WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid metabolism cam

  1. Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants: powerful tools for unravelling the functional elements of CAM photosynthesis.

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2014-07-01

    Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) describes the optional use of CAM photosynthesis, typically under conditions of drought stress, in plants that otherwise employ C3 or C4 photosynthesis. In its cleanest form, the upregulation of CAM is fully reversible upon removal of stress. Reversibility distinguishes facultative CAM from ontogenetically programmed unidirectional C3-to-CAM shifts inherent in constitutive CAM plants. Using mainly measurements of 24h CO2 exchange, defining features of facultative CAM are highlighted in five terrestrial species, Clusia pratensis, Calandrinia polyandra, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, Portulaca oleracea and Talinum triangulare. For these, we provide detailed chronologies of the shifts between photosynthetic modes and comment on their usefulness as experimental systems. Photosynthetic flexibility is also reviewed in an aquatic CAM plant, Isoetes howellii. Through comparisons of C3 and CAM states in facultative CAM species, many fundamental biochemical principles of the CAM pathway have been uncovered. Facultative CAM species will be of even greater relevance now that new sequencing technologies facilitate the mapping of genomes and tracking of the expression patterns of multiple genes. These technologies and facultative CAM systems, when joined, are expected to contribute in a major way towards our goal of understanding the essence of CAM. PMID:24642847

  2. Australia lacks stem succulents but is it depauperate in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)?

    Holtum, Joseph Am; Hancock, Lillian P; Edwards, Erika J; Crisp, Michael D; Crayn, Darren M; Sage, Rowan; Winter, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In the flora of Australia, the driest vegetated continent, crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), the most water-use efficient form of photosynthesis, is documented in only 0.6% of native species. Most are epiphytes and only seven terrestrial. However, much of Australia is unsurveyed, and carbon isotope signature, commonly used to assess photosynthetic pathway diversity, does not distinguish between plants with low-levels of CAM and C3 plants. We provide the first census of CAM for the Australian flora and suggest that the real frequency of CAM in the flora is double that currently known, with the number of terrestrial CAM species probably 10-fold greater. Still unresolved is the question why the large stem-succulent life - form is absent from the native Australian flora even though exotic large cacti have successfully invaded and established in Australia. PMID:27088716

  3. Modeling analysis of the benefits of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) for sustainable agriculture in arid regions

    Bartlett, M. S.; Vico, G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In view of the pressing needs to sustainably manage water and soil resources, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, here we propose a new carbon assimilation model that couples a simple yet mechanistic description of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis to the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The model captures the full coupling of the CAM photosynthetic pathway with fluctuations in environmental conditions (cycles of light availability and air humidity, changes in soil moisture as driven by plant transpiration and rainfall occurrence). As such, the model is capable of reproducing the different phases of CAM, including daytime stomatal closure and photosynthesis from malic acid, afternoon stomatal opening for direct carbon assimilation, and nighttime stomatal opening for CO2 uptake and malic acid synthesis. Thanks to its versatility, our model allows us to relate CAM productivity, for both obligate and facultative CAM plants, to various soil moisture conditions including hydroclimatic scenarios of rainfall frequency and intensity as well as different night-time conditions of temperature, wind speed, and humidity. Our analyses show the potential productive benefits of CAM cultivation in dryland environments as feedstock and possible biofuel source, in terms of sustainable water use and economic benefits. In particular, the model is used to explore conditions where CAM plant resiliency to water stress makes these plants a more sustainable alternative to C3 and C4 species for potential deficit irrigation.

  4. Day–Night Changes of Energy-rich Compounds in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) Species Utilizing Hexose and Starch

    Chen, Li-Song; NOSE, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) can be divided into two groups according to the major carbohydrates used for malic acid synthesis, either polysaccharide (starch) or monosaccharide (hexose). This is related to the mechanism and affects energy metabolism in the two groups. In Kalanchoë pinnata and K. daigremontiana, which utilize starch, ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (tonoplast inorganic pyrophosphatase) activity is greater than inorganic pyrophosphate-d...

  5. Toward systems-level analysis of agricultural production from crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM): scaling from cell to commercial production.

    Davis, Sarah C; Ming, Ray; LeBauer, David S; Long, Stephen P

    2015-10-01

    Systems-level analyses have become prominent tools for assessing the yield, viability, economic consequences and environmental impacts of agricultural production. Such analyses are well-developed for many commodity crops that are used for food and biofuel, but have not been developed for agricultural production systems based on drought-tolerant plants that use crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). We review the components of systems-level evaluations, and identify the information available for completing such analyses for CAM cropping systems. Specific needs for developing systems-level evaluations of CAM agricultural production include: improvement of physiological models; assessment of product processing after leaving the farm gate; and application of newly available genetic tools to the optimization of CAM species for commercial production. PMID:26094655

  6. Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in an epiphytic ant-plant, Myrmecodia beccarii Hook.f. (Rubiaceae).

    Tsen, Edward W J; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2012-09-01

    This study demonstrates unequivocally the presence of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in a species of the Rubiaceae, the fourth largest angiosperm plant family. The tropical Australian endemic epiphytic ant-plant, Myrmecodia beccarii Hook.f., exhibits net CO(2) uptake in the dark and a concomitant accumulation of titratable acidity in plants in the field and in cultivation. Plants growing near Cardwell, in a north Queensland coastal seasonally dry forest of Melaleuca viridiflora Sol. ex Gaertn., accumulated ~50 % of their 24 h carbon gain in the dark during the warm wet season. During the transition from the wet season to the dry season, 24 h carbon gain was reduced whilst the proportion of carbon accumulated during the dark increased. By mid dry season many plants exhibited zero net carbon uptake over 24 h, but CO(2) uptake in the dark was observed in some plants following localised rainfall. In a shade-house experiment, droughted plants in which CO(2) uptake in the light was absent and dark CO(2) uptake was reduced, were able to return to relatively high rates of CO(2) uptake in the light and dark within 12 h of rewatering. PMID:22442054

  7. Climate-resilient agroforestry: physiological responses to climate change and engineering of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) as a mitigation strategy.

    Borland, Anne M; Wullschleger, Stan D; Weston, David J; Hartwell, James; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2015-09-01

    Global climate change threatens the sustainability of agriculture and agroforestry worldwide through increased heat, drought, surface evaporation and associated soil drying. Exposure of crops and forests to warmer and drier environments will increase leaf:air water vapour-pressure deficits (VPD), and will result in increased drought susceptibility and reduced productivity, not only in arid regions but also in tropical regions with seasonal dry periods. Fast-growing, short-rotation forestry (SRF) bioenergy crops such as poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) are particularly susceptible to hydraulic failure following drought stress due to their isohydric nature and relatively high stomatal conductance. One approach to sustaining plant productivity is to improve water-use efficiency (WUE) by engineering crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. CAM improves WUE by shifting stomatal opening and primary CO2 uptake and fixation to the night-time when leaf:air VPD is low. CAM members of the tree genus Clusia exemplify the compatibility of CAM performance within tree species and highlight CAM as a mechanism to conserve water and maintain carbon uptake during drought conditions. The introduction of bioengineered CAM into SRF bioenergy trees is a potentially viable path to sustaining agroforestry production systems in the face of a globally changing climate. PMID:25366937

  8. Eddy covariance captures four-phase crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) gas exchange signature in Agave.

    Owen, Nick A; Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Males, Jamie; Del Real Laborde, José Ignacio; Rubio-Cortés, Ramón; Griffiths, Howard; Lanigan, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mass and energy fluxes were measured over a field of Agave tequilana in Mexico using eddy covariance (EC) methodology. Data were gathered over 252 d, including the transition from wet to dry periods. Net ecosystem exchanges (FN,EC ) displayed a crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) rhythm that alternated from CO2 sink at night to CO2 source during the day, and partitioned canopy fluxes (FA,EC ) showed a characteristic four-phase CO2 exchange pattern. Results were cross-validated against diel changes in titratable acidity, leaf-unfurling rates, energy exchange fluxes and reported biomass yields. Projected carbon balance (g C m(-2)  year(-1) , mean ± 95% confidence interval) indicated the site was a net sink of -333 ± 24, of which contributions from soil respiration were +692 ± 7, and FA,EC was -1025 ± 25. EC estimated biomass yield was 20.1 Mg (dry) ha(-1)  year(-1) . Average integrated daily FA,EC was -234 ± 5 mmol CO2  m(-2)  d(-1) and persisted almost unchanged after 70 d of drought conditions. Regression analyses were performed on the EC data to identify the best environmental predictors of FA . Results suggest that the carbon acquisition strategy of Agave offers productivity and drought resilience advantages over conventional semi-arid C3 and C4 bioenergy candidates. PMID:26177873

  9. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world.

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C; Borland, Anne M; Edwards, Erika J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A; Owen, Nick A; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J Andrew C; De Paoli, Henrique C; Weston, David J; Cottingham, Robert; Hartwell, James; Davis, Sarah C; Silvera, Katia; Ming, Ray; Schlauch, Karen; Abraham, Paul; Stewart, J Ryan; Guo, Hao-Bo; Albion, Rebecca; Ha, Jungmin; Lim, Sung Don; Wone, Bernard W M; Yim, Won Cheol; Garcia, Travis; Mayer, Jesse A; Petereit, Juli; Nair, Sujithkumar S; Casey, Erin; Hettich, Robert L; Ceusters, Johan; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J; Yin, Hengfu; Reyes-García, Casandra; Andrade, José Luis; Freschi, Luciano; Beltrán, Juan D; Dever, Louisa V; Boxall, Susanna F; Waller, Jade; Davies, Jack; Bupphada, Phaitun; Kadu, Nirja; Winter, Klaus; Sage, Rowan F; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2015-08-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO2 uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAM crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food, feed, and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM has potential for high returns on research investment. To exploit the potential of CAM crops and CAM bioengineering, it will be necessary to elucidate the evolution, genomic features, and regulatory mechanisms of CAM. Field trials and predictive models will be required to assess the productivity of CAM crops, while new synthetic biology approaches need to be developed for CAM engineering. Infrastructure will be needed for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management. PMID:26153373

  10. A Preliminary Study of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) in the Endangered Aquatic Quillwort Isoetes sinensis Palmer in China

    Pang Xin-an; Wang Qing-feng; Gituru W.Robert; Liu Hong; Yang Xiao-lin; Liu Xing

    2003-01-01

    Isoetes sinensis Palmer (Isoetaceae) is an aquatic or amphibious plant that is critically endangered in China. Previous studies have revealed the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)-like photosynthetic pathway occurs com-monly in submerged leaves in genus Isoetes. Water chemistry parameters and the titratable acidity content of the plant extract were measured from samples obtained in the early morning (7:00) and late afternoon (15:00) from two I.sinensis populations in China. One population occurs in the eulittoral zone of a freshwater tidal river at low elevation (134 m) and another occurs in a densely vegetated, high elevation (1 100 m) alpine shallow pool. Significant differences in pH and titratable acidity of the plant extract were detected between the morning and afternoon samples. These changes are associated with diurnalchanges in water chemistry. Our results provide the first evidence for the exist-ence of the CAM pathwa in the East Asian endemic Isoetes sinensis Palmer.The magnitude of fluctuations in the titratable acidity of the plant extract mayb e correlated with the severe carbon limitation imposed on the plants by its aquatic habitat.

  11. Large-scale mRNA expression profiling in the common ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, performing C3 photosynthesis and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    Cushman, John C; Tillett, Richard L; Wood, Joshua A; Branco, Joshua M; Schlauch, Karen A

    2008-01-01

    The common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) has emerged as a useful model for molecular genetic studies of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) because CAM can be induced in this species by water deficit or salinity stress. Non-redundant sequence information from expressed sequence tag data was used to fabricate a custom oligonucleotide microarray to compare large-scale mRNA expression patterns in M. crystallinum plants conducting C(3) photosynthesis versus CAM. Samples were collected every 4 h over a 24 h time period at the start of the subjective second day from plants grown under constant light and temperature conditions in order to capture variation in mRNA expression due to salinity stress and circadian clock control. Of 8455 genes, a total of 2343 genes (approximately 28%) showed a significant change as judged by analysis of variance (ANOVA) in steady-state mRNA abundance at one or more time points over the 24 h period. Of these, 858 (10%) and 599 (7%) exhibited a greater than two-fold ratio (TFR) increase or decrease in mRNA abundance, respectively. Functional categorization of these TFR genes revealed that many genes encoding products that function in CAM-related C(4) acid carboxylation/decarboxylation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, polysaccharide, polyol, and starch biosynthesis/degradation, protein degradation, transcriptional activation, signalling, stress response, and transport facilitation, and novel, unclassified proteins exhibited stress-induced increases in mRNA abundance. In contrast, salt stress resulted in a significant decrease in transcript abundance for genes encoding photosynthetic functions, protein synthesis, and cellular biogenesis functions. Many genes with CAM-related functions exhibited phase shifts in their putative circadian expression patterns following CAM induction. This report establishes an extensive catalogue of gene expression patterns for future investigations aimed at understanding the complex, transcriptional

  12. A Comparative Study by δ13C-Analysis of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) in Kalanchoë (Crassulaceae) Species of Africa and Madagascar

    The carbon isotope ratios (δ13C values) of samples of Kalanchoë species collected in Africa were compared with previous data obtained with species from Madagascar. In contrast to the Malagasy species which cover the whole range of δ13C values from −10 to − 30%o, indicating high inter- and intraspecific diversity of CAM performance, in the African species nearly all δ13C values were less negative than −18%0. Thus, in the African species the CAM behaviour is characterized by CO2 uptake proceeding mainly during the night. The distribution of δ13C values among the species clearly mirrors the taxonomic groups and the three sections of the genus Kalanchoë sensu lato. The Kitchingia section comprises only groups having CAM with a high proportion of carbon acquisition by the C3-pathway of photosynthesis. The same holds true for the first three groups of the Bryophyllum section, whereas in the following groups of the section CAM with CO2 proceeding mainly during the night is common. The latter CAM mode is typical also for the majority of groups and species in the section Eukalanchoë. The African Kalanchoë species belong to the Eukalanchoë section, whereas in Madagascar all three sections are abundant. The data support the view that the centre of adaptive radiation of the genus is located in Madagascar. They also suggest that high CAM variability is abundant in the more primitive taxa of the genus, whereas the phylogenetically more derived taxa show a stereotype CAM with CO2 uptake taking place only during the night. (author)

  13. Evaluating rare amino acid substitutions (RGC_CAMs in a yeast model clade.

    Kenneth Polzin

    Full Text Available When inferring phylogenetic relationships, not all sites in a sequence alignment are equally informative. One recently proposed approach that takes advantage of this inequality relies on sites that contain amino acids whose replacement requires multiple substitutions. Identifying these so-called RGC_CAM substitutions (after Rare Genomic Changes as Conserved Amino acids-Multiple substitutions requires that, first, at any given site in the amino acid sequence alignment, there must be a minimum of two different amino acids; second, each amino acid must be present in at least two taxa; and third, the amino acids must require a minimum of two nucleotide substitutions to replace each other. Although theory suggests that RGC_CAM substitutions are expected to be rare and less likely to be homoplastic, the informativeness of RGC_CAM substitutions has not been extensively evaluated in biological data sets. We investigated the quality of RGC_CAM substitutions by examining their degree of homoplasy and internode certainty in nearly 2.7 million aligned amino acid sites from 5,261 proteins from five species belonging to the yeast Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade whose phylogeny is well-established. We identified 2,647 sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions, a number that contrasts sharply with the 100,887 sites containing RGC_non-CAM substitutions (i.e., changes between amino acids that require only a single nucleotide substitution. We found that RGC_CAM substitutions had significantly lower homoplasy than RGC_non-CAM ones; specifically RGC_CAM substitutions showed a per-site average homoplasy index of 0.100, whereas RGC_non-CAM substitutions had a homoplasy index of 0.215. Internode certainty values were also higher for sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions than for RGC_non-CAM ones. These results suggest that RGC_CAM substitutions possess a strong phylogenetic signal and are useful markers for phylogenetic inference despite their rarity.

  14. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency.

    Borland, Anne M; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J; Schlauch, Karen A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2014-05-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency (WUE) is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic 'parts list' required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, diurnal decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates. PMID:24559590

  15. Light quality modulates metabolic synchronization over the diel phases of crassulacean acid metabolism

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M; Taybi, Tahar; Frans, Mario; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P

    2014-01-01

    Temporal compartmentation of carboxylation processes is a defining feature of crassulacean acid metabolism and involves circadian control of key metabolic and transport steps that regulate the supply and demand for carbon over a 24h cycle. Recent insights on the molecular workings of the circadian clock and its connection with environmental inputs raise new questions on the importance of light quality and, by analogy, certain photoreceptors for synchronizing the metabolic components of CAM. T...

  16. Light quality modulates metabolic synchronization over the diel phases of crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M; Taybi, Tahar; Frans, Mario; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P

    2014-07-01

    Temporal compartmentation of carboxylation processes is a defining feature of crassulacean acid metabolism and involves circadian control of key metabolic and transport steps that regulate the supply and demand for carbon over a 24h cycle. Recent insights on the molecular workings of the circadian clock and its connection with environmental inputs raise new questions on the importance of light quality and, by analogy, certain photoreceptors for synchronizing the metabolic components of CAM. The present work tested the hypothesis that optimal coupling of stomatal conductance, net CO2 uptake, and the reciprocal turnover of carbohydrates and organic acids over the diel CAM cycle requires both blue and red light input signals. Contrasting monochromatic wavelengths of blue, green, and red light (i.e. 475, 530, 630nm) with low fluence rates (10 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) were administered for 16 hours each diel cycle for a total treatment time of 48 hours to the obligate CAM bromeliad, Aechmea 'Maya'. Of the light treatments imposed, low-fluence blue light was a key determinant in regulating stomatal responses, organic acid mobilization from the vacuole, and daytime decarboxylation. However, the reciprocal relationship between starch and organic acid turnover that is typical for CAM was uncoupled under low-fluence blue light. Under low-fluence red or green light, the diel turnover of storage carbohydrates was orchestrated in line with the requirements of CAM, but a consistent delay in acid consumption at dawn compared with plants under white or low-fluence blue light was noted. Consistent with the acknowledged influences of both red and blue light as input signals for the circadian clock, the data stress the importance of both red and blue-light signalling pathways for synchronizing the metabolic and physiological components of CAM over the day/night cycle. PMID:24803500

  17. Fatty acid metabolism: target for metabolic syndrome

    Wakil, Salih J.; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi A.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are a major energy source and important constituents of membrane lipids, and they serve as cellular signaling molecules that play an important role in the etiology of the metabolic syndrome. Acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 (ACC1 and ACC2) catalyze the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, the substrate for fatty acid synthesis and the regulator of fatty acid oxidation. They are highly regulated and play important roles in the energy metabolism of fatty acids in animals, including humans. They...

  18. Photoperiodism and Crassulacean acid metabolism : II. Relations between leaf aging and photoperiod in Crassulacean acid metabolism induction.

    Brulfert, J; Guerrier, D; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Measurements of net CO2 exchange, malate accumulation, properties and capacity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) in leaves of different ages of two short-day dependent Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom thumb and K. velutina Welw.) show that, in both species: a) young leaves from plants grown under long days display a CO2 exchange pattern typical of C3 plants; b) leaf aging promotes CAM under long-day conditions; c) short-day treatment induces CAM in young leaves to a higher degree than aging under long days; d) at least in K. blossfeldiana, the PEPC form developed with leaf aging under long days and the enzyme form synthetized de novo in young leaves grown under short days were shown to have similar properties. Short days also promote CAM in older leaves though at a lesser extent than in young leaves: The result is that this photoperiodic treatment increases the general level of CAM performance by the whole plant. The physiological meaning of the control of PEPC capacity by photoperiodism could be to afford a precisely timed seasonal increase in CAM potentiality, enabling the plant to immediately optimize its response to the onset of drought periods. PMID:24276160

  19. Reversible Burst of Transcriptional Changes during Induction of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Talinum triangulare.

    Brilhaus, Dominik; Bräutigam, Andrea; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Winter, Klaus; Weber, Andreas P M

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerance is a key factor for agriculture in the 21st century as it is a major determinant of plant survival in natural ecosystems as well as crop productivity. Plants have evolved a range of mechanisms to cope with drought, including a specialized type of photosynthesis termed Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM is associated with stomatal closure during the day as atmospheric CO2 is assimilated primarily during the night, thus reducing transpirational water loss. The tropical herbaceous perennial species Talinum triangulare is capable of transitioning, in a facultative, reversible manner, from C3 photosynthesis to weakly expressed CAM in response to drought stress. The transcriptional regulation of this transition has been studied. Combining mRNA-Seq with targeted metabolite measurements, we found highly elevated levels of CAM-cycle enzyme transcripts and their metabolic products in T. triangulare leaves upon water deprivation. The carbohydrate metabolism is rewired to reduce the use of reserves for growth to support the CAM-cycle and the synthesis of compatible solutes. This large-scale expression dataset of drought-induced CAM demonstrates transcriptional regulation of the C3-CAM transition. We identified candidate transcription factors to mediate this photosynthetic plasticity, which may contribute in the future to the design of more drought-tolerant crops via engineered CAM. PMID:26530316

  20. Reversible Burst of Transcriptional Changes during Induction of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Talinum triangulare1[OPEN

    Winter, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerance is a key factor for agriculture in the 21st century as it is a major determinant of plant survival in natural ecosystems as well as crop productivity. Plants have evolved a range of mechanisms to cope with drought, including a specialized type of photosynthesis termed Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM is associated with stomatal closure during the day as atmospheric CO2 is assimilated primarily during the night, thus reducing transpirational water loss. The tropical herbaceous perennial species Talinum triangulare is capable of transitioning, in a facultative, reversible manner, from C3 photosynthesis to weakly expressed CAM in response to drought stress. The transcriptional regulation of this transition has been studied. Combining mRNA-Seq with targeted metabolite measurements, we found highly elevated levels of CAM-cycle enzyme transcripts and their metabolic products in T. triangulare leaves upon water deprivation. The carbohydrate metabolism is rewired to reduce the use of reserves for growth to support the CAM-cycle and the synthesis of compatible solutes. This large-scale expression dataset of drought-induced CAM demonstrates transcriptional regulation of the C3–CAM transition. We identified candidate transcription factors to mediate this photosynthetic plasticity, which may contribute in the future to the design of more drought-tolerant crops via engineered CAM. PMID:26530316

  1. Analysis and Simulation of Circadian Multi-Oscillator Systems in a Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant

    Bohn, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is an adaptation of photosynthetic organisms to drought stress: improved water-use efficiency is achieved by an optimized temporal arrangement of photosynthetic subprocesses, which are driven by an endogenous pacemaker, i.e. a circadian clock. The present work deals with the hypothesis that the circadian rhythm of gas-exchange of entire leaves of the CAM plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana has to be understood as the collective signal of the population of cells i...

  2. Seasonal influences on carbohydrate metabolism in the CAM bromeliad Aechmea ‘Maya’: consequences for carbohydrate partitioning and growth

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M.; Ceusters, Nathalie; Verdoodt, Veerle; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Photosynthetic plasticity in response to a range of environmental factors that include [CO2], water availability, light intensity and temperature, is ubiquitous among plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). The present study examined how seasonal changes in light availability, as experienced by greenhouse CAM crops in northern latitude regions, influence diel carboxylation patterns and impact on carbon gain and seasonal accumulation of biomass. Methods In the CAM bromeliad Aechmea ‘Maya’ integrated measurements of leaf gas exchange, diel metabolite dynamics (e.g. malate, soluble sugars and starch) and biomass accumulation were made four times a year, i.e. in winter, spring, summer and autumn. Key Results During the brighter seasons (spring and summer) daytime Phases II and IV were dominated by C4 carboxylation, whilst the higher diurnal uptake in the autumn and winter was characterized by equal contributions of both Rubisco and PEPC. As a consequence, net CO2 uptake showed a significant depression at the end of the day in the darker months when supplementary illumination was turned off. Remarkable seasonal consistency was found in the amount of storage reserves available for nocturnal carboxylation, a consequence of predominantly daytime export of carbohydrate in spring and summer whilst nocturnal export was the major sink for carbohydrate in autumn and winter. Conclusions Throughout the different seasons Aechmea ‘Maya’ showed considerable plasticity in the timing and magnitude of C3 and C4 carboxylation processes over the diel cycle. Under low PPFD (i.e. winter and autumn) it appears that there was a constraint on the amount of carbohydrate exported during the day in order to maintain a consistent pool of transient carbohydrate reserves. This gave remarkable seasonal consistency in the amount of storage reserves available at night, thereby optimizing biomass gain throughout the year. The data have important practical

  3. Selective cell adhesion inhibitors: Barbituric acid based alpha4beta7--MAdCAM inhibitors.

    Harriman, Geraldine C; Brewer, Matthias; Bennett, Robert; Kuhn, Cyrille; Bazin, Marc; Larosa, Greg; Skerker, Paul; Cochran, Nancy; Gallant, Debra; Baxter, Deborah; Picarella, Dominic; Jaffee, Bruce; Luly, Jay R; Briskin, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    A novel series of barbituric acid derivatives were identified as selective inhibitors of alpha4beta7 MAdCAM (mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1) interactions via a high throughput screening exercise. These inhibitors were optimized to submicromolar potencies in whole cell adhesion assays, retaining their selectivity over alpha4beta1 VCAM. PMID:18331794

  4. Photoperiodism and crassulacean acid metabolism : I. Immunological and kinetic evidences for different patterns of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoforms in photoperiodically inducible and non-inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plants.

