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Sample records for acid mediates regulation

  1. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  2. Tropodithietic Acid Production in Phaeobacter gallaeciensis Is Regulated by N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing▿

    Berger, Martine; Neumann, Alexander; Schulz, Stefan; Simon, Meinhard; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    The production of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) is widely distributed within the marine Roseobacter clade, and it was proposed that AHL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) is one of the most common cell-to-cell communication mechanisms in roseobacters. The traits regulated by AHL-mediated QS are yet not known for members of the Roseobacter clade, but production of the antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA) was supposed to be controlled by AHL-mediated QS in Phaeobacter spp. We describe here for th...

  3. Phenolic Acid-Mediated Regulation of the padC Gene, Encoding the Phenolic Acid Decarboxylase of Bacillus subtilis▿ †

    Tran, Ngoc Phuong; Gury, Jerôme; Dartois, Véronique; Nguyen, Thi Kim Chi; Seraut, Hélène; Barthelmebs, Lise; Gervais, Patrick; Cavin, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, several phenolic acids specifically induce expression of padC, encoding a phenolic acid decarboxylase that converts these antimicrobial compounds into vinyl derivatives. padC forms an operon with a putative coding sequence of unknown function, yveFG, and this coding sequence does not appear to be involved in the phenolic acid stress response (PASR). To identify putative regulators involved in the PASR, random transposon mutagenesis, combined with two different screens, w...

  4. Ascorbic acid inhibition of Candida albicans Hsp90-mediated morphogenesis occurs via the transcriptional regulator Upc2.

    Van Hauwenhuyse, Frédérique; Fiori, Alessandro; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Morphogenetic transitions of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans are influenced by temperature changes, with induction of filamentation upon a shift from 30 to 37°C. Hsp90 was identified as a major repressor of an elongated cell morphology at low temperatures, as treatment with specific inhibitors of Hsp90 results in elongated growth forms at 30°C. Elongated growth resulting from a compromised Hsp90 is considered neither hyphal nor pseudohyphal growth. It has been reported that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) interferes with the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. In the present study, we show that ascorbic acid also antagonizes the morphogenetic change caused by hampered Hsp90 function. Further analysis revealed that Upc2, a transcriptional regulator of genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, and Erg11, the target of azole antifungals, whose expression is in turn regulated by Upc2, are required for this antagonism. Ergosterol levels correlate with elongated growth and are reduced in cells treated with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GdA) and restored by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. In addition, we show that Upc2 appears to be required for ascorbic acid-mediated inhibition of the antifungal activity of fluconazole. These results identify Upc2 as a major regulator of ascorbic acid-induced effects in C. albicans and suggest an association between ergosterol content and elongated growth upon Hsp90 compromise. PMID:25084864

  5. Genetic interaction of two abscisic acid signaling regulators, HY5 and FIERY1, in mediating lateral root formation

    Chen, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Root architecture is continuously shaped in a manner that helps plants to better adapt to the environment. Gene regulation at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels largely controls this environmental response. Recently, RNA silencing has emerged as an important player in gene regulation and is involved in many aspects of plant development, including lateral root formation. In a recent study, we found that FIERY1, a bifunctional abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling regulator and an endogenous RNA silencing suppressor, mediates auxin response during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. We proposed that FRY1 regulates lateral root development through its activity on adenosine 3,5-bisphosphate (PAP), a strong inhibitor of exoribonucleases (XRNs). Interestingly, some of the phenotypes of fry1, such as enhanced response to light in repressing hypocotyl elongation and hypersensitivity to ABA in lateral root growth, are opposite to those of another light- and ABA-signaling mutant, hy5. Here we analyzed the hy5 fry1 double mutant for root and hypocotyl growth. We found that the hy5 mutation can suppress the enhanced light sensitivity in fry1 hypocotyl elongation and restore the lateral root formation. The genetic interaction between HY5 and FRY1 indicates that HY5 and FRY1 may act in overlapping pathways that mediate light signaling and lateral root development. © 2011 Landes Bioscience.

