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Sample records for acid oxidation defects-remaining

  1. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C)palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C)acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO/sup 2/ and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ..mu..M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ..mu..M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine.

  2. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-[14C]palmitate to 14CO2 and total [14C]acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO2 and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 μM). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 μM and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine

  3. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  4. Direct Oxidation of Ethene to Acetic Acid

    2001-01-01

    Direct oxidation of ethene to acetic acid over Pd-SiW12/SiO2 catalysts prepared by several methods was studied. A better method for reducing palladium composition of the catalysts was found. Acetic acid was obtained with selectivity of 82.7% and once-through space time yield (STY) of 257.4 g/h×L.

  5. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  6. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in astrocytes

    Astrocytes were derived from cortex of two-day-old rat brain and grown in primary culture to confluence. The metabolism of the fatty acids, octanoate and palmitate, to CO2 in oxidative respiration and to the formation of ketone bodies was examined by radiolabeled tracer methodology. The net production of acetoacetate was also determined by measurement of its mass. The enzymes in the ketogenic pathway were examined by measuring enzymic activity and/or by immunoblot analyses. Labeled CO2 and labeled ketone bodies were produced from the oxidation of fatty acids labeled at carboxy- and ω-terminal carbons, indicating that fatty acids were oxidized by β-oxidation. The results from the radiolabeled tracer studies also indicated that a substantial proportion of the ω-terminal 4-carbon unit of the fatty acids bypassed the β-ketothiolase step of the β-oxidation pathway. The [14C]acetoacetate formed from the [1-14C]labeled fatty acids, obligated to pass through the acetyl-CoA pool, contained 50% of the label at carbon 3 and 50% at carbon 1. In contrast, the [14C]acetoacetate formed from the (ω-1)labeled fatty acids contained 90% of the label at carbon 3 and 10% at carbon 1

  7. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO2, highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO4/2.5M H3PO4 solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO2 (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation

  8. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenyl Acetic Acid and Dl-Mandelic Acid by Permanganate in Acid Medium

    B. Syama Sundar; P.S.Radhakrishna murti

    2014-01-01

    Kinetics of oxidation of phenyl acetic acid and DL- Mandelic acid by potassium permanganate in aqueous acetic acid and perchloric acid mixture reveals that the kinetic orders are first order in oxidant, first order in H+ and zero order in substrate for phenyl acetic acid. DL-Mandelic acid exhibits first order in oxidant and zero order in substrate. The results are rationalised by a mechanism involving intermediate formation of mandelic acid in case of Phenyl acetic acid and ester formation wi...

  9. Fatty acid oxidation in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    The biochemical investigations described in this thesis deal with two aspects of fatty acid oxidation in muscle: a comparison of the use of cell-free and cellular systems for oxidation measurements, and studies on the assay and the role of the fatty acid binding protein in fatty acid metabolism. The fatty acid oxidation rates are determined radiochemically by the sum of 14CO2 and 14C-labeled acid-soluble products formed during oxidation of [14C]-fatty acids. A radiochemical procedure for the assay of fatty acid binding by proteins is described. (Auth.)

  10. CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION AND OXIDATION OF BIOMASS-DERIVED LEVULINIC ACID

    Yan Gong; Lu Lin; Zhipei Yan

    2011-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA), 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, is a new platform chemical with various potential uses. In this paper, catalytic hydrogenation and oxidation of levulinic acid were studied. It was shown from experiments that levulinic acid can be hydrogenated to γ-valerolactone (GVL) over transition metal catalysts and oxidative-decarboxylated to 2-butanone (methyl-ethyl-ketone, MEK) and methyl-vinyl-ketone (MVK) by cupric oxide (CuO), cupric oxide/cerium oxide (CuO/CeO2), cupric oxide/ alumina (Cu...

  11. CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION AND OXIDATION OF BIOMASS-DERIVED LEVULINIC ACID

    Yan Gong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Levulinic acid (LA, 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, is a new platform chemical with various potential uses. In this paper, catalytic hydrogenation and oxidation of levulinic acid were studied. It was shown from experiments that levulinic acid can be hydrogenated to γ-valerolactone (GVL over transition metal catalysts and oxidative-decarboxylated to 2-butanone (methyl-ethyl-ketone, MEK and methyl-vinyl-ketone (MVK by cupric oxide (CuO, cupric oxide/cerium oxide (CuO/CeO2, cupric oxide/ alumina (CuO/ Al2O3, and silver(I/ peroxydisulfate (Ag(I/S2O82-.

  12. Quinolinic Acid: Neurotoxin or Oxidative Stress Modulator?

    Lenka Kubicova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, QUIN is a well-known neurotoxin. Consequently, QUIN could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS are generated in reactions catalyzed by transition metals, especially iron (Fe. QUIN can form coordination complexes with iron. A combination of differential pulse voltammetry, deoxyribose degradation and Fe(II autoxidation assays was used for explorating ROS formation in redox reactions that are catalyzed by iron in QUIN-Fe complexes. Differential pulse voltammetry showed an anodic shift of the iron redox potential if iron was liganded by QUIN. In the H2O2/FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant of the deoxyribose degradation assay, the dose-response curve was U-shaped. In the FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant, QUIN unambiguously showed antioxidant effects. In the Fe(II autoxidation assay, QUIN decreased the rate of ROS production caused by Fe(II oxidation. Our study confirms that QUIN toxicity may be caused by ROS generation via the Fenton reaction. This, however, applies only for unnaturally high concentrations that were used in attempts to provide support for the neurotoxic effect. In lower concentrations, we show that by liganding iron, QUIN affects the Fe(II/Fe(III ratios that are beneficial to homeostasis. Our results support the notion that redox chemistry can contribute to explaining the hormetic dose-response effects.

  13. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  14. Advanced oxidation of acid and reactive dyes

    Arslan-Alaton, I.; Gursoy, B.H.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    The effect of untreated and Fenton-treated acid dyes (C.I. Acid Red 183 and C.I. Acid Orange 51) and a reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Blue 4) on aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic processes was investigated. The optimum Fe2+:H2O2 molar ratio was selected as 1:5 (4:hsp sp="0.25" mM:20:hsp sp="0.25"mM) for...... 10:hsp sp="0.25" min Fenton treatment at pH 3, resulting in reduced chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon removal efficiencies; only acetate was detected as a stable dye oxidation end product. During anaerobic digestion, 100, 29% and no inhibition in methane production was observed for...... the untreated blue, red and orange dyes, respectively. The inhibitory effect of the blue reactive dye on methane production was ∼21% after Fenton treatment. Neither untreated nor treated dyes exhibited an inhibitory effect on denitrification. Aerobic glucose degradation was inhibited by 23-29% by...

  15. Nitrous oxides desorption from nitric acid (58–60 wt. %)

    Литвиненко, Олександр Олександрович; Печенко, Тамара Ивановна; Подустов, Михаил Алексеевич; Букатенко, Алексей Иванович

    2015-01-01

    The process of nitrous oxides desorption from nitric acid solutions (in domestic schemes) was considered. It is shown that in the process of desorption (or stripping), the nitrous oxides are not removed from solutions completely, so, the nitric acid does not satisfy the technical requirements in Ukraine.The research objective was to bring the quality of nitric acid to technological standards by removing (stripping) nitrous oxides from its solutions.To achieve the research objective, the balan...

  16. Acrylic acid obtaining from methanol and acetic acid in the presence of complex oxide catalysts

    Небесний, Роман Володимирович; Піх, Зорян Григорович; Шпирка, Ірина Іванівна; Івасів, Володимир Васильович; Небесна, Юлія Віталіївна; Фуч, Уляна Василівна

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to research process of single-stage acrylic acid obtaining from methanol and acetic acid, namely: to develop effective catalysts for the process of methanol oxidation to formaldehyde with its further aldol condensation with acetic acid to acrylic acid, and to determine optimum conditions for the process. Complex oxide catalysts consisting of oxides of boron, phosphorus, tungsten and vanadium supported on the silica gel have been investigated. The effect of vanadium...

  17. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid into the aldehydes nonanal and 9-oxo-nonanoic acid or into pelargonic and azelaic acid. Considerable hazards, including explosion risks, are associated with the use of ozone, and alternative processes...

  18. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid int

  19. Pyrrhotite oxidation in weakly acidic solutions

    Complete text of publication follows: The kinetics and mechanism of pyrrhotite (for simplicity noted FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen was investigated in weakly acidic solutions as a function of pH (2.75 to 3.45) and temperature (25 to 45 C). The changes in Eh, pH and total dissolved iron were monitored to quantify the reaction progress. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the oxidation products of FeS. The experimental results demonstrate the importance of temperature and initial pH for the FeS oxidative dissolution. The amounts of dissolved iron (nFe) and removed H+ (nH) increase with temperature and initial [H+]. The activation energy of FeS oxidative dissolution is 41.6 ± 10.7 kJ mol-1 at initial pH=3.00 suggesting that the kinetic regime is controlled by a mix of diffusion and surface reaction (De Guidici et al., 2005). It was found that the reaction order of oxidative dissolution of FeS is 1.0 ± 0.02 (25 C) with respect to initial [H+]. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of several sulfur species (S0, Sn2-, S2O32-, SO32- and SO42-) and ferric hydroxides or oxyhydroxide (Fe(OH)3 and goethite) on residual FeS surface. It is important to note that the experimental ratios of nH over nFe (nH:nFe) observed at 25 C decrease over a first period of time (0-4 h) of FeS oxidative dissolution from 7.97 down to 2.01. Afterwards, the nH:nFe ratio becomes lower than 2 and remains roughly constant (4-72 h). At higher temperatures (35 and 45 C) and pH 3.00, nH:nFe≤2 and is quasi-invariant over the reaction time. The experimental observations suggest a mechanism based on the protonation of FeS surface (Chirita and Descostes, 2006) followed by oxidation of FeS by dissolved oxygen to produce Fe2+, S0 and Sn2-. Fe2+ is unstable in oxidative conditions (Descostes et al., 2002) and transforms into Fe(OH)3(s) and goethite after approximately 30 h of reaction. References:1) De Guidici G., Rossi A., Fanfani L., Lattanzi P

  20. Pyrrhotite oxidation in weakly acidic solutions

    Chirita, P. [Univ Cariova, Craiova 200440 (Romania); Descostes, M. [CEA/DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR Lab Radionuclides Migrat Measurements and Modelling, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Schlegel, M.L. [CEA/DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP Lab Reactiv Surfaces and Interfaces, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2007-08-15

    Complete text of publication follows: The kinetics and mechanism of pyrrhotite (for simplicity noted FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen was investigated in weakly acidic solutions as a function of pH (2.75 to 3.45) and temperature (25 to 45 C). The changes in Eh, pH and total dissolved iron were monitored to quantify the reaction progress. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the oxidation products of FeS. The experimental results demonstrate the importance of temperature and initial pH for the FeS oxidative dissolution. The amounts of dissolved iron (n{sub Fe}) and removed H{sup +} (n{sub H}) increase with temperature and initial [H{sup +}]. The activation energy of FeS oxidative dissolution is 41.6 {+-} 10.7 kJ mol{sup -1} at initial pH=3.00 suggesting that the kinetic regime is controlled by a mix of diffusion and surface reaction (De Guidici et al., 2005). It was found that the reaction order of oxidative dissolution of FeS is 1.0 {+-} 0.02 (25 C) with respect to initial [H{sup +}]. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of several sulfur species (S{sup 0}, S{sub n}{sup 2-}, S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2-}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and ferric hydroxides or oxyhydroxide (Fe(OH){sub 3} and goethite) on residual FeS surface. It is important to note that the experimental ratios of n{sub H} over n{sub Fe} (n{sub H}:n{sub Fe}) observed at 25 C decrease over a first period of time (0-4 h) of FeS oxidative dissolution from 7.97 down to 2.01. Afterwards, the n{sub H}:n{sub Fe} ratio becomes lower than 2 and remains roughly constant (4-72 h). At higher temperatures (35 and 45 C) and pH 3.00, n{sub H}:n{sub Fe}{<=}2 and is quasi-invariant over the reaction time. The experimental observations suggest a mechanism based on the protonation of FeS surface (Chirita and Descostes, 2006) followed by oxidation of FeS by dissolved oxygen to produce Fe{sup 2+}, S{sup 0} and S{sub n}{sup 2-}. Fe{sup 2+} is unstable in

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenyl Acetic Acid and Dl-Mandelic Acid by Permanganate in Acid Medium

    B.Syama Sundar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of oxidation of phenyl acetic acid and DL- Mandelic acid by potassium permanganate in aqueous acetic acid and perchloric acid mixture reveals that the kinetic orders are first order in oxidant, first order in H+ and zero order in substrate for phenyl acetic acid. DL-Mandelic acid exhibits first order in oxidant and zero order in substrate. The results are rationalised by a mechanism involving intermediate formation of mandelic acid in case of Phenyl acetic acid and ester formation with Mn (VII in case of DL-Mandelic acid. The following order of reactivity is observed: DL-Mandelic acid > Phenyl acetic acid. The high reactivity of DL-Mandelic acid over phenyl acetic acid may be due to different mechanisms operating with the two substrates and benzaldehyde is the final product in both the cases.

  2. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines inhibits microtubule polymerization

    Clark, Hillary M; Hagedorn, Tara D.; Landino, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. In addition, protein thiol redox reactions are increasingly identified as a mechanism to regulate protein structure and function. We assessed the effect of hypothiocyanous acid on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by hypothiocyanous and hypochlorous acids was monitored by labeling tubulin with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein and by detecting higher molecula...

  3. Platinum nanoparticles–manganese oxide nanorods as novel binary catalysts for formic acid oxidation

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2012-01-01

    The current study proposes a novel binary catalyst system (composed of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles) as a promising electrocatalyst in formic acid oxidation. The electro-catalytic oxidation of formic acid is carried out with binary catalysts of Pt nanoparticles (nano-Pt) and manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx) electrodeposited onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) measurements showed that unmodified GC and nano-MnOx/GC electrodes have no catalytic activity. While tw...

  4. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by bromate in aqueous hydrochloric acid medium

    R S Yalgudre; G S Gokavi

    2012-07-01

    Selenium dioxide catalysed acetic acid hydrazide oxidation by bromate was studied in hydrochloric acid medium. The order in oxidant concentration, substrate and catalyst were found to be unity. Increasing hydrogen ion concentration increases the rate of the reaction due to protonation equilibria of the oxidant. The mechanism of the reaction involves prior complex formation between the catalyst and substrate, hydrazide, followed by its oxidation by diprotonated bromate in a slow step. Acetic acid was found to be the oxidation product. Other kinetic data like effect of solvent polarity and ionic strength on the reaction support the proposed mechanism.

  5. Investigation of products of molybdenite oxidation by nitric acid

    Physicochemical study of products of oxidation by nitric acid of molybdenum concentrate containing 98% MoS2 is carried out. It is shown that appearing molybdenum oxide forms block oxidizer access to the surface of sulfide phase and hinder its complete oxidation. When complexing reagents (H2SO4, H3PO4, HCl) are introduced in the solution the bulk of oxidized molybdenum transfers into solution in the form of a stable complex, at that. The effect of internal diffusion decreases and a considerable increase of MoS2 oxidation rate and completeness is achieved

  6. Defective [U-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased [U-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation. [1-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

  7. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Stevanovic, R. M.; Popovic, K. Dj.; Jovanovic, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid oxidation was studied on platinum-bismuth deposits on glassy carbon (GC) substrate. The catalysts of equimolar ratio were prepared by potentiostatic deposition using chronocoulometry. Bimetallic structures obtained by two-step process, comprising deposition of Bi followed by deposition...... dissolution, deposits were subjected to electrochemical oxidation, in the relevant potential range and supporting electrolyte, prior to use as catalysts for HCOOH oxidation. Anodic striping charges indicated that along oxidation procedure most of deposited Bi was oxidized. ICP mass spectroscopy analysis of...... latter. Catalysts prepared in this way exhibit about 10 times higher activity for formic acid oxidation in comparison to pure Pt, as revealed both by potentiodynamic and quasy-potentiostatic measurements. This high activity is the result of well-balanced ensemble effect induced by Bi-oxide species...

  8. Chemical oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    The oxidation of six phenolic acids by soil Fe and Mn oxides was demonstrated by changes in phenolic acid extractability from soil with time, by production of Fe(II) and soluble Mn from the oxidation reaction, by quantitative recoveries of added phenolic acids from soil pretreated with dithionite-citrate to remove Fe and Mn oxides, and by the reactivity of phenolic acids in the presence of pure Mn and Fe oxides. The reactivities of phenolic acids were associated with the structures of the chemicals. Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring increased reactivity, and cinnamic acid derivatives were more reactive than benzoic acid derivatives. Oxidation products of 14C labeled ferulic acid were sorbed to MnO2 within minutes and were unextractable by organic solvents unless the mineral was pretreated with 6 M HCl or 0.5 M NaOH. The oxidation rate of ferulic acid by MnO2 approached zero after four days even with a surplus of reactants

  9. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  10. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  11. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans.

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils Joakim

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has during the past decade proven to be a valuable model organism to identify and examine molecular mechanisms regulating lipid storage and metabolism. While the primary approach has been to identify genes and pathways conferring alterations in lipid accumulation, only a few recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in live C. elegans by examining oxidation of tritium-labeled fatty acids to tritiated H2O that can be measured by scintillation counting. Treating animals with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the electron transport chain, reduced (3)H2O production to approximately 15%, while boiling of animals prior to assay completely blocked the production of labeled water. We demonstrate that worms fed different bacterial strains exhibit different fatty acid oxidation rates. We show that starvation results in increased fatty acid oxidation, which is independent of the transcription factor NHR-49. On the contrary, fatty acid oxidation is reduced to approximately 70% in animals lacking the worm homolog of the insulin receptor, DAF-2. Hence, the present methodology can be used to delineate the role of specific genes and pathways in the regulation of β-oxidation in C. elegans. PMID:24058820

  12. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by the oxidation of nucleic acids.

    Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Animals;chemistry;deficiency;DNA Damage;DNA Glycosylases;DNA Repair;DNA Repair Enzymes;Enzymes;genetics;Genomics;Guanine;Hydrolases;Intestinal Neoplasms;Japan;Liver Neoplasms;metabolism;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Mice;Mutagenesis;Mutation;Neoplasms;Nucleic Acids;Oxidation-Reduction;Oxidative Stress;Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases;Skin Neoplasms;Ultraviolet Rays.

  13. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements

  14. Ghrelin reduces hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation.

    Rigault, C; Le Borgne, F; Georges, B; Demarquoy, J

    2007-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide secreted during starvation by gastric cells. Ghrelin physiologically induces food intake and seems to alter lipid and glucid metabolism in several tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. Liver has a key position in lipid metabolism as it allows the metabolic orientation of fatty acids between oxidation and esterification. We investigated the effects of peripheral ghrelin administration on 2 crucial parameters of fatty acid oxidation: the levocarnitine (L-carnitine)-dependent entry of the fatty acids in the mitochondria and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Ghrelin was either given to rats prior to the hepatocyte preparation and culture or used to treat hepatocytes prepared from control animals. Direct incubation of ghrelin to raw hepatocytes did not induce any change in the studied parameters. In hepatocytes prepared from 3 nmol ghrelin-treated rats, a 44% reduction of the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation while no alteration of the L-carnitine-related parameters were observed. These results suggested (a) that ghrelin has no direct effect on liver, and (b) that when administrated to a whole organism, ghrelin may alter the lipid metabolism and the energy balance through a marked decrease in liver fatty acid oxidation. PMID:17556859

  15. Modulating fatty acid oxidation in heart failure

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Stanley, William C.; Recchia, Fabio A.

    2011-01-01

    In the advanced stages of heart failure, many key enzymes involved in myocardial energy substrate metabolism display various degrees of down-regulation. The net effect of the altered metabolic phenotype consists of reduced cardiac fatty oxidation, increased glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and rigidity of the metabolic response to changes in workload. Is this metabolic shift an adaptive mechanism that protects the heart or a maladaptive process that accelerates structural and functional dera...

  16. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in live C. elegans by examining oxidation of tritium-labeled fatty acids to tritiated H2O that can be measured by...... scintillation counting. Treating animals with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the electron transport chain, reduced (3)H2O production to approximately 15%, while boiling of animals prior to assay completely blocked the production of labeled water. We demonstrate that worms fed different bacterial strains exhibit...

  17. Platinum nanoparticles–manganese oxide nanorods as novel binary catalysts for formic acid oxidation

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study proposes a novel binary catalyst system (composed of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles as a promising electrocatalyst in formic acid oxidation. The electro-catalytic oxidation of formic acid is carried out with binary catalysts of Pt nanoparticles (nano-Pt and manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx electrodeposited onto glassy carbon (GC electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV measurements showed that unmodified GC and nano-MnOx/GC electrodes have no catalytic activity. While two oxidation peaks were observed at nano-Pt/GC electrode at ca. 0.2 and 0.55 V (corresponding to the direct oxidation of formic acid and the oxidation of the poisoning CO intermediate, respectively. The combined use of nano-MnOx and nano-Pt results in superb enhancement of the direct oxidation pathway. Nano-MnOx is shown to facilitate the oxidation of CO (to CO2 by providing oxygen at low over-potential. This leads to retrieval of Pt active sites necessary for the direct oxidation of formic acid. The higher catalytic activity of nano-MnOx/nano-Pt/GC electrode (with Pt firstly deposited compared to its mirror image electrode (i.e., with MnOx firstly deposited, nano-Pt/nano-MnOx/GC reveals that the order of the electrodeposition is an essential parameter.

  18. The oxidation of acid azo dye AY 36 by a manganese oxide containing mine waste

    Highlights: ► This study looks at the oxidative breakdown of the amine containing dye acid yellow 36 by a Mn oxide containing mine waste. ► The oxidation proceeds by successive one electron transfers between the dye molecule and the Mn oxide minerals. ► The initial decolorization of the dye is rapid, but does not involve the cleavage of the azo bond. -- Abstract: The oxidative breakdown of acid azo dye acid yellow 36 (AY 36) by a Mn oxide containing mine tailings is demonstrated. The oxidation reaction is pH dependent with the rate of decolorization increasing with decreasing pH. The oxidation reaction mechanism is initiated at the amino moiety and proceeds via successive, one electron transfers from the dye to the Mn oxide minerals. The reaction pathway involves the formation of a number of colorless intermediate products, some of which hydrolyze in a Mn oxide-independent step. Decolorization of the dye is rapid and is observed before the cleavage of the azo-bond, which is a slower process. The terminal oxidation products were observed to be p-benzoquinone and 3-hydroxybenzenesulfonate. The reaction order of the initial decolorization was determined to be pseudo fractional order with respect to pH and pseudo first order with respect to dye concentration and Mn tailings’ surface area

  19. Oxidative stability of fatty acid alkyl esters: a review.

    Michal Angelovič

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate and to process the current literary knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of vegetable oil raw used for biodiesel production in terms of its qualitative stability. An object of investigation was oxidative stability of biodiesel. In the study, we focused on the qualitative physico-chemical properties of vegetable oils used for biodiesel production, oxidative degradation and its mechanisms, oxidation of lipids, mechanisms of autooxidation, effectivennes of different synthetic antioxidants in relation to oxidative stability of biodiesel and methods of oxidative stability determination. Knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of vegetable oil as raw material and the factors affecting these properties is critical for the production of quality biodiesel and its sustainability. According to the source of oilseed, variations in the chemical composition of the vegetable oil are expressed by variations in the molar ratio among different fatty acids in the structure. The relative ratio of fatty acids present in the raw material is kept relatively constant after the transesterification reaction. The quality of biodiesel physico-chemical properties is influenced by the chain length and the level of unsaturation of the produced fatty acid alkyl esters. A biodiesel is thermodynamically stable. Its instability primarily occurs from contact of oxygen present in the ambient air that is referred to as oxidative instability. For biodiesel is oxidation stability a general term. It is necessary to distinguish ‘storage stability' and ‘thermal stability', in relation to oxidative degradation, which may occur during extended periods of storage, transportation and end use. Fuel instability problems can be of two related types, short-term oxidative instability and long-term storage instability. Storage instability is defined in terms of solid formation, which can plug nozzles, filters, and degrade engine

  20. Oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Ascorbic acid and low pH increase oxidative deterioration

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Timm Heinrich, Maike; Meyer, Anne S.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid (0-4000 ppm) and pH (3.8-6.2) on oxidation and levels of iron and copper in various fractions of mayonnaise enriched with 16% fish oil was investigated. Ascorbic acid induced release of iron from the assumed oil- water interface into the aqueous phase at all pH levels......H promoted oxidation. It is proposed that iron bridges between the egg yolk proteins low-density lipoproteins, lipovitellin, and phosvitin at the oil-water interface are broken at low pH values, whereby iron ions become accessible as oxidation initiators. In the presence of ascorbic acid, oxidation is...... further enhanced due to the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ that rapidly catalyzes lipid oxidation via lipid hydroperoxide decomposition at the oil-water interface in mayonnaise...

  1. Ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid as reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Lack of post-sampling stability of ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid and failure to block their in vivo equilibrium have lowered their value as biomarkers of oxidative stress and limited the ability to further investigate their possible role in disease prevention. In the present paper, the...... analytical reproducibility was tested by repeated analysis of plasma aliquots from one individual over four years. The plasma was subjected to acidic deproteinization with an equal volume of 10% meta-phosphoric acid containing 2 mM EDTA and analyzed for ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid by high-performance...

  2. Acid-catalyzed kinetics of indium tin oxide etching

    We report the kinetic characterization of indium tin oxide (ITO) film etching by chemical treatment in acidic and basic electrolytes. It was observed that film etching increased under more acidic conditions, whereas basic conditions led to minimal etching on the time scale of the experiments. Quartz crystal microbalance was employed in order to track the reaction kinetics as a function of the concentration of hydrochloric acid and accordingly solution pH. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy experiments determined that acid treatment increases surface hydrophilicity and porosity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments identified that film etching is primarily caused by dissolution of indium species. A kinetic model was developed to explain the acid-catalyzed dissolution of ITO surfaces, and showed a logarithmic relationship between the rate of dissolution and the concentration of undisassociated hydrochloric acid molecules. Taken together, the findings presented in this work verify the acid-catalyzed kinetics of ITO film dissolution by chemical treatment, and support that the corresponding chemical reactions should be accounted for in ITO film processing applications. - Highlights: • Acidic conditions promoted indium tin oxide (ITO) film etching via dissolution. • Logarithm of the dissolution rate depended linearly on the solution pH. • Acid treatment increased ITO surface hydrophilicity and porosity. • ITO film etching led to preferential dissolution of indium species over tin species

  3. Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials

    A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NOx vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180 degrees C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200 degrees C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time

  4. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils Joakim

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has during the past decade proven to be a valuable model organism to identify and examine molecular mechanisms regulating lipid storage and metabolism. While the primary approach has been to identify genes and pathways conferring alterations in lipid accumulation, only a few recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in liv...

  5. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

    Pohl, Carolina H.; Johan L. F. Kock

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; ...

  6. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Claude Daneault; Saïd Barazzouk

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, th...

  7. Mechanism of catalytic action of oxide systems in reactions of aldehyde oxidation to carboxylic acids

    Mechanism of selective action of oxide catalysts (on the base of V2O4, MoO3) of aldehyde oxidation to acids is considered, reaction acrolein oxidation to acrylic acid is taken as an example. Multistage mechanism of the process is established; it involves consequent transformation of coordination-bonded aldehyde into carbonyl-bonded aldehyde and symmetric carboxylate. Principles of active surface construction are formulated, they take into account the activity of stabilization center of concrete intermediate compound and bond energy of oxygen with surface. (author)

  8. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  9. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation and limitations to fatty acid oxidation during exercise

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Kiens, Bente

    2012-01-01

    turn is trapped by carnitine. This will lead to less availability of free carnitine for fatty acid transport into mitochondria. This review summarizes our present view on how FA metabolism is regulated during exercise with a special focus on the limitations in FA oxidation in the transition from...

  11. Oxidation of coal-based raw materials by nitric acid

    Novák, J.; Novák, František; Madronová, L.; Machovič, V.; Kozler, J.

    New York : Nova Science Publisher, 2011 - (Madronová, L.), s. 105-123 ISBN 978-1-61668-965-0. - ( Chemistry Research and Applications ) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : oxidation * coal-based raw materials * nitric acid Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation

  12. Role of biologically assisted pyrrhotite oxidation in acid mine drainage

    Water contaminated by acidic mine drainage (AMD) from base metal tailings and waste rock is a serious environmental problem. Previous studies have focused on pyrite as the principal acid producing mineral. In this work, the significance of pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) oxidation, both chemical and biochemical, on the acid generation process is discussed. Chemical and biochemical kinetic studies of pyrrhotite oxidation were conducted in pneumatically mixed, internal split flow reactors. Controlling variables included the specific surface area, temperature, pH, partial pressure of oxygen, and co-oxidation with pyrite. Bacterial oxidations, using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans as inoculant. included the inherent metabolic rate and cell sorption equilibria on the ore surface. Mathematical models were derived to couple the kinetics with oxygen mass transfer. The mass transport model combined mechanisms based on the shrinking radius (fine particles) and the shrinking reactive front (massive sulfides) concepts. The objective of the research was the application of fundamental kinetic and physical data to field conditions for simulating both the rate of mineral oxidation and simulating pore water quality

  13. Complexes of low oxidated /sup 99/Tc with salicylic acid

    While several complexes of technetium with hydroxycarboxylic acids in solution are well known, little has been done about complexes of technetium with phenolcarboxylic acids. M.A. Kayssi suggested the use of sulphosalicylic acid as a reagent for the quantitative determination of technetium. The resulting complex shows a spectrophotometric maximum at 460 nm; the author supposes that the complex could contain technetium in the (V) oxidation state. In this paper the reaction between technetium and salicylic acid at concentrations between 10/sup -4/ and 5 x 10/sup -2/ M, in a pH range of 2 to 4.5, has been studied. The pH does not seem to influence the reaction, while the salicylic acid concentration is particularly significant

  14. Studies of Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    The oxidation state of Tc is an important aspect of the speciation in groundwater which contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg/L and the Tc (VII) concentration is about 10-8 mol/L. The radiocounting of 99Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl3 coagulation method was carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (IV) and Tc (VII) for the availability of the LaCl3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentration are well agreement with the LaCl3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (VII) is very stable in the Tc (VII)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (IV) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (VII) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  15. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 M concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with (U- $C)oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of UC label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine.

  16. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 μM concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with [U-1$C]oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of 14C label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine

  17. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic -amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide

    Raghvendra Shukla; Pradeep K Sharma; Kalyan K Banerji

    2004-03-01

    The oxidation of eleven amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid results in the formation of the corresponding carbonyl compounds and ammonia. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with some of the amino acids while others exhibit second-order dependence. It failed to induce polymerization of acrylonitrile. The effect of solvent composition indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increase in the polarity of the medium. Addition of tetrabutylammonium chloride has no effect on the rate of oxidation. Addition of bromide ion causes decrease in the oxidation rate but only to a limiting value. The reaction is susceptible to both polar and steric effects of the substituents. A suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  19. Impacts of acid gases on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst

    A series of bench-scale experiments were completed to evaluate acid gases of HCl, SO2, and SO3 on mercury oxidation across a commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. The SCR catalyst was placed in a simulated flue gas stream containing O2, CO2, H2O, NO, NO2, and NH3, and N2. HCl, SO2, and SO3 were added to the gas stream either separately or in combination to investigate their interactions with mercury over the SCR catalyst. The compositions of the simulated flue gas represent a medium-sulfur and low- to medium-chlorine coal that could represent either bituminous or subbituminous. The experimental data indicated that 5-50 ppm HCl in flue gas enhanced mercury oxidation within the SCR catalyst, possibly because of the reactive chlorine species formed through catalytic reactions. An addition of 5 ppm HCl in the simulated flue gas resulted in mercury oxidation of 45% across the SCR compared to only 4% mercury oxidation when 1 ppm HCl is in the flue gas. As HCl concentration increased to 50 ppm, 63% of Hg oxidation was reached. SO2 and SO3 showed a mitigating effect on mercury chlorination to some degree, depending on the concentrations of SO2 and SO3, by competing against HCl for SCR adsorption sites. High levels of acid gases of HCl (50 ppm), SO2 (2000 ppm), and SO3 (50 ppm) in the flue gas deteriorate mercury adsorption on the SCR catalyst. (author)

  20. Radiolytical oxidation of ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions

    Complete text of publication follows. Ascorbic acid, AsA (vitamin c), has been widely studied as an antioxidant or as an initiator of some technological processes, for example polymerization or nanoparticles formation. AsA can be easily oxidized to ascorbyl radical, in the first stage, and to dehydroascorbic acid, DHA, in the second stage. It has been found that several different ascorbyl radicals are formed during AsA oxidation but the main radical exists as the anion with the unpaired electron delocalized on a highly conjugated tricarbonyl system. Absorption spectrum of ascorbyl radical shows two bands with maxima at 300 and 360 nm, however only that at 360 nm is proportional to the dose and thus this wavelength was chosen for observations. We studied the oxidation of AsA by the following oxidizing radicals generated by the pulse radiolysis method ·OH, (SCN)2-·, Cl2-·, N3· and NO2·. The observed dependence of the yield and the formation rate of the AsA radical on the reduction potential of the oxidizing radical is discussed. The results obtained in water are compared with those obtained with AsA enclosed in the water pools of reverse micelles formed by AOT in n-heptane or by Igepal CO-520 in c-hexane. Somewhat surprising observation of different ascorbyl radical in pulse irradiated reverse micelles containing DHA is also commented.

  1. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  2. Selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid over mixed metal oxide catalysts

    Wei Zheng; Zhenxing Yu; Ping Zhang; Yuhang Zhang; Hongying Fu; Xiaoli Zhang; Qiquan Sun; Xinguo Hu

    2008-01-01

    The effects of metal atomic ratio, water content, oxygen content, and calcination temperature on the catalytic perfor-mances of MoVTeNbO mixed oxide catalyst system for the selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid have been investigated and discussed. Among the catalysts studied, it was found that the MoVTeNbO catalyst calcined at a temperature of 600 ℃ showed the best performance in terms of propane conversion and selectivity for acrylic acid under an atmosphere of nitrogen. An effective MoVTeNbO oxide catalyst for propane selective oxidation to acrylic acid was obtained with a combination of a preferred metal atomic ratio (Mo1 V0.31Te0.23Nb0.12). The optimum reaction condition for the selective oxidation of propane was the molar ratio of C3H81 :O2 : H2O : N1 = 4.4 : 12.8 : 15.3 : 36.9. Under such conditions, the conversion of propane and the maximum yield of acrylic acid reached about 50% and 21%, respectively.

  3. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Claude Daneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS spectroscopic techniques.

  4. Adipose fatty acid oxidation is required for thermogenesis and potentiates oxidative stress induced inflammation

    Jieun Lee; Jessica M. Ellis; Michael J. Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To understand the contribution of adipose tissue fatty acid oxidation to whole-body metabolism, we generated mice with an adipose-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2A−/−), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. CPT2A−/− mice became hypothermic after an acute cold challenge, and CPT2A−/− brown adipose tissue (BAT) failed to upregulate thermogenic genes in response to agonist-induced stimulation. The adipose-specific loss of CPT2 resulted in d...

  5. The Kinetics and Mechanism for the Oxidation of Nicotinic Acid by Peroxomonosulfate in Acidic Aqueous Medium

    The kinetics of oxidation of nicotinic acid by peroxomonosulfate (PMS) has been studied in acetate buffers. Stoichiometry of the reaction corresponds to the reaction of one mole of the oxidant with a mole of nicotinic acid. N→O product has been confirmed both by UV visible and IR spectroscopy. The reaction is second order viz. first order with respect to each reactant. Activation parameters have also been evaluated. A plausible reaction mechanism is mentioned and the derived kinetic rate law accounts for experimental observations

  6. Oxidation of aniline in the presence of phenolic acids

    Janošević Aleksandra M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aniline was oxidized with ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS in aqueous solutions of various phenolic acids: 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNSA and gallic acid (GA. Polymerizations were performed at the constant molar ratios [acid]/[aniline]=0.5 and [APS]/[aniline]=1.25. The conductivity of synthesized polyaniline (PANI is affected by the dopant anion type and decreases in order: PANI-SSA > PANI-DNSA > PANI-GA, the last polymer being nonconducting. This decrease is in accordance with the increase of initial pH value of the reaction mixture. The differences in molecular structure of synthesized PANI have been revealed by FTIR spectroscopy. FTIR spectra of PANI-SSA and PANI-DNSA show typical features of PANI conductive emeraldine salt segments. On the contrary, FTIR spectrum of PANI-GA shows absence of bands typical for conducting PANI polaronic lattice, and indicates the higher oxidation state of this polymer than that of emeraldine, the presence of substituted phenazines as constitutional units, as well as significant content of monosubstituted benzene rings which reflects low polymerization degree and/or pronounced chain branching. The strong hydrogen bonding between GA and PANI can obstruct propagation of oligoanilines and formation of longer conducting PANI chains.

  7. Oxidative stability of Liposomes composed of docosahexaenoic acid-containing phospholipids

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jørgensen, Kent;

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stability of liposomes made of (Docosahexaenoic acid) DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) was examined during preparation and storage. After preparation of the liposomes, the concentration of primary (conjugated dienes) and secondary oxidation products (Thiobarbituric acid-reactive ......Oxidative stability of liposomes made of (Docosahexaenoic acid) DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) was examined during preparation and storage. After preparation of the liposomes, the concentration of primary (conjugated dienes) and secondary oxidation products (Thiobarbituric acid...

  8. Enhanced formic acid oxidation on Cu-Pd nanoparticles

    Dai, Lin; Zou, Shouzhong

    Developing catalysts with high activity and high resistance to surface poisoning remains a challenge in direct formic acid fuel cell research. In this work, copper-palladium nanoparticles were formed through a galvanic replacement process. After electrochemically selective dissolution of surface Cu, Pd-enriched Cu-Pd nanoparticles were formed. These particles exhibit much higher formic acid oxidation activities than that on pure Pd nanoparticles, and they are much more resistant to the surface poisoning. Possible mechanisms of catalytic activity enhancement are briefly discussed.

  9. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...... on calculations with the kinetic model. Formic acid is consumed mainly by reaction with OH, yielding OCHO, which dissociates rapidly to CO2 + H, and HOCO, which may dissociate to CO + OH or CO2 + H, or react with H, OH, or O2 to form more stable products. The branching fraction of the HOCHO + OH...

  10. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ ethylene plant defense pathways

    Mur, Luis A. J.; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra; Hall, Michael A.; Hebelstrup, Kim H

    2013-01-01

    Plant defense against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defense responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signaling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO in...

  11. Bezafibrate in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Preisler, Nicolai;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether bezafibrate increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and lowers heart rate (HR) during exercise in patients with carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiencies. METHODS: This was a 3-month, randomized, double......-blind, crossover study of bezafibrate in patients with CPT II (n = 5) and VLCAD (n = 5) deficiencies. Primary outcome measures were changes in FAO, measured with stable-isotope methodology and indirect calorimetry, and changes in HR during exercise. RESULTS: Bezafibrate lowered low-density lipoprotein......, triglyceride, and free fatty acid concentrations; however, there were no changes in palmitate oxidation, FAO, or HR during exercise. CONCLUSION: Bezafibrate does not improve clinical symptoms or FAO during exercise in patients with CPT II and VLCAD deficiencies. These findings indicate that previous in vitro...

  12. Oxide for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Lam, L. T.; Lim, O. V.; Haigh, N. P.; Rand, D. A. J.; Manders, J. E.; Rice, D. M.

    In order to meet the increasing demand for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, a new soft lead has been produced by Pasminco Metals. In this material, bismuth is increased to a level that produces a significant improvement in battery cycle life. By contrast, other common impurities, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel, antimony and tellurium, that are known to be harmful to VRLA batteries are controlled to very low levels. A bismuth (Bi)-bearing oxide has been manufactured (Barton-pot method) from this soft lead and is characterized in terms of phase composition, particle size distribution, BET surface area, and reactivity. An investigation is also made of the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from the Bi-bearing oxide. For comparison, the characteristics and performance of a Bi-free (Barton-pot) oxide, which is manufactured in the USA, are also examined. Increasing the level of bismuth and lowering those of the other impurities in soft lead produces no unusual changes in either the physical or the chemical properties of the resulting Bi-bearing oxide compared with Bi-free oxide. This is very important because there is no need for battery manufacturers to change their paste formulae and paste-mixing procedures on switching to the new Bi-bearing oxide. There is little difference in the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from Bi-bearing or Bi-free oxides. On the other hand, these rates increase on the former electrodes when the levels of all the other impurities are made to exceed (by deliberately adding the impurities as oxide powders) the corresponding, specified values for the Bi-bearing oxide. The latter behaviour is particularly noticeable for hydrogen evolution, which is enhanced even further when a negative electrode prepared from Bi-bearing oxide is contaminated through the deposition of impurities added to the sulfuric acid solution. The effects of impurities in the positive

  13. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  14. Oxidation of amino acids and proteins by peroxynitrite

    Recent studies suggested that proteins exposed to free radicals and other strong oxidants generated by living organisms may be the source of damage to tissues even at sites distant from the original point of generation of the reactive species. In examining the ability of biologically significant oxidizing agents to generate protein peroxides, the authors have studied protein peroxidation by peroxynitrite (ONOO-), known to be a potential source of tissue damage. Treatment of bovine serum albumin, Iysozyme, apotransferrin, insulin or human serum albumin with peroxynitrous acid (POXNA) led to formation of hydroperoxide groups on the proteins, detected by their reaction with iodide. Under optimum conditions, up to one peroxide group formed on each molecule of protein. Hydroxyl radical scavengers, antioxidants, or metal chelators, were unable to affect the quantities of peroxides generated by POXNA. These findings suggest that the oxidation was not mediated by the hydroxyl free radicals. The iodide assay cannot be applied to the measurement of peroxides in presence of nitrite, which is a contaminant of most solutions of POXNA. Nitrite can be easily removed from proteins by molecular filtration, but this method cannot be applied to amino acids. Therefore an amino acid peroxide test based on chemiluminescence was used, which shows promise for general peroxide detection

  15. Influence of oxidation on fulvic acids composition and biodegradability.

    Kozyatnyk, Ivan; Świetlik, Joanna; Raczyk-Stanisławiak, Ursula; Dąbrowska, Agata; Klymenko, Nataliya; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2013-08-01

    Oxidation is well-known process of transforming natural organic matter during the treatment of drinking water. Chlorine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide are common oxidants used in water treatment technologies for this purpose. We studied the influence of different doses of these oxidants on by-products formation and changes in biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of fulvic acids (FA) with different BDOC content. Chlorination did not significantly change the MWD of FA and disinfection by-products formation. However, higher molecular weight compounds, than those in the initial FA, were formed. It could be a result of chlorine substitution into the FA structure. Chlorine dioxide oxidized FA stronger than chlorine. During ozonation of FA, we found the highest increase of BDOD due to the formation of a high amount of organic acids and aldehydes. FA molecules were transformed into a more biodegradable form. Ozonation is the most preferable process among those observed for pre-treatment of FA before biofiltration. PMID:23746389

  16. Electrocatalysis by nanoparticles: Oxidation of formic acid at manganese oxide nanorods-modified Pt planar and nanohole-arrays

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2010-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of formic acid (an essential reaction in direct formic acid fuel cells) is a challenging process because of the deactivation of anodes by the adsorption of the poisoning intermediate carbon monoxide (CO). Pt electrodes in two geometries (planar and nanohole-array) were modified by the electrodeposition of manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx). The modified Pt electrodes were then tested for their electrocatalytic activity through the electro-oxidation of formic acid in a ...

  17. Adipose Fatty Acid Oxidation Is Required for Thermogenesis and Potentiates Oxidative Stress-Induced Inflammation

    Jieun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the contribution of adipose tissue fatty acid oxidation to whole-body metabolism, we generated mice with an adipose-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2A−/−, an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. CPT2A−/− mice became hypothermic after an acute cold challenge, and CPT2A−/− brown adipose tissue (BAT failed to upregulate thermogenic genes in response to agonist-induced stimulation. The adipose-specific loss of CPT2 resulted in diet-dependent changes in adiposity but did not result in changes in body weight on low- or high-fat diets. Additionally, CPT2A−/− mice had suppressed high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in visceral white adipose tissue (WAT; however, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was not improved. These data show that fatty acid oxidation is required for cold-induced thermogenesis in BAT and high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in WAT.

  18. Nitrate enhances skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation via a nitric oxide-cGMP-PPAR-mediated mechanism

    Ashmore, Tom; Roberts, Lee D.; Morash, Andrea J.; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Finnerty, John; James A. West; Murfitt, Steven A.; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Branco, Cristina, 1960-; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Clarke, Kieran; Johnson, Randall S.; Feelisch, Martin; Griffin, Julian L; Murray, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle is associated with metabolic flexibility, including a high capacity to increase fatty acid (FA) oxidation in response to increased lipid supply. Lipid overload, however, can result in incomplete FA oxidation and accumulation of potentially harmful intermediates where mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle capacity cannot keep pace with rates of β-oxidation. Enhancement of muscle FA oxidation in combination with mitochondrial biogenesis is ther...

  19. Advanced oxidation processes of decomposing dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid in water

    WANG Kun-ping; GUO Jin-song; YANG Min; JUNJI Hirotsuji; DENG Rong-sen; LIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the decomposition of two haloacetic acids (HAAs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), in water by single oxidants ozone (O3) and ultraviolet radiation (UV) and the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) constituted by the combinations of O3/UV, H2O2/UV, O3 /H2O2, and O3/H2O2/UV. The concentrations of HAAs were analyzed at specified time intervals to track their decomposition. Except for O3 and UV, the four combined oxidation processes remarkably enhance the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA owing to the generated very reactive hydroxyl radicals. The fastest decomposition process is O3/H2O2/UV, closely followed by O3/UV. DCAA is much easier to decompose than TCAA. The kinetics of HAA decomposition by O3/UV can be described well by a pseudo first-order reaction model under a constant initial dissolved O3 concentration and fixed UV radiation. Humic acids and HCO3- in the reaction system both decrease the decomposition rate constants for DCAA and TCAA. The amount of H2O2 accumulates in the presence of humic acids in the O3/UV process.

  20. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  1. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  2. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  3. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine

    Dimple Garg; Seema Kothari

    2004-11-01

    The oxidation of lactic acid, mandelic acid and ten monosubstituted mandelic acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine (HABR) in glacial acetic acid, leads to the formation of the corresponding oxoacid. The reaction is first order with respect to each of the hydroxy acids and HABR. It is proposed that HABR itself is the reactive oxidizing species. The oxidation of -deuteriomandelic acid exhibits the presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (/ = 5.91 at 298 K). The rates of oxidation of the substituted mandelic acids show excellent correlation with Brown’s + values. The reaction constants are negative. The oxidation exhibits an extensive cross conjugation between the electron-donating substituent and the reaction centre in the transition state. A mechanism involving transfer of a hydride ion from the acid to the oxidant is postulated.

  5. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  6. Phosphonic Acids for Interfacial Engineering of Transparent Conductive Oxides.

    Paniagua, Sergio A; Giordano, Anthony J; Smith, O'Neil L; Barlow, Stephen; Li, Hong; Armstrong, Neal R; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Ginger, David; Marder, Seth R

    2016-06-22

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), such as indium tin oxide and zinc oxide, play an important role as electrode materials in organic-semiconductor devices. The properties of the inorganic-organic interface-the offset between the TCO Fermi level and the relevant transport level, the extent to which the organic semiconductor can wet the oxide surface, and the influence of the surface on semiconductor morphology-significantly affect device performance. This review surveys the literature on TCO modification with phosphonic acids (PAs), which has increasingly been used to engineer these interfacial properties. The first part outlines the relevance of TCO surface modification to organic electronics, surveys methods for the synthesis of PAs, discusses the modes by which they can bind to TCO surfaces, and compares PAs to alternative organic surface modifiers. The next section discusses methods of PA monolayer deposition, the kinetics of monolayer formation, and structural evidence regarding molecular orientation on TCOs. The next sections discuss TCO work-function modification using PAs, tuning of TCO surface energy using PAs, and initiation of polymerizations from TCO-tethered PAs. Finally, studies that examine the use of PA-modified TCOs in organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics are compared. PMID:27227316

  7. Lewis Acid Catalysis in the Oxidative Cycloaddition of Thiophenes

    Li, Yuanqiang; Thiemann, Thies; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Mataka, Shuntaro; Tashiro, Masashi

    1997-01-01

    Thiophenes 1 were treated with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (m-CPBA) under BF3·Et2O catalysis to afford thiophene S-monoxides. These could be reacted in situ as intermediary species with a number of dienophiles to provide arenes (with alkynes as dienophiles) or 7-thiabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene 7-oxides (with alkenes as dienophiles). It was also possible to isolate thiophene S-monoxides in solution and to cycloadd them in a second step. In either way it could be shown that the use of BF3·Et2O enhance...