    Brulfert, J; Müller, D; Kluge, M; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Plants of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom Thumb and Sedum morganianum E. Walth. were grown under controlled photoperiodic conditions under either short or long days. Gaz exchange measurements confirmed that in K. blossfeldiana Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was photoperiodically inducible and that S. morganianum performed CAM independently of photoperiod. With K. blossfeldiana, a comparison of catalytic and regulatory properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) from short-day and long-day grown plants showed differences, but not with S. morganianum. Ouchterlony double diffusion tests and immunotitration experiments (using a S. morganianum PEPC antibody) established that CAM is induced in K. blossfeldiana-but not in S. morganianum-through the synthesis of a new PEPC isoform; this form shows an immunological behavior different from that prevailing under non-inductive conditions and can be considered as specific for CAM performance. PMID:24276159

  5. Shared origins of a key enzyme during the evolution of C4 and CAM metabolism.

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Monica; Osborne, Colin P; Bräutigam, Andrea; Sage, Rowan F; Hibberd, Julian M; Kelly, Steven; Covshoff, Sarah; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Hancock, Lillian; Edwards, Erika J

    2014-07-01

    CAM and C4 photosynthesis are two key plant adaptations that have evolved independently multiple times, and are especially prevalent in particular groups of plants, including the Caryophyllales. We investigate the origin of photosynthetic PEPC, a key enzyme of both the CAM and C4 pathways. We combine phylogenetic analyses of genes encoding PEPC with analyses of RNA sequence data of Portulaca, the only plants known to perform both CAM and C4 photosynthesis. Three distinct gene lineages encoding PEPC exist in eudicots (namely ppc-1E1, ppc-1E2 and ppc-2), one of which (ppc-1E1) was recurrently recruited for use in both CAM and C4 photosynthesis within the Caryophyllales. This gene is present in multiple copies in the cacti and relatives, including Portulaca. The PEPC involved in the CAM and C4 cycles of Portulaca are encoded by closely related yet distinct genes. The CAM-specific gene is similar to genes from related CAM taxa, suggesting that CAM has evolved before C4 in these species. The similar origin of PEPC and other genes involved in the CAM and C4 cycles highlights the shared early steps of evolutionary trajectories towards CAM and C4, which probably diverged irreversibly only during the optimization of CAM and C4 phenotypes. PMID:24638902

  6. Crassulacean acid metabolism-cycling in Euphorbia milii.

    Herrera, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) occurs in many Euphorbiaceae, particularly Euphorbia, a genus with C3 and C4 species as well. With the aim of contributing to our knowledge of the evolution of CAM in this genus, this study examined the possible occurrence of CAM in Euphorbia milii, a species with leaf succulence and drought tolerance suggestive of this carbon fixation pathway. Leaf anatomy consisted of a palisade parenchyma, a spongy parenchyma and a bundle sheath with chloroplasts, which indicates the possible functioning of C2 photosynthesis. No evidence of nocturnal CO2 fixation was found in plants of E. milii either watered or under drought; watered plants had a low nocturnal respiration rate (R). After 12 days without watering, the photosynthetic rate (P N) decreased 85 % and nocturnal R was nearly zero. Nocturnal H(+) accumulation (ΔH(+)) in watered plants was 18 ± 2 (corresponding to malate) and 18 ± 4 (citrate) μmol H(+) (g fresh mass)(-1). Respiratory CO2 recycling through acid synthesis contributed to a night-time water saving of 2 and 86 % in watered plants and plants under drought, respectively. Carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) was -25.2 ± 0.7 ‰ in leaves and -24.7 ± 0.1 ‰ in stems. Evidence was found for the operation of weak CAM in E. milii, with statistically significant ΔH(+), no nocturnal CO2 uptake and values of δ(13)C intermediate between C3 and constitutive CAM plants; ΔH(+) was apparently attributable to both malate and citrate. The results suggest that daily malate accumulation results from recycling of part of the nocturnal respiratory CO2, which helps explain the occurrence of an intermediate value of leaf δ(13)C. Euphorbia milii can be considered as a CAM-cycling species. The significance of the operation of CAM-cycling in E. milii lies in water conservation, rather than carbon acquisition. The possible occurrence of C2 photosynthesis merits research. PMID:23596548

  7. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO2 fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were ...

  8. Crassulacean acid metabolism under severe light limitation: a matter of plasticity in the shadows?

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M; Godts, Christof; Londers, Elsje; Croonenborghs, Sarah; Van Goethem, Davina; De Proft, Maurice P

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increased energetic costs of CAM compared with C(3) photosynthesis, it is hypothesized that the inherent photosynthetic plasticity of CAM allows successful acclimation to light-limiting conditions. The present work sought to determine if CAM presented any constraints to short and longer term acclimation to light limitation and to establish if and how metabolic and photosynthetic plasticity in the deployment of the four phases of CAM might facilitate acclimation to conditions of deep shade. Measurements of leaf gas exchange, organic acids, starch and soluble sugar (glucose, fructose, and sucrose) contents were made in the leaves of the constitutive CAM bromeliad Aechmea 'Maya' over a three month period under severe light limitation. A. 'Maya' was not particularly tolerant of severe light limitation in the short term. A complete absence of net CO(2) uptake and fluctuations in key metabolites (i.e. malate, starch or soluble sugars) indicated a dampened metabolism whilst cell death in the most photosynthetically active leaves was attributed to an over-acidification of the cytoplasm. However, in the longer term, plasticity in the use of the different phases of gas exchange and different storage carbohydrate pools, i.e. a switch from starch to sucrose as the major carbohydrate source, ensured a positive carbon balance for this CAM species under extremely low levels of irradiance. As such, co-ordinated plasticity in the use of C(3) and C(4) carboxylases and different carbohydrate pools together with an increase in the abundance of light-harvesting complexes, appear to underpin the adaptive radiation of the energetically costly CAM pathway within light-limiting environments such as wet cloud forests and shaded understoreys of tropical forests. PMID:20861137

  9. Effects of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) on the Metabolism and Transport of Anticancer Drugs

    Mooiman, K.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), such as herbs and dietary supplements, has become more popular among cancer patients. Cancer patients use these supplements for different reasons such as reduction of side effects and improvement of their quality of life. In general, the use

  10. Changes in oxidative properties of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana leaf mitochondria during development of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Rustin, P; Queiroz-Claret, C

    1985-06-01

    Kalanchoe blossfeldiana plants grown under long days (16 h light) exhibit a C3-type photosynthetic metabolism. Switching to short days (9 h light) leads to a gradual development of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Under the latter conditions, dark CO2 fixation produces large amounts of malate. During the first hours of the day, malate is rapidly decarboxylated into pyruvate through the action of a cytosolic NADP(+)-or a mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme. Mitochondria were isolated from leaves of plants grown under long days or after treatment by an increasing number of short days. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as well as exogenous NADH and NADPH were readily oxidized by mitochondria isolated from the two types of plants. Glycine, known to be oxidized by C3-plant mitochondria, was still oxidized after CAM establishment. The experiments showed a marked parallelism in the increase of CAM level and the increase in substrate-oxidation capacity of the isolated mitochondria, particularly the capacity to oxidize malate in the presence of cyanide. These simultaneous variations in CAM level and in mitochondrial properties indicate that the mitochondrial NAD(+)-malic enzyme could account at least for a part of the oxidation of malate. The studies of whole-leaf respiration establish that mitochondria are implicated in malate degradation in vivo. Moreover, an increase in cyanide resistance of the leaf respiration has been observed during the first daylight hours, when malate was oxidized to pyruvate by cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes. PMID:24249613

  11. Aspects of CO_2 Uptake in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Orchid Phalaenopsis

    Ichihashi, S.; Higuchi, T.; Shibayama, H; Tesima, Y.; Nishiwaki, K; Ota, K.

    2008-01-01

    Phalaenopsis and its hybrids are the most important orchid pot plant commercially in the world now. Research on photosynthesis gives us practical and useful information for improving cultivation. Although conventional gas-exchange technique has some limitations in the research of a crassulacean acid metabolism plant (CAM), we investigated CO_2 uptake in Phalaenopsis. CO_2 uptake at night (Phase 1) changed with temperature. Maximum CO_2 uptake was observed around 20℃. CO_2 absorption at night ...

  12. Day-to-night variations of cytoplasmic pH in a crassulacean acid metabolism plant.

    Hafke, J B; Neff, R; Hütt, M T; Lüttge, U; Thiel, G

    2001-01-01

    In crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) large amounts of malic acid are redistributed between vacuole and cytoplasm in the course of night-to-day transitions. The corresponding changes of the cytoplasmic pH (pHcyt) were monitored in mesophyll protoplasts from the CAM plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier by ratiometric fluorimetry with the fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6-)carboxyfluorescein as a pHcyt indicator. At the beginning of the light phase, pHcyt was slightly alkaline (about 7.5). It dropped during midday by about 0.3 pH units before recovering again in the late-day-to-early-dark phase. In the physiological context the variation in pHcyt may be a component of CAM regulation. Due to its pH sensitivity, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase appears as a likely target enzyme. From monitoring delta pHcyt in response to loading the cytoplasm with the weak acid salt K-acetate a cytoplasmic H(+)-buffer capacity in the order of 65 mM H+ per pH unit was estimated at a pHcyt of about 7.5. With this value, an acid load of the cytoplasm by about 10 mM malic acid can be estimated as the cause of the observed drop in pHcyt. A diurnal oscillation in pHcyt and a quantitatively similar cytoplasmic malic acid is predicted from an established mathematical model which allows simulation of the CAM dynamics. The similarity of model predictions and experimental data supports the view put forward in this model that a phase transition of the tonoplast is an essential functional element in CAM dynamics. PMID:11732184

  13. Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Permutation and Survival of Caralluma Species (Apocynaceae in Arid Habitats

    Yahya S. Masrahi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several species of the stem succulent Caralluma (Apocynaceae are abundant perennials in arid regions of the Arabian Peninsula. These arid regions have a short wet season with erratic rainfall and are characterized by harsh climatic conditions of high temperature, high evaporation and sand storms. Work presented in this paper aimed at investigating importance of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM for survival of three Caralluma species in their natural habitat. Investigations involved studying stomatal characteristics, stomatal diffusive conductance, chlorophyll fluorescence, and CAM in three species of Caralluma, namely C. acutangula (Decne. N.E.Br., C. edulis (Edgew. Benth. ex Hook.f., and C. subulata (Forssk. Decne. Microscopic examination revealed a pattern of stomatal characteristics typical of CAM plants in these three Caralluma species. Results showed that these three Caralluma species were obligate CAM plants exhibiting this mode of photosynthesis during both the wet and the dry seasons. Under protracted water stress during the long dry season very low values of stomatal diffusive conductance and dampening of CAM acidification-deacidification cycles denoted the tendency of these three Caralluma species to shift from the obligate CAM physiotype to CAM-idling mode. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated that protracted water stress induced a reduction in Photosystem II (PSII antenna efficiency and quantum yield in the three studied Caralluma species. This reduction of PSII activity occurred in concomitance with a marked rise in non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence denoting operation of non-photochemical energy dissipating mechanisms known to be important for photoprotection of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  14. Regional myocardial free fatty acid metabolism

    Experimental evidence to date has confirmed the potential value of radioactive labelled free fatty acid (FFA) and their analogs for the assessment of regional myocardial FFA metabolism despite a number of current limitations. It is emphasized that with these agents only one specific aspect of myocardial metabolism, that of FFA, can be tested and that with these compounds information on the overall metabolic state cannot always be obtained. (WU)

  15. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in pla...

  16. Bile acid metabolism in tupaias (lemurs)

    The goal of this work is to study biliary elimination and the metabolism of the most important primary bile acids, cholic acid and chenodesoxycholic acid, and the toxic secondary bile acid, lithocholic acid, which is formed in the intestine as a result of chenodesoxycholate therapy for the dissolving of gall stones. This work herewith offers a contribution to the answering of the question whether tupaias are a relevant animal model for the study of gall stone formation and their medicamentous dissolution by means of bile acids. (orig./MG)

  17. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in plant metabolism and physiology. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the metabolic pathways and cellular processes in which they are involved, focusing on the proteins that participate in their metabolism and cellular/intracellular transport in Arabidopsis. PMID:26380567

  18. Cytokines: muscle protein and amino acid metabolism

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    raises TNF-α and IL-6 to moderate levels, has only identified IL-6 as a potent cytokine, decreasing systemic amino acid levels and muscle protein metabolism. The marked decrease in circulatory and muscle amino acid concentrations was observed with a concomitant reduction in both the rates of muscle...... IL-6 on the regulation of muscle protein metabolism but indirectly via IL-6 reducing amino acid availability. SUMMARY: Recent studies suggest that the best described cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are unlikely to be the major direct mediators of muscle protein loss in inflammatory diseases. However, these...

  19. CAM Photosynthesis in Submerged Aquatic Plants

    Keeley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2-concentrating mechanism selected in response to aridity in terrestrial habitats, and, in aquatic environments, to ambient limitations of carbon. Evidence is reviewed for its presence in five genera of aquatic vascular plants, including Isoe??tes, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, Crassula, and Littorella. Initially, aquatic CAM was considered by some to be an oxymoron, but some aquatic species have been studied in sufficient detail to say definitively that they possess CAM photosynthesis. CO2-concentrating mechanisms in photosynthetic organs require a barrier to leakage; e.g., terrestrial C4 plants have suberized bundle sheath cells and terrestrial CAM plants high stomatal resistance. In aquatic CAM plants the primary barrier to CO2 leakage is the extremely high diffusional resistance of water. This, coupled with the sink provided by extensive intercellular gas space, generates daytime CO2(Pi) comparable to terrestrial CAM plants. CAM contributes to the carbon budget by both net carbon gain and carbon recycling, and the magnitude of each is environmentally influenced. Aquatic CAM plants inhabit sites where photosynthesis is potentially limited by carbon. Many occupy moderately fertile shallow temporary pools that experience extreme diel fluctuations in carbon availability. CAM plants are able to take advantage of elevated nighttime CO2 levels in these habitats. This gives them a competitive advantage over non-CAM species that are carbon starved during the day and an advantage over species that expend energy in membrane transport of bicarbonate. Some aquatic CAM plants are distributed in highly infertile lakes, where extreme carbon limitation and light are important selective factors. Compilation of reports on diel changes in titratable acidity and malate show 69 out of 180 species have significant overnight accumulation, although evidence is presented discounting CAM in some. It is concluded that similar proportions of the aquatic

  20. Renal transport and metabolism of nicotinic acid

    Renal metabolism and brush-border transport of nicotinic acid were studied in renal cortical slices and brush-border membrane vesicles exposed to a physiological concentration of vitamin (2.2-3.5 microM). Vesicle transport of [3H]nicotinic acid was found to be Na+ dependent and concentrative. The presence of a Na+ gradient resulted in a fivefold increase in the rate of nicotinic acid uptake over that observed with mannitol and caused a transient nicotinic acid accumulation two- to fourfold above the equilibrium value. The effects of membrane potential, pH, and elimination of Na+-H+ exchange were also studied. Cortical slices and isolated tubules exposed to 2.2 microM [14C]nicotinic acid took up vitamin and rapidly metabolized most of it to intermediates in the Preiss-Handler pathway for NAD biosynthesis; little free nicotinic acid was detectable intracellularly. The replacement of Na+ with Li+ in the bathing medium reduced total accumulation of 14C label primarily as a result of reduced nicotinic acid uptake. Cortical tissue concentrated free nicotinic acid only when the involved metabolic pathways were saturated by levels of nicotinic acid far in excess of what occurs in vivo

  1. Patterns of Carbon Partitioning in Leaves of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Species during Deacidification.

    Christopher, J. T.; Holtum, JAM.

    1996-09-01

    Carbohydrates stored during deacidification in the light were examined in 11 Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species from widely separated taxa grown under uniform conditions. The hypothesis that NAD(P) malic enzyme CAM species store chloroplastic starch and glucans, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase species store extrachloroplastic sugars or polymers was disproved. Of the six malic enzyme species examined, Kalanchoe tubiflora, Kalanchoe pinnata, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, and Vanilla planifolia stored mainly starch. Sansevieria hahnii stored sucrose and Agave guadalajarana did not store starch, glucose, fructose, or sucrose. Of the five phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase species investigated, Ananus comosus stored extrachloroplastic carbohydrate, but Stapelia gigantea, Hoya carnosa, and Portea petropolitana stored starch, whereas Aloe vera stored both starch and glucose. Within families, the major decarboxylase was common for all species examined, whereas storage carbohydrate could differ both between and within genera. In the Bromeliaceae, A. comosus stored mainly fructose, but P. petropolitana stored starch. In the genus Aloe, A. vera stored starch and glucose, but A. arborescens is known to store a galactomannan polymer. We postulate that the observed variation in carbohydrate partitioning between CAM species is the result of two principal components: (a) constraints imposed by the CAM syndrome itself, and (b) diversity in biochemistry resulting from different evolutionary histories. PMID:12226397

  2. METABOLISMO ÁCIDO DE LAS CRASULÁCEAS Crassulacean Acid Metabolism

    THOMAS DAVID GEYDAN

    Full Text Available Se presenta una revisión del metabolismo ácido de las Crasuláceas, caracterizado por la ocurrencia, actividad y plasticidad del mecanismo desde un punto de vista fisiológico, bioquímico y molecular, enmarcado por la presencia de las denominadas cuatro fases de dicho metabolismo y su repercusión y expresión por diversas restricciones hídricas a nivel ecológico. Se presentan las principales enzimas y metabolitos básicos para el funcionamiento del metabolismo CAM, así como su modo de acción y control celular. Finalmente, se muestra que la plasticidad fenotípica en patrones de expresión CAM se encuentra mediada por condiciones ambientales y por señalizaciones moleculares.A review of Crassulacean acid metabolism is presented, characterized by showing the occurrence, activity and plasticity of these complex mechanism at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level, framed by the presence of the denominated four phases in CAM and its repercussion and expression due to different stresses in an ecological context. The basic enzymes, and metabolites necessary for the optional functioning of CAM are presented as well as their mode of action and cellular control. Finally, it is shown how environmental conditions and molecular signalling mediate the phenotypic plasticity.

  3. Metabolism of sinapic acid and related compounds in the rat.

    Griffiths, L A

    1969-07-01

    1. Administration of sinapic acid to the rat results in the excretion of 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid, dihydrosinapic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methoxycinnamic acid and unchanged sinapic acid in the urine. The sinapic acid conjugate sinalbin is also catabolized to free sinapic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid in the rat. 2. 3,4,5-Trimethoxycinnamic acid is metabolized in part to sinapic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid. 3. 3,5-Dimethoxycinnamic acid is metabolized to 3-hydroxy-5-methoxycinnamic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid. 4. The metabolic interrelationships of these compounds were studied by the administration of intermediates and a metabolic pathway is proposed. 5. The metabolism of the corresponding benzoic acids was studied, but these compounds and their metabolites were shown not to be intermediates or products of the metabolism of the related cinnamic acids. PMID:5386182

  4. Omeprazole induces altered bile acid metabolism

    Shindo, K; Machida, M.; Fukumura, M; Koide, K.; Yamazaki, R.

    1998-01-01

    Background—It has been reported that the acidity of gastric contents could be an important factor in regulating jejunal flora. 
Aims—To investigate the effects of omeprazole induced changes in gastric pH on jejunal flora and bile acid metabolism. 
Methods—Twenty one patients with gastric ulcer and 19 healthy volunteers were studied. Deconjugation of bile acids was detected using a bile acid breath test. Jejunal fluid was aspirated using a double lumen tube with a rubber cover o...

  5. Capture of Tumor Cells on Anti-EpCAM-Functionalized Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Surfaces.

    Andree, Kiki C; Barradas, Ana M C; Nguyen, Ai T; Mentink, Anouk; Stojanovic, Ivan; Baggerman, Jacob; van Dalum, Joost; van Rijn, Cees J M; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-06-15

    The presence of tumor cells in blood is predictive of short survival in several cancers and their isolation and characterization can guide toward the use of more effective treatments. These circulating tumor cells (CTC) are, however, extremely rare and require a technology that is sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify CTC against a background of billions of blood cells. Immuno-capture of cells expressing the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) are frequently used to enrich CTC from blood. The choice of bio conjugation strategy and antibody clone is crucial for adequate cell capture but is poorly understood. In this study, we determined the binding affinity constants and epitope binding of the EpCAM antibodies VU1D-9, HO-3, EpAb3-5, and MJ-37 by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). Glass surfaces were coated using a poly(acrylic acid) based coating and functionalized with anti-EpCAM antibodies. Binding of cells from the breast carcinoma cell line (SKBR-3) to the functionalized surfaces were compared. Although EpAb3-5 displayed the highest binding affinity HO-3 captured the highest amount of cells. Hence we report differences in the performance of the different antibodies and more importantly that the choice of antibody to capture CTC should be based on multiple assays. PMID:27187784

  6. Regulation of uric acid metabolism and excretion.

    Maiuolo, Jessica; Oppedisano, Francesca; Gratteri, Santo; Muscoli, Carolina; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2016-06-15

    Purines perform many important functions in the cell, being the formation of the monomeric precursors of nucleic acids DNA and RNA the most relevant one. Purines which also contribute to modulate energy metabolism and signal transduction, are structural components of some coenzymes and have been shown to play important roles in the physiology of platelets, muscles and neurotransmission. All cells require a balanced quantity of purines for growth, proliferation and survival. Under physiological conditions the enzymes involved in the purine metabolism maintain in the cell a balanced ratio between their synthesis and degradation. In humans the final compound of purines catabolism is uric acid. All other mammals possess the enzyme uricase that converts uric acid to allantoin that is easily eliminated through urine. Overproduction of uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has been proven to play emerging roles in human disease. In fact the increase of serum uric acid is inversely associated with disease severity and especially with cardiovascular disease states. This review describes the enzymatic pathways involved in the degradation of purines, getting into their structure and biochemistry until the uric acid formation. PMID:26316329

  7. Aquatic CAM photosynthesis: a brief history of its discovery

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic CAM (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism) photosynthesis was discovered while investigating an unrelated biochemical pathway concerned with anaerobic metabolism. George Bowes was a significant contributor to this project early in its infancy. Not only did he provide me with some valuable perspectives on peer review rejections, but by working with his gas exchange system I was able to take our initial observations of diel fluctuations in malic acid to the next level, showing this aquatic plant exhibited dark CO2 uptake. CAM is universal in all aquatic species of the worldwide Lycophyta genus Isoetes and non-existent in terrestrial Isoetes. Outside of this genus aquatic CAM has a limited occurrence in three other families, including the Crassulaceae. This discovery led to fascinating adventures in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes in search of Stylites, a terrestrial relative of Isoetes. Stylites is a plant that is hermetically sealed from the atmosphere and obtains all of its carbon from terrestrial sources and recycles carbon through CAM. Considering the Mesozoic origin of Isoetes in shallow pools, coupled with the fact that aquatic Isoetes universally possess CAM, suggests the earliest evolution of CAM photosynthesis was most likely not in terrestrial plants.

  8. The pineapple genome and the evolution of CAM photosynthesis

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is the most economically valuable crop possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a photosynthetic carbon assimilation pathway with high water-use efficiency, and the second most important tropical fruit. We sequenced the genomes of pineapple varieties F153 ...

  9. Metabolic annotation of 2-ethylhydracrylic acid.

    Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-25

    Increased levels of the organic acid, 2-ethylhydracrylic acid (2-EHA) occur in urine of subjects with impaired L(+)-isoleucine metabolism. Chiral intermediates formed during isoleucine degradation are (S) enantiomers. Blockage of (S) pathway flux drives racemization of (2S, 3S) L(+)-isoleucine and its (2S, 3R) stereoisomer, L(+)-alloisoleucine. This non-protein amino acid is metabolized to (R)-2-methylbutyryl CoA via enzymes common to branched chain amino acid degradation. Subsequently, (R) intermediates serve as alternate substrates for three valine metabolic enzymes, generating 2-EHA. Once formed, 2-EHA accumulates because it is poorly recognized by distal valine pathway enzymes. Thus, urinary 2-EHA represents a biomarker of isoleucine pathway defects. 2-EHA levels are also increased in rats exposed to the industrial solvent, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether or the neurotoxin precursor, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. In these cases, a block in (S) pathway isoleucine catabolism occurs at the level of (S)-2-methylbutyryl CoA conversion to tiglyl CoA via inhibition of electron transferring flavoprotein/ubiquinone oxidoreductase dependent reactions. Elevated urinary 2-EHA in propionyl CoA carboxylase deficiency and methylmalonic aciduria results from a buildup of distal intermediates in the (S) pathway of isoleucine degradation. In Barth syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome, 2-EHA is a byproduct of impeded propionyl CoA entry into the Krebs cycle. PMID:26115894

  10. On the Mechanism of Reinitiation of Endogenous Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Rhythm by Temperature Changes.