  6. Betulinic acid regulates generation of neuroinflammatory mediators responsible for tissue destruction in multiple sclerosis in vitro

    Blaževski, Jana; Petković, Filip; Momčilović, Miljana; Paschke, Reinhard; Kaluđerović, Goran N; Mostarica Stojković, Marija; Miljković, Djordje

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the influences of betulinic acid (BA), a triterpenoid isolated from birch bark, on neuroinflammatory mediators involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vitro. Methods: Encephalitogenic T cells were prepared from draining lymph nodes and spinal cords of Dark Agouti rats 8 to 10 d after immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant. Macrophages were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of adult untreated rats. Astrocytes were isolated from neonatal rat brains. The cells were cultured and then treated with different agents. IFN-γ, IL-17, iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels in the cells were analyzed with RT-PCR. iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels were detected using immunoblot. NO and ROS generation was measured using Griess reaction and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: In encephalitogenic T cells stimulated with MBP (10 μg/mL), addition of BA inhibited IL-17 and IFN-γ production in a dose-dependent manner. The estimated IC50 values for IL-17 and IFN γ were 11.2 and 63.8 μmol/L, respectively. When the macrophages were stimulated with LPS (10 ng/mL), addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation, and suppressed NO generation. The astrocytes were stimulated with ConASn containing numerous inflammatory mediators, which mimicked the inflammatory milieu within CNS; addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation, and blocked ConASn-induced increases in iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels, but did not affect iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels. Importantly, in both the macrophages and astrocytes, addition of BA (50 μmol/L) inhibited lipid peroxidation. Conclusion: Besides inhibiting encephalitogenic T cell cytokines and reducing NO generation, BA induces tissue-damaging ROS generation within CNS. PMID:23377550

  7. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation.

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into disease-related isoforms (PrP(Sc)). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrP(C) in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrP(Sc) formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrP(C). In contrast, PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc). Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrP(C) inhibited the production of PrP(Sc) within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrP(C) contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrP(C). Desialylated PrP(C) was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C) and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. PMID:26553874

  8. Distinctive effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in regulating neural stem cell fate are mediated via endocannabinoid signalling pathways.

    Dyall, S C; Mandhair, H K; Fincham, R E A; Kerr, D M; Roche, M; Molina-Holgado, F

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a complex interplay between the endocannabinoid system, omega-3 fatty acids and the immune system in the promotion of brain self-repair. However, it is unknown if all omega-3 fatty acids elicit similar effects on adult neurogenesis and if such effects are mediated or regulated by interactions with the endocannabinoid system. This study investigated the effects of DHA and EPA on neural stem cell (NSC) fate and the role of the endocannabinoid signalling pathways in these effects. EPA, but not DHA, significantly increased proliferation of NSCs compared to controls, an effect associated with enhanced levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and p-p38 MAPK, effects attenuated by pre-treatment with CB1 (AM251) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, in NSCs derived from IL-1β deficient mice, EPA significantly decreased proliferation and p-p38 MAPK levels compared to controls, suggesting a key role for IL-1β signalling in the effects observed. Although DHA similarly increased 2-AG levels in wild-type NSCs, there was no concomitant increase in proliferation or p-p38 MAPK activity. In addition, in NSCs from IL-1β deficient mice, DHA significantly increased proliferation without effects on p-P38 MAPK, suggesting effects of DHA are mediated via alternative signalling pathways. These results provide crucial new insights into the divergent effects of EPA and DHA in regulating NSC proliferation and the pathways involved, and highlight the therapeutic potential of their interplay with endocannabinoid signalling in brain repair. PMID:27044662

  9. The antagonistic regulation of abscisic acid-inhibited root growth by brassinosteroids is partially mediated via direct suppression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 5 expression by BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT 1.