  8. In situ electrocatalytic oxidation of acid violet 12 dye effluent.

    Mohan, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2006-08-21

    Electrochemical treatment of organic pollutants is a promising treatment technique for substances which are recalcitrant to biodegradation. Experiments were carried out to treat acid violet 12 dye house effluent using electrochemical technique for removal color and COD reduction covering wide range in operating conditions. Ruthenium/lead/tin oxide coated titanium and stainless steel were used as anode and cathode, respectively. The influence of effluent initial concentration, pH, supporting electrolyte and the electrode material on rate of degradation has been critically examined. The results indicate that the electrochemical method can be used to treat dye house effluents. PMID:16730894

  9. Degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid by advanced oxidation processes

    C. L. P. S. Zanta; Martínez-Huitle, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as the UV/H2O2 and Fenton processes were investigated for the degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (2-HBA) in lab-scale experiments. Different [H2O2]/[2-HBA] molar ratios and pH values were used in order to establish the most favorable experimental conditions for the Fenton process. For comparison purposes, degradation of 2-HBA was carried out by the UV/H2O2 process under Fenton experimental conditions. The study showed that the Fenton p...

  10. Nitrogen isotope exchange in between nitric oxide and nitric acid

    The exchange rate law experimentally observed for 15 N/14 N exchange in NO - HNO3 system at low nitric acid concentration, both at atmospheric pressure and at low pressure of NO: R k[H+][NO3-][HNO2], is identical with the rate law for the reaction between NO and HNO3, when HNO2 is formed.The rate of nitrogen isotope exchange between NO and HNO3 has been measured as a function of nitric acid concentration of 1.5 4 M.l-1. The exchange rate law is shown to be R k[HNO3]2[N2O3] and the measured activation energy is E = 67.78 kJ.M-1. It is concluded that N2O3 participates in 15 N/14 N exchange between NO and HNO3 at nitric acid concentration higher than 1.5 M.l-1. The rate of the same isotope exchange in NO - HNO3 system has been also measured as a function of nitric oxide pressure 0.1 0.4 M.Pa for 1 and 2 M.l-1 HNO3. It is demonstrated that 15 N/14 N exchange in this system has a linear dependence on NO pressure as indicated by rate measurements at different NO partial pressures and constant overall pressure, by adding helium in reactor. Using the rate law presented above the nitrogen isotope exchange rate for nitric acid concentration 1.5 10 M.l-1 were calculated. Nitrogen isotope exchange between nitric oxide and concentrated nitric acid with a single stage separation factor = 1.055, for 10 M.l-1 nitric acid, at 25 deg. C, provides the bases for 15 N separation process that is most widely used at the present time, i.e. the method of Spindel and Taylor. In order to know what happens in 15N separation at higher pressure, when the isotopic transport is improved, a stainless steel laboratory experimental plant with a 1000 mm long and 18 mm i.d. column, packed with triangular wire springs of 1.8 x 1.8 x 0.2 mm, was utilised. At 1.5 atm (absolute) and 2.36 ml.cm-2.min-1 flow rate, HETP was 7% smaller than at atmospheric pressure and 1.5 times smaller flow rate. The operation of 15 N separation plant at 1.8 atm (absolute), instead atmospheric pressure, will permit doubling

  11. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

    Carolina H. Pohl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  12. Formation of Nanoporous Tin Oxide Layers on Different Substrates during Anodic Oxidation in Oxalic Acid Electrolyte

    Leszek Zaraska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous tin oxide layers were obtained on various Sn substrates including high- and low-purity foils and wire by one-step anodic oxidation carried out in a 0.3 M oxalic acid electrolyte at various anodizing potentials. In general, amorphous oxide layers with the atomic ratio of Sn : O (1 : 1 were grown during anodization, and a typical structure of the as-obtained film consists of the “outer” layer with less regular, interconnetted pores and the “inner” layer with much more uniform and regular channels formed as a result of vigorous gas evolution. It was found that the use of electrochemical cell with the sample placed horizontally on the metallic support and stabilized by the Teflon cover, instead of the typical two-electrode system with vertically arranged electrodes, can affect the morphology of as-obtained layers and allows fabrication of nanoporous oxides even at anodizing potentials up to 11 V. An average pore diameter in the “outer” oxide layer increases with increasing anodizing potential, and no significant effect of substrate purity on the structure of anodic film was proved, except better uniformity of the oxides grown on high-purity Sn. A strong linear relationship between the average steady-state current density and anodizing potential was also observed.

  13. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe3) and oxygen (O2) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H2 within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO2. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–Oads and Pt–(OH)ads) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed

  14. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Hsieh, Chien-Te, E-mail: cthsieh@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe{sub 3}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H{sub 2} within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO{sub 2}. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O{sub ads} and Pt–(OH){sub ads}) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed.

  15. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation : activity, localization and function of some enzymes involved

    A. van Tol (Arie)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractFatty acid oxidation is an important pathway for energy production in mammals and birds. In animal tissues the enzymes of fatty acid oxidation are located in the mitochondrion. Recent reports suggest that this is not the case in Castor bean endosperm. In this tissue the enzymes of B-oxid

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF NIOBIUM ON THE ACIDITY AND STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-ALUMINA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM OXIDES

    Sathler M.N.B.; Eon J.G.

    1998-01-01

    Gamma-alumina-supported niobium oxide was used as a support for vanadium oxides. The influence of the addition of niobium oxide was studied by looking for changes in the structure and acid-base character of superficial species. Vanadium oxide was deposited using the continuous adsorption method; niobium oxide was impregnated using the incipient wetness method. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. Catalytic tests were performed using propane oxidation reacti...

  17. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N-bromobenzenesulphonamide in acid medium: A mechanistic approach

    Puttaswamy; Nirmala Vaz

    2001-08-01

    Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids (glutamic acid (Glu) and aspartic acid (Asp)) by sodium N-bromobenzenesulphonamide (bromamine-B or BAB) has been carried out in aqueous HClO4 medium at 30°C. The rate shows firstorder dependence each on [BAB]o and [amino acid]o and inverse first-order on [H+]. At [H+] > 0 60 mol dm-3, the rate levelled off indicating zero-order dependence on [H+] and, under these conditions, the rate has fractional order dependence on [amino acid]. Succinic and malonic acids have been identified as the products. Variation of ionic strength and addition of the reaction product benzenesulphonamide or halide ions had no significant effect on the reaction rate. There is positive effect of dielectric constant of the solvent. Proton inventory studies in H2O-D2O mixtures showed the involvement of a single exchangeable proton of the OH- ion in the transition state. Kinetic investigations have revealed that the order of reactivity is Asp > Glu. The rate laws proposed and derived in agreement with experimental results are discussed.

  18. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of Np(V) by nitric acid catalyzed par nitrous acid

    The oxidation reaction kinetics of Np(V) to Np(VI) by nitric acid catalyzed by nitrous acid was studied. In a first part, a detailed bibliographical survey was made of the oxidation-reduction reactions of U, Np, Pu, Am with nitrous and nitric acids (51 references). It is shown that only when both the organic and aqueous phases are mixed up, the extraction of a reaction product (NpVI) induces an equilibrium displacement. TBP was used as solvent. It is shown that the extraction of nitrous acid from the solvent enables the nitrous acid concentration to be kept constant and in the same order of magnitude than that of Np. This enables to show that Np(V) and nitrous acid have no simple orders. The temperature and nitric acid concentration dependence was studied. It is shown that tetravalent nitrogen must play a major part in the Np(V) oxidation

  19. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines. PMID:25263417

  20. Oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines by aqueous hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for the oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines to the corresponding pyridines is achieved by using hydrogen peroxide as green oxidant and acetic acid as catalyst in aqueous solution.

  1. All-trans retinoic acid increases oxidative metabolism in mature adipocytes

    Mercader, Josep; Madsen, Lise; Felipe, Francisco;

    2007-01-01

    increased expression of proteins favoring fat oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha, uncoupling protein 2, fasting-induced adipose factor, enzymes of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation). These changes paralleled inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein and were...

  2. Mechanisms of oxide dissolution by acid chelating agents

    In this paper, the different possible rate controlling processes in the dissolution of metallic oxides are examined. In particular, the following situations are assessed: mass-transfer control; coupling of mass-transfer and reactions at the interface; interface equilibration with the solution; various interface disruption and reconstruction phenomena. For each of the above mentioned cases, the influence of variables such as reagent concentration, temperature, pH, fluid hydrodynamics and general and specific catalysts is discussed. Depending upon the particular situation it is found that a more rational basis for the development of reagent is given by these considerations. The influence of chelating agents on both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the process is discussed, and the results of experimental studies in batch on magnetite and various ferrites are presented and discussed. For this purpose, several reagents were studied, including some very effective ones like thioglycolic acid, and others commonly used in actual decontamination, like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and oxalic acid. The relation to other (reductive) chemical decontamination procedures is discussed. The relevance of these studies to decontamination of metallic surfaces is discussed

  3. Electrocatalysis by nanoparticles: Oxidation of formic acid at manganese oxide nanorods-modified Pt planar and nanohole-arrays

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electro-oxidation of formic acid (an essential reaction in direct formic acid fuel cells is a challenging process because of the deactivation of anodes by the adsorption of the poisoning intermediate carbon monoxide (CO. Pt electrodes in two geometries (planar and nanohole-array were modified by the electrodeposition of manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx. The modified Pt electrodes were then tested for their electrocatalytic activity through the electro-oxidation of formic acid in a solution of pH 3.45. Two oxidation peaks (Ipd and Ipind were observed at 0.2 and 0.55 V, respectively; these were assigned to the direct and indirect oxidative pathways. A significant enhancement of the direct oxidation of formic acid to CO2 was observed at the modified electrodes, while the formation of the poisoning intermediate CO was suppressed. Ipd increases with surface coverage (θ of nano-MnOx with a concurrent depression of Ipind. An increase in the ratio Ipd/ν1/2 with decreasing potential scan rate (ν indicates that the oxidation process proceeds via a catalytic mechanism. The modification of Pt anodes with manganese oxide nanorods results in a significant improvement of the electrocatalytic activity along with a higher tolerance to CO. Thus nano-MnOx plays a crucial role as a catalytic mediator which facilitates the charge transfer during the direct oxidation of formic acid to CO2.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by benzyltrimethylammonium dichloroiodate

    Poonam Gupta; Seema Kothari

    2001-04-01

    The oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by benzyltrimethylammonium dichloroiodate (BTMACI), in the presence of zinc chloride, leads to the formation of carbon dioxide. The reaction is first order with respect to BTMACI, zinc chloride and organic acid. Oxidation of deuteriated formic acid indicates the presence of a kinetic isotope effect. Addition of benzyltrimethylammonium chloride enhances the rate. It is proposed that the reactive oxidizing species is [(PhCH2Me3N)+ (IZn2Cl6)−]. Suitablemechanisms have been proposed.

  5. Phytoagents for Cancer Management: Regulation of Nucleic Acid Oxidation, ROS, and Related Mechanisms

    Wai-Leng Lee; Jing-Ying Huang; Lie-Fen Shyur

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized nucleic acids causes genomic instability leading to senescence, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Phytoagents are known to reduce the risk of cancer development; whether such effects are through regulating the extent of nucleic acid oxidation remains unclear. Here, we outlined the role of reactive oxygen species in nucleic acid oxidation as a driving force in cancer progression. The consequential relationship between genome instability and cancer progression highlights th...

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF NIOBIUM ON THE ACIDITY AND STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-ALUMINA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM OXIDES

    Sathler M.N.B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-alumina-supported niobium oxide was used as a support for vanadium oxides. The influence of the addition of niobium oxide was studied by looking for changes in the structure and acid-base character of superficial species. Vanadium oxide was deposited using the continuous adsorption method; niobium oxide was impregnated using the incipient wetness method. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. Catalytic tests were performed using propane oxidation reaction at 400oC. For coverage below the monolayer, both vanadium and niobium oxides were observed in slightly condensed superficial species. The presence of vanadium oxide on the support was found to increase the Lewis acidity and create some Bronsted acidity. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for propene were associated with vanadium oxides. The presence of niobium did not contribute to the modification of the chemical properties of superficial vanadium but did decrease the adsorption of vanadium on the alumina.

  7. Fatty Acid Incubation of Myotubues from Humans with Type 2 Diabetes Leads to Enhanced Release of Beta Oxidation Products Due to Impaired Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Wensaas, Andreas J; Rustan, Arild C; Just, Marlene;

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Increased availability of fatty acids is important for accumulation of intracellular lipids and development of insulin resistance in human myotubes. It is unknown whether different types of fatty acids like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) influence these...... processes. Research Design and Methods: We examined fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and gene expression in cultured human skeletal muscle cells from control and T2D individuals after four days preincubation with EPA or TTA. Results: T2D myotubes exhibited reduced formation of CO(2) from palmitic acid (PA......), whereas release of beta-oxidation products was unchanged at baseline, but significantly increased with respect to control myotubes after preincubation with TTA and EPA. Preincubation with TTA enhanced both complete (CO(2)) and beta-oxidation of PA, whereas EPA increased only beta-oxidation significantly...

  8. Preferential oxidation of linolenic acid compared to linoleic acid in the liver of catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis and Clarias batrachus)

    The fate of [1(-14C] linoleic acid and [1(14C] linolenic acid in the liver slices and also in the liver tissues of live carnivorous catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis and Clarias batrachus, was studied. Incorporation of the fatty acids into different lipid classes in the live fish differed greatly from the tissue slices, indicating certain physiological control operative in vivo. The extent of desaturation and chain elongation of linoleic and linolenic acids into long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids was low. Linolenic acid was oxidized (thus labeling the saturated fatty acid with liberated 14C-acetyl-CoA) in preference to linoleic acid, and this oxidation also seemed to be under physiological control since both of the fatty acids were poorly oxidized in the tissue slices and in the killed fish. These fish can therefore recognize the difference in the acyl chain structures of linoleate and linolenate. The higher oxidation of linolenic acid and poor capacity for its conversion to longer chain, highly unsaturated derivatives indicates a higher demand for the dietary supply of these essential fatty acids in these two species

  9. [The influence of panthotenic acid mitochondrial oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation in liver of rats with alimentary obesity].

    Naruta, E E; Egorov, A I; Omel'ianchik, C N; Buko, V U

    2004-01-01

    Alimentary obesity induced by the long-term feeding of rats by high-fat diet results the reducing of rate and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in liver mitochondria when NAD-dependent substrates are used. The treatment of the obese rats with panthotenic acid derivatives (phosphopantotenate, panthetin, panthenol) enhanced oxidative phosphorylation of pyruvate and fatty acid carnitine esters. Among investigated compounds panthenol activated respiratory control and phosphorylation rate more effectively. Moreover, panthenol, but not phosphopanthotenate nor panthetine, increased the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 that confirms the preferable usage of fatty acids for mitochondrial oxidation under the influence of this compound. PMID:15460980

  10. Catalytic oxidation of N-methyldiphenylamine-4-sulfonic acid in weakly acid solutions: a study by radiospectroscopic methods

    The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of N-methyldiphenylamine-4-sulfonic acid (MDPASA) in weakly acid (10-3 M H2SO4) solutions is studied by EPR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. It is shown that the oxidation of the reagent with potassium periodate in the presence of ruthenium(4) proceeds through the radical mechanism that includes alternate steps of the oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. The suggested mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of MDPASA gave theoretical grounds to the conditions for the determination of ruthenium by kinetic methods that were selected previously in the basis of experimental data

  11. Oxidation states of molybdenum in oxide films formed in sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate the oxidation states of molybdenum in thin films formed potentiostatically, over a range of potentials, in either 1 mol dm−3 H2SO4 or 10 mol dm−3 NaOH at 20 °C. Mo 3d spectra suggested that MoO2 and Mo(OH)2 were the main components of the films, with smaller amounts of MoO3 and possibly Mo2O5. O 1s spectra indicated the presence of oxygen as oxide and hydroxide species and as bound water. Ion beam analysis revealed the formation of thin films at all potentials, with significant losses of oxidized molybdenum to the electrolyte. - Highlights: ► Oxides are formed on molybdenum in sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide solutions. ► Molybdenum IV and VI are identified by XPS, with MoO2 species dominating. ► Thicknesses of films are determined by ion beam analysis for a range of potentials. ► Films form at low efficiency due to loss of molybdenum species to electrolyte.

  12. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  13. Investigation of the oxidation of hydrochloric acid in scrubbing solutions containing hydrogen peroxide

    Oxidation and absorption of nitrogen oxides by a solution containing sulphuric, nitric acids and hydrogen peroxide have been investigated. The oxidation of nitric oxide is dependent among others on hydrogen peroxide concentration total acidity and temperature. The absorption of N O2 by the scrubbing solution (H2 S O4,H N O3 and H2 O2) in all cases studied is not less than 98%. The oxidation of chloride into chlorine gas increases as the concentration of each of hydrochloric acid, nitric oxide and nitric acid increases. On the other hand as the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increases the amount of chlorine gas decreases. The results show that the oxidation of chloride into chlorine gas is mainly due to nitrogen dioxide. 7 fig., 2 tab

  14. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    Plutonium (IV) is only marginally soluble in alkaline solution. Precipitation of plutonium using sodium or potassium hydroxide to neutralize acidic solutions produces a gelatinous solid that is difficult to filter and an endpoint that is difficult to control. If the pH of the solution is too high, additional species precipitate producing an increased volume of solids separated. The use of magnesium oxide as a reagent has advantages. It is added as a solid (volume of liquid waste produced is minimized), the pH is self-limiting (pH does not exceed about 8.5), and the solids precipitated are more granular (larger particle size) than those produced using KOH or NaOH. Following precipitation, the raffinate is expected to meet criteria for disposal to tank farms. The solid will be heated in a furnace to dry it and convert any hydroxide salts to the oxide form. The material will be cooled in a desiccator. The material is expected to meet vault storage criteria

  15. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  16. Extraction of rare earths and hydrochloric acid by trialkylphosphine oxide

    Extraction of rare earth chlorides and hydrochloric acid by trialkylphosphine oxide with different radicals (POR) (RR'2PO-POR, where RR'=alkyl of a normal structure, containing 7 to 9 carbon atoms, R=isoamyl) has been studied. Distribution of lanthanum-, neodymium-, lutetium- and yttrium chlorides during extraction with 1.28 mol/l POR solution in white spirit is investigated in the salt concentration range in the equilibrium aqueous phase from 0 to 2.8 mol/l. Lanthanide distribution coefficients increase with an increase in the order number of elements, with the separation coefficients of two extreme members of the series (Lu and La) for chlorides and nitrates constituting 100 and 80, respectively microquantities of Ln against the background of macroquantities of La is 2.6 mol/l. According to the results of measurements of viscosity, electric conductivity and water content in the extracts a conclusion is made on the state of salt in the organic phase. In the systems POR-LnCl3-HCl-H2O the hydrochloric acid extraction increases with an increase in the rare earth chloride concentration and order number of the element

  17. Bifunctional Nb/Ti-MCM-41 catalyst in oxidative acidic reaction of cyclohexene to diol

    Bifunctional oxidative and acidic catalyst was prepared by incorporating titanium ion (Ti4+) and niobic acid in meso porous molecular sieves MCM-41 structure. The catalyst is active both in oxidation, and acid-catalyzed reaction of olefin to diol. Nb/ Ti-MCM-41 catalyst was prepared by first synthesizing Ti-MCM-41 by hydrothermal method, followed by subsequent impregnation of niobic acid (Nb) into Ti-MCM-41 at various % wt Nb loading. The framework structure of Ti-MCM-41 collapsed after incorporation of Nb but the tetrahedral form of Ti4+ still maintained with octahedral Nb species. Both Bronsted and Lewis acid sites are present in all Nb/ Ti-MCM-41 samples. The formation of cyclohexanediol in the epoxidation of cyclohexene proved the bifunctional oxidative and acidic catalyst through the formation of cyclohexane oxide. The yield increased with the increase amount of the Bronsted acid sites provided by niobium species. (author)

  18. Oxidation of carcinogenic polycylic hydrocarbons in the oleic acid under the effect of ionizing radiation

    The destruction of cancerogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons in oleic acid as a function of its oxidation degree was studied. Ionizing radiation was used as a factor initiating autooxidation. The effect of antioxidants on the cancerogens destruction was investigated. A correlation between the cancerogen destruction value and the oxidation rate of oleic acid was obtained. A mechanism of antioxidants action was discussed

  19. Study of Oxidation of Glutathione Treated with Hypochlorous Acid by Capillary Electrophoresis

    2001-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for the separation and quantification of reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and glutathione sulphonic acid (GSO3H). Baseline separation was obtained within five minutes. The effects of reaction time and molar ratio of hypochlorous acid (HOCI) to GSH on the oxidation of GSH were investigated.

  20. The Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation with Trifluoroacetic Acid and Household Sodium Percarbonate

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Clemons, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    A method for carrying out the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of cyclopentanone to [delta]-valerolactone in a large-section introductory organic chemistry laboratory course is reported. The oxidizing agent is trifluoroperoxyacetic acid generated in situ from trifluoroacetic acid and household sodium percarbonate such as OxiClean, Oxi Magic, or…

  1. Screening of anti-oxidative effects in Camellia sinensis L. leaves treated with boric acid

    İsmailoğlu, Işıl; COŞKUN, Zeynep Mine; Ersöz, Melike; Murat Ali TURAN

    2014-01-01

    Camellia sinensis L. (tea) is one of the most widely consumed drink in the World. The anti-oxidant role of boric acid has been reported. The present study was aimed to evaluate the alteration of anti-oxidative effects of C. sinensis L. leaves extract treated with boric acid.

  2. Enhancing the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes by acid treatment, air oxidization and heat treatment

    Chensha Li; Baoyou Zhang; Xingjuan Chen; Xiaoqing Hu; Ji Liang

    2005-01-01

    Three approaches of treating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including acid treatment, air oxidization and heat treatment at high temperature were studied to enhance the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes. High temperature heat-treatment elevates the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes. Acid treatment removes parts of amorphous carbonaceous matter through its oxidization effect.Air oxidization disperses carbon nanotubes and amorphous carbonaceous matter. The treatment of combining acid treatment with heat-treatment further elevates the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes comparing with acid treatment or heat-treatment. The combination of the three treatments creates the thorough effects of enhancing the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Interference by morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and related buffers in phenolic oxidation by peroxidase

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the 4-morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer being used. In the presence of MES, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H2O2, was uti...

  4. Enzymology of the branched-chain amino acid oxidation disorders: the valine pathway

    Wanders, Ronald J.A.; Duran, Marinus; Loupatty, Ference J.

    2010-01-01

    Valine is one of the three branched-chain amino acids which undergoes oxidation within mitochondria. In this paper, we describe the current state of knowledge with respect to the enzymology of the valine oxidation pathway and the different disorders affecting oxidation.

  5. Formation and dissolution behaviour of niobium oxide in phosphoric acid solutions

    The effect of phosphoric acid concentration and temperature on the formation and dissolution process of niobium oxide was investigated using capacitance, potential and galvanostatic measurements. The formation rate of the niobium oxide increases with increasing phosphoric acid concentration and decreases with increasing temperature. The dissolution rate of the niobium oxide is accelerated by increasing phosphoric acid concentration and temperature. The activation energy was calculated for both the formation and dissolution process and found to be 8.93 and 16.65 kJ/mol respectively. The effect of formation voltage on the dissolution process of niobium oxide was also investigated. The oxide film formed at high-formation voltage has a more defective character than that formed at lower voltage. This enhances the dissolution process of the oxide. The effect of current density on the formation rate and the thickness during the oxide film growth was measured. (orig.)

  6. Folic acid supplementation reduces oxidative stress and hepatic toxicity in rats treated chronically with ethanol

    Lee, Soo-Jung; Kang, Myung-Hee; Min, Hyesun

    2011-01-01

    Folate deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia are found in most patients with alcoholic liver disease. Oxidative stress is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to homocysteine (Hcy)-induced tissue injury. However it has not been examined whether exogenous administration of folic acid attenuates oxidative stress and hepatic toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo effect of folic acid supplementation on oxidative stress and hepatic toxicity induced by chronic et...

  7. Metabolic induction of experimental ulcerative colitis by inhibition of fatty acid oxidation.

    Roediger, W E; Nance, S.

    1986-01-01

    There is some evidence that failure of fatty acid or beta-oxidation in the epithelium of the colonic mucosa is associated with the development of ulcerative colitis. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of fatty acid oxidation in the colonic mucosa of the rat reproduces the histological, clinical and biochemical lesions of acute ulcerative colitis of man. A specific inhibitor of beta-oxidation, sodium 2-bromo-octanoate, was instilled rectally for 5 days or exposed to isolated colonic epit...

  8. Bile acids increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration and nitric oxide production in vascular endothelial cells

    Nakajima, Toshiaki; Okuda, Yukichi; Chisaki, Keigo; Shin, Wee-Soo; Iwasawa, Kuniaki; Morita, Toshihiro; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Seizi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Toyo-Oka, Teruhiko; Nagai, Ryozo; Omata, Masao

    2000-01-01

    The effects of bile acids on intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i and nitric oxide production were investigated in vascular endothelial cells.Whole-cell patch clamp techniques and fluorescence measurements of [Ca2+]i were applied in vascular endothelial cells obtained from human umbilical and calf aortic endothelial cells. Nitric oxide released was determined by measuring the concentration of NO2−.Deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and the taurine conjugates increased [Ca2+]i concent...

  9. Elevated oxidative stress and sensorimotor deficits but normal cognition in mice that cannot synthesize ascorbic acid

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Yu, S Sarah; Van Den Bossche, Kristen L; Li, Liying; May, James M.; McDonald, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the cognitive deterioration associated with normal aging as well as neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's diseases. We investigated the effect of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) on oxidative stress, cognition and motor abilities in mice null for gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo). Gulo−/− mice are unable to synthesize ascorbic acid and depend on dietary ascorbic acid for survival. Gulo−/− mice were given supplements that provided them either ...

  10. Hydrogen oxidation on gold electrode in perchloric acid solution

    Sustersic, M.G.; Almeida, N.V.; Von Mengershausen, A.E. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 25 de Mayo N 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this research is to study the interface gold/perchloric acid solution in presence of hydrogen. The reactive is generated by H{sup +} ion reduction and by saturating the electrolyte with the gaseous H{sub 2}. No evidence of H{sub 2} dissociative adsorption is found. In special conditions, a strongly adsorbed layer is formed from the atoms diffusing from inside of the metal. The mass transport occurs in three ways: the diffusion of H atoms inwards, the diffusion of H atoms back to the surface and the dissolved H{sub 2} diffusion from the bulk electrolyte to the surface. When dissolved H{sub 2} reacts, the reaction is kinetically controlled when the H{sub 2} partial pressure is high, and it is diffusionally controlled when the reactive partial pressure is low. Above 0.7 V, (measured vs. RHE), the (100) plane surface reconstruction lifts, and the rate determining step is the H diffusion towards inside of the metal, and the current suddenly falls. The Hydrogen redox reaction on gold shows reversibility with respect to the potential when the reactives are the H diffusing outwards of the metal and the H{sup +} ion present in the electrolyte. However, the absolute current values of oxidation and reduction are different because the reactive sources are different. (author)

  11. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Levulinic Acid by Silver(I/Persulfate

    Yan Gong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative decarboxylation of levulinic acid (LA by silver(I/persulfate [Ag(I/S2O82−] has been investigated in this paper. The effects of buffer solution, initial pH value, time and temperature and dosages of Ag(I/S2O82− on the decarboxylation of LA were examined in batch experiments and a reaction scheme was proposed on basis of the reaction process. The experimental results showed that a solution of NaOH-KH2PO4 was comparatively suitable for the LA decarboxylation reaction by silver(I/persulfate. Under optimum conditions (temperature 160 °C, pH 5.0, and time 0.5 h, the rate of LA conversion in NaOH-KH2PO4 solutions with an initial concentration of 0.01 mol LA reached 70.2%, 2-butanone (methyl ethyl ketone was the single product in the gas phase and the resulted molar yield reached 44.2%.

  12. A novel system combining biocatalytic dephosphorylation of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid.

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Homma, Toshimasa; Kondo, Mizuki; Shimomura, Masato

    2011-03-15

    An enzyme electrode was prepared with acid phosphatase (ACP) for development of a new electric power generation system using ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P) as a fuel. The properties of the electrode were investigated with respect to biocatalytic dephosphorylation of AA2P and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid (AA). The enzyme electrode was fabricated by immobilization of ACP through amide linkage onto a self-assembled monolayer of 3-mercaptopropionic acid on a gold electrode. AA2P was not oxidized on a bare gold electrode in the potential sweep range from -0.1 to +0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. However, the enzyme electrode gave an oxidation current in citric buffer solution of pH 5 containing 10 mM of AA2P. The oxidation current began to increase at +0.2V, and reached to 5.0 μA cm(-2) at +0.5 V. The potential +0.2 V corresponded to the onset of oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA). These results suggest that the oxidation current observed with the enzyme electrode is due to AA resulting from dephosphorylation of AA2P. The oxidation current increased with increasing concentration of AA2P and almost leveled off at around the concentration of 5mM. Thus the enzyme electrode brought about biocatalytic conversion of AA2P to AA, followed by electrochemical oxidation of the AA. The oxidation current is likely to be controlled by the biocatalytic reaction. PMID:21247749

  13. Generation of organic acids and monosaccharides by hydrolytic and oxidative transformation of food processing residues.

    Fischer, Klaus; Bipp, Hans-Peter

    2005-05-01

    Carbohydrate-rich biomass residues, i.e. sugar beet molasses, whey powder, wine yeast, potato peel sludge, spent hops, malt dust and apple marc, were tested as starting materials for the generation of marketable chemicals, e.g. aliphatic acids, sugar acids and mono-/disaccharides. Residues were oxidized or hydrolyzed under acidic or alkaline conditions applying conventional laboratory digestion methods and microwave assisted techniques. Yields and compositions of the oxidation products differed according to the oxidizing agent used. Main products of oxidation by 30% HNO(3) were acetic, glucaric, oxalic and glycolic acids. Applying H(2)O(2)/CuO in alkaline solution, the organic acid yields were remarkably lower with formic, acetic and threonic acids as main products. Gluconic acid was formed instead of glucaric acid throughout. Reaction of a 10% H(2)O(2) solution with sugar beet molasses generated formic and lactic acids mainly. Na(2)S(2)O(8) solutions were very inefficient at oxidizing the residues. Glucose, arabinose and galactose were formed during acidic hydrolysis of malt dust and apple marc. The glucose content reached 0.35 g per gram of residue. Important advantages of the microwave application were lower reaction times and reduced reagent demands. PMID:15607197

  14. Overexpression of Fatty-Acid-β-Oxidation-Related Genes Extends the Lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster

    Shin-Hae Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the aging process is necessary to ensure that the healthcare needs of an aging population are met. With the trend toward increased human life expectancies, identification of candidate genes affecting the regulation of lifespan and its relationship to environmental factors is essential. Through misexpression screening of EP mutant lines, we previously isolated several genes extending lifespan when ubiquitously overexpressed, including the two genes encoding the fatty-acid-binding protein and dodecenoyl-CoA delta-isomerase involved in fatty-acid β-oxidation, which is the main energy resource pathway in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we analyzed flies overexpressing the two main components of fatty-acid β-oxidation, and found that overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes extended the Drosophila lifespan. Furthermore, we found that the ability of dietary restriction to extend lifespan was reduced by the overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes. Moreover, the overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes enhanced stress tolerance to oxidative and starvation stresses and activated the dFOXO signal, indicating translocation to the nucleus and transcriptional activation of the dFOXO target genes. Overall, the results of this study suggest that overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes extends lifespan in a dietary-restriction-related manner, and that the mechanism of this process may be related to FOXO activation.

  15. Impact of acid and oxidative modifications, single or dual, of sorghum starch on biodegradable films.

    Biduski, Bárbara; Silva, Francine Tavares da; Silva, Wyller Max da; Halal, Shanise Lisie de Mello El; Pinto, Vania Zanella; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acid and oxidation modifications on sorghum starch, as well as the effect of dual modification of starch on the physical, morphological, mechanical, and barrier properties of biodegradable films. The acid modification was performed with 3% lactic acid and the oxidation was performed with 1.5% active chlorine. For dual modification, the acid modification was performed first, followed by oxidation under the same conditions as above. Both films of the oxidized starches, single and dual, had increased stiffness, providing a higher tensile strength and lower elongation when compared to films based on native and single acid modified starches. However, the dual modification increased the water vapor permeability of the films without changing their solubility. The increase in sorghum starch concentration in the filmogenic solution increased the thickness, water vapor permeability, and elongation of the films. PMID:27507447

  16. Oxidation-Resistant Coating For Bipolar Lead/Acid Battery

    Bolstad, James J.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode side of bipolar substrate coated with nonoxidizable conductive layer. Coating prepared as water slurry of aqueous dispersion of polyethylene copolymer plus such conductive fillers as tin oxide, titanium, tantalum, or tungsten oxide. Applied easily to substrate of polyethylene carbon plastic. As slurry dries, conductive, oxidation-resistant coating forms on positive side of substrate.

  17. Oxidation and degradation of short-chain aliphatic compounds by hyperazeotropic nitric acid

    To determine the ultimate fate of organic material present in nuclear fuel reprocessing solutions and the chemical nature of the last surviving residues, organic products of the hydrolysis/nitrolysis of tributyl phosphate were subjected to further degradation with boiling 20 M HNO3 (Iodox Process) and carbon balances were run. Except for methyl nitrate, nitrate esters were oxidized in refluxing 20 M HNO3, primarily to a mixture of carbon dioxide and the corresponding and shorter chain aliphatic acids. Typically, 40% or more of the carbon from the nitrate esters was converted to CO2. Except for formic acid, the straight-chain monobasic acids oxidized slowly. Compounds identified among those resulting from oxidation of butyric acid (e.g., from the oxidation of butyl nitrate) included succinic and oxalic acids, 3- and 4-hydroxy-butyric acids, nitrate esters of 3- and 4-hydroxybutyric acid, butyrolactone, and 3-nitrobutyric acid. The mechanisms for formation of these products are briefly discussed. Oxalic acid and the hydroxyaliphatic acids have some potential for complexing ceertain metallic fission products. These results show that traces of organic materials will always be present in actual fuel processing solutions unless special measures are taken to ensure their removal. This conclusion was reinforced by analysis of recycle acid from the Savannah River Plant. The possible implications to a reprocessing plant using 100% recycle are briefly discussed

  18. Dissolution of thorium/uranium mixed oxide in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution

    The dissolution process of thorium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide is studied, as a step of the head-end of the fuel reprocessing. An extensive bibliography was analysed, concerning the main aspects of the system, specially the most important process variables. Proposed mechanisms and models for the thorium oxide dissolution are presented. The laboratory tests were performed in two phases: at first, powdered thoria was used as the material to be dissolved. The objective was to know how changes in he concentrations of the dissolvent solution components HNO3, HF and Al(NO3)3 affect the dissolution rate. The tests were planned according to the fractional factorial method. Thes results showed that it is advantageous to work with powdered material, since the reaction occurs rapidly. And, if the Thorex solution (HNO3 13M, HF 0.05M and Al(NO3)3 0.10M) is a suitable dissolvent, it was verified that it is possible to reduce the concentration of either nitric or fluoridric acid, without reducing the reaction rate to an undesirable value. It was also observed significant interaction between the components of the dissolvent solution. In the second phase of the tests, (Th, 5%U)O2 sintered pellets were used. The main goals were to know the pellets dissolution behaviour and to compare the results for different pellets among themselves. It was observed that the metallurgical history of the material strongly influences its dissolution, specially the density and the microstructure. It was also studied how the (Th,U)O2 mass/Thorex solution volume ratio affects the time needed to obtain an 1 M Th/liter solution. The activation energy for the reaction was obtained. (Author)

  19. Oxidation of uranium dioxide by hydrogen peroxide in sulfuric acid medium

    The oxidation of uranium dioxide by hydrogen peroxide in sulfuric acid medium was studied. It was found that in the UO2-H2O2-Fe/sup (II,III)/-H2SO4 system, the value of the oxidation potential (OP) is determined by the amount of Fe/sup (III)/ ions formed as the result of the oxidation of ferrous oxide by hydrogen peroxide. At normal temperature, H2O2 displays its oxidizing activity with respect to uranium dioxide at OP values of 500-550 mV, and at elevated temperature (40-600C) and in the presence of iron ions, at 400-450 mV. In a wide range of pH values, hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent considerably surpasses oxidizing agents such as nitrous acid, manganese dioxide, manganates, and permanganates. The process proceeds vigorously not only with the participation of iron ions, but also in their absence

  20. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    Penghua Yin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C, persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH. The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs.

  1. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions.

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C-50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO₄(-)• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO₄(-)•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF₂-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn-1F2n-1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  2. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  3. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  4. Progress report on nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation

    The purpose of this program has been to demonstrate a nitric-phosphoric acid destruction technology which can treat a heterogeneous waste stream. This technology is being developed to convert hazardous liquid and solid organics to inorganic gases and salts while simultaneously performing a surface decontamination of the noncombustible items. Pu-238 waste is an issue because it must be shipped to WIPP. However, the presence of organics and Pu-238 waste is an issue because it must be shipped to WIPP. However, the presence of organics and Pu-238 exceeds packaging requirements because of concerns of hydrogen generation. If the TRU can be separated from the organics, the allowable heat load of a container increases a factor of 25. More importantly, since the current shipping package is limited by volume and not heat loading, destroying the organic compounds and decontaminating noncombustible can potentially create a three-order magnitude decrease in the number of shipments that must be made to WIPP. The process envisioned will be configured to handle 1 million pounds (as of 12/91) of a wide range of solid TRU-contaminated waste of which 600,000 pounds is combustible. The process will oxidize the combustibles (a mixture of 14% cellulose, 3% rubber, 64% plastics, 9% absorbed oil, 4% resins and sludges, and 6% miscellaneous organics) without requiring separation from the 400,000 pounds of noncombustibles. The system is being developed to operate below 200 C at moderate pressures (0--15 psig). This report primarily discusses results obtained over the past 3 1/2 months and their impact on the feasibility of a pilot-scale system

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids differentially modulate enzymatic anti-oxidant systems in skeletal muscle cells

    E. P. da Silva; Nachbar, R. T.; Levada-Pires, A. C.; Hirabara, S. M.; Lambertucci, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    During physical activity, increased reactive oxygen species production occurs, which can lead to cell damage and in a decline of individual’s performance and health. The use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a supplement to protect the immune system has been increasing; however, their possible benefit to the anti-oxidant system is not well described. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) can be bene...

  6. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, but not gallic acid, strongly inhibited oxidative deterioration

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Thomsen, Mikael Holm;

    2001-01-01

    attributed to its ability to chelate free metal ions and iron from egg yolk located at the oil-water interface. Gallic acid reduced the levels of both free radicals and lipid hydroperoxides but promoted slightly the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaise and influenced the profile of volatiles. Gallic......The antioxidative effects of gallic acid, EDTA, and extra emulsifier Panodan DATEM TR in mayonnaise enriched with 16% fish oil were investigated. EDTA reduced the formation of free radicals, lipid hydroperoxides, volatiles, and fishy and rancid off-flavors. The antioxidative effect of EDTA was...... acid may therefore promote the decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides to volatile oxidation products. Addition of extra emulsifier reduced the lipid hydroperoxide levels but did not influence the level of free radicals or the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaisse; however, it appeared to alter...

  7. Changes in lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability during Cantonese sausage processing.

    Qiu, Chaoying; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Zhou, Feibai; Cui, Chun

    2013-03-01

    Lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability were evaluated during Cantonese sausage processing. Free fatty acids increased with concomitant decrease of phospholipids. Total content of free fatty acids at 72 h in muscle and adipose tissue was 7.341 mg/g and 3.067 mg/g, respectively. Total amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (SFA, MUFA, and PUFA) in neutral lipid exhibited a little change during processing, while the proportion of PUFA significantly decreased in the PL fraction. The main triacylglycerols were POO+SLO+OOO, PSO (P = palmitic acid, O = oleic acid, L = linoleic acid, S = stearic acid), and a preferential hydrolysis of palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid was observed. Phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were the main components of phospholipids and PE exhibited the most significant degradation during processing. Thiobarbituric acid values (TBARS) increased while peroxide values and hexanal contents varied during processing. PMID:23273460

  8. Fatty acids and oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders

    Tonello Lucio; Cocchi Massimo; Tsaluchidu Sofia; Puri Basant K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether there is published evidence for increased oxidative stress in neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods A PubMed search was carried out using the MeSH search term 'oxidative stress' in conjunction with each of the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association in order to identify potential studies. Results There was published evidence of increased oxidative stress in the following DSM-IV-TR diagnostic categ...

  9. Synthesis of pteroylglutamic acid-3',5'-2H2 by trifluoroacetic acid catalyzed exchange with deuterium oxide

    Pteroylglutamic acid (PGA) was deuterated by trifluoroacetic acid catalyzed exchange with deuterium oxide. The product, pteroylglutamic acid-3',5'-2H2, was specifically deuterated in the aromatic protons of the p-aminobenzoyl (PABA) moiety; the protons on C7 and C9 and in the glutamic acid residue were not exchanged. Deuterium incorporation was measured by chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS). Pteroylglutamates were cleaved by a base-catalyzed, oxidative hydrolysis to PABA, which was converted to the methyl ester, N-trifluoroacetate for analysis by gas chromatography-chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Products from the exchange typically contained 1 percent 2H1 and 90 percent 2H2 species. The procedure may be used to label specifically various analogs of PGA with deuterium in the PABA portion of the molecule

  10. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by etiolated and green corn tissues

    Etiolated corn tissues oxidase indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to oxindole-3-acetic acid (OxIAA). This oxidation results in loss of auxin activity and may plant a role in regulating IAA-stimulated growth. The enzyme has been partially purified and characterized and shown to require O2, and a heat-stable lipid-soluble corn factor which can be replaced by linolenic or linoleic acids in the oxidation of IAA. Corn oil was tested as a cofactor in the IAA oxidation reaction. Corn oil stimulated enzyme activity by 30% while trilinolein was inactive. The capacity of green tissue to oxidize IAA was examined by incubating leaf sections from 2 week old light-grown corn seedlings with 14C-IAA. OxIAA and IAA were separated from other IAA metabolites on a 3 ml anion exchange column. Of the IAA taken up by the sections, 13% was oxidized to OxIAA. This is the first evidence that green tissue of corn may also regulate IAA levels by oxidizing IAA to OxIAA

  11. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids differentially modulate enzymatic anti-oxidant systems in skeletal muscle cells.

    da Silva, E P; Nachbar, R T; Levada-Pires, A C; Hirabara, S M; Lambertucci, R H

    2016-01-01

    During physical activity, increased reactive oxygen species production occurs, which can lead to cell damage and in a decline of individual's performance and health. The use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a supplement to protect the immune system has been increasing; however, their possible benefit to the anti-oxidant system is not well described. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) can be beneficial to the anti-oxidant system in cultured skeletal muscle cells. C2C12 myocytes were differentiated and treated with either eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid for 24 h. Superoxide content was quantified using the dihydroethidine oxidation method and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity, and expression was quantified. We observed that the docosahexaenoic fatty acids caused an increase in superoxide production. Eicosapentaenoic acid induced catalase activity, while docosahexaenoic acid suppressed superoxide dismutase activity. In addition, we found an increased protein expression of the total manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes when cells were treated with eicosapentaenoic acid. Taken together, these data indicate that the use of eicosapentaenoic acid may present both acute and chronic benefits; however, the treatment with DHA may not be beneficial to muscle cells. PMID:26386577

  13. A novel application of horseradish peroxidase: Oxidation of alcohol ethoxylate to alkylether carboxylic acid

    2008-01-01

    A novel application of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the oxidation of alcohol ethoxylate to alkylether carboxylie acid in the present of H2O2 was reported in this paper. We propose the mechanism for the catalytic oxidation reaction is that the hydrogen transfers from the substrate to the ferryl oxygen to form the a-hydroxy carbon radical intermediate. The reaction offers a new approach for further research structure and catalytic mechanism of HRP and production of alkylether carboxylic acid.

  14. Low ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in gulo−/− mice during development

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Meredith, M. Elizabeth; Dawes, Sean M.; Saskowski, Jeanette L.; May, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) depletion during pre-natal and post-natal development can lead to oxidative stress in the developing brains and other organs. Such damage may lead to irreversible effects on later brain function. We studied the relationship between AA deficiency and oxidative stress during development in gulonolactone oxidase (gulo) knockout mice that are unable to synthesize their own ascorbic acid. Heterozygous gulo(+/−) mice can synthesize AA and typically have similar tissue ...

  15. Biological implications of oxidation and unidirectional chiral inversion of D-amino acids.

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Gong, Nian; Xin, Yan-Fei; Hao, Bin; Zhou, Xiang-Jun; Pang, Catherine C Y

    2012-03-01

    Recent progress in chiral separation of D- and L-amino acids by chromatography ascertained the presence of several free Damino acids in a variety of mammals including humans. Unidirectional chiral inversion of many D-amino acid analogs such as exogenous NG-nitro-D-arginine (D-NNA), endogenous D-leucine, D-phenylanine and D-methionine have been shown to take place with inversion rates of 4-90%, probably dependent on various species D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) enzymatic activities. DAAO is known to catalyze the oxidative deamination of neutral and basic D-amino acids to their corresponding α-keto acids, hydrogen peroxide and ammonia, and is responsible for the chiral inversion. This review provides an overview of recent research in this area: 1) oxidation and chiral inversion of several D-amino acid analogs in the body; 2) the indispensable but insufficient role of DAAO particularly in the kidneys and brain for the oxidation and chiral inversion of D-amino acids analogs; and 3) unidentified transaminase(s) responsible for the second step of chiral inversion. The review also discusses the physiological significance of oxidation and chiral inversion of D-amino acids, which is still a subject of dispute. PMID:22304623

  16. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  17. Measurement of the oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    The present invention relates to processes for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid and more particularly to the oxidation-extraction steps in the DEPA-TOPO process for such recovery. A more efficient use of oxidant is obtained by monitoring the redox potential during the extraction step

  18. Oxidation of L-tyrosine by vanadium (V) in presence of sulphuric acid

    Oxidation of L-tyrosine with vanadium (V) in sulphuric acid mediumn at constant ionic strength is first order in oxidant and H+. The order in tyrosine varies from 1 to 0. A mechanism consistent with the kinetic results is proposed in which the rate determining step is the decompostition of the complex formed in the prior equilibrium. (Author)

  19. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of [1-14C]palmitic acid but not that of [1-14C]palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of [1-14C]palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of [1-14C]octanoic acid and [1-14C]butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of [14C]CO2 from [1-14C]fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids

  20. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. (Unite de Recherches de Physiolopathologie Hepatique (INSERM U-24), Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France))

    1990-11-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid but not that of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)octanoic acid and (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

  1. Oxidation-reduction reactions of simple hydroxamic acids and plutonium(IV) ions in nitric acid

    Carrott, M. J.; Fox, O. D.; LeGurun, G.; Jones, C J; Mason, C; Taylor, Robin; Andrieux, Fabrice; Boxall, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Simple hydroxamic acids such as formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids have been proposed as suitable reagents for the separation of either Pu and/or Np from U in modified or single cycle Purex based solvent extraction processes designed to meet the emerging requirements of advanced fuel cycles. The stability of these hydroxamic acids is dominated by their decomposition through acid hydrolysis. Kinetic studies of the acid hydrolysis of formo- and acetohydroxamic acids are reported in the absence a...

  2. Hydroxyapatite formation on graphene oxide modified with amino acids: arginine versus glutamic acid.

    Tavafoghi, M; Brodusch, N; Gauvin, R; Cerruti, M

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) is the main inorganic component of hard tissues, such as bone and dentine. HA nucleation involves a set of negatively charged phosphorylated proteins known as non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). These proteins attract Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions and increase the local supersaturation to a level required for HA precipitation. Polar and charged amino acids (AAs) are highly expressed in NCPs, and seem to be responsible for the mineralizing effect of NCPs; however, the individual effect of these AAs on HA mineralization is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the effect of a negatively charged (Glu) and positively charged (Arg) AA bound to carboxylated graphene oxide (CGO) on HA mineralization in simulated body fluids (SBF). Our results show that Arg induces HA precipitation faster and in larger amounts than Glu. We attribute this to the higher stability of the complexes formed between Arg and Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, and also to the fact that Arg exposes both carboxyl and amino groups on the surface. These can electrostatically attract both Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, thus increasing local supersaturation more than Glu, which exposes carboxyl groups only. PMID:26791001

  3. Biologically relevant oxidants and terminology, classification and nomenclature of oxidatively generated damage to nucleobases and 2-deoxyribose in nucleic acids

    Cadet, Jean; Loft, Steffen; Olinski, Ryszard;

    2012-01-01

    A broad scientific community is involved in investigations aimed at delineating the mechanisms of formation and cellular processing of oxidatively generated damage to nucleic acids. Perhaps as a consequence of this breadth of research expertise, there are nomenclature problems for several of the...

  4. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate

    Hiemstra, T.; Mia, S.; Duhaut, P.B.; Molleman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application

  5. Selective Oxidative Decarboxylation of Amino Acids to Produce Industrially Relevant Nitriles by Vanadium Chloroperoxidase

    But, A.; Notre, le J.E.L.; Scott, E.L.; Wever, R.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial nitriles from biomass: Vanadium-chloroperoxidase is successfully used to transform selectively glutamic acid into 3-cyanopropanoic acid, a key intermediate for the synthesis of bio-succinonitrile and bio-acrylonitrile, by using a catalytic amount of a halide salt. This clean oxidative dec

  6. Oxidative stability of structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2003-01-01

    commercial antioxidant blend Grindox 117 (propyl gallate/citric acid/ascorbyl palmitate) or gallic acid to the SL was investigated. The lipid type affected the oxidative stability: SL was less stable than SO and RL. The reduced stability was most likely caused by both the structure of the lipid and...