    Grams, TEE.; Borland, A. M.; Roberts, A.; Griffiths, H.; Beck, F.; Luttge, U.

    1997-04-01

    Under continuous light the endogenous Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) rhythm of Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier de la Bathie disappears at high (>29.0[deg]C) or low (<8.0[deg]C) temperatures. We investigated the reinitiation of rhythmicity when temperature was reduced from above the upper and increased from below the lower threshold level via measurements of (a) short-term changes in carbon-isotope discrimination to illustrate shifts between C3 and C4 carboxylation in vivo, and (b) the malate sensitivity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in vitro. When the net CO2-exchange rhythm disappears at both temperatures, the instantaneous discrimination indicates low PEPC activity. Leaf malate concentration and osmolarity attain high and low values at low and high temperatures, respectively. After small temperature increases or reductions from the low and high temperatures, respectively, the rhythm is reinitiated, with phases shifted by 180[deg] relative to each other. This can be related to the contrasting low and high leaf malate concentrations due to direct inhibition of PEPC and possibly also of the phosphorylation of PEPC by malate. The experimental results were satisfactorily simulated by a mathematical CAM-cycle model, with temperature acting only on the passive efflux of malate from the vacuole. We stress the important role of the tonoplast in malate compartmentation and of malate itself for the reinitiation and generation of endogenous CAM rhythmicity. PMID:12223675

  11. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (psandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks. PMID:26830822

  12. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications.

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-12-15

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  13. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    Akifumi; Kushiyama; Kentaro; Tanaka; Shigeko; Hara; Shoji; Kawazu

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase(XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid(UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950 s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target forvascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted.

  14. Lateral diffusion of CO2 in leaves of the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier.

    Duarte, Heitor M; Jakovljevic, Ivona; Kaiser, Friedemann; Lüttge, Ulrich

    2005-04-01

    Dynamic patchiness of photosystem II (PSII) activity in leaves of the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier, which was independent of stomatal control and was observed during both the day/night cycle and circadian endogenous oscillations of CAM, was previously explained by lateral CO2 diffusion and CO2 signalling in the leaves [Rascher et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98:11801-11805; Rascher and Luttge (2002) Plant Biol 4:671-681]. The aim here was to actually demonstrate the importance of lateral CO2 diffusion and its effects on localized PSII activity. Covering small sections of entire leaves with silicone grease was used for local exclusion of a contribution of atmospheric CO2 to internal CO2 via transport through stomata. A setup for combined measurement of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was used for recording photosynthetic activity with a spatiotemporal resolution. When remobilization of malic acid from vacuolar storage and its decarboxylation in the CAM cycle caused increasing internal CO2 concentrations sustaining high PSII activity behind closed stomata, PSII activity was also increased in adjacent leaf sections where vacuolar malic acid accumulation was minimal as a result of preventing external CO2 supply due to leaf-surface greasing, and where therefore CO2 could only be supplied by diffusion from the neighbouring malic acid-remobilizing leaf tissue. This demonstrates lateral CO2 diffusion and its effect on local photosynthetic activity. PMID:15843962

  15. Stomatal responses to CO2 during a diel Crassulacean acid metabolism cycle in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Kalanchoe pinnata.

    von Caemmerer, Susanne; Griffiths, Howard

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the diurnal variation of stomatal sensitivity to CO2, stomatal response to a 30 min pulse of low CO2 was measured four times during a 24 h time-course in two Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Kalanchoe pinnata, which vary in the degree of succulence, and hence, expression and commitment to CAM. In both species, stomata opened in response to a reduction in pCO2 in the dark and in the latter half of the light period, and thus in CAM species, chloroplast photosynthesis is not required for the stomatal response to low pCO2. Stomata did not respond to a decreased pCO2 in K. daigremontiana in the light when stomata were closed, even when the supply of internal CO2 was experimentally reduced. We conclude that stomatal closure during phase III is not solely mediated by high internal pCO2, and suggest that in CAM species the diurnal variability in the responsiveness of stomata to pCO2 could be explained by hypothesizing the existence of a single CO2 sensor which interacts with other signalling pathways. When not perturbed by low pCO2, CO2 assimilation rate and stomatal conductance were correlated both in the light and in the dark in both species. PMID:19210641

  16. Separation and purification of the tonoplast ATPase and pyrophosphatase from plants with constitutive and inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Bremberger, C; Haschke, H P; Lüttge, U

    1988-10-01

    Tonoplast vesicles were isolated from Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Pierrer de la Bâthie and Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L., exhibiting constitutive and inducible crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), respectively. Membrane-bound proteins were detergent-solubilized with 2% of Triton X-100. During CAM induction in M. crystallinum, ATPase activity increases four-fold, whereas pyrophosphatase activity decreases somewhat. With all plants, ATPase and pyrophosphatase could be separated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC, Sephacryl S 400), and the ATPase was further purified by diethylaminoethyl-ion-exchange chromatography. Sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis of the SEC fractions from K. daigremontiana containing maximum ATPase activity separates several protein bands, indicating subunits of 72, 56, 48, 42, 28, and 16 kDa. Purified ATPase from M. crystallinum in the C3 and CAM states shows a somewhat different protein pattern. With M. crystallinum, an increase in ATP-hydrolysis and changes in the subunit composition of the native enzyme indicate that the change from the C3 to the CAM state is accompanied by de-novo synthesis and by structural changes of the tonoplast ATPase. PMID:24221927

  17. Leaf anatomy and ultrastructure of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Balsamo, R A; Uribe, E G

    1988-02-01

    Light-microscopic analysis of leaf clearings of the obligate Crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) species Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perr. has shown the existence of unusual and highly irregular venation patterns. Fifth-order veins exhibit a three-dimensional random orientation with respect to the mesophyll. Minor veins were often observed crossing over or under each other and over and under major veins in the mesophyll. Paraffin sections of mature leaves show tannin cells scattered throughout the mesophyll rather evenly spaced, and a distinct layer of tannin cells below the abaxial epidermis. Scanning electron microscopy showed that bundle-sheath cells are distinct from the surrounding mesophyll in veins of all orders. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated developing sieve-tube elements in expanded leaves. Cytosolic vesicles produced by dictyosomes undergo a diurnal variation in number and were often observed in association with the chloroplasts. These vesicles are an interesting feature of cell ultrastructure of CAM cells and may serve a regulatory role in the diurnal malic-acid fluctuations in this species. PMID:24226398

  18. Metabolic mechanism of phenyllactic acid naturally occurring in Chinese pickles.

    Li, Xingfeng; Ning, Yawei; Liu, Dou; Yan, Aihong; Wang, Zhixin; Wang, Shijie; Miao, Ming; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Yingmin

    2015-11-01

    Phenyllactic acid, a phenolic acid phytochemical with the antimicrobial activity, was rarely reported in food besides honey and sourdough. This study evidenced a new food source of phenyllactic acid and elucidated its metabolic mechanism. Phenyllactic acid naturally occurred in Chinese pickles with concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.30 mM in 23 pickle samples including homemade and commercial ones. Then, lactic acid bacteria capable of metabolizing phenyllactic acid were screened from each homemade pickle and a promising strain was characterized as Lactobacillus plantarum. Moreover, the investigation of the metabolic mechanism of phenyllactic acid in pickles suggested that the yield of phenyllactic acid was positively related to the content of phenylalanine in food, and the addition of phenylalanine as precursor substance could significantly promote the production of phenyllactic acid. This investigation could provide some insights into the accumulation of phenyllactic acid in pickle for long storage life. PMID:25976820

  19. The pineapple genome and the evolution of CAM photosynthesis

    Ming, Ray; VanBuren, Robert; Wai, Ching Man; Tang, Haibao; Schatz, Michael C.; Bowers, John E.; Lyons, Eric; Wang, Ming-Li; Chen, Jung; Biggers, Eric; Zhang, Jisen; Huang, Lixian; Zhang, Lingmao; Miao, Wenjing; Zhang, Jian; Ye, Zhangyao; Miao, Chenyong; Lin, Zhicong; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Hongye; Yim, Won C.; Priest, Henry D.; Zheng, Chunfang; Woodhouse, Margaret; Edger, Patrick P.; Guyot, Romain; Guo, Hao-Bo; Guo, Hong; Zheng, Guangyong; Singh, Ratnesh; Sharma, Anupma; Min, Xiangjia; Zheng, Yun; Lee, Hayan; Gurtowski, James; Sedlazeck, Fritz J.; Harkess, Alex; McKain, Michael R.; Liao, Zhenyang; Fang, Jingping; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Weichang; Qin, Yuan; Wang, Kai; Chen, Li-Yu; Shirley, Neil; Lin, Yann-Rong; Liu, Li-Yu; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Wright, Chris L.; Bulone, Vincent; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Heath, Katy; Zee, Francis; Moore, Paul H.; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Mockler, Todd; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Freeling, Michael; Sankoff, David; Paterson, Andrew H.; Zhu, Xinguang; Yang, Xiaohan; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Cushman, John C.; Paull, Robert E.; Yu, Qingyi

    2016-01-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is the most economically valuable crop possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a photosynthetic carbon assimilation pathway with high water use efficiency, and the second most important tropical fruit after banana in terms of international trade. We sequenced the genomes of pineapple varieties ‘F153’ and ‘MD2’, and a wild pineapple relative A. bracteatus accession CB5. The pineapple genome has one fewer ancient whole genome duplications than sequenced grass genomes and, therefore, provides an important reference for elucidating gene content and structure in the last common ancestor of extant members of the grass family (Poaceae). Pineapple has a conserved karyotype with seven pre rho duplication chromosomes that are ancestral to extant grass karyotypes. The pineapple lineage has transitioned from C3 photosynthesis to CAM with CAM-related genes exhibiting a diel expression pattern in photosynthetic tissues using beta-carbonic anhydrase (βCA) for initial capture of CO2. Promoter regions of all three βCA genes contain a CCA1 binding site that can bind circadian core oscillators. CAM pathway genes were enriched with cis-regulatory elements including the morning (CCACAC) and evening (AAAATATC) elements associated with regulation of circadian-clock genes, providing the first link between CAM and the circadian clock regulation. Gene-interaction network analysis revealed both activation and repression of regulatory elements that control key enzymes in CAM photosynthesis, indicating that CAM evolved by reconfiguration of pathways preexisting in C3 plants. Pineapple CAM photosynthesis is the result of regulatory neofunctionalization of preexisting gene copies and not acquisition of neofunctionalized genes via whole genome or tandem gene duplication. PMID:26523774

  20. Increased brain fatty acid uptake in metabolic syndrome

    Karmi, Anna; Iozzo, Patricia; Viljanen, Antti;

    2010-01-01

    To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it.......To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it....

  1. What is the potential for dark CO2 fixation in the facultative crassulacean acid metabolism species Talinum triangulare?

    Herrera, Ana; Ballestrini, Caín; Montes, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, dark CO2 fixation is almost the sole route of CO2 fixation and, under drought, continues for long periods. In contrast, in plants of the facultative CAM species Talinum triangulare under experimental drought, dark CO2 fixation provides a small proportion of the daily assimilation observed in watered plants and occurs only for a few days, after which almost nil CO2 fixation is observed. Under field conditions, with a practically unlimited substrate volume, drought-induced CAM might operate for a longer period and make a higher contribution to daily CO2 fixation. Greenhouse-grown plants of T. triangulare were subjected to low and nearly constant soil water content; the operation of CAM was assessed through the measurement of nocturnal proton accumulation and dark CO2 fixation. Dark CO2 fixation appeared 19d after the onset of drought; its contribution during three months of experiment to daily CO2 assimilation ranged from 0.5 to 30.7% with a mean of 13.5%. Twenty days after the beginning of treatment, nocturnal proton accumulation increased six times and remained high for over three months. In spite of low soil water content, leaves did not engage in dark CO2 fixation all the time but dark CO2 fixation was large enough to produce an increase in relative (13)C composition of mature leaves compared to watered plants but not to the value in short-term drought experiments. Leaf anatomical characteristics may guarantee the achievement of higher rates of dark CO2 fixation but results evidence the occurrence of a limit to the expression of CAM that remains to be determined. PMID:25462967

  2. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    Evelien P. J. G. Neis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Discrimination in the dark. Resolving the interplay between metabolic and physical constraints to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the crassulacean acid metabolism cycle.

    Griffiths, Howard; Cousins, Asaph B; Badger, Murray R; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-02-01

    A model defining carbon isotope discrimination (delta13C) for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was experimentally validated using Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and instantaneous CO2 discrimination (for 13C and 18O) were made from late photoperiod (phase IV of CAM), throughout the dark period (phase I), and into the light (phase II). Measurements of CO2 response curves throughout the dark period revealed changing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) capacity. These systematic changes in PEPC capacity were tracked by net CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance, and online delta13C signal; all declined at the start of the dark period, then increased to a maximum 2 h before dawn. Measurements of delta13C were higher than predicted from the ratio of intercellular to external CO2 (p(i)/p(a)) and fractionation associated with CO2 hydration and PEPC carboxylations alone, such that the dark period mesophyll conductance, g(i), was 0.044 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1). A higher estimate of g(i) (0.085 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1)) was needed to account for the modeled and measured delta18O discrimination throughout the dark period. The differences in estimates of g(i) from the two isotope measurements, and an offset of -5.5 per thousand between the 18O content of source and transpired water, suggest spatial variations in either CO2 diffusion path length and/or carbonic anhydrase activity, either within individual cells or across a succulent leaf. Our measurements support the model predictions to show that internal CO2 diffusion limitations within CAM leaves increase delta13C discrimination during nighttime CO2 fixation while reducing delta13C during phase IV. When evaluating the phylogenetic distribution of CAM, carbon isotope composition will reflect these diffusive limitations as well as relative contributions from C3 and C4 biochemistry. PMID:17142488

  4. Polysialic acid on SynCAM 1 in NG2 cells and on neuropilin-2 in microglia is confined to intracellular pools that are rapidly depleted upon stimulation.

    Werneburg, Sebastian; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Stangel, Martin; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    NG2 cells comprise a heterogeneous precursor population but molecular markers distinguishing between the assumed NG2 cell subpopulations are lacking. Previously, we described that a subfraction of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 is modified with the glycan polysialic acid (polySia) in NG2 cells. As for its major carrier, the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, polySia attenuates SynCAM 1 adhesion. Functions, as well as cellular and subcellular distribution of polySia-SynCAM 1 are elusive. Using murine glial cultures we now demonstrate that polySia-SynCAM 1 is confined to the Golgi compartment of a subset of NG2 cells and transiently recruited to the cell surface in response to depolarization. NG2 cells with Golgi-confined polySia were NCAM-negative, but positive for markers of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Consistent with previous data on polySia-SynCAM 1, polySia in Ncam(-/-) NG2 cells was exclusively attached to N-glycans and synthesized by ST8SIA2, one out of two mammalian polysialyltransferases. Unexpectedly, Golgi-confined polySia was also detected in Ncam(-/-) microglia, but this fraction resided on O-glycans and was produced by the second polysialyltransferase, ST8SIA4, indicating the presence of yet another polySia carrier in microglia. Searching for this carrier, we identified polysialylated neuropilin-2, so far only known from dendritic cells and exudate macrophages. Microglia activation by LPS, but not interleukin-4, caused a transient translocation of Golgi-localized polySia to the cell surface, resulting in complete depletion. Finally, NO-production of LPS-stimulated microglia was attenuated by addition of polySia suggesting that the observed loss of polySia-neuropilin-2 is involved in negative feedback regulation of pro-inflammatory microglia polarization. PMID:25752299

  5. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Salicylic acid nanoparticles behavior on chick CAM vasculature

    Mihaiescu, Dan Eduard [' Politechnica' University of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science (Romania); Buteica, Alice Sandra; Neamtu, Johny [University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Faculty of Pharmacy (Romania); Istrati, Daniela [' Politechnica' University of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science (Romania); Mindrila, Ion, E-mail: tutu0101@yahoo.com [University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Department of Morphological Sciences (Romania)

    2013-08-15

    A modified ferrite co-precipitation synthesis was used to obtain core-shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/salicylic acid magnetic nanoparticles (Sa-MNP) with well-dispersed aqueous solution properties. The newly developed iron oxide nanoparticles properties were investigated with X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, and laser light scattering for their characteristic establishment. The resulting Sa-MNPs have spherical morphology, homogenous size distribution around 60 nm (35 nm FWHM), and a 67 mV Zeta potential value (15.5 mV STDV). In vivo biocompatibility and intravascular behavior of the 60 nm diameter size range synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated on chick chorioallantoic membrane model. The results show a reversible and good controlled intravascular accumulation under static magnetic field, a low risk of embolisation with nanoparticle aggregates detached from venous intravascular nanoblocked areas, a persistent blocking of the arterioles and dependent capillaries network, a good circulating life time and biocompatibility. The beneficial effects of salicylic acid (SA) and in vivo demonstrated capacity of Sa-MNPs to cutoff regional vascular supply under static magnetic field control suggest a possible biomedical application of these MNPs in targeted cancer therapy through magnetic controlled blood flow nanoblocking mechanism.

  6. Fe3O4/Salicylic acid nanoparticles behavior on chick CAM vasculature

    A modified ferrite co-precipitation synthesis was used to obtain core–shell Fe3O4/salicylic acid magnetic nanoparticles (Sa-MNP) with well-dispersed aqueous solution properties. The newly developed iron oxide nanoparticles properties were investigated with X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, and laser light scattering for their characteristic establishment. The resulting Sa-MNPs have spherical morphology, homogenous size distribution around 60 nm (35 nm FWHM), and a 67 mV Zeta potential value (15.5 mV STDV). In vivo biocompatibility and intravascular behavior of the 60 nm diameter size range synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated on chick chorioallantoic membrane model. The results show a reversible and good controlled intravascular accumulation under static magnetic field, a low risk of embolisation with nanoparticle aggregates detached from venous intravascular nanoblocked areas, a persistent blocking of the arterioles and dependent capillaries network, a good circulating life time and biocompatibility. The beneficial effects of salicylic acid (SA) and in vivo demonstrated capacity of Sa-MNPs to cutoff regional vascular supply under static magnetic field control suggest a possible biomedical application of these MNPs in targeted cancer therapy through magnetic controlled blood flow nanoblocking mechanism

  7. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed c

  8. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-01

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis. PMID:26398285

  9. Uric acid as a modulator of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Lima, William Gustavo; Martins-Santos, Maria Emília Soares; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2015-09-01

    In humans, uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism. The serum uric acid level is based on the balance between the absorption, production and excretion of purine. Uric acid is similarly produced in the liver, adipose tissue and muscle and is primarily excreted through the urinary tract. Several factors, including a high-fructose diet and the use of xenobiotics and alcohol, contribute to hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia belongs to a cluster of metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities, called metabolic syndrome, characterised by abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Hyperuricaemia reduction in the Pound mouse or fructose-fed rats, as well as hyperuricaemia induction by uricase inhibition in rodents and studies using cell culture have suggested that uric acid plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. These studies have shown that high uric acid levels regulate the oxidative stress, inflammation and enzymes associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, suggesting a mechanism for the impairment of metabolic homeostasis. Humans lacking uricase, the enzyme responsible for uric acid degradation, are susceptible to these effects. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of the effects of uric acid on the regulation of metabolism, primarily focusing on liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. PMID:26133655

  10. A Preliminary Study of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) in the Endangered Aquatic Quillwort Isoetes sinensis Palmer in China

    PangXin-an; WangQing-feng; GituruW.Robert; LiuHong; YangXiao-lin; LiuXing

    2003-01-01

    Isoetes sinensis Palmer (Isoetaceae) is an aquatic or amphibious plant that is critically endangered in China. Previous studies have revealed the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)-like photosynthetic pathway occurs commonly in submerged leaves in genus Isoetes. Water chemistry parameters and the titratable acidity content of the plant extract were measured from samples obtained in the early morning (7:00) and late afternoon (15=00) from two I.sinensis populations in China. One population occurs in the eulittoral zone of a freshwater tidal river at low elevation (134 m) and another occurs in a densely vegetated, high elevation (1 100 m) alpine shallow pool. Significant difference sin pH and titratable acidity of the plant extract were detected between the morning and afternoon samples. These changes are associated with diurnal changes in water chemistry. Our results provide the first evidence for the existence of the CAM pathway in the East Asian endemic Isoetes sinensis Palmer.The magnitude of fluctuations in the titratable acidity of the plant extract may be correlated with the severe carbon limitation imposed on the plants by its aquatic habitat.

  11. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    Marko Kreft

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  12. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S;

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pat......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation....

  13. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    Marko Kreft; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Arne Schousboe

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  14. Absorption and metabolism of benzoic acid in growing pigs

    Kristensen, N B; Nørgaard, J V; Wamberg, S; Engbæk, M; Fernández, J A; Zacho, H D; Poulsen, H D

    2009-01-01

    Dietary benzoic acid (BA) supplementation causes a pronounced reduction in urinary pH but only small changes in blood pH. The present study aimed to investigate the portal absorption profile, hepatic metabolism of BA, and renal excretion of hippuric acid (HA) underlying the relatively small impact...

  15. Specific fatty acids as metabolic modulators in the dairy cow

    J.A.A. Pires

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent developments on the utilization of specific fatty acids to modulate bovine energy metabolism, with emphasis on the periparturient dairy cow. A number of experiments have assessed the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on bovine hepatic energy metabolism using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of hepatocytes with specific fatty acids altered energy metabolism in vitro. For example, linolenic acid seemed to decrease hepatocyte triacylglycerol accumulation. This effect was confirmed in vivo, using parenteral infusions of emulsions derived from different fat sources to feed-restricted non-lactating cows. Additionally, polyunsaturated fatty acids can increase whole body response to insulin, potentially enhancing antilipolytic effects of insulin and muscle protein anabolism in the bovine. There is limited literature on the effects of feeding fat sources rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as fish oil and linseed oil, on metabolism of periparturient dairy cows. Available research has yielded conflicting results which need further clarification. On the other hand, specific isomers of conjugated linoleic acid consistently induce milk fat depression and are able to decrease energy export in milk by periparturient dairy cows. Nonetheless, research is still needed to assess whether these effects will ultimately benefit productivity and health status of periparturient dairy cows. Limitations of available methods to protect fatty acids from ruminal biohydrogenation are also addressed.

  16. Metabolic Response of Pakchoi Leaves to Amino Acid Nitrogen

    WANG Xiao-li; YU Wen-juan; ZHOU Qian; HAN Rui-feng; HUANG Dan-feng

    2014-01-01

    Different nitrogen (N) forms may cause changes in the metabolic profiles of plants. However, few studies have been conducted on the effects of amino acid-N on plant metabolic proifles. The main objective of this study was to identify primary metabolites associated with amino acid-N (Gly, Gln and Ala) through metabolic proifle analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Plants of pakchoi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis L.), Huawang and Wuyueman cultivars, were grown with different nitrogen forms (i.e., Gly, Gln, Ala, NO3--N, and N starvation) applied under sterile hydroponic conditions. The fresh weight and plant N accumulation of Huawang were greater than those of Wuyueman, which indicates that the former exhibited better N-use efficiency than the latter. The physiological performances of the applied N forms were generally in the order of NO3--N>Gln>Gly>Ala. The metabolic analysis of leaf polar extracts revealed 30 amino acid N-responsive metabolites in the two pakchoi cultivars, mainly consisting of sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. Changes in the carbon metabolism of pakchoi leaves under amino acid treatments occurred via the accumulation of fructose, glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Disruption of amino acid metabolism resulted in accumulation of endogenous Gly in Gly treatment, Pro in Ala treatment, and Asn in three amino acid (Gly, Gln and Ala) treatments. By contrast, the levels of endogenous Gln and Leu decreased. However, this reduction varied among cultivars and amino acid types. Amino acid-N supply also affected the citric acid cycle, namely, the second stage of respiration, where leaves in Gly, Gln and Ala treatments contained low levels of malic, citric and succinic acids compared with leaves in NO3--N treatments. No signiifcant difference in the metabolic responses was observed between the two cultivars which differed in their capability to use N. The response of primary metabolites in pakchoi leaves to amino acid-N supply

  17. The relationship between turgor pressure and titratable acidity in mesophyll cells of intact leaves of a Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plant, Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perr.