    Yang, Xiaorui; Bai, Yang; Shang, Jianxiu; Xin, Ruijiao; Tang, Wenqiang

    2016-09-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) and abscisic acid (ABA) are plant hormones that antagonistically regulate many aspects of plant growth and development; however, the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk of these two hormones are still not well understood. BRs regulate plant growth and development by activating BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT 1 (BZR1) family transcription factors. Here we show that the crosstalk between BRs and ABA signalling is partially mediated by BZR1 regulated gene expression. bzr1-1D is a dominant mutant with enhanced BR signalling; our results showed that bzr1-1D mutant is less sensitive to ABA-inhibited primary root growth. By RNA sequencing, a subset of BZR1 regulated ABA-responsive root genes were identified. Of these genes, the expression of a major ABA signalling component ABA INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5) was found to be suppressed by BR and by BZR1. Additional evidences showed that BZR1 could bind strongly with several G-box cis-elements in the promoter of ABI5, suppress the expression of ABI5 and make plants less sensitive to ABA. Our study demonstrated that ABI5 is a direct target gene of BZR1, and modulating the expression of ABI5 by BZR1 plays important roles in regulating the crosstalk between the BR and ABA signalling pathways. PMID:27149247

  10. TORC1 Inhibits GSK3-Mediated Elo2 Phosphorylation to Regulate Very Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Autophagy

    Zimmermann, Christine; Santos, Aline; Gable, Kenneth; Epstein, Sharon; Gururaj, Charulatha; Chymkowitch, Pierre; Pultz, Dennis; Rødkær, Steven V; Clay, Lorena; Bjørås, Magnar; Barral, Yves; Chang, Amy; Færgeman, Nils J.; Dunn, Teresa M; Riezman, Howard; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are essential fatty acids with multiple functions, including ceramide synthesis. Although the components of the VLCFA biosynthetic machinery have been elucidated, how their activity is regulated to meet the cell's metabolic demand remains unknown. The goal of ...

  11. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis.

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-Li; Wang, Chang-Yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-Jun; Sun, Peng-Yuan; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Yao, Ji-Hong; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. PMID:25655198

  12. P-type ATPase TAT-2 negatively regulates monomethyl branched-chain fatty acid mediated function in post-embryonic growth and development in C. elegans.

    Emylie Seamen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs are essential for Caenorhabditis elegans growth and development. To identify factors acting downstream of mmBCFAs for their function in growth regulation, we conducted a genetic screen for suppressors of the L1 arrest that occurs in animals depleted of the 17-carbon mmBCFA C17ISO. Three of the suppressor mutations defined an unexpected player, the P-type ATPase TAT-2, which belongs to the flippase family of proteins that are implicated in mediating phospholipid bilayer asymmetry. We provide evidence that TAT-2, but not other TAT genes, has a specific role in antagonizing the regulatory activity of mmBCFAs in intestinal cells. Interestingly, we found that mutations in tat-2 also suppress the lethality caused by inhibition of the first step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. We further showed that the fatty acid side-chains of glycosylceramides contain 20%-30% mmBCFAs and that this fraction is greatly diminished in the absence of mmBCFA biosynthesis. These results suggest a model in which a C17ISO-containing sphingolipid may mediate the regulatory functions of mmBCFAs and is negatively regulated by TAT-2 in intestinal cells. This work indicates a novel connection between a P-type ATPase and the critical regulatory function of a specific fatty acid.

  13. Specialized Pro-Resolving Mediators from Omega-3 Fatty Acids Improve Amyloid-β Phagocytosis and Regulate Inflammation in Patients with Minor Cognitive Impairment.