  7. Oxidative stability of milk drinks containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    adding potential antioxidants EDTA or gallic acid to the milk drink based on SL was investigated. The lipid type significantly affected the oxidative stability of the milk drinks: Milk drink based on SL oxidized faster than milk drink based on RL or SO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SL milk...... drink could not be ascribed was most likely influenced by the structure of the lipid and to a single factor, differences in the process applied to produce and purify the lipids. EDTA was a strong antioxidant, while gallic acid did not exert a distinct antioxidative effect in the milk drink based on SL....

  8. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26996746

  9. Ferrous iron oxidation by molecular oxygen under acidic conditions: The effect of citrate, EDTA and fulvic acid

    Jones, Adele M.; Griffin, Philippa J.; Waite, T. David

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the rates of Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were determined over the pH range 4.0-5.5 and, for all of the ligands investigated, found to be substantially faster than oxidation rates in the absence of any ligand. EDTA was found to be particularly effective in enhancing the rate of Fe(II) oxidation when sufficient EDTA was available to complex all Fe(II) present in solution, with a kinetic model of the process found to adequately describe all results obtained. When Fe(II) was only partially complexed by EDTA, reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heterogeneous Fe(II) oxidation were found to contribute significantly to the removal rate of iron from solution at different stages of oxidation. This was possible due to the rapid rate at which EDTA enhanced Fe(II) oxidation and formed ROS and Fe(III). The rapid rate of Fe(III) generation facilitated the formation of free ferric ion activities in excess of those required for ferric oxyhydroxide precipitation following Fe(III)-EDTA dissociation. In comparison, the rate of Fe(II) oxidation was slower in the presence of citrate, and therefore the concentrations of free Fe(III) able to form in the initial stages of Fe(II) oxidation were much lower than those formed in the presence of EDTA, despite the resultant Fe(III)-citrate complex being less stable than that of Fe(III)-EDTA. The slower rate of citrate enhanced oxidation also resulted in slower rates of ROS generation, and, as such, oxidation of the remaining inorganic Fe(II) species by ROS was negligible. Overall, this study demonstrates that organic ligands may substantially enhance the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Even under circumstances where the ligand is not present at sufficient concentrations to complex all of the Fe(II) in solution, ensuing oxidative processes may sustain an enhanced rate of Fe(II) oxidation relative to that of

  10. COMPLEX OXIDE CATALYSTS OF ACRYLIC ACID OBTAINING BY ALDOL CONDENSATION METHOD

    Nebesnyi, R.

    2015-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to solving the problem of diversification of the raw materials base for acrylate monomers obtaining,  first of all acrylic acid. Acrylic acid and its derivatives are bulk products of organic synthesis with a wide range of applications. The main industrial method of acrylic acid production is  propylene oxidation. But this method has instable economic indicators as propylene is petroleum origin raw material.It is possible to expand the resource base of acrylic aci...

  11. Kinetics of oxidation of ethyldigol by vanadium(V) in aqueous acidic medium

    The kinetics of oxidation of ethyldigol by vanadium(V) in aqueous acidic medium has been carried out. The reaction is first order with respect to vanadium(V) and the substrate and is acid catalysed. Hammett acidity function (H0) and Bunnett hypothesis have been applied. The formation of free radicals during the course of the reaction has been indicated. A probable reaction mechansim is proposed. (Author)

  12. Oxidized Fatty Acid Analysis by Charge Switch Derivatization, Selected Reaction Monitoring and Accurate Mass Quantification

    Liu, Xinping; Moon, Sung Ho; Mancuso, David J.; Jenkins, Christopher M.; Guan, Shaoping; Sims, Harold F.; Gross, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive, specific and robust method for the analysis of oxidized metabolites of linoleic, acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was developed using charge-switch derivatization, LC-ESI MS/MS with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and quantitation by high mass accuracy analysis of product ions thereby minimizing interferences from contaminating ions. Charge-switch derivatization of LA, AA and DHA metabolites with N-(4-aminomethylphenyl)-pyridinium resulted...

  13. Electrochemical Oxidation of Methanol and Formic Acid in Fuel Cell Processes

    Seland, Frode

    2005-01-01

    The main objectives of the thesis work were: (1), to study the oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum electrodes by employing conventional and advanced electrochemical methods, and (2), to develop membrane electrode assemblies based on polybenzimidazole membranes that can be used in fuel cells up to 200 °C.D.c. voltammetry and a.c. voltammetry studies of methanol and formic acid on polycrystalline platinum in sulphuric acid electrolyte were performed to determine the mechanism and ...

  14. Oxidation of saturated hydrocarbons with peroxyacetic acid catalyzed by vanadium complexes

    Gonzalez Cuervo, Laura; Kozlov, Yuriy N.; Süss-Fink, Georg; Shul’pin, Georgiy B.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxyacetic acid (PAA) oxidizes alkanes in acetonitrile or acetic acid at 60 °C if a soluble vanadium(V) salt, n-Bu4NVO3 (1), is used as a catalyst. Corresponding ketones, alcohols and alkyl hydroperoxides are the main products. Methane, ethane, propane, cyclohexane, and other higher alkanes were substrates in the oxidations. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a complex between (1) and PAA with equilibrium constants 3.3 and 6.8 dm3 mol−1 for acetonitrile and acetic acid as solv...

  15. Oxidation of aromatic alcohols on zeolite-encapsulated copper amino acid complexes

    Ernst, S.; Teixeira Florencio, J.M. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry, Chemical Technology

    1998-12-31

    Copper complexes of the amino acids histidine, arginine and lysine have been introduced into the supercages of zeolite Y and, for the first time, into the large intracrystalline cavities of zeolites EMT and MCM-22. The resulting host/guest compounds are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, UV/VIS-spectroscopy in the diffuse reflectance mode and by catalytic tests in the liquid-phase oxidation of aromatic alcohols (viz. benzyl alcohol, 2- and 3-methylbenzyl alcohol and 2,5-dimethylbenzyl alcohol) with tertiary-butylhydroperoxide as oxidant. It was observed that intracrystalline copper-amino acid complexes possess remarkable catalytic activity, yielding the corresponding aromatic aldehydes and acids. (orig.)

  16. Novel Approach: Tungsten Oxide Nanoparticle as a Catalyst for Malonic Acid Ester Synthesis via Ozonolysis

    Bilal A. Wasmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malonic acid ester was synthesized via the one-step ozonolysis of palm olein. Malonic acid ester was spectroscopically characterized using gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Tungsten oxide nanoparticles were used as the catalyst, which was characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. Tungsten oxide provided several advantages as a catalyst for the esterification malonic acid such as simple operation for a precise ozonation method, an excellent yield of approximately 10%, short reaction times of 2 h, and reusability due to its recyclability.

  17. Investigation of the direct and indirect electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine in nitric acid medium on platinum

    In nuclear fuel processing by the PUREX process, the purification of plutonium in nitric acid medium requires the oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV), and of hydrazinium nitrate to nitrogen. The study helped to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the oxidation of hydrazinium nitrate and the reduction of nitric acid to nitrous acid, a compound which can chemically oxidize hydrazinium nitrate and Pu(III). Electro-analytical studies on polycrystalline platinum showed that hydrazine is oxidized in two potential zones, which depend on the surface texture of the platinum anode. Electrolysis in separate compartments, carried out in medium-acid media (2 and 4 mo/l) in the potential zone where these processes take place, showed that, at 0.9 V/ECS, the hydrazine oxidation reactions involved are: a four-electron process (75 %) with nitrogen formation and a one-electron process (25 %) with formation of nitrogen and ammonium ion. By contrast, electrolysis carried out at 0.65 V/ECS (with reactivation of the electrode at - 0.2 V/ECS to remove the poison from the platinum) allowed the selective oxidation of hydrazine to nitrogen by the four-electron reaction. Nitric acid can only be reduced to nitrous acid in the absence of hydrazine. For medium-acid media (≤ 6 mol/l), this reaction takes place at potentials below - 0.2 V/ECS. However, the production rate of nitrous acid (partial order 0 with respect to nitric acid) is very low compared with the values obtained for strongly-acid media (6 to 10 mol/l) at the potential of - 0.1 V/ECS. Note that, in concentrated nitric medium, the selectivity of the reduction reaction is 47 to 85 % for nitrous acid, depending on the nitric acid concentration (6 to 10 mol/l) and the potential imposed (- 0.1 ≤ E ≤ 0.6 V/ECS). A kinetic study helped to determine the hydrazine oxidation rates as a function of the operating conditions. In all cases, the reaction rate is of partial order 0 with respect to hydrazine. These studies accordingly

  18. Oxidation of microquantities of transplutonium elements to tetravalent state in mineral acid solutions and their stability

    Kinetics of americium(3) microquantity oxidation and stability of forming americium(4), as well as possibility of curium and californium oxidation to tetravalent state in solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids depending on the concentration of mineral acid, potassium tungstophosphate and ammonium persulfate are studied by the extraction method. It is shown that curium(3) and californium(3) in solutions of 0.05-2.5 mol/l H2SO4 and HNO3 containing 10-3 mol/l potassium tungstophosphate is not practically oxidized by the mixture of silver nitrate and ammonium persulfate. Americium(3) is oxidized to the utmost to Am(4) for 2-3 min at room temperature, but stability of Am(4) depends on the concentration of sulfuric acid and potassium tungstophosphate

  19. Electro-oxidation of ascorbic acid catalyzed on cobalt hydroxide-modified glassy carbon electrode

    GHASEM KARIM-NEZHAD

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of ascorbic acid on a cobalt hydroxide modified glassy carbon (CHM–GC electrode in alkaline solution was investigated. The process of the involved oxidation and its kinetics were established using the cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry techniques, as well as by steady state polarization measurements. The results revealed that cobalt hydroxide promotes the rate of oxidation by increasing the peak current; hence ascorbic acid is oxidized at lower potentials, which is thermodynamically more favorable. The cyclic voltammograms and chronoamperometry indicate a catalytic EC mechanism is operative with the electrogeneration of Co(IV as the electrochemical process. Also, the process is diffusion-controlled and the current–time responses follow Cottrellian behavior. This result was confirmed by steady state measurements. The rate constants of the catalytic oxidation of ascorbic acid and the electron-transfer coefficient are reported.

  20. An environment-friendly preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets via amino acid

    Chemically modified graphene has been studied in many applications due to its excellent electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Among the chemically modified graphenes, reduced graphene oxide is the most important for its structure and properties, which are similar to pristine graphene. Here, we introduce an environment-friendly approach for preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets through the reduction of graphene oxide that employs L-cysteine as the reductant under mild reaction conditions. The conductivity of the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets produced in this way increases by about 106 times in comparison to that of graphene oxide. This is the first report about using amino acids as a reductant for the preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets, and this procedure offers an alternative route to large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for applications that require such material.

  1. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets doped graphene oxide for electrochemical simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    Graphical abstract: Schematic drawing of electrochemical oxidize AA, DA and UA on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite modified electrode. - Highlights: • Synthesize g-C3N4, GO and CNNS-GO composite. • CNNS-GO composite was the first time for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. • CNNS-GO/GCE displays fantastic selectivity and sensitivity for AA, DA and UA. • CNNS-GO/GCE was applied to detect real sample with satisfactory results. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets with a graphite-like structure have strong covalent bonds between carbon and nitride atoms, and nitrogen atoms in the carbon architecture can accelerate the electron transfer and enhance electrical properties effectually. The graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite was synthesized. And the electrochemical performance of the composite was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry ulteriorly. Due to the synergistic effects of layer-by-layer structures by π-π stacking or charge-transfer interactions, graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite can improved conductivity, electro-catalytic and selective oxidation performance. The proposed graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite modified electrode was employed for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid in their mixture solution, it exhibited distinguished sensitivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. Moreover, the modified electrode was applied to detect urine and dopamine injection sample, and then the samples were spiked with certain concentration of three substances with satisfactory recovery results

  2. 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase catalyzes a key 3 step oxidation to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid in Catharanthus roseus iridoid biosynthesis.

    Salim, Vonny; Wiens, Brent; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Iridoids are key intermediates required for the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), as well as quinoline alkaloids. Although most iridoid biosynthetic genes have been identified, one remaining three step oxidation required to form the carboxyl group of 7-deoxyloganetic acid has yet to be characterized. Here, it is reported that virus-induced gene silencing of 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase (7DLS, CYP76A26) in Catharanthus roseus greatly decreased levels of secologanin and the major MIAs, catharanthine and vindoline in silenced leaves. Functional expression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed its function as an authentic 7DLS that catalyzes the 3 step oxidation of iridodial-nepetalactol to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid. The identification of CYP76A26 removes a key bottleneck for expression of iridoid and related MIA pathways in various biological backgrounds. PMID:24594312

  3. Growth behavior of anodic oxide formed by aluminum anodizing in glutaric and its derivative acid electrolytes

    Nakajima, Daiki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-12-01

    The growth behavior of anodic oxide films formed via anodizing in glutaric and its derivative acid solutions was investigated based on the acid dissociation constants of electrolytes. High-purity aluminum foils were anodized in glutaric, ketoglutaric, and acetonedicarboxylic acid solutions under various electrochemical conditions. A thin barrier anodic oxide film grew uniformly on the aluminum substrate by glutaric acid anodizing, and further anodizing caused the film to breakdown due to a high electric field. In contrast, an anodic porous alumina film with a submicrometer-scale cell diameter was successfully formed by ketoglutaric acid anodizing at 293 K. However, the increase and decrease in the temperature of the ketoglutaric acid resulted in non-uniform oxide growth and localized pitting corrosion of the aluminum substrate. An anodic porous alumina film could also be fabricated by acetonedicarboxylic acid anodizing due to the relatively low dissociation constants associated with the acid. Acid dissociation constants are an important factor for the fabrication of anodic porous alumina films.

  4. Dietary ellagic acid attenuates oxidized LDL uptake and stimulates cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages.

    Park, Sin-Hye; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Sook; Han, Seon-Young; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2011-11-01

    Foam cell formation is the hallmark of early atherosclerosis. Lipid uptake by scavenger receptors (SR) in macrophages initiates chronic proinflammatory cascades linked to atherosclerosis. It has been reported that the upregulation of cholesterol efflux may be protective in the development of atherosclerosis. Ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound mostly found in berries, walnuts, and pomegranates, possesses antioxidative, growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-promoting activities in cancer cells. However, the antiatherogenic actions of ellagic acid are not well defined. The current study elucidated oxidized LDL handling of ellagic acid in J774A1 murine macrophages. Noncytotoxic ellagic acid suppressed SR-B1 induction and foam cell formation within 6 h after the stimulation of macrophages with oxidized LDL, confirmed by Oil red O staining of macrophages. Ellagic acid at ≤5 μmol/L upregulated PPARγ and ATP binding cassette transporter-1 in lipid-laden macrophages, all responsible for cholesterol efflux. In addition, 5 μmol/L ellagic acid accelerated expression and transcription of the nuclear receptor of liver X receptor-α highly implicated in the PPAR signaling. Furthermore, ellagic acid promoted cholesterol efflux in oxidized LDL-induced foam cells. These results provide new information that ellagic acid downregulated macrophage lipid uptake to block foam cell formation of macrophages and boosted cholesterol efflux in lipid-laden foam cells. Therefore, dietary and pharmacological interventions with berries rich in ellagic acid may be promising treatment strategies to interrupt the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21940512

  5. Photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol on photocatalyst prepared by acid leaching of titanium oxide/hydroxyapatite composite

    Ono, Y., E-mail: ono-y@kanagawa-iri.go.jp [Mechanical and Material Engineering Division, Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center, Ebina, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Rachi, T.; Yokouchi, M.; Kamimoto, Y. [Mechanical and Material Engineering Division, Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center, Ebina, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Nakajima, A. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Okada, K. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Photocatalyst powder was prepared by acid leaching of TiO{sub 2}/apatite composite. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated from in situ FT-IR study using ethanol. ► Apatite in the composite had positive effect for the photo-oxidation of ethanol. ► The enhanced oxidation rate was explained by the difference in deactivation rate. - Abstract: Highly active photocatalysts were synthesized by leaching of heat-treated titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})/hydroxyapatite (HAp) powder with hydrochloric acid at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 mol/l, and their photocatalytic activities were evaluated from in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) study of photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol. By changing the acid concentration, the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composite had different atomic ratios of Ca/Ti (0.0–2.8) and P/Ti (0.3–2.1). It was found that phosphate group remained on the surface of TiO{sub 2} particle even in the sample treated with concentrated acid (0.75 mol/l). These acid-treated samples showed higher rates for ethanol photo-oxidation than the commercial TiO{sub 2} powder, Degussa P25. The highest rate was obtained in the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composite treated with the dilute (0.25 mol/l) acid in spite of its low content of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. This enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to the result that the deactivation with repeated injections of ethanol gas was suppressed in the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composites compared with the TiO{sub 2} powders.

  6. Photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol on photocatalyst prepared by acid leaching of titanium oxide/hydroxyapatite composite

    Highlights: ► Photocatalyst powder was prepared by acid leaching of TiO2/apatite composite. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated from in situ FT-IR study using ethanol. ► Apatite in the composite had positive effect for the photo-oxidation of ethanol. ► The enhanced oxidation rate was explained by the difference in deactivation rate. - Abstract: Highly active photocatalysts were synthesized by leaching of heat-treated titanium dioxide (TiO2)/hydroxyapatite (HAp) powder with hydrochloric acid at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 mol/l, and their photocatalytic activities were evaluated from in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) study of photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol. By changing the acid concentration, the TiO2/HAp composite had different atomic ratios of Ca/Ti (0.0–2.8) and P/Ti (0.3–2.1). It was found that phosphate group remained on the surface of TiO2 particle even in the sample treated with concentrated acid (0.75 mol/l). These acid-treated samples showed higher rates for ethanol photo-oxidation than the commercial TiO2 powder, Degussa P25. The highest rate was obtained in the TiO2/HAp composite treated with the dilute (0.25 mol/l) acid in spite of its low content of TiO2 photocatalyst. This enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to the result that the deactivation with repeated injections of ethanol gas was suppressed in the TiO2/HAp composites compared with the TiO2 powders

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of N-chlorosaccharin oxidation of malic acid

    Sanjay Kumar Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic study of N-chlorosaccharin (NCSA oxidation of malic acid (MA in aqueous acetic acid medium in presence of perchloric acid has been investigated. The reactions exhibit first-order dependency in oxidant and HClO4 while order varies from one to zero in substrate. The reactions are acid catalyzed and retarded by the addition of saccharin, a byproduct of reaction. The rate of oxidation decreases with decrease in dielectric constant of the medium. The effect of temperature on the reaction has been investigated in the temperature range 313-333 K. The stochiometric studies revealed 1:1 mole ratio. Various thermodynamic parameters have been computed and a possible operative mechanism is proposed.

  8. Fatty Acid Oxidation and Cardiovascular Risk during Menopause: A Mitochondrial Connection?

    Paulo J. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a consequence of the normal aging process in women. This fact implies that the physiological and biochemical alterations resulting from menopause often blur with those from the aging process. It is thought that menopause in women presents a higher risk for cardiovascular disease although the precise mechanism is still under discussion. The postmenopause lipid profile is clearly altered, which can present a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Due to the role of mitochondria in fatty acid oxidation, alterations of the lipid profile in the menopausal women will also influence mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation fluxes in several organs. In this paper, we propose that alterations of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the heart, consequence from normal aging and/or from the menopausal process, result in decreased fatty acid oxidation and accumulation of fatty acid intermediates in the cardiomyocyte cytosol, resulting in lipotoxicity and increasing the cardiovascular risk in the menopausal women.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by quinolinium fluorochromate

    Madhu Khurana; Pradeep K Sharma; Kalyan K Banerji

    2000-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by quinolinium fluorochromate (QFC) have been studied in dimethylsulphoxide. The main product of oxidation is carbon dioxide. The reaction is first-order with respect to QFC. Michaelis-Menten type of kinetics were observed with respect to the reductants. The reaction is acid-catalysed and the acid dependence has the form: obs = + [H+]. The oxidation of -deuterioformic acid exhibits a substantial primary kinetic isotope effect (H/D = 6.01 at 303 K). The reaction has been studied in nineteen different organic solvents and the solvent effect has been analysed using Taft’s and Swain’s multiparametric equations. The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect indicates the presence of a symmetrical cyclic transition state in the rate-determining step. Suitable mechanisms have been proposed

  10. Critical evaluation of pressurized microwave-assisted digestion efficiency using nitric acid oxidizing systems (M7)

    Full text: The possibilities of enhancement of a medium-pressure microwave-assisted digestion system for sample preparation in trace element analysis of biological material was investigated. Based on optimal digestion conditions for oxidizing systems with nitric acid, different digestion procedures were examined to minimize residual carbon. The substitution of nitric acid and the addition of hydrogen peroxide and ozone to nitric acid was evaluated. The residual carbon content of the digestate was determined coulometrically. Addition of hydrogen peroxide during organic oxidation reactions does not lower the resolved carbon in the solution. Ozone was tested as an additional, potentially non-contaminating, digestion/oxidation system to the nitric acid used in the sample preparation method. (author)

  11. Orphan drugs in development for long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders: challenges and progress

    Sun A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Sun, J Lawrence Merritt II Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Fatty acid oxidation disorders are inborn errors of metabolism resulting in failure of ß-oxidation within or transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. The long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders are characterized by variable presentations ranging from newborn cardiomyopathy, to infantile hypoketotic hypoglycemia resulting from liver involvement, to skeletal myopathy often resulting in rhabdomyolysis in adolescents and adults. Treatments for these long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders have typically focused upon avoidance of fasting with dietary fat restriction and medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. These treatments have resulted in only a partial response with improvements in hypoglycemia, reduction in frequency of rhabdomyolysis, and improvement in cardiomyopathy with early therapy, but significant risk remains. Recent advances in therapies for long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders are reviewed in this article. These include sodium D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate, triheptanoin, gene therapy, and bezafibrates. Sodium D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate has shown clinical effect, with improvements in muscle tone, neurological abnormalities, and some cases of cardiomyopathy and leukodystrophy. Triheptanoin has been used as an alternative medium-chain triglyceride in a number of fatty acid oxidation disorders and has shown promising findings in the treatment of cardiomyopathy and hypoglycemia. However, it does not significantly reduce episodes of rhabdomyolysis. Gene therapy has been shown to improve acylcarnitine levels in very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency mouse models, with preservation of glucose levels. Bezafibrates have shown improvements in acylcarnitine concentrations in fibroblast studies, but clinical observations have not demonstrated consistent effects. Together, these treatments have shown some

  12. Ruthenium-catalyzed aerobic oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids: a green, zero-waste route to biobased nitriles.

    Claes, Laurens; Verduyckt, Jasper; Stassen, Ivo; Lagrain, Bert; De Vos, Dirk E

    2015-04-18

    Oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids into nitriles was performed using molecular oxygen as terminal oxidant and a heterogeneous ruthenium hydroxide-based catalyst. A range of amino acids was oxidized in very good yield, using water as the solvent. PMID:25773363

  13. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  14. Empirical Modeling of Iron Oxide Dissolution in Sulphuric and Hydrochloric Acid

    Hemmelmann, Jan C.; Xu, Hao; Krumm, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    A new approach is presented to an empirical modeling of chemical pickling processes, based on the activation energy of oxide dissolution in hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). The model allows us to calculate pickling times as a function of definite parameters. The main oxide layers on hot-rolled materials are magnetite (Fe3O4), hematite (Fe2O3), and wustite (FeO). On the laboratory scale, the activation energy of each oxide has been determined. FeO is a metastable oxide and has been produced based on magnetite powder in a H2/H2O atmosphere. The oxide powders used for the experimental procedure have been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction to insure the proper stoichiometry and composition. The model allows us to calculate the time of oxide dissolution based on the parameters temperature, acid concentration, and the composition of the oxide layer. Calculated values are verified by surface potential measurement on industrial oxide layers. The hot-rolled material used for verification is low carbon steel. A comparison between calculated pickling times and experimental data will be presented.

  15. Electrochemically oxidized carbon anode in direct L-ascorbic acid fuel cells

    The activity of electrochemically oxidized carbon electrode was investigated in the operation of a direct L-ascorbic acid fuel cell anode. The surface oxygen species placed on electrochemically oxidized carbon electrode were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical oxidation process of carbon electrode can facilitate the pore-filling process (i.e., wetting) of the electrolyte into the microstructure of the carbon electrode by increasing the number of more polar functional groups on the electrode surface. The electrochemically oxidized carbon electrode exhibited significantly enhanced electro-catalytic oxidation activity of L-ascorbic acid compared to an unmodified carbon electrode. Moreover, the simplified electrode structure using carbon paper without an additional powder-based precious catalyst layer is very favorable in creating percolation network and generates power density of 18 mW/cm2 at 60 deg. C

  16. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP+ accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [14C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [14C]O2 release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency

  17. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Iacobazzi, Francesco [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Bari, Piazza Giulio Cesare 11, Policlinico, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Liu, Aiping [ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Longo, Nicola, E-mail: Nicola.Longo@hsc.utah.edu [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  18. Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces

    Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

  19. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Perera Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control, alpha lipoic acid alone (100 mg/kg p.o for 21 days, haloperidol alone (2 mg/kg i.p for 21 days, and haloperidol with alpha lipoic acid groups (for 21 days. Haloperidol treatment significantly decreased levels of the brain antioxidant enzymes super oxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and concurrent treatment with alpha lipoic acid significantly reversed the oxidative effects of haloperidol. Histopathological changes revealed significant haloperidol-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, and substantia nigra. Alpha lipoic acid significantly reduced this damage and there were very little neuronal atrophy. Areas of angiogenesis were also seen in the alpha lipoic acid-treated group. In conclusion, the study proves that alpha lipoic acid treatment significantly reduces haloperidol-induced neuronal damage.

  20. Effect of thermal treatment conditions on properties of vanadium molybdenum oxide catalyst in acrolein oxidation reaction to acrylic acid

    The effect of thermal treatment conditions (temperature and gas medium) on properties of vanadium molybdenum oxide catalyst in acrolein oxidation reaction to acrylic acid is investigated. It is shown that active and selective catalysts are formed in the course of thermal decomposition of the drying product of ammonium metavanadate and paramolybdate under the conditions ensuring the vanadium ion reduction up to tetravalent state with conservation of molybdenum oxidation degree equal to 6. It is possible to realize it either by treatment of the catalyst calcinated in the air flow at 300 deg by the reaction mixture at the activation stage or by gas-reducer flow treatment at 280 deg. Thermal treatment in the reducing medium of the oxidized catalyst does not lead to complete regeneration of its properties

  1. Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of solid and liquid organic materials

    Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation has been developed specifically to address issues that face the Savannah River Site, other defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate SRS solid, Pu-contaminated job-control waste, the technology has also exhibited potential for remediating hazardous and mixed-hazardous waste forms. The process is unique to Savannah River and offers a valuable alternative to other oxidation processes that require extreme temperatures and/or elevated pressures. To address the broad categories of waste, many different organic compounds which represent a cross-section of the waste that must be treated have been successfully oxidized. Materials that have been quantitatively oxidized at atmospheric pressure below 180 degrees C include neoprene, cellulose, EDTA, tributylphosphate, and nitromethane. More stable compounds such as benzoic acid, polyethylene, oils, and resins have been completely decomposed below 200 degrees C and 10 psig. The process uses dilute nitric acid in a concentrated phosphoric acid media as the main oxidant for the organic compounds. Phosphoric acid allow nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction forms NOx vapors which can be reoxidized and recycled using air and water. The addition of 0.001M Pd(II) reduces CO generation to near 1% of the released carbon gases. The advantages of this process are that it is straightforward, uses relatively inexpensive reagents, operates at relatively low temperature and pressure, and produces final solutions which are compatible with stainless steel equipment. For organic wastes, all carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are converted to gaseous products. If interfaced with an acid recovery system which converts NOx back to nitric acid, the net oxidizer would be oxygen from air

  2. Uric acid correlates to oxidation and inflammation in opposite directions in women

    Wu, Sheng Hui; Shu, Xiao Ou; Milne, Ginger; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zhang, Xianglan; Cai, Qiuyin; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F; Chen, Honglei; Purdue, Mark; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of uric acid (UA) levels with a panel of markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Methods Plasma UA levels, along with a panel of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, were measured in 755 Chinese women. Results Plasma UA levels were inversely associated with urinary levels of the oxidative stress marker F2-isoprostanes and positively correlated to levels of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein and some proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) in blood as well as prostaglandin E2 metabolites in urine. Conclusions Plasma UA levels correlate to oxidation and inflammation biomarkers in opposite directions in women. PMID:26301880

  3. The graphene nanopowder for electro-catalytic oxidation of dopamine and uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid

    Yuan; Bu; Wenle; Dai; Nan; Li; Xinran; Zhao; Xia; Zuo

    2013-01-01

    The graphene nanopowder for electro-catalytic oxidation of dopamine and uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry,linear polarization and chronoamperometry.The graphene nanopowder modified electrode was prepared using the drop coating method,which displayed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of dopamine and uric acid compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode in phosphate buffer solution at pH=7.0.Linear responses for dopamine and uric acid were obtained in the ranges of3.3μmol/L to 249.1μmol/L and 6.7μmol/L to 386.3μmol/L with detection limits of 1.5μmol/L and 2.7μmol/L(S/N=3),respectively.The response time was less than 2 s in case of dopamine and 3 s in case of uric acid,respectively.The results demonstrated that the graphene nanopowder had potential for detecting dopamine and uric acid.

  4. Characteristics of Oxidative Storage Stability of Canola Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Stabilised with Antioxidants

    Tirto Prakoso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The storage effects on the oxidation characteristics of fatty acid methyl ester of canola oil (CME were investigated in this study. CME stabilised with two antioxidants, i.e. 2,6-di-tert-bytyl-p-cresol (BHT and 6,6-di-tert-butyl-2, 2’-methylendi-p-cresol (BPH, was stored at 20, 40 and 60°C. The oxidation stability data were measured by the Rancimat test method and it was found that both BHT and BPH addition increased the oxidation resistance of the CME. The results showed that when BPH or BHT was added at a concentration of 100 ppm, the oxidation induction period of the neat CME samples increased from 5.53 h to 6.93 h and 6.14 h, respectively. Comparing both antioxidants, BPH proved to be more effective in increasing the oxidation resistance when both antioxidants were added at the same concentration. Furthermore, the oxidation induction time decreased linearly with the storage time. It was shown that the oxidation occurred rapidly in the first 8 weeks of storage. Later, a kinetic study was undertaken and first-order kinetics were applied to explain the oxidation characteristics of the CME added with antioxidants. This kinetic study focused on exploiting the activation energy values obtained from the Arrhenius equations. Also, the oxidation effects on other quality parameters, including acid value, peroxide value, kinematic viscosity, and water content, were examined.

  5. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Jacob P. Beam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA, and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3 - 3.5; temperature = 68 - 75 °C in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4 - 40 d, and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 d, and reached steady-state levels within 14 - 30 d, corresponding to visible Fe(III-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 d, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 d and in mature Fe(III-oxide mats (1 - 2 cm thick. First-order rate constants of Fe(III-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 - 0.05 d-1, and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III-oxide mats are useful for understanding other Fe(II-oxidizing systems.

  6. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs.

    Beam, Jacob P; Bernstein, Hans C; Jay, Zackary J; Kozubal, Mark A; Jennings, Ryan deM; Tringe, Susannah G; Inskeep, William P

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3-3.5; temperature = 68-75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4-40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14-30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1-2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day(-1), and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems. PMID:26913020

  7. Peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibitors of the mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    Skorin, C; Necochea, C; Johow, V; Soto, U; Grau, A M; Bremer, J; Leighton, F

    1992-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation was studied in the presence of inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), in normal and in peroxisome-proliferated rat hepatocytes. The oxidation decreased in mitochondria, as expected, but in peroxisomes it increased. These two effects were seen, in variable proportions, with (+)-decanoylcarnitine, 2-tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA) and etomoxir. The decrease in mitochondrial oxidation (ketogenesis) affected saturated fatty acids with 12 or more carbon atoms, whereas the increase in peroxisomal oxidation (H2O2 production) affected saturated fatty acids with 8 or more carbon atoms. The peroxisomal increase was sensitive to chlorpromazine, a peroxisomal inhibitor. To study possible mechanisms, palmitoyl-, octanoyl- and acetyl-carnitine acyltransferase activities were measured, in homogenates and in subcellular fractions from control and TDGA-treated cells. The palmitoylcarnitine acyltransferase was inhibited, as expected, but the octanoyltransferase activity also decreased. The CoA derivative of TDGA was synthesized and tentatively identified as being responsible for inhibition of the octanoylcarnitine acyltransferase. These results show that inhibitors of the mitochondrial CPT I may also inhibit the peroxisomal octanoyl transferase; they also support the hypothesis that the octanoyltransferase has the capacity to control or regulate peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. PMID:1736904

  8. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins

    Hawkins, C L; Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Activated phagocytes generate the potent oxidant hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is known to react with a number of biological targets including proteins, DNA, lipids and cholesterol. Proteins are likely to be major targets for reactio...

  9. Enhanced photoluminescence in transparent thin films of polyaniline–zinc oxide nanocomposite prepared from oleic acid modified zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Sajimol Augustine, M., E-mail: sajimollazar@gmail.com [Department of Physics, St. Teresa' s College, Kochi-11, Kerala (India); Jeeju, P.P.; Varma, S.J.; Francis Xavier, P.A. [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: lakshminathcusat@gmail.com [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22, Kerala (India)

    2014-07-01

    Oleic acid capped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet chemical route. The chemical oxidative method is employed to synthesize polyaniline (PANI) and PANI/ZnO nanocomposites doped with four different dopants such as orthophosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}), hydrochloric acid (HCl), naphthalene-2-sulphonic acid and camphor sulphonic acid (CSA). The samples have been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic techniques. A comparison of the photoluminescence (PL) emission intensity of PANI and PANI/ZnO nanocomposites is attempted. The enhanced PL intensity in PANI/ZnO nanocomposites is caused by the presence of nanostructured and highly fluorescent ZnO in the composites. It has been observed that, among the composites, the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} doped PANI/ZnO nanocomposite is found to exhibit the highest PL intensity because of the higher extent of (pi) conjugation and the more orderly arrangement of the benzenoid and quinonoid units. In the present work, transparent thin films of PANI and PANI/ZnO nanocomposite for which PL intensity is found to be maximum, have been prepared after re-doping with CSA by the spin-coating technique. The XRD pattern of the PANI/ZnO film shows exceptionally good crystallanity compared to that of pure PANI, which suggests that the addition of ZnO nanocrystals helps in enhancing the crystallanity of the PANI/ZnO nanocomposite. There is a significant increase in the PL emission intensity of the PANI/ZnO nanocomposite film making it suitable for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • Oleic acid capped zinc oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method. • Polyaniline/zinc oxide nanocomposites are prepared by in-situ polymerization. • Polyaniline and polyaniline/zinc oxide thin films are deposited using spin-coating. • Enhanced photoluminescence is observed in polyaniline

  10. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. (Josai Univ., Saitama (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  11. Iron and hydroxyl radicals in lipid oxidation: Fenton reactions in lipid and nucleic acids co-oxidized with lipid

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals can initiate lipid peroxidation in liquids, but their high reactivity affords reaction paths so short that they are unlikely to reach lipids in membrane bilayers when formed exteriorly. EPR studies of Fenton-like reactions inducing oxidation in bulk lipids indicate that iron-dependent initiation of lipid oxidation in organelles and vesicles may result from hydroxyl radicals formed within the hydrophobic membrane interiors, where they would be inaccessible to typical hydrophilic radical scavengers. The cytotoxic or cytogenetic results of lipid peroxidation, especially in nuclear membranes, may include radiominetic chemical damage to adjacent DNA or nucleoprotein. Preliminary product analyses of nucleic acid basis cooxidized with lipids in vitro support this view.

  12. Protective effects of gallic acid against spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress.

    Yang, Yong Hong; Wang, Zao; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of gallic acid in oxidative stress induced during spinal cord injury (SCI). In order to measure oxidative stress, the levels of lipid peroxide, protein carbonyl, reactive oxygen species and nitrates/nitrites were determined. In addition, the antioxidant status during SCI injury and the protective role of gallic acid were investigated by determining glutathione levels as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Adenosine triphophatase (ATPase) enzyme activities were determined to evaluate the role of gallic acid in SCI-induced deregulation of the activity of enzymes involved in ion homeostasis. The levels of inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB and cycloxygenase (COX)-2 were determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with gallic acid was observed to significantly mitigate SCI-induced oxidative stress and the inflammatory response by reducing the oxidative stress, decreasing the expression of NF-κB and COX-2 as well as increasing the antioxidant status of cells. In addition, gallic acid modulated the activity of ATPase enzymes. Thus the present study indicated that gallic acid may have a role as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent against SCI. PMID:25955644

  13. Graphene Oxide Reinforced Polylactic Acid/Polyurethane Antibacterial Composites

    Xiaoli An; Haibin Ma; Bin Liu; Jizeng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposites from PLA/PU containing small concentrations of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared by simple liquid-phase mixing followed by casting. The as-prepared ternary PLA/PU/GO composite films exhibited good antibacterial activity against the gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and the gram-negative Escherichia coli, due to the excellent antibacterial property of GO sheets with high specific surface area. The addition of GO inhibited the attachment and proliferation of microbes on the fil...

  14. The kinetics of the 15N/14N isotopic exchange between nitric oxide and nitric acid

    The rate of the 15N isotopic exchange between NO-NHO3 at high nitric acid concentration (2-10M) have been measured. The experimental data were obtained by contacting nitric oxide at atmospheric pressure with nitric acid solution labelled with 15N, in a glass contactor. The measurements were carried out in a glass vessel with magnetic stirrer maintaining always the same stirring rate (17 rot.s-1). The temperature was kept constant at 25 +-0.5 deg C. The reaction vessel was connected to a vacuum line and a purified nitric oxide source. The rate of the isotopic exchange and of the nitric oxide absorption in nitric acid were determined with a gas-burette in the simple apparatus described earlier. (T.G.)

  15. All-trans retinoic acid increases oxidative metabolism in mature adipocytes

    Mercader, Josep; Madsen, Lise; Felipe, Francisco;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In rodents, retinoic acid (RA) treatment favors loss of body fat mass and the acquisition of brown fat features in white fat depots. In this work, we sought to examine to what extent these RA effects are cell autonomous or dependent on systemic factors. METHODS: Parameters of lipid...... metabolism and related gene expression were analyzed in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes after exposure to RA or vehicle. RESULTS: Treatment with RA resulted in decreased cellular triacylglycerol content and increased basal lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation rate. At the mRNA level, RA treatment led to a...... increased expression of proteins favoring fat oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha, uncoupling protein 2, fasting-induced adipose factor, enzymes of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation). These changes paralleled inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein and were...

  16. Fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I: emerging therapeutic targets in cancer.

    Qu, Q; Zeng, F; Liu, X; Wang, Q J; Deng, F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit unique metabolic adaptations that are increasingly viewed as potential targets for novel and specific cancer therapies. Among these targets, the carnitine palmitoyltransferase system is responsible for delivering the long-chain fatty acid (FA) from cytoplasm into mitochondria for oxidation, where carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). With increasing understanding of the crucial role had by fatty acid oxidation in cancer, CPTI has received renewed attention as a pivotal mediator in cancer metabolic mechanism. CPTI activates FAO and fuels cancer growth via ATP and NADPH production, constituting an essential part of cancer metabolism adaptation. Moreover, CPTI also functionally intertwines with other key pathways and factors to regulate gene expression and apoptosis of cancer cell. Here, we summarize recent findings and update the current understanding of FAO and CPTI in cancer and provide theoretical basis for this enzyme as an emerging potential molecular target in cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27195673

  17. Selective liquid phase oxidation of glycerol to glyceric acid over novel supported Pt catalysts

    Sproge Elina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several supported platinum catalysts were prepared by extractive-pyrolytic method for the selective glyceric acid production from glycerol. Al2O3, Y2O3, Lu2O3, ZrO2-Y2O3 TiO2, SG, Fe2O3, γ-AlO(OH and C were used as catalyst supports, glycerol oxidation was carried out in the alkaline solutions and oxygen was used as oxidant. The optimal catalyst preparation parameters and glycerol oxidation conditions to obtain glyceric acid were determined. The best result (selectivity to glyceric acid 57% with glycerol conversion 92% was achieved in the presence of 4.8%Pt/Al2O3 catalyst.

  18. Catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid over manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria.

    Xing, Shengtao; Lu, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lin; Ma, Zichuan; Wu, Yinsu

    2016-02-01

    Manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria was prepared and used as catalyst for catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid (SA). Characterization results indicated that the manganese oxide was mostly incorporated into the pores of ceria. The synthesized catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the mineralization of SA in aqueous solution by ozone, and more than 95% of total organic carbon was removed in 30 min under various conditions. Mechanism studies indicated that SA was mainly degraded by ozone molecules, and hydroxyl radical reaction played an important role for the degradation of its ozonation products (small molecular organic acids). The manganese oxide in the pores of CeO2 improved the adsorption of small molecular organic acids and the generation of hydroxyl radicals from ozone decomposition, resulting in high TOC removal efficiency. PMID:26344143

  19. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% α-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+α-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid

  20. Erythrocyte Sialic Acid Content during Aging in Humans: Correlation with Markers of Oxidative Stress

    Mehdi, Mohammad Murtaza; Singh, Prabhakar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are substituted neuraminic acid derivatives which are typically found at the outermost end of glycan chains on the membrane in all cell types. The role of erythrocyte membrane sialic acids during aging has been established however the relationship between sialic acid and oxidative stress is not fully understood. The present work was undertaken to analyze the relationship between erythrocyte membrane sialic acid with its plasma level, membrane and plasma lipid hydroperoxide levels and plasma total antioxidant capacity. Results show that sialic acid content decreases significantly (P < 0.001) in RBC membrane (r = −0.901) and increases in plasma (r = 0.860) as a function of age in humans. Lipid peroxidation measured in the form of hydroperoxides increases significantly (P < 0.001) in plasma (r = 0.830) and RBC membranes (r = 0.875) with age in humans. The Trolox Equivalent Total Antioxidant Capacity (TETAC) of plasma was found to be significantly decreased (P < 0.001, r = −0.844). We observe significant correlations between decrease of erythrocyte membrane sialic acid and plasma lipid hydroperoxide and TETAC. Based on the observed correlations, we hypothesize that increase in oxidative stress during aging may influence the sialic acid decomposition from membrane thereby altering the membrane configuration affecting many enzymatic and transporter activities. Considering the importance of plasma sialic acid as a diagnostic parameter, it is important to establish age-dependent reference. PMID:22377734

  1. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  2. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  4. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA...

  5. A high linoleic acid diet increases oxidative stress in vivo and affects nitric oxide metabolism in humans.

    Turpeinen, A M; Basu, S; Mutanen, M

    1998-09-01

    Evidence from in vitro studies shows that increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids leads to increased oxidative stress, which may be associated with endothelial damage. We measured the urinary levels of 8-iso-PGF2alpha and nitric oxide metabolites as well as plasma sICAM-1 levels from healthy subjects after strictly controlled diets rich in either linoleic acid (LA, C18:2 n-6) or oleic acid (OA, C18:1 n-9). Thirty-eight volunteers (20 women and 18 men, mean age 27 years) consumed a baseline diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) for 4 weeks and were then switched to either a high LA diet (11.5 en%) or a high OA diet (18.0 en%) also for 4 weeks. During the LA and OA diets, nearly all food was provided for the whole day. A control group of 13 subjects consumed their habitual diet throughout the study. Urinary excretion of 8-iso-PGF2alpha was significantly increased after the LA diet (170 vs 241 ng/mmol creatinine, P=0.04), whereas the urinary concentration of nitric oxide metabolites decreased (4.2 vs 2.6 mg/mmol creatinine, P=0.03). No significant changes were seen in the OA group. Significant differences between the LA and control group were found for both 8-oxo-PGF2alpha (P=0.03) and NO (P=0.02), whereas the OA and LA groups did not differ with respect to any parameter. Also plasma sICAM-1 remained unchanged in both groups throughout the study. In conclusion, the high-LA diet increased oxidative stress and affected endothelial function in a way which may in the long-term predispose to endothelial dysfunction. PMID:9844997

  6. Determining organic impurities in mother liquors from oxidative terephthalic acid synthesis by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    Huang, Hsi-Ya; Wei, Mercury; Lin, Yu-Ru; Lu, Pin-Hsuan

    2009-03-20

    In this study, a microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) method was developed to analyze and detect several aromatic acids (benzoic acid (BA), isophthalic acid (IPA), terephthalic acid (TPA), p-toluic acid (p-TA), 4-carboxylbenzaldehyde (4-CBA), trimesic acid (TSA), trimellitic acid (TMA), o-phthalic acid (OPA), and hemimellitic acid (HMA)), which are common organic impurities produced by liquid-phase catalytic oxidation of p-xylene to TPA. The effects of microemulsion composition, column temperature, column length and applied voltage were examined in order to optimize the aromatic acid separations. This work demonstrated that variation in the concentration of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) and oil phase (octane) had a pronounced effect on separation of the nine aromatic acids. It was also found that a decrease in column length had the greatest effect on shortening separation time and improving separation resolution for these aromatic acids when compared to that of an increase in column temperature or applied voltage. However, the nature and concentration of cosurfactants and organic modifiers were found to play only minor roles in the separation mechanism. Thus, a separation with baseline resolution was achieved within 14 min by using a microemulsion solution of pH 2.0 containing 3.7% SDS, 0.975% octane, and 5.0% cyclohexanol; and a 50-cm capillary column (effective length of 40-cm) at 26 degrees C. As a result, the developed MEEKC method successfully determined eight impurities of aromatic acids in the mother liquors produced from the oxidation synthesis of TPA. PMID:19167001

  7. Oxidation and Textural Characteristics of Butter and Ice Cream with Modified Fatty Acid Profiles

    Gonzalez, Sonia

    2001-01-01

    Milk fat composition determines specific rheological, sensory and physicochemical properties of dairy products such as texture, melting point, flavor, color, oxidation rates, and viscosity. Previous studies have shown that milkfats containing higher levels of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids have lower melting points and decreased solid fat contents which leads to softer-textured products. An increased risk of higher oxidation rates can be a disadvantage of high levels of polyunsaturate...

  8. Therapeutic inhibition of fatty acid oxidation in right ventricular hypertrophy: exploiting Randle’s cycle

    Fang, Yong-Hu; Piao, Lin; Hong, Zhigang; Toth, Peter T.; Marsboom, Glenn; Bache-Wiig, Peter; Rehman, Jalees; Archer, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure are major determinants of prognosis in pulmonary hypertension and congenital heart disease. In RVH, there is a metabolic shift from glucose oxidation (GO) to glycolysis. Directly increasing GO improves RV function, demonstrating the susceptibility of RVH to metabolic intervention. However, the effects of RVH on fatty acid oxidation (FAO), the main energy source in adult myocardium, are unknown. We hypothesized that partial inhibitors of FAO (...

  9. Nitric oxide secretion in human conjunctival fibroblasts is inhibited by alpha linolenic acid

    Erdinest, Nir; Shohat, Noam; Moallem, Eli; Yahalom, Claudia; Mechoulam, Hadas; Anteby, Irene; Ovadia, Haim; Solomon, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is known that both human conjunctival fibroblasts (HCF) and corneal epithelial (HCE) cells contribute to the inflammatory process in the ocular surface by releasing inflammatory cytokines. In addition, nitric oxide (NO) has an important role in inflammatory responses in the ocular surface. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the capacity of these cells to release nitric oxide in response to cytokines and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and show that Alpha-linoleic acid (ALA) i...

  10. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Perera Joachim; Tan Joon; Jeevathayaparan S; Chakravarthi Srikumar; Haleagrahara Nagaraja

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the ra...

  11. Influence of concentration in phosphoric acid treatment of titanium oxide and their powder properties

    Hiroaki Onoda; Aki Matsukura

    2015-01-01

    Titanium oxide that has the photocatalytic activity is used as a white pigment for cosmetics. A certain degree of sebum on the skin is decomposed by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium oxide was shaken with various concentrations of phosphoric acid to synthesize a novel white pigment for cosmetics. Their chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activity, color phase, and smoothness were studied. The obtained materials indicated XRD peaks of titanium ox...

  12. Characterization of Bronze Surface Layer Formed by Microarc Oxidation Process in 12-Tungstophosphoric Acid

    Zoran Nedić; Stevan Stojadinović; Ubavka B. Mioč

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a brief review of our recent research into novel uses for heteropoly compounds as precursors for thin films that can be used as catalysts and materials with good optical, conductive and other characteristics. In view of this, we have chosen thin film obtained with 12-tungsphosphoric acid on aluminum substrates. In all cases, a relatively new, microarc oxidation technique has been used to prepare oxide coatings on substrate surfaces. Advanced physicochemical methods, AFM and SEM-...