    Rygol, J; Winter, K; Zimmermann, U

    1987-12-01

    Day/night changes in turgor pressure (P) and titratable acidity content were investigated in the (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Measurements of P were made on individual mesophyll cells of intact attached leaves using the pressure-probe technique. Under conditions of high relative humidity, when transpiration rates were minimal, changes in P correlated well with changes in the level of titratable acidity. During the standard 12 h light/12 h dark cycle, maximum turgor pressure (0.15 MPa) occurred at the end of the dark period when the level of titratable acidity was highest (about 300 μeq H(+)·g(-1) fresh weight). A close relationship between P and titratable acidity was also seen in leaves exposed to perturbations of the standard light/dark cycle. (The dark period was either prolonged, or else only CO2-free air was supplied in this period). In plants deprived of irrigation for five weeks, diurnal changes in titratable acidity of the leaves were reduced (ΔH=160 μeq H(+)·g(-1) fresh weight) and P increased from essentially zero at the end of the light period to 0.02 MPa at the end of the dark period. Following more severe water stress (experiments were made on leaves which had been detached for five weeks), P was zero throughout day and night, yet small diurnal changes in titratable acidity were still measured. These findings are discussed in relation to a hypothesis by Lüttge et al. 1975 (Plant Physiol. 56,613-616) for the role of P in the regulation of acidification/de-acidification cycles of plants exhibiting CAM. PMID:24226067

  18. Biobased organic acids production by metabolically engineered microorganisms

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    expanded as organic acids constitute a key group among top building block chemicals that can be produced from renewable resources. Here we review the current status for production of citric acid and lactic acid, and we highlight the use of modern metabolic engineering technologies to develop high......Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further...

  19. Nutritional regulation of bile acid metabolism is associated with improved pathological characteristics of the metabolic syndrome

    Liaset, Bjørn; Hao, Qin; Jørgensen, Henry;

    2011-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are powerful regulators of metabolism, and mice treated orally with cholic acid are protected from dietinduced obesity, hepatic lipid accumulation, and increased plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) and glucose levels. Here, we show that plasma BA concentration in rats was elevated by ex...

  20. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases,...

  1. Fatty acids from diet and microbiota regulate energy metabolism

    Joe Alcock; Lin, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    A high-fat diet and elevated levels of free fatty acids are known risk factors for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and visceral obesity. Although these disease associations are well established, it is unclear how different dietary fats change the risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Here, we review emerging evidence that insulin resistance and fat storage are linked to changes in the gut microbiota. The gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, in turn, are highly ...

  2. Role of brain glutamic acid metabolism changes in neurodegenerative pathologies

    Nina Pavlovna Kanunnikova

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an essential participant of brain metabolism. It is known that the glutamate is a neurotransmitter in a numerous part of the brain synapses and acts through various ionotropic or metabotropic receptors. Multiple alterations of the brain glutamate system are observed in both acute and chronic brain injures. Glutamate metabolism changes take place in many neurodegenerative pathologies, such as brain ischemia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyot...

  3. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including the...... interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods for...... manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  4. Comparative functional genomics of amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria

    Pastink, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    The amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria used as starters in industrial fermentations has profound effects on the quality of the fermented foods. The work described in this PhD thesis was initiated to use genomics technologies and a comparative approach to link the gene content of some well-known lactic acid bacteria to flavor formation and to increase our general knowledge in the area of amino acid metabolism. The three well-known lactic acid bacteria that were used in these studies...

  5. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  6. Metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids and their tartaric acid esters by Brettanomyces and Pediococcus in red wines.

    Caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric, respectively) are found in wines in varying concentrations. While Brettanomyces and Pediococcus can utilize the free acids, it is not known whether they can metabolize the correspon...

  7. N-13 labeled amino acids: biodistribution, metabolism and dosimetric considerations

    With the growing interest in metabolic imaging and with the increasing number of cyclotron/PET facilities, more studies are being performed in animal and humans using short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides. Amino acids labeled either with N-13 or C-11 are one group of compounds being used to study in vivo regional organ (i.e., brain and heart) or tumor metabolism. Of the studies previously reported using C-11 or N-13 labeled amino acids (methionine, alanine, valine, glutamate, glutamine and tryptophan), imaging was restricted mainly to the organ or tissue of interest with little information obtained about the whole-bode distribution of the label. Such data are important for studying interorgan transport of amino acids and for determining accurate dosimetric measurements after intravenous injection of labeled amino acids. The goals of the authors study were to compare the distribution of several N-13 L-amino acids and N-13 ammonia in tumor-bearing mice and to determine the metabolic fate of the label in vivo. The following amino acids were enzymatically labeled using N-13 ammonia: glutamine, glutamate, methionine, α-aminobutyric acid, valine and leucine. 30 references, 2 figures, 14 tables

  8. Biosynthesis and metabolic pathways of pivalic acid

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Kolouchová, I.; Čejková, A.; Sigler, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 6 (2012), s. 1371-1376. ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/0215 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Pivalic acid * Isooctane * Biosynthesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.689, year: 2012

  9. Radioiodinated PHIPA's; metabolically trapped fatty acids

    Radioiodinated PHIPA 3-10 [13-(4'-iodophenyl)-3-(p-phenylene)tridecanoic acid] has been developed for nuclear-cardiological investigation of coronary artery disease or cardiomyopathies of various origin. The compound features a phenylene group located within the backbone of a long-chain fatty acid. In spite of its bulky structure [123I]PHIPA 3-10 is extracted by the myocardium in a manner similar to that for the unmodified fatty acid analogue, [123I]IPPA. The retention of PHIPA 3-10 in heart muscle results from the presence of the p-phenylene group which prevents more than one β-oxidation cycle. Only one single, rapidly formed metabolite was found in rat-heart extracts. According to comparative HPLC with synthetic metabolites and mass spectrometric analysis this metabolite was identified as [123I]PHIPA 1-10, a by two methylene groups shortened PHIPA derivative. Formation of this metabolite could be suppressed by Etomoxir, a carnitine palmitoyl fransferase I inhibitor, indicating β-oxidation of [123I]PHIPA 3-10 in mitochondria. Final evidence for the involvement of mitochondria in the degradation of [123I]PHIPA 3-10 was obtained performing density-gradient centrifugation with homogenized rat heart tissue. Labeled free PHIPA 3-10 and free metabolite peaked with the fraction containing mitochondria. With respect to its biochemical characteristics, [123I]PHIPA 3-10 may be considered as a useful tool for nuclear cardiological investigations. (orig.)

  10. Metabolically engineered cells for the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    2005-01-01

    improvement of the PUFA content in the host organism through fermentation optimization, e.g. decreasing the temperature and/or designing an optimal medium, or through improving the flux towards fatty acids by metabolic engineering, e.g. through over-expression of fatty acid synthases, over-expression of other...... enzymes involved in biosynthesis of the precursor for PUFAs, or codon optimization of the heterologous genes, or expression of heterologous enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the precursor for PUFAs....

  11. The Role of Diet1 in Bile Acid Metabolism

    Lee, Jessica Mei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Elevated cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk for atherosclerosis, heart disease and stroke. Variations in plasma cholesterol levels among individuals are determined by the interaction of environmental and genetic factors, many of which remain to be identified. This dissertation presents the initial characterization of a novel gene Diet1, the product of which influences plasma cholesterol levels through its effects on bile acid metabolism. Bile acids are synthesized from c...

  12. A Review of the Metabolic Origins of Milk Fatty Acids

    Anamaria COZMA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Milk fat and its fatty acid profile are important determinants of the technological, sensorial, and nutritional properties of milk and dairy products. The two major processes contributing to the presence of fatty acids in ruminant milk are the mammary lipogenesis and the lipid metabolism in the rumen. Among fatty acids, 4:0 to 12:0, almost all 14:0 and about a half of 16:0 in milk fat derive from de novo synthesis within the mammary gland. De novo synthesis utilizes as precursors acetate and butyrate produced through carbohydrates ruminal fermentation and involves acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase as key enzymes. The rest of 16:0 and all of the long-chain fatty acids derive from mammary uptake of circulating lipoproteins and nonesterified fatty acids that originate from digestive absorption of lipids and body fat mobilization. Further, long-chain fatty acids as well as medium-chain fatty acids entering the mammary gland can be desaturated via Δ-9 desaturase, an enzyme that acts by adding a cis-9-double bond on the fatty acid chain. Moreover, ruminal biohydrogenation of dietary unsaturated fatty acids results in the formation of numerous fatty acids available for incorporation into milk fat. Ruminal biohydrogenation is performed by rumen microbial population as a means of protection against the toxic effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Within the rumen microorganisms, bacteria are principally responsible for ruminal biohydrogenation when compared to protozoa and anaerobic fungi.

  13. Arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes

    The authors attempted to characterize the general features of arachidonate metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes. The cells labeled with [3H]arachidonate were stimulated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), ionophore A23187, and fetal bovine serum (FBS). Common to the three substances, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine almost equally served as sources of arachidonate liberated by the action of phospholipase A2. The stimulation of phospholipase A2 action was observed in the order of A23187 greater than FBS greater than TPA. When stimulated by TPA or A23187, the radioactivity released into the extracellular medium was mostly found in prostaglandin (PG) E2. Formation of other PGs and hydroxyeicosatetraenoate (HETE) was extremely limited. In the case of stimulation by FBS, however, the released radioactivity was mainly associated with non-converted arachidonate. FBS also inhibited the TPA- and A23187-induced conversion of arachidonate to PGE2. Phospholipid degradation induced by the three stimulators was similarly dependent on extracellular Ca2+. The stimulation by FBS and A23187 was suppressed by calmodulin antagonists, though the effect of A23187 was much more sensitive to the antagonists when compared to that of FBS. The authors observed more than additive effects of the three stimulators when tested together

  14. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production

  16. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  17. Taurocholic acid metabolism by gut microbes and colon cancer.

    Ridlon, Jason M; Wolf, Patricia G; Gaskins, H Rex

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent causes of cancer death worldwide and is associated with adoption of a diet high in animal protein and saturated fat. Saturated fat induces increased bile secretion into the intestine. Increased bile secretion selects for populations of gut microbes capable of altering the bile acid pool, generating tumor-promoting secondary bile acids such as deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid. Epidemiological evidence suggests CRC is associated with increased levels of DCA in serum, bile, and stool. Mechanisms by which secondary bile acids promote CRC are explored. Furthermore, in humans bile acid conjugation can vary by diet. Vegetarian diets favor glycine conjugation while diets high in animal protein favor taurine conjugation. Metabolism of taurine conjugated bile acids by gut microbes generates hydrogen sulfide, a genotoxic compound. Thus, taurocholic acid has the potential to stimulate intestinal bacteria capable of converting taurine and cholic acid to hydrogen sulfide and deoxycholic acid, a genotoxin and tumor-promoter, respectively. PMID:27003186

  18. Metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for itaconic acid production.

    Blazeck, John; Hill, Andrew; Jamoussi, Mariam; Pan, Anny; Miller, Jarrett; Alper, Hal S

    2015-11-01

    Itaconic acid is a naturally produced organic acid with diverse applications as a replacement for petroleum derived products. However, its industrial viability as a bio-replacement has been restricted due to limitations with native producers. In this light, Yarrowia lipolytica is an excellent potential candidate for itaconic acid production due to its innate capacity to accumulate citric acid cycle intermediates and tolerance to lower pH. Here, we demonstrate the capacity to produce itaconic acid in Y. lipolytica through heterologous expression of the itaconic acid synthesis enzyme, resulting in an initial titer of 33 mg/L. Further optimizations of this strain via metabolic pathway engineering, enzyme localization, and media optimization strategies enabled 4.6g/L of itaconic acid to be produced in bioreactors, representing a 140-fold improvement over initial titer. Moreover, these fermentation conditions did not require additional nutrient supplementation and utilized a low pH condition that enabled the acid form of itaconic acid to be produced. Overall yields (0.058 g/g yield from glucose) and maximum productivity of 0.045 g/L/h still provide areas for future strain improvement. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates that Y. lipolytica has the potential to serve as an industrially relevant platform for itaconic acid production. PMID:26384571

  19. Metabolism and metabolic inhibition of gamboglc acid in rat liver microsomes

    Yi-tong LIU; Kun HAO; Xiao-quan LIU; Guang-Ji WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the metabolism of gambogic acid (GA) and the effects of selective cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) inhibitors on the metabolism of GA in rat liver microsomes in vitro. Methods: Rat liver micrp,so,rn,e$ were used to perform metabolism studies. Various selective CYP450 inhibitors were used to investigate their effects on the metabolism of GA and the principal CYP450 isoform involved in the formation of major metabolite M1 in rat liver microsomes. Types of inhibition in an enzyme kinetics model were used to model the interaction. Results: GA was rapidly metabolized to two phase Ⅰ metabolites,, M1 and M2, in rat liver microsomes. M1 and M2 were tentatively presumed to be the hydration metabolite and epoxide metabolite of GA, respectively. α-Naphthoflavone uncompetitively inhibited the formation of M1 while ketoconazole, sulfophenazole, diethyl dithiocarbamate and quinidine had little or no inhibitory effects on the formation of M1. Conclusion: GA is rapidly metabolized in rat liver microsomes and M1 is crucial for the elimination of GA. Cytochrome P-450 1A2 is the major rat CYP involved in the metabolism of GA.

  20. Role of CCN2 in Amino Acid Metabolism of Chondrocytes.

    Murase, Yurika; Hattori, Takako; Aoyama, Eriko; Nishida, Takashi; Maeda-Uematsu, Aya; Kawaki, Harumi; Lyons, Karen M; Sasaki, Akira; Takigawa, Masaharu; Kubota, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    CCN2/connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a multi-functional molecule that promotes harmonized development and regeneration of cartilage through its matricellular interaction with a variety of extracellular biomolecules. Thus, deficiency in CCN2 supply profoundly affects a variety of cellular activities including basic metabolism. A previous study showed that the expression of a number of ribosomal protein genes was markedly enhanced in Ccn2-null chondrocytes. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the impact of CCN2 on amino acid and protein metabolism in chondrocytes. Comparative metabolome analysis of the amino acids in Ccn2-null and wild-type mouse chondrocytes revealed stable decreases in the cellular levels of all of the essential amino acids. Unexpectedly, uptake of such amino acids was rather enhanced in Ccn2-null chondrocytes, and the addition of exogenous CCN2 to human chondrocytic cells resulted in decreased amino acid uptake. However, as expected, amino acid consumption by protein synthesis was also accelerated in Ccn2-null chondrocytes. Furthermore, we newly found that expression of two genes encoding two glycolytic enzymes, as well as the previously reported Eno1 gene, was repressed in those cells. Considering the impaired glycolysis and retained mitochondrial membrane potential in Ccn2-null chondrocytes, these findings suggest that Ccn2 deficiency induces amino acid shortage in chondrocytes by accelerated amino acid consumption through protein synthesis and acquisition of aerobic energy. Interestingly, CCN2 was found to capture such free amino acids in vitro. Under physiological conditions, CCN2 may be regulating the levels of free amino acids in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 927-937, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26364758

  1. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO(2) fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO(2) fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g(-1) DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (delta(13)C values of -13 and -11 per thousand for starch and malate compared to -11 per thousand of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (-17 per thousand and -14 per thousand) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g(-1) DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1-3 mg C g(-1) DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in delta(13)C values (from -17 per thousand in the evening to -12 per thousand in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export. PMID:20159885

  2. Structurally modified fatty acids - clinical potential as tracers of metabolism

    Dudczak, R.; Schmoliner, R.; Angelberger, P.; Knapp, F.F.; Goodman, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recently 15-p-iodophenyl-betamethyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMPPA) was proposed for myocardial scintigraphy, as possible probe of metabolic processes other than ..beta..-oxidation. In 19 patients myocardial scintigraphy was done after i.v. BMPPA (2 to 4 mCi). Data were collected (LAO 45/sup 0//14; anterior/5) for 100 minutes in the fasted patients. From heart (H) and liver (L) organ to background (BG) ratios were calculated, and the elimination (E) behavior was analyzed from BG (V. cava region) corrected time activity curves. In 10 patients plasma and urine were examined. By CHCl/sub 3//MeOH extraction of plasma samples (90 min. pi) both in water and in organic medium soluble catabolites were found. TLC fractionation showed that those were co-migrating, compared to standards, with benzoic acid, BMPPA and triglycerides. In urine (0 to 2h pi: 4.1% dose) hippuric acid was found. It is concluded that BMPPA is a useful agent for myocardial scintigraphy. Its longer retention in the heart compared to unbranched radioiodinated fatty acids may facilitate SPECT studies. Rate of elimination and plasma analysis indicate the metabolic breakdown of BMPPA. Yet, the complexity of the supposed mechanism may impede curve interpretation in terms of specific metabolic pathways. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Metabolically Engineered Fungal Cells With Increased Content Of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of fatty acids and particularly to the production of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in genetically engineered fungal cells, in particular, to metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  4. The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Bergentall, Mattias;

    2015-01-01

    , liver, and adipose tissues. We used these functional models to determine the global metabolic differences between CONV-R and GF mice. Based on gene expression data, we found that the gut microbiota affects the host amino acid (AA) metabolism, which leads to modifications in glutathione metabolism. To....... Our analyses revealed that the gut microbiota influences host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice....

  5. Arachidonic Acid-metabolizing Cytochrome P450 Enzymes Are Targets of ω-3 Fatty Acids*

    Arnold, Cosima; Markovic, Marija; Blossey, Katrin; Wallukat, Gerd; Fischer, Robert; Dechend, Ralf; Konkel, Anne; von Schacky, Clemens; Luft, Friedrich C.; Muller, Dominik N.; Rothe, Michael; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2010-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) protect against cardiovascular disease by largely unknown mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that EPA and DHA may compete with arachidonic acid (AA) for the conversion by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, resulting in the formation of alternative, physiologically active, metabolites. Renal and hepatic microsomes, as well as various CYP isoforms, displayed equal or elevated activities when metabolizing EPA or DHA instead of AA. CYP2C/2J...

  6. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  7. Fatty Acids in Energy Metabolism of the Central Nervous System

    Alexander Panov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we analyze the current hypotheses regarding energy metabolism in the neurons and astroglia. Recently, it was shown that up to 20% of the total brain’s energy is provided by mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. However, the existing hypotheses consider glucose, or its derivative lactate, as the only main energy substrate for the brain. Astroglia metabolically supports the neurons by providing lactate as a substrate for neuronal mitochondria. In addition, a significant amount of neuromediators, glutamate and GABA, is transported into neurons and also serves as substrates for mitochondria. Thus, neuronal mitochondria may simultaneously oxidize several substrates. Astrocytes have to replenish the pool of neuromediators by synthesis de novo, which requires large amounts of energy. In this review, we made an attempt to reconcile β-oxidation of fatty acids by astrocytic mitochondria with the existing hypothesis on regulation of aerobic glycolysis. We suggest that, under condition of neuronal excitation, both metabolic pathways may exist simultaneously. We provide experimental evidence that isolated neuronal mitochondria may oxidize palmitoyl carnitine in the presence of other mitochondrial substrates. We also suggest that variations in the brain mitochondrial metabolic phenotype may be associated with different mtDNA haplogroups.

  8. Transport and metabolism of glycolic acid by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    In order to understand the excretion of glycolate from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the conditions affecting glycolate synthesis and metabolism were investigated. Although glycolate is synthesized only in the light, the metabolism occurs in the light and dark with greater metabolism in the light due to refixation of photorespiratory CO2. The amount of internal glycolate will affect the metabolism of externally added glycolate. When glycolate synthesis exceeds the metabolic capacity, glycolate is excreted from the cell. The transport of glycolate into the cells occurs very rapidly. Equilibrium is achieved at 40C within the time cells are pelleted by the silicone oil centrifugation technique through a layer of [14C] glycolate. Glycolate uptake does not show the same time, temperature and pH dependencies as diffusion of benzoate. Uptake can be inhibited by treatment of cells with N-ethylmaleimide and stimulated in the presence of valino-mycin/KCl. Acetate and lactate are taken up as quickly as glycolate. The hypothesis was made that glycolate is transported by a protein carrier that transports monocarboxylic acids. The equilibrium concentration of glycolate is dependent on the cell density, implying that there may be a large number of transporter sites and that uptake is limited by substrate availability

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Drought-Tolerant CAM plants Agave deserti and Agave tequilana

    Gross, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to hot and arid environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis) and existing technologies for ethanol production, agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits ...

  10. De novo transcriptome assembly of drought tolerant CAM plants, Agave deserti and Agave tequilana

    Gross, Stephen M.; Martin, Jeffrey A.; Simpson, June; Abraham-Juarez, María Jazmín; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Background Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to xeric environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis), and existing technologies for ethanol production, agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets li...

  11. Carbohydrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and recovery: interactions between pyruvate dehydrogenase, fatty acids, and amino acids

    Mourtzakis, Marina; Saltin, B.; Graham, T.;

    2006-01-01

    During prolonged exercise, carbohydrate oxidation may result from decreased pyruvate production and increased fatty acid supply and ultimately lead to reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Pyruvate also interacts with the amino acids alanine, glutamine, and glutamate, whereby the decline...... activity (P < 0.05) and increased PDH kinase 4 mRNA (P < 0.05) during exercise and recovery. At 1 h of exercise, pyruvate production was greatest and was closely linked to glutamate, which was the predominant amino acid taken up during exercise and recovery. Alanine and glutamine were also associated with...... pyruvate metabolism, and they comprised 68% of total amino-acid release during exercise and recovery. Thus reduced pyruvate production was primarily associated with reduced carbohydrate oxidation, whereas the greatest production of pyruvate was related to glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism in...

  12. S-NITROSYLATED PROTEINS OF A MEDICINAL, CAM PLANT KALANCHOE PINNATA: RIBULOSE-1, 5-BISPHOSPATE CARBOXYLASE/OXYGENASE ACTIVITY TARGETED FOR INHIBITION

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a new addition to signaling molecules that affect a myriad of processes in plants. However, the mechanistic details are scanty. NO post-translationally modifies proteins by S-nitrosylation of cysteines. Soluble S-nitrosoproteome of a medicinal, crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)...

  13. Impact of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on fatty acid metabolism and endocannabinoid biosynthesis

    Piras, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid (LA) mainly found in the meat and dairy products of ruminants. CLA has been shown to possess different biological activities such as anticarcinogenic and anti-atherogenic properties, and also to influence body weight, energy and lipid metabolism, immune response, and inflammation. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in a variety of physiological processes, ...

  14. Fatty-acid metabolism is involved in stress-resistance mechanisms of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Horikawa, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are the major components of the phospholipid bilayer and are involved in several functions of cell membrane. We previously reported that fatty-acid metabolism is involved in the regulation of DAF-2/insulin signal in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we investigate the role of fatty-acid metabolism in stress resistance with respect to daf-16 in nematode. We found that fatty-acid metabolism regulates heat, osmotic, and oxidative-stress resistance in C. elegans. RNA interference...

  15. Hepatic arachidonic acid metabolism is disrupted after hexachlorobenzene treatment

    Hexaclorobenzene (HCB), one of the most persistent environmental pollutants, can cause a wide range of toxic effects including cancer in animals, and hepatotoxicity and porphyria both in humans and animals. In the present study, liver microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, hepatic PGE production, and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) activity were investigated in an experimental model of porphyria cutanea tarda induced by HCB. Female Wistar rats were treated with a single daily dose of HCB (100 mg kg-1 body weight) for 5 days and were sacrificed 3, 10, 17, and 52 days after the last dose. HCB treatment induced the accumulation of hepatic porhyrins from day 17 and increased the activities of liver ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD), and aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND) from day 3 after the last dose. Liver microsomes from control and HCB-treated rats generated, in the presence of NADPH, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), 11,12-Di HETE, and ω-OH/ω-1-OH AA. HCB treatment caused an increase in total NADPH CYP-dependent AA metabolism, with a higher response at 3 days after the last HCB dose than at the other time points studied. In addition, HCB treatment markedly enhanced PGE production and release in liver slices. This HCB effect was time dependent and reached its highest level after 10 days. At this time cPLA2 activity was shown to be increased. Unexpectedly, HCB produced a significant decrease in cPLA2 activity on the 17th and 52nd day. Our results demonstrated for the first time that HCB induces both the cyclooxygenase and CYP-dependent AA metabolism. The effects of HCB on AA metabolism were previous to the onset of a marked porphyria and might contribute to different aspects of HCB-induced liver toxicity such as alterations of membrane fluidity and membrane-bound protein function. Observations also suggested that a possible role of cPLA2 in the

  16. How closely do the delta(13)C values of Crassulacean Acid metabolism plants reflect the proportion of CO(2) fixed during day and night?