    Fiala, Milan; Terrando, Niccolo; Dalli, Jesmond

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the immunopathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and recent advances in the prevention of minor cognitive impairment (MCI) by nutritional supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids. Defective phagocytosis of amyloid-β (Aβ) and abnormal inflammatory activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are the two key immune pathologies of MCI and AD patients. The phagocytosis of Aβ by PBMCs of MCI and AD patients is universally defective and the inflammatory gene transcription is heterogeneously deregulated in comparison to normal subjects. Recent studies have discovered a cornucopia of beneficial anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving effects of the specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) resolvins, protectins, maresins, and their metabolic precursors. Resolvin D1 and other mediators switch macrophages from an inflammatory to a tissue protective/pro-resolving phenotype and increase phagocytosis of Aβ. In a recent study of AD and MCI patients, nutritional supplementation by omega-3 fatty acids individually increased resolvin D1, improved Aβ phagocytosis, and regulated inflammatory genes toward a physiological state, but only in MCI patients. Our studies are beginning to dissect positive factors (adherence to Mediterranean diet with omega-3 and exercise) and negative factors (high fat diet, infections, cancer, and surgeries) in each patient. The in vitro and in vivo effects of omega-3 fatty acids and SPMs suggest that defective phagocytosis and chronic inflammation are related to defective production and/or defective signaling by SPMs in immune cells. PMID:26401996

  14. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  15. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  16. Substance P primes lipoteichoic acid- and Pam3CysSerLys4-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating Toll-like receptor 2.

    Tancowny, Brian P; Karpov, Victor; Schleimer, Robert P; Kulka, Marianna

    2010-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide with neuroimmunoregulatory activity that may play a role in susceptibility to infection. Human mast cells, which are important in innate immune responses, were analysed for their responses to pathogen-associated molecules via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the presence of SP. Human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were activated by SP and TLR ligands including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and mast cell leukotriene and chemokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gene expression by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Mast cell degranulation was determined using a β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) assay. SP treatment of LAD2 up-regulated mRNA for TLR2, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9 while anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) stimulation up-regulated expression of TLR4 only. Flow cytometry and western blot confirmed up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR8. Pretreatment of LAD2 with SP followed by stimulation with Pam3CSK4 or LTA increased production of leukotriene C4 (LTC(4) ) and interleukin (IL)-8 compared with treatment with Pam3CSK4 or LTA alone (>2-fold; P<0·01). SP alone activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) nuclear translocation but also augmented Pam3CSK4 and LTA-mediated 5-LO translocation. Pam3CSK4, LPS and LTA did not induce LAD2 degranulation. SP primed LTA and Pam3CSK4-mediated activation of JNK, p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activated the nuclear translocation of c-Jun, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and cyclic-AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. Pretreatment with SP followed by LTA stimulation synergistically induced production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 protein. SP primes TLR2-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating TLR expression and

  17. Ammonium regulates embryogenic potential in Cucurbita pepo through pH-mediated changes in endogenous auxin and abscisic acid

    Pěnčík, Aleš; Turečková, Veronika; Paulisić, S.; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav; Mihaljević, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 1 (2015), s. 89-100. ISSN 0167-6857 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Abscisic acid * Ammonium * Indole-3-acetic acid Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.125, year: 2014

  18. Release of GTP Exchange Factor Mediated Down-Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signal Transduction through ABA-Induced Rapid Degradation of RopGEFs

    Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical to plant development and stress responses. Abiotic stress triggers an ABA signal transduction cascade, which is comprised of the core components PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, PP2C-type protein phosphatases, and protein kinases. Small GTPases of the ROP/RAC family act as negative regulators of ABA signal transduction. However, the mechanisms by which ABA controls the behavior of ROP/RACs have remained unclear. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis guanine nucleotide exchange factor protein RopGEF1 is rapidly sequestered to intracellular particles in response to ABA. GFP-RopGEF1 is sequestered via the endosome-prevacuolar compartment pathway and is degraded. RopGEF1 directly interacts with several clade A PP2C protein phosphatases, including ABI1. Interestingly, RopGEF1 undergoes constitutive degradation in pp2c quadruple abi1/abi2/hab1/pp2ca mutant plants, revealing that active PP2C protein phosphatases protect and stabilize RopGEF1 from ABA-mediated degradation. Interestingly, ABA-mediated degradation of RopGEF1 also plays an important role in ABA-mediated inhibition of lateral root growth. The presented findings point to a PP2C-RopGEF-ROP/RAC control loop model that is proposed to aid in shutting off ABA signal transduction, to counteract leaky ABA signal transduction caused by “monomeric” PYL/RCAR ABA receptors in the absence of stress, and facilitate signaling in response to ABA. PMID:27192441

  19. Pregnane X receptor mediated-transcription regulation of CYP3A by glycyrrhizin: a possible mechanism for its hepatoprotective property against lithocholic acid-induced injury.

