. Phosphonic Acids for Interfacial Engineering of Transparent Conductive Oxides.

    Paniagua, Sergio A; Giordano, Anthony J; Smith, O'Neil L; Barlow, Stephen; Li, Hong; Armstrong, Neal R; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Ginger, David; Marder, Seth R

    2016-06-22

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), such as indium tin oxide and zinc oxide, play an important role as electrode materials in organic-semiconductor devices. The properties of the inorganic-organic interface-the offset between the TCO Fermi level and the relevant transport level, the extent to which the organic semiconductor can wet the oxide surface, and the influence of the surface on semiconductor morphology-significantly affect device performance. This review surveys the literature on TCO modification with phosphonic acids (PAs), which has increasingly been used to engineer these interfacial properties. The first part outlines the relevance of TCO surface modification to organic electronics, surveys methods for the synthesis of PAs, discusses the modes by which they can bind to TCO surfaces, and compares PAs to alternative organic surface modifiers. The next section discusses methods of PA monolayer deposition, the kinetics of monolayer formation, and structural evidence regarding molecular orientation on TCOs. The next sections discuss TCO work-function modification using PAs, tuning of TCO surface energy using PAs, and initiation of polymerizations from TCO-tethered PAs. Finally, studies that examine the use of PA-modified TCOs in organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics are compared. PMID:27227316

  13. Small-polaron hopping via defect centres: anomalous temperature and voltage dependence of current through fatty-acid monolayers

    We study electron hopping in thin metal-insulator-metal structures which involves two defect centres with a strong electron-phonon coupling. We calculate the dependences of the current, J, on voltage, V, and temperature, T, and show that they are consistent with those observed in molecular monolayers of fatty acids. We analyse in detail an unusual, near-exponential temperature dependence of the current: J(T) ∝ exp (T/T0) T ≥ 50 K in eicosanoic acid (C20) organic monolayers sandwiched between Pt electrodes, where the parameter T0 increases with the bias voltage. We show that at relatively high voltages the two-defect small-polaron hopping results in N-shape current-voltage characteristics which were observed in some organic molecular monolayers

  14. When folic acid fails: Insights from 20 years of neural tube defect surveillance in South Carolina.

    Bupp, Caleb P; Sarasua, Sara M; Dean, Jane H; Stevenson, Roger E

    2015-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the most common of the severe malformations of the brain and spinal cord. Increased maternal intake of folic acid (FA) during the periconceptional period is known to reduce NTD risk. Data from 1046 NTD cases in South Carolina were gathered over 20 years of surveillance. It was possible to determine maternal periconceptional FA use in 615 NTD-affected pregnancies. In 163 occurrent (26.9%) and two recurrent (22%) NTD cases, the mothers reported periconceptional FA use. These women were older and more likely to be white. Maternal periconceptional FA usage was reported in 40.4% of cases of spina bifida with other anomalies but in only 25.2% of isolated spina bifida cases (P = 0.02). This enrichment for associated anomalies was not noted among cases of anencephaly or of encephalocele. Among the 563 subsequent pregnancies to mothers with previous NTD-affected pregnancies, those taking FA had a 0.4% NTD recurrence rate, but the recurrence without FA was 8.5%. NTDs with other associated findings were less likely to be prevented by FA, suggesting there is a background NTD rate that cannot be further reduced by FA. Nonetheless, the majority (73.9%) of NTDs in pregnancies in which the mothers reported periconceptional FA use were isolated NTDs of usual types. Cases in which FA failed in prevention of NTDs provide potential areas for further study into the causation of NTDs. The measures and techniques implemented in South Carolina can serve as an effective and successful model for prevention of NTD occurrence and recurrence. PMID:26108864

  15. Lewis Acid Catalysis in the Oxidative Cycloaddition of Thiophenes

    Li, Yuanqiang; Thiemann, Thies; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Mataka, Shuntaro; Tashiro, Masashi

    1997-01-01

    Thiophenes 1 were treated with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (m-CPBA) under BF3·Et2O catalysis to afford thiophene S-monoxides. These could be reacted in situ as intermediary species with a number of dienophiles to provide arenes (with alkynes as dienophiles) or 7-thiabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene 7-oxides (with alkenes as dienophiles). It was also possible to isolate thiophene S-monoxides in solution and to cycloadd them in a second step. In either way it could be shown that the use of BF3·Et2O enhance...