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2002-08-01

    The extent to which Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant delta(13)C values provide an index of the proportions of CO(2) fixed during daytime and nighttime was assessed. Shoots of seven CAM species (Aloe vera, Hylocereus monocanthus, Kalanchoe beharensis, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, Kalanchoe pinnata, Vanilla pauciflora, and Xerosicyos danguyi) and two C(3) species (teak [Tectona grandis] and Clusia sp.) were grown in a cuvette, and net CO(2) exchange was monitored for up to 51 d. In species exhibiting net dark CO(2) fixation, between 14% and 73.3% of the carbon gain occurred in the dark. delta(13)C values of tissues formed inside the cuvette ranged between -28.7 per thousand and -11.6 per thousand, and correlated linearly with the percentages of carbon gained in the light and in the dark. The delta(13)C values for new biomass obtained solely during the dark and light were estimated as -8.7 per thousand and -26.9 per thousand, respectively. For each 10% contribution of dark CO(2) fixation integrated over the entire experiment, the delta(13)C content of the tissue was, thus, approximately 1.8 per thousand less negative. Extrapolation of the observations to plants previously surveyed under natural conditions suggests that the most commonly expressed version of CAM in the field, "the typical CAM plant," involves plants that gain about 71% to 77% of their carbon by dark fixation, and that the isotopic signals of plants that obtain one-third or less of their carbon in the dark may be confused with C(3) plants when identified on the basis of carbon isotope content alone. PMID:12177497

  17. Effect of acute acid loading on acid-base and calcium metabolism

    Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acid-base and calcium metabolic responses to acute non-carbonic acid loading in idiopathic calcium stone-formers and healthy males using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h ammonium chloride loading studies were performed in 12...... male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone-formers and 12 matched healthy men using a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Arterialized capillary blood, serum and urine were collected hourly for measurement of electrolytes, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and acid-base...... status. Concentrations of non-metabolizable base (NB) and acid (NA) were calculated from measured concentrations of non-metabolizable ions. RESULTS: The extracellular acid-base status in the stone-formers during basal conditions and acid loading was comparable to the levels in the healthy controls...

  18. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the production of nutraceuticals

    Hugenholtz, J.; Sybesma, W.; Groot, M.N.; Wisselink, W.; Ladero, V.; Burgess, K.; Sinderen, van D.; Piard, J.C.; Eggink, G.; Smid, E.J.; Savoy, G.; Sesma, F.; Jansen, T.; Hols, P.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria display a relatively simple and well-described metabolism where the sugar source is converted mainly to lactic acid. Here we will shortly describe metabolic engineering strategies on the level of sugar metabolism, that lead to either the efficient re-routing of the lactococcal s

  19. Bile Acid-Activated Receptors, Intestinal Microbiota, and the Treatment of Metabolic Disorders.

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Distrutti, Eleonora

    2015-11-01

    The composition of the bile acid pool is a function of the microbial metabolism of bile acids in the intestine. Perturbations of the microbiota shape the bile acid pool and modulate the activity of bile acid-activated receptors (BARs) even beyond the gastrointestinal tract, triggering various metabolic axes and altering host metabolism. Bile acids, in turn, can also regulate the composition of the gut microbiome at the highest taxonomic levels. Primary bile acids from the host are preferential ligands for the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), while secondary bile acids from the microbiota are ligands for G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). In this review, we examine the role of bile acid signaling in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and how changes in bile acid composition affect human metabolism. Bile acids may offer novel therapeutic modalities in inflammation, obesity, and diabetes. PMID:26481828

  20. VARIABLE-THROW CAM

    Godsil, E.C.; Robinson, E.Y.

    1963-07-16

    A variable-throw cam comprising inner and outer eccentric sleeves which are adjustably locked together is described. The cam throw is varied by unlocking the inner and outer sleeves, rotating the outer sleeve relative to the inner one until the desired throw is obtained, and locking the sleeves together again. The cam is useful in applications wherein a continuously-variable throw is required, e.g., ram-and-die pressing operations, cyclic fatigue testing of materials, etc. (AEC)

  1. Metabolic Interactions between Vitamin A and Conjugated Linoleic Acid

    Gianfranca Carta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-soluble molecules share several aspects of their physiology due to their common adaptations to a hydrophilic environment, and may interact to regulate their action in a tissue-specific manner. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA is a fatty acid with a conjugated diene structure that is found in low concentrations in ruminant products and available as a nutritional supplement. CLA has been shown to increase tissue levels of retinol (vitamin A alcohol and its sole specific circulating carrier protein retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4. However, the precise mechanism of this action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge in this specific area of research and speculate that retinol and CLA may compete for catabolic pathways modulated by the activity of PPAR-α and RXR heterodimer. We also present preliminary data that may position PPAR-α at the crossroads between the metabolism of lipids and vitamin A.

  2. Metabolism of Flavone-8-acetic Acid in Mice.

    Pham, Minh Hien; Auzeil, Nicolas; Regazzetti, Anne; Scherman, Daniel; Seguin, Johanne; Mignet, Nathalie; Dauzonne, Daniel; Chabot, Guy G

    2016-08-01

    Flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) is a potent antivascular agent in mice but not in humans. Assuming that FAA was bioactivated in mice, we previously demonstrated that 6-OH-FAA was formed from FAA by mouse microsomes but not by human microsomes; its antivascular activity was 2.1- to 15.9-fold stronger than that of FAA, and its antivascular activity was mediated through the Ras homolog gene family (Rho) protein kinase A (RhoA) pathway. The present work aimed to study FAA metabolism in order to verify if 6-OH-FAA is formed in mice. Using synthesized standards and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with ultraviolet (UV) detection and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, we herein demonstrated, for the first time, that in vitro FAA and its monohydroxylated derivatives could directly undergo phase II metabolism forming glucuronides, and two FAA epoxides were mostly scavenged by NAC and GSH forming corresponding adducts. FAA was metabolized in mice. Several metabolites were formed, in particular 6-OHFAA. The antitumor activity of 6-OH-FAA in vivo is worthy of investigation. PMID:27466491

  3. Dietary trans-fatty acids and metabolic syndrome

    Zdzisław Kochan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trans-fatty acids (TFAs, products of partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils, have become more prevalent in our diet since the 1960s, when they replaced animal fats. TFAs also occur naturally in meat and dairy products from ruminants. There is growing evidence that dietary trans-fatty acids may increase the risk of metabolic syndrome. Several studies have demonstrated adverse effects of TFAs on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. In dietary trials, trans-fatty acids have been shown to raise the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and Lp(a levels in blood. Moreover, a high intake of TFAs has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Prospective cohort studies have shown that dietary trans-fatty acids promote abdominal obesity and weight gain. In addition, it appears that TFA consumption may be associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The documented adverse health effects of TFAs emphasise the importance of efforts to reduce the content of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in foods.

  4. Patterns of amino acid metabolism by proliferating human mesenchymal stem cells

    Higuera, G.A.; Schop, D.; Spitters, T.W.; Dijkhuizen, R.; Bracke, M.; Bruijn, J.D.; Martens, D.E.; Karperien, M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of stem cells have not been determined; in particular, the amino acid metabolism of stem cells is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the amino acid metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with focus on two questions: Which amino acids are consume

  5. Myocardial metabolism of pantothenic acid in chronically diabetic rats.

    Beinlich, C J; Naumovitz, R D; Song, W O; Neely, J R

    1990-03-01

    Transport and metabolism of [3H]pantothenic acid ([3H]Pa) was investigated in hearts from control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In isolated perfused hearts from control animals, the transport of [3H]Pa was linear over 3 h of perfusion when 11 mM glucose was the only exogenous substrate. The in vitro transport of [3H]Pa by hearts from 48-h diabetic rats was reduced by 65% compared to controls and was linear over 2 h of perfusion with no further accumulation of Pa during the third hour. The defect in transport observed in vitro could be corrected by in vivo treatment with 4 U Lente insulin/day for 2 days. In vitro addition of insulin in the presence of 11 mM glucose or 11 mM glucose plus 1.2 mM palmitate had no effect on [3H]Pa transport in hearts from 48-h diabetic rats during 3 h of perfusion. Accumulation of [3H]Pa was not inhibited by inclusion of 0.7 mM amino acids, 1 mM carnitine, 50 microM mersalic acid or 1 mM panthenol, pantoyllactone or pantoyltaurine. Uptake was inhibited by 1 mM nonanoic, octanoic or heptanoic acid, 0.1 mM biotin or 0.25 mM probenecid, suggesting a requirement for the terminal carboxyl group for transport. Transport of pantothenic acid was reduced in hearts from diabetic rats within 24 h of injection of streptozotocin. In vitro accumulation of [3H]Pa decreased to 10% of control 1 week after streptozotocin injection and then remained at 30% of the control value over 10 weeks.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2141362

  6. Metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids and esters by Brettanomyces in different red wines

    Depending on the cultivars and other factors, differing concentrations of hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids) and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric acid, respectively) are found in red wines. Hydroxycinnamic acids are metabolized by...

  7. Enzyme Regulation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Photosynthesis : Studies on Thioredoxin-Linked Enzymes of KalanchoE daigremontiana.

    Hutcheson, S W; Buchanan, B B

    1983-07-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) were identified and purified from the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Kalanchoë daigremontiana. FBPase and SBPase showed respective molecular weights of 180,000 and 76,000, and exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with their counterparts from chloroplasts of C(3) (spinach) and C(4) (corn) plants. Based on Western blot analysis, FBPase was composed of four identical 45,000-dalton subunits and SBPase of two identical 38,000-dalton subunits. Immunological evidence, together with physical properties, indicated that both enzymes were of chloroplast origin.Kalanchoë FBPase and SBPase could be activated by thioredoxin f reduced chemically by dithiothreitol or photochemically by a reconstituted Kalanchoë ferredoxin/thioredoxin system. Both enzymes were activated synergistically by reduced thioredoxin f and thier respective substrates.Kalanchoë FBPase could be partially activated by Mg(2+) at concentrations greater than 10 millimolar; however, such activation was considerably less than that observed in the presence of reduced thioredoxin and Ca(2+), especially in the pH range between 7.8 and 8.3. In contrast to FBPase, Kalanchoë SBPase exhibited an absolute requirement for a dithiol such as reduced thioredoxin irrespective of Mg(2+) concentration. However, like FBPase, increased Mg(2+) concentrations enhanced the thioredoxin-linked activation of this enzyme.In conjunction with these studies, an NADP-linked malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) was identified in cell-free preparations of Kalanchoë leaves which required reduced thioredoxin m for activity.These results indicate that Kalanchoë FBPase, SBPase, and NADP-MDH share physical and regulatory properties with their equivalents in C(3) and C(4) plants. In contrast to previous evidence, all three enzymes appear to have the capacity to be photoregulated in chloroplasts of CAM plants, thereby providing a means for the

  8. Metabolomic analysis of amino acid and energy metabolism in rats supplemented with chlorogenic acid

    Ruan, Zheng; Yang, Yuhui; Zhou, Yan; Wen, Yanmei; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Gang; Wu, Xin; Deng, Zeyuan; Assaad, Houssein; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) supplementation on serum and hepatic metabolomes in rats. Rats received daily intragastric administration of either CGA (60 mg/kg body weight) or distilled water (control) for 4 weeks. Growth performance, serum biochemical profiles, and hepatic morphology were measured. Additionally, serum and liver tissue extracts were analyzed for metabolomes by high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics and multivariate statistics. CGA did not affect rat growth performance, serum biochemical profiles, or hepatic morphology. However, supplementation with CGA decreased serum concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, succinate, citrate, β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, while increasing serum concentrations of glycine and hepatic concentrations of glutathione. These results suggest that CGA supplementation results in perturbation of energy and amino acid metabolism in rats. We suggest that glycine and glutathione in serum may be useful biomarkers for biological properties of CGA on nitrogen metabolism in vivo. PMID:24927697

  9. Protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle

    Wu, Guoyao.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated chick extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles and, in some experiments, rat skeletal muscles were used to study a number of aspects of protein and amino acid metabolism. (1) Chick EDC muscles synthesize and release large amounts of alanine and glutamine, which indirectly obtain their amino groups from branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). (2) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) decrease (P < 0.01) alanine synthesis and BCAA transamination in EDC muscles from 24-h fasted chicks by decreasing (P < 0.01) intracellular concentrations of pyruvate due to inhibition of glycolysis. (3) Glutamine is extensively degraded in skeletal muscles from both chicks and rats, thus challenging the traditional view that glutamine oxidation is negligible in skeletal muscle. The cytosolic glutamine aminotransferases L and K in the rat and the mitochondrial phosphate-activated glutaminase in the chick play important roles in the conversion of glutamine to {alpha}-ketoglutarate for further oxidation. (4) Although methionine has been reported to be extensively transaminated in rat skeletal muscle preparations in the absence of other amino acids, transamination of methionine is absent or negligible in chick and rat skeletal muscles in the presence of physiological concentrations of amino acids. (5) Glutamine at 1.0-15 mM increases (P < 0.01) protein synthesis ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine incorporation), and at 10.0-15.0 mM decreases (P < 0.05) protein degradation ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine release from prelabelled protein in vivo) in EDC muscles from fed chicks as compared to muscles incubated in the absence of glutamine. (6) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) has a small but significant inhibitory effect (P < 0.05) on the rate of protein synthesis, but has no effect (P > 0.05) on the rate of protein degradation in EDC muscles from fed chicks.

  10. Dynamics of human whole body amino acid metabolism

    The mechanism of regulation of the nitrogen metabolism in humans under various nutritional and physiological states was examined using stable isotopes. In the simultaneous continuous infusion of 1- [13] - leucine and α- [15N]- lysine, their fluxed decreased when individuals received lower protein intake. The rates of oxidation and incorporation into body proteins of leucine changed in parallel with the protein intake. Such effects of diet on whole body leucine kinetics were modified by the energy state and dietary energy level. The nitrogen balance was also improved by an excess level of dietary energy. When the intake of dietary protein was lowered below the maintenance level, the whole body flux and de novo synthesis of glycine were lowered, but alanine synthesis was clearly increased. The intravenous infusion of glucose at 4 mg/kg.min, which causes increase in excess blood sugar and plasma insulin, increased the alanine flux, but had no effect on the glycine flux. The rate of albumin synthesis, determined by giving 15N-glycine orally every 3 hr, decreased with the lowered intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. This explains why the serum albumin synthesis increases with the increase in the intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. The rate of whole body protein synthesis in young men receiving the L-amino acid diets providing with the required intake of specific amino acid was much lower than that in the men receiving the diets providing with generous intake of specific amino acid. Thus the control mechanism to maintain the homeostasis of body nitrogen and amino acids is related in some unknown way to the nutritional requirement of the hosts. (Kaihara, S.)

  11. Metabolism of food phenolic acids by Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748T

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Landete, José María; Rivas, Blanca de las; Muñoz, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Phenolic acids account for almost one third of the dietary phenols and are associated with organoleptic, nutritional and antioxidant properties of foods. This study was undertaken to assess the ability of Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748T to metabolize 19 food phenolic acids. Among the hydroxycinnamic acids studied, only p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and m-coumaric acids were metabolized by L. plantarum. Cultures of L. plantarum produced ethyl and vinyl derivatives from p-coumaric and...

  12. Obesity and Cancer Progression: Is There a Role of Fatty Acid Metabolism?

    Seher Balaban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression.

  13. Cytosolic fatty acid-binding proteins: subjects and tools in metabolic research

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are major targets for specific binding of fatty acids in vivo. They constitute a widely expressed family of genetically related, small cytosolic proteins which very likely mediate intracellular transport of free long chain fatty acids. Genetic inhibition of FABP expression in vivo should therefore provide a useful tool to investigate and engineer fatty acid metabolism. (orig.)

  14. Metabolism of nonesterified and esterified hydroxycinnamic acids in red wines by Brettanomyces bruxellensis

    While Brettanomyces can metabolize non–esterified hydroxycinnamic acids found in grape musts/wines (caffeic, p–coumaric, and ferulic acids), it was not known whether this yeast could utilize the corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, p–coutaric, and fertaric acids, respectively). Red wines fr...

  15. Retrobiosynthetic nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of amino acid biosynthesis and intermediary metabolism. Metabolic flux in developing maize kernels.

    Glawischnig, E; Gierl, A; Tomas, A; Bacher, A; Eisenreich, W

    2001-03-01

    Information on metabolic networks could provide the basis for the design of targets for metabolic engineering. To study metabolic flux in cereals, developing maize (Zea mays) kernels were grown in sterile culture on medium containing [U-(13)C(6)]glucose or [1,2-(13)C(2)]acetate. After growth, amino acids, lipids, and sitosterol were isolated from kernels as well as from the cobs, and their (13)C isotopomer compositions were determined by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The highly specific labeling patterns were used to analyze the metabolic pathways leading to amino acids and the triterpene on a quantitative basis. The data show that serine is generated from phosphoglycerate, as well as from glycine. Lysine is formed entirely via the diaminopimelate pathway and sitosterol is synthesized entirely via the mevalonate route. The labeling data of amino acids and sitosterol were used to reconstruct the labeling patterns of key metabolic intermediates (e.g. acetyl-coenzyme A, pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate, erythrose 4-phosphate, and Rib 5-phosphate) that revealed quantitative information about carbon flux in the intermediary metabolism of developing maize kernels. Exogenous acetate served as an efficient precursor of sitosterol, as well as of amino acids of the aspartate and glutamate family; in comparison, metabolites formed in the plastidic compartments showed low acetate incorporation. PMID:11244098

  16. CAM and NK Cells

    Kazuyoshi Takeda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that tumor development, outgrowth and metastasis are under the surveillance of the immune system. Although both innate and acquired immune systems play roles, innate immunity is the spearhead against tumors. Recent studies have revealed the critical role of natural killer (NK cells in immune surveillance and that NK cell activity is considerably influenced by various agents, such as environmental factors, stress, foods and drugs. Some of these NK cell stimulants have been used in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM since ancient times. Therefore, the value of CAM should be re-evaluated from this point of view. In this review, we overview the intimate correlation between NK cell functions and CAM agents, and discuss possible underlying mechanisms mediating this. In particular, neuro-immune crosstalk and receptors for CAM agents are the most important and interesting candidates for such mechanisms.

  17. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  18. Intestinal Crosstalk between Bile Acids and Microbiota and Its Impact on Host Metabolism.

    Wahlström, Annika; Sayin, Sama I; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-07-12

    The gut microbiota is considered a metabolic "organ" that not only facilitates harvesting of nutrients and energy from the ingested food but also produces numerous metabolites that signal through their cognate receptors to regulate host metabolism. One such class of metabolites, bile acids, is produced in the liver from cholesterol and metabolized in the intestine by the gut microbiota. These bioconversions modulate the signaling properties of bile acids via the nuclear farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled membrane receptor 5, which regulate numerous metabolic pathways in the host. Conversely, bile acids can modulate gut microbial composition both directly and indirectly through activation of innate immune genes in the small intestine. Thus, host metabolism can be affected through microbial modifications of bile acids, which lead to altered signaling via bile acid receptors, but also by altered microbiota composition. PMID:27320064

  19. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  20. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants). Final report

    Loewus, F.A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry; Seib, P.A. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Grain Science and Industry

    1991-12-31

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  1. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants)

    Loewus, F.A. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry); Seib, P.A. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Grain Science and Industry)

    1991-01-01

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  2. Metabolic carbon fluxes and biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Ralstonia eutropha on short chain fatty acids.

    Yu, Jian; Si, Yingtao

    2004-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids can be synthesized into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Ralstonia eutropha. Metabolic carbon fluxes of the acids in living cells have significant effect on the yield, composition, and thermomechanical properties of PHA bioplastics. Based on the general knowledge of central metabolism pathways and the unusual metabolic pathways in R. eutropha, a metabolic network of 41 bioreactions is constructed to analyze the carbon fluxes on utilization of the short chain fatty acids. In fed-batch cultures with constant feeding of acid media, carbon metabolism and distribution in R. eutropha were measured involving CO2, PHA biopolymers, and residual cell mass. As the cells underwent unsteady state metabolism and PHA biosynthesis under nitrogen-limited conditions, accumulative carbon balance was applied for pseudo-steady-state analysis of the metabolic carbon fluxes. Cofactor NADP/NADPH balanced between PHA synthesis and the C3/C4 pathway provided an independent constraint for solution of the underdetermined metabolic network. A major portion of propionyl-CoA was directed to pyruvate via the 2-methylcitrate cycle and further decarboxylated to acetyl-CoA. Only a small amount of propionate carbon (acetic acid in the medium. Malate is the node of the C3/C4 pathway and TCA cycle and its decarboxylation to dehydrogenation ranges from 0.33 to 1.28 in response to the demands on NADPH and oxaloacetate for short chain fatty acids utilization. PMID:15296425

  3. Metabolic syndrome, alcohol consumption and genetic factors are associated with serum uric acid concentration.

    Blanka Stibůrková

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans, and increased serum uric acid concentrations lead to gout. The objective of the current study was to identify factors that are independently associated with serum uric acid concentrations in a cohort of Czech control individuals. METHODS: The cohort consisted of 589 healthy subjects aged 18-65 years. We studied the associations between the serum uric acid concentration and the following: (i demographic, anthropometric and other variables previously reported to be associated with serum uric acid concentrations; (ii the presence of metabolic syndrome and the levels of metabolic syndrome components; and (iii selected genetic variants of the MTHFR (c.665C>T, c.1286A>C, SLC2A9 (c.844G>A, c.881G>A and ABCG2 genes (c.421C>A. A backward model selection procedure was used to build two multiple linear regression models; in the second model, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met replaced the metabolic syndrome-related variables. RESULTS: The models had coefficients of determination of 0.59 and 0.53. The serum uric acid concentration strongly correlated with conventional determinants including male sex, and with metabolic syndrome-related variables. In the simplified second model, the serum uric acid concentration positively correlated with the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met, and this model retained the explanatory power of the first model. Moderate wine drinking did not increase serum uric acid concentrations, and the urate transporter ABCG2, unlike MTHFR, was a genetic determinant of serum uric acid concentrations. CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome, moderate wine drinking and the c.421C>A variant in the ABCG gene are independently associated with the serum uric acid concentration. Our model indicates that uric acid should be clinically monitored in persons with metabolic syndrome.

  4. High photosynthetic capacity in a shade-tolerant crassulacean acid metabolism plant. Implications for sunfleck use, nonphotochemical energy dissipation, and susceptibility to photoinhibition

    Aechmea magdalenae Andre ex Baker, a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant from the shaded Panamanian rain forest understory, has a maximum photosynthesis rate 2 to 3 times that of co-occurring C3 species and a limited potential for photosynthetic acclimation to high light. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated that (a) compared with co-occurring C3 species, photosynthetic electron transport in A. magdalenae responded more rapidly to light flecks of moderate intensity, attained a higher steady-state rate, and maintained a lower reduction state of plastoquinone during light flecks; (b) these characteristics were associated with phase III CO2 fixation of CAM; (c) when grown in full sun, A. magdalenae was chronically photoinhibited despite a remarkably high nonphotochemical quenching capacity, indicating a large potential for photoprotection; and (d) the degree of photoinhibition was inversely proportional to the length of phase III. Results from the light fleck studies suggest that understory A. magdalenae plants can make more efficient use of sun flecks for leaf carbon gain over most of the day than co-occurring C3 species. The association between the duration of phase III and the degree of photoinhibition for A. magdalenae in high light is discussed in relation to the limited photosynthetic plasticity in this species

  5. High Photosynthetic Capacity in a Shade-Tolerant Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant (Implications for Sunfleck Use, Nonphotochemical Energy Dissipation, and Susceptibility to Photoinhibition).

    Skillman, J. B.; Winter, K.

    1997-02-01

    Aechmea magdalenae Andre ex Baker, a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant from the shaded Panamanian rain forest understory, has a maximum photosynthesis rate 2 to 3 times that of co-occurring C3 species and a limited potential for photosynthetic acclimation to high light. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated that (a) compared with co-occurring C3 species, photosynthetic electron transport in A. magdalenae responded more rapidly to light flecks of moderate intensity, attained a higher steady-state rate, and maintained a lower reduction state of plastoquinone during light flecks; (b) these characteristics were associated with phase III CO2 fixation of CAM; (c) when grown in full sun, A. magdalenae was chronically photoinhibited despite a remarkably high nonphotochemical quenching capacity, indicating a large potential for photoprotection; and (d) the degree of photoinhibition was inversely proportional to the length of phase III. Results from the light fleck studies suggest that understory A. magdalenae plants can make more efficient use of sun flecks for leaf carbon gain over most of the day than co-occurring C3 species. The association between the duration of phase III and the degree of photoinhibition for A. magdalenae in high light is discussed in relation to the limited photosynthetic plasticity in this species. PMID:12223618

  6. Acid Stress-Mediated Metabolic Shift in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis LSCE1 ▿

    Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Sado-Kamdem, Sylvain L.; Corsetti, Aldo; Vogel, Rudi F.; Ehrmann, Matthias; Guerzoni, M. Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis LSCE1 was selected as a target organism originating from recurrently refreshed sourdough to study the metabolic rerouting associated with the acid stress exposure during sourdough fermentation. In particular, the acid stress induced a metabolic shift toward overproduction of 3-methylbutanoic and 2-methylbutanoic acids accompanied by reduced sugar consumption and primary carbohydrate metabolite production. The fate of labeled leucine, the role of different nutrie...