    Wang, Yu-Guang; Zhou, Jian-Ming; Ma, Zeng-Chun; Li, Hua; Liang, Qian-De; Tan, Hong-Ling; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Zhang, Bo-Li; Gao, Yue

    2012-10-25

    Licorice (LE) has been commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for over 4000 years to reconcile various drugs and for hepatic disorders. Glycyrrhizin is the main bioactive component isolated from LE herbs. In the present study we examined the effects of glycyrrhizin on pregnane X receptor (PXR)-mediated CYP3A expression and its hepatoprotective activity. Treatment of HepG2 cells with glycyrrhizin resulted in marked increase in both CYP3A4 mRNA and protein levels. The transcriptional activation of the CYP3A4 gene through glycyrrhizin is PXR-dependent, as shown in transient transfection experiments. Glycyrrhizin activates the DNA-binding capacity of the PXR for the CYP3A4 element responding to xenobiotic signals, as measured by the electrophoretic-mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results indicate that the induction of the hepatic CYP3A4 by glycyrrhizin is mediated through the activation of PXR. The next aim of the current study was to determine whether the activation of PXR and induction of CYP3A by glycyrrhizin prevents hepatotoxicity during cholestasis as a mechanism of hepatoprotection. Mice were pretreated with glycyrrhizin prior to induction of intrahepatic cholestasis using lithocholic acid (LCA). Pre-treatment with glycyrrhizin, as well as the PXR activator pregnenolone 16α-carbontrile (PCN), prevents the increase in plasma ALT and AST activity, multifocal necrosis and prevents an increase in a level of serum LCA level in mice, as compared with the results in the mice treated with LCA alone. Activation of the PXR by glycyrrhizin results in induction of CYP3A11 (CYP3A4 for human) expression and inhibition of CYP7A1 through an increase in small heterodimer partner (SHP) expression. Glycyrrhizin regulates the expression of the gene mentioned above to prevent toxic accumulation of bile acids in the liver and it also protects mouse livers from the harmful effects of LCA. In conclusion, PXR-mediated effects on CYP3A and CYP7A may contribute to the

  20. Essential fatty acids and lipid mediators. Endocannabinoids

    G. Caramia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1929 Burr and Burr discovered the essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. Since then, researchers have shown a growing interest in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA as precursors of “lipid mediator” molecules, often with opposing effects, prostaglandins, prostacyclins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipossines, resolvines, protectines, maresins that regulate immunity, platelet aggregation, inflammation, etc. They showed that the balance between omega-3 and omega-6 acids has a profound influence on all the body’s inflammatory responses and a raised level of PUFA omega-3 in tissue correlate with a reduced incidence of degenerative cardiovascular disease, some mental illnesses such as depression, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The CYP-catalyzed epoxidation and hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA were established recently as the so-called third branch of AGE cascade. Cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenases convert AA to four epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET regioisomers, that produce vascular relaxation anti-inflammatory effects on blood vessels and in the kidney, promote angiogenesis, and protect ischemic myocardium and brain. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are accessible to CYP enzymes in the same way as AA. Metabolites derived from EPA include epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (EETR and hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (19- and 20-HEPE, whereas DHA include epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (21- and 22-HDoHE. For many of the CYP isoforms, the n-3 PUFAs are the preferred substrates and the available data suggest that some of the vasculo- and cardioprotective effects attributed to dietary n-3 PUFAs may be mediated by CYP-dependent metabolites of EPA and DHA. From AA derives also endocannabinoids like anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, capable of mimicking the pharmacological actions of the active principle of Cannabis sativa preparations such as

  1. Coordinated Recruitment of Histone Methyltransferase G9a and Other Chromatin-Modifying Enzymes in SHP-Mediated Regulation of Hepatic Bile Acid Metabolism▿