  13. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    Highlights: → PPARα activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. → PPARα activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. → PPARα activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. → PPARα activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPARα in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPARα using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPARα by GW7647, a potent PPARα agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPARγ, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPARα activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPARγ is activated. On the other hand, PPARα activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPARα-dependent manner. Moreover, PPARα activation increased the production of CO2 and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPARα stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPARα agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected effects of PPARα activation are very valuable for managing diabetic conditions accompanied by obesity, because PPAR

  14. Influence of fatty acid oxidation rate on glycerol release from cardiac myocytes

    Quiescent cardiac myocytes are characterized by low rates of fatty acid oxidation due to the reduced energy demand compared with beating hearts. The accumulation of intracellular fatty acid metabolites may, therefore, result in feed-back inhibition of the cardiac lipase responsible for the mobilization of triacylglycerols (lipolysis). The objective of this study was to examine if interventions that increase fatty acid oxidation rates in myocytes have an effect on lipolysis. Addition of 100 μM dinitrophenol (DNP) to calcium-tolerant rat ventricular myocytes caused an increase in the rate of 14C-oleic acid oxidation from 1.11 +/- 0.06 to 2.38 +/- 0.17 nmol 14CO2/106 cells/min (115% stimulation; mean +/- S.D., n = 3). In parallel incubations, DNP increased the rate of lipolysis from 4.4 +/- 1.7 to 13.6 +/- 3.2 nmol glycerol/106 cells/30 min (215% stimulation). The addition of 1 mM barium to a modified Ringer's incubation medium produced an increase in the contractile activity of the myocytes, and increased the rates of oleic acid oxidation from 0.62 +/- 0.16 to 0.88 +/- 0.23 nmol/106 cells/min (42% stimulation; n = 6) and lipolysis from 13.1 +/- 6.5 to 22.2 +/- 6.4 nmol/106 cells/30 min (70% stimulation). These data show that stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in myocardial myocytes is accompanied by increased lipolytic rates, the latter probably due to release of feed-back inhibition of cardiac lipases by accumulated fatty acid metabolites

  15. Influence of fatty acid oxidation rate on glycerol release from cardiac myocytes

    Larsen, T.S.; Severson, D.L.

    1986-03-05

    Quiescent cardiac myocytes are characterized by low rates of fatty acid oxidation due to the reduced energy demand compared with beating hearts. The accumulation of intracellular fatty acid metabolites may, therefore, result in feed-back inhibition of the cardiac lipase responsible for the mobilization of triacylglycerols (lipolysis). The objective of this study was to examine if interventions that increase fatty acid oxidation rates in myocytes have an effect on lipolysis. Addition of 100 ..mu..M dinitrophenol (DNP) to calcium-tolerant rat ventricular myocytes caused an increase in the rate of /sup 14/C-oleic acid oxidation from 1.11 +/- 0.06 to 2.38 +/- 0.17 nmol /sup 14/CO/sub 2//10/sup 6/ cells/min (115% stimulation; mean +/- S.D., n = 3). In parallel incubations, DNP increased the rate of lipolysis from 4.4 +/- 1.7 to 13.6 +/- 3.2 nmol glycerol/10/sup 6/ cells/30 min (215% stimulation). The addition of 1 mM barium to a modified Ringer's incubation medium produced an increase in the contractile activity of the myocytes, and increased the rates of oleic acid oxidation from 0.62 +/- 0.16 to 0.88 +/- 0.23 nmol/10/sup 6/ cells/min (42% stimulation; n = 6) and lipolysis from 13.1 +/- 6.5 to 22.2 +/- 6.4 nmol/10/sup 6/ cells/30 min (70% stimulation). These data show that stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in myocardial myocytes is accompanied by increased lipolytic rates, the latter probably due to release of feed-back inhibition of cardiac lipases by accumulated fatty acid metabolites.

  16. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO2− oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  17. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Methimazole by Chlorite in Slightly Acidic Media.

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of methimazole (1-methyl-3H-imidazole), MMI, by chlorite in mildly acidic environments were studied. It is a complex reaction that gives oligo-oscillations in chlorine dioxide concentrations in excess chlorite conditions. The stoichiometry is strictly 2:1, with the sulfur center being oxidized to sulfate and the organic moiety being hydrolyzed to several indeterminate species. In excess MMI conditions over chlorite, the sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid were observed as major intermediates. The sulfenic acid, which was observed in the electrochemical oxidation of MMI, was not observed with chlorite oxidations. Initial reduction of chlorite produced HOCl, an autocatalytic species in chlorite oxidations. HOCl rapidly reacts with chlorite to produce chlorine dioxide, which, in turn, reacts rapidly with MMI to produce more chlorite. The reaction of chlorine dioxide with MMI is competitive, in rate, with the chlorite-MMI and HOCl-ClO2(-) reactions. This explains the oligo-oscillations in ClO2 concentrations. PMID:27126471

  18. Electro-oxidation of perfluorooctanoic acid by carbon nanotube sponge anode and the mechanism.

    Xue, An; Yuan, Zi-Wen; Sun, Yan; Cao, An-Yuan; Zhao, Hua-Zhang

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging persistent organic pollutant (POPs), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exists widely in natural environment. It is of particular significance to develop efficient techniques to remove low-concentration PFOA from the contaminated waters. In this work, we adopted a new material, carbon nanotube (CNT) sponge, as electrode to enhance electro-oxidation and achieve high removal efficiency of low-concentration (100μgL(-1)) PFOA from water. CNT sponge was pretreated by mixed acids to improve the surface morphology, hydrophilicity and the content of carbonyl groups on the surface. The highest removal efficiencies for low-concentration PFOA electrolyzed by acid-treated CNT sponge anode proved higher than 90%. The electro-oxidation mechanism of PFOA on CNT sponge anode was also discussed. PFOA is adsorbed on the CNT sponge rapidly increasing the concentration of PFOA on anode surface. When the potential on the anode is adjusted to more than 3.5V, the adsorbed PFOA undergoes electrochemically oxidation and hydrolysis to produce shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids with less CF2 unit. The efficient electro-oxidation of PFOA by CNT sponge anode is due to the combined effect of adsorption and electrochemical oxidation. These findings provide an efficient method to remove actual concentration PFOA from water. PMID:26172515

  19. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-09-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, H4PVMo11O40 gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  20. The active component of vanadium-molybdenum catalysts for the oxidation of acrolein to acrylic acid

    The catalytic properties of the vanadium-molybdenum oxide system were investigated in the oxidation of acrolein to acrylic acid. The active component of the catalyst is the compound VMo3O11, the maximum amount of which is observed at a content of 7-15 mole% V2O4. The compound VMo3O11 is formed in the thermodecomposition of silicomolybdovanadium heteropoly acids or isopoly compounds, reduced with respect to vanadium, and contains V4+ and Mo6+. The optimum treatment for the formation of this compound is treatment in the reaction mixture at 400 degrees C

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of acetanilide by quinquevalent vanadium in acid medium

    The kinetics of the oxidation of acetanilide with vanadium(V) in sulphuric acid medium at constant ionic strength has been studied. The reaction is first order with oxidant. The order of reaction in acetanilide varies from one to zero. The reaction follows an acid catalyzed independent path, exhibiting square dependence in H+. A Bunnett plot indicates that the water acts as a nucleophile. The thermodynamic parameters have been computed. A probable reaction mechanism and rate law consistent with these data are given. (Author)

  2. Electrochemical oxidation of substituted benzylamines in aquo-acetic acid medium: substituent and solvent effects

    A Thirumoorthi; K P Elango

    2007-07-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of nine para- and meta-substituted benzylamines in varying mole fractions of acetic acid in water has been investigated in the presence of 0.1 M sulphuric acid as supporting electrolyte. The oxidation potentials correlate well with Hammett’s substituent constants affording negative reaction constants. The correlation of potential values with macroscopic solvent parameters is non-linear suggesting that the operation of both specific and non-specific solvent-solvent-solute interaction mechanisms. Multiple correlation analysis of the experimental data with Kamlet-Taft solvatochromic parameters is employed.

  3. Radiolytic chain oxidation of dithiothreitol in aerated acidic solutions

    In the radiolysis of dithiothreitol (DTT or HS-D-SH) in air saturated acidic and neutral solutions sulphur centered radicals are formed. In the presence of oxygen the final products are ox - DTT and H2O2 via certain complex reactions. G(ox - DTT) and G(H2O2) are dependent upon DTT and acid concentrations and dose rate. The chain is predominant only at low pH. The HO2 radical carries the chain by abstracting an H atom from DTT (k = 120 dm3mol-1s-1). The chain is continued when the DTT radicals react with oxygen to give an unstable peroxyl radical finally yielding ox - DTT and HO2. (author)

  4. Malic acid assisted precursor route to hierarchical structured nickel oxide

    Wang, Haizhen [Zhejiang California International Nanosystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Qian, Yitai [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2010-05-15

    A novel malic acid assisted precursor route to prepare NiO materials with novel hierarchical structures has been investigated in this work. The Ni-based precursors can be synthesized by a malic acid-assisted hydrothermal route, which have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). NiO materials can be prepared via the thermal treatment of the precursor in ambient atmosphere. The XRD, SEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy of the NiO materials were also examined. The effects of the reaction conditions, such as the reaction temperature, the quantity of the raw materials on the morphologies of the precursors were discussed, which indicates that it is an effective method to synthesize NiO materials with different hierarchical structures. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Potential in vitro Protective Effect of Quercetin, Catechin, Caffeic Acid and Phytic Acid against Ethanol-Induced Oxidative Stress in SK-Hep-1 Cells

    Lee, Ki-Mo; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kwak, Hahn-Shik

    2012-01-01

    Phytochemicals have been known to exhibit potent antioxidant activity. This study examined cytoprotective effects of phytochemicals including quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid, and phytic acid against oxidative damage in SK-Hep-1 cells induced by the oxidative and non-oxidative metabolism of ethanol. Exposure of the cells to excess ethanol resulted in a significant increase in cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid hydroperoxide (LPO), and antioxidant enzyme activity. E...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline nickel oxide using NaOH and oxalic acid as oxide sources

    Precursors of nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesized through a simple chemical precipitation method by changing the oxide source used for the synthesis. The synthesized precursors were subjected to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the temperature at which the precursors decompose into nickel oxide. The obtained results of TGA suggest that precursor NiO prepared using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) showed NiO formation at 600 °C, whereas, when oxalic acid was used as oxide source the formation of NiO took place at 400 °C. After calcinations of the precursors at respective temperatures, NiO nanocrystals have been harvested. The synthesized NiO powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. An FE-TEM image of NiO prepared using oxalic acid showed spherical and elliptical particles with sizes in the range of 15 nm. The Williamson–Hall (W–H) plots were drawn for the annealed products to study their lattice strain and crystallite size. The sizes of NiO nanocrystals obtained from W–H analysis are well correlated with sizes estimated using Scherrer’s formula. The relatively low saturation magnetization of NiO confirms its super paramagnetic behavior. (papers)

  7. Vanadium oxides supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors: the effect of acid base properties on the oxidation of isopropanol

    Vanadium oxide supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors was studied in the oxidation of isopropanol. Hydrotalcites with different y = Mg/Al ratios were synthesized by the method of coprecipitation nitrates of Mg and Al cations with K2CO3 as precipitant. The decomposition of these hydrotalcite precursors at 450 deg C yielded homogeneous MgyAlOx mixed oxides that contain the Al+3 cations totally incorporated into the MgO framework. The materials were characterized by chemical analysis, BET superficial area, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and the reaction of isopropanol, a probe molecule used to evaluate the acid-base properties. The results of TPR showed that the reducibility of V+5 decreased with the increase in magnesium loading in catalysts. The X-ray diffraction patterns of Al-rich hydrotalcite precursors showed the presence of crystalline phases of brucite and gibbsite. It was shown that chemical composition, texture, acid-base properties of the active sites and also Mg/Al ratio strongly affect the formation of the products in the oxidation of isopropanol. The Al-rich catalysts were much more active than the Mg-rich ones, converting isopropanol mainly to propylene. (author)

  8. Vanadium oxides supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors: the effect of acid-base properties on the oxidation of isopropanol

    D. M. Meira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium oxide supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors was studied in the oxidation of isopropanol. Hydrotalcites with different y = Mg/Al ratios were synthesized by the method of coprecipitation nitrates of Mg and Al cations with K2CO3 as precipitant. The decomposition of these hydrotalcite precursors at 450°C yielded homogeneous MgyAlOx mixed oxides that contain the Al+3 cations totally incorporated into the MgO framework. The materials were characterized by chemical analysis, BET superficial area, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR and the reaction of isopropanol, a probe molecule used to evaluate the acid-base properties. The results of TPR showed that the reducibility of V+5 decreased with the increase in magnesium loading in catalysts. The X-ray diffraction patterns of Al-rich hydrotalcite precursors showed the presence of crystalline phases of brucite and gibbsite. It was shown that chemical composition, texture, acid-base properties of the active sites and also Mg/Al ratio strongly affect the formation of the products in the oxidation of isopropanol. The Al-rich catalysts were much more active than the Mg-rich ones, converting isopropanol mainly to propylene.

  9. Formic Acid Modified Co3O4-CeO2 Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Ruishu Shang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A formic acid modified catalyst, Co3O4-CeO2, was prepared via facile urea-hydrothermal method and applied in CO oxidation. The Co3O4-CeO2-0.5 catalyst, treated by formic acid at 0.5 mol/L, performed better in CO oxidation with T50 obtained at 69.5 °C and T100 obtained at 150 °C, respectively. The characterization results indicate that after treating with formic acid, there is a more porous structure within the Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst; meanwhile, despite of the slightly decreased content of Co, there are more adsorption sites exposed by acid treatment, as suggested by CO-TPD and H2-TPD, which explains the improvement of catalytic performance.

  10. Large discharge capacity from carbon electrodes in sulfuric acid with oxidant

    Inagaki, M.; Iwashita, N.

    The discharge performance of the graphite intercalation compounds in sulfuric acid containing nitric acid (H 2SO 4-GICs) was studied by focusing on the effects of oxidant and carbon nanotexture. A large discharge capacity from H 2SO 4-GICs synthesized by using an excess amount of HNO 3, more than 150 times of the theoretical value (93 mAh/g carbon), was obtained depending on the amount of oxidant added, the discharge current, and the nanotexture of carbon electrode. The experimental results are explained in terms of competition between the de-intercalation of sulfuric acid due to galvanostatic reduction and the re-intercalation due to chemical oxidation by HN03 during discharging. However, a subsidiary reaction decreases the effective amount of HNO 3 on the discharge by a small current and also on the cycle of chemical charging and electrochemical discharging. The oxidant KMnO 4 gave only a little larger capacity for discharge than the theoretical one, because it was reduced to the manganese oxide precipitates during the oxidation of the carbon electrode.

  11. Oxidation Effect on Tribological Pproperties of Rapeseed oil and Lard Mixtures Containing Monoglycerides and Fatty Acids

    Violeta Makareviciene

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils and animal fats are increasingly popular base material to produce environmentally friendly lubricants. This is a renewable and easily biodegradable in the natural environment material. The main disadvantage of vegetable oils and animal fats as raw materials and its lubricants is pour oxidation stability. There are already a wide range of environmentally friendly lubricants in the market, while the variety of greases offer is not so high. This research aims to explore the properties of prepared compositions of lubricating greases produced from rapeseed oil and lard, modifying them with monoglycerides, stearic and oleic acids. The plastic properties (penetration and oxidation influence on tribological and corrosive properties of these compositions were studied. It was found that modifying rapeseed oil and lard with monoglycerides, oleic and stearic acids a few lubricating compositions of NLGI grades can be achieved: soft or very soft rapeseed oil based greases and medium or nearly hard consistency lard based compositions. The oxidation studies showed that it decreases the tribological properties of base and monoglycerides modified lubricants. Oxidation has greater negative impact on lard and lard based compositions. Oleic and stearic acids reduces or completely eliminates the negative influence of oxidation. Corrosion studies have shown that both fresh and oxidized lubricant compositions have no significant affect on copper strip corrosion.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.61.3.1763

  12. Oxidative degradation of salicylic acid by sprayed WO3 photocatalyst

    Highlights: • The photoactivity of sprayed WO3 thin film. • Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid. • Reaction kinetics and mineralization of pollutants by COD. - Abstract: The WO3 thin films were deposited using spray pyrolysis technique. The prepared WO3 thin films were characterized using photoelectrochemical (PEC), X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and UV–vis absorbance spectroscopy techniques. PEC measurements of WO3 films deposited at different deposition temperatures were carried out to study photoresponse. The maximum photocurrent (Iph = 261 μA/cm2) was observed for the film deposited at the 225 °C. The monoclinic crystal structure of WO3 has been confirmed from X-ray diffraction studies. AFM studies were used to calculate particle size and average roughness of the films. Optical absorbance was studied to estimate the bandgap energy of WO3 thin film which was about 2.65 eV. The photoelectrocatalytic activity of WO3 film was studied by degradation of salicylic acid with reducing concentrations as function of reaction time. The WO3 photocatalyst degraded salicylic acid to about 67.14% with significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) value

  13. The contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using diamond anodes.

    Bensalah, Nasr; Dbira, Sondos; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes was investigated in different electrolytes. A complete mineralization of cyanuric acid was obtained in NaCl; however lower degrees of mineralization of 70% and 40% were obtained in Na2SO4 and NaClO4, respectively. This can be explained by the nature of the oxidants electrogenerated in each electrolyte. It is clear that the contribution of active chlorine (Cl2, HClO, ClO(-)) electrogenerated from oxidation of chlorides on BDD is much more important in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid than the persulfate and hydroxyl radicals produced by electro-oxidation of sulfate and water on BDD anodes. This could be explained by the high affinity of active chlorine towards nitrogen compounds. No organic intermediates were detected during the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid in any the electrolytes, which can be explained by their immediate depletion by hydroxyl radicals produced on the BDD surface. Nitrates and ammonium were the final products of electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid on BDD anodes in all electrolytes. In addition, small amounts of chloramines were formed in the chloride medium. Low current density (≤10mA/cm(2)) and neutral medium (pH in the range 6-9) should be used for high efficiency electrolytic degradation and negligible formation of hazardous chlorate and perchlorate. PMID:27372125

  14. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  15. Dynamic simulations on the mitochondrial fatty acid Beta-oxidation network

    Weinberger Klaus M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria plays an important role in energy metabolism and genetic disorders of this pathway may cause metabolic diseases. Enzyme deficiencies can block the metabolism at defined reactions in the mitochondrion and lead to accumulation of specific substrates causing severe clinical manifestations. Ten of the disorders directly affecting mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have been well-defined, implicating episodic hypoketotic hypoglycemia provoked by catabolic stress, multiple organ failure, muscle weakness, or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additionally, syndromes of severe maternal illness (HELLP syndrome and AFLP have been associated with pregnancies carrying a fetus affected by fatty acid oxidation deficiencies. However, little is known about fatty acids kinetics, especially during fasting or exercise when the demand for fatty acid oxidation is increased (catabolic stress. Results A computational kinetic network of 64 reactions with 91 compounds and 301 parameters was constructed to study dynamic properties of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. Various deficiencies of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were simulated and verified with measured concentrations of indicative metabolites of screened newborns in Middle Europe and South Australia. The simulated accumulation of specific acyl-CoAs according to the investigated enzyme deficiencies are in agreement with experimental data and findings in literature. Investigation of the dynamic properties of the fatty acid β-oxidation reveals that the formation of acetyl-CoA – substrate for energy production – is highly impaired within the first hours of fasting corresponding to the rapid progress to coma within 1–2 hours. LCAD deficiency exhibits the highest accumulation of fatty acids along with marked increase of these substrates during catabolic stress and the lowest production rate of acetyl-CoA. These findings might confirm gestational loss to

  16. Reactivity of aminophosphonic acids. Oxidative dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids by aqueous halogens.

    Drabowicz, Józef; Jordan, Frank; Kudzin, Marcin H; Kudzin, Zbigniew H; Stevens, Christian V; Urbaniak, Paweł

    2016-02-01

    The reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with bromine-water, chlorine-water and iodine-water were investigated. The formation of phosphoric(v) acid, as a result of a halogen-promoted cleavage of the Cα-P bond, accompanied by nitrogen release, was observed. The dephosphonylation of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids was found to occur quantitatively. In the reactions of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids with other halogen-water reagents investigated by (31)P NMR, scission of the Cα-P bond was also observed, the reaction rates being comparable for bromine and chlorine, but much slower for iodine. PMID:26631424

  17. Riboflavin enhances photo-oxidation of amino acids under simulated clinical conditions

    In neonatal nurseries, solutions of amino acids with added vitamins may be exposed to relatively intense light from phototherapy units. Light, especially in the presence of photosensitizers such as certain vitamins, is capable of destroying amino acids. In the present study, the effect of riboflavin on amino acid concentrations in solutions exposed to light was studied. Solutions of crystalline amino acids with and without added riboflavin were infused into shielded collecting vessels for 24 hr under conditions simulating those occurring during phototherapy. Decreases in concentrations of some amino acids were observed with light exposure alone. Decreases in concentrations of methionine, proline, tryptophan, and tyrosine were significantly greater in the presence of riboflavin that in its absence. Riboflavin concentrations were also significantly reduced after light exposure. Although the losses of amino acids are probably not nutritionally significant, the photo-oxidation products are largely unknown and may be toxic

  18. Performance of Caro's acid as an oxidant at the Nabarlek Mill

    Pyrolusite (manganese dioxide) was originally chosen as the oxidant at the Nabarlek Mill in northern Australia. Subsequent laboratory and plant trial investigations showed that if Caro's acid were to replace pyrolusite, acid consumption in the leaching circuit could be reduced by 15-20% for the same uranium extraction. Lime required to neutralize the tailings/raffinate slurry could also be similarly reduced. A Caro's acid generator was commissioned at Nabarlek in April 1983. Caro's acid is manufactured at the mill site by reaction of hydrogen peroxide with concentrated sulphuric acid. This installation is the first commercial utilization of Caro's acid in uranium processing. The system has operated successfully for three months and reagent savings have resulted in a reduction in operating costs of greater than $3.t-1 ore processed. (author)

  19. Natural resistance to ascorbic acid induced oxidative stress is mainly mediated by catalase activity in human cancer cells and catalase-silencing sensitizes to oxidative stress

    Klingelhoeffer Christoph; Kämmerer Ulrike; Koospal Monika; Mühling Bettina; Schneider Manuela; Kapp Michaela; Kübler Alexander; Germer Christoph-Thomas; Otto Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Ascorbic acid demonstrates a cytotoxic effect by generating hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in oxidative cell stress. A panel of eleven human cancer cell lines, glioblastoma and carcinoma, were exposed to serial dilutions of ascorbic acid (5-100 mmol/L). The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of catalase, an important hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzyme, on the resistance of cancer cells to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative stress. ...

  20. Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents

    Patwardhan, Amol M.; Akopian, Armen N.; Ruparel, Nikita B.; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies b...

  1. Bile acid induced colonic irritation stimulates intracolonic nitric oxide release in humans.

    F. Casellas; Mourelle, M; Papo, M; Guarner, F; Antolin, M; Armengol, J R; J. R. Malagelada

    1996-01-01

    AIM--To measure the intracolonic release of nitric oxide end products (nitrates plus nitrites) and eicosanoids in response to intraluminal irritation with deoxycholic acid (DCA). PATIENTS--Seven patients with irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS--The left colon was perfused with a solution with or without 3 mM deoxycholic acid. Aspirates were assayed for eicosanoids by specific radioimmuno-assay, and for nitrates plus nitrites by the Griess reaction. To confirm that stimulated colonic mucosa can...

  2. Effect of acid oxidization of carbon nanotube electrode on the capacitances of double layer capacitors

    LI; Chensha; WANG; Dazhi; LIANG; Tongxiang; WANG; Xiaofen

    2004-01-01

    Polarizable electrode of electric double layer capacitor was made from carbon nanotubes. The effect of acid oxidation of electrode on the specific capacitance was studied. Oxidation removed the redundant carbon, expanded the pore size and introduced some kinds of functional groups on the surface of CNTs. The specific capacit ance of the electrodes with organic electrolyte was increased from 21.4 to 49.6 F/gafter being oxidized at a volume ratio of H2SO4 to HNO3 of 3:1.

  3. Highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles on chemically modified graphene with aminophenyl groups for formic acid oxidation

    Yang Su-Dong; Shen Cheng-Min; Tong Hao; He Wei; Zhang Xiao-Gang; Gao Hong-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A novel electrode material based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) with aminophenyl groups is covalently functionalized by a nucleophilic ring-opening reaction between the epoxy groups of graphene oxide and the aminophenyl groups of p-phenylenediamine.Palladium nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.2 nm are deposited on the CMG by a liquid-phase borohydride reduction.The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pd/CMG composite towards formic acid oxidation are found to be higher than those of reduced graphene oxide and commercial carbon materials such as Vulcan XC-72 supported Pd electrocatalysts.

  4. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in acid soils is supported by hydrolysis of urea

    Lu, Lu; Han, Wenyan; Zhang, Jinbo; Wu, Yucheng; Wang, Baozhan; Lin, Xiangui; Zhu, Jianguo; Cai, Zucong; Jia, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of urea as a source of ammonia has been proposed as a mechanism for the nitrification of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in acidic soil. The growth of Nitrososphaera viennensis on urea suggests that the ureolysis of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) might occur in natural environments. In this study, 15N isotope tracing indicates that ammonia oxidation occurred upon the addition of urea at a concentration similar to the in situ ammonium content of tea orchard soil (pH 3.75) and ...

  5. Direct synthesis of graphene nanosheets support Pd nanodendrites for electrocatalytic formic acid oxidation

    Yang, Su-Dong; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    We report a solvothermal method preparation of dendritic Pd nanoparticles (DPNs) and spherical Pd nanoparticles (SPNs) supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Drastically different morphologies of Pd NPs with nanodendritic structures or spherical structures were observed on graphene by controlling the reduction degree of graphene oxide (GO) under mild conditions. In addition to being a commonplace substrate, GO plays a more important role that relies on its surface groups, which serves as a shape-directing agent to direct the dendritic growth. As a result, the obtained DPNs/RGO catalyst exhibits a significantly enhanced electro-catalytic behavior for the oxidation of formic acid compared to the SPNs/RGO catalyst.

  6. Highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles on chemically modified graphene with aminophenyl groups for formic acid oxidation

    A novel electrode material based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) with aminophenyl groups is covalently functionalized by a nucleophilic ring-opening reaction between the epoxy groups of graphene oxide and the aminophenyl groups of p-phenylenediamine. Palladium nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.2 nm are deposited on the CMG by a liquid-phase borohydride reduction. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pd/CMG composite towards formic acid oxidation are found to be higher than those of reduced graphene oxide and commercial carbon materials such as Vulcan XC-72 supported Pd electrocatalysts. (atomic and molecular physics)

  7. Oxidative acid treatment and characterization of new biocarbon from sustainable Miscanthus biomass.

    Anstey, Andrew; Vivekanandhan, Singaravelu; Rodriguez-Uribe, Arturo; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar Kumar

    2016-04-15

    Oxidative acid treatments of biochar produced from Miscanthus were performed in this study using nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and a mixture of both. The structural and morphological changes of the acid-treated biochar were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, organic elemental analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Improved surface functionality of the treated biochars was observed in their respective FT-IR spectra through the presence of nitro and carboxylic acid functional groups. SEM-EDS and elemental analysis revealed a large increase in the oxygen to carbon ratio in the biochar, which was evidence of chemical oxidation from the acid treatment. Further, TGA study showed the reduced thermal stability of acid-treated biochar over 200°C due to the increased oxygen content. Acid treatments also influenced the graphitic structure of the biochar, as observed in the Raman spectra. The results suggest that biochar can be successfully functionalized for composite applications and provide a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based carbon additives. PMID:26820927

  8. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  9. Boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle as a novel tool for adsorption of sugar

    Synthesis of boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been reported. Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by simple co-precipitation from Fe2+ and Fe3+ solution. m-Aminophenyl boronic acid was attached to iron oxide particles through 3,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde through C=N bond. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction have shown the formation of inverse spinel phase magnetite of both as prepared and functionalized magnetite particles. FTIR shows attachment of boronic acid-imine onto iron oxide surface through enediol group. Transmission electron microscopy shows well dispersion of boronic acid functionalized particles of size 8 ± 2 nm. Vibration sample magnetometry shows both the particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature having saturation magnetization (Ms) 52 emu/g. In this work the affinity of these boronic acid functionalized particles towards sugar binding was studied taking dextrose sugar as a model. The influence of pH and sugar concentration has been extensively investigated. The results show that such boronic acid modified superparamagnetic particles are efficient support for sugar separation having maximum sugar loading capacity (60 μg/50 μl) at pH 8.

  10. Boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle as a novel tool for adsorption of sugar

    Mohapatra, S., E-mail: sasmita05@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela-769008 (India); Panda, N. [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela-769008 (India); Pramanik, P. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur-721302 (India)

    2009-08-31

    Synthesis of boronic acid functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been reported. Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by simple co-precipitation from Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} solution. m-Aminophenyl boronic acid was attached to iron oxide particles through 3,4-dihydroxy benzaldehyde through C=N bond. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction have shown the formation of inverse spinel phase magnetite of both as prepared and functionalized magnetite particles. FTIR shows attachment of boronic acid-imine onto iron oxide surface through enediol group. Transmission electron microscopy shows well dispersion of boronic acid functionalized particles of size 8 {+-} 2 nm. Vibration sample magnetometry shows both the particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature having saturation magnetization (Ms) 52 emu/g. In this work the affinity of these boronic acid functionalized particles towards sugar binding was studied taking dextrose sugar as a model. The influence of pH and sugar concentration has been extensively investigated. The results show that such boronic acid modified superparamagnetic particles are efficient support for sugar separation having maximum sugar loading capacity (60 {mu}g/50 {mu}l) at pH 8.

  11. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways

    Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra;

    2013-01-01

    Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses...

  12. Formation of Porous Anodic Oxide Film on Titanium in Phosphoric Acid Electrolyte

    Liu, Z.; Thompson, G. E.

    2015-01-01

    A sequential breakdown anodizing conditions on cp-Ti in phosphoric acid has been investigated in the present study. Anodic oxide films were formed at 100, 150, and 200 V, examined by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A porous oxide texture was formed at each voltage. The thickness of anodic porous oxide increased with the increase of anodic voltage. Nano-particulates were formed around and within the pores, and the size of pores increased with increased voltage due to the expansion of particulates. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was initiated during the film growth. The degree of crystallinity in the anodic oxide film fabricated at 200 V is more abundant than 150 and 100 V. Increased content of the phosphorus species was incorporated into the porous film with the increase of anodic voltage, stabilizing for the nanocrystals developed within the oxide.

  13. Changes in oxidative properties of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana leaf mitochondria during development of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Rustin, P; Queiroz-Claret, C

    1985-06-01

    Kalanchoe blossfeldiana plants grown under long days (16 h light) exhibit a C3-type photosynthetic metabolism. Switching to short days (9 h light) leads to a gradual development of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Under the latter conditions, dark CO2 fixation produces large amounts of malate. During the first hours of the day, malate is rapidly decarboxylated into pyruvate through the action of a cytosolic NADP(+)-or a mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme. Mitochondria were isolated from leaves of plants grown under long days or after treatment by an increasing number of short days. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as well as exogenous NADH and NADPH were readily oxidized by mitochondria isolated from the two types of plants. Glycine, known to be oxidized by C3-plant mitochondria, was still oxidized after CAM establishment. The experiments showed a marked parallelism in the increase of CAM level and the increase in substrate-oxidation capacity of the isolated mitochondria, particularly the capacity to oxidize malate in the presence of cyanide. These simultaneous variations in CAM level and in mitochondrial properties indicate that the mitochondrial NAD(+)-malic enzyme could account at least for a part of the oxidation of malate. The studies of whole-leaf respiration establish that mitochondria are implicated in malate degradation in vivo. Moreover, an increase in cyanide resistance of the leaf respiration has been observed during the first daylight hours, when malate was oxidized to pyruvate by cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes. PMID:24249613

  14. Chromium–tungsten–titanium mixed oxides solid catalyst for fatty acid methyl ester synthesis from palm fatty acid distillate

    Highlights: • Chromium–tungsten–titanium mixed oxides as solid catalyst. • Catalyst used for esterification of palm fatty acid distillate to methyl esters. • The maximum methyl ester content is 83%. • Catalyst has shown good activity and can be recycled for 4 times. - Abstract: Chromium–tungsten–titanium mixed oxides solid catalysts were prepared and evaluated in the esterification of palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) to produce fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Esterification was conducted in a batch reactor at 110–200 °C temperature ranges. The catalysts were characterized by several techniques such as BET, TEM, FTIR, TGA, XRD, EDX and SEM. The treatment conditions during catalyst preparation, effect of reaction parameters, leaching of the active species and the recycled use of the catalyst were investigated. The catalyst with formula CrWTiO2 was found to be the most active with maximum FAME content of 83% obtained at best reaction conditions of 170 °C for 3 h, 2:1 (methanol to oil molar ratio) and 2 wt.% catalyst dosage. The catalyst can be recycled for 4 times. The results revealed CrWTiO2 good potentials for use in esterification of high acid value oil

  15. Silver ion catalyzed cerium(IV) mediated electrochemical oxidation of phenol in nitric acid medium

    Mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO) is one of the sustainable processes for organic pollutant destruction and has been employed for organic mineralization reactions by many researchers. In the MEO a metal ion capable of exhibiting redox behavior is oxidized from lower oxidation state to higher oxidation state by an electrochemical cell and subsequently used as an oxidant for mineralizing the toxic organics into CO2 and water. The net result is the consumption of electrical energy for organic mineralization. Therefore, the current efficiency is an important factor and maximizing the current efficiency is one of the ways of reducing the running cost of the MEO process. It has been reported in the literature that the current efficiency could be increased using a metal ion catalyst having a good redox potential. In this study Ce(IV) mediated electrochemical oxidation of phenol was carried out with silver ion catalyst. The current efficiency for the electro-oxidation of cerium(III) in nitric acid was found to be increased by the addition of silver ions. This mixed mediator system was tested for the oxidation of phenol in order to optimize the parameters for organic pollutant destruction. The mineralization efficiency calculated based on the CO2 evolution was found to be higher for silver catalyzed Ce(IV) mediated oxidation compared to the non-silver catalyzed system

  16. Quinolinic acid induces oxidative stress in rat brain synaptosomes

    Santamaria, A.; Galván-Arzate, S.; Lisý, Václav; Ali, S. F.; Duhart, H. M.; Osorio-Rico, L.; Rios, C.; Šťastný, František

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2001), s. 871-874. ISSN 0959-4965 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0211; GA ČR GA305/99/1317 Grant ostatní: CONACyT(MX) J28612-M; CONACyT(MX) 130.205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : 2-amino-5- phosphonovaleric acid * brain regions * glutathione Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.374, year: 2001

  17. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Beam, Jake; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, Mark; Jennings, Ryan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous geobiological features on Earth and occur in extant acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA, and form as a result of microbial processes. The relative contribution of different organisms to the development of these mat ecosystems is of specific interest. We hypothesized that chemolithoautotrophic organisms contribute to the early development and production of Fe(III)-oxide mats, which could support later-colonizing heterotrophic microorganisms. Sterile glass slides were incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP, and spatiotemporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and abundance of relevant community members were measured. Lithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum spp. were first colonizers and the most abundant taxa identified during early successional stages (7 – 40 days). Populations of M. yellowstonensis colonized after ~ 7 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized after 30 days, and emerge as the dominant functional guild in mature iron oxide mats (1 – 2 cm thick) that form after 70 – 120 days. First-order rate constants of iron oxide accretion ranged from 0.05 – 0.046 day-1, and reflected the absolute amount of iron accreted. Micro- and macroscale microterracettes were identified during iron oxide mat development, and suggest that the mass transfer of oxygen limits microbial growth. This was also demonstrated using microelectrode measurements of oxygen as a function of mat depth, which showed steep gradients in oxygen from the aqueous mat interface to ~ 1 mm. The formation and succession of amorphous Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a predictable pattern of distinct stages and growth. The successional stages and microbial signatures observed in these extant Fe(III)-oxide mat communities may be relevant to other past or present Fe(III)-oxide mineralizing systems.

  18. Mechanistic studies of formic acid oxidation at polycarbazole supported Pt nanoparticles

    Highlights: •A polycarbazole support decreases the accumulation of adsorbed intermediates on Pt during formic acid oxidation. •Polycarbazole causes a bilayer of Cu to form on Pt nanoparticles during Cu underpotential deposition. •XPS suggests that both of these effects are due to electron donation from the metal (Pt or Cu) into the polymer π-system. -- Abstract: Mechanistic aspects of the promotion of formic acid oxidation at Pt nanoparticles supported on a thin layer of polycarbazole (PCZ) have been investigated by voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Pt nanoparticles were drop coated onto a glassy carbon (GC) electrode coated with a ca. 9 nm layer of electrochemically deposited polycarbazole. After 500 s of formic acid oxidation at 0 V vs. SCE, the current at a GC/PCZ/Pt electrode was 25 times higher than at a GC/Pt electrode. Voltammetry in formic acid free H2SO4 following potentiostatic oxidation of formic acid revealed that there was less accumulation of adsorbed intermediates for the polycarbazole supported Pt nanoparticles than for those deposited directly onto the glassy carbon with, 50% more Pt sites remaining available for the GC/PCZ/Pt electrode relative to the GC/Pt electrode. Independent CO stripping experiments revealed only slight differences, while Cu underpotential deposition surprisingly resulted in the deposition of a ca. two-fold excess of Cu on the polycarbazole supported particles. This observation was supported by XPS which also revealed a second Cu signal at a higher binding energy, suggesting electron donation into the conjugated π system of the polymer. Such an interaction of Pt with the polycarbazole may be responsible for its higher activity for formic acid oxidation

  19. Diurnal variation of urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation

    Grew, Ida S; Cejvanovic, Vanja; Broedbaek, Kasper; Henriksen, Trine; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T; Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Weimann, Allan; Poulsen, Henrik E

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) are biomarkers of oxidative stress with clinical potential in a variety of diseases. As part of their clinical validation, this study aimed to investigate whether the urinary excretion of 8-oxod...... quantified using a modified version of UPLC-MS/MS. RESULTS: No significant difference in excretion levels between the 12-h diurnal and 12-h nocturnal state or between the four 6-h periods during the day was found for either biomarker. A strong linear relationship between the excretion levels in each of the 6......-h periods and the 24-h excretion level was shown for both biomarkers. Creatinine correction of the 6-h levels reduced the biological variation of the excretion levels and weakened the linear relationship with the uncorrected 24-h excretion level for both biomarkers. The correlations were...

  20. Oxidative degradation of ion-exchange resins in acid medium. Vol. 3

    Volume reduction of spent ion-exchange resins used in nuclear facilities receive increasing importance due to the increase in storage cost, unstable physical and chemical properties and their relatively high specific activity (in some cases up to 1 Ci per liter). The present study is part of research program on the treatment and immobilization of radioactive spent ion-exchange resins simulate; hydrogen peroxide was used for the oxidative degradation of spent ion-exchange resins simulate in sulphuric acid medium. Five liters ring digester developed in Karlsruhe nuclear research center-(KFK)- in germany was the chosen option to perform the oxidation process. The work reported focused on the kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process. Heating the organic resins in sulphuric acid results in its carbonization and partial oxidation of only 1.7% of the carbon added. Results show that the oxidation reaction is a relatively slow process of first order with K value in the order of 10-4 min-1, and the main oxidation product was carbon dioxide. The production of carbon oxide in the off gas stream increased sharply by the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the hot sulphuric acid-resin mixture. The results obtained show that more than 97% of the carbon added was oxidized to carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. The rate constant value (K) of this reaction was calculated to be (1.69±0.13) x 10-2 min-1. The results of gas chromatographic analysis indicate that no significant amounts of hazardous organic materials were detected in the off-gas streams. 6 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Synergistic Effects of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Fatty Acids on Toxicity to Caco-2 Cells

    Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Kermanizadeh, Ali;

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids exposure may increase sensitivity of intestinal epithelial cells to cytotoxic effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs). This study evaluated the synergistic effects of ZnO NPs and palmitic acid (PA) or free fatty acids (FFAs) mixture (oleic/PA 2:1) on toxicity to human colon...... epithelial (Caco-2) cells. The ZnO NPs exposure concentration dependently induced cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells showing as reduced proliferation and activity measured by 3 different assays. PA exposure induced cytotoxicity, and coexposure to ZnO NPs and PA showed the largest cytotoxic effects. The presence of...

  2. Fatty acid circuit as a physiological mechanism of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Skulachev, V P

    1991-12-01

    Free fatty acids, natural uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, are shown to differ from artificial ones in that they fail to increase conductance of phospholipid bilayers which are permeable for the protonated form of fatty acids but impermeable for their anionic form. Recent studies have revealed that uncoupling by fatty acids in mitochondria is mediated by the ATP/ADP antiporter and, in brown fat, by thermogenin which is structurally very similar to the antiporter. It is suggested that both the ATP/ADP antiporter and thermogenin facilitate translocation of the fatty anions through the mitochondrial membrane. PMID:1756853

  3. The effects of solvents and structure on the electronic absorption spectra of the isomeric pyridine carboxylic acid N-oxides

    Drmanić Saša Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultraviolet absorption spectra of the carboxyl group of three isomeric pyridine carboxylic acids N-oxides (picolinic acid N-oxide, nicotinic acid N-oxide and isonicotinic acid N-oxide were determined in fourteen solvents in the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm. The position of the absorption maxima (λmax of the examined acids showed that the ultraviolet absorption maximum wavelengths of picolinic acid N-oxide are the shortest, and those of isonicotinic acid N-oxide acid are the longest. In order to analyze the solvent effect on the obtained absorption spectra, the ultraviolet absorption frequencies of the electronic transitions in the carboxylic group of the examined acids were correlated using a total solvatochromic equation of the form max = v0 + sπ + aα+ bβ, where υmax is the absorption frequency (1/λmax, p is a measure of the solvent polarity, β represents the scale of solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities and α represent the scale of solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities. The correlation of the spectroscopic data was carried out by means of multiple linear regression analysis. The solvent effects on the ultraviolet absorption maximums of the examined acids were discussed.

  4. Acetic Acid Formation by Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol over Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Hanning, Christopher William;

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst systems comprising ruthenium hydroxide supported on different carrier materials, titania, alumina, ceria, and spinel (MgAl2O4), were applied in selective aerobic oxidation ethanol to form acetic acid, an important bulk chemical and food ingredient. The catalysts were...

  5. Characterization and formic acid oxidation studies of PtAu nanoparticles.

    Saipanya, Surin; Srisombat, Laongnuan; Wongtap, Pitak; Sarakonsri, Thapanee

    2014-10-01

    Characterization and electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid on PtAu nanoparticles supported multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were studied. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in a self-made conventional three-electrode glass cell at room temperature. A Pt wire and Ag/AgCl were used as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. The Pt was electrodeposited onto the electrode and their catalytic activities in the electrooxidation of formic acid were examined and compared. The morphology and composition were studied by a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Cyclic voltamograms of formic acid electrooxidation show a distinguishing shape with a prominent oxidation peak in the forward scan contributed to the formic acid oxidation whilst the backward scan is associated with the oxidation of exclusion of carbonaceous species. On the basis of the onset potential and current density, the resulting PtAu nanoparticles showed much higher electrocatalytic activity than other counterparts. The results show an excellent sign of applications for fuel cell. PMID:25942921

  6. Intrinsic nitric oxide-stimulatory activity of lipoteichoic acids from different Gram-positive bacteria

    Zídek, Zdeněk; Farghali, H.; Kmoníčková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2010), s. 300-310. ISSN 1089-8603 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/08/0535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Lipoteichoic acid * Gram-positive bacteria * Nitric oxide Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.384, year: 2010

  7. Anodic oxidation of salicylic acid on BDD electrode: Variable effects and mechanisms of degradation

    Rabaaoui, Nejmeddine, E-mail: chimie_tunisie@yahoo.fr [Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, Departement de Chimie, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Allagui, Mohamed Salah [Faculte des Sciences de Gafsa, Campus Universitaire Sidi Ahmed Zarrouk, 2112 Gafsa (Tunisia)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidation with BDD is a powerful electrochemical method able to mineralize. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA is oxidized to aromatic compounds then CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymeric intermediate products were formed. - Abstract: The degradation of 100 mL of solution with salicylic acid (SA) in the pH range 3.0-10.0 has been studied by anodic oxidation in a cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel cathode, both of 3 cm{sup 2} area, by applying a current of 100, 300 and 450 mA at 25 Degree-Sign C. Completed mineralization is always achieved due to the great concentration of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) generated at the BDD surface. The mineralization rate increases with increasing applied current, but decreases when drug concentration rises from 200 mg L{sup -1}. Nevertheless, the pH effect was not significant. During oxidation it was observed that catechol, 2,5-dihydroxylated benzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylated benzoic acid and hydroquinone were formed as aromatic intermediates. In addition, ion-exclusion chromatography allowed the detection of fumaric, maleic, oxalic and formic as the ultimate carboxylic acid.

  8. Method for the manufacture of nitric acid soluble mixed oxide fuel pellets

    For the manufacture of nitric acid-soluble mixed oxide fuel pellets with adjustable proportions, the starting powder is ground down to a primary grain size of < 2 μm together with a halogen-free grinding aid and subsequently mixed. The change is then granulated in a rotating chamber, pressed into pellet form and sintered. (orig.)

  9. Copper/ascorbic acid dyad as a catalytic system for selective aerobic oxidation of amines

    Šrogl, Jiří; Voltrová, Svatava

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2009), s. 843-845. ISSN 1523-7060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : copper * ascorbic acid * oxidative deamination Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.420, year: 2009

  10. Electrocatalytic oxidation of n-propanol to produce propionic acid using an electrocatalytic membrane reactor.

    Li, Jiao; Li, Jianxin; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Bowen; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Yang, Yang; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2013-05-18

    An electrocatalytic membrane reactor assembled using a nano-MnO2 loading microporous Ti membrane as an anode and a tubular stainless steel as a cathode was used to oxidize n-propanol to produce propionic acid. The high efficiency and selectivity obtained is related to the synergistic effect between the reaction and separation in the reactor. PMID:23572114

  11. Urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation and cancer in type 2 diabetes

    Kasper Broedbaek

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Urinary excretion of the nucleic acid oxidation markers 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo at the time of diagnosis was not associated with cancer overall in type 2 diabetes patients. For site-specific cancers, risk elevations were seen for breast cancer (8-oxodG. These findings should be examined in future and larger studies.

  12. Synthesis and characterisation of manganese oxides from potassium permanganate and citric acid mixtures

    Burhanuddin, Syazwani; Yarmo, Ambar; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2013-11-01

    Reaction of KMnO4 and citric acid at different stoichiometric ratio found to give black precipitate after calcined at 500 %C. The black precipitate are classified as two type of manganese oxides mineral namely as bixbyite and hollandite. IR and XRD data were in agreement with the literature report.

  13. Comparison of amino acid oxidation and urea metabolism in haemodialysis patients during fasting and meal intake

    Veeneman, JM; Kingma, HA; Stellaard, F; de Jong, PE; Reijngoud, DJ; Huisman, RM

    2004-01-01

    Background. The PNA (protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance) is used to calculate protein intake from urea kinetics. One of the essential assumptions in the calculation of PNA is that urea accumulation in haemodialysis (HD) patients is equivalent to amino acid oxidation. However, urea is hydrolys

  14. Anodic oxidation of salicylic acid on BDD electrode: Variable effects and mechanisms of degradation

    Highlights: ► Oxidation with BDD is a powerful electrochemical method able to mineralize. ► SA is oxidized to aromatic compounds then CO2 and H2O. ► Polymeric intermediate products were formed. - Abstract: The degradation of 100 mL of solution with salicylic acid (SA) in the pH range 3.0–10.0 has been studied by anodic oxidation in a cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel cathode, both of 3 cm2 area, by applying a current of 100, 300 and 450 mA at 25 °C. Completed mineralization is always achieved due to the great concentration of hydroxyl radical (·OH) generated at the BDD surface. The mineralization rate increases with increasing applied current, but decreases when drug concentration rises from 200 mg L−1. Nevertheless, the pH effect was not significant. During oxidation it was observed that catechol, 2,5-dihydroxylated benzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylated benzoic acid and hydroquinone were formed as aromatic intermediates. In addition, ion-exclusion chromatography allowed the detection of fumaric, maleic, oxalic and formic as the ultimate carboxylic acid.

  15. Oxidative allylic rearrangement of cycloalkenols: Formal total synthesis of enantiomerically pure trisporic acid B

    Bernhard Westermann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Enantiomerically highly enriched unsaturated β-ketoesters bearing a quaternary stereocenter can be utilized as building blocks for the synthesis of natural occurring terpenes, i. a., trisporic acid and its derivatives. An advanced building block has been synthesized in a short reaction sequence, which involves an oxidative allylic rearrangement initiated by pyridinium dichromate (PDC as the key step.