  7. Understanding fatty acid metabolism through an active learning approach.

    Fardilha, M; Schrader, M; da Cruz E Silva, O A B; da Cruz E Silva, E F

    2010-03-01

    A multi-method active learning approach (MALA) was implemented in the Medical Biochemistry teaching unit of the Biomedical Sciences degree at the University of Aveiro, using problem-based learning as the main learning approach. In this type of learning strategy, students are involved beyond the mere exercise of being taught by listening. Less emphasis is placed on transmitting information and the focus is shifted toward developing higher order thinking (analysis, synthesis, and evaluation). However, MALA should always involve clearly identified objectives and well-defined targets. Understanding fatty acid metabolism was one of the proposed goals of the Medical Biochemistry unit. To this end, students were challenged with a variety of learning strategies to develop skills associated with group conflict resolution, critical thinking, information access, and retrieval, as well as oral and written communication skills. Overall, students and learning facilitators were highly motivated by the diversity of learning activities, particularly due to the emphasis on correlating theoretical knowledge with human health and disease. As a quality control exercise, the students were asked to answer a questionnaire on their evaluation of the whole teaching/learning experience. Our initial analysis of the learning outcomes permits us to conclude that the approach undertaken yields results that surpass the traditional teaching methods. PMID:21567798

  8. Effects of Butter and Phytanic acid intake on metabolic parameters and T-cell polarization

    Drachmann, Tue

    The still growing obesity epidemic is a major risk for our society, as it is associated with the development of the so called metabolic syndrome, which is a clinical diagnosis correlated to development of metabolic disorders. Lack of physical activity, excess energy intake, and nutritional factors...... disorders. Dairy fat is the most complex type of fat occurring in the nature, with more than 400 identified fatty acids. Several of these fatty acids that occur in low amounts have been suggested to have beneficial properties with regard to metabolic disorders. The concentrations of certain of these minor...... e.g. fatty acid composition of the diet, are important factors with regard to development of metabolic syndrome. There is a controversy between the fact that several studies has shown that intake of saturated fatty acids are strongly correlated to the development of metabolic related diseases...

  9. Upregulated expression of brain enzymatic markers of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid metabolism in a rat model of the metabolic syndrome

    Taha Ameer Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animal models, the metabolic syndrome elicits a cerebral response characterized by altered phospholipid and unesterified fatty acid concentrations and increases in pro-apoptotic inflammatory mediators that may cause synaptic loss and cognitive impairment. We hypothesized that these changes are associated with phospholipase (PLA2 enzymes that regulate arachidonic (AA, 20:4n-6 and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6n-6 acid metabolism, major polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain. Male Wistar rats were fed a control or high-sucrose diet for 8 weeks. Brains were assayed for markers of AA metabolism (calcium-dependent cytosolic cPLA2 IVA and cyclooxygenases, DHA metabolism (calcium-independent iPLA2 VIA and lipoxygenases, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and synaptic integrity (drebrin and synaptophysin. Lipid concentrations were measured in brains subjected to high-energy microwave fixation. Results The high-sucrose compared with control diet induced insulin resistance, and increased phosphorylated-cPLA2 protein, cPLA2 and iPLA2 activity and 12-lipoxygenase mRNA, but decreased BDNF mRNA and protein, and drebrin mRNA. The concentration of several n-6 fatty acids in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and lysophosphatidylcholine was increased, as was unesterified AA concentration. Eicosanoid concentrations (prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2 and leukotriene B4 did not change. Conclusion These findings show upregulated brain AA and DHA metabolism and reduced BDNF and drebrin, but no changes in eicosanoids, in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome. These changes might contribute to altered synaptic plasticity and cognitive impairment in rats and humans with the metabolic syndrome.

  10. Conjugated linoleic acids influence fatty acid metabolism in ovine ruminal epithelial cells.

    Masur, F; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Fuhrmann, H; Gäbel, G

    2016-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), particularly cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) and trans-10,cis-12 (t10c12), are used as feed additives to adapt to constantly increasing demands on the performance of lactating cows. Under these feeding conditions, the rumen wall, and the rumen epithelial cells (REC) in particular, are directly exposed to high amounts of CLA. This study determined the effect of CLA on the fatty acid (FA) metabolism of REC and expression of genes known to be modulated by FA. Cultured REC were incubated with c9t11, t10c12, and the structurally similar FA linoleic acid (LA), oleic acid (OA), and trans-vaccenic acid (TVA) for 48 h at a concentration of 100µM. Cellular FA levels were determined by gas chromatography. Messenger RNA expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 and 4 were quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Fatty acid evaluation revealed significant effects of CLA, LA, OA, and TVA on the amount of FA metabolites of β-oxidation and elongation and of metabolites related to desaturation by SCD. The observed changes in FA content point (among others) to the ability of REC to synthesize c9t11 from TVA endogenously. The mRNA expression levels of SCD identified a decrease after CLA, LA, OA, or TVA treatment. In line with the changes in mRNA expression, we found reduced amounts of C16:1n-7 cis-9 and C18:1n-9 cis-9, the main products of SCD. The expression of MCT1 mRNA increased after c9t11 and t10c12 treatment, and CLA c9t11 induced an upregulation of MCT4. Application of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α antagonist suggested that activation of PPARα is involved in the changes of MCT1, MCT4, and SCD mRNA expression induced by c9t11. Participation of PPARγ in the changes of MCT1 and SCD mRNA expression was shown by the application of the respective antagonist. The study demonstrates that exposure to CLA affects both FA metabolism and regulatory pathways within REC. PMID

  11. PreCam

    Allam, Sahar S. [Fermilab; Tucker, Douglas L. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) will be taking the next step in probing the properties of Dark Energy and in understanding the physics of cosmic acceleration. A step towards the photometric calibration of DES is to have a quick, bright survey in the DES footprint (PreCam), using a pre-production set of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) CCDs and a set of 100 mm×100 mm DES filters. The objective of the PreCam Survey is to create a network of calibrated DES grizY standard stars that will be used for DES nightly calibrations and to improve the DES global relative calibrations. Here, we describe the first year of PreCam observation, results, and photometric calibrations.

  12. Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Metabolism Responses to Amino Acid Nutrition.

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Healthy individuals maintain remarkably constant skeletal muscle mass across much of adult life, suggesting the existence of robust homeostatic mechanisms. Muscle exists in dynamic equilibrium whereby the influx of amino acids (AAs) and the resulting increases in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) associated with the intake of dietary proteins cancel out the efflux of AAs from muscle protein breakdown that occurs between meals. Dysregulated proteostasis is evident with aging, especially beyond the sixth decade of life. Women and men aged 75 y lose muscle mass at a rate of ∼0.7% and 1%/y, respectively (sarcopenia), and lose strength 2- to 5-fold faster (dynapenia) as muscle "quality" decreases. Factors contributing to the disruption of an otherwise robust proteostatic system represent targets for potential therapies that promote healthy aging. Understanding age-related impairments in anabolic responses to AAs and identifying strategies to mitigate these factors constitute major areas of interest. Numerous studies have aimed to identify 1) the influence of distinct protein sources on absorption kinetics and muscle anabolism, 2) the latency and time course of MPS responses to protein/AAs, 3) the impacts of protein/AA intake on muscle microvascular recruitment, and 4) the role of certain AAs (e.g., leucine) as signaling molecules, which are able to trigger anabolic pathways in tissues. This review aims to discuss these 4 issues listed, to provide historical and modern perspectives of AAs as modulators of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism, to describe how advances in stable isotope/mass spectrometric approaches and instrumentation have underpinned these advances, and to highlight relevant differences between young adults and older individuals. Whenever possible, observations are based on human studies, with additional consideration of relevant nonhuman studies. PMID:27422520

  13. Volatile profiling reveals intracellular metabolic changes in Aspergillus parasiticus: veA regulates branched chain amino acid and ethanol metabolism

    Roze Ludmila V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi in the genus Aspergillus produce a variety of natural products, including aflatoxin, the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known. Aflatoxin biosynthesis, one of the most highly characterized secondary metabolic pathways, offers a model system to study secondary metabolism in eukaryotes. To control or customize biosynthesis of natural products we must understand how secondary metabolism integrates into the overall cellular metabolic network. By applying a metabolomics approach we analyzed volatile compounds synthesized by Aspergillus parasiticus in an attempt to define the association of secondary metabolism with other metabolic and cellular processes. Results Volatile compounds were examined using solid phase microextraction - gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the wild type strain Aspergillus parasiticus SU-1, the largest group of volatiles included compounds derived from catabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine; we also identified alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and lipid-derived volatiles. The number and quantity of the volatiles produced depended on media composition, time of incubation, and light-dark status. A block in aflatoxin biosynthesis or disruption of the global regulator veA affected the volatile profile. In addition to its multiple functions in secondary metabolism and development, VeA negatively regulated catabolism of branched chain amino acids and synthesis of ethanol at the transcriptional level thus playing a role in controlling carbon flow within the cell. Finally, we demonstrated that volatiles generated by a veA disruption mutant are part of the complex regulatory machinery that mediates the effects of VeA on asexual conidiation and sclerotia formation. Conclusions 1 Volatile profiling provides a rapid, effective, and powerful approach to identify changes in intracellular metabolic networks in filamentous fungi. 2 VeA coordinates the

  14. CAMS achievements in 1995

    CAMS (Computerized Accident Management Support) is a system being developed as a joint research activity at the Halden Reactor Project with additional financing from the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) and the Nordic NKS/RAK-2 project. Three types of users are envisaged: the staff in the control room, the staff in the technical support centre and the staff at a national emergency centre. It is still an experimental system. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate kindly accepted to test CAMS at a safety exercise on the 4th of May, 1995. CAMS is designed assuming automatic data transfer from the plant. Missing the data link, a simulator running in the next room was updated now and then with data received by phone. As seen from CAMS, it did not matter if the data came from a fake plant or from a real plant, except that the data were delayed. Overall, it seemed that CAMS can be a very important tool for a national authority. A data link from the plant would increase its usefulness. Several comments on design features were collected and will be used to improve the system. The model needs more inputs to control the main parameters, and a larger repertoire of fault conditions should be put into the model. In the second half of 1995 the work on CAMS has concentrated upon designing new modules for signal validation, tracking simulation and state identification. This will provide better capabilities for on-line monitoring and assessment of the plant state. Further, it has been proposed to introduce Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to assist in risk monitoring. A first prototype has been made on a personal computer showing the main features of such a PSA module. (au)

  15. Effect of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Lipoprotein Metabolism: A Comprehensive Update

    Esther M.M. Ooi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Dietary fatty-acid composition regulates lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and may confer CVD benefit. This review updates understanding of the effect of dietary fatty-acids on human lipoprotein metabolism. In elderly participants with hyperlipidemia, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA consumption diminished hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL secretion and enhanced TRL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL conversion. n-3 PUFA also decreased TRL-apoB-48 concentration by decreasing TRL-apoB-48 secretion. High n-6 PUFA intake decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by up-regulating VLDL lipolysis and uptake. In a study of healthy subjects, the intake of saturated fatty-acids with increased palmitic acid at the sn-2 position was associated with decreased postprandial lipemia. Low medium-chain triglyceride may not appreciably alter TRL metabolism. Replacing carbohydrate with monounsaturated fatty-acids increased TRL catabolism. Trans-fatty-acid decreased LDL and enhanced high-density lipoprotein catabolism. Interactions between APOE genotype and n-3 PUFA in regulating lipid responses were also described. The major advances in understanding the effect of dietary fatty-acids on lipoprotein metabolism has centered on n-3 PUFA. This knowledge emphasizes the importance of regulating lipoprotein metabolism as a mode to improve plasma lipids and potentially CVD risk. Additional studies are required to better characterize the cardiometabolic effects of other dietary fatty-acids.

  16. Effect of dietary Fatty acids on human lipoprotein metabolism: a comprehensive update.

    Ooi, Esther M M; Watts, Gerald F; Ng, Theodore W K; Barrett, P Hugh R

    2015-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dietary fatty-acid composition regulates lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and may confer CVD benefit. This review updates understanding of the effect of dietary fatty-acids on human lipoprotein metabolism. In elderly participants with hyperlipidemia, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA) consumption diminished hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) secretion and enhanced TRL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conversion. n-3 PUFA also decreased TRL-apoB-48 concentration by decreasing TRL-apoB-48 secretion. High n-6 PUFA intake decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by up-regulating VLDL lipolysis and uptake. In a study of healthy subjects, the intake of saturated fatty-acids with increased palmitic acid at the sn-2 position was associated with decreased postprandial lipemia. Low medium-chain triglyceride may not appreciably alter TRL metabolism. Replacing carbohydrate with monounsaturated fatty-acids increased TRL catabolism. Trans-fatty-acid decreased LDL and enhanced high-density lipoprotein catabolism. Interactions between APOE genotype and n-3 PUFA in regulating lipid responses were also described. The major advances in understanding the effect of dietary fatty-acids on lipoprotein metabolism has centered on n-3 PUFA. This knowledge emphasizes the importance of regulating lipoprotein metabolism as a mode to improve plasma lipids and potentially CVD risk. Additional studies are required to better characterize the cardiometabolic effects of other dietary fatty-acids. PMID:26043038

  17. The influence of lactate and dipyridamole on myocardial fatty acid metabolism in man, traced with 123I-17-iodoheptadecanoic acid

    Changes in myocardial metabolism can be detected externally by registration of time-activity curves after administration of radioiodinated fatty acids. In this scintigraphic study the influence of lactate on fatty acid metabolism was investigated in the normal human myocardium, traced with 123I-17-iodoheptadecanoic acid (123I-17-HDA). In patients (paired, n=7) lactate loading decreased the uptake of 123I-17-HDA significantly from 27 (control:22-36) to 20 counts/min/pixel (16-31; p 123I-17-HDA scintigraphy of the heart. (orig.)

  18. Interpreting expression data with metabolic flux models: predicting Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid production.

    Caroline Colijn

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is central to cell physiology, and metabolic disturbances play a role in numerous disease states. Despite its importance, the ability to study metabolism at a global scale using genomic technologies is limited. In principle, complete genome sequences describe the range of metabolic reactions that are possible for an organism, but cannot quantitatively describe the behaviour of these reactions. We present a novel method for modeling metabolic states using whole cell measurements of gene expression. Our method, which we call E-Flux (as a combination of flux and expression, extends the technique of Flux Balance Analysis by modeling maximum flux constraints as a function of measured gene expression. In contrast to previous methods for metabolically interpreting gene expression data, E-Flux utilizes a model of the underlying metabolic network to directly predict changes in metabolic flux capacity. We applied E-Flux to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB. Key components of mycobacterial cell walls are mycolic acids which are targets for several first-line TB drugs. We used E-Flux to predict the impact of 75 different drugs, drug combinations, and nutrient conditions on mycolic acid biosynthesis capacity in M. tuberculosis, using a public compendium of over 400 expression arrays. We tested our method using a model of mycolic acid biosynthesis as well as on a genome-scale model of M. tuberculosis metabolism. Our method correctly predicts seven of the eight known fatty acid inhibitors in this compendium and makes accurate predictions regarding the specificity of these compounds for fatty acid biosynthesis. Our method also predicts a number of additional potential modulators of TB mycolic acid biosynthesis. E-Flux thus provides a promising new approach for algorithmically predicting metabolic state from gene expression data.

  19. Coordinations between gene modules control the operation of plant amino acid metabolic networks

    Galili Gad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being sessile organisms, plants should adjust their metabolism to dynamic changes in their environment. Such adjustments need particular coordination in branched metabolic networks in which a given metabolite can be converted into multiple other metabolites via different enzymatic chains. In the present report, we developed a novel "Gene Coordination" bioinformatics approach and use it to elucidate adjustable transcriptional interactions of two branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants in response to environmental stresses, using publicly available microarray results. Results Using our "Gene Coordination" approach, we have identified in Arabidopsis plants two oppositely regulated groups of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched Asp-family network of Arabidopsis plants, which metabolizes the amino acids Lys, Met, Thr, Ile and Gly, as well as a single group of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic network, which metabolizes the amino acids Trp, Phe and Tyr. These genes possess highly coordinated adjustable negative and positive expression responses to various stress cues, which apparently regulate adjustable metabolic shifts between competing branches of these networks. We also provide evidence implying that these highly coordinated genes are central to impose intra- and inter-network interactions between the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid metabolic networks as well as differential system interactions with other growth promoting and stress-associated genome-wide genes. Conclusion Our novel Gene Coordination elucidates that branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants are regulated by specific groups of highly coordinated genes that possess adjustable intra-network, inter-network and genome-wide transcriptional interactions. We also hypothesize that such transcriptional interactions enable regulatory metabolic adjustments needed for adaptation to the stresses.

  20. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-22

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  1. Arachidonic acid metabolism in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    Smith, D. M.; Walsh, C E; DeChatelet, L R; Waite, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the calcium ionophore A23187 on the release and metabolism of [3H]arachidonic acid was examined in normal polymorphonuclear leukocytes and those obtained from patients with chronic granulomatous disease. The ionophore A23187 which stimulates oxidative metabolism in normal polymorphonuclear leukocytes was ineffective in increasing oxidative metabolism (chemiluminescence) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease. However, the ionophore A2318...

  2. Visualizing digestive organ morphology and function using differential fatty acid metabolism in live zebrafish

    Carten, Juliana Debrito; Bradford, Mary Katherine; Farber, Steven Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular function as sources of fuel, critical signaling molecules and membrane components. Deficiencies in lipid processing and transport underlie many metabolic diseases. To better understand metabolic function as it relates to disease etiology, a whole animal approach is advantageous, one in which multiple organs and cell types can be assessed simultaneously in vivo. Towards this end, we have developed an assay to visualize fatty acid (FA) metabolism in larval zebr...

  3. Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Polymorphisms and Metabolic Measures in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Patients Taking Antipsychotics

    Burghardt, Kyle J.; Kristen N. Gardner; Johnson, Joshua W.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have become a common therapeutic option in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, these medications come with a high risk of metabolic side effects, particularly dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Therefore, identification of patients who are at increased risk for metabolic side effects is of great importance. The genetics of fatty acid metabolism is one area of research that may help identify such patients. Therefore, in this present study, we aimed to de...

  4. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  5. BIOCONCENTRATION AND METABOLISM OF ALL-TRANS RETINOIC ACID BY RANA SYLVATICA AND RANA CLAMITANS TADPOLES

    Retinoids, which are Vitamin A derivatives, are important signaling molecules that regulate processes critical for development in all vertebrates. The objective of our study was to examine uptake and metabolism of all-trans retinoic acid...

  6. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  7. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for improved fermented foods

    Flahaut, N.A.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have long been used in industrial dairy and other food fermentations that make use of their metabolic activities leading to products with specific organoleptic properties. Metabolic engineering is a rational approach to steer fermentations toward the production of desired compou

  8. Genome-wide association studies for fatty acid metabolic traits in five divergent pig populations

    Zhang, Wanchang; Bin Yang; Zhang, Junjie; Cui, Leilei; Ma, Junwu; Chen, Congying; Ai, Huashui; Xiao, Shijun; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid composition profiles are important indicators of meat quality and tasting flavor. Metabolic indices of fatty acids are more authentic to reflect meat nutrition and public acceptance. To investigate the genetic mechanism of fatty acid metabolic indices in pork, we conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 33 fatty acid metabolic traits in five pig populations. We identified a total of 865 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), corresponding to 11 genome-wide significant loci on nine chromosomes and 12 suggestive loci on nine chromosomes. Our findings not only confirmed seven previously reported QTL with stronger association strength, but also revealed four novel population-specific loci, showing that investigations on intermediate phenotypes like the metabolic traits of fatty acids can increase the statistical power of GWAS for end-point phenotypes. We proposed a list of candidate genes at the identified loci, including three novel genes (FADS2, SREBF1 and PLA2G7). Further, we constructed the functional networks involving these candidate genes and deduced the potential fatty acid metabolic pathway. These findings advance our understanding of the genetic basis of fatty acid composition in pigs. The results from European hybrid commercial pigs can be immediately transited into breeding practice for beneficial fatty acid composition. PMID:27097669

  9. Engineering Escherichia Coli Fatty Acid Metabolism for the Production of Biofuel Precursors

    Ford, Tyler John

    2015-01-01

    Medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs, 6-12 carbons) are potential precursors to biofuels with properties similar to gasoline and diesel fuel but are not native products of Escherichia coli fatty acid synthesis. Herein we engineer E. coli to produce, metabolize, and activate MCFAs for their future reduction into alcohols and alkanes (potential biofuels). We develop an E. coli strain with an octanoate (8-carbon MCFA) producing enzyme (a thioesterase), metabolic knockouts, and the capa...

  10. Regulation of Fatty Acid Metabolism by Cell Autonomous Circadian Clocks: Time to Fatten up on Information?*

    Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular, cellular, and animal-based studies have recently exposed circadian clocks as critical regulators of energy balance. Invariably, mouse models of genetically manipulated circadian clock components display features indicative of altered lipid/fatty acid metabolism, including differential adiposity and circulating lipids. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a comprehensive summary of current knowledge regarding the regulation of fatty acid metabolism by distinct cell autonomou...

  11. HDAC Inhibition Modulates Cardiac PPARs and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chin; Chung, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Yao-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate cardiac glucose and lipid homeostasis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor has anti-inflammatory effects which may play a key role in modulating PPARs and fatty acid metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether HDAC inhibitor, MPT0E014, can modulate myocardial PPARs, inflammation, and fatty acid metabolism in diabetes mellitus (DM) cardiomyopathy. Electrocardiography, echocardiography, and western blotting were used...

  12. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas; Mattijssen, Frits; Evers-van Gogh, Inkie; Schaart, Gert; Jeppesen, Jacob; Kneppers, Anita; Mensink, Marco; Voshol, Peter J.; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Tan, Nguan Soon; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Berbée, Jimmy F.; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise causes profound changes in energy metabolism in humans. In this study we show that resting skeletal muscle has a crucial role in the metabolic response to acute exercise. During endurance exercise, selective induction of the protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) in nonexercising muscle reduces local fatty acid uptake, presumably to prevent fat overload, while directing fatty acids to the active skeletal muscle as fuel. Our data thus suggest that nonexercising muscle has a ke...

  13. Studies on amino acid metabolism in Lathyrus sativus Biosynthesis of homoserine and O-oxalylhomoserine

    J. Przybylska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Examination of free amino acid pool in Lathyrus sativus showed a rapid increase of homoserine and O-oxalylhomoserine during germination. Isotopic experiments indicated that aspartic acid was an effective precursor of homoserine in Lathyrus sativus and suggested oxalic acid to be incorporated into O-oxalylhomiaserine as an intact moiety. Similar trends of amino acid metabolism of Lathyrus sativus and of Pisum sativum have been discussed.

  14. Mechanism of long chain monoenoic fatty acids acting on the energy metabolism of heart

    The oxidation of 1-14C-erucic (Csub(22:1)) and 1-14C-nervonic (Csub(24:1)) acid was studied compared to 1-14C-palmitic and -oleic acid in isolated rat and pig heart mitochondria. After mitochondrial incubation with the albumin-bound fatty acids only small amounts of 14CO2 developed from the oxidation of the long chain monoenoic acids as compared to palmitic or oleic acid. The slow down of the oxidation rate was more pronounced in rat than in pig heart mitochondria. The oxidation of palmitic or oleic acid was not found to be inhibited by the C20-C24-monoeneic acids, whereas palmitic or oleic acid inhibited the oxidation of erucic acid competitively. From present findings an idea may be developed of the interference on fatty acid metabolism in heart muscle by erucic and other long chain monenoic acids. (orig.)

  15. Arachidonic acid and calcium metabolism in rnelittin stimulated neutrophils

    Nielsen, Ole H.; Bouchelouche, Pierre N.; Dag Berild

    1992-01-01

    Melittin, the predominant fraction of bee venom proteins, was studied in an experimental model of human neutrophil granulocytes to reveal its influence on eicosanoid release, metabolism and receptor function in relation to intracellular calcium metabolism. Melittin (2 μmol/l) was as potent as the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/l) for activation of 5-lipoxygenase, releasing arachidonate only from phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine of cellular membranes, as judged from the de...

  16. Zonation of glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the liver : Mechanism and metabolic consequences

    Hijmans, Brenda S.; Greffiorst, Aldo; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Groen, Albert K.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is generally considered as a relatively homogeneous organ containing four different cell types. It is however well-known that the liver is not homogeneous and consists of clearly demarcated metabolic zones. Hepatocytes from different zones show phenotypical heterogeneity in metabolic featu

  17. Genomic and Metabolic Disposition of Non-Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rats to Increased Myocardial Fatty Acid Metabolism

    Devanathan, Sriram; Nemanich, Samuel T.; Kovacs, Attila; Fettig, Nicole; Gropler, Robert J.; Shoghi, Kooresh I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipotoxicity of the heart has been implicated as a leading cause of morbidity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). While numerous reports have demonstrated increased myocardial fatty acid (FA) utilization in obese T2DM animal models, this diabetic phenotype has yet to be demonstrated in non-obese animal models of T2DM. Therefore, the present study investigates functional, metabolic, and genomic differences in myocardial FA metabolism in non-obese type 2 diabetic rats. The study utilized Goto-K...