  16. Degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid by advanced oxidation processes

    C. L. P. S. Zanta; Martínez-Huitle, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as the UV/H2O2 and Fenton processes were investigated for the degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (2-HBA) in lab-scale experiments. Different [H2O2]/[2-HBA] molar ratios and pH values were used in order to establish the most favorable experimental conditions for the Fenton process. For comparison purposes, degradation of 2-HBA was carried out by the UV/H2O2 process under Fenton experimental conditions. The study showed that the Fenton p...

  17. In situ electrocatalytic oxidation of acid violet 12 dye effluent.

    Mohan, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2006-08-21

    Electrochemical treatment of organic pollutants is a promising treatment technique for substances which are recalcitrant to biodegradation. Experiments were carried out to treat acid violet 12 dye house effluent using electrochemical technique for removal color and COD reduction covering wide range in operating conditions. Ruthenium/lead/tin oxide coated titanium and stainless steel were used as anode and cathode, respectively. The influence of effluent initial concentration, pH, supporting electrolyte and the electrode material on rate of degradation has been critically examined. The results indicate that the electrochemical method can be used to treat dye house effluents. PMID:16730894

  18. Nitrogen isotope exchange in between nitric oxide and nitric acid

    The exchange rate law experimentally observed for 15 N/14 N exchange in NO - HNO3 system at low nitric acid concentration, both at atmospheric pressure and at low pressure of NO: R k[H+][NO3-][HNO2], is identical with the rate law for the reaction between NO and HNO3, when HNO2 is formed.The rate of nitrogen isotope exchange between NO and HNO3 has been measured as a function of nitric acid concentration of 1.5 4 M.l-1. The exchange rate law is shown to be R k[HNO3]2[N2O3] and the measured activation energy is E = 67.78 kJ.M-1. It is concluded that N2O3 participates in 15 N/14 N exchange between NO and HNO3 at nitric acid concentration higher than 1.5 M.l-1. The rate of the same isotope exchange in NO - HNO3 system has been also measured as a function of nitric oxide pressure 0.1 0.4 M.Pa for 1 and 2 M.l-1 HNO3. It is demonstrated that 15 N/14 N exchange in this system has a linear dependence on NO pressure as indicated by rate measurements at different NO partial pressures and constant overall pressure, by adding helium in reactor. Using the rate law presented above the nitrogen isotope exchange rate for nitric acid concentration 1.5 10 M.l-1 were calculated. Nitrogen isotope exchange between nitric oxide and concentrated nitric acid with a single stage separation factor = 1.055, for 10 M.l-1 nitric acid, at 25 deg. C, provides the bases for 15 N separation process that is most widely used at the present time, i.e. the method of Spindel and Taylor. In order to know what happens in 15N separation at higher pressure, when the isotopic transport is improved, a stainless steel laboratory experimental plant with a 1000 mm long and 18 mm i.d. column, packed with triangular wire springs of 1.8 x 1.8 x 0.2 mm, was utilised. At 1.5 atm (absolute) and 2.36 ml.cm-2.min-1 flow rate, HETP was 7% smaller than at atmospheric pressure and 1.5 times smaller flow rate. The operation of 15 N separation plant at 1.8 atm (absolute), instead atmospheric pressure, will permit doubling

  19. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

    Carolina H. Pohl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  20. Formation of Nanoporous Tin Oxide Layers on Different Substrates during Anodic Oxidation in Oxalic Acid Electrolyte