  16. Kinetics of pyrite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in phosphoric acid solutions

    VALENTINA DIMITRIJEVIC

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of pyrite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in phosphoric acid solutions were investigated. The effects of stirring, temperature, and particle size, as well as of the hydrogen peroxide and phosphoric acid concentrations were studied. The effect of phosphate ion addition was also examined. The oxidation kinetics was found to follow a shrinking core model, with the surface chemical reaciton as the rate-controlling step. This is in accord with an activation energy of 57 kJ mol-1 and a linear relationship between the rate constant and the reciprocal of the particle radius. The reaction order with respect to the hydrogen peroxide concentration was found to be equal to unity. Variation of the phosphoric acid concentration had practically no effect on the rate of pyrite oxidation. Addition of the phosphate ion in the relatively low concentration range (0.005-0.1 mol dm-3 had a highly negative influence on the rate of pyrite oxidation, indicating that this ion has an inhibiting effect on the oxidation of pyrite by hydrogen peroxide.

  17. Direct conversion of corn cob to formic and acetic acids over nano oxide catalysts

    Liyuan; Cheng; Hong; Liu; Yuming; Cui; Nianhua; Xue; Weiping; Ding

    2014-01-01

    Considering energy shortage, large molecules in corn cob and easy separation of solid catalysts, nano oxides are used to transform corn cob into useful chemicals. Because of the microcrystals, nano oxides offer enough accessible sites for cellulose, hemicellulose and monosaccharide from corn cob hydrolysis and oxidant. Chemical conversion of corn cob to organic acids is investigated over nano ceria, alumina, titania and zirconia under various atmospheres. Liquid products are mainly formic and acetic acids. A small amount of other compounds, such as D-xylose,D-glucose, arabinose and xylitol are also detected simultaneously. The yield of organic acids reaches 25%–29% over the nano oxide of ceria,zirconia and alumina with 3 h reaction time under 453 K and 1.2 MPa O2. The unique and fast conversion of corn cob is directly approached over the nano oxides. The results are comparative to those of biofermentation and offer an alternative method in chemically catalytic conversion of corn cob to useful chemicals in a one-pot chemical process.

  18. Electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at an ordered intermetallic PtBi surface.

    Casado-Rivera, Emerilis; Gál, Zoltán; Angelo, A C D; Lind, Cora; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2003-02-17

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at a PtBi ordered intermetallic electrode surface has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). The results are compared to those at a polycrystalline platinum electrode surface. The PtBi electrode exhibits superior properties when compared to polycrystalline platinum in terms of oxidation onset potential, current density, and a much diminished poisoning effect by CO. Using the RDE technique, a value of 1.4 x 10(-4) cm s-1 was obtained for the heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant. The PtBi surface did not appear to be poisoned when exposed to a CO saturated solution for periods exceeding 0.5 h. The results for PtBi are discussed within the framework of the dual-path mechanism for the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid, which involves formation of a reactive intermediate and a poisoning pathway. PMID:12619419

  19. Oxidative stability during storage of structured lipids produced from fish oil and caprylic acid

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Xu, Xuebing; Timm Heinrich, Maike;

    2004-01-01

    Structured lipids produced by enzymatic or chemical methods for different applications have been receiving considerable attention. The oxidative stability of a randomized structured lipid (RFO), produced by chemical interesterification from fish oil (FO) and tricaprylin, and a specific structured...... lipid (SFO), produced by enzymatic interesterification from the same oil and caprylic acid, was compared with the stability of FO. Oils were stored at 2degreesC for 11 wk followed by storage at 20degreesC for 6 wk. In addition, the antioxidative effect of adding the metal chelators EDTA or citric acid...... storage period, and off-flavors were more pronounced in SFO. The lower oxidative stability of SFO was probably related to the initially lower quality (regarding oxidation products), which is apparently a result of the long production procedure required. Addition of metal chelators did not reduce the...

  20. Structural insight into the oxidation of sinapic acid by CotA laccase.

    Xie, Tian; Liu, Zhongchuan; Liu, Qian; Wang, Ganggang

    2015-05-01

    Laccases can oxidize plenty of substrates by use of molecular oxygen as the final electron acceptor. The broad substrate spectrum is further expanded by using redox mediators in so-called laccase-mediator systems, but the structural studies on interactions between laccases and natural mediators are still absent. In this study, the crystal structure of CotA/sinapic acid complex is solved, structural comparison has revealed a novel substrate binding mode. The residue of His419 instead of His497 is bonding to the sinapic acid (SA) as the primary electron acceptor. Moreover, the binding of SA leads to 10° rotation on Arg416, our mutagenesis data exhibits that the residue Arg416 is crucial in the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and syringaldazine (SGZ). Furthermore, oxidation of several phenolic acids and one non-phenolic acid by CotA was investigated. By analyzing interactions between CotA and SA, it is indicated that the presence of methoxy groups in the ortho-position of the phenolic structure is crucial for the substrate recognition by CotA laccase. This work establishes structure-function relationships for laccase-natural mediator system. PMID:25799944

  1. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Protect Neural Progenitor Cells against Oxidative Injury

    Qiang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, derived mainly from fish oil, play important roles in brain development and neuroplasticity. Here, we reported that application of ω-3 PUFAs significantly protected mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs against H2O2-induced oxidative injury. We also isolated NPCs from transgenic mice expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans fat-1 gene. The fat-1 gene, which is absent in mammals, can add a double bond into an unsaturated fatty acid hydrocarbon chain and convert ω-6 to ω-3 fatty acids. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining showed that a marked decrease in apoptotic cells was found in fat-1 NPCs after oxidative injury with H2O2 as compared with wild-type NPCs. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a much higher expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a master transcriptional factor for antioxidant genes, in fat-1 NPCs. The results of the study provide evidence that ω-3 PUFAs resist oxidative injury to NPCs.

  2. Factors affecting the fatty acid composition and fat oxidative stability in pigs

    Karel Vehovsky

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of selected factors affecting fatty acids (FA composition in pig fat. In the experiment, the influence of nutrition, gender, carcass weight, lean meat proportion (LMP and intramuscular fat (IMF were monitored. The effect of diet, specifically the influence of added linseed or corn on the fatty acids composition in the backfat was studied in pigs. From the perspective of the required increase of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA only the addition of the linseed proved to have a significant effect. Another evaluated aspect concerning the FA spectrum was the gender. While the backfat in barrows showed higher (P≤0.05 amount of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, the backfat in gilts displayed a significantly higher proportion (P≤0.01 of the PUFA and total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA. A significant effect on the PUFA proportion has also been demonstrated for the lean meat proportion (LMP parameter, which therefore represents not only a qualitative carcass meat parameter but also plays an important role in relation to the FA composition in the fat in pigs. In connection to the FA proportion changes the study also monitored the fat oxidative stability with the use of the TBARS method. Concerning the oxidative stability the effects of nutrition, FA groups, gender, carcass weight and LMP were studied. The relationship between the above mentioned factors and oxidative stability was found to be insignificant.

  3. Graphene Oxide Reinforced Polylactic Acid/Polyurethane Antibacterial Composites

    Xiaoli An

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites from PLA/PU containing small concentrations of graphene oxide (GO were prepared by simple liquid-phase mixing followed by casting. The as-prepared ternary PLA/PU/GO composite films exhibited good antibacterial activity against the gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and the gram-negative Escherichia coli, due to the excellent antibacterial property of GO sheets with high specific surface area. The addition of GO inhibited the attachment and proliferation of microbes on the film surfaces, resulting in that the PLA/PU/GO composite films show remarkably improved antibacterial activity compared with PLA/PU composite film. The inhibition efficiency is proportional to the amount of GO. Furthermore, PLA/PU/GO composite fibrous paper was fabricated using electrospinning and exhibited good biocompatibility. The addition of GO does not destroy normal cell’s proliferation and differentiation. PLA/PU/GO composites with good antibacterial activity and biocompatibility make it attractive for the environmental and clinical applications and also provide a candidate for future application of tissue engineering.

  4. Anodic oxidation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on platinum electrode in alkaline medium

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) forms strong metal complexes and is often used to remove scale from heat-transfer equipment and to decontaminate equipment exposed to radioactive material. However, the resultant waste in the form of EDTA-metal complex is hard to treat due to the high stability of such complexes. The anodic oxidation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was studied in alkaline medium on a smooth platinum electrode. Bulk electrolysis indicated that stable organic intermediates (formaldehyde and glyoxal) are formed during the oxidation of EDTA and that complete oxidation to CO2 can be achieved. The proposed pathway suggests that the acetate groups in EDTA are initially oxidized, generating formaldehyde and ethylenediamine. The rest potential of EDTA (0.066 to 0.164 V vs. Hg/HgO) was observed to be higher than for other organic species. In alkaline medium, very little EDTA oxidation was found to occur on bare platinum. Limiting-current behavior due to PtO formation was observed immediately positive of the rest potential. Tafel behavior (Tafel slope 120 mV/dec) was observed in the potential region positive of the cessation of the bulk of oxide film formation and negative of the onset of O2 evolution. The reaction order of EDTA was determined to be ∼0.5, and that of OH- was close to zero. The reaction mechanism consistent with the experimental data involves Temkin-type adsorption and a first-electron-transfer rate-determining step

  5. Efficacy of boswellic acid on lysosomal acid hydrolases, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant status in gouty arthritic mice

    Evan Prince Sabina; Haridas Indu; Mahaboobkhan Rasool

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the efficacy of boswellic acid against monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in mice. Methods:The mice were divided into four experimental groups. Group I served as control;mice in group II were injected with monosodium urate crystal;group III consisted of monosodium urate crystal-induced mice who were treated with boswellic acid (30 mg/kg/b.w.);group IV comprised monosodium urate crystal-induced mice who were treated with indomethacin (3 mg/kg/b.w.). Paw volume and levels/activities of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidant status and inflammatory mediator TNF-αwere determined in control and monosodium urate crystal-induced mice. In addition, the levels of β-glucuronidase and lactate dehydrogenase were also measured in monosodium urate crystal-incubated polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) in vitro. Results:The activities of lysosomal enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and tumour necrosis factor-αlevels and paw volume were increased significantly in monosodium urate crystal-induced mice, whereas the activities of antioxidant status were in turn decreased. However, these changes were modulated to near normal levels upon boswellic acid administration. In vitro, boswellic acid reduced the level of β-glucuronidase and lactate dehydrogenase in monosodium urate crystal-incubated PMNL in concentration dependent manner when compared with control cells. Conclusions: The results obtained in this study further strengthen the anti-inflammatory/antiarthritic effect of boswellic acid, which was already well established by several investigators.

  6. Investigation of phosphonic acid surface modifications on zinc oxide nanoparticles under ambient conditions

    Quiñones, Rosalynn, E-mail: quinonesr@marshall.edu [Marshall University, Chemistry Department, 1 John Marshall Drive. Huntington, WV 25755 (United States); Rodriguez, Kate; Iuliucci, Robbie J. [Washington and Jefferson College, Chemistry Department, 60 South Lincoln St, Washington, PA 15301 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have emerged as a fascinating metal oxide semiconductor nanomaterial due largely to their wide array of properties that can be altered by surface modification. For example electrical and photonic properties include a range of conductivity from metallic to insulating (n-type and p- type conductivity), wide-band gap semiconductivity, room-temperature ferromagnetism, and chemical-sensing. Recently there has been much interest in the electronic and photonic properties of ZnO nanostructures as foreseeable applications include solar cells and laser diodes. For such purposes, controlling the surface functionalization is important and can be tailored by the chemical attachment of organic acids to the surface. The oxide surface readily reacts with organics forming self-assembled alkylphosphonate films. In this study, ZnO nanoparticles were modified using self-assembly thin films with phosphonic functional head groups. The amount of organic acid used in preparation of the thin film was shown to be important to the nanoparticle surface coverage. The modified ZnO nanoparticles were then characterized using infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The interfacial bonding was identified by spectroscopy analysis to be the bidentate and tridentate motifs between the phosphonic head group and the oxide surface. Work function modification was measured using Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The influences of temperature, humidity, and solvent rinse on the stability of the surface modifications were performed. - Highlights: • Zinc Oxide nanoparticles were modified using alkylphosphonic acid films. • Phosphonic acid modifications were strongly bonded and stable on the surface. • The surface coverage of the alkylphosphonic acid molecules was highly controlled. • The attachments were characterized using spectroscopy

  7. Investigation of phosphonic acid surface modifications on zinc oxide nanoparticles under ambient conditions

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have emerged as a fascinating metal oxide semiconductor nanomaterial due largely to their wide array of properties that can be altered by surface modification. For example electrical and photonic properties include a range of conductivity from metallic to insulating (n-type and p- type conductivity), wide-band gap semiconductivity, room-temperature ferromagnetism, and chemical-sensing. Recently there has been much interest in the electronic and photonic properties of ZnO nanostructures as foreseeable applications include solar cells and laser diodes. For such purposes, controlling the surface functionalization is important and can be tailored by the chemical attachment of organic acids to the surface. The oxide surface readily reacts with organics forming self-assembled alkylphosphonate films. In this study, ZnO nanoparticles were modified using self-assembly thin films with phosphonic functional head groups. The amount of organic acid used in preparation of the thin film was shown to be important to the nanoparticle surface coverage. The modified ZnO nanoparticles were then characterized using infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The interfacial bonding was identified by spectroscopy analysis to be the bidentate and tridentate motifs between the phosphonic head group and the oxide surface. Work function modification was measured using Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The influences of temperature, humidity, and solvent rinse on the stability of the surface modifications were performed. - Highlights: • Zinc Oxide nanoparticles were modified using alkylphosphonic acid films. • Phosphonic acid modifications were strongly bonded and stable on the surface. • The surface coverage of the alkylphosphonic acid molecules was highly controlled. • The attachments were characterized using spectroscopy

  8. Enhanced uptake of water by oxidatively processed oleic acid

    A. Asad

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance apparatus has been used to measure the room temperature uptake of water vapour by thin films of oleic acid as a function of relative humidity, both before and following exposure of the films to various partial pressures of gas phase ozone. A rapid increase in the water-sorbing ability of the film is observed as its exposure to ozone is increased, followed by a plateau region in which no additional water is taken up. In this fully-processed region the mass of water taken up by the film is about 4 times that of the unprocessed film. Infrared spectra of the films, measured after variable exposures to ozone, show dramatic increases in both the "free" and hydrogen-bonded O-H stretching regions, and a decrease in the intensity of olefinic features. These results are consistent with the formation of an oxygenated polymeric product or products, as well as the gas phase products previously identified.

  9. Amine-oxide hybrid materials for acid gas separations

    Bollini, Praveen

    2011-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials based on porous silica materials functionalized with amine-containing organic species are emerging as an important class of materials for the adsorptive separation of acid gases from dilute gas streams. In particular, these materials are being extensively studied for the adsorption of CO 2 from simulated flue gas streams, with an eye towards utilizing these materials as part of a post-combustion carbon capture process at large flue gas producing installations, such as coal-fired electricity-generating power plants. In this Application Article, the utilization of amine-modified organic-inorganic hybrid materials is discussed, focusing on important attributes of the materials, such as (i) CO 2 adsorption capacities, (ii) adsorption and desorption kinetics, and (iii) material stability, that will determine if these materials may one day be useful adsorbents in practical CO 2 capture applications. Specific research needs and limitations associated with the current body of work are identified. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Effects of intravenous methyl palmoxirate on the turnover and oxidation of fatty acids in conscious dogs

    Bailey, J.W.; Jensen, M.D.; Miles, J.M. (Mayo Medical School, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1991-04-01

    Methyl palmoxirate (MP) is a member of a class of hypoglycemic agents that inhibit fatty acid oxidation in vitro. The studies presented here were undertaken to determine the effects of intravenous (IV) MP on tracer-determined rates of fatty acid oxidation and systemic adipose tissue lipolysis in dogs. MP (40 mg/kg) was administered IV to five mongrel dogs using a primed continuous infusion of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitate to determine palmitate kinetics. Palmitate concentration and rate of appearance decreased rapidly (from 155 +/- 25 to 47 +/- 6 mumol/L and 2.9 +/- 0.5 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1, respectively, at 15 minutes, both P less than .05). Palmitate oxidation also decreased, from 1.5 +/- 0.4 to 0.3 +/- 0.1 mumol.kg-1.min-1, P less than .05. Oxidative clearance decreased by approximately 50% 90 minutes after MP administration (P less than .05). Fractional oxidation of palmitate also decreased by approximately 40% (P less than .05). Plasma insulin increased from 45 +/- 6 to 240 +/- 93 pmol/L at 15 minutes (P less than .05). Plasma glucose decreased over the course of study by approximately 20% (P less than .05). In summary, MP has a specific inhibitory effect on plasma free fatty acid (FFA) oxidation in dogs, confirming previous in vitro observations in an in vivo model. In addition, it has a potent antilipolytic effect when administered IV, an effect likely mediated by stimulation of insulin secretion. The observation that systemic FFA oxidation was only partially suppressed at this relatively high dose of MP is consistent with previous studies suggesting that MP may exert its major effect in the liver, and may be less potent in extrahepatic tissues.

  11. Effects of intravenous methyl palmoxirate on the turnover and oxidation of fatty acids in conscious dogs

    Methyl palmoxirate (MP) is a member of a class of hypoglycemic agents that inhibit fatty acid oxidation in vitro. The studies presented here were undertaken to determine the effects of intravenous (IV) MP on tracer-determined rates of fatty acid oxidation and systemic adipose tissue lipolysis in dogs. MP (40 mg/kg) was administered IV to five mongrel dogs using a primed continuous infusion of [1-14C]palmitate to determine palmitate kinetics. Palmitate concentration and rate of appearance decreased rapidly (from 155 +/- 25 to 47 +/- 6 mumol/L and 2.9 +/- 0.5 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1, respectively, at 15 minutes, both P less than .05). Palmitate oxidation also decreased, from 1.5 +/- 0.4 to 0.3 +/- 0.1 mumol.kg-1.min-1, P less than .05. Oxidative clearance decreased by approximately 50% 90 minutes after MP administration (P less than .05). Fractional oxidation of palmitate also decreased by approximately 40% (P less than .05). Plasma insulin increased from 45 +/- 6 to 240 +/- 93 pmol/L at 15 minutes (P less than .05). Plasma glucose decreased over the course of study by approximately 20% (P less than .05). In summary, MP has a specific inhibitory effect on plasma free fatty acid (FFA) oxidation in dogs, confirming previous in vitro observations in an in vivo model. In addition, it has a potent antilipolytic effect when administered IV, an effect likely mediated by stimulation of insulin secretion. The observation that systemic FFA oxidation was only partially suppressed at this relatively high dose of MP is consistent with previous studies suggesting that MP may exert its major effect in the liver, and may be less potent in extrahepatic tissues

  12. Electrochemical determination of activation energies for methanol oxidation on polycrystalline platinum in acidic and alkaline electrolytes.

    Cohen, Jamie L; Volpe, David J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation pathways of methanol (MeOH) have been the subject of intense research due to its possible application as a liquid fuel in polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The design of improved catalysts for MeOH oxidation requires a deep understanding of these complex oxidation pathways. This paper will provide a discussion of the literature concerning the extensive research carried out in acidic and alkaline electrolytes. It will highlight techniques that have proven useful in the determination of product ratios, analysis of surface poisoning, anion adsorption, and oxide formation processes, in addition to the effects of temperature on the MeOH oxidation pathways at bulk polycrystalline platinum (Pt(poly)) electrodes. This discussion will provide a framework with which to begin the analysis of activation energy (E(a)) values. This kinetic parameter may prove useful in characterizing the rate-limiting step of the MeOH oxidation at an electrode surface. This paper will present a procedure for the determination of E(a) values for MeOH oxidation at a Pt(poly) electrode in acidic and alkaline media. Values from 24-76 kJ mol(-1) in acidic media and from 36-86 kJ mol(-1) in alkaline media were calculated and found to be a function of applied potential and direction of the potential sweep in a voltammetric experiment. Factors that influence the magnitude of the calculated E(a) include surface poisoning from MeOH oxidation intermediates, anion adsorption from the electrolyte, pH effects, and oxide formation processes. These factors are all potential, and temperature, dependent and must clearly be addressed when citing E(a) values in the literature. Comparison of E(a) values must be between systems of comparable electrochemical environment and at the same potential. E(a) values obtained on bulk Pt(poly), compared with other catalysts, may give insight into the superiority of other Pt-based catalysts for MeOH oxidation and lead to the development of new catalysts

  13. Effect of omega-3 fatty acid oxidation products on the cellular and mitochondrial toxicity of BDE 47

    Yeh, Andrew; Kruse, Shane E.; Marcinek, David J.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of the flame retardant 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) have been detected in Pacific salmon sampled near urban areas, raising concern over the safety of salmon consumption. However, salmon fillets also contain the antioxidants eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), whose oxidation products induce cellular antioxidant responses. Because oxidative stress is a mechanism of BDE 47 toxicity, we hypothesized that oxidized EPA and DHA can ameliorate the c...

  14. Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Is Not Caused by Sulfur Amino Acid Insufficiency

    Jones, Dean P.; Youngja Park; Ziegler, Thomas R; Orr, Michael L.; Young-Mi Go; Vos, Miriam B.; James R. Roede; Kunde, Sachin S.

    2011-01-01

    Fructose-sweetened liquid consumption is associated with fatty liver and oxidative stress. In rodent models of fructose-mediated fatty liver, protein consumption is decreased. Additionally, decreased sulfur amino acid intake is known to cause oxidative stress. Studies were designed to test whether oxidative stress in fructose-sweetened liquid-induced fatty liver is caused by decreased ad libitum solid food intake with associated inadequate sulfur amino acid intake. C57BL6 mice were grouped as...

  15. A Study on Anti-oxidative Activity of Soybean Peptides with Linoleic Acid Peroxidation Systems

    2006-01-01

    Soybean bioactive peptides(SBPs) were prepared from the isolated soybean protein by proteolysis with an alkaline protease, alcalase, at 50 ℃ and pH = 8. 0. The dependence of hydrolysis time on hydrolysis degree and molecular weight distribution were examined. The hydrolysate was fractionated on a Sephadex G-25 column and the anti-oxidative activities of the fractions were detected by the method of pyrogallol auto-oxidation. The average chain length of soybean peptides that have anti-oxidative activity was estimated to be about 7. The anti-oxidative properties of the soybean peptide were also studied by using linoleic acid peroxidation systems. The optimal condition of the peroxidation system was set up, Vc/Cu2 + as the inducer at pH = 7.4 and 25 ℃. In addition, soybean peptides show higher antioxidative activity compared with GSH.

  16. Mechanistic study of electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at platinum in acidic solution by time-resolved surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    Samjeské, Gabor; Miki, Atsushi; Ye, Shen; Osawa, Masatoshi

    2006-08-24

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) combined with cyclic voltammetry or chronoamperometry has been utilized to examine kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid on a polycrystalline Pt surface at the molecular scale. Formate is adsorbed on the electrode in a bridge configuration in parallel to the adsorption of linear and bridge CO produced by dehydration of formic acid. A solution-exchange experiment using isotope-labeled formic acids (H(12)COOH and H(13)COOH) reveals that formic acid is oxidized to CO(2) via adsorbed formate and the decomposition (oxidation) of formate to CO(2) is the rate-determining step of the reaction. The adsorption/oxidation of CO and the oxidation/reduction of the electrode surface strongly affect the formic acid oxidation by blocking active sites for formate adsorption and also by retarding the decomposition of adsorbed formate. The interplay of the involved processes also affects the kinetics and complicates the cyclic voltammograms of formic acid oxidation. The complex voltammetric behavior is comprehensively explained at the molecular scale by taking all these effects into account. PMID:16913790

  17. Monohydroxamic acids and bridging dihydroxamic acids as chelators to ruthenium(III) and as nitric oxide donors: syntheses, speciation studies and nitric oxide releasing investigations.

    Griffith, Darren; Krot, Krystyna; Comiskey, Jedd; Nolan, Kevin B; Marmion, Celine J

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterisation of novel mononuclear Ru(III)(edta)(hydroxamato) complexes of general formula [Ru(H2edta)(monoha)] (where monoha = 3- or 4-NH2, 2-, 3- or 4-C1 and 3-Me-phenylhydroxamato), as well as the first example of a Ru(III)-N-aryl aromatic hydroxamate, [Ru(H2edta)(N-Me-bha)].H2O (N-Me-bha = N-methylbenzohydroxamato) are reported. Three dinuclear Ru(III) complexes with bridging dihydroxamato ligands of general formula [{Ru(H2edta)}2(mu-diha)] where diha = 2,6-pyridinedihydroxamato and 1,3- or 1,4-benzodihydroxamato, the first of their kind with Ru(III), are also described. The speciation of all of these systems (with the exception of the Ru-1,4-benzodihydroxamic acid and Ru-N-methylbenzohydroxamic systems) in aqueous solution was investigated. We previously proposed that nitrosyl abstraction from hydroxamic acids by Ru(III) involves initial formation of Ru(III)-hydroxamates. Yet, until now, no data on the rate of nitric oxide (NO) release from hydroxamic acids has been published. We now describe a UV-VIS spectroscopic study, where we monitored the decrease in the ligand-to-metal charge-transfer band of a series of Ru(III)-monohydroxamates with time, with a view to gaining an insight into the NO-releasing properties of hydroxamic acids. PMID:18399240

  18. The oxidation of aniline with inorganic oxidants in environment of different acidity

    Bláha, Michal; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Prokeš, J.

    Linz: Johannes Kepler University Linz, 2015 - (List, M.; Paulik, C.; Major, Z.; Teasdale, I.; Brüggemann, O.). s. 96 ISBN 978-3-99033-491-1. [Danube Vltava Sava Polymer Meeting - DVSPM 2015. 11.05.2015-13.05.2015, Gmunden] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/0911 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : aniline oxidation * conductivity * morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  19. Selective oxidation of glycerol to formic acid in highly concentrated aqueous solutions with molecular oxygen using V-substituted phosphomolybdic acids

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid is an important commodity chemical as well as a promising medium for hydrogen storage and hydrogen production. In this paper, we report that formic acid can be produced through selective oxidation of glycerol, a low-cost by-product of biodiesel, by using vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acids as catalysts and molecular oxygen as the oxidant. Significantly, this catalytic system allows for high-concentration conversions and thus leads to exceptional efficiency. Specifically, 3.64 g of formic acid was produced from 10 g of glycerol/water (50/50 in weight) solution. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  20. Comparative Study of Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide Binary and Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide/Titanium-Oxide Ternary for Use as Energy Storage Material

    Andiarto, Rizky; Khalish Nuryadin, Muhammad; Saleh, Rosari

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a series of stearic acid/Fe3O4, and stearic acid/Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites for thermal energy storage (TES) system were synthesized through a two-step process. Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites were first prepared using sol-gel methods and then both samples were mixed into stearic acid by dispersion technique at three different weight % ratio to stearic acid: 5%, 10% and 15% to obtain stearic acid/Fe3O4, and stearic acid/Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites. Morphologies and structural properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), while thermal properties of the sample were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fhermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD patterns demonstrate, that stearic acid/Fe3O4 contained characteristic peaks of Fe3O4 and stearic acid structures, while peaks corresponded to anatase TiO2 structures appear in stearic acid/ Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites. From the DSC measurements, it is found that the maximum latent heat was found at samples with weight ratio of 5%. Moreover, the enhancement up to 20% of latent heat in solidifying as well as melting processes was observed. TGA measurements show high degradation temperature in the range of 246 - 251°C. The TGA results also shows that the residual mass of the sample matches the composition of Fe3O4 and Fe3O4/TiO2 which is added to the stearic acid.

  1. Influence of Oxide Film to Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zirconium in Boiling Nitric Acid Solution

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing process acts an important role of nuclear energy cycle. In Japan, a commercial reprocessing plant has been operating at the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. Purex process that is used nitric acid and dodecane with tributyl phosphate for solvent has been adopted in the plant. Boiling nitric acid is applied to dissolve oxide spent nuclear fuel. In the boiling nitric acid solution, plant material corrodes severely and intergranular corrosion is observed in stainless steels. In order to avoid corrosion in such severe environment, some equipment in the plants has been made of zirconium, which has excellent corrosion resistance in nitric acid solutions. However, it has been known that zirconium has stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in concentrated HNO3 with nobler corrosion potential. Nobler corrosion potential causes breakdowns of passive film having excellent protective performance and raises SCC susceptibility of zirconium in nitric acid solutions. Therefore, it is important to clarify the relationship among potential, growth and the breakdown of oxide film for the SCC initiation mechanism. In this study, we investigated the oxide film growth of zirconium with various potentials in boiling nitric acid solutions. Electrochemical tests and immersion tests with various applied potentials conducted in boiling 3. 6 and 9 mol.dm-3 HNO3. The potentials in the immersion tests were set at 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 V vs. sat. KCl-Ag/AgCl electrode (SSE). These were in the region of trans-passive state of zirconium in boiling nitric acid solution. The test durations were 10, 100 and 500 h. After the corrosion tests, cross-sectional observations of oxide films were conducted. From the results of anodic polarization curves of zirconium in boiling nitric acid, passivity region was observed through rest potential to about 1.5 V in boiling 6 mol.dm-3 HNO3. Rapid increase of current density was observed at the potential attributed to transition from passivity

  2. Mechanisms of hydroxyl radical production from abiotic oxidation of pyrite under acidic conditions

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (radOH) produced from pyrite oxidation by O2 have been recognized, but mechanisms regarding the production under anoxic and oxic conditions are not well understood. In this study, the mechanisms of radOH production from pyrite oxidation under anoxic and oxic conditions were explored using benzoic acid (BA) as an radOH probe. Batch experiments were conducted at pH 2.6 to explore radOH production under anoxic and oxic conditions. The cumulative radOH concentrations produced under anoxic and oxic conditions increased linearly to 7.5 and 52.2 μM, respectively within 10 h at 10 g/L pyrite. Under anoxic conditions, radOH was produced from the oxidation of H2O on the sulfur-deficient sites on pyrite surface, showing an increased production with the increase of pyrite surface exposure due to oxidation. Under oxic conditions, the formation of radOH proceeds predominantly via the two-electron reduction of O2 on pyrite surface along with a minor contribution from the oxidation of H2O on surface sulfur-defects and the reactions of Fe2+/sulfur intermediates with O2. For both O2 reduction and H2O oxidation on the surface sulfur-defects, H2O2 was the predominant intermediate, which subsequently transformed to radOH through Fenton mechanism. The radOH produced had a significant impact on the transformation of contaminants in the environment. Anoxic pyrite suspensions oxidized 13.9% As(III) (C0 = 6.67 μM) and 17.6% sulfanilamide (C0 = 2.91 μM) within 10 h at pH 2.6 and 10 g/L pyrite, while oxic pyrite suspensions improved the oxidation percentages to 55.4% for As(III) and 51.9% for sulfanilamide. The ratios of anoxic to oxic oxidation are consistent with the relative contribution of surface sulfur-defects to radOH production. However, Fe2+ produced from pyrite oxidation competed with the contaminants for radOH, which is of particular significance with the increase of time in a static environment. We conclude that radOH can be produced from abiotic oxidation of

  3. Electrocatalytic oxidation of some amino acids on a nickel-curcumin complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    Majdi, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: jabbari@kntu.ac.ir; Heli, H. [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A. [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-04-01

    This study investigated the electrocatalytic oxidation of alanine, L-arginine, L-phenylalanine, L-lysine and glycine on poly-Ni(II)-curcumin film (curcumin: 1,7-bis [4-hydroxy-3-methoxy phenyl]-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione) electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode in alkaline solution. The process of oxidation and its kinetics were established by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Voltammetric studies indicated that in the presence of amino acids the anodic peak current of low valence nickel species increased, followed by a decrease in the corresponding cathodic current. This indicates that amino acids were oxidized on the redox mediator which was immobilized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. Using Laviron's equation, the values of {alpha} and k {sub s} for the immobilized redox species were determined as 0.43 {+-} 0.03 and 2.47 {+-} 0.02 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}, respectively. The rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient and the diffusion coefficients involved in the electrocatalytic oxidation of amino acids were determined.

  4. The boron oxide - boric acid system: Nanoscale mechanical and wear properties

    The film that forms spontaneously when boron oxide (B2O3) is exposed to humid air is a solid lubricant. This film is usually assumed to be boric acid (H3BO3), the stable bulk phase. We describe the nanometer-scale surface morphology, mechanical properties, and tribological properties of these films and compare them with crystals precipitated from saturated solutions of boric acid. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) and low-load indentation were the primary experimental tools. Mechanical properties and their variation with depth are reported. In all cases, the surfaces were covered with a layer that has different mechanical properties than the underlying bulk. The films formed on boron oxide showed no evidence of crystalline structure. A thin surface layer was rapidly removed, followed by slower wear of the underlying film. The thickness of this initial layer was sensitive to sample preparation conditions, including humidity. Friction on the worn surface was lower than on the as-formed surface in all cases. In contrast, the SFM tip was unable to cause any wear to the surface film on the precipitated crystals. Indentation pop-in features were common for precipitated crystals but did not occur on the films formed on boron oxide. The surface structures were more complex than assumed in models put forth previously to explain the mechanism of lubricity in the boron oxide - boric acid - water system. copyright 1999 Materials Research Society

  5. Electrocatalytic oxidation of some amino acids on a nickel-curcumin complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    This study investigated the electrocatalytic oxidation of alanine, L-arginine, L-phenylalanine, L-lysine and glycine on poly-Ni(II)-curcumin film (curcumin: 1,7-bis [4-hydroxy-3-methoxy phenyl]-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione) electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode in alkaline solution. The process of oxidation and its kinetics were established by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Voltammetric studies indicated that in the presence of amino acids the anodic peak current of low valence nickel species increased, followed by a decrease in the corresponding cathodic current. This indicates that amino acids were oxidized on the redox mediator which was immobilized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. Using Laviron's equation, the values of α and k s for the immobilized redox species were determined as 0.43 ± 0.03 and 2.47 ± 0.02 x 106 s-1, respectively. The rate constant, the electron transfer coefficient and the diffusion coefficients involved in the electrocatalytic oxidation of amino acids were determined

  6. Influence of humic acids of different origins on oxidation of phenol and chlorophenols by permanganate

    He Di, E-mail: hedy1997@hotmail.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Guan Xiaohong, E-mail: hitgxh@126.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Ma Jun, E-mail: majun@hit.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Yang Xue, E-mail: yangxue1_ok@163.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Cui Chongwei, E-mail: cuichongwei1991@126.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2010-10-15

    The influences of humic acids (HAs) of different origins, including two commercial HAs, three soil HAs and one aquatic HA, on phenols oxidation by permanganate were studied. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP)/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs at pH 7 followed the order of commercial HA (Shanghai) > soil HAs > commercial HA (Fluka) > aquatic HA. Moreover, the commercial HA (Shanghai) could accelerate the oxidation of different chlorophenols (CP) significantly under neutral condition. The FTIR analysis demonstrated greater content of C=C moieties and less amount of carboxylate, aliphatic groups and polysaccharide-like substances in soil HAs than in aqueous HA, suggesting that the increase of aromaticity in HA was beneficial to the oxidation of phenols by permanganate. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-CP/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs correlated well with specific visible absorption (SVA) at 665 nm of HAs. High positive correlation coefficients (R{sup 2} > 0.75) implied that {pi}-electrons of HA strongly influenced the reactivity of 2-CP/phenol towards permanganate oxidation, which agreed well with positive correlation between Fluorescence Regional Integration (FRI) and the apparent second-order rate constants. The {pi}-{pi} interaction between HAs and phenols, the steric hindrance effect and the dissociation of phenols may affect the oxidation of phenols by permanganate in the presence of HA at pH = 7.0.

  7. Influence of humic acids of different origins on oxidation of phenol and chlorophenols by permanganate

    The influences of humic acids (HAs) of different origins, including two commercial HAs, three soil HAs and one aquatic HA, on phenols oxidation by permanganate were studied. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP)/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs at pH 7 followed the order of commercial HA (Shanghai) > soil HAs > commercial HA (Fluka) > aquatic HA. Moreover, the commercial HA (Shanghai) could accelerate the oxidation of different chlorophenols (CP) significantly under neutral condition. The FTIR analysis demonstrated greater content of C=C moieties and less amount of carboxylate, aliphatic groups and polysaccharide-like substances in soil HAs than in aqueous HA, suggesting that the increase of aromaticity in HA was beneficial to the oxidation of phenols by permanganate. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-CP/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs correlated well with specific visible absorption (SVA) at 665 nm of HAs. High positive correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.75) implied that π-electrons of HA strongly influenced the reactivity of 2-CP/phenol towards permanganate oxidation, which agreed well with positive correlation between Fluorescence Regional Integration (FRI) and the apparent second-order rate constants. The π-π interaction between HAs and phenols, the steric hindrance effect and the dissociation of phenols may affect the oxidation of phenols by permanganate in the presence of HA at pH = 7.0.

  8. Mathematical Modelling to Predict Oxidative Behaviour of Conjugated Linoleic Acid in the Food Processing Industry

    Aitziber Ojanguren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial processes that apply high temperatures in the presence of oxygen may compromise the stability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA bioactive isomers. Statistical techniques are used in this study to model and predict, on a laboratory scale, the oxidative behaviour of oil with high CLA content, controlling the limiting factors of food processing. This modelling aims to estimate the impact of an industrial frying process (140 °C, 7 L/h air on the oxidation of CLA oil for use as frying oil instead of sunflower oil. A factorial design was constructed within a temperature (80–200 °C and air flow (7–20 L/h range. Oil stability index (Rancimat method was used as a measure of oxidation. Three-level full factorial design was used to obtain a quadratic model for CLA oil, enabling the oxidative behaviour to be predicted under predetermined process conditions (temperature and air flow. It is deduced that temperatures applied in food processes affect the oxidation of CLA to a greater extent than air flow. As a result, it is estimated that the oxidative stability of CLA oil is less resistant to industrial frying than sunflower oil. In conclusion, thanks to the mathematical model, a good choice of the appropriate industrial food process can be selected to avoid the oxidation of the bioactive isomers of CLA, ensuring its functionality in novel applications.

  9. Stable isotope geochemistry of acid mine drainage; experimental oxidation of pyrite

    Sulfate and water from experiments in which pyrite was oxidized at a pH of 2.0 were analyzed for sulfur and oxygen stable isotopes. Experiments were conducted under both aerobic and anaerobic sterile conditions, as well as under aerobic conditions in the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, to elucidate the pathways of oxidation. Oxygen isotope fractionation between SO42- and H2O varied from +4.0 per mille (anaerobic, sterile) to +18.0 per mille (aerobic, with T. ferrooxidans). The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved oxygen utilized in both chemical and microbially-mediated oxidation was also determined (+11.4 per mille, by T. ferrooxidans; +18.4 per mille, chemical). Contributions of water-derived oxygen and dissolved oxygen to the sulfate produced in the oxidation of pyrite could thus be estimated. Water-derived oxygen constituted from 23 to approx. 100 per cent of the oxygen in the sulfate produced in the experiments, and this closely approximates the range of contribution in natural acid mine drainage. Oxidation of sulfides in anaerobic, water-saturated environments occurs primarily by chemical oxidation pathways, whereas oxidation of sulfides in well-aerated, unsaturated zone environments occurs dominantly by microbially-mediated pathways. (author)

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O' Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), longchain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart.

  11. Electrochemical oxidation of methanol and formic acid in fuel cell processes

    Seland, Frode

    2005-07-01

    The main objectives of the thesis work were: (1), to study the oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum electrodes by employing conventional and advanced electrochemical methods, and (2), to develop membrane electrode assemblies based on polybenzimidazole membranes that can be used in fuel cells up to 200 C. D.c. voltammetry and a.c. voltammetry studies of methanol and formic acid on polycrystalline platinum in sulphuric acid electrolyte were performed to determine the mechanism and kinetics of the oxidation reactions. A combined potential step and fast cyclic voltammetry experiment was employed to investigate the time dependence primarily of methanol oxidation on platinum. Charge measurements clearly demonstrated the existence of a parallel path at low potentials and short times without formation of adsorbed CO. Furthermore, experimental results showed that only the serial path, via adsorbed CO, exists during continuous cycling, with the first step being diffusion controlled dissociative adsorption of methanol directly from the bulk electrolyte. The saturation charge of adsorbed CO derived from methanol was found to be significantly lower than CO derived from formic acid or dissolved CO. This was attributed to the site requirements of the dehydrogenation steps, and possibly different compositions of linear, bridged or multiply bonded CO. The coverage of adsorbed CO from formic acid decreased significantly at potentials just outside of the hydrogen region (0.35 V vs. RHE), while it did not start to decrease significantly until about 0.6 V vs. RHE for methanol. Adsorbed CO from dissolved CO rapidly oxidized at potentials above about 0.75 V due to formation of platinum oxide. Data from a.c. voltammograms from 0.5 Hz up to 30 kHz were assembled into electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and analyzed using equivalent circuits. The main advantages of collecting EIS spectra from a.c. voltammetry experiments are the ability to directly correlate the impedance

  12. Acid Separation, Catalytic Oxidation and Coagulation for ATC Waste Liquid Treatment

    DING Xiaoling; JIA Chunning

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult to treat 2-amino-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATC) waste liquid effectively at present for its characteristics of high chemical oxygen demand (COD), high salinity and low biodegradability. In order to solve this problem, this paper presents several kinds of physical-chemical treatment unit techniques, including acid separation, catalytic oxidation and coagulation. First of all, acid separation was adopted to precipitate relevant organics at isoelectric point. When the temperature and pH value of acid separation were controlled at about 5 ℃ and 2.2 respectively, the COD removal rate could reach 27.6%. Secondly, oxidation was used to break chemical constitution of refractory organics. The optimal reaction parameters of catalytic oxidation should be 20 ℃, pH adjusted to 5.0 and [Fe2+] 300 mg/L. Then with 5% H 2O 2 added and after one-hour reaction, the COD removal rate could achieve about 52%. Finally, coagulation was adopted to remove a portion of refractory organics, and 15% polymeric molysite flocculant was the best for the coagulation, and the COD removal rate could reach about 15%. Therefore, the proposed feasible process of physical-chemical pretreatment for ATC waste liquid could have about 70% COD removed in total.

  13. Carbon nanotube-supported bimetallic palladium-gold electrocatalysts for electro-oxidation of formic acid

    Chen, Cheng-Han; Liou, Wei-Jen; Lin, Hong-Ming; Wu, She-Huang [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei (China); Mikolajczuk, Anna; Borodzinski, Andrzej; Kedzierzawski, Piotr [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, Leszek [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland); Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    It is known that palladium-based catalysts are initially very active in direct formic acid oxidation but they suffer from fast deactivation caused by a strongly adsorbed CO intermediate. Reactivation of the catalysts involving application of anodic potential may cause palladium dissolution. The aim of the present study is to increase the stability and performance of palladium-based catalysts in direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). Preparation and characterization of palladium/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd/MWCNTs) and towards formic acid oxidation via different treatments are described. The catalysts were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was shown that the Pd and Pd-Au MWCNTs supported catalysts after reduction in H{sub 2}-Ar at 200 C (R200 treatment) were highly active in formic acid electro-oxidation, whereas the catalysts after heating in argon at 250 C (C250 treatment) were inactive. The catalysts after hydrogen treatment have smaller metal particles and better contact with MWCNTs support. CV, simulating reactivation of the catalysts, showed that the Pd catalyst suffers from severe Pd dissolution, whereas for the Pd-Au selective leaching of Pd is considerably slower. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Mechanisms of the rapid dissolution of plutonium dioxide in acidic media under oxidizing or reducing conditions

    Until recently plutonium dioxide was known to be among the metallic oxides most difficult to dissolve. This property is understandable given the free energy of the dissolution reaction (ΔG0) in acidic noncomplexing media (ΔG0 = 32.04 kJ/mol). Thermodynamic calculations predict that PuO2 will dissolve under oxidizing or reducing conditions. The oxidizing dissolution, leading to Pu(VI) ion in solution, is easy to perform with a strong oxidant like Ag(II). The mechanism of the oxidizing dissolution of PuO2 was investigated by using carbon paste electrochemistry (CPE) and 18 O labeling. PuO2 can also be dissolved in acidic solution if the redox potential of the mixture is low (e.g., Cr2+, V2+, or U3+ as reducing agents). The kinetics of the heterogeneous reducing dissolution of PuO2 with Cr2+ were investigated and the reaction mechanism was determined by 18 O labeling. All the results will be presented and discussed in the context of minimizing the amount of plutonium-contaminated solid wastes in the nuclear fuel cycle. 9 figs., 17 refs

  15. Toward targeted 'oxidation therapy' of cancer: peroxidase-catalysed cytotoxicity of indole-3-acetic acids

    Purpose: The study aimed to identify suitable prodrugs that could be used to test the hypothesis that peroxidase activity in cells, either endogenous or enhanced by immunological targeting, can activate prodrugs to cytotoxins. We hypothesized that prototype prodrugs based on derivatives of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), when activated by peroxidase enzymes (e.g., from horseradish, HRP) should produce peroxyl radicals, with deleterious biological consequences. Methods and Materials: V79 hamster cells were incubated with IAA or derivatives ± HRP and cytotoxicity assessed by a clonogenic assay. To assess the toxicity of stable oxidation products, prodrugs were also oxidized by HRP without cells, and the products then added to cells. Results: The combination of prodrug and enzyme resulted in cytotoxicity, but neither indole nor enzyme in isolation was toxic under the conditions used. Although lipid peroxidation was stimulated in liposomes by the prodrug/enzyme treatment, it could not be measured in mammalian cells. Adding oxidized prodrugs to cells resulted in cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Although the hypothesis that prodrugs of this type could enhance oxidative stress via lipid peroxidation was not established, the results nonetheless demonstrated oxidatively-activated cytotoxicity via indole acetic acid prodrugs, and suggested these as a new type of substrate for antibody-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy (ADEPT). The hypothesized free-radical fragmentation intermediates were demonstrated, but lipid peroxidation associated with peroxyl radical formation was unlikely to be the major route to cytotoxicity

  16. Mechanisms of the rapid dissolution of plutonium dioxide in acidic media under oxidizing or reducing conditions

    Until recently plutonium dioxide was known to be among the metallic oxides most difficult to dissolve. This property is understandable given the free energy of the dissolution reaction (ΔG0) in acidic noncomplexing media (ΔG0 = 32.04 kJ/mol). Thermodynamic calculations predict that PuO2 will dissolve under oxidizing or reducing conditions. The oxidizing dissolution, leading to Pu(VI) ion in solution, is easy to perform with a strong oxidant like Ag(II). The mechanism of the oxidizing dissolution of PuO2 was investigated by using carbon paste electrochemistry (CPE) and 18O labeling. PuO2 can also be dissolved in acidic solution if the redox potential of the mixture is low (e.g., Cr2+, V2+, or U3+ as reducing agents). The kinetics of the heterogeneous reducing dissolution of PuO2 with Cr2+ were investigated and the reaction mechanism was determined by 18O labeling. In this paper all the results are presented and discussed in the context of minimizing the amount of plutonium-contaminated solid wastes in the nuclear fuel cycle

  17. Omega-9 Oleic Acid Induces Fatty Acid Oxidation and Decreases Organ Dysfunction and Mortality in Experimental Sepsis

    Oliveira, Flora Magno de Jesus; Burth, Patrícia; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Castro Faria, Mauro Velho; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by inflammatory and metabolic alterations, which lead to massive cytokine production, oxidative stress and organ dysfunction. In severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome, plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) are increased. Several NEFA are deleterious to cells, activate Toll-like receptors and inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase, causing lung injury. A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil is beneficial. The main component of olive oil is omega-9 oleic acid (OA), a monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA). We analyzed the effect of OA supplementation on sepsis. OA ameliorated clinical symptoms, increased the survival rate, prevented liver and kidney injury and decreased NEFA plasma levels in mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). OA did not alter food intake and weight gain but diminished reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NEFA plasma levels. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT1A) mRNA levels were increased, while uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) liver expression was enhanced in mice treated with OA. OA also inhibited the decrease in 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) expression and increased the enzyme expression in the liver of OA-treated mice compared to septic animals. We showed that OA pretreatment decreased NEFA concentration and increased CPT1A and UCP2 and AMPK levels, decreasing ROS production. We suggest that OA has a beneficial role in sepsis by decreasing metabolic dysfunction, supporting the benefits of diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). PMID:27078880

  18. Mesoporous Nb and Ta Oxides: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications in Heterogeneous Acid Catalysis

    Rao, Yuxiang Tony

    In this work, a series of mesoporous Niobium and Tantalum oxides with different pore sizes (C6, C12, C18 , ranging from 12A to 30 A) were synthesized using the ligand-assisted templating approach and investigated for their activities in a wide range of catalytic applications including benzylation, alkylation and isomerization. The as-synthesized mesoporous materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and solid-state Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. In order to probe into the structural and coordination geometry of mesoporous Nb oxide and in efforts to make meaningful comparisons of mesoporous niobia prepared by the amine-templating method with the corresponding bulk sol-gel prepared Nb2O5 phase, 17O magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR studies were conducted. The results showed a very high local order in the mesoporous sample. The oxygen atoms are coordinated only as ONb 2 in contrast with bulk phases in which the oxygen atoms are always present in a mixture of ONb2 and ONb3 coordination environments. To enhance their surface acidities and thus improve their performance as solid acid catalysts in the acid-catalyzed reactions mentioned above, pure mesoporous Nb and Ta oxides were further treated with 1M sulfuric acid or phosphoric acid. Their surface acidities before and after acid treatment were measured by Fourier transform infraRed (FT IR), amine titration and temperature programmed desorption of ammonia (NH3-TPD). Results obtained in this study showed that sulfated mesoporous Nb and Ta oxides materials possess relative high surface areas (up to 612 m 2/g) and amorphous wormhole structure. These mesoporous structures are thus quite stable to acid treatment. It was also found that Bronsted (1540 cm-1) and Lewis (1450 cm-1) acid sites coexist in a roughly 50:50 mixture

  19. Strategies for comprehensive analysis of amino acid biomarkers of oxidative stress.

    Ptolemy, A S; Lee, R; Britz-McKibbin, P

    2007-07-01

    Despite the wide interest in using modified amino acids as putative biomarkers of oxidative stress, many issues remain as to their overall reliability for early detection and diagnosis of diseases. In contrast to conventional single biomarker studies, comprehensive analysis of biomarkers offers an unbiased strategy for global assessment of modified amino acid metabolism due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This review examines recent analytical techniques amenable for analysis of modified amino acids in biological samples reported during 2003-2007. Particular attention is devoted to the need for validated methods applicable to high-throughput analysis of multiple amino acid biomarkers, as well as consideration of sample pretreatment protocols on artifact formation for improved clinical relevance. PMID:17514495

  20. Spontaneously Bi decorated carbon supported Pt nanoparticles for formic acid electro-oxidation

    Highlights: ► Selective decoration of Bi onto commercial Pt/C is carried out by a simple gas controlled surface potential modulation technique. ► Electrochemical measurements indicate Bi decorated Pt/C catalyst exhibits higher and much longer electrocatalytic performance for formic acid electro-oxidation due to a combination of the electronic effect and third-body effect. ► The 3.4 nm catalysts demonstrated higher performance over that of 2.4 nm due to decrease in Pt–COads bond strength. ► The onset potential for formic acid electro-oxidation reduced by more than 100 mV. - Abstract: This work presents carbon supported Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles decorated with a submonolayer of Bismuth (Bi) to enhance the anodic electro-oxidation efficiency for a Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). The coverage of Bi adatoms, as measured by cyclic voltammetry was controlled in the range of 15–75%. This ex situ study of the Bi decorated Pt/C catalysts was done using a three electrode electrochemical cell at room temperature to access formic acid electro-oxidation performance and durability. Two commercial Pt/C catalysts were investigated of varying average size: 2.4 nm and 3.4 nm. An optimal Bi coverage was observed to be 54% coverage or greater for both catalyst sizes, resulting in a favorable decrease in the formic acid onset potential by greater than 0.1 V. The 3.4 nm catalyst demonstrated higher performance over that of 2.4 nm, with a 23-fold current density increase at 0.2 V vs. RHE. The results indicate that Bi decorated Pt nanoparticles have excellent electrochemical properties for the electro-oxidation of formic acid (high electro-catalytic activity and excellent stability) due to a combination of the electronic effect and third-body effect, thereby promoting the non-poisoning direct electro-oxidation reaction pathway. Based on position of CO stripping peak for 15% Bi coverage, Pt–COads bond strength decreased for 3.4 nm Pt/C whereas no shift was observed in

  1. UV assisted photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of phthalic acid using spray deposited Al doped zinc oxide thin films

    Mahadik, M.A.; Shinde, S.S.; Hunge, Y.M.; Mohite, V.S.; Kumbhar, S.S.; Moholkar, A.V.; Rajpure, K.Y.; Bhosale, C.H., E-mail: chbhosale@gmail.com

    2014-10-25

    Highlights: • Nanostructured undoped and AZO thin films prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis. • Effect of Al doping on the structural, morphological and photoluminance properties. • Photocatalytic degradation of phthalic acid under UV light illumination. • Reaction kinetics and mineralization of phthalic acid. - Abstract: Undoped and Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films are successfully prepared by spray pyrolysis technique at optimised substrate temperature of 400 °C onto amorphous and F:SnO{sub 2} coated glass substrates. Effect of Al doping on structural, morphological and optical properties of ZnO thin films is studied. Deposited films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure having (0 0 2) preferred orientation. The PEC characterization shows that, short circuit current (I{sub sc}) and open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) are (I{sub sc} = 0.38 mA and V{sub oc} = 421 mV) relatively higher at the 3 at.% Al doping. SEM images show deposited thin films are compact and uniform with seed like grains. All films exhibit average transmittance of about 82% in the visible region and a sharp absorption onset at 375 nm corresponding to 3.3 eV. The photocatalytic activities of the large surface area (64 cm{sup 2}) Al-doped ZnO photocatalyst samples were evaluated by photoelectrocatalytic degradation of phthalic acid under UV light irradiation. The results show that the 3 at.% AZO thin film photocatalyst exhibited degradation of phthalic acid up to about 45% within 3 h with significant reduction in COD and TOC values.