    Fang, Sungsoon; Miao, Ji; Xiang, Lingjin; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Treuter, Eckardt; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2006-01-01

    SHP has been implicated as a pleiotropic regulator of diverse biological functions by its ability to inhibit numerous nuclear receptors. Recently, we reported that SHP inhibits transcription of CYP7A1, a key gene in bile acid biosynthesis, by recruiting histone deacetylases (HDACs) and a Swi/Snf-Brm complex. To further delineate the mechanism of this inhibition, we have examined whether methylation of histones is also involved and whether a functional interplay between chromatin-modifying enz...

  2. Fatty acids and hypolipidemic drugs regulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α- and γ-mediated gene expression via liver fatty acid binding protein: A signaling path to the nucleus

    Wolfrum, Christian; Borrmann, Carola M.; Börchers, Torsten; Spener, Friedrich

    2001-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes and target for fatty acids and hypolipidemic drugs. How these signaling molecules reach the nuclear receptor is not known; however, similarities in ligand specificity suggest the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) as a possible candidate. In localization studies using laser-scanning microscopy, we show that L-FABP and PPARα colocalize in the nucleus of...

  3. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription.

    Armengot, Laia; Caldarella, Eleonora; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Martínez, M Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA) homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN) genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID), an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling. PMID:27275924

  4. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription.

    Laia Armengot

    Full Text Available The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID, an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling.

  5. Fasting induces IL-1 resistance and free fatty acid-mediated up-regulation of IL-1R2 and IL-1RA

    jenifer j joesting

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Weight loss is a near societal obsession and many diet programs use significant calorie restriction (CR including fasting/short term starvation to generate rapid effects. Fasting is also a well-recognized cause of immunosuppression especially within the innate immune system. In this study, we sought to determine if the IL-1 arm of the neuroimmune system was down-regulated by a 24 hr fast and how fasting might generate this effect. Design: Mice were allowed ad libitum access to food or had food withheld for 24 hrs. Expression of the endogenous IL-1 antagonists IL-1 receptor type 2 (IL-1R2 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA were determined as were sickness behaviors before and after IL-1 administration.Results: Fasting markedly increased gene expression of IL-1R2 (83-fold in adipose tissue, 9.5-fold in liver and IL-1RA (68-fold in liver. Fasted mice were protected from IL-1-induced weight loss, hypoglycemia, loss of locomotor and social anxiety. These protections were coupled to a large positive interaction of fasting and IL-1 on IL-1R2 gene expression in adipose tissue and liver (2.6-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively. Fasting not only increased IL-1RA and IL-1R2 protein 2.5-fold and 3.2-fold, respectively, in liver; but also increased IL-1R2 1.8-fold in adipose tissue. Fasting, in turn, triggered a 2.4-fold increase in plasma free-fatty acids (FFAs and a 2.1-fold increase in plasma corticosterone. Inhibition, of glucocorticoid action with mifepristone did not impact fasting-dependent IL-1R2 or IL-1RA gene expression. Administration of the FFA, palmitate, to mice increased liver IL-1R2 and IL-1RA gene expression by 14-fold and 11-fold, respectively. Conclusion: These findings indicate that fasting augments expression of endogenous IL-1 antagonists inducing IL-1 resistance. Fasting-induced increases in plasma FFAs appears to be a signal that drives immunosuppression during fasting/short term starvation.

  6. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  7. OsRACK1 is involved in abscisic acid- and H2O2-mediated signaling to regulate seed germination in rice (Oryza sativa, L..