    Leszek Zaraska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous tin oxide layers were obtained on various Sn substrates including high- and low-purity foils and wire by one-step anodic oxidation carried out in a 0.3 M oxalic acid electrolyte at various anodizing potentials. In general, amorphous oxide layers with the atomic ratio of Sn : O (1 : 1 were grown during anodization, and a typical structure of the as-obtained film consists of the “outer” layer with less regular, interconnetted pores and the “inner” layer with much more uniform and regular channels formed as a result of vigorous gas evolution. It was found that the use of electrochemical cell with the sample placed horizontally on the metallic support and stabilized by the Teflon cover, instead of the typical two-electrode system with vertically arranged electrodes, can affect the morphology of as-obtained layers and allows fabrication of nanoporous oxides even at anodizing potentials up to 11 V. An average pore diameter in the “outer” oxide layer increases with increasing anodizing potential, and no significant effect of substrate purity on the structure of anodic film was proved, except better uniformity of the oxides grown on high-purity Sn. A strong linear relationship between the average steady-state current density and anodizing potential was also observed.

  1. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe3) and oxygen (O2) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H2 within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO2. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–Oads and Pt–(OH)ads) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed

  2. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Hsieh, Chien-Te, E-mail: cthsieh@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe{sub 3}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H{sub 2} within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO{sub 2}. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O{sub ads} and Pt–(OH){sub ads}) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed.

  3. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation : activity, localization and function of some enzymes involved

    A. van Tol (Arie)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractFatty acid oxidation is an important pathway for energy production in mammals and birds. In animal tissues the enzymes of fatty acid oxidation are located in the mitochondrion. Recent reports suggest that this is not the case in Castor bean endosperm. In this tissue the enzymes of B-oxid

  4. A point defect model for the general and pitting corrosion on iron-oxide-electrolyte interface deduced from current oscillations

    Pagitsas, M; Sazou, D

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the passive-active oscillatory region of the Fe-0.75 M H sub 2 SO sub 4 system, perturbed by adding small amounts of halide species, allow the distinction between pitting and general corrosion. Complex periodic and aperiodic current oscillations characterize pitting corrosion whereas monoperiodic oscillations of a relaxation type indicate general corrosion. A point defect model (PDM) is considered for the microscopic description of the growth and breakdown of the iron oxide film. The physicochemical processes leading to different types of corrosion can be clarified in terms of the PDM. Occupation of an anion vacancy by a halide ion results in the localized attack of the passive oxide and pitting corrosion. On the other hand, the formation of surface soluble iron complexes is related to the uniform dissolution of the passive oxide and general corrosion.

  5. The role of oxygen vacancies and defects on Lithium intercalation capacity of composite vanadium-titanium oxide thin films

    Sahana, M. B.; Sudakar, C.; Thapa, C.; Lawes, G.; Padmanabhan, K. R.; Naik, R.; Auner, G.; Naik, V. M.

    2008-03-01

    Composite films of vanadium-titanium oxides have been recognized as promising cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. While there is a consensus agreement that the cycling stability of the mixed V/Ti-oxide system is improved compared to V2O5 thin films, there are different findings on the Li+ intercalation capacity of V2O5 with the addition of TiO2. To understand the difference we have carried out a systematic semi quantitative investigations on the defect and oxygen vacancy concentration as determined using Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy of V2O5 and 5%Ti doped V2O5 films prepared by spin coating using two precursors: a metalorganic and a organic sol gel precursor. We observe that a critical concentration of defects and oxygen vacancies is important to have high capacity. With 5% Ti doping the capacity in films prepared using solgel precursor increases, but the capacity decreases in films prepared with the metalorganic precursor. We attribute this to the different concentrations of oxygen vacancy defects in the two samples.