  2. Reduced Capacity for Fatty Acid Oxidation in Rats with Inherited Susceptibility to Diet-Induced Obesity

    Ji, Hong; Friedman, Mark I.

    2007-01-01

    High-fat, energy-dense diets promote weight gain and obesity in humans and other animals, but the mechanisms underlying such diet-induced obesity remain elusive. To determine whether a reduced capacity to oxidize fat is involved in the etiology of diet-induced obesity, we examined different measures of fatty acid oxidation in rats selectively bred for susceptibility (DIO) or resistance (DR) to dietary obesity before and after they were fed a high-fat diet and became obese. DIO rats eating a l...

  3. Oxidative Stress in Dog with Heart Failure: The Role of Dietary Fatty Acids and Antioxidants

    Emmanuelle Sagols

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In dogs with heart failure, cell oxygenation and cellular metabolism do not work properly, leading to the production of a large amount of free radicals. In the organism, these free radicals are responsible of major cellular damages: this is oxidative stress. However, a suitable food intake plays an important role in limiting this phenomenon: on the one hand, the presence of essential fatty acids in the composition of membranes decreases sensitivity of cells to free radicals and constitutes a first protection against the oxidative stress; on the other hand, coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, and polyphenols are antioxidant molecules which can help cells to neutralize these free radicals.

  4. Application of advanced oxidation processes for removing salicylic acid from synthetic wastewaters

    Djalma; Ribeiro; da; Silva; Carlos; A.Martinez-Huítle

    2010-01-01

    In this study,advanced oxidation processes(AOPs) such as anodic oxidation(AO),UV/H_2O_2 and Fenton processes(FP) were investigated for the degradation of salicylic acid(SA) in lab-scale experiments.Boron-doped diamond(BDD) film electrodes using Ta as substrates were employed for AO of SA.In the case of FP and UV/H_2O_2,most favorable experimental conditions were determined for each process and these were used for comparing with AO process.The study showed that the FP was the most effective process under ...

  5. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kawada, Teruo, E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  6. Synthesis of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials by oxidation and thermolysis

    Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Zou, Yongcun [State Key Laboratory of Inoranic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistryg, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Shujie; Liu, Heng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst. The obtained sample of SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent catalytic activity in aldol condensation reaction. Research highlights: {yields} Synthesize acid-base bifunctional mesoporous materials SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. {yields} Oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. {yields} Exhibit good catalytic performance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. -- Abstract: A novel and efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of acid-base bifunctional catalyst SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}. This method was achieved by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and (3-triethoxysilylpropyl) carbamicacid-1-methylcyclohexylester (3TAME) in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), followed by oxidation and then thermolysis to generate acidic site and basic site. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron micrographs (TEM) show that the resultant materials keep mesoporous structure. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), back titration, solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR and solid-state {sup 29}Si MAS NMR confirm that the organosiloxanes were condensed as a part of the silica framework. The bifunctional sample (SO{sub 3}H-MCM-41-NH{sub 2}) containing amine and sulfonic acids exhibits excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  7. Coriander seed oil methyl esters as biodiesel fuel: Unique fatty acid composition and excellent oxidative stability

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt%) acid. Most of the remaining fatty acid profile consisted of common 18 carbon constituents such as linoleic (9Z,12Z-octadeca-dienoic; 13.0 wt%), oleic (9Z-octadecenoic; 7.6 wt%) and stearic (octadecanoic; 3.1 wt%) acids. A standard transesterification procedure with methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst was used to provide C. sativum oil methyl esters (CSME). Acid-catalyzed pretreatment was necessary beforehand to reduce the acid value of the oil from 2.66 to 0.47 mg g-1. The derived cetane number, kinematic viscosity, and oxidative stability (Rancimat method) of CSME was 53.3, 4.21 mm2 s-1 (40 oC), and 14.6 h (110 oC). The cold filter plugging and pour points were -15 oC and -19 oC, respectively. Other properties such as acid value, free and total glycerol content, iodine value, as well as sulfur and phosphorous contents were acceptable according to the biodiesel standards ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Also reported are lubricity, heat of combustion, and Gardner color, along with a comparison of CSME to soybean oil methyl esters (SME). CSME exhibited higher oxidative stability, superior low temperature properties, and lower iodine value than SME. In summary, CSME has excellent fuel properties as a result of its unique fatty acid composition.

  8. Investigation of surfactant mediated acid-base charging of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems.

    Gacek, Matthew M; Berg, John C

    2012-12-21

    The current work examines the role of acid-base properties on particle charging in apolar media. Manipulating the polarity and magnitude of charge in such systems is of growing interest to a number of applications. A major hurdle to the implementation of this technology is that the mechanism(s) of particle charging remain a subject of debate. The authors previously conducted a study of the charging of a series of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems that contained the surfactant AOT. It was observed that there was a correlation between the particle electrophoretic mobility and the acid-base nature of the particle, as characterized by aqueous point of zero charge (PZC) or the isoelectric point (IEP). The current study investigates whether or not a similar correlation is observed with other surfactants, namely, the acidic Span 80 and the basic OLOA 11000. This is accomplished by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of a series of mineral oxides that are dispersed in Isopar-L containing various concentrations of either Span 80 or OLOA 11000. The mineral oxides used have PZC values that cover a wide range of pH, providing a systematic study of how particle and surfactant acid-base properties impact particle charge. It was found that the magnitude and polarity of particle surface charge varied linearly with the particle PZC for both surfactants used. In addition, the point at which the polarity of charge reversed for the basic surfactant OLOA 11000 was shifted to a pH of approximately 8.5, compared to the previous result of about 5 for AOT. This proves that both surfactant and particle acid-base properties are important, and provides support for the theory of acid-base charging in apolar media. PMID:23157688

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of ascorbic acid mediated by carbon nano tubes/ Li+/ carbon paste modified solid electrode

    Multi-walled carbon nano tube (MWCNT) was used to modify BPPG electrode because of its unique structure and extraordinary properties. MWCNT modified electrode exhibited obvious enhancing and electro catalyzing effects to the oxidation of ascorbic acid using cyclic voltammetry technique. MWCNT was bonded on BPPG electrode surface using carbon paste with ratio of 30 % (w/ W) carbon paste (binder): 70 % (w/ w) MWCNT. This method of modification has lowered the capacitance background current and enabled lower detection limit of ascorbic acid concentration. The electrical conductivity property of MWCNT modified electrode was further improved with the intercalation with lithium ion and resulted in current enhancement of 2 times on the oxidation current of ascorbic acid. Parameters of pH and temperature showed significant relation to the sensitivity of MWCNT modified electrode. Under the optimized parameters, the calibration curve constructed was linear up from 50 μM to 5 mM with sensitivity of 34.5 mA M-1. The practical application of MWCNT modified electrode was demonstrated with Vitamin C pill and orange juice. Good reproducibility and recovery of ascorbic acid concentration showed the feasibility of MWCNT modified electrode to be used in the detection of ascorbic acid in aqueous solution. This also proposed MWCNT modified BPPG electrode possessed advantages such as low detection limit, high stability, low cost and simplicity in fabrication. (author)

  10. Oxidation and textural characteristics of butter and ice cream with modified fatty acid profiles.

    Gonzalez, S; Duncan, S E; O'Keefe, S F; Sumner, S S; Herbein, J H

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate oxidation and firmness of butter and ice cream made with modified milkfat containing enhanced amounts of linoleic acid or oleic acid. The influence of the fatty acid profile of the HO milkfat relating to product properties as compared with the influence the fatty acid profile of the HL milkfat was the main focus of the research. Altering the degree of unsaturation in milkfat may affect melting characteristics and oxidation rates, leading to quality issues in dairy products. Three milkfat compositions (high-oleic, high-linoleic, and control) were obtained by modifying the diets of Holstein cows. Ice cream and butter were processed from milkfat obtained from cows in each dietary group. Butter and ice cream samples were analyzed to determine fatty acid profile and firmness. High-oleic milkfat resulted in a softer butter. Solid fat index of high-oleic and high-linoleic milkfat was lower than the control. Control ice cream mix had higher viscosity compared with high-oleic and high-linoleic, but firmness of all ice creams was similar when measured between -17 and -13 degrees C. Nutritional and textural properties of butter and ice cream can be improved by modifying the diets of cows. PMID:12613850

  11. Photo-Fenton-like treatment of K-acid: assessment of treatability, toxicity and oxidation products.

    Olmez-Hanci, Tugba; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Gelegen, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Photo-Fenton-like treatment of the commercially important naphthalene sulphonate K-acid (2-naphthylamine-3,6,8-trisulphonic acid) was investigated using UV-C, UV-A and visible light irradiation. Changes in toxicity patterns were followed by the Vibrio fischeri bioassay. Rapid and complete degradation of K-acid accompanied with nearly complete oxidation and mineralization rates (>90%) were achieved for all studied irradiation types. On the other hand, detoxification was rather limited and did not change significantly during photo-Fenton-like treatment. Several oxidation products could be identified via liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer analyses, such as desulphonated and hydroxylated naphthalene derivatives, quinones, and ring-opening as well as dimerization products. Photo-Fenton-like treatment of K-acid with UV-C, UV-A and visible light irradiation occurred through a series of hydroxylation and desulphonation reactions, followed by ring cleavage. A common degradation pathway for photo-Fenton-like treatment of K-acid using different irradiation types was proposed. PMID:25259495

  12. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid

    Y. Tan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid is an important intermediate in aqueous methylglyoxal oxidation and a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. Altieri et al. (2008 proposed that acetic acid was the precursor of oligoesters observed in methylglyoxal oxidation. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid at concentrations relevant to atmospheric waters (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radical. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, and IC-ESI-MS. The formation of glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids were observed. In contrast to methylglyoxal oxidation, succinic acid and oligomers were not detected. Using results from these and methylglyoxal + OH radical experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  13. Effects of Dietary Zinc Oxide and a Blend of Organic Acids on Broiler Live Performance, Carcass Traits, and Serum Parameters

    BG Sarvari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of different dietary supplementation levels of zinc oxide and of an organic acid blend on broiler performance, carcass traits, and serum parameters. A total of 2400 one-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks, with average initial body weight 44.21±0.19g, was distributed according to a completely randomized design in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement. Six treatments, consisting of diets containing two zinc oxide levels (0 and 0.01% of the diet and three organic acid blend levels (0, 0.15, and 0.30% were applied, with eight replicates of 50 birds each. The experimental diets were supplied ad libitum for 42 days. There were significant performance differences among birds fed the different zinc oxide and organic acid blend levels until 42 d of age (p<0.01. The result of this experiment showed that the organic acid blend did not affect feed intake, but zinc oxide increased feed intake. Carcass traits were not influenced by the experimental supplements. Zinc oxide supplementation increased serum alkaline phosphatase level (p<0.01. The organic acid blend reduced serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels (p<0.05. No interactions were found between zinc oxide and the organic acid blend for none of the evaluated parameters. We concluded that zinc oxide and the evaluated organic acid blend improve broiler performance.

  14. The dynamics of nitric acid production and the fate of nitrogen oxides

    Russell, Armistead G.; McRae, Gregory J.; Cass, Glen R.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical model is used to study the fate of nitrogen oxides (NO_x) emissions and the reactions responsible for the formation of nitric acid (HNO_3). Model results indicate that the majority of the NO_x inserted into an air parcel in the Los Angeles basin is removed by dry deposition at the ground during the first 24 h of travel, and that HNO_3 is the largest single contributor to this deposition flux. A significant amount of the nitric acid is produced at night by N_2O_5 hydrolysis. Per...

  15. Effect of Diluents on the Extraction of Oxalic Acid by Trialkylphosphine Oxide

    李玉鑫; 王运东; 戴猷元

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In liquid-liquid solvent extraction processes, diluents have a strong influence on the extraction mechanism and efficiency. In this study, benzene, cyclohexane, trichloromethane, carbon tetrachloride, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), butyl acetate, and 1-octanol were used as diluents in the extraction of oxalic acid by trialkylphosphine oxide (TRPO). The effects of extractant concentration, initial concentration of oxalic acid and diluent type on the extraction equilibrium partition coefficient are analyzed. The sequence of the extraction ability by different diluents is MIBK > butyl acetate > cyclohexane=benzene > carbon tetrachloride > 1-octanol > trichloromethane. Extraction mechanism was analyzed and extraction model parameters were evaluated.

  16. Investigation on the spectroscopic characteristics for Pu oxidation state in acid and alkali medium

    The absorption spectra of Pu in stock solution were measured using a UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer after dissolving PuO2 with HNO3, HF and HCIO4. The spectroscopic characteristics of Pu (III, IV, VI) in acidic, neutral and alkali media were investigated. Also, the intensities and position of major peaks for Pu(VI) were observed with increasing acidic and alkali concentration. The variation of oxidation states of Pu(VI) with an adding reducing reactant was investigated in HCI and NaOH medium

  17. Peroxydisulfate Oxidation of L-Ascorbic Acid for Its Direct Spectrophotometric Determination in Dietary Supplements

    Salkić, M.; Selimović, A.; Pašalić, H.; Keran, H.

    2014-03-01

    A selective and accurate direct spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of L-as cor bic acid in dietary supplements. Background correction was based on the oxidation of L-ascorbic acid by potassi um peroxydisulfate in an acidic medium. The molar absorptivity of the proposed method was 1.41 · 104 l/(mol · cm) at 265 nm. The method response was linear up to an L-ascorbic acid concentration of 12.00 μg/ml. The detection limit was 0.11 μg/ml, and the relative standard deviation was 0.9 % (n = 7) for 8.00 μg/ml L-ascorbic acid. Other compounds commonly found in the dietary supplements did not interfere with the detection of L-ascorbic acid. The proposed procedure was successfully applied to the determination of L-ascorbic acid in these supplements, and the results obtained agreed with those obtained by iodine titration.

  18. Synthesis, Characterization, and Tribological Behavior of Oleic Acid Capped Graphene Oxide

    Tiedan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO nanosheets were prepared by modified Hummers and Offeman methods. Furthermore, oleic acid (OA capped graphene oxide (OACGO nanosheets were prepared and characterized by means of Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. At the same time, the friction and wear properties of OA capped graphite powder (OACG, OACGO, and oleic acid capped precipitate of graphite (OACPG as additives in poly-alpha-olefin (PAO were compared using four-ball tester and SRV-1 reciprocating ball-on-disc friction and wear tester. By the addition of OACGO to PAO, the antiwear ability was improved and the friction coefficient was decreased. Also, the tribological mechanism of the GO was investigated.

  19. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability. PMID:27474635

  20. Fast repair of oxidizing OH adducts of DNA by hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. A pulse radiolytic study

    Using pulse radiolytic techniques, it has been demonstrated that the interactions of oxidizing OH adducts of DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA), polyA and polyG with hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives proceed via an electron transfer process (k=5-30x108 dm3 mol-1 s-1). In addition, the rates for fast repair of OH adducts of dAMP, polyA and DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA) are slower than the corresponding rates for the rest OH adducts of DNA constituents. The slower rates for repair of oxidizing OH adducts of dAMP may be the rate determining step during the interaction of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives with OH adducts of DNA containing the varieties of OH adducts of DNA constituents

  1. Oxidation kinetics of crystal violet by potassium permanganate in acidic medium

    Khan, Sameera Razi; Ashfaq, Maria; Mubashir; Masood, Summyia

    2016-05-01

    The oxidation kinetics of crystal violet (a triphenylmethane dye) by potassium permanganate was focused in an acidic medium by the spectrophotometric method at 584 nm. The oxidation reaction of crystal violet by potassium permanganate is carried out in an acidic medium at different temperatures ranging within 298-318 K. The kinetic study was carried out to investigate the effect of the concentration, ionic strength and temperature. The reaction followed first order kinetics with respect to potassium permanganate and crystal violet and the overall rate of the reaction was found to be second order. Thermodynamic activation parameters like the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H*), free energy change (Δ G*), and entropy change (Δ S*) have also been evaluated.

  2. Synthesis of graphene nanosheets via oxalic acid-induced chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide

    Song, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Mingxun; Cui, Xiao-Li; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-01

    Preparing high-quality graphene through reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by oxalic acid is demonstrated in this paper. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry were taken to confirm the reduction of GO and the formation of graphene under these mild conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis and conductivity measurements further testify the excellent thermal stability and conductivity of the obtained graphene. A possible mechanism for the reduction process was also proposed. Furthermore, a Pt-graphene composite was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation was observed. With advantages of low toxicity, simple purification process and high quality of the product, oxalic acid provides a feasible route to prepare graphene from GO under mild conditions, thus facilitating the use of graphene-based materials for large-scale applications.

  3. Protective effect of vitamin E on sperm motility and oxidative stress in valproic acid treated rats.

    Ourique, Giovana M; Saccol, Etiane M H; Pês, Tanise S; Glanzner, Werner G; Schiefelbein, Sun Hee; Woehl, Viviane M; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Pavanato, Maria A; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Barreto, Kátia P

    2016-09-01

    Long-term administration of valproic acid (VPA) is known to promote reproductive impairment mediated by increase in testicular oxidative stress. Vitamin E (VitE) is a lipophilic antioxidant known to be essential for mammalian spermatogenesis. However, the capacity of this vitamin to abrogate the VPA-mediated oxidative stress has not yet been assessed. In the current study, we evaluated the protective effect of VitE on functional abnormalities related to VPA-induced oxidative stress in the male reproductive system. VPA (400 mg kg(-1)) was administered by gavage and VitE (50 mg kg(-1)) intraperitoneally to male Wistar rats for 28 days. Analysis of spermatozoa from the cauda epididymides was performed. The testes and epididymides were collected for measurement of oxidative stress biomarkers. Treatment with VPA induced a decrease in sperm motility accompanied by an increase in oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, depletion of reduced glutathione and a decrease in total reactive antioxidant potential on testes and epididymides. Co-administration of VitE restored the antioxidant potential and prevented oxidative damage on testes and epididymides, restoring sperm motility. Thus, VitE protects the reproductive system from the VPA-induced damage, suggesting that it may be a useful compound to minimize the reproductive impairment in patients requiring long-term treatment with VPA. PMID:27424124

  4. Photoelectrochemical oxidation of salicylic acid and salicylaldehyde on titanium dioxide nanotube arrays

    We report on the kinetics of photoelectrochemical oxidation of salicylic acid (SA) and salicylaldehyde (SH) on titanium dioxide nanotube arrays. The TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by the electrochemical oxidation of titanium substrates in a nonaqueous electrolyte (DMSO/HF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to examine the morphology of the formed nanotubes. Linear voltammetry was used to study the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical behavior of the synthesized TiO2 nanotube arrays. The photoelectrochemical oxidation of SA and SH on the TiO2 nanotubes was monitored by in situ UV-vis spectroscopy, showing that the kinetics of the photoelectrochemical oxidation of SA and SH follows pseudo first-order and that the rate constant of SH oxidation is 1.5 times larger than that of SA degradation. Quantum chemical calculations based on the DFT method were performed on SA and SH to address the large difference in kinetics. The relatively higher ELUMO - EHOMO makes SA more stable and thus more difficult to be oxidized photoelectrochemically. The impact of temperature and initial concentrations on the kinetics of SA and SH photoelectrochemical degradation was also investigated in the present work.

  5. CD36 Mediated Fatty Acid-Induced Podocyte Apoptosis via Oxidative Stress.

    Wei Hua

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia-induced apoptosis mediated by fatty acid translocase CD36 is associated with increased uptake of ox-LDL or fatty acid in macrophages, hepatocytes and proximal tubular epithelial cells, leading to atherosclerosis, liver damage and fibrosis in obese patients, and diabetic nephropathy (DN, respectively. However, the specific role of CD36 in podocyte apoptosis in DN with hyperlipidemia remains poorly investigated.The expression of CD36 was measured in paraffin-embedded kidney tissue samples (Ctr = 18, DN = 20 by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. We cultured conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes (MPC5 and treated cells with palmitic acid, and measured CD36 expression by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence; lipid uptake by Oil red O staining and BODIPY staining; apoptosis by flow cytometry assay, TUNEL assay and Western blot analysis; and ROS production by DCFH-DA fluorescence staining. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 statistical software.CD36 expression was increased in kidney tissue from DN patients with hyperlipidemia. Palmitic acid upregulated CD36 expression and promoted its translocation from cytoplasm to plasma membrane in podocytes. Furthermore, palmitic acid increased lipid uptake, ROS production and apoptosis in podocytes, Sulfo-N-succinimidyloleate (SSO, the specific inhibitor of the fatty acid binding site on CD36, decreased palmitic acid-induced fatty acid accumulation, ROS production, and apoptosis in podocytes. Antioxidant 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidine -1-oxyl (tempol inhibited the overproduction of ROS and apoptosis in podocytes induced by palmitic acid.CD36 mediated fatty acid-induced podocyte apoptosis via oxidative stress might participate in the process of DN.

  6. Effect of Salicylic and Picolinic Acids on the Adsorption of U(VI) onto Oxides

    The effect of organic acids on the adsorption of U(VI) onto oxide surfaces (TiO2(anatase), SiO2 (amorphous) and Al2O-3(amorphous)) has been investigated. Two different organic acids, salicylic and picolinic acids, were used. Changes of adsorption ratio of U(VI), which depend on the existence of organic acids in a sample, were measured as a function of pH. Quantities of adsorbed organic acids, which depend on the existence of U(VI) in a sample, were also measured as a function of pH. It is confirmed that the soluble complex formation of U(VI) with organic acids can deteriorate the adsorption of U(VI) onto TiO2 surface. It is noteworthy that salicylic acid does not affect the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO2 surface, however, picolinic acid enhances the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO2 surface. The latter effect can be understood by considering the formation of a ternary surface complex on SiO2 surface, which was confirmed by the co-adsorption of picolinic acid with U(VI) and the change in a fluorescence spectra of U(VI) on surface, In the case of Al2O-3, organic acids themselves were largely adsorbed onto a surface without deteriorating the adsorption of U(VI). This would support the possibility of a ternary surface complex formation on the Al2O-3 surface, and an additional spectroscopic study is required.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acid oxidation products prevent vascular endothelial cell activation by coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls

    Coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may facilitate development of atherosclerosis by stimulating pro-inflammatory pathways in the vascular endothelium. Nutrition, including fish oil-derived long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6ω-3), can reduce inflammation and thus the risk of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that cyclopentenone metabolites produced by oxidation of DHA can protect against PCB-induced endothelial cell dysfunction. Oxidized DHA (oxDHA) was prepared by incubation of the fatty acid with the free radical generator 2,2-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Cellular pretreatment with oxDHA prevented production of superoxide induced by PCB77, and subsequent activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A4/J4-neuroprostanes (NPs) were identified and quantitated using HPLC ESI tandem mass spectrometry. Levels of these NPs were markedly increased after DHA oxidation with AAPH. The protective actions of oxDHA were reversed by treatment with sodium borohydride (NaBH4), which concurrently abrogated A4/J4-NP formation. Up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by PCB77 was markedly reduced by oxDHA, but not by un-oxidized DHA. These protective effects were proportional to the abundance of A4/J4 NPs in the oxidized DHA sample. Treatment of cells with oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5ω-3) also reduced MCP-1 expression, but less than oxDHA. Treatment with DHA-derived cyclopentenones also increased DNA binding of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and downstream expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), similarly to the Nrf-2 activator sulforaphane. Furthermore, sulforaphane prevented PCB77-induced MCP-1 expression, suggesting that activation of Nrf-2 mediates the observed protection against PCB77 toxicity. Our data implicate A4/J4-NPs as mediators of omega-3 fatty acid-mediated protection against the endothelial toxicity of coplanar PCBs.

  8. Citrus Flavanones Affect Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation in Rats by Acting as Prooxidant Agents

    Rodrigo Polimeni Constantin; Gilson Soares do Nascimento; Renato Polimeni Constantin; Clairce Luzia Salgueiro; Adelar Bracht; Emy Luiza Ishii-Iwamoto; Nair Seiko Yamamoto; Jorgete Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Citrus flavonoids have a wide range of biological activities and positive health effects on mammalian cells because of their antioxidant properties. However, they also act as prooxidants and thus may interfere with metabolic pathways. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effects of three citrus flavanones, hesperidin, hesperetin, and naringenin, on several parameters linked to fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and perfused livers of rats. When exogenous octanoate was ...

  9. Silicon isotopic fractionation during adsorption of aqueous monosilicic acid onto iron oxide

    Delstanche, Séverine; Opfergelt, Sophie; Cardinal, Damien; Elsass, Francoise; André, Luc; Delvaux, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The quantification of silicon isotopic fractionation by biotic and abiotic processes contributes to the understanding of the Si continental cycle. In soils, light Si isotopes are selectively taken up by plants, and concentrate in secondary clay-sized minerals. Si an readily be retrieved from soil solution through the specific adsorption of monosilicic acid () by iron oxides. Here, we report on the Si-isotopic fractionation during adsorption on synthesized ferrihydrite and goethite in batch ex...

  10. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from rumi...

  11. Oxidation Reactivities of Organic Sulfur Compounds in Fuel Oil Using Immobilized Heteropoly Acid as Crystal

    YAN Xuemin; LEI Jiaheng; LIU Dan; GUO Liping; WU Yangchun

    2007-01-01

    Heteropoly acid of Keggin structure phosphotungstic(HPW) and phosphomolybdic(HPMo) were chemically anchored to the modified SBA-15 channel. The materials were used as catalyst for oxidative desulfurization of organic sulfur compounds including benzothiophene (BT), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and 4,6-dimethydibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT). The experimental results show that the catalysts are efficient and reusable, the catalytic activity is hardly reduced even in the 5th cycle of use.

  12. Oxidation of benzaldehydes to benzoic acid derivatives by three Desulfovibrio strains.

    Zellner, G; Kneifel, H; De Winter, J.

    1990-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Marburg, "Desulfovibrio simplex" XVI, and Desulfovibrio sp. strain MP47 used benzaldehydes such as vanillin, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, protocatechualdehyde, syringaldehyde, p-anisaldehyde, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and 2-methoxybenzaldehyde as electron donors for sulfate reduction and carbon dioxide and/or components of yeast extract as carbon sources for cell synthesis. The aldehydes were oxidized to their corresponding benzoic acids. The three sulfate reducers oxidiz...

  13. Oxidative Stress in Dog with Heart Failure: The Role of Dietary Fatty Acids and Antioxidants

    Emmanuelle Sagols; Nathalie Priymenko

    2011-01-01

    In dogs with heart failure, cell oxygenation and cellular metabolism do not work properly, leading to the production of a large amount of free radicals. In the organism, these free radicals are responsible of major cellular damages: this is oxidative stress. However, a suitable food intake plays an important role in limiting this phenomenon: on the one hand, the presence of essential fatty acids in the composition of membranes decreases sensitivity of cells to free radicals and constitutes a ...

  14. Birth Prevalence of Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Disorders in Iberia

    Rocha, Hugo; Castiñeiras, Daisy; Delgado, Carmen; Egea, José; Yahyaoui, Raquel; González, Yolanda; Conde, Manuel; González, Inmaculada; Rueda, Inmaculada; Rello, Luis; Vilarinho, Laura; Cocho, José

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation disorders (FAOD) are main targets for newborn screening (NBS) programs, which are excellent data sources for accurate estimations of disease birth prevalence. Epidemiological data is of key importance for the understanding of the natural history of the disorders as well as to define more effective public health strategies. In order to estimate FAOD birth prevalence in Iberia, the authors collected data from six NBS programs from Portugal and Spain, encompa...

  15. Effects of composite restorations on nitric oxide and uric acid levels in saliva

    Nilgun Akgul; Pinar Gul; Hamit Hakan Alp; Ahmet Kiziltunc

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, and should, therefore, not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances capable of causing side effects. This study was intended to investigate the effects on salivary nitric oxide (NO) and uric acid (UA) levels after application of dental composite filling materials to healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 individuals (32 female and 20 male) participated in the stu...

  16. Electrochromic iridium oxide films: Compatibility with propionic acid, potassium hydroxide, and lithium perchlorate in propylene carbonate

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2013-01-01

    Porous thin films of It oxide were prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering onto unheated substrates. The crystallite size was similar to 5 nm, and a small amount of unoxidized Ir was present. The electrochromic performance was studied by optical transmittance measurements and cyclic voltammetry applied to films in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes, specifically being 1 M propionic acid, 1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and 1 M lithium perchlorate in propylene carbonate (Li-PC). Cyclic v...

  17. Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols over Gold Catalysts: Role of Acid and Base

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; DeLa Riva, Andrew T.; Helveg, Stig; Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen; Christensen, Claus H.

    Gold nanoparticles are deposited on potassium titanate nanowires and used as heterogeneous catalysts in the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol in methanol to methyl benzoate at ambient conditions. The presence of a catalytic amount of base promotes the reaction and the formation of free benzoic...... acid during the reaction poisons the catalyst. The activity however, of the catalyst can be restored again by addition of base....

  18. Loss of adipose fatty acid oxidation does not potentiate obesity at thermoneutrality

    Jieun Lee; Joseph Choi; Susan Aja; Susanna Scafidi; Michael J. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Ambient temperature affects energy intake and expenditure to maintain homeostasis in a continuously fluctuating environment. Here, mice with an adipose-specific defect in fatty acid oxidation (Cpt2A−/−) were subjected to varying temperatures to determine the role of adipose bioenergetics in environmental adaptation and body weight regulation. Microarray analysis of mice acclimatized to thermoneutrality revealed that Cpt2A−/− interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) failed to induce the expres...

  19. Degradation of acid red 14 by silver ion-catalyzed peroxydisulfate oxidation in an aqueous solution

    RASOULIFARD, Mohammad Hossein; MOHAMMADI, Seied Mohammad Mahdi DOUST

    2012-01-01

    Silver ion (Ag1+)-catalyzed peroxydisulfate was studied for the degradation of acid red 14 (AR-14) in an aqueous medium. The effect of different parameters, such as temperature, peroxydisulfate concentration, and dye and Ag1+ concentrations, were investigated. Application of Ag1+-catalyzed peroxydisulfate, as an advanced oxidation process, introduces an effectual method for wastewater treatment. An accelerated reaction using S2O82- to destroy dyes can be achieved via chemical activat...

  20. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin induce mitochondrial biogenesis and beta-oxidation in white fat

    Flachs, Pavel; Matějková, Olga; Pecina, Petr; Frassen, N.; Brauner, Petr; Rossmeisl, Martin; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef; Kopecký, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. S1 (2005), s. 10-10. ISSN 1467-7881. [European Congress on Obesity /14./. 01.06.2005-04.06.2005, Athens] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/2580; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adipose tissue * n-3 PUFA * mitochondria * fatty acid oxidation * gene expression Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  1. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin induce mitochondrial biogenesis and beta-oxidation in white fat

    Flachs, Pavel; Matějková, Olga; Pecina, Petr; Frassen, N.; Brauner, Petr; Rossmeisl, Martin; Keijer, J.; Houštěk, Josef; Kopecký, Jan

    Elsevier. Roč. 6, č. 1 (2005), s. 8-8. ISSN 1567-5688. [Congress of the European Atherosclerosis Society /75./. 23.04.2005-26.04.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/2580; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : n-3 PUFA * adipose tissue * mitochondria * fatty acid oxidation * gene expression Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  2. Trans fatty acids induce vascular inflammation and reduce vascular nitric oxide production in endothelial cells.

    Naomi G Iwata

    Full Text Available Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA, which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived-dairy products and meat on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans, Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans, and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation.

  3. Fresh green tea and gallic acid ameliorate oxidative stress in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Jeng, Kee-Ching G; Yao, Pei-Wun; Chuang, Lu-Te; Kuo, Su-Ling; Hou, Chien-Wei

    2012-03-01

    Green tea is one of the most-consumed beverages due to its taste and antioxidative polyphenols. However, the protective effects of green tea and its constituent, gallic acid (GA), against kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure have not been studied. We investigated the effect of fresh green tea leaf (GTL) and GA on KA-induced neuronal injury in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that GTL and GA reduced the maximal seizure classes, predominant behavioral seizure patterns, and lipid peroxidation in male FVB mice with status epilepticus (SE). GTL extract and GA provided effective protection against KA-stressed PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the protective mechanism study, GTL and GA decreased Ca(2+) release, ROS, and lipid peroxidation from KA-stressed PC12 cells. Western blot results revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), RhoA, and COX-2 expression were increased in PC12 cells under KA stress, and expression of COX-2 and p38 MAPK, but not RhoA, was significantly reduced by GTL and GA. Furthermore, GTL and GA were able to reduce PGE(2) production from KA-stressed PC12 cells. Taken together, the results showed that GTL and GA provided neuroprotective effects against excitotoxins and may have a clinical application in epilepsy. PMID:22324774

  4. Methanol oxidation at platinum electrodes in acid solution: comparison between model and real catalysts

    A. V. TRIPKOVIC

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Methanol oxidation in acid solution was studied at platinum single crystals, Pt(hkl, as the model catalyst, and at nanostructural platinum supported on high surface area carbon, Pt/C, as the real catalyst. The linear extrapolation method was used to determine the beginning of hydroxyl anion adsorption. Structural sensitivity of the adsorption was proved and a correlation with the onset of the methanol oxidation current was established at all catalysts. Bisulfate and chloride anions were found to decrease the methanol oxidation rate, but probably did not influence the reaction parth. The specific activity for the reaction increased in the sequence Pt(110 < Pt/C < Pt(111, suggesting that the activity of the supported Pt catalyst can be correlated with the activities of the dominating crystal planes on its surface.

  5. Study of the electrocatalytic oxidation of Ethanol over platinum in medium acid

    Electro-catalytic oxidation of ethanol on platinum surfaces in sulfuric acid solutions at different temperatures and concentrations was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The results shown that there is ethanol adsorption at potentials below 0.4V (vs. RHE) with electrode coverage fraction for residues of 0.3 or less. There are also, two irreversible oxidation reactions. Former reaction seems be catalyzed by Pt(OH) species with electronic charge transfer control and the second reaction seems be catalyzed by Pt(OH)4 with diffusion control while Pt(OH)2 does not have catalytic activity. The activity and selectivity for total oxidation increases with ethanol concentration and temperature. Finally, a reaction mechanism, which explains the obtained data, is proposed

  6. Kinetics of oxidation and dissolution of uranium dioxide in aqueous acid solutions

    The oxidation and dissolution of UO2 has been studied using electrochemical methods with an UO2 rotating disc electrode in acidic (pH 3) and non-complexing (trifluoromethanesulfonate: 0.1 mol L−1 NaCF3SO3) media. The effect of the experimental parameters such as scan rate (v) and rotation rate (ω) on the electrochemical signal has been studied. The rotation rate of the electrode does not influence the resulting signal, which indicates that only a charge transfer is involved in the UO2 oxidation kinetic. However, scan rate variations show different reactions involved in the UO2 oxidation. Linear sweep voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry coupled to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements suggest two successive electrochemical reactions with an exchange of one electron for each of them and the formation of one intermediate species of U(V).

  7. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    Silvia Guzmán-Beltrán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs. Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.

  8. Direct synthesis of graphene nanosheets support Pd nanodendrites for electrocatalytic formic acid oxidation

    杨苏东; 陈琳

    2015-01-01

    We report a solvothermal method preparation of dendritic Pd nanoparticles (DPNs) and spherical Pd nanoparticles (SPNs) supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Drastically different morphologies of Pd NPs with nanodendritic structures or spherical structures were observed on graphene by controlling the reduction degree of graphene oxide (GO) un-der mild conditions. In addition to being a commonplace substrate, GO plays a more important role that relies on its surface groups, which serves as a shape-directing agent to direct the dendritic growth. As a result, the obtained DPNs/RGO catalyst exhibits a significantly enhanced electro-catalytic behavior for the oxidation of formic acid compared to the SPNs/RGO catalyst.

  9. Luminescence properties of oxide films formed by anodization of aluminum in 12-tungstophosphoric acid

    In this paper, we have investigated luminescence properties of oxide films formed by anodization of aluminum in 12-tungstophosphoric acid. For the first time we have measured weak luminescence during anodization of aluminum in this electrolyte (so-called galvanoluminescence GL) and showed that there are wide GL bands in the visible region of the spectrum and observed two dominant spectral peaks. The first one is at about 425 nm, and the second one shifts with anodization voltage. As the anodization voltage approaches the breakdown voltage, a large number of sparks appear superimposed on the anodic GL. Several intensive band peaks were observed under breakdown caused by electron transitions in W, P, Al, O, H atoms. Furthermore, photoluminescence (PL) of anodic oxide films and anodic-spark formed oxide coatings were performed. In both cases wide PL bands in the range from 320 nm to 600 nm were observed.

  10. Isoproterenol stimulates 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase and fatty acid oxidation in neonatal hearts.

    Jaswal, Jagdip S; Lund, Chad R; Keung, Wendy; Beker, Donna L; Rebeyka, Ivan M; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2010-10-01

    Isoproterenol increases phosphorylation of LKB, 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), enzymes involved in regulating fatty acid oxidation. However, inotropic stimulation selectively increases glucose oxidation in adult hearts. In the neonatal heart, fatty acid oxidation becomes a major energy source, while glucose oxidation remains low. This study tested the hypothesis that increased energy demand imposed by isoproterenol originates from fatty acid oxidation, secondary to increased LKB, AMPK, and ACC phosphorylation. Isolated working hearts from 7-day-old rabbits were perfused with Krebs solution (0.4 mM palmitate, 11 mM glucose, 0.5 mM lactate, and 100 mU/l insulin) with or without isoproterenol (300 nM). Isoproterenol increased myocardial O(2) consumption (in J·g dry wt(-1)·min(-1); 11.0 ± 1.4, n = 8 vs. 7.5 ± 0.8, n = 6, P < 0.05), and the phosphorylation of LKB (in arbitrary density units; 0.87 ± 0.09, n = 6 vs. 0.59 ± 0.08, n = 6, P < 0.05), AMPK (0.82 ± 0.08, n = 6 vs. 0.51 ± 0.06, n = 6, P < 0.05), and ACC-β (1.47 ± 0.14, n = 6 vs. 0.97 ± 0.07, n = 6, P < 0.05), with a concomitant decrease in malonyl-CoA levels (in nmol/g dry wt; 0.9 ± 0.9, n = 8 vs. 7.5 ± 1.3, n = 8, P < 0.05) and increase in palmitate oxidation (in nmol·g dry wt(-1)·min(-1); 272 ± 45, n = 8 vs. 114 ± 9, n = 6, P < 0.05). Glucose and lactate oxidation were increased (in nmol·g dry wt(-1)·min(-1); 253 ± 75, n = 8 vs. 63 ± 15, n = 9, P < 0.05 and 246 ± 43, n = 8 vs. 82 ± 11, n = 6, P < 0.05, respectively), independent of alterations in pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphorylation, but occurred secondary to a decrease in acetyl-CoA content and acetyl-CoA-to-free CoA ratio. As acetyl-CoA levels decrease in response to isoproterenol, despite an acceleration of the rates of palmitate and carbohydrate oxidation, these data suggest net rates of acetyl-CoA utilization exceed the net rates of acetyl-CoA generation. PMID:20656883

  11. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate.

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Mia, Shamim; Duhaut, Pierre-Benoît; Molleman, Bastiaan

    2013-08-20

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application of biochar, potentially creating Darks Earths or Terra Preta soils. A surface complexation approach has been developed that aims to describe the competitive behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) in soil as well as model systems. Modeling points unexpectedly to a strong change of the molecular conformation of humic acid (HA) with a predominant adsorption in the Stern layer domain at low NOM loading. In soil, mineral oxide surfaces remain efficiently loaded by mineral-protected organic carbon (OC), equivalent with a layer thickness of ≥ ~0.5 nm that represents at least 0.1-1.0% OC, while surface-associated OC may be even three times higher. In natural systems, surface complexation modeling should account for this pervasive NOM coverage. With our charge distribution model for NOM (NOM-CD), the pH-dependent oxyanion competition of the organo-mineral oxide fraction can be described. For pyrogenic HA, a more than 10-fold increase in dissolved phosphate is predicted at long-term applications of biochar or black carbon. PMID:23875678

  12. The Effects of Conducting Polymers on Formic Acid Oxidation at Pt Nanoparticles

    Highlights: • The activity of Pt nanoparticles for formic acid oxidation varies with the chemical structure of the polymer support. • Polycarbazole is strongly activating while a polypyrrole support inhibits formic acid oxidation. • There is a correlation between activity and the energy of the lowest unoccupied orbital of the repeat unit of the polymer. • An electronic effect involving electron donation from Pt to the polymer may be responsible for the differences in activity. - Abstract: The effects of polyaniline, polypyrrole, polyindole and polycarbazole on formic acid oxidation at Pt nanoparticles are compared. The observed trend in activity (polypyrrole < polyaniline ∼ polyindole < polycarbazole) correlates with the decreasing LUMO energies of the monomers (pyrrole > aniline > indole > carbazole), supporting previous evidence of electron donation from Pt nanoparticles into the π-system of a polycarbazole support layer. Density functional theory calculations on CO and carbazole binding to Pt4 clusters show that the electronic effect of carbazole in a carbazole-Pt4-CO ensemble considerably weakens the binding of CO. The magnitude of this effect is comparable to the effects of graphite and graphene supports reported by other researchers, and stronger than the effect calculated here for indole

  13. Myocardial hypertrophy and the maturation of fatty acid oxidation in the newborn human heart.

    Yatscoff, Michael A; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Grant, Meghan R; Greenwood, Rachel; Lukat, Trish; Beker, Donna L; Rebeyka, Ivan M; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2008-12-01

    After birth dramatic decreases in cardiac malonyl CoA levels result in the rapid maturation of fatty acid oxidation. We have previously demonstrated that the decrease in malonyl CoA is due to increased activity of malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), and decreased activity of acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), enzymes which degrade and synthesize malonyl CoA, respectively. Decreased ACC activity corresponds to an increase in the activity of 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), which phosphorylates and inhibits ACC. These alterations are delayed by myocardial hypertrophy. As rates of fatty acid oxidation can influence the ability of the heart to withstand an ischemic insult, we examined the expression of MCD, ACC, and AMPK in the newborn human heart. Ventricular biopsies were obtained from infants undergoing cardiac surgery. Immunoblot analysis showed a positive correlation between MCD expression and age. In contrast, a negative correlation in both ACC and AMPK expression and age was observed. All ventricular samples displayed some degree of hypertrophy, however, no differences in enzyme expression were found between moderate and severe hypertrophy. This indicates that increased expression of MCD, and the decreased expression of ACC and AMPK are important regulators of the maturation of fatty acid oxidation in the newborn human heart. PMID:18614968

  14. Genotoxicity and oxidative stress of microwave radiation role of ascorbic acid

    Radiofrequency fields and especially microwaves are very important part of electromagnetic spectrum that can produce generations of reactive oxygen species, and thus can affect DNA and cause chromosomal aberrations. So this effect can be diminished by the supplement of an antioxidant such as ascorbic acid. In this study, the proposed protective role of ascorbic acid was tested against the EMF induced chromosomal aberrations and lipid peroxidation. The present study proved that EMF had a clastogenic effect on the bone marrow cells of mice, either with the exposure to EMF; 950 MHz or frequency EMF; 2450 MHz. This effect was evidenced by structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The study also proved that EMF had an effect on oxidative stress, evidenced by increase in the level of lipid peroxide, in a dose dependent manner. So, the mechanism of EMF induced chromosomal aberrations can be explained by this oxidative stress induced by EMF exposure. The present study showed that ascorbic acid had a protective effect against both EMF induced chromosomal aberrations and oxidative stress, when it is applied concomitantly with EMF exposure either at frequency of 950 MHz or 2450 MHz. this is evident by decreases in the level of lipid peroxide and decrease in chromosomal aberrations

  15. Effect of Mannitol on Hyaluronic Acid Stability in Two in Vitro Models of Oxidative Stress

    Marguerite Rinaudo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose the evaluation of the mannitol’s ability to reduce hyaluronic acid (HA degradation using two different models of oxidative stress. Firstly, a solution of hyaluronan and a solution of the same HA including mannitol in PBS buffer were submitted to an oxidative stress generated by the addition of xanthine + xanthine oxidase generating oxygen free radicals. Different enzyme concentrations were used and the HA properties were studied after 24 h of contact at ambient temperature. Decreases of the viscosity of the solution were assessed by rheometry (viscous and elastic module and that of HA molecular weight was determined by steric exclusion chromatography. Rheologic behavior was assessed on identical HA solutions subjected to another model of oxidative stress imposed by addition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of mannitol concentration on HA degradation was also demonstrated. Whatever the stress applied, it appears very clearly that mannitol protects hyaluronic acid from mediated oxygen free radicals degradation. These in vitro results suggest that mannitol could be a simple way to significantly increase the intra-articular residence time of the injected hyaluronic acid and therefore might improve viscosupplementation effectiveness.