  18. Metabollic Engineering of Saccharomyces Cereviae a,omi acid metabolism for production of products of industrial interest

    Chen, Xiao

    -based processes. This study has focused on metabolic engineering of the amino acid metabolism in S. cerevisiae for production of two types of chemicals of industrial interest. The first chemical is δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)–L-cysteinyl–D-valine (LLD-ACV). ACV belongs to non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), which are...... synthesized by specific peptide synthetases and have a broad range of biological and pharmacological properties. Due to the scarcity of the production of NRPs in nature and the difficulties in their chemical synthesis, it was initiated here to develop S. cerevisiae as a platform for microbial production of...

  19. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. ...

  20. Hyaluronic acid metabolism is increased in unstable plaques

    P.T. Bot; G. Pasterkamp; M.J. Goumans; C. Strijder; F.L. Moll; J.P. de Vries; S.T. Pals; D.P. de Kleijn; J.J. Piek; I.E. Hoefer

    2010-01-01

    P>Background Hyaluronic acid is expressed in atherosclerotic lesions, but its exact role in atherosclerotic disease remains unknown. As degradation of hyaluronic acid by hyaluronidase into low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMW-HA) is associated with inflammation and Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP

  1. Occurrence and metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid in Zea mays

    Lewer, P.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was identified as a catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in germinating kernels of Zea mays and found to be present in amounts of ca 3.1 nmol/kernel. 7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was shown to be a biosynthetic intermediate between 2-indolinone-3-acetic acid and 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside in both kernels and roots of Zea mays. Further metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-[5-3H]-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside occurred to yield tritiated water plus, as yet, uncharacterized products.

  2. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean.

    Charles Kanobe

    Full Text Available The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of "metabolic hijacking" by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor.

  3. Interactions between prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols: diet or supplementation for metabolic syndrome prevention?

    Peluso, Ilaria; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2014-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be prevented by the Mediterranean diet, characterized by fiber, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols. However, the composition of the Mediterranean diet, which can be viewed as a natural multiple supplement, is poorly controlled, and its beneficial effects poorly predictable. The metabolic syndrome is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and the gut microbioma seems to be the main target and player in the interactions occurring between probiotics, prebiotics, omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. From the reviewed evidence, it is reasonable to manage growth and metabolism of gut microflora with specific prebiotics and polyphenols. Even though the healthy properties of functional foods and nutraceuticals still need to be fully elucidated, available data suggest that well-designed supplements, containing the better ratio of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants, specific probiotic strains, and selected polyphenols and prebiotics, could be useful in metabolic syndrome prevention and treatment. PMID:24467635

  4. Dissolution kinetics of nickel laterite ore using different secondary metabolic acids

    S. Sahu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The dissolution kinetics of nickel laterite ore in aqueous acid solutions of three metabolic acids, i.e., citric acid, oxalic acid and acetic acid were investigated in a batch reactor individually. It was determined that experimental data comply with a shrinking core model. The diffusion coefficients for citric acid, oxalic acid and acetic acid were found to be 1.99×10-9 cm²/s, 2.59×10-8 cm²/s and 1.92×10-10 cm²/s respectively. The leaching ability of each acid was observed and it was found that oxalic acid was better than the other two.

  5. Transcriptional Factors Mediating Retinoic Acid Signals in the Control of Energy Metabolism

    Rui Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA, an active metabolite of vitamin A (VA, is important for many physiological processes including energy metabolism. This is mainly achieved through RA-regulated gene expression in metabolically active cells. RA regulates gene expression mainly through the activation of two subfamilies in the nuclear receptor superfamily, retinoic acid receptors (RARs and retinoid X receptors (RXRs. RAR/RXR heterodimers or RXR/RXR homodimers bind to RA response element in the promoters of RA target genes and regulate their expressions upon ligand binding. The development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes is often associated with profound changes in the expressions of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in metabolically active cells. RA regulates some of these gene expressions. Recently, in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that status and metabolism of VA regulate macronutrient metabolism. Some studies have shown that, in addition to RARs and RXRs, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor β/δ may function as transcriptional factors mediating RA response. Herein, we summarize current progresses regarding the VA metabolism and the role of nuclear receptors in mediating RA signals, with an emphasis on their implication in energy metabolism.

  6. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett;

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5bet...

  7. Oral retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent Rambazole for plaque psoriasis: an immunohistochemical study.

    Bovenschen, H.J.; Kooijmans-Otero, M.E.; Langewouters, A.M.G.; Vlijmen-Willems, I.M.J.J. van; Rens, D.W.A. van; Seyger, M.M.B.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The novel systemic all-trans retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) R115866 (Rambazole(TM); Barrier Therapeutics, Geel, Belgium; further referred to as rambazole) increases intracellular levels of endogenous all-trans retinoic acid (RA). Well-known effects of RA are normalizatio

  8. No indications for altered essential fatty acid metabolism in two murine models for cystic fibrosis

    Werner, A; Bongers, MEJ; Bijvelds, MJ; de Jonge, HR; Verkade, HJ

    2004-01-01

    A deficiency of essential fatty acids (EFA) is frequently described in cystic fibrosis (CF), but whether this is a primary consequence of altered EFA metabolism or a secondary phenomenon is unclear. It was suggested that defective long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) synthesis contributes

  9. Branched chain amino acids requirements and metabolism in pigs

    Assadi Soumeh, Elham

    2015-01-01

    investigation. A non-targeted metabolomics study was thereafter conducted in order to screen the bio-fluids of pigs for discriminating metabolites and identify biomarkers of BCAA, when the pigs were fed the optimum level of BCAA for the highest growth performance. The results of the Ile dose-response study...... requirements at 0.93. Metabolomics, one of the last “-omics”, is a global analysis and interpretation of metabolome in specific health or nutritional status. Non-targeted metabolomics is used for screening the metabolic profile, and the metabolic signature could be used for hypothesis generation. The results...... of a non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics approach in the current study provided novel knowledge of the metabolic response of pigs to increasing dietary BCAA and enabled us to identify the biomarkers of BCAA in plasma and urine of pigs when fed the optimum dietary Ile, Val, and Leu for the highest growth...

  10. Docosahexaenoic Acid Levels in Blood and Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Children: Is There a Link?

    Carlotta Lassandro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing in the pediatric population. Considering the different existing criteria to define metabolic syndrome, the use of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria has been suggested in children. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been associated with beneficial effects on health. The evidence about the relationship of DHA status in blood and components of the metabolic syndrome is unclear. This review discusses the possible association between DHA content in plasma and erythrocytes and components of the metabolic syndrome included in the IDF criteria (obesity, alteration of glucose metabolism, blood lipid profile, and blood pressure and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children. The current evidence is inconsistent and no definitive conclusion can be drawn in the pediatric population. Well-designed longitudinal and powered trials need to clarify the possible association between blood DHA status and metabolic syndrome.

  11. Metabolism of fatty acids in rat brain in microsomal membranes

    Using a technique in which substrate fatty acids are incorporated into microsomal membranes followd by comparison of their rates of desaturation or elongation with those of exogenous added fatty acids it has been found that the desaturation rate is more rapid for the membrane-bound substrate than for the added fatty acid. Moreover, the product of the membrane-bound substrate is incorporated into membrane phospholipid whereas the product of the exogenous substrate is found in di- and triacyl glycerols and in free fatty acids as well. These and other findings point to a normal sequence of reaction of membrane liqids with membrane-bound substrates involving transfer of fatty acid from phospholipid to the coupled enzyme systems without ready equilibration with the free fatty acid pool

  12. Polymorphisms in fatty acid metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk

    Hoeft, B.; Linseisen, J.; Beckmann, L.; Muller-Decker, K.; Canzian, F.; Husing, A.; Kaaks, R.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Jakobsen, M.U.; Overvad, K.; Hansen, R.D.; Knuppel, S.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Koumantaki, Y.; Trichopoulos, D.; Berrino, F.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; van Duijnhoven, F.J.B.; van Gils, C.H.; Peeters, P.H.; Dumeaux, V.; Lund, E.; Castano, J.M.H.; Munoz, X.; Rodriguez, L.; Barricarte, A.; Manjer, J.; Jirstrom, K.; Van Guelpen, B.; Hallmans, G.; Spencer, E.A.; Crowe, F.L.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Morois, S.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Chajes, V.; Jenab, M.; Boffetta, P.; Vineis, P.; Mouw, T.; Norat, T.; Riboli, E.; Nieters, A.

    2010-01-01

    as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes...

  13. Iodomethylated fatty acid metabolism in mice and dogs

    Fagret, D.; Wolf, J.E.; Pilichowski, P.; Mathieu, J.P.; Pernin, C.; Apparu, M.; Arvieux, C.; Cuchet, P.; Vidal, M.; Comet, M.

    1988-12-01

    The myocardial uptake of fatty acids labeled with radioactive iodine and injected i.v. can only be evaluated with SPECT if their oxidation kinetics is slow enough. For this reason, we evaluated different iodomethylated fatty acids in mice and dogs to determine which of them shows the highest myocardial uptake and the slowest oxidation. The most suitable was found to be 16-iodo-3-methyl hexadecanoic acid (mono ..beta..) since its myocardial fixation was the same as that of the reference, i.e. 16-iodo-9-hexadecenoic acid (IHA), whereas it was degraded more slowly. Thirty min after injection of mono ..beta.. into dogs, the decrease in myocardial activity with respect to the maximum was two fold less than after IHA injection. The myocardial uptake of the two dimethylated fatty acids studied, i.e. 16-iodo-2,2-methyl hexadecanoic acid and 16-iodo-3,3-methyl hexadecanoic acid, was less than that of IHA in mice and dogs. In the latter, the myocardial uptake was so small that we were unable to study the time course of its activity. Consequently, these dimethylated fatty acids are not suitable for the study of the myocardial uptake of fatty acids in man.

  14. Iodomethylated fatty acid metabolism in mice and dogs

    The myocardial uptake of fatty acids labeled with radioactive iodine and injected i.v. can only be evaluated with SPECT if their oxidation kinetics is slow enough. For this reason, we evaluated different iodomethylated fatty acids in mice and dogs to determine which of them shows the highest myocardial uptake and the slowest oxidation. The most suitable was found to be 16-iodo-3-methyl hexadecanoic acid (mono β) since its myocardial fixation was the same as that of the reference, i.e. 16-iodo-9-hexadecenoic acid (IHA), whereas it was degraded more slowly. Thirty min after injection of mono β into dogs, the decrease in myocardial activity with respect to the maximum was two fold less than after IHA injection. The myocardial uptake of the two dimethylated fatty acids studied, i.e. 16-iodo-2,2-methyl hexadecanoic acid and 16-iodo-3,3-methyl hexadecanoic acid, was less than that of IHA in mice and dogs. In the latter, the myocardial uptake was so small that we were unable to study the time course of its activity. Consequently, these dimethylated fatty acids are not suitable for the study of the myocardial uptake of fatty acids in man. (orig.)

  15. Deficits in docosahexaenoic acid and associated elevations in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids in the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of patients with bipolar disorder.

    McNamara, Robert K; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Stanford, Kevin E; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Richtand, Neil M

    2008-09-30

    Previous antemortem and postmortem tissue fatty acid composition studies have observed significant deficits in the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cell (RBC) and postmortem cortical membranes of patients with unipolar depression. In the present study, we determined the fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, Brodmann area 10) of patients with bipolar disorder (n=18) and age-matched normal controls (n=19) by gas chromatography. After correction for multiple comparisons, DHA (-24%), arachidonic acid (-14%), and stearic acid (C18:0) (-4.5%) compositions were significantly lower, and cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) (+12.5%) composition significantly higher, in the OFC of bipolar patients relative to normal controls. Based on metabolite:precursor ratios, significant elevations in arachidonic acid, stearic acid, and palmitic acid conversion/metabolism were observed in the OFC of bipolar patients, and were inversely correlated with DHA composition. Deficits in OFC DHA and arachidonic acid composition, and elevations in arachidonic acid metabolism, were numerically (but not significantly) greater in drug-free bipolar patients relative to patients treated with mood-stabilizer or antipsychotic medications. OFC DHA and arachidonic acid deficits were greater in patients plus normal controls with high vs. low alcohol abuse severity. These results add to a growing body of evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acid deficiency as well as the OFC in the pathoaetiology of bipolar disorder. PMID:18715653

  16. Phytic acid and raffinose series oligosaccharides metabolism in developing chickpea seeds

    Zhawar, Vikramjit Kaur; Kaur, Narinder; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Phytic acid and raffinose series oligosaccharides (RFOs) have anti-nutritional properties where phytic acid chelates minerals and reduces their bioavailability to humans and other animals, and RFOs cause flatulence. Both phytic acid and RFOs cannot be digested by monogastric animals and are released as pollutant-wastes. Efforts are being made to reduce the contents of these factors without affecting the viability of seeds. This will require a thorough understanding of their metabolism in diff...

  17. Nitrogen and amino acid metabolism in dairy cows

    Tamminga, S.

    1981-01-01

    For the process of milk production, the dairy cow requires nutrients of which energy supplying nutrients and protein or amino acid supplying nutrients are the most important. Amino acid supplying nutrients have to be absorbed from the small intestine and the research reported in this thesis mainly c

  18. Iodine 125-phenylpentadecanoic acid and its beta-methyl substitute metabolism in cultured mouse embryonal myocytes

    Iodine-labelled fatty acids have been proposed as new tracers of cardiac metabolisms. However, it is not clear how these tracers would reflect the intracellular metabolism. Therefore, we measured the uptake and release of iodine 125-labelled phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA), its β-methyl substitute (BMIPP) and 201Tl in cultured myocytes of mouse embryos, and compared these values to intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content after metabolic inhibitions of oxidative phosphorylation by sodium cyanide (CN), glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) or fatty acid β-oxidation by lactate. The uptake and release of BMIPP was not changed by any inhibitors suggesting BMIPP would not be metabolized in the myocytes. The uptake of IPPA was significantly reduced by 2DG and 60-80% of IPPA was metabolized to hydrophilic catabolites. The correlation of BMIPP and IPPA uptake to intracellular ATP content were high (r=0.89, p201Tl to ATP values (r=0.53, n.s.). These results suggested that iodine-labelled fatty acids could be used as better tracers of myocardial metabolism than 201Tl. (author)

  19. Metabolism of Aromatic Amino Acids during the Growth Cycle of Batch Suspension Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

    Nagaoka, Noriko; ASHIHARA, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Profiles of the levels and metabolism of aromatic compounds in suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus during the growth cycle were determined. The level of total protein-amino acids, i.e., sum of the amounts of amino acids in hydrolyzates of proteins, and the level of total phenolic acids increased after transfer of the cells in the stationary phase to fresh Murashige-Skoog medium. The maximum levels of the proteinamino acids and those of the phenolic acids were observed on days 3-5...

  20. Effect of salicylic acid on the growth photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism in salt stressed maize plants

    Aqueous solutions of salicylic acid as a spray to Na CI-treated corn (Zea mays L,) significantly increased the growth of shoots and roots as measured after seven days of treatment. Spraying of salicylic acid caused significant increases in the activity of both ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) enzyme and photosynthetic pigments. Moreover, salicylic acid treatment induced high values of soluble carbohydrate fractions in salt stressed plants as compared with salicylic acid treated samples. These data suggest that salicylic acid might improve the growth pattern of NaCl-treated maize plants via increasing the rate of photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism

  1. Bifidobacterium breve with α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid alters fatty acid metabolism in the maternal separation model of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Eoin Barrett

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the impact of dietary supplementation with a Bifidobacterium breve strain together with linoleic acid & α-linolenic acid, for 7 weeks, on colonic sensitivity and fatty acid metabolism in rats. Maternally separated and non-maternally separated Sprague Dawley rats (n = 15 were orally gavaged with either B. breve DPC6330 (10(9 microorganisms/day alone or in combination with 0.5% (w/w linoleic acid & 0.5% (w/w α-linolenic acid, daily for 7 weeks and compared with trehalose and bovine serum albumin. Tissue fatty acid composition was assessed by gas-liquid chromatography and visceral hypersensitivity was assessed by colorectal distension. Significant differences in the fatty acid profiles of the non-separated controls and maternally separated controls were observed for α-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid in the liver, oleic acid and eicosenoic acid (c11 in adipose tissue, and for palmitoleic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in serum (p<0.05. Administration of B. breve DPC6330 to MS rats significantly increased palmitoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in the liver, eicosenoic acid (c11 in adipose tissue and palmitoleic acid in the prefrontal cortex (p<0.05, whereas feeding B. breve DPC6330 to non separated rats significantly increased eicosapentaenoic acid and docosapentaenoic acid in serum (p<0.05 compared with the NS un-supplemented controls. Administration of B. breve DPC6330 in combination with linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid to maternally separated rats significantly increased docosapentaenoic acid in the serum (p<0.01 and α-linolenic acid in adipose tissue (p<0.001, whereas feeding B. breve DPC6330 with fatty acid supplementation to non-separated rats significantly increased liver and serum docosapentaenoic acid (p<0.05, and α-linolenic acid in adipose tissue (p<0.001. B. breve DPC6330 influenced host fatty acid metabolism. Administration of B. breve DPC6330 to maternally separated

  2. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26683700

  3. Three Conazoles Increase Hepatic Microsomal Retinoic Acid Metabolism and Decrease Mouse Hepatic Retinoic Acid Levels In Vivo

    Conazoles are fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals. In a previous toxicogenomic study of triazole-containing conazoles we found gene expression changes consistent with the alteration of the metabolism of all trans-retinoic acid (atRA), a vitamin A metabolite with...

  4. Metabolic engineering of folate production in lactic acid bacteria

    Sybesma, W.F.H.

    2003-01-01

    Folate is an essential compound in the human diet. Folate deficiency occurs frequently among certain population groups even in highly developed countries and may increase the risks for several diseases like neural tube defects, cardiovascular diseases and certain forms of cancer. The dairy starter bacterium Lactococcus lactis is able to synthesize this vitamin. The use of metabolic engineering has enabled the generation of a L. lactis strain with a more than 50-fold increased folate productio...

  5. Arachidonic acid and calcium metabolism in rnelittin stimulated neutrophils

    Ole H. Nielsen

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Melittin, the predominant fraction of bee venom proteins, was studied in an experimental model of human neutrophil granulocytes to reveal its influence on eicosanoid release, metabolism and receptor function in relation to intracellular calcium metabolism. Melittin (2 μmol/l was as potent as the calcium ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/l for activation of 5-lipoxygenase, releasing arachidonate only from phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine of cellular membranes, as judged from the decreases in radioactivity by 15.4% and 30.5%, respectively. The mechanism responsible for the release of arachidonate from cellular membranes is closely coupled to cellular calcium metabolism, and melittin was found to promote calcium entry through receptor gated calcium channels, probably due to an activation of phospholipase A2. Furthermore, a down-regulation of leukotriene B4 receptors was seen. The maximal number of binding sites per cell was reduced from a median of 1520 to 950 with melittin (1 μmol/l. The study has revealed some factors important for the inflammatory mechanisms mediated by melittin.

  6. Reconstruction of Pathways Associated with Amino Acid Metabolism in Human Mitochondria

    Purnima; Guda; Chittibabu; Guda; Shankar; Subramaniam

    2007-01-01

    We have used a bioinformatics approach for the identification and reconstruction of metabolic pathways associated with amino acid metabolism in human mitochon- dria. Human mitochondrial proteins determined by experimental and computa- tional methods have been superposed on the reference pathways from the KEGG database to identify mitochondrial pathways. Enzymes at the entry and exit points for each reconstructed pathway were identified, and mitochondrial solute carrier proteins were determined where applicable. Intermediate enzymes in the mito- chondrial pathways were identified based on the annotations available from public databases, evidence in current literature, or our MITOPRED program, which pre- dicts the mitochondrial localization of proteins. Through integration of the data derived from experimental, bibliographical, and computational sources, we recon- structed the amino acid metabolic pathways in human mitochondria, which could help better understand the mitochondrial metabolism and its role in human health.

  7. Anti-Inflammation Effects and Potential Mechanism of Saikosaponins by Regulating Nicotinate and Nicotinamide Metabolism and Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    Ma, Yu; Bao, Yongrui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Tianjiao; Chang, Xin; Yang, Guanlin; Meng, Xiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation is an important immune response; however, excessive inflammation causes severe tissue damages and secondary inflammatory injuries. The long-term and ongoing uses of routinely used drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are associated with serious adverse reactions, and not all patients have a well response to them. Consequently, therapeutic products with more safer and less adverse reaction are constantly being sought. Radix Bupleuri, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, saikosaponins (SS) as the main pharmacodynamic active ingredient, their pharmacological effects and action mechanism in anti-inflammation have not been reported frequently. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of SS and clarify the potential mechanism in acute inflammatory mice induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin in hind paws. Paw edema was detected as an index to evaluate the anti-inflammatory efficacy of SS. Then, a metabolomic method was used to investigate the changed metabolites and potential mechanism of SS. Metabolite profiling was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-TOF-MS). The detection and identification of the changed metabolites were systematically analyzed by multivariate data and pathway analysis. As a result, 12 different potential biomarkers associated with SS in anti-inflammation were identified, including nicotinate, niacinamide, arachidonic acid (AA), and 20-carboxy-leukotriene B4, which are associated with nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism. The expression levels of biomarkers were effectively modulated towards the normal range by SS. It indicated that SS show their effective anti-inflammatory effects through regulating nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:27251379

  8. Synthesis and Metabolism of Carbonyl-C14 Pyruvic andHydroxypyruvic Acids in Algae

    Milhaud, Gerhard; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, M.

    1955-03-30

    1. Pyruvic and hydroxypyruvic acids a r e metabolized by Scenedesmus. 2. The products of metabolism of pyruvic -2 -C{sup 14} and hydroxypyruvic-2 -C{sup 14} acids a r e essentially identical to those of C{sup 14}-O fixations. 3. Lipids a r e rapidly formed i n the light from both substrates. In the dark the major products a r e intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. 4. Zt does not appear likely that f r e e hydroxypyruvic acid is a photosynthetic intermediate, 5 . Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates a r e formed from exogenous pyruvate a s fast in the light a s in the dark.

  9. Energy Metabolism Regulates Retinoic Acid Synthesis and Homeostasis in Physiological Contexts

    Obrochta, Kristin Marie

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports a regulated and reciprocal relationship between retinoid homeostasis and energy metabolism, with a physiologically relevant consequence of disrupted energy balance. This research was motivated by an observation that all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), and biosynthetic precursors, were responsive to acute shifts in energy status, in wild type animals with normal body weight and glucose tolerance, i.e. not consequent to metabolic syndrome. My dissertation was designed to ...

  10. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism ameliorates disease activity in an animal model of multiple sclerosis

    Shriver, Leah P.; Manchester, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and a leading cause of neurological disability. The complex immunopathology and variable disease course of multiple sclerosis have limited effective treatment of all patients. Altering the metabolism of immune cells may be an attractive strategy to modify their function during autoimmunity. We examined the effect of inhibiting fatty acid metabolism in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mo...

  11. Bioactive Compounds Derived from the Yeast Metabolism of Aromatic Amino Acids during Alcoholic Fermentation

    Albert Mas; Jose Manuel Guillamon; Maria Jesus Torija; Gemma Beltran; Cerezo, Ana B; Troncoso, Ana M.; M. Carmen Garcia-Parrilla

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being und...

  12. Functional Analysis of Free Fatty Acid Receptor GPR120 in Human Eosinophils: Implications in Metabolic Homeostasis

    Yasunori Konno; Shigeharu Ueki; Masahide Takeda; Yoshiki Kobayashi; Mami Tamaki; Yuki Moritoki; Hajime Oyamada; Masamichi Itoga; Hiroyuki Kayaba; Ayumi Omokawa; Makoto Hirokawa

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR1...

  13. Impact of oral vancomycin on gut microbiota, bile acid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity

    Vrieze, Anne; Out, Carolien; Fuentes, Susana;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obesity has been associated with changes in the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota. Modulation of the microbiota by antibiotics also alters bile acid and glucose metabolism in mice. Hence, we hypothesized that short term administration of oral antibiotics in...... humans would affect fecal microbiota composition and subsequently bile acid and glucose metabolism. METHODS: In this single blinded randomized controlled trial, 20 male obese subjects with metabolic syndrome were randomized to 7 days of amoxicillin 500 mg t.i.d. or 7 days of vancomycin 500 mg t.i.d. At...... baseline and after 1 week of therapy, fecal microbiota composition (Human Intestinal Tract Chip phylogenetic microarray), fecal and plasma bile acid concentrations as well as insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using [6,6-(2)H2]-glucose tracer) were measured. RESULTS: Vancomycin reduced...

  14. TGF-β-SMAD3 signaling mediates hepatic bile acid and phospholipid metabolism following lithocholic acid-induced liver injury.