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant uncouples the constitutive activation of salicylic acid signalling from growth defects

    Swain, S.; Roy, S.; Shah, J.; Wees, S.C.M. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Nandi, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis genotypes with a hyperactive salicylic acidmediated signalling pathway exhibit enhanced disease resistance, which is often coupled with growth and developmental defects, such as dwarfing and spontaneous necrotic lesions on the leaves, resulting in reduced biomass yield. In this article,

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF NIOBIUM ON THE ACIDITY AND STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-ALUMINA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM OXIDES

    Sathler M.N.B.; Eon J.G.

    1998-01-01

    Gamma-alumina-supported niobium oxide was used as a support for vanadium oxides. The influence of the addition of niobium oxide was studied by looking for changes in the structure and acid-base character of superficial species. Vanadium oxide was deposited using the continuous adsorption method; niobium oxide was impregnated using the incipient wetness method. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. Catalytic tests were performed using propane oxidation reacti...

  8. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N-bromobenzenesulphonamide in acid medium: A mechanistic approach

    Puttaswamy; Nirmala Vaz

    2001-08-01

    Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids (glutamic acid (Glu) and aspartic acid (Asp)) by sodium N-bromobenzenesulphonamide (bromamine-B or BAB) has been carried out in aqueous HClO4 medium at 30°C. The rate shows firstorder dependence each on [BAB]o and [amino acid]o and inverse first-order on [H+]. At [H+] > 0 60 mol dm-3, the rate levelled off indicating zero-order dependence on [H+] and, under these conditions, the rate has fractional order dependence on [amino acid]. Succinic and malonic acids have been identified as the products. Variation of ionic strength and addition of the reaction product benzenesulphonamide or halide ions had no significant effect on the reaction rate. There is positive effect of dielectric constant of the solvent. Proton inventory studies in H2O-D2O mixtures showed the involvement of a single exchangeable proton of the OH- ion in the transition state. Kinetic investigations have revealed that the order of reactivity is Asp > Glu. The rate laws proposed and derived in agreement with experimental results are discussed.

  9. Defect-induced magnetism in undoped wide band gap oxides: Zinc vacancies in ZnO as an example

    G. Z. Xing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To shed light on the mechanism responsible for the weak ferromagnetism in undoped wide band gap oxides, we carry out a comparative study on ZnO thin films prepared using both sol-gel and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE methods. Compared with the MBE samples, the sol-gel derived samples show much stronger room temperature ferromagnetism with a magnetic signal persisting up to ∼740 K, and this ferromagnetic order coexists with a high density of defects in the form of zinc vacancies. The donor-acceptor pairs associated with the zinc vacancies also cause a characteristic orange-red photoluminescence in the sol-gel films. Furthermore, the strong correlation between the ferromagnetism and the zinc vacancies is confirmed by our first-principles density functional theory calculations, and electronic band alteration as a result of defect engineering is proposed to play the critical role in stabilizing the long-range ferromagnetism.

  10. Evolution of insoluble eutectic Si particles in anodic oxidation films during adipic-sulfuric acid anodizing processes of ZL114A aluminum alloys

    Hua, Lei; Liu, Jian-hua; Li, Song-mei; Yu, Mei; Wang, Lei; Cui, Yong-xin

    2015-03-01

    The effects of insoluble eutectic Si particles on the growth of anodic oxide films on ZL114A aluminum alloy substrates were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anodic oxidation was performed at 25°C and a constant voltage of 15 V in a solution containing 50 g/L sulfuric acid and 10 g/L adipic acid. The thickness of the formed anodic oxidation film was approximately 7.13 μm. The interpore distance and the diameters of the major pores in the porous layer of the film were within the approximate ranges of 10-20 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. Insoluble eutectic Si particles strongly influenced the morphology of the anodic oxidation films. The anodic oxidation films exhibited minimal defects and a uniform thickness on the ZL114A substrates; in contrast, when the front of the oxide oxidation films encountered eutectic Si particles, defects such as pits and non-uniform thickness were observed, and pits were observed in the films.