  16. Oxidative Stress Attenuates Lipid Synthesis and Increases Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation in Hepatoma Cells Infected with Hepatitis C Virus.

    Douglas, Donna N; Pu, Christopher Hao; Lewis, Jamie T; Bhat, Rakesh; Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Logan, Michael; Lund, Garry; Addison, William R; Lehner, Richard; Kneteman, Norman M

    2016-01-22

    Cytopathic effects are currently believed to contribute to hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced liver injury and are readily observed in Huh7.5 cells infected with the JFH-1 HCV strain, manifesting as apoptosis highly correlated with growth arrest. Reactive oxygen species, which are induced by HCV infection, have recently emerged as activators of AMP-activated protein kinase. The net effect is ATP conservation via on/off switching of metabolic pathways that produce/consume ATP. Depending on the scenario, this can have either pro-survival or pro-apoptotic effects. We demonstrate reactive oxygen species-mediated activation of AMP-activated kinase in Huh7.5 cells during HCV (JFH-1)-induced growth arrest. Metabolic labeling experiments provided direct evidence that lipid synthesis is attenuated, and β-oxidation is enhanced in these cells. A striking increase in nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, which plays a dominant role in the expression of β-oxidation genes after ligand-induced activation, was also observed, and we provide evidence that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α is constitutively activated in these cells. The combination of attenuated lipid synthesis and enhanced β-oxidation is not conducive to lipid accumulation, yet cellular lipids still accumulated during this stage of infection. Notably, the serum in the culture media was the only available source for polyunsaturated fatty acids, which were elevated (2-fold) in the infected cells, implicating altered lipid import/export pathways in these cells. This study also provided the first in vivo evidence for enhanced β-oxidation during HCV infection because HCV-infected SCID/Alb-uPA mice accumulated higher plasma ketones while fasting than did control mice. Overall, this study highlights the reprogramming of hepatocellular lipid metabolism and bioenergetics during HCV infection, which are predicted to impact both the HCV life cycle and pathogenesis. PMID:26627833

  17. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    Eun Ah Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies.

  18. Oxidation of hydrogen peroxide by [NiIII(cyclam)]3+ in aqueous acidic media

    Sankaran Anuradha; Venkatapuram Ramanujam Vijayaraghavan

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of H2O2 by [NiIII(cyclam)]3+, [NiIIIL1], was studied in aqueous acidic media at 25°C and I = 0.5M (NaClO4). The [NiIIIL1] to [NiIIL1] reduction was found to be fast in the presence of Cu(II) ion than the oxidation of the cyclam ligand by ·OH. The rate constant showed an inverse acid dependence on H+ ion at the pH range 1-1.5. The presence of sulphate retards the reaction. Macrocylic ligand oxidation was followed spectrophotometrically by examining the oxidation of nickel(II) complexes of macrocyclic ligands such as 1,8-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,3,6,8,10,13-hexaazacyclotetradecane (L2), -5,7,7,12,14,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (L3), rac-Me6[14]-4,11-dieneN4 (L4) by reaction with hydrogen peroxide. The rate constant for the cross reaction is discussed in terms of Marcus relationship.

  19. Biochemical competition makes fatty-acid β-oxidation vulnerable to substrate overload.

    Karen van Eunen

    Full Text Available Fatty-acid metabolism plays a key role in acquired and inborn metabolic diseases. To obtain insight into the network dynamics of fatty-acid β-oxidation, we constructed a detailed computational model of the pathway and subjected it to a fat overload condition. The model contains reversible and saturable enzyme-kinetic equations and experimentally determined parameters for rat-liver enzymes. It was validated by adding palmitoyl CoA or palmitoyl carnitine to isolated rat-liver mitochondria: without refitting of measured parameters, the model correctly predicted the β-oxidation flux as well as the time profiles of most acyl-carnitine concentrations. Subsequently, we simulated the condition of obesity by increasing the palmitoyl-CoA concentration. At a high concentration of palmitoyl CoA the β-oxidation became overloaded: the flux dropped and metabolites accumulated. This behavior originated from the competition between acyl CoAs of different chain lengths for a set of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases with overlapping substrate specificity. This effectively induced competitive feedforward inhibition and thereby led to accumulation of CoA-ester intermediates and depletion of free CoA (CoASH. The mitochondrial [NAD⁺]/[NADH] ratio modulated the sensitivity to substrate overload, revealing a tight interplay between regulation of β-oxidation and mitochondrial respiration.

  20. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate Radiation-induced Oxidative Stress and Organ Dysfunctions in Rats

    The Aim of the present study was to determine the possible protective effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA) against radiation-induced oxidative stress associated with organ dysfunctions. Omega-3 PUFA was administered by oral gavages to male albino rats at a dose of 0.4 g/ kg body wt daily for 4 weeks before whole body γ-irradiation with 4Gy. Significant increase of serum lipid peroxidation end product as malondialdehyde (MDA) along with the reduction in blood glutathione (GSH) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) enzyme activities were recorded on 3rd and 8th days post-irradiation. Oxidative stress was associated with a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) enzyme activities, markers of heart damage, significant increases in uric acid, urea and creatinine levels, markers of kidney damage, significant increases of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and transaminases (ALT and AST) activities, markers of liver damage. Moreover significant increases in total cholesterol and triglycerides levels were recorded. Omega-3 PUFA administration pre-irradiation significantly attenuated the radiation-induced oxidative stress and organ dysfunctions tested in this study. It could be concluded that oral supplementation of omega-3 PUFA before irradiation may afford protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress and might preserve the integrity of tissue functions of the organs under investigations.

  1. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Ameliorated Diabetic Nephropathy by Attenuating Hyperglycemia-Mediated Oxidative Stress.

    Cao, Aili; Wang, Li; Chen, Xia; Guo, Hengjiang; Chu, Shuang; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress has a great role in diabetes and diabetes induced organ damage. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesize that ER stress inhibition could protect against kidney injury through anti-oxidative effects. To test whether block ER stress could attenuate oxidative stress and improve diabetic nephropathy in vivo and in vitro, the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), an ER stress inhibitor, on spontaneous diabetic nephropathy db/db mice, ER stress inducer or high glucose-triggered podocytes were studied. Mice were assigned to 3 groups (n=6 per group): control group (treated with vehicle), db/db group (treated with vehicle), and UDCA group (db/db mice treated with 40 mg/kg/d UDCA). After 8 weeks treatment, mice were sacrificed. Blood and kidneys were collected for the assessment of albumin/creatinine ratio, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr), insulin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), oxidized LDL-C, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA), the expressions of SOD isoforms and glutathione peroxidase 1, as well as histopathological examination. In addition, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by 2'7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) fluorescence. The results showed that UDCA alleviated renal ER stress-evoked cell death, oxidative stress, renal dysfunction, ROS production, upregulated the expression of Bcl-2 and suppressed Bax in vivo and in vitro. Hence, inhibition ER stress diminishes oxidative stress and exerts renoprotective effects. PMID:27193377

  2. Formation of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid via gas phase oxidation of pinonic acid – a mass spectrometric study of SOA aging

    L. Müller

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric investigations of the OH-initiated oxidative aging of α-pinene SOA under simulated tropospheric conditions at the large aerosol chamber facility AIDA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In particular, the OH-initiated oxidation of pure pinic and pinonic acid, two well-known oxidation products of α-pinene, was investigated. Two complementary analytical techniques were used, on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (APCI/MS and filter sampling followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS. The results show that 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA, a known and very low volatile α-pinene SOA product, is formed from the oxidation of pinonic acid and that this oxidation takes place in the gas phase. This finding is confirmed by temperature-dependent aging experiments on whole SOA formed from α-pinene, in which the yield of MBTCA scales with the pinonic acid fraction in the gas phase. Based on the results, several feasible gas-phase radical mechanisms are discussed to explain the formation of MBTCA from OH-initiated pinonic acid oxidation.

  3. Formation of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid via gas phase oxidation of pinonic acid - a mass spectrometric study of SOA aging

    Müller, L.; Reinnig, M.-C.; Naumann, K. H.; Saathoff, H.; Mentel, T. F.; Donahue, N. M.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric investigations of the OH-initiated oxidative aging of α-pinene SOA under simulated tropospheric conditions at the large aerosol chamber facility AIDA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In particular, the OH-initiated oxidation of pure pinic and pinonic acid, two well-known oxidation products of α-pinene, was investigated. Two complementary analytical techniques were used, on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (APCI/MS) and filter sampling followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS). The results show that 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a very low volatile α-pinene SOA product and a tracer compound for terpene SOA, is formed from the oxidation of pinonic acid and that this oxidation takes place in the gas phase. This finding is confirmed by temperature-dependent aging experiments on whole SOA formed from α-pinene, in which the yield of MBTCA scales with the pinonic acid fraction in the gas phase. Based on the results, several feasible gas-phase radical mechanisms are discussed to explain the formation of MBTCA from OH-initiated pinonic acid oxidation.

  4. Unravelling the properties of supported copper oxide: can the particle size induce acidic behaviour?

    Zaccheria, Federica; Scotti, Nicola; Marelli, Marcello; Psaro, Rinaldo; Ravasio, Nicoletta

    2013-02-01

    There is a renewed interest in designing solid acid catalysts particularly due to the significance of Lewis acid catalyzed processes such as Friedel-Crafts acylation and alkylation and cellulose hydrolysis for the development of sustainable chemistry. This paper reports a new focus point on the properties of supported CuO on silica, a material that up to now has been considered only as the precursor of an effective hydrogenation catalyst. Thus, it deals with a re-interpretation of some of our results with supported copper oxide aimed to unveil the root of acidic activity exhibited by this material, e.g. in alcoholysis reactions. Several techniques were used to highlight the very high dispersion of the oxide phase on the support allowing us to ascribe the acidic behavior to coordinative unsaturation of the very small CuO particles. In turn this unsaturation makes the CuO particles prone to coordinate surrounding molecules present in the reaction mixture and to exchange them according to their nucleophilicity. PMID:23207422

  5. Ammonia-oxidizing activity and microbial community structure in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil

    Okamura, K.; Takanashi, A.; Yamada, T.; Hiraishi, A.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ammonia-oxidizing activity and the phylogentic composition of microorganisms involved in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil. All soil samples were collected from three sites located in Tahara and Toyohashi, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The potential nitrification rate (PNR) was measured by the chlorate inhibition method. The soil pH of tea orchards studied ranged from 2.78 to 4.84, differing significantly from sample to sample, whereas that of meadow and unplanted fields ranged from 5.78 to 6.35. The PNR ranged from 0.050 to 0.193 μg NO2--Ng-1 h-1 and were positively correlated with the soil pH (r2 = 0.382, pamoA genes. The detected archaeal clones separated from the cluster of the 'Soil clones' and tightly clustered with the clones originating from other acidic soil environments including the Chinese tea orchard soil. These results suggest that the specific archaeal populations dominate as the ammonia oxidizers in acid tea-orchard soils and possibly other acid soils, independent of geographic locations, which results from the adaptation to specific ecological niches.

  6. 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized graphene oxide composites: Preparation, characterization and selective enrichment of glycopeptides.

    Jiang, Bo; Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    Selective enrichment and isolation of glycopeptides from complex biological samples was indispensable for mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomics, however, it remained a great challenge due to the low abundance of glycoproteins and the ion suppression of non-glycopeptides. In this work, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized graphene oxide composites were synthesized via loading gold nanoparticles on polyethylenimine modified graphene oxide surface, followed by 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid immobilization by the formation of Au-S bonding (denoted as GO/PEI/Au/4-MPB composites). The composites showed highly specific and efficient capture of glycopeptides due to their excellent hydrophilicity and abundant boronic acid groups. The composites could selectively capture the glycopeptides from the mixture of glycopeptides and nonglycopeptides, even when the amounts of non-glycopeptides were 100 times more than glycopeptides. Compared with commercial meta-amino phenylboronic acid agarose, the composites showed better selectivity when the sample was decreased to 10 ng. These results clearly verified that the GO/PEI/Au/4-MPB composites might be a promising material for glycoproteomics analysis. PMID:26920771

  7. Photon and Water Mediated Sulfur Oxide and Acid Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Venus

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur compounds have been observed in the atmospheres of a number of planetary bodies in our solar system including Venus, Earth, Mars, Io, Europa, and Callisto. The global cloud cover on Venus located at an altitude between 50 and 80 kilometers is composed primarily of sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) and water. Planetary photochemical models have attempted to explain observations of sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides with significant discrepancies remaining between models and observation. In particular, high SO_2 mixing ratios are observed above 90 km which exceed model predictions by orders of magnitude. Work recently done in the Vaida lab has shown red light can drive photochemistry through overtone pumping for acids like H_2SO_4 and has been successful in explaining much of the sulfur chemistry in Earth's atmosphere. Water can have a number of interesting effects such as catalysis, suppression, and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical processes. We investigate the role of water complexes in the hydration of sulfur oxides and dehydration of sulfur acids and present spectroscopic studies to document such effects. We investigate these reactions using FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and will report on our findings.

  8. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of oxidized di-caffeoylquinic acids generated by metalloporphyrin-catalyzed reactions

    Michel D. Santos; Norberto P. Lopes; Yassuko Iamamoto

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS investigation on the oxidation of 3,5- and 4,5- dicaffeoylquinic acid using iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride as catalyst. Two major mono-oxidised products of the quinic acid moiety have been identified for both compounds. However, only the 4,5-derivative afforded two different tri-oxo products. Thus, it seems that the oxidation pattern depends on the number and positions of the caffeic acid moieties present in caffeoylquinic acid molecules.

  9. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of oxidized di-caffeoylquinic acids generated by metalloporphyrin-catalyzed reactions

    Michel D. Santos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS investigation on the oxidation of 3,5- and 4,5- dicaffeoylquinic acid using iron(III tetraphenylporphyrin chloride as catalyst. Two major mono-oxidised products of the quinic acid moiety have been identified for both compounds. However, only the 4,5-derivative afforded two different tri-oxo products. Thus, it seems that the oxidation pattern depends on the number and positions of the caffeic acid moieties present in caffeoylquinic acid molecules.

  10. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances as marker of oxidative stress in pregnancies with pre-eclampsia

    Novakov-Mikić Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-eclampsia is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation and diminished antioxidant capacity. The aim of the study was to establish concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances as a marker of lipid peroxidation in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated with pre-eclampsia, and to estimate the possibility of using thiobarbituric acid reactive substances as a screening method for development of pre-eclampsia. The study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Clinical Centre of Vojvodina. The study included 57 singleton pregnancies, gestation >24 weeks, of which 29 were healthy pregnancies and 28 were with pre-eclampsia, defined as systolic arterial pressure of >90 mmHg, diastolic of >145 mmHg, and 24h proteinuria of >300mg. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentrations evaluated by malondialdehyde equivalent standards (OxiSelect™ TBARS Assay Kit (malondialdehyde Quantitation, Cell Biolabs’ OxiSelect™ showed that oxidative stress was more evident in the group with pre-eclampsia, though not statistically significant (p= 0.107. There was no correlation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels with gestation in either group. The differences between the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance concentrations in pre-eclampsia and healthy pregnancies indicate the possibility of using thiobarbituric acid reactive substances as a screening tool for the development of pre-eclampsia. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are needed in order to come to final conclusions.

  11. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-08-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2.

  12. Oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid over vanadium-impregnated zeolite beta

    Pestana, Carolina F.M.; Guerra, Antonio C.O.; Turci, Cassia C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Glaucio B. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Mota, Claudio J.A., E-mail: cmota@iq.ufrj.br [INCT Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid was studied over vanadium-impregnated zeolite Beta. Catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation of ammonium metavanadate over ammonium-exchanged zeolite Beta, followed by air calcination at 823 K. Impregnation reduced the specific surface area, but did not significantly affected the acidity (Bronsted and Lewis) of the zeolites. The catalytic evaluation was carried out in a fixed bed flow reactor using air as the carrier and injecting glycerol by means of a syringe pump. Acrolein was the main product, with acetaldehyde and hydroxy-acetone (acetol) being also formed. Acrylic acid was formed with approximately 25% selectivity at 548 K over the impregnated zeolites. The result can be explained by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) measurements, which indicated a good dispersion of the vanadium inside the pores. (author)

  13. Ascorbic acid-containing whey protein film coatings for control of oxidation.

    Min, Seacheol; Krochta, John M

    2007-04-18

    A formulation for the whey protein isolate film or coating incorporating ascorbic acid (AA-WPI film or coating) was developed. Tensile and oxygen-barrier properties of the AA-WPI film were measured. Antioxidant effects of the AA-WPI coating on roasted peanuts were studied by comparing the values of peroxide (PO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and free-radical-scavenging activity, determined with noncoated peanuts and peanuts coated with WPI with and without ascorbic acid during storage at 21% relative humidity (RH) and 23, 35, and 50 degrees C. The incorporation of AA reduced elongation of WPI films. The oxygen-barrier property of the WPI film was significantly improved by incorporation of AA. The AA-WPI coating retarded lipid oxidation in peanuts significantly at 23, 35, and 50 degrees C. The AA-WPI coated peanuts were more red than noncoated peanuts at all storage temperatures. PMID:17367158

  14. The Biochemistry and Physiology of Mitochondrial Fatty Acid β-Oxidation and Its Genetic Disorders.

    Houten, Sander M; Violante, Sara; Ventura, Fatima V; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) is the major pathway for the degradation of fatty acids and is essential for maintaining energy homeostasis in the human body. Fatty acids are a crucial energy source in the postabsorptive and fasted states when glucose supply is limiting. But even when glucose is abundantly available, FAO is a main energy source for the heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney. A series of enzymes, transporters, and other facilitating proteins are involved in FAO. Recessively inherited defects are known for most of the genes encoding these proteins. The clinical presentation of these disorders may include hypoketotic hypoglycemia, (cardio)myopathy, arrhythmia, and rhabdomyolysis and illustrates the importance of FAO during fasting and in hepatic and (cardio)muscular function. In this review, we present the current state of knowledge on the biochemistry and physiological functions of FAO and discuss the pathophysiological processes associated with FAO disorders. PMID:26474213

  15. Third phase formation in nitric acid extraction by n-octyl(phenyl)-n,n-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide

    The third phase formation was studied as a function of n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) concentrations and temperature in the extraction of nitric acid. The concentration fractions of CMPO and TBP in the second and the third phases were determined by gas chromatography. Both CMPO and TBP were found to be enriched in the third phase. The concentrations of nitric acid in the second and the third phases relatively agreed with the calculated concentrations based on the extraction equilibrium constants of nitric acid by CMPO and TBP. The extraction of Np with the third phase formation was also discussed. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Electrochemical Oxidation and Determination of Oxalic Acid at an Exfoliated Graphite-Polystyrene Composite Electrode

    Joop Schoonman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available An exfoliated graphite-polystyrene composite electrode was evaluated as analternative electrode in the oxidation and the determination of oxalic acid in 0.1 M Na2SO4supporting electrolyte. Using CV, LSV, CA procedures, linear dependences I vs. C wereobtained in the concentrations range of oxalic acid between 0.5 to 3 mM, with LOD =0.05mM, and recovery degree of 98%, without need of surface renewing between successiveruns. The accuracy of the methods was evaluated as excellent comparing the detection resultswith that obtained using conventional KMnO4 titration method. In addition, the apparentdiffusion coefficient of oxalic acid D was found to be around 2.89 · 10-8 cm2·s-1 by CA andCV.

  17. Oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid over vanadium-impregnated zeolite beta

    The oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid was studied over vanadium-impregnated zeolite Beta. Catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation of ammonium metavanadate over ammonium-exchanged zeolite Beta, followed by air calcination at 823 K. Impregnation reduced the specific surface area, but did not significantly affected the acidity (Bronsted and Lewis) of the zeolites. The catalytic evaluation was carried out in a fixed bed flow reactor using air as the carrier and injecting glycerol by means of a syringe pump. Acrolein was the main product, with acetaldehyde and hydroxy-acetone (acetol) being also formed. Acrylic acid was formed with approximately 25% selectivity at 548 K over the impregnated zeolites. The result can be explained by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) measurements, which indicated a good dispersion of the vanadium inside the pores. (author)

  18. Characterization and Localization of Iron-Oxidizing Proteins in Acid Mine Drainage Biofilms

    Chan, C. S.; Thelen, M. P.; Hwang, M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    As molecular geomicrobiologists, we are interested in the microbially-produced molecules that effect geochemical transformations, particularly proteins involved in lithotrophic energy generation. We have identified two such proteins produced by Leptospirillum group II microbes, which dominate biofilms floating on acidic waters in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA. Leptospirillum generates energy by iron oxidation, producing the ferric iron catalyst responsible for pyrite oxidation, subsequent acid generation and toxic metal release. We have shown that a small (~16 kDa) soluble protein, cytochrome-579, extracted from environmental biofilm samples is capable of iron oxidation in vitro, consistent with prior studies on similar cytochromes from L. ferriphilum and ferrooxidans (Blake et al., 1993; Hart et al., 1991). The abundance of cyt579 and its ability to oxidize iron makes it a key link between microbial metabolism and acid mine drainage. Given the importance of cyt579 in biofilm sustenance as well as acid generation, we want to understand more about its distribution and also the architecture of the biofilm environment in which it functions. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on ultrathin sections, we observe biofilms as thin as 15 microns with densely-packed cells in a matrix of polymers. To localize cyt579 in the biofilm, we purified the protein and developed antibodies for immunolabeling. The antibodies were shown to be highly specific for cyt579 using Western blots of whole biofilm lysate. Fluorescence- and gold-labeled secondary antibodies were used to visualize immunolabeled biofilms by confocal laser scanning microscopy and TEM, respectively. Preliminary results suggest that the cytochrome is on the bacterial cell surface or in the periplasm but not throughout the biofilm, as we had postulated due to the abundance of cytochrome in extracellular fractions of biofilm samples. These localization studies will be helpful in determining the

  19. Incomplete free fatty acid oxidation by ascites tumor cells under low oxygen tension.

    Ookhtens, M; Baker, N

    1983-01-01

    We tried to understand why our earlier estimates of fatty acid (FA) oxidation rates under the nearly anaerobic state of the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in vivo were even greater than those found in vitro under aerobic conditions. Using tracers [1-14C]linoleate, [1-14C]-, and [9,10-3H]palmitate, and NaH14CO3, we estimated essential and nonessential FA oxidation rates to CO2 + H2O by EAT in living mice and in vitro under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Sequestration of intraperitoneally (ip)-injected 14C-FFA allowed a selective labeling of the tumor versus the host; thus, breath 14CO2 could be used to estimate the maximum rate of FA oxidation in vivo by the tumor. Initially, we measured breath 14CO2 following NaH14CO3 injections and developed a multicompartmental model to simulate the tumor-host HCO-3-CO2 system. This model was integrated with our earlier model for tumor FA turnover. The integrated model was fitted to breath 14CO2 data from mice injected ip with 14C-FFA to compute tumor FA oxidation rates. Both essential and nonessential FA were oxidized to CO2 at similar rates. The maximum rate of total FA oxidation to CO2 was 5-6 nmol FA X min-1 X 7-ml tumor-1, about 5-10 times lower than all previous estimates obtained in vitro and in vivo. To resolve this dilemma we used doubly labeled [1-14C; 9,10-3H]palmitate and found that under aerobic conditions, in vitro, EAT formed 3H2O and 14CO2 at nearly equal rates. These rates were suppressed markedly but unequally at low PO2. Anaerobic suppression of 14CO2 formation greatly exceeded that of 3H2O formation. As a result 3H2O/14CO2 reached a value of congruent to 10 at low PO2. Our data indicate that under the nearly anaerobic conditions of a growing EAT in vivo, the partial beta-oxidation of FA to 2C + H2O takes place at a 5 to 10 times faster rate than the complete oxidation of FA to CO2 + H2O. This finding can account for earlier apparent inconsistencies in the literature, since aerobic studies of 14C-FA oxidation

  20. Titania nanotubes from weak organic acid electrolyte: fabrication, characterization and oxide film properties.

    Munirathinam, Balakrishnan; Neelakantan, Lakshman

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanotubes were fabricated using anodic oxidation in fluoride containing weak organic acid for different durations (0.5h, 1h, 2h and 3h). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs reveal that the morphology of titanium oxide varies with anodization time. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that the as-formed oxide nanotubes were amorphous in nature, yet transform into crystalline phases (anatase and rutile) upon annealing at 600°C. Wettability measurements show that both as-formed and annealed nanotubes exhibited hydrophilic behavior. The electrochemical behavior was ascertained by DC polarization and AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 0.9% NaCl solution. The results suggest that the annealed nanotubes showed higher impedance (10(5)-10(6)Ωcm(2)) and lower passive current density (10(-7)Acm(-2)) than the as-formed nanotubes. In addition, we investigated the influence of post heat treatment on the semiconducting properties of the oxides by capacitance measurements. In vitro bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that precipitation of Ca/P is easier in crystallized nanotubes than the amorphous structure. Our study uses a simple strategy to prepare nano-structured titania films and hints the feasibility of tailoring the oxide properties by thermal treatment, producing surfaces with better bioactivity. PMID:25686985

  1. Electrochemical oxidation of oxalic acid in the presence of halides at boron doped diamond electrode

    Martinez-Huitle, C.A. [University of Milan, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry]. E-mail: Carlos.Martinez@unimi.it; Ferro, S.; Battisti, A. de [University of Ferrara (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry. Lab. of Electrochemistry; Reyna, S.; Cerro-Lopez, M.; Quiroz, M.A. [Universidad de las Americas-Puebla, Puebla (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica y Biologia. Lab. de Electroquimica]. E-mail: marcoa.quiroz@udlap.mx

    2008-07-01

    Aim of this work is to discuss the electrochemical oxidation of oxalic acid (OA), analyzing the influence of NaCl and NaBr. Experiments were carried out at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes, in alkaline media. BDD electrodes have a poor superficial adsorptivity so their great stability toward oxidation allows the reaction to take place with reactants and intermediates in a non-adsorbed state. The process is significantly accelerated by the presence of a halogen salt in solution; interestingly, the mediated process does not depend on applied current density. Based on the results, bromide was selected as a suitable mediator during OA oxidation at BDD. Br{sup -} primarily acts in the volume of the solution, with the formation of strong oxidants; while Cl{sup -} action has shown lower improvements in the OA oxidation rate at BDD respect to the results reported using Pt electrode. Finally, the parameters of removal efficiency and energy consumption for the electrochemical incineration of OA were calculated. (author)

  2. Electro-Oxidation of Concentrated Ce(Ⅲ) at Carbon Felt Anode in Nitric Acid Media

    2006-01-01

    Electro-oxidation of Ce( Ⅲ) to Ce( Ⅳ ) in parallel plate flow type electrolyzer divided with cation exchange membrane was carried out in nitric acid media at carbon felt anode under galvanostatic conditions. Carbon felt was used as an anode for its high specific surface area and high oxygen evolution overpotential. Pt coated Ti plates were used as cathcurrent efficiency (92%) until about 80% of Ce( Ⅲ) was oxidized. Then, oxygen evolution, accompanied by terminal voltage jump, took place, lowering current efficiency. Ce( Ⅲ ) was oxidized up to 90% with current efficiency of 62%. In this mode, strong carbon felt anode oxidation was observed. The wear out of carbon felt was 46% in six consequent runs (6 h of operation). After each run, carbon felt surface had to be renewed with slightly alkaline solution to remove carbon oxidation products and ensure regular operational conditions. When anode surface was blocked, oxygen evolution took place from the beginning of electrolysis due to higher actual current density. The wear out of carbon felt anode could be minimized by means of oxygen evolution prevention. In the case when electrolysis had been stopped before oxygen evolution started (at Ce( Ⅳ ) conversion of about 80% ), the wear out of anode was less than 2% during 6 consequent runs (4 h of operation).

  3. Direct Oxidation of Ethene to Acetic Acid over Pd-H4SiW12O40-Based Catalyst

    2001-01-01

    @@The direct oxidation of ethene to acetic acid has the advantages of abundant raw materials and low cost of equipment[1],hence the research for this process has been of much interest in industry application.

  4. Interleukin-6 deficiency reduces the brain inflammatory response and increases oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after kainic acid-induced seizures

    Penkowa, M; Molinero, A; Carrasco, J;

    2001-01-01

    and were killed six days later. Morphological damage to the hippocampal field CA1-CA3 was seen after kainic acid treatment. Reactive astrogliosis and microgliosis were prominent in kainic acid-injected normal mice hippocampus, and clear signs of increased oxidative stress were evident. Thus...... was caused by kainic acid, as revealed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling and interleukin-1beta converting enzyme/Caspase-1 stainings. In kainic acid-injected interleukin-6 null mice, reactive astrogliosis and microgliosis were reduced, while...... morphological hippocampal damage, oxidative stress and apoptotic neuronal death were increased. Since metallothionein-I+II levels were lower, and those of inducible nitric oxide synthase higher, these concomitant changes are likely to contribute to the observed increased oxidative stress and neuronal death...

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of alloys 690, 800, and 600 in acid environments containing copper oxides

    Secondary side stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator (SG) tubes may be due to the formation of an acid environment in crevices, as demonstrated for several Belgian PWR plants. The susceptibility of alloys 600 and 800 in this type of environment, which had been partially evidenced by several laboratory works, has been confirmed by capsule tests performed at Laborelec, whereas the SCC resistance of alloy 690 always appeared excellent. Capsule tests have been recently conducted at 320 C with the same heats of tubings in the same acid solutions (cationic resins + magnetite + sodium silicate, with or without lead, and sodium sulfate + iron sulfate, with or without lead oxide) containing CuO and Cu2O. It appeared that the SCC resistance of the three alloys was generally reduced by the addition of copper oxides, at least when the cover gas did not contain hydrogen. The situation was particularly dramatic for the capsules made of alloy 690 tubing: most of them developed deep cracks, sometimes throughwall (the shortest time to failure being less than 50 h) whereas the same solutions without copper oxides had produced no cracking at all in alloy 690 capsules exposed during more than 2,000 h. Although the corrosion is reduced in presence of hydrazine or at lower concentration, copper oxides probably contribute significantly to the degradation of the tubes in alloy 600, at least in SG's forming acid sulfate crevice environments. This is also an issue for the new SG's, especially for those equipped with tubes in alloy 690 TT, particularly for the top of the tubesheet which is a critical deposit area since the high stresses and strains resulting from the expansion of the tube in the tubesheet lead to a risk of circumferential cracking at the transition

  6. Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage in Multiple Sclerosis and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Modulation via Fumaric Acid Esters

    Ralf Gold

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in many neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s as well as Huntington’s disease. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic-progressive MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Here, fumaric acid esters (FAE are a new, orally available treatment option which had already been tested in phase II/III MS trials demonstrating beneficial effects on relapse rates and magnetic resonance imaging markers. In vitro, application of dimethylfumarate (DMF leads to stabilization of Nrf2, activation of Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity and abundant synthesis of detoxifying proteins. Furthermore, application of FAE involves direct modification of the inhibitor of Nrf2, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1. On cellular levels, the application of FAE enhances neuronal survival and protects astrocytes against oxidative stress. Increased levels of Nrf2 are detected in the central nervous system of DMF treated mice suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. In EAE, DMF ameliorates the disease course and improves preservation of myelin, axons and neurons. Finally, Nrf2 is also up-regulated in the spinal cord of autopsy specimens from untreated patients with MS, probably as part of a naturally occurring anti-oxidative response. In summary, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapies like FAE.

  7. Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mouse Cumulus-Oocyte Complexes during Maturation and Modulation by PPAR Agonists

    Dunning, Kylie R.; Anastasi, Marie R.; Zhang, Voueleng J.; Russell, Darryl L.; Robker, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation is an important energy source for the oocyte; however, little is known about how this metabolic pathway is regulated in cumulus-oocyte complexes. Analysis of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation showed that many are regulated by the luteinizing hormone surge during in vivo maturation, including acyl-CoA synthetases, carnitine transporters, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and acetyl-CoA transferase, but that many are dysregulated when cumulus-oocyte complexes are matured under i...

  8. Skeletal muscle ACC2 S212 phosphorylation is not required for the control of fatty acid oxidation during exercise

    O’Neill, Hayley M.; Lally, James S.; Galic, Sandra; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; Ford, Rebecca J; Dyck, Jason R.B.; van Denderen, Bryce J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2015-01-01

    During submaximal exercise fatty acids are a predominant energy source for muscle contractions. An important regulator of fatty acid oxidation is acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), which exists as two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) with ACC2 predominating in skeletal muscle. Both ACC isoforms regulate malonyl-CoA production, an allosteric inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1); the primary enzyme controlling fatty acyl-CoA flux into mitochondria for oxidation. AMP-activated protein kinase...

  9. PPARd IS A LIPID SENSOR AND A REGULATOR OF FATTY ACID OXIDATION IN PANCREATIC β-CELLS

    Ravnskjær, Kim; Nielsen, Tina; Børgesen, Michael; Mandrup, Susanne

    islets and in the insulinoma cell line INS-1E. This is reflected at the functional level in activity assays using a PPRE-driven luciferase reporter construct. The fatty acids oleic, arachidonic and linolenic acid are able to acivate this construct synergistically with the synthetic RXR agonist LG100268......-oleate oxidation. The current observations suggest that PPARd is an important lipid sensor and regulator of lipid oxidation in pancreatic b-cells....

  10. Titania nanotubes from weak organic acid electrolyte: Fabrication, characterization and oxide film properties

    Munirathinam, Balakrishnan, E-mail: blkrish88@gmail.com; Neelakantan, Lakshman

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were fabricated using anodic oxidation in fluoride containing weak organic acid for different durations (0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs reveal that the morphology of titanium oxide varies with anodization time. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that the as-formed oxide nanotubes were amorphous in nature, yet transform into crystalline phases (anatase and rutile) upon annealing at 600 °C. Wettability measurements show that both as-formed and annealed nanotubes exhibited hydrophilic behavior. The electrochemical behavior was ascertained by DC polarization and AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 0.9% NaCl solution. The results suggest that the annealed nanotubes showed higher impedance (10{sup 5}–10{sup 6} Ω cm{sup 2}) and lower passive current density (10{sup −7} A cm{sup −2}) than the as-formed nanotubes. In addition, we investigated the influence of post heat treatment on the semiconducting properties of the oxides by capacitance measurements. In vitro bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that precipitation of Ca/P is easier in crystallized nanotubes than the amorphous structure. Our study uses a simple strategy to prepare nano-structured titania films and hints the feasibility of tailoring the oxide properties by thermal treatment, producing surfaces with better bioactivity. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were synthesized in a citric acid and sodium fluoride environment. • Wettability measurements show that both as-formed and annealed nanotubes exhibited hydrophilic behavior. • TiO{sub 2} nanotube layer behaves as an n-type semiconductor. • Annealed TiO{sub 2} nanotubes had a higher impedance magnitude compared to as-formed nanotubes.

  11. Titania nanotubes from weak organic acid electrolyte: Fabrication, characterization and oxide film properties

    In this study, TiO2 nanotubes were fabricated using anodic oxidation in fluoride containing weak organic acid for different durations (0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs reveal that the morphology of titanium oxide varies with anodization time. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that the as-formed oxide nanotubes were amorphous in nature, yet transform into crystalline phases (anatase and rutile) upon annealing at 600 °C. Wettability measurements show that both as-formed and annealed nanotubes exhibited hydrophilic behavior. The electrochemical behavior was ascertained by DC polarization and AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 0.9% NaCl solution. The results suggest that the annealed nanotubes showed higher impedance (105–106 Ω cm2) and lower passive current density (10−7 A cm−2) than the as-formed nanotubes. In addition, we investigated the influence of post heat treatment on the semiconducting properties of the oxides by capacitance measurements. In vitro bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that precipitation of Ca/P is easier in crystallized nanotubes than the amorphous structure. Our study uses a simple strategy to prepare nano-structured titania films and hints the feasibility of tailoring the oxide properties by thermal treatment, producing surfaces with better bioactivity. - Highlights: • TiO2 nanotubes were synthesized in a citric acid and sodium fluoride environment. • Wettability measurements show that both as-formed and annealed nanotubes exhibited hydrophilic behavior. • TiO2 nanotube layer behaves as an n-type semiconductor. • Annealed TiO2 nanotubes had a higher impedance magnitude compared to as-formed nanotubes

  12. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool size: functional importance for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Marwood, Simon; Bruce, Mark; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major final common pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids and some amino acids, which produces reducing equivalents in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide that result in production of large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via oxidative phosphorylation. Although regulated primarily by the products of ATP hydrolysis, in particular adenosine diphosphate, the rate of delivery of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain is also a potential regulatory step of oxidative phosphorylation. The TCA cycle is responsible for the generation of approximately 67% of all reducing equivalents per molecule of glucose, hence factors that influence TCA cycle flux will be of critical importance for oxidative phosphorylation. TCA cycle flux is dependent upon the supply of acetyl units, activation of the three non-equilibrium reactions within the TCA cycle, and it has been suggested that an increase in the total concentration of the TCA cycle intermediates (TCAi) is also necessary to augment and maintain TCA cycle flux during exercise. This article reviews the evidence of the functional importance of the TCAi pool size for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle. In parallel with increased oxidative metabolism and TCA cycle flux during exercise, there is an exercise intensity-dependent 4- to 5-fold increase in the concentration of the TCAi. TCAi concentration reaches a peak after 10-15 minutes of exercise, and thereafter tends to decline. This seems to support the suggestion that the concentration of TCAi may be of functional importance for oxidative phosphorylation. However, researchers have been able to induce dissociations between TCAi pool size and oxidative energy provision using a variety of nutritional, pharmacological and exercise interventions. Brief periods of endurance training (5 days or 7 weeks) have been found to result in reduced TCAi pool

  13. Simultaneous Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid Using an Iron Oxide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Teo Peik-See

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of an electrochemical sensor based on an iron oxide/graphene modified glassy carbon electrode (Fe3O4/rGO/GCE and its simultaneous detection of dopamine (DA and ascorbic acid (AA is described here. The Fe3O4/rGO nanocomposite was synthesized via a simple, one step in-situ wet chemical method and characterized by different techniques. The presence of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of rGO sheets was confirmed by FESEM and TEM images. The electrochemical behavior of Fe3O4/rGO/GCE towards electrocatalytic oxidation of DA was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV analysis. The electrochemical studies revealed that the Fe3O4/rGO/GCE dramatically increased the current response against the DA, due to the synergistic effect emerged between Fe3O4 and rGO. This implies that Fe3O4/rGO/GCE could exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity and remarkable electron transfer kinetics towards the oxidation of DA. Moreover, the modified sensor electrode portrayed sensitivity and selectivity for simultaneous determination of AA and DA. The observed DPVs response linearly depends on AA and DA concentration in the range of 1–9 mM and 0.5–100 µM, with correlation coefficients of 0.995 and 0.996, respectively. The detection limit of (S/N = 3 was found to be 0.42 and 0.12 µM for AA and DA, respectively.

  14. Oxidative photodegradation of herbicide fenuron in aqueous solution by natural iron oxide α-Fe2O3, influence of polycarboxylic acids.

    Kribéche, Mohamed El Amine; Mechakra, Hind; Sehili, Tahar; Brosillon, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The photodegradation of the herbicide fenuron (1,1-dimethyl-3-phenylurea) by using a natural iron oxide (NIO), α-Fe2O3, in aqueous solution at acidic pH has been undertaken. The NIO was characterized by the Raman spectroscopy method. The degradation pathways and the formation of degradation products were studied. A high-pressure mercury lamp and sunlight were employed as light source. Fenuron photodegradation using NIO with oxalic acid followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics, the optimal experimental conditions were [oxalic acid]0 = 10(-3) M and [NIO] = 0.1 g L(-1) at pH 3. A UVA/NIO/oxalic acid system led to a low fenuron half-life (60 min). The results were even better when solar light is used (30 min). The variables studied were the doses of iron oxide, of carboxylic acids, the solution pH and the effect of sunlight irradiation. The effects of four carboxylic acids, oxalic, citric, tartaric and malic acids, on the fenuron photodegradation with NIO have been investigated, oxalic acid was the most effective carboxylic acid used at pH 3. A similar trend was observed for the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), 75% of TOC was removed. The analytical study showed many aromatic intermediates, short-chain carboxylic acids and inorganic ion. PMID:26102217

  15. Spontaneously Bi decorated carbon supported Pd nanoparticles for formic acid electro-oxidation

    Highlights: • Selective decoration of Bi onto commercial Pd/C is carried out by a simple gas controlled surface potential modulation technique. • Bi decorated Pd/C catalyst exhibits higher and sustained formic acid oxidation activity presumably via the electronic effect. • Shielding of Pd atoms by Bi increases long term stability. • Formic acid electro-oxidation current increased by 121% at 0.2 V vs. RHE. -- Abstract: The activity and stability of carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) nanoparticles decorated with a submonolayer of bismuth (Bi) for formic acid (FA) electro-oxidation was investigated herein. The FA electro-oxidation activity enhancement of Bi decorated Pd/C was evaluated electrochemically using a rotating disk electrode configuration by linear sweep voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements. Commercial Pd/C was decorated by irreversible adsorption of Bi via a simple gas controlled surface potential modulation technique, and the coverage of Bi adatoms as measured by cyclic voltammetry was controlled in the range of 30–87%. An optimal Bi coverage was observed to be 40%, resulting in a favorable decrease in the FA onset potential by greater than 0.1 V and increase in electro-oxidation current density from 0.25 mA cm−2SA to 0.55 mA cm−2SA at 0.2 V vs. RHE, compared to commercial Pd/C. The results indicate that Bi decorated Pd nanoparticles have excellent properties for the electro-oxidation of FA, i.e. high electro-catalytic activity and excellent stability, due to sustained promotion of dehydrogenation pathway attributed to the electronic effect, thereby promoting FA adsorption in the CH-down orientation. Based on no significant shifting in the CO stripping peak position, minimal impact of Bi on the Pd-CO bond strength is observed. Chronoamperometry results show much better long-term electro-catalytic activity for Bi decorated Pd nanoparticles attributed to shielding of surface Pd atoms by Bi and reducing Pd dissolution

  16. Oxidation of Tetracaine Hydrochloride by Chloramine-B in Acid Medium: Kinetic Modeling

    Jayachamarajapura Pranesh Shubha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetracaine hydrochloride (TCH is one of the potent local anaesthetics. A kinetic study of oxidation of tetracaine hydrochloride by sodium N-chlorobenzenesulfonamide (chloramine-B or CAB has been carried in HClO4 medium at 303 K. The rate shows first-order dependence on [CAB]o, shows fractional–order dependence on [substrate]o, and is self-governing on acid concentration. Decrease of dielectric constant of the medium, by adding methanol, increased the rate. Variation of ionic strength and addition of benzenesulfonamide or NaCl have no significant effect on the rate. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters have been evaluated. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be 1 : 5 and the oxidation products were identified by spectral analysis. The conjugate free acid C6H5SO2NHCl of CAB is postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. The observed results have been explained by plausible mechanism and the related rate law has been deduced.

  17. Coke-free direct formic acid solid oxide fuel cells operating at intermediate temperatures

    Chen, Yubo; Su, Chao; Zheng, Tao; Shao, Zongping

    2012-12-01

    Formic acid is investigated as a fuel for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for the first time. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that carbon deposition is avoidable above 600 °C. The carbon deposition properties are also investigated experimentally by first treating a nickel plus yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) anode material in particle form under a formic acid-containing atmosphere for a limited time at 500-800 °C and then analyzing the particles by O2-TPO. This analysis confirms that carbon deposition on Ni-YSZ is weak above 600 °C. We further treat half-cells composed of YSZ electrolyte and Ni-YSZ anode under formic acid-containing atmosphere at 600, 700 and 800 °C; the anodes maintain their original geometric shape and microstructure and show no obvious weight gain. It suggests that formic acid can be directly fed into SOFCs constructed with conventional nickel-based cermet anodes. I-V tests show that the cell delivers a promising peak power density of 571 mW cm-2 at 800 °C. In addition, the cells also show good performance stability. The results indicate that formic acid is highly promising as a direct fuel for SOFCs without the need for cell material modifications.

  18. In vitro oxidation of indoleacetic acid by soluble auxin-oxidases and peroxidases from maize roots

    Soluble auxin-oxidases were extracted from Zea mays L. cv LG11 apical root segments and partially separated from peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) by size-exclusion chromatography. Auxin-oxidases were resolved into one main peak corresponding to a molecular mass of 32.5 kilodaltons and a minor peak at 54.5 kilodaltons. Peroxidases were separated into at least four peaks, with molecular masses from 32.5 to 78 kilodaltons. In vitro activity of indoleacetic acid-oxidases was dependent on the presence of MnCl2 and p-coumaric acid. Compound(s) present in the crude extract and several synthetic auxin transport inhibitors (including 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid) inhibited auxin-oxidase activity, but had no effect on peroxidases. The products resulting from the in vitro enzymatic oxidation of [3H]indoleacetic acid were separated by HPLC and the major metabolite was found to cochromatograph with indol-3yl-methanol

  19. Wet oxidation of glycerol into fine organic acids: catalyst selection and kinetic evaluation

    J. E. N. Brainer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid phase oxidation of glycerol was performed producing fine organic acids. Catalysts based on Pt, Pd and Bi supported on activated carbon were employed to perform the conversion of glycerol into organic acids at 313 K, 323 K and 333 K, under atmospheric pressure (1.0 bar, in a mechanically agitated slurry reactor (MASR. The experimental results indicated glycerol conversions of 98% with production of glyceric, tartronic and glycolic acids, and dihydroxyacetone. A yield of glyceric acid of 69.8%, and a selectivity of this compound of 70.6% were reached after 4 h of operation. Surface mechanisms were proposed and rate equations were formulated to represent the kinetic behavior of the process. Selective formation of glyceric acid was observed, and the kinetic parameter values indicated the lowest activation energy (38.5 kJ/mol for its production reaction step, and the highest value of the adsorption equilibrium constant of the reactant glycerol (10-4 dm³/mol.

  20. Comparative study of the nonvolatile products in irradiated and thermally oxidized unsaturated fatty acids

    Oleic acid, ethyl oleate, trioleyl glycerol, linolenic acid and ethyl linolenate were either heated at 1800C for 1 hour in the presence of air or irradiated under vacuum at 250 kGy. The nonvolatile product analysis showed that: 1) the volatiles amounted to less than 3% while the nonvolatiles represented more than 23%; 2) diene and/or triene conjugation occurred to a substantially greater extent in the case of heating; 3) TLC analysis showed that the heated samples produced more classes of compounds, many of which were highly polar in nature. Irradiated samples produced simpler decomposition products and also of lower polarity; 4) the acidic compounds produced in irradiated esters were the parent acids from cleavage the alkyl-oxygen bond. The heated esters, produced short chain monobasic and dibasic acids from further oxidation of the initial allylic hydroperoxides; 5) the irradiated samples showed a lesser content of dimeric and polymeric decomposition products than that of the heated samples. In the case of irradiated trioleyl glycerol, the intramolecular dimerization is a major source of formation of dimeric compounds; and 6) the nonpolar dehydrodimers were formed in both the heated and irradiated samples (except ethyl linolenate) which had the structure of carbn-carbon crosslinking between two allylic monomers

  1. A novel and selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols with polymer-supported periodic acid under mild aprotic conditions

    Ali Reza Pourali; Mehrosadat Tabaean; S. Mohamad Reza Nazifi

    2012-01-01

    A new polymeric oxidizing reagent was prepared by supporting periodic acid on poly(1,4-phenylene-2,5-pyridine dicarboxyamide).This polymeric reagent was used for the selective oxidation of primary benzylic alcohols to the corresponding benzaldehydes in CH3CN at reflux conditions.Excellent selectivity was observed between primary benzyl alcohols and secondary ones as well as non-benzylic alcohols in the oxidation reactions.Allylic alcohols were also converted to the corresponding aldehydes with good yields.

  2. Impurity-defect structure of anodic aluminum oxide produced by two-sided anodizing in tartaric acid

    Chernyakova, K. V.; Vrublevsky, I. A.; Ivanovskaya, M. I.; Kotsikau, D. A.

    2012-03-01

    Porous aluminum oxide is prepared in a 0.4 M aqueous solution of tartaric acid by two-sided anodizing. Fourier Transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR) data reveal the presence, in the alumina, of unoxidized tartarate ions, as well as products of their partial (radical organic products and CO) and complete (CO2) oxidation. Carboxylate ions and elemental carbon contained in the anodic oxide impart a gray color to the films.

  3. Effects of Combination Tocopherols and Alpha Lipoic Acid Therapy on Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Ramos, Luis F.; Kane, Jane; McMonagle, Ellen; Le, Phuong; Wu, Pingsheng; Shintani, Ayumi; Ikizler, T. Alp; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and inflammation are highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet few studies have investigated whether oral antioxidant therapy can alter markers of inflammation or oxidative stress in CKD. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a combination of mixed tocopherols and alpha lipoic acid (ALA) would alter biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in subjects with Stage 3–4 CKD.