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Naoki; Sato, Misako; Kang, Dong Wook; Krausz, Kristopher W; Flanders, Kathleen C; Ikeda, Kazuo; Luecke, Hans; Wakefield, Lalage M; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2012-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is activated as a result of liver injury, such as cholestasis. However, its influence on endogenous metabolism is not known. This study demonstrated that TGFβ regulates hepatic phospholipid and bile acid homeostasis through MAD homolog 3 (SMAD3) activation as revealed by lithocholic acid-induced experimental intrahepatic cholestasis. Lithocholic acid (LCA) induced expression of TGFB1 and the receptors TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 in the liver. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed higher TGFβ expression around the portal vein after LCA exposure and diminished SMAD3 phosphorylation in hepatocytes from Smad3-null mice. Serum metabolomics indicated increased bile acids and decreased lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) after LCA exposure. Interestingly, in Smad3-null mice, the metabolic alteration was attenuated. LCA-induced lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 4 (LPCAT4) and organic solute transporter β (OSTβ) expression were markedly decreased in Smad3-null mice, whereas TGFβ induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in primary mouse hepatocytes. In addition, introduction of SMAD3 enhanced the TGFβ-induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. In conclusion, considering that Smad3-null mice showed attenuated serum ALP activity, a diagnostic indicator of cholangiocyte injury, these results strongly support the view that TGFβ-SMAD3 signaling mediates an alteration in phospholipid and bile acid metabolism following hepatic inflammation with the biliary injury. PMID:23034213

  15. Fatty acids from diet and microbiota regulate energy metabolism [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Joe Alcock

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-fat diet and elevated levels of free fatty acids are known risk factors for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and visceral obesity. Although these disease associations are well established, it is unclear how different dietary fats change the risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Here, we review emerging evidence that insulin resistance and fat storage are linked to changes in the gut microbiota. The gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, in turn, are highly influenced by the composition of fat in the diet. We review findings that certain fats (for example, long-chain saturated fatty acids are associated with dysbiosis, impairment of intestinal barrier function, and metabolic endotoxemia. In contrast, other fatty acids, including short-chain and certain unsaturated fatty acids, protect against dysbiosis and impairment of barrier function caused by other dietary fats. These fats may promote insulin sensitivity by inhibiting metabolic endotoxemia and dysbiosis-driven inflammation. During dysbiosis, the modulation of metabolism by diet and microbiota may represent an adaptive process that compensates for the increased fuel demands of an activated immune system.

  16. Diet, nutrition intake, and metabolism in populations at high and low risk for colon cancer. Metabolism of bile acids.

    Turjman, N; Goodman, G T; Jaeger, B; Nair, P P

    1984-10-01

    High levels of fecal bile acids have been associated with populations at high risk for developing colon cancer. In this study, 168 subjects were drawn from populations that show low and high mortality from colon cancer [pure vegetarians, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and nonvegetarians Seventh-day Adventists (SDA) and demographically comparable group from the general population]. Lyophilized aliquots of 3-day stool samples were examined for levels of primary (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) and secondary (deoxycholic and lithocholic acids) bile acids. Total bile acids (mg/g lyophilized stools) were statistically different among dietary groups: SDA pure vegetarians 2.16 +/- 0.32, SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians 3.66 +/- 0.41, SDA nonvegetarians 4.39 +/- 0.44, general population nonvegetarians 6.04 +/- 0.75; but were similar when stool weights, body weights, and fat intake were taken into account. The most striking difference was evident in the ratio of secondary to primary bile acids: when compared to SDA pure vegetarians, both SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians and SDA nonvegetarians had twice the ratio while values for general population nonvegetarians were five to six times. The data indicate that these differences in excretion patterns among dietary groups reveal distinctly characteristic metabolic features associated with diet and lifestyle. PMID:6486102

  17. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for biotechnological production of high-value organic acids and alcohols

    Yu, Chao; Cao, Yujin; Zou, Huibin; Xian, Mo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao (China). Key Lab. of Biofuels

    2011-02-15

    Confronted with the gradual and inescapable exhaustion of the earth's fossil energy resources, the bio-based process to produce platform chemicals from renewable carbohydrates is attracting growing interest. Escherichia coli has been chosen as a workhouse for the production of many valuable chemicals due to its clear genetic background, convenient to be genetically modified and good growth properties with low nutrient requirements. Rational strain development of E. coli achieved by metabolic engineering strategies has provided new processes for efficiently biotechnological production of various high-value chemical building blocks. Compared to previous reviews, this review focuses on recent advances in metabolic engineering of the industrial model bacteria E. coli that lead to efficient recombinant biocatalysts for the production of high-value organic acids like succinic acid, lactic acid, 3-hydroxypropanoic acid and glucaric acid as well as alcohols like 1,3-propanediol, xylitol, mannitol, and glycerol with the discussion of the future research in this area. Besides, this review also discusses several platform chemicals, including fumaric acid, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, sorbitol, itaconic acid, and 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, which have not been produced by E. coli until now. (orig.)

  18. Influence of organic acids and organochlorinated insecticides on metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Pejin Dušanka J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to different stress factors during the production: osmotic, temperature, oxidative. The response to these stresses is the adaptive mechanism of cells. The raw materials Saccharomyces cerevisiae is produced from, contain metabolism products of present microorganisms and protective agents used during the growth of sugar beet for example the influence of acetic and butyric acid and organochlorinated insecticides, lindan and heptachlor, on the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and presented in this work. The mentioned compounds affect negatively the specific growth rate, yield, content of proteins, phosphorus, total ribonucleic acids. These compounds influence the increase of trechalose and glycogen content in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

  19. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    Love, Lonnie J.; Lind, Randall F.

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  20. Engineering the fatty acid metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biofuel production

    Xiaoling Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals have attracted a great deal of attention in recent decades, due to their following properties of high compatibility to gasoline-based fuels and existing infrastructure for their direct utilization, storage and distribution. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the ideal biofuel producing candidate, based on the wealth of available genetic information and versatile tools designed to manipulate its metabolic pathways. Engineering the fatty acid metabolic pathways in S. cerevisiae is an effective strategy to increase its fatty acid biosynthesis and provide more pathway precursors for production of targeted products. This review summarizes the recent progress in metabolic engineering of yeast cells for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives production, including the regulation of acetyl-CoA biosynthesis, NADPH production, fatty acid elongation, and the accumulation of activated precursors of fatty acids for converting enzymes. By introducing specific enzymes in the engineered strains, a powerful platform with a scalable, controllable and economic route for advanced biofuel production has been established.

  1. Studies of citric acid metabolism in heart muscle

    Meduski, J.W.

    1950-01-01

    1. The pentabromoacetone method for the determination of citric acid was studied; a modification of the procedure of Natelson, Lugovoy and Pincus was used. 2. Two tissue preparations were obtained. The first by washing with water, the second by washing with water and then with 0.5% sodium bicarbo

  2. Investigations into selective metabolic aspects of bifidobacteria: carbohydrate metabolism, fatty acid biosynthesis and plasmid biology

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a diverse ecosystem, and is colonised by a diverse array of bacteria, of which bifidobacteria are a significant component. Bifidobacteria are Gram-positive, saccharolytic, non-motile, non-sporulating, anaerobic, Y-shaped bacteria, which possess a high GC genome content. Certain bifidobacteria possess the ability to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) from linoleic acid (LA) by a biochemical pathway that is hypothesised to be achieved via a linoleic isome...

  3. Hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids: Oxidised derivatives of linoleic acid and their role in inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    Vangaveti, Venkat N; Jansen, Holger; Kennedy, Richard Lee; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-08-15

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a major constituent of low-density lipoproteins. An essential fatty acid, LA is a polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is oxidised by endogenous enzymes and reactive oxygen species in the circulation. Increased levels of low-density lipoproteins coupled with oxidative stress and lack of antioxidants drive the oxidative processes. This results in synthesis of a range of oxidised derivatives, which play a vital role in regulation of inflammatory processes. The derivatives of LA include, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids, oxo-​octadecadienoic acids, epoxy octadecadecenoic acid and epoxy-keto-octadecenoic acids. In this review, we examine the role of LA derivatives and their actions on regulation of inflammation relevant to metabolic processes associated with atherogenesis and cancer. The processes affected by LA derivatives include, alteration of airway smooth muscles and vascular wall, affecting sensitivity to pain, and regulating endogenous steroid hormones associated with metabolic syndrome. LA derivatives alter cell adhesion molecules, this initial step, is pivotal in regulating inflammatory processes involving transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways, thus, leading to alteration of metabolic processes. The derivatives are known to elicit pleiotropic effects that are either beneficial or detrimental in nature hence making it difficult to determine the exact role of these derivatives in the progress of an assumed target disorder. The key may lie in understanding the role of these derivatives at various stages of development of a disorder. Novel pharmacological approaches in altering the synthesis or introduction of synthesised LA derivatives could possibly help drive processes that could regulate inflammation in a beneficial manner. Chemical Compounds: Linoleic acid (PubChem CID: 5280450), 9- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 5312830), 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 6443013), 9-oxo

  4. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions.

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  5. PGC-1α-mediated branched-chain amino acid metabolism in the skeletal muscle.

    Yukino Hatazawa

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α is a coactivator of various nuclear receptors and other transcription factors, which is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, thermogenesis, and other biological processes that control phenotypic characteristics of various organ systems including skeletal muscle. PGC-1α in skeletal muscle is considered to be involved in contractile protein function, mitochondrial function, metabolic regulation, intracellular signaling, and transcriptional responses. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA metabolism mainly occurs in skeletal muscle mitochondria, and enzymes related to BCAA metabolism are increased by exercise. Using murine skeletal muscle overexpressing PGC-1α and cultured cells, we investigated whether PGC-1α stimulates BCAA metabolism by increasing the expression of enzymes involved in BCAA metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing PGC-1α specifically in the skeletal muscle had increased the expression of branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT 2, branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH, which catabolize BCAA. The expression of BCKDH kinase (BCKDK, which phosphorylates BCKDH and suppresses its enzymatic activity, was unchanged. The amount of BCAA in the skeletal muscle was significantly decreased in the transgenic mice compared with that in the wild-type mice. The amount of glutamic acid, a metabolite of BCAA catabolism, was increased in the transgenic mice, suggesting the activation of muscle BCAA metabolism by PGC-1α. In C2C12 cells, the overexpression of PGC-1α significantly increased the expression of BCAT2 and BCKDH but not BCKDK. Thus, PGC-1α in the skeletal muscle is considered to significantly contribute to BCAA metabolism.

  6. Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth

    Bhawna Saxena; Mayavan Subramaniyan; Karan Malhotra; Neel Sarovar Bhavesh; Shobha Devi Potlakayala; Shashi Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI-mass spectrometry. The excess metabolic flux of isopentenyl pyrophosphate generated by an engineered mevalonate pathway was diverted for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid. However, expression of megatransgenes impacted the growth of the transplastomic plantlets. By combining two exogenous pathways, artemisinic acid was produced in transplastomic plants, which can be improved further using better metabolic engineering strategies for commercially viable yield of desirable isoprenoid products.

  7. Skinny on Fat Metabolism: Lipolysis and Fatty Acid Utilization

    Ahmadian, Maryam; Duncan, Robin E.; Sul, Hei Sook

    2009-01-01

    Lipolysis for the provision of fatty acids (FA) for other organs during times of energy demand occurs uniquely in white adipose tissue (WAT). Recent findings have identified a bona fide TAG hydrolase as well as the major adipose phospholipase A2, AdPLA. By controlling PGE2 levels, AdPLA dominantly regulates lipolysis in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Moreover, recent findings demonstrate that, surprisingly, increasing lipolysis in adipose tissue does not necessarily increase serum FA levels, ...

  8. Metabolism of nonparticulate phosphorus in an acid bog lake

    Koenings, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    In North Gate Lake, an acid bog lake located on the northern Michigan-Wisconsin border, U.S.A., the algal nutrient inorganic phosphate (FRP) is not detectable by chemical means. Organic phosphorus (FUP) represents 100% of the detectable filterable phosphorus. The availability and cycling of this organic fraction are of considerable interest in regard to the primary productivity of this system. To clarify these relationships, the cycling of nonparticulate forms of phosphorus found in the epilimnion of this lake was studied.

  9. Metabolism of nonparticulate phosphorus in an acid bog lake

    In North Gate Lake, an acid bog lake located on the northern Michigan-Wisconsin border, U.S.A., the algal nutrient inorganic phosphate (FRP) is not detectable by chemical means. Organic phosphorus (FUP) represents 100% of the detectable filterable phosphorus. The availability and cycling of this organic fraction are of considerable interest in regard to the primary productivity of this system. To clarify these relationships, the cycling of nonparticulate forms of phosphorus found in the epilimnion of this lake was studied

  10. Metabolic regulation of amino acid uptake in marine waters

    Kirchman, D.L.; Hodson, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    To determine the relationships among the processes of uptake, intracellular pool formation, and incorporation of amino acids into protein, the authors measured the uptake of dipeptides and free amino acids by bacterial assemblages in estuarine and coastal waters of the southeast US. The dipeptide phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (phe-phe) lowered V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake when the turnover rate of phenylalanine was relatively high. When the turnover rate was relatively low, phe-phe either had no effect or increased V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake. An analytical model was developed and tested to measure the turnover time of the intracellular pool of phenylalanine. The results suggested that the size of the intracellular pool is regulated, which precludes high assimilation rates of both phenylalanine and phe-phe. In waters with relatively low phenylalanine turnover rates, bacterial assemblages appear to have a greater capacity to assimilate phenylalanine and phe-phe simultaneously. Marine bacterial assemblages do not substantially increase the apparent respiration of amino acids when concentrations increase. The authors conclude that sustained increases in uptake rates and mineralization by marine bacterial assemblages in response to an increase in the concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen is determined by the rate of protein synthesis.

  11. Anti-inflammatory potential of 2-styrylchromones regarding their interference with arachidonic acid metabolic pathways

    Gomes, Ana; Fernandes, Eduarda; Silva, Artur; Santos, Clementina M.M.; Pinto, Diana; Cavaleiro, José; Lima, José Costa

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cyclooxygenases (COXs) are the key enzymes in the biosynthesis of prostanoids. COX-1 is a constitutive enzyme while the expression of COX-2 is highly stimulated in the event of inflammatory processes, leading to the production of large amounts of prostaglandins (PGs), in particular PGE2 and PGI2, which are pro-inflammatory mediators. Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are enzymes that produce hydroxy acids and leukotrienes (LTs). 5-LOX metabolizes arachidonic acid to yield, a...

  12. Studies on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in relation to plasma lipoproteins

    Sjöberg, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids is tightly controlled but only partially characterized. The liver is responsible for most of the clearance and catabolism of plasma cholesterol, and the hepatocyte expression of LDL receptors is central in this process. The major pathways for net excretion of cholesterol from the body are through biliary excretion as free cholesterol or after conversion to bile acids. Through activation of the nuclear receptor FXR and the G protein-coupled receptor...

  13. Abnormal Unsaturated Fatty Acid Metabolism in Cystic Fibrosis: Biochemical Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    Seegmiller, Adam C.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited multi-organ disorder caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. Patients with this disease exhibit characteristic abnormalities in the levels of unsaturated fatty acids in blood and tissue. Recent studies have uncovered an underlying biochemical mechanism for some of these changes, namely increased expression and activity of fatty acid desaturases. Among other effects, this drives metabolism of linoeate to arachidonate. Increased desaturase expression appears to be ...

  14. TRANSLATIONAL STUDIES ON REGULATION OF BRAIN DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID (DHA) METABOLISM IN VIVO

    Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    One goal in the field of brain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolism is to translate the many studies that have been conducted in vitro and in animal models to the clinical setting. Doing so should elucidate the role of PUFAs in the human brain, and effects of diet, drugs, disease and genetics. This review briefly discusses new in vivo radiotracer kinetic and neuroimaging techniques that allow us to do this, with a focus on docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). We illustrate how brain PUFA metab...

  15. CAD/CAM data management

    Bray, O. H.

    1984-01-01

    The role of data base management in CAD/CAM, particularly for geometric data is described. First, long term and short term objectives for CAD/CAM data management are identified. Second, the benefits of the data base management approach are explained. Third, some of the additional work needed in the data base area is discussed.

  16. Characterization of bile acid metabolism in man using bile acids labeled with stable isotopes. [/sup 13/C

    Hofmann, A.F. Klein, P.D.

    1977-01-01

    Bile acids labeled with stable isotopes in the steroid moiety can be used to characterize bile acid metabolism in man. Isotope dilution studies give information on pool size and input. Biotransformations are easily characterized. Stable isotopically labeled bile acids offer the advantage of freedom from radiation hazard, and also offer the possibility of monitoring all pools simultaneously, since all bile acids are separated by gas chromatography before isotope measurements are made. Further, since the proportion of the pool labeled with stable isotopes is greater than that achieved when radioactive isotopes are used, stable isotopes may permit isotope dilution studies to be done on serum samples in which the absolute concentration of bile acids is very low. A major disadvantage is the complex technology required for stable isotope measurement which often makes remote processing necessary. Bile acid labeled with /sup 13/C in the amino acid moiety, e.g. cholylglycine-1-/sup 13/C can be used for detection of increased bile acid deconjugation by intestinal bacteria, since the glycine-/sup 13/C, when liberated, is rapidly converted to /sup 13/CO/sub 2/, which is expired in breath. Bile acids labeled with stable isotopes may also be used for quantitation by inverse isotope dilution, but the technique is still in the development stage and seems unlikely to compete successfully with radioimmunoassay.

  17. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  18. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice.

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(TM) (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM. PMID:24717228

  19. Uptake and metabolism of dissolved amino acids by larvae and embryos of three gastropod species

    Dissolved organic matter is a potential nutritional resource for soft-bodied marine invertebrates. Experiments were done with developmental stages of three gastropod species to examine uptake kinetics and metabolism of dissolved amino acids. Free-swimming larvae of Crepidula fornicata and Thais-haemastoma were fed before experiments or starved for 48 hours before experiments to see whether nutritional state affected uptake of 14C-glycine of 14C-alanine. Time course of amino acid uptake was linear from 0-100 minutes for fed and starved larvae of both species. Uptake rates of starved T. haemastoma larvae were similar to or greater than rates for fed larvae, while uptake rates of starved C. fornicata larvae are similar to or less than rates for fed larvae. Starvation may enhance uptake by T. haemastoma larvae. 14CO2 was detected 10 minutes after larval exposure to labeled amino acids began, indicating rapid catabolism of amino acids. Label was found in protein extracted from larvae, indicating that absorbed glycine and alanine can be used for protein synthesis. A greater percent of glycine and alanine was converted to CO2 by starved larvae of both species. Encapsulated embryos of Nucella lapillus were used to study uptake and metabolism of amino acids because encapsulated embryos are in a bacteria-free environment. Uptake by embryos was linear from 10-90 minutes. Because capsules were bacteria-free embryos were the agents responsible for uptake and metabolism of labeled amino acids

  20. Effects of the oestrous cycle on the metabolism of arachidonic acid in rat isolated lung.

    Bakhle, Y S; Zakrzewski, J T

    1982-01-01

    1. The metabolism of exogenous arachidonic acid perfused through the pulmonary circulation was investigated in lungs taken from rats at different stages of the oestrous cycle. 2. Following perfusion with [14C]arachidonic acid there was more radioactivity associated with cyclo-oxygenase products in general at pro-oestrus than at any other stage of the cycle. 3. Production of 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha and hence of prostacyclin (PGI2) was also highest at pro-oestrus. 4. Production of thromboxane B2 was highest at pro-oestrus although it was never greater than PGI2 production at any stage. 5. Radioactivity retained in lung tissue was mostly present in phospholipid and free fatty acid fractions with the distribution at pro-oestrus being different from the other stages. 6. Following perfusion with [14C]oleic acid (which is not a substrate for cyclooxygenase), variations in the distribution of label in radioactivity in lung were also observed. However, these were not related to the stages of the oestrous cycle in the same way as those associated with arachidonic acid. 7. We conclude that both pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism in lung--oxidation via cyclo-oxygenase and incorporation into phospholipid - are affected by the progress of the oestrous cycle. 8. Altered arachidonate metabolism appeared to be associated chiefly with pro-oestrus and may be linked to those hormones involved in this stage of the oestrous cycle. PMID:6809935

  1. Metabolic acidosis

    Acidosis - metabolic ... Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not ... the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ...

  2. Optimisation Methods for Cam Mechanisms

    Claudia–Mari Popa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the criteria which represent the base of optimizing the cam mechanisms and also we perform the calculations for several types of mechanisms. We study the influence of the constructive parameters in case of the simple machines with rotation cam and follower (flat or curve of translation on the curvature radius and that of the transmission angle. As it follows, we present the optimization calculations of the cam and flat rotation follower mechanisms, as well as the calculations for optimizing the cam mechanisms by circular groove followers’ help. For an easier interpretation of the results, we have visualized the obtained cam in AutoCAD according to the script files generated by a calculation program.

  3. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  4. Study of metabolism of hydrazoic acid in the purex process

    The transfer of HN3 between different phases has been studied - It has been found that the transfer of HN3 from aqueous solution of the reprocessing to gaz phase is a physical mechanism of desorbtion. - The limiting phenomena of the transfer of HN3 fromt the organic to the gaseous phase, is the decomplexation of this specy with tributyl phosphate (TBP). - Chemical reactions of hydrazoic acid occurring with nitrogen oxides in the gaseous flow has shown that it is rapidly destroyed in the presence of nitrogen dioxide

  5. Role of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFAR2) in the Regulation of Metabolic Homeostasis.

    Mohammad, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Besides being an important source of fuel and structural components of biological membranes, free fatty acids (FFAs) are known to display a wide variety of roles that include modulation of receptor signaling and regulation of gene expression among many. FFAs play a significant role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis by activating specific G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in pancreatic β cells, immune cells, white adipose tissue, intestine and several other tissues. Free Fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2) also known as GPR43 belongs to this group of GPCRs and has been shown to participate in a number of important biological activities. FFAR2 is activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFAs are formed in the distal gut by bacterial fermentation of macro-fibrous material that escapes digestion in the upper gastrointestinal tract and enters the colon and have been shown to play vital role in the immune regulation and metabolic homeostasis. FFAR2 and other free fatty acid receptors are considered key components of the body's nutrient sensing mechanism and targeting these receptors is assumed to offer novel therapies for the management of diabetes and other metabolic disorders. This review aims to summarize the current state of our understanding of FFAR2 biology with a particular focus on its role in metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25850624

  6. A dynamic mechanistic model of lactic acid metabolism in the rumen

    Mills, J.A.N.; Crompton, L.A.; Ellis, J.L.; Dijkstra, J.; Bannink, A.; Hook, S.E.; Benchaar, C.; France, J.

    2014-01-01

    Current feed evaluation systems for ruminants are too imprecise to describe diets in terms of their acidosis risk. The dynamic mechanistic model described herein arises from the integration of a lactic acid (La) metabolism module into an extant model of whole-rumen function. The model was evaluated

  7. UPTAKE AND METABOLISM OF ALL-TRANS RETINOIC ACID BY THREE NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN RANIDS

    Retinoids, which are Vvitamin A derivatives, are important signaling molecules that regulate processes critical for development in all vertebrates. The objective of our study was to examine uptake and metabolism of the model retinoid, all-trans retinoic acid (all-trans RA), by th...

  8. Metabolic Engineering of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle for Improved Lysine Production by Corynebacterium glutamicum▿

    Becker, Judith; Klopprogge, Corinna; Schröder, Hartwig; Wittmann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum was improved by metabolic engineering of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The 70% decreased activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, achieved by start codon exchange, resulted in a >40% improved lysine production. By flux analysis, this could be correlated to a flux shift from the TCA cycle toward anaplerotic carboxylation.

  9. Initial Net CO2 Uptake Responses and Root Growth for a CAM Community Placed in a Closed Environment

    Nobel, Park S.; BOBICH, EDWARD G.

    2002-01-01

    To help understand carbon balance between shoots and developing roots, 41 bare‐root crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants native to the Sonoran Desert were studied in a glass‐panelled sealable room at day/night air temperatures of 25/15 °C. Net CO2 uptake by the community of Agave schottii, Carnegia gigantea, Cylindropuntia versicolor, Ferocactus wislizenii and Opuntia engelmannii occurred 3 weeks after watering. At 4 weeks, the net CO2 uptake rate measured for south‐east‐facing younger p...

  10. Comparative study of eicosapentaenoic acid metabolism by human platelets in vivo and in vitro

    During long-term dietary n-3 fatty acid supplementation, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is not incorporated into phosphatidylinositol or -serine of human platelets in vivo and is not detectable in phosphatidic acid upon stimulation with thrombin. However, EPA is released from platelet phospholipids and metabolized to thromboxane B3 (TXB3). In contrast, in vitro, platelets incorporate [14C]EPA into phosphatidylinositol, whether they contain endogenous EPA in their cellular lipids or not. Following platelet stimulation, [14C]EPA appears in phosphatidic acid, as free fatty acid, and is transformed to TXB3. The authors conclude that the fatty acid compositions of platelet phospholipid subclasses are regulated with a high degree of specificity in vivo. Qualitative differences exist between in vivo and in vitro uptake of EPA into platelet phospholipid subclasses. After in vivo incorporation, EPA is released by action of a phospholipase A2