  4. Application of several advanced oxidation processes for the destruction of terephthalic acid (TPA)

    Terephthalic acid (TPA) is widely applied as a raw material in making polyester fiber, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, polyester films, etc. TPA is toxic and is known to act as endocrine disruptor. TPA wastewater is traditionally treated by biological process and this study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of several advanced oxidation processes on TPA removal. The oxidation processes studied were: UV-TiO2, UV-H2O2, UV-H2O2-Fe, O3, O3/Fe, O3/TiO2, UV-O3-H2O2-Fe and UV-O3-H2O2-Fe-TiO2. The results indicate that the time required for the complete destruction of 50 ppm of TPA can be minimized from 10 h using UV-TiO2 system, to less than 10 min by UV-H2O2-Fe-O3 system. Some of the likely organic intermediates identified during TPA destruction include, benzoquinone, benzene, maleic acid and oxalic acid. Possible destruction pathway of TPA has been proposed. TPA degradation by various systems was also analyzed based on the reaction kinetics and operating costs

  5. Role of Chlorogenic Acids in Controlling Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress Conditions

    Ningjian Liang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorogenic acids (CGAs are esters formed between caffeic and quinic acids, and represent an abundant group of plant polyphenols present in the human diet. CGAs have different subgroups that include caffeoylquinic, p-coumaroylquinic, and feruloyquinic acids. Results of epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of beverages such as coffee, tea, wine, different herbal infusions, and also some fruit juices is linked to reduced risks of developing different chronic diseases. These beverages contain CGAs present in different concentrations and isomeric mixtures. The underlying mechanism(s for specific health benefits attributed to CGAs involves mitigating oxidative stress, and hence the related adverse effects associated with an unbalanced intracellular redox state. There is also evidence to show that CGAs exhibit anti-inflammatory activities by modulating a number of important metabolic pathways. This review will focus on three specific aspects of the relevance of CGAs in coffee beverages; namely: (1 the relative composition of different CGA isomers present in coffee beverages; (2 analysis of in vitro and in vivo evidence that CGAs and individual isomers can mitigate oxidative and inflammatory stresses; and (3 description of the molecular mechanisms that have a key role in the cell signaling activity that underlines important functions.

  6. Role of Chlorogenic Acids in Controlling Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress Conditions.

    Liang, Ningjian; Kitts, David D

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) are esters formed between caffeic and quinic acids, and represent an abundant group of plant polyphenols present in the human diet. CGAs have different subgroups that include caffeoylquinic, p-coumaroylquinic, and feruloyquinic acids. Results of epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of beverages such as coffee, tea, wine, different herbal infusions, and also some fruit juices is linked to reduced risks of developing different chronic diseases. These beverages contain CGAs present in different concentrations and isomeric mixtures. The underlying mechanism(s) for specific health benefits attributed to CGAs involves mitigating oxidative stress, and hence the related adverse effects associated with an unbalanced intracellular redox state. There is also evidence to show that CGAs exhibit anti-inflammatory activities by modulating a number of important metabolic pathways. This review will focus on three specific aspects of the relevance of CGAs in coffee beverages; namely: (1) the relative composition of different CGA isomers present in coffee beverages; (2) analysis of in vitro and in vivo evidence that CGAs and individual isomers can mitigate oxidative and inflammatory stresses; and (3) description of the molecular mechanisms that have a key role in the cell signaling activity that underlines important functions. PMID:26712785

  7. Synergistic hypergolic ignition of blends of dienes and dienophiles with red fuming nitric acid as oxidizer

    Panda, S.P.; Kulkarni, S.G.; Prabhakaran, C.

    1989-04-01

    Synergistic hypergolic ignition of several fuel blends and mixtures with red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) as oxidizer has been reported previously. The liquid fuels consisted of blends of 3-carene, cyclopentadiene, or norbornadiene with cardanol in the weight ratio 70:30 for the first two and 85:15 for norbornadiene. In all these cases, synergism in ignition was believed to be due to the fast and exothermic oligomerization of 3-carene, cyclopentadiene, and norbornadiene in the presence of acid. The exothermicity of the systems was enhanced by the addition of cardanol to the unsaturation of oligomers, leading to the formation of highly oxidizable phenolic ethers. Two more important reactions at the preignition stage were nitration and oxidation of the ethers leading to the production of gaseous combustibles and heat. In this case, an attempt has been made to extend the range of possible preignition reactions by introducing diene-dienophile Diels-Alder cycloaddition with low activation energy by replacing cardanol with furfuryl alcohol or furfurylideneacetone having a furan ring to behave as acid polymerizable dienes in the above systems.

  8. Oxidation of formic acid on platinum surfaces decorated with cobalt(III) macrocyclic complexes

    Stevanović, S.; Babić-Samardžija, K.; Sovilj, S. P.; Tripković, A.; Jovanović, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    Platinum electrode decorated with three different mixed-ligand cobalt(III) complexes of the general formula [Co(Rdtc)cyclam](ClO4)2 [cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane, Rdtc- = morpholine-(Morphdtc), piperidine-(Pipdtc), and 4-methylpiperidine-(4-Mepipdtc) dithiocarbamates, respectively] was used to study oxidation of formic acid in acidic solution. The complexes were adsorbed on differently prepared Pt surfaces, at open circuit potential. The preliminary results show increased catalytic activity of Pt for formic acid oxidation with complex ion adsorbed on the polycrystalline surfaces. The increase in catalytic activity depends on the structure of the complex applied and follows the order of metal-coordinated bidentate ligand as Morphdtc > Pipdtc > 4-Mepipdtc. Based on IR and NMR data, the main characteristics of the Rdtc ligands do not vary dramatically, but high symmetry of the corresponding complexes decreases in the same order. Accordingly, the complexes are distinctively more mobile, causing chemical interactions to occur on the surface with appreciable speed and enhanced selectivity. The effect of the complexes on catalytic activity presumably depends on structural changes on Pt surfaces caused by their adsorption.

  9. Traumatic Acid Reduces Oxidative Stress and Enhances Collagen Biosynthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Pankiewicz, Walentyn; Czerpak, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic acid (TA) is a plant hormone (cytokinin) that in terms of chemical structure belongs to the group of fatty acids derivatives. It was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris. TA activity and its influence on human cells and organism has not previously been the subject of research. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TA on collagen content and basic oxidative stress parameters, such as antioxidative enzyme activity, reduced glutathione, thiol group content, and lipid peroxidation in physiological conditions. The results show a stimulatory effect of TA on tested parameters. TA caused a decrease in membrane phospholipid peroxidation and exhibited protective properties against ROS production. It also increases protein and collagen biosynthesis and its secretion into the culture medium. The present findings reveal that TA exhibits multiple and complex activity in fibroblast cells in vitro. TA, with its activity similar to unsaturated fatty acids, shows antioxidant and stimulatory effects on collagen biosynthesis. It is a potentially powerful agent with applications in the treatment of many skin diseases connected with oxidative stress and collagen biosynthesis disorders. PMID:27423205

  10. Optimization of Lipase-Mediated Synthesis of 1-Nonene Oxide Using Phenylacetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide

    Mohd Basyaruddin Abdul Rahman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Herein, an efficient epoxidation of 1-nonene is described. In a simple epoxidation system, commercially available Novozym 435, an immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were utilized to facilitate the in situ oxidation of phenylacetic acid to the corresponding peroxy acid which then reacted with 1-nonene to give 1-nonene oxide with high yield and selectivity. The aliphatic terminal alkene was epoxidised efficiently in chloroform to give an excellent yield (97%–99% under the optimum reaction conditions, including temperature (35 °C, initial H2O2 concentration (30%, H2O2 amount (4.4 mmol, H2O2 addition rate (one step, acid amount (8.8 mmol, and stirring speed (250 rpm. Interestingly, the enzyme was stable under the single-step addition of H2O2 with a catalytic activity of 190.0 Ug−1. The entire epoxidation process was carried out within 12 h using a conventional water bath shaker.

  11. CPT1α over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells

    To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1α (CPT1α). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1α transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1α over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1α over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1α over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1α, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo

  12. Effect of Dietary n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Oxidant/Antioxidant Status in Macrosomic Offspring of Diabetic Rats

    B. Guermouche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA on oxidant/antioxidant status, in vitro very low and low density lipoprotein (VLDL-LDL, and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition in macrosomic pups of diabetic mothers. We hypothesized that n-3 PUFA would improve oxidative stress in macrosomia. Diabetes was induced in female Wistar rats fed with the ISIO diet (control or with the EPAX diet (enriched in n-3 PUFAs, by streptozotocin. The macrosomic pups were killed at birth (day 0 and at adulthood (day 90. Lipid parameters and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition were investigated. The oxidant/antioxidant status was determined by measuring plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC, hydroperoxides, carbonyl proteins, and VLDL-LDL oxidation. Macrosomic rats of ISIO fed diabetic mothers showed an increase in plasma and VLDL-LDL-triglycerides and VLDL-LDL-cholesterol levels and altered VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition. Plasma ORAC was low with high hydroperoxide and carbonyl protein levels. The in vitro oxidizability of VLDL-LDL was enhanced in these macrosomic rats. The EPAX diet corrected lipid parameters and improved oxidant/antioxidant status but increased VLDL-LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Macrosomia is associated with lipid abnormalities and oxidative stress. n-3 PUFA exerts favorable effects on lipid metabolism and on the oxidant/antioxidant status of macrosomic rats. However, there are no evident effects on VLDL-LDL oxidation.

  13. Rosiglitazone increases fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) but not carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in rat muscle mitochondria

    Benton, Carley R; Holloway, Graham P; Campbell, S E; Yoshida, Yuko; Tandon, Narendra N; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) alter the expression of genes involved in regulating lipid metabolism. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, induces tissue-specific effects on lipid metabolism; however, its mode of action in skeletal muscle remains unclear. Since fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) was recently identified as a possible regulator of skeletal muscle fatty acid transport and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, we examined in this tissue the effects of rosiglitazone infusion (7 days, 1 mg day−1) on FAT/CD36 mRNA and protein, its plasmalemmal content and fatty acid transport. In addition, in isolated subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria we examined rates of fatty acid oxidation, FAT/CD36 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) protein, and CPTI and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activities. Rosiglitazone did not alter FAT/CD36 mRNA or protein expression, FAT/CD36 plasmalemmal content, or the rate of fatty acid transport into muscle (P > 0.05). In contrast, rosiglitazone increased the rates of fatty acid oxidation in both SS (+21%) and IMF mitochondria (+36%). This was accompanied by concomitant increases in FAT/CD36 in subsarcolemmal (SS) (+43%) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria (+46%), while SS and IMF CPTI protein content, and CPTI submaximal and maximal activities (P > 0.05) were not altered. Similarly, citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were also not altered by rosiglitazone in SS and IMF mitochondria (P > 0.05). These studies provide another example whereby changes in mitochondrial fatty oxidation are associated with concomitant changes in mitochondrial FAT/CD36 independent of any changes in CPTI. Moreover, these studies identify for the first time a mechanism by which rosiglitazone stimulates fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, namely the chronic, subcellular relocation of FAT/CD36 to mitochondria. PMID:18238811

  14. Anode material selection criteria for selective oxidation of inorganic compounds in nitric acid media

    Significant progress has been made since the 19606 in developing highly effective anode materials for electrochemical processes, The problem areas currently facing electrochemistry researchers include investigating new composite materials obtained by grafting or doping, improving fabrication techniques to extend the lifetime of the materials while maintaining their selectivity, studying their electrochemical properties and relating them to the material structure. Research on materials with high oxygen over-potentials-materials on which water oxidation is kinetically affected, and which open an electro-activity window on high potentials (2.0 VESH or greater) - has opened new avenues such as the use of various metallic oxide deposits. Two oxide classes were identified from a structural standpoint on the basis of their water oxidation properties: chemisorbed active oxygen anodes (e.g. PtOx, IrO2 or RuO2) and physi-sorbed active oxygen anodes (e.g. SnO2 or PbO2). Selective electrochemical generation of powerful oxidants between 1.4 and 2.0 VESH in concentrated nitric acid media is used in the context of the nuclear fuel cycle, and the potential advantages of new materials with a high oxygen over-potential-other than widely used platinum-have attracted attention. The relevant physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of such materials were therefore investigated to assess their selective oxidation performance. The study focused in particular on identifying the specific aspects of concentrated nitric acid media in the processes occurring at the electrode/solution interface, using linear and cyclic voltammetry, imposed-potential electrolysis and impedance spectroscopy. This approach allowed characterization of the electron charge transfer kinetics of the medium (nitric acid, compared with other acids such as methane sulfonic acid) and of the selected redox couple (Ag(II)/Ag(I) in this case). The tests covered a wide range of materials, including IrO2, SnO2, PbO2

  15. Electroactive behavior assessment of poly(acrylic acid)-graphene oxide composite hydrogel in the detection of cadmium

    Bejarano-Jimenez, A.; Escobar-Barrios, V.A.; Kleijn, J.M.; Oritz-Ledon, C.A.; Chazaro-Ruiz, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    Super absorbent polymers of acrylic acid-graphene oxide (PAA-GO) were synthesized with different percentage of chemical neutralization (0, 10, and 20%) of the acrylic acid monomer before its polymerization. The influence of their swelling and adsorption/desorption capacity of cadmium ions in aqueous

  16. Transition metal-catalyzed oxidative double bond cleavage of simple and bio-derived alkenes and unsaturated fatty acids

    Spannring, Peter; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert. M.; Klein Gebbink, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of the C=C double bond in unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids is a reaction of current interest in biomass valorization. The products of this reaction, which is currently being performed on an industrial scale by means of ozonolysis, can be applied for t

  17. Selective Aerobic Oxidation of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural to 5-Formyl-2-furancarboxylic Acid in Water.

    Ventura, Maria; Aresta, Michele; Dibenedetto, Angela

    2016-05-23

    A simple, cheap, and selective catalyst based on copper/cerium oxides is described for the oxidation of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (5-HMF) in water. An almost quantitative conversion (99 %) with excellent (90 %) selectivity towards the formation of 5-formyl-2-furancarboxylic acid, a platform molecule for other high value chemicals, is observed. The catalyst does not require any pretreatment or additives, such as bases, to obtain high yield and selectivity in water as solvent and using oxygen as oxidant. When a physical mixture of the oxides is used, low conversion and selectivity are observed. Air can be used instead of oxygen, but a lower conversion rate is observed if the same overall pressure is used, and the selectivity remains high. The catalyst can be recovered almost quantitatively and reused. Deactivation of the catalyst, observed in repeated runs, is due to the deposition of humins on its surface. Upon calcination the catalyst almost completely recovers its activity and selectivity, proving that the catalyst is robust. PMID:27101568

  18. Preparation and characterization of a composite hydrogel with graphene oxide as an acid catalyst.

    Jiang, Ting; Sui, Zhu-Yin; Yang, Quan-Sheng; Zhang, Xuetong; Han, Bao-Hang

    2015-04-28

    In this study, a facile method for synthesizing a novel graphene oxide/pyrrole-formaldehyde (GOP-1) composite hydrogel was developed via in situ polymerization of pyrrole and formaldehyde in the presence of graphene oxide sheets without any additional catalyst. During the polymerization, graphene oxide can act as a two-dimensional template to regulate the aggregation state of polymer and as an acid catalyst to accelerate the reaction rate of pyrrole and formaldehyde. The morphology and microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The chemical properties were analyzed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The freeze-dried GOP-1 composite hydrogel exhibited a large specific surface area, high nitrogen content, and three-dimensional network structure. Based on the above features, the freeze-dried GOP-1 composite hydrogel used as a gas adsorbent showed a high carbon dioxide uptake capacity at 1.0 bar and 273 K (11.1 wt%), in sharp contrast to that of graphene oxide (7.4 wt%). Furthermore, the as-prepared composite hydrogel may possess attractive potential in the fields of electrode material, tissue engineering, and water treatment. PMID:25760407

  19. Ammonium-oxidizing bacteria facilitate aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid in activated sludge.

    Chen, Gang; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfanilic acid (SA) is a toxic sulfonated aromatic amine commonly found in anaerobically treated azo dye contaminated effluents. Aerobic acclimatization of SA-degrading mixed microbial culture could lead to co-enrichment of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) because of the concomitant release of ammonium from SA oxidation. To what extent the co-enriched AOB would affect SA oxidation at various ammonium concentrations was unclear. Here, a series of batch kinetic experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of AOB on aerobic SA degradation in an acclimatized activated sludge culture capable of oxidizing SA and ammonium simultaneously. To account for the effect of AOB on SA degradation, allylthiourea was used to inhibit AOB activity in the culture. The results indicated that specific SA degradation rate of the mixed culture was negatively correlated with the initial ammonium concentration (0-93 mM, R²= 0.99). The presence of AOB accelerated SA degradation by reducing the inhibitory effect of ammonium (≥ 10 mM). The Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to correlate substrate concentration (SA and ammonium) and oxygen uptake rate. This study revealed, for the first time, that AOB could facilitate SA degradation at high concentration of ammonium (≥ 10 mM) in an enriched activated sludge culture. PMID:25259503

  20. Investigation of the oxidation states of Pu isotopes in a hydrochloric acid solution.

    Lee, M H; Kim, J Y; Kim, W H; Jung, E C; Jee, K Y

    2008-12-01

    The characteristics of the oxidation states of Pu in a hydrochloric acid solution were investigated and the results were applied to a separating of Pu isotopes from IAEA reference soils. The oxidation states of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were prepared by adding hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium nitrite to a Pu stock solution, respectively. Also, the oxidation state of Pu(VI) was adjusted with concentrated HNO(3) and HClO(4). The stability of the various oxidation states of plutonium in a HCl solution with elapsed time after preparation were found to be in the following order: Pu(III) approximately Pu(VI)>Pu(IV)>Pu(V). The chemical recoveries of Pu(IV) in a 9M HCl solution with an anion exchange resin were similar to those of Pu(VI). This method for the determination of Pu isotopes with an anion exchange resin in a 9M HCl medium was applied to IAEA reference soils where the activity concentrations of (239,240)Pu and (238)Pu in IAEA-375 and IAEA-326 were consistent with the reference values reported by the IAEA. PMID:18674920

  1. Accumulation of Flavonols over Hydroxycinnamic Acids Favors Oxidative Damage Protection under Abiotic Stress

    Martinez, Vicente; Mestre, Teresa C.; Rubio, Francisco; Girones-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Moreno, Diego A.; Mittler, Ron; Rivero, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a key role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses. Although multiple pathways, enzymes, and antioxidants are present in plants, their exact roles during different stress responses remain unclear. Here, we report on the characterization of the different antioxidant mechanisms of tomato plants subjected to heat stress, salinity stress, or a combination of both stresses. All the treatments applied induced an increase of oxidative stress, with the salinity treatment being the most aggressive, resulting in plants with the lowest biomass, and the highest levels of H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. However, the results obtained from the transcript expression study and enzymatic activities related to the ascorbate-glutathione pathway did not fully explain the differences in the oxidative damage observed between salinity and the combination of salinity and heat. An exhaustive metabolomics study revealed the differential accumulation of phenolic compounds depending on the type of abiotic stress applied. An analysis at gene and enzyme levels of the phenylpropanoid metabolism concluded that under conditions where flavonols accumulated to a greater degree as compared to hydroxycinnamic acids, the oxidative damage was lower, highlighting the importance of flavonols as powerful antioxidants, and their role in abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:27379130

  2. Nitric oxide metabolism and indole acetic acid biosynthesis cross-talk in Azospirillum brasilense SM.

    Koul, Vatsala; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-04-01

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) and the presence of NO metabolism genes, nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), nitrous oxide reductase regulator (nosR) and nitric oxide reductase (norB) were identified in the plant-associated bacterium (PAB) Azospirillum brasilense SM. NO presence was confirmed in all overexpressing strains, while improvement in the plant growth response of these strains was mediated by increased NO and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the strains. Electron microscopy showed random distribution to biofilm, with surface colonization of pleiomorphic Azospirilla. Quantitative IAA estimation highlighted a crucial role of nosR and norBC in regulating IAA biosynthesis. The NO quencher and donor reduced/blocked IAA biosynthesis by all strains, indicating their common regulatory role in IAA biosynthesis. Tryptophan (Trp) and l-Arginine (Arg) showed higher expression of NO genes tested, while in the case of ipdC, only Trp and IAA increased expression, while Arg had no significant effect. The highest nosR expression in SMnosR in the presence of IAA and Trp, along with its 2-fold IAA level, confirmed the relationship of nosR overexpression with Trp in increasing IAA. These results indicate a strong correlation between IAA and NO in A. brasilense SM and suggest the existence of cross-talk or shared signaling mechanisms in these two growth regulators. PMID:25700632

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of loop diuretic furosemide in aqueous acid medium and its analytical application

    Shikandar D. Bukkitgar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of oxidative–reductive mechanisms of pharmaceutically important molecules gives us information about the metabolic fact of targeted drug. As compared to recent ongoing, time-consuming and costly techniques, there is an urgent needing for development of a sensitive technique, which can help easy understanding of these pathways. Therefore, in the present work, an effective, low-cost and time-saving technique to investigate the reaction mechanism of furosemide in aqueous acid medium is attempted. Furosemide undergoes two-proton and two-electron transfer reaction. The product obtained was analysed by UV spectra. It was found that the chemical oxidation and electrochemical oxidation of furosemide follows two different pathways. In addition, an effective technique has been developed to determine furosemide in its trace level. Good recoveries and low detection limit accomplished the magnitude of the proposed method. The proposed method was adopted for furosemide determination in human urine and pharmaceutical samples.

  4. The Effects of Ferulic Acid Against Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Formaldehyde-Induced Hepatotoxicity.

    Gerin, Fethullah; Erman, Hayriye; Erboga, Mustafa; Sener, Umit; Yilmaz, Ahsen; Seyhan, Hatice; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the protective effects of ferulic acid (FA) on formaldehyde-induced hepatotoxicity by measuring some routine biochemical parameters, cytokine levels, and oxidative stress-related parameters in addition to YKL-40 in male Wistar albino rats. Tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured. Also, serum YKL-40, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, total protein, albumin, total bilirubin concentrations, and AST, ALT, ALP, and LDH activities were measured. Histological specimens were examined in light microscopy. Formaldehyde significantly increased tissue MDA, and serum cytokine levels and also decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes. FA treatment decreased MDA and cytokine levels and increased activities of antioxidant enzymes. FA also alleviated degeneration due to formaldehyde toxicity. We suggested that FA can be used as a promising hepatoprotective agent against formaldehyde toxicity because of the obvious beneficial effects on oxidative stress parameters. PMID:27235018

  5. Intrinsic oxidation kinetics of sulfite catalyzed by peracetic acid under different water quality and light conditions

    2009-01-01

    Oxidation of sulfite is an important process in wet flue gas desulfurization.Using highly purified water or distilled water as a reaction medium and a transparent or an opaque intermittent reaction apparatus,the intrinsic oxidation kinetics of sulfite catalyzed by peracetic acid was investigated under four dif-ferent conditions.The reaction order of the reagents and the activation energy were obtained.The re-sults indicate that water quality and light have no obvious effects on the reaction order and activation energy,but have an influence on the reaction rate constant.The mechanism of the intrinsic reaction is proposed.The results derived with this mechanism are in good agreement with the experimental re-sults.

  6. Oxidation of Chalcones by Morpholinium Chlorochromate with Oxalic Acid as Catalyst: Kinetic and Mechanistic Study

    K. Rajalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of chalcones by morpholinium chlorochromate (MCC has been studied in 55% acetic acid-water (v/v medium. The reaction showed unit order dependence each with respect to oxidant and catalyst and fractional order with respect to substrate and H+ ion. Increased ionic strength has no effect on the reaction rate. In the case of substituted chalcones, the order with respect to substrate varies depending upon the nature of the substituent present in the ring. In general, the electron withdrawing substituents retard the reaction rate while the electron releasing substituents enhance the rate of the reaction. From the kinetic data obtained, the activation parameters have been calculated and a suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  7. Kinetics of oxidation of pentavalent neptunium by pentavalent vanadium in solutions of nitric acid

    Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2010-03-01

    Management of the oxidation state of neptunium in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by solvent extraction is very important. The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(V) by vanadium(V) in solutions of nitrate acid was investigated at constant ionic strength 4M. The reaction rate is first order with respect to Np(V) and V(V). The effects of proton concentration on the apparent second order rate constant k1" was determined for temperature 25°C as k1" = (0.99±0.03)·[H+]1.21M-1s-1. Activation parameters associated with the overall reaction have been calculated; the standard reaction enthalpy and entropy were 52.6±0.9 kJ/mol and -55.8±0.9 J/K/mol respectively.

  8. Alpha-Lipoic Acid Attenuates Oxidative Damage in Organs After Sepsis.

    Petronilho, Fabricia; Florentino, Drielly; Danielski, Lucinéia Gainski; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Martins, Maryane Modolon; Vieira, Andriele; Bonfante, Sandra; Goldim, Mariana Pereira; Vuolo, Francieli

    2016-02-01

    Sepsis progression is linked with the imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant enzymes. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), a powerful antioxidant, in organs of rats submitted to sepsis. Male Wistar rats were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation puncture (CLP) and treated with ALA or vehicle. After CLP (12 and 24 h), the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, protein and lipid oxidative damage, and antioxidant enzymes in the liver, kidney, heart, and lung were evaluated. ALA was effective in reducing MPO activity, lipid peroxidation in the liver, and protein carbonylation only in the kidney in 12 h after CLP. In 12 h, SOD activity increased in the kidney and CAT activity in the liver and kidney with ALA treatment. Thus, ALA was able to reduce the inflammation and oxidative stress in the liver and kidney after sepsis in rats. PMID:26431839

  9. Cellulose nanocrystals prepared via formic acid hydrolysis followed by TEMPO-mediated oxidation.

    Li, Bin; Xu, Wenyang; Kronlund, Dennis; Määttänen, Anni; Liu, Jun; Smått, Jan-Henrik; Peltonen, Jouko; Willför, Stefan; Mu, Xindong; Xu, Chunlin

    2015-11-20

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a renewable and biodegradable nanomaterial have wide application value. In this work, CNCs were extracted from bleached chemical pulp using two stages of isolation (i.e. formic acid (FA) hydrolysis and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) mediated oxidation) under mild conditions. In the first stage, FA was used to remove hemicellulose, swell cellulose fibers, and release CNCs. The FA could be readily recovered and reused. In the second stage, the CNCs isolated by FA were further modified by TEMPO-mediated oxidation to increase the surface charge of CNCs. It was found that the modified CNCs with more ordered crystal structure and higher surface charge had better redispersibility and higher viscosity in aqueous phase. Therefore, the modified CNCs could be more effective when used as rheology modifier in the fields of water based coating, paint, food etc. PMID:26344319

  10. Gas-Phase Partial Oxidation of Lignin to Carboxylic Acids over Vanadium Pyrophosphate and Aluminum-Vanadium-Molybdenum.

    Lotfi, Samira; Boffito, Daria C; Patience, Gregory S

    2015-10-26

    Lignin is a complex polymer that is a potential feedstock for aromatic compounds and carboxylic acids by cleaving the β-O-4 and 5-5' linkages. In this work, a syringe pump atomizes an alkaline solution of lignin into a catalytic fluidized bed operating above 600 K. The vanadium heterogeneous catalysts convert all the lignin into carboxylic acids (up to 25 % selectivity), coke, carbon oxides, and hydrogen. Aluminum-vanadium-molybdenum mostly produced lactic acid (together with formic acid, acrylic acid, and maleic anhydride), whereas the vanadium pyrophosphate catalyst produced more maleic anhydride. PMID:26361086

  11. Extractive and oxidative removal of copper bound to humic acid in soil.

    Hwang, Bo-Ram; Kim, Eun-Jung; Yang, Jung-Seok; Baek, Kitae

    2015-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is often found strongly bound to natural organic matter (NOM) in soil through the formation of strong Cu-NOM complexes. Therefore, in order to successfully remediate Cu-contaminated soils, effective removal of Cu bound to soil organic matter should be considered. In this study, we investigated soil washing methods for Cu removal from a synthetic Cu-contaminated model silica soil coated with humic acid (HA) and from field contaminated soil. Various reagents were studied to extract Cu bound to NOM, which included oxidant (H2O2), base (NaOH), and chelating agents (citric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)). Among the wash reagents, EDTA extracted Cu most effectively since EDTA formed very strong complexes with Cu, and Cu-HA complexes were transformed into Cu-EDTA complexes. NaOH extracted slightly less Cu compared to EDTA. HA was effectively extracted from the model soil under strongly alkaline conditions with NaOH, which seemed to concurrently release Cu bound to HA. However, chemical oxidation with H2O2 was not effective at destroying Cu-HA complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis revealed that chelating agents such as citrate and EDTA were adsorbed onto the model soil via possible complexation between HA and extraction agents. The extraction of Cu from a field contaminated soil sample was effective with chelating agents, while oxidative removal with H2O2 and extractive removal with NaOH separated negligible amounts of Cu from the soil. Based on these results, Cu bound to organic matter in soil could be effectively removed by chelating agents, although remnant agents may remain in the soil. PMID:25388560

  12. Urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation in Danish overweight/obese children and youths.

    Kloppenborg, Julie Tonsgaard; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann; Johannesen, Jesper; Bjerrum, Poul Jannik; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-07-01

    Urinary excretion of the RNA and DNA oxidation markers, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in newly diagnosed adult type 2 diabetics are reported to be long-term predictors of mortality independent of conventional risk factors. In the current study, we investigated the relationships between urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation concentrations and the degree of obesity and glucose metabolism in overweight compared to lean children. Forty-two (24 girls) overweight and 35 lean (19 girls) children and adolescents were recruited from the Registry of the Danish Childhood Obesity Biobank. Anthropometric measurements were collected at baseline and glucose metabolism was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test. A urine sample was obtained during the test. Linear regression did not demonstrate any associations between the urinary markers and the degree of obesity or glucose metabolism in lean and obese children. However, sub-analyses adjusted for age, sex, and the degree of obesity showed positive associations between the 2 h glucose and the urinary markers, 8-oxoGuo (p = 0.02, r(2)= 0.63) and 8-oxodG (p = 0.046, r(2)= 0.48), and between the insulinogenic index and 8-oxoGuo (p = 0.03, r(2 )=( )0.60) in the 12 obese children exhibiting impaired glucose tolerance. Excretion of the urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation and the degree of obesity or the glucose metabolism were not associated in this study. Nevertheless, obese children with impaired glucose tolerance seem to exhibiting an increased oxidative stress level, but due to the small sample size in this study, further investigations are required to elucidate this correlation. PMID:26982114

  13. Urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation and cancer in type 2 diabetes

    Broedbaek, Kasper; Siersma, Volkert; Henriksen, Trine; Weimann, Allan; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T.; Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Hansen, Lars J.; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Bonnema, Steen J.; de Fine Olivarius, Niels; Friis, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We investigated whether urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation are associated with an increased risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods Urine samples from 1381 newly diagnosed diabetes patients were assayed for the oxidatively modified guanine nucleosides 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the relationship between the urinary markers and cancer incidence. Results The crude analyses showed an association between overall cancer and urinary excretion of the RNA oxidation marker 8-oxoGuo (unadjusted hazard ratio for cancer per natural log increase in 8-oxoGuo 1.35 [95% CI, 1.01–1.81]), however, in the adjusted analyses, no significant associations between 8-oxodG or 8-oxoGuo and overall cancer were found. For site-specific cancers 8-oxodG was associated with breast cancer in the crude analyses (unadjusted hazard ratio for breast cancer per natural log increase in 8-oxodG was 2.37 [95% CI, 1.07–5.26]), although the association was attenuated in the adjusted analyses (sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio 2.15 [95% CI, 0.92–5.02] and multivariate adjusted hazard ratio1.98 [95% CI, 0.95–4.10]). Conclusions Urinary excretion of the nucleic acid oxidation markers 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo at the time of diagnosis was not associated with cancer overall in type 2 diabetes patients. For site-specific cancers, risk elevations were seen for breast cancer (8-oxodG). These findings should be examined in future and larger studies. PMID:25498965

  14. The effects of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation on brain tissue oxidative status in aged wistar rats

    Avramovic, N; Dragutinovic, V; Krstic, D; Colovic, MB; Trbovic, A; de Luka, S; Milovanovic, I; Popovic, T

    2012-01-01

    Background: The omega 3 fatty acids play an important role in many physiological processes. Their effect is well documented in neurodegenerative diseases and inflammatory diseases. Also, aging as a biophysiological process could be influenced by eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) components of fish oil. However there are not many studies showing the effect of PUFA (polyunsaturated FA) suplementation in eldery brain functions and the response to oxidative strees. The aim ...

  15. Effect of Ocimum sanctum, ascorbic acid, and verapamil on macrophage function and oxidative stress in mice exposed to cocaine

    Bhattacharya, S K; Rathi, N.; Mahajan, P; Tripathi, A. K.; Paudel, K.R.; G P Rauniar; Das, B. P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Ocimum sanctum, ascorbic acid, and verapamil on macrophage function and oxidative stress in experimental animals exposed to cocaine. Materials and Methods: Mice were used in this study and were divided randomly into different groups of six animals each. They were either treated with intraperitoneal injection of saline or cocaine hydrochloride or an oral feeding of oil of Ocimum sanctum, ascorbic acid or verapamil, or both (ascorbic acid and verapamil), ...

  16. Involvement of Nitric Oxide on Calcium Mobilization and Arachidonic Acid Pathway Activation during Platelet Aggregation with different aggregating agonists

    Banerjee, Debipriya; Mazumder, Sahana; Kumar Sinha, Asru

    2016-01-01

    Platelet aggregation by different aggregating agonists is essential in the normal blood coagulation process, the excess of which caused acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In all cases, the activation of arachidonic acid by cycloxygenase was needed for the synthesis of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) but the mechanism of arachidonic acid release in platelets remains obscure. Studies were conducted to determine the role of nitric oxide (NO), if any, on the release of arachidonic acid in platelets. The cytoso...

  17. Kinetics of the oxidative hydroxylation of sodium hypophosphite in the presence of copper (II) chloride modified by humic (fulvo-) acid

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov; Dina Akbayeva; Zhaniya Eshova; M. Bazhanovа

    2012-01-01

    It was established that in soft conditions (50-70oC, PO2 = 1 atm) sodium hypophosphite effectively is oxidized by oxygen in water solutions of copper(II) chloride  to give mainly a phosphorous acid. Humic (fulvo-) acid was extracted from brown coal of domestic deposit Kiyakty. For determination of optimum parameters of fulvo-acid extraction the laboratory experiments were carried out using the method of experiment planning. The kinetics, the intermediate and final products, optimal conditions...

  18. Nitric oxide functions in both methyl jasmonate signaling and abscisic acid signaling in Arabidopsis guard cells

    Saito, Naoki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C.; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular components in methyl jasmonate (MeJA) signaling remain largely unknown, to compare those in well-understood abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. We have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling component in MeJA-induced stomatal closure, as well as ABA-induced stomatal closure in the previous study. To gain further information about the role of NO in the guard cell signaling, NO production was examined in an ABA- and MeJA-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant, rcn1. Neither MeJA nor AB...

  19. Study of oxidative stress and uric acid in pregnancy induced hypertension

    Lavanya, Y. Ruth; B., Shobharani

    2015-01-01

    Background:  Pregnancy induced hypertension is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnant woman. Preeclampsia and Eclampsia Sepsis and Haemorrhage are the prime killers in pregnancy.Aim: This study is aimed to assess the role of oxidative stress by estimating Malondialdehyde(MDA), Glutathione –s-transferase (GST) and its severity by estimating serum uric acid levels in PIH.Materials and Methods:  The study comprised of 60 third trimester pregnant woman . Among those 24 were clinic...

  20. Kinetics of bromide catalysed oxidation of dextrose by cerium (IV) in aqueous sulphuric acid solution

    Kinetics of bromide catalysed oxidation of dextrose by CeIV in aqueous sulphuric acid medium show first order dependence each in dextrose and cerium(IV). The reaction rate decreases on increasing the concentration of hydrogen ion. The increase in [HSO4-] or [SO42-] decreases the rate. The bromide ion shows positive catalytic effect on the reaction rate. The value of activation energy has been calculated and a suitable mechanism confirming to the kinetic data is proposed. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Oxidation of some disubstituted anisole derivatives with ceric perchlorate in perchloric acid solution

    The influence of concentration of particular reagents on the kinetics of Ce(IV) reduction by 2,6-dimethyl and 3,5-dimethyl-anisole as well as 2-methoxy-5-methyl- and 4-methoxy-2-methyl-aniline in perchloric acid solution was investigated, establishing the stoichiometry of these processes. Some intermediate products - macromolecular, derivatives of p-benzoquinone and 4,4'-diphenoquinone - were separated and identified. The effects of substituents and the conditions of performed oxidation processes on the kind and yields of the resultant products were considered. (author). 22 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Oxidative stripping process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    The present invention is a two-cycle liquid-liquid extraction process in which the uranium, as uranous ion, is extracted with a first-cycle extractant and then oxidatively stripped with a concentrated phosphoric acid solution. This uranium-enriched strip solution then serves as feed for a second liquid-liquid solvent extraction cycle where uranyl ions are extracted into an organic phase, stripped from the organic phase with ammonium carbonate soluton, and recovered as a high-grade u3O8 product. (author)

  3. A Single-Tube Nucleic Acid Extraction, Amplification, and Detection Method Using Aluminum Oxide

    Dames, Shale; Bromley, L. Kathryn; Herrmann, Mark; Elgort, Marc; Erali, Maria; Smith, Roger; Voelkerding, Karl V.

    2006-01-01

    A disposable 0.2-ml polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tube modified with an aluminum oxide membrane (AOM) has been developed for the extraction, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids. To assess the dynamic range of AOM tubes for real-time PCR, quantified herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA was used to compare AOM tubes to standard PCR tubes. AOM PCR tubes used for amplification and detection of quantified HSV-1 displayed a crossing threshold (CT) shift 0.1 cycles greater than PCR tube contro...

  4. Salicylic acid alleviates cold-induced photosynthesis inhibition and oxidative stress in Jasminum sambac

    CAI, HAN; He, Mengying; Ma, Kun; HUANG, YONGGAO; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a signal molecule that mediates many biotic and abiotic stress-induced physiological responses in plants. In the current study the protective effects of SA on cold stress-caused oxidative damage and photosynthesis inhibition in jasmine plants (Jasminum sambac) were examined. Jasmine seedlings were pretreated with 100 µM SA for 3 days and then subjected to cold stress (4 °C) for 15 days. The amounts of superoxide radicals (O_2^{-}) and hydrogen peroxide (H_{2}O_{2}) sign...

  5. Photoluminescence emission of nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide films prepared in phosphoric acid

    Nourmohammadi, Abolghasem; Asadabadi, Saeid Jalali; Yousefi, Mohammad Hasan; Ghasemzadeh, Majid

    2012-12-01

    The photoluminescence emission of nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide films formed in phosphoric acid is studied in order to explore their defect-based subband electronic structure. Different excitation wavelengths are used to identify most of the details of the subband states. The films are produced under different anodizing conditions to optimize their emission in the visible range. Scanning electron microscopy investigations confirm pore formation in the produced layers. Gaussian analysis of the emission data indicates that subband states change with anodizing parameters, and various point defects can be formed both in the bulk and on the surface of these nanoporous layers during anodizing.

  6. Two-parameter stochastic resonance in a model of electrochemical oxidation of formic acid on Pt

    皮宗新; 辛厚文

    2002-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is shown in a two-parameter system, a model of electro-chemical oxidation of formic acid on Pt. The driving current and the saturation coverage for carbon monoxide are two control parameters in this model. Modulation of an excitable focal stable state close to a Hopf bifurcation by a weak periodic signal in one parameter and noise in the other parameter is found to give rise to SR. The results indicate that the noise can enlarge a weak peri-odic signal and lead the system to be ordered. The scenario and novel aspects of SR in this system are discussed.

  7. Crystal structure of the 1:2 molecular complex of tetrafluoroboric acid with triphenylphosphine oxide

    Crystalline molecular complex of tetrafluoroboric acid with triphenylphosphine oxide of Ph3PO·0.5HBF4 (1) is prepared and studied by means of x-ray diffraction method. HBF4 molecule is situated near crystallographic axis 2 and is statistically disordered relatively this axis. All the atoms of the molecule have positions of population density equal 0.5. Boron atom has distorted tetrahedral coordination. B-F(H) bond is significantly more lengthy then other three B-F bonds and is donor-acceptor one. HBF4 molecule is bonded with Ph3PO molecule by strong asymmetrical hydrogen bond with 50 % probability

  8. Oxidative Precipitation of Manganese from Acid Mine Drainage by Potassium Permanganate

    Regeane M. Freitas; Perilli, Thomaz A. G.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q.

    2013-01-01

    Although oxidative precipitation by potassium permanganate is a widely recognised process for manganese removal, research dealing with highly contaminated acid mine drainage (AMD) has yet to be performed. The present study investigated the efficiency of KMnO4 in removing manganese from AMD effluents. Samples of AMD that originated from inactive uranium mine in Brazil were chemically characterised and treated by KMnO4 at pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0. Analyses by Raman spectroscopy and geochemical mode...

  9. Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid over Nickel Catalysts Supported on Aluminum Oxide to Prepare γ-Valerolactone

    Jie Fu; Dong Sheng; Xiuyang Lu

    2015-01-01

    Four types of nickel catalysts supported on aluminum oxide (Ni/Al2O3) with different nickel loadings were synthesized using the co-precipitation method and were used for the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) to prepare γ-valerolactone (GVL). The synthesized Ni/Al2O3 catalysts exhibited excellent catalytic activity in dioxane, and the activity of the catalysts was excellent even after being used four times in dioxane. The catalytic activity in dioxane as a solvent was found to be superior t...

  10. Three-dimensional graphene oxide/phytic acid composite for uranium(VI) sorption

    In this work, a novel three dimensional graphene oxide sponge composite material was synthesized by functionalized GO sheets with phytic acid (PA). The as-synthesized samples were characterized and employed to investigate the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Results show that higher pH favored the sorption of uranium on PA-GO. Ionic strength puts insignificant influence on the sorption. The maximum adsorption capacity is 124.3 mg g-1 at pH 5.5. The adsorption isotherms can be well described by Langmuir isotherm model and the sorption kinetics has been successfully modeled by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. (author)

  11. Application of the Generic Modeling Template Approach to Unsaturated Fatty Acid Oxidation and Crystallization Systems

    Fedorova, Marina; Papadakis, Emmanouil; Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    In this work, a couple of applications of the template-based approach for model development are presented. The computer-aided template concept has been developed based on a model decomposition technique and has been implemented as a software tool, which provides a user-friendly interface for...... following the modelling workflow steps, guidance through the steps , as well as providing additional information and comments. The application of the tool is highlighted with two case studies: oxidation of unsaturated acid with hydrogen peroxide and modeling of a crystal lization operation for the...... paracetamol-ethanol system....

  12. Removal of Acid Alizarin Black Dye from Aqueous Solution by Adsorption using Zinc Oxide

    Haydar A. Mohammad Salim

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of Acid Alizarin Black (AAB) dye (C.I. 21725) on zinc oxide was investigated in this study. The adsorption was carried out under different operating conditions. The operating conditions were adsorbent dosage (10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 mg), initial dye concentration (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 mg/L), pH of solution (2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 12) and temperature (20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 oC). The removal percentage of dye on ZnO decreases from 67 % to 54 % with increase in initial dye c...

  13. Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system

    An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement. 2 figs

  14. Electrophoretic deposition and electrochemical behavior of novel graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings

    Li, Ming; Liu, Qian; Jia, Zhaojun; Xu, Xuchen; Shi, Yuying; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-11-01

    Novel ternary graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite (GO-HY-HA) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Ti substrate using anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Hyaluronic acid was employed as charging additive and dispersion agent during EPD. The kinetics and mechanism of the deposition, and the microstructure of the coated samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and microscopic Fourier transform infrared analysis. The results showed that the addition of GO sheets into the HY-HA suspensions could increase the deposition rate and inhibit cracks creation and propagation in the coatings. The corrosion resistant of the resulting samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization method in simulated body fluid, and the GO-HY-HA coatings could effectively improve the anti-corrosion property of the Ti substrate.

  15. Electrophoretic deposition and electrochemical behavior of novel graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings

    Novel ternary graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite (GO-HY-HA) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Ti substrate using anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Hyaluronic acid was employed as charging additive and dispersion agent during EPD. The kinetics and mechanism of the deposition, and the microstructure of the coated samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and microscopic Fourier transform infrared analysis. The results showed that the addition of GO sheets into the HY-HA suspensions could increase the deposition rate and inhibit cracks creation and propagation in the coatings. The corrosion resistant of the resulting samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization method in simulated body fluid, and the GO-HY-HA coatings could effectively improve the anti-corrosion property of the Ti substrate

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Lactic Acid by Dihydroxyditelluratoargentate(Ⅲ)in Alkaline Medium

    SHANJin-huan; WANGLi; LIUBao-sheng; SHENShi-gang

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of lactic acid(Lac) by dihydroxyditelluratoargentate(Ⅲ)[abbreviated as DDA of Ag(Ⅲ)]anions was studied in an aqueous alkaline medium by conventional spectrophotometry in a temperature range of 25-40℃.The order of the redox reaction of lactic acid and DDA was found to be first-order.The rates increased with the increase in [OH-]and decreased with the increase in [tellurate].No free radical was detected.In the view of this the dihydroxymonotelluratoargentate(Ⅲ)species(DMA) is assumed to be the active species.A plausible mechanism involving a two-electron transfer is proposed,and the rate equation derived from the mechanism can be used to explain all the experimenttal results.The activation parameters(25℃)and the rate constants of the rate-determining step along with the preequilibrium constants at different temperatures were evaluated.

  17. Electrons Mediate the Gas-Phase Oxidation of Formic Acid with Ozone.

    van der Linde, Christian; Tang, Wai-Kit; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-08-26

    Gas-phase reactions of CO3 (.-) with formic acid are studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Signal loss indicates the release of a free electron, with the formation of neutral reaction products. This is corroborated by adding traces of SF6 to the reaction gas, which scavenges 38 % of the electrons. Quantum chemical calculations of the reaction potential energy surface provide a reaction path for the formation of neutral carbon dioxide and water as the thermochemically favored products. From the literature, it is known that free electrons in the troposphere attach to O2 , which in turn transfer the electron to O3 . O3 (.-) reacts with CO2 to form CO3 (.-) . The reaction reported here formally closes the catalytic cycle for the oxidation of formic acid with ozone, catalyzed by free electrons. PMID:27400953

  18. Sampling the oxidative weathering products and the potentially acidic permafrost on Mars

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Large areas of Mars' surface are covered by oxidative weathering products containing ferric and sulfate ions having analogies to terrestrial gossans derived from sulfide mineralization associated with iron-rich basalts. Chemical weathering of such massive and disseminated pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages and host basaltic rocks in the Martian environment could have produced metastable gossaniferous phases (limonite containing poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates and oxyhydroxides, clay silicates and opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost on Mars, may still be acidic due to incomplete buffering reactions by wall-rock alteration of unfractured host rock. Such acidic solutions stabilize temperature-sensitive complex ions and sols which flocculate to colloidal precipitates at elevated temperatures. Sampling procedures of Martian regolith will need to be designed bearing in mind that the frozen permafrost may be corrosive and be stabilizing unique complex ions and sols of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni and other minor elements.

  19. Comparative Adsorption of Saturated and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at the Iron Oxide/Oil Interface.

    Wood, Mary H; Casford, M T; Steitz, R; Zarbakhsh, A; Welbourn, R J L; Clarke, Stuart M

    2016-01-19

    A detailed comparison of the adsorption behavior of long straight chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids at the iron oxide/oil interface has been considered using a combination of surface study techniques. Both depletion isotherms and polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) show that the extent of adsorption decreases as the number of double bonds in the alkyl chains increases. Sum frequency generation spectroscopic measurements demonstrate that there is also an increase in chain disorder within the adsorbed layer as the unsaturation increases. However, for the unsaturated analogues, a decrease in peak intensity is seen for the double bond peak upon heating, which is thought to arise from isomerization in the surface-bound layer. The PNR study of oleic acid adsorption indicates chemisorbed monolayer adsorption, with a further diffuse reversible adsorbed layer formed at higher concentrations. PMID:26707597

  20. Oxidation of glycylglycine by ferricyanide in acid medium: Kinetics and mechanism

    Krishna K. Yerneni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative degradation of glycylglycine (GlyGly to formic acid, ammonium ion, and carbon dioxide occurs when it reacts with ferricyanide in acid medium, which has been studied spectrophotometrically at 303 nm at constant temperature. Kinetic runs have been performed under a pseudo-first-order condition of [GlyGly]0 >> [ferricyanide]0. The experimental rate law obtained for the redox reaction is: rate = kı [$ \\text{Fe(CN}^{3 - }_{6} $] [GlyGly]x [H+]y[Pd(II]0, where x and y are fractional orders. Effects of ionic strength and dielectric constant are also investigated. Activation parameters have been evaluated using Arrhenius and Eyring plots. A probable mechanism has been proposed and the derived rate law is consistent with the kinetic data.