    Dongping Zhang

    Full Text Available The receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1 is one member of the most important WD repeat-containing family of proteins found in all eukaryotes and is involved in multiple signaling pathways. However, compared with the progress in the area of mammalian RACK1, our understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of RACK1 in the regulation of plant growth and development is still in its infancy. In the present study, we investigated the roles of rice RACK1A gene (OsRACK1A in controlling seed germination and its molecular mechanisms by generating a series of transgenic rice lines, of which OsRACK1A was either over-expressed or under-expressed. Our results showed that OsRACK1A positively regulated seed germination and negatively regulated the responses of seed germination to both exogenous ABA and H2O2. Inhibition of ABA biosynthesis had no enhancing effect on germination, whereas inhibition of ABA catabolism significantly suppressed germination. ABA inhibition on seed germination was almost fully recovered by exogenous H2O2 treatment. Quantitative analyses showed that endogenous ABA levels were significantly higher and H2O2 levels significantly lower in OsRACK1A-down regulated transgenic lines as compared with those in wildtype or OsRACK1A-up regulated lines. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the transcript levels of OsRbohs and amylase genes, RAmy1A and RAmy3D, were significantly lower in OsRACK1A-down regulated transgenic lines. It is concluded that OsRACK1A positively regulates seed germination by controlling endogenous levels of ABA and H2O2 and their interaction.

  8. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    Je Min Lee; Hyungjae Lee; SeokBeom Kang; Woo Jung Park

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human phys...

  9. REGULATION OF RAT HEPATIC DELTA-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE AND HEME OXYGENASE ACTIVITIES: EVIDENCE FOR CONTROL BY HEME AND AGAINST MEDIATION BY PROSTHETIC IRON

    The effects of in vivo administration of 6 compounds on the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthetase and heme oxygenase were determined. The order of decreasing potency in reducing ALA synthetase activity was heme, bilirubin, protoporphyrin IX, bilirubin dimethyl es...

  10. Retinoic acid-mediated repression of human papillomavirus 18 transcription and different ligand regulation of the retinoic acid receptor beta gene in non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic HeLa hybrid cells.

    Bartsch, D; Boye, B; Baust, C; zur Hausen, H; Schwarz, E

    1992-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) belongs to the group of genital papillomaviruses involved in the development of cervical carcinomas. Since retinoic acid (RA) is a key regulator of epithelial cell differentiation and a growth inhibitor in vitro of HPV18-positive HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, we have used HeLa and HeLa hybrid cells in order to analyse the effects of RA on expression of the HPV18 E6 and E7 oncogenes and of the cellular RA receptor genes RAR-beta and -gamma. We show here that RA down-regulates HPV18 mRNA levels apparently due to transcriptional repression. Transient cotransfection assays indicated that RARs negatively regulate the HPV18 upstream regulatory region and that the central enhancer can confer RA-dependent repression on a heterologous promoter. RA treatment resulted in induction of RAR-beta mRNA levels in non-tumorigenic HeLa hybrid cells, but not in tumorigenic hybrid segregants nor in HeLa cells. No alterations of the RAR-beta gene or of the HeLa RAR-beta promoter could be revealed by Southern and DNA sequence analysis, respectively. As determined by transient transfection assays, however, the RAR-beta control region was activated by RA more strongly in non-tumorigenic hybrid cells than in HeLa cells, thus indicating differences in trans-acting regulatory factors. Our data suggest that the RARs are potential negative regulators of HPV18 E6 and E7 gene expression, and that dysregulation of the RAR-beta gene either causatively contributes to or is an indicator of tumorigenicity in HeLa and HeLa hybrid cells. Images PMID:1318198

  11. Signaling by Tyrosine Kinases Negatively Regulates the Interaction between Transcription Factors and SMRT (Silencing Mediator of Retinoic Acid and Thyroid Hormone Receptor) Corepressor

    Hong, Suk-Hyun; Wong, Chi-Wai; Privalsky, Martin L.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors that bind to specific sites on DNA and modulate the expression of adjacent target genes. Many nuclear hormone receptors display bimodal transcriptional properties; thyroid hormone receptors, for example, typically repress target gene expression in the absence of hormone, but activate target gene expression in the presence of hormone. The ability to repress is closely linked to the ability of the apo-receptor to physically b...

  12. OsRACK1 Is Involved in Abscisic Acid- and H2O2-Mediated Signaling to Regulate Seed Germination in Rice (Oryza sativa, L.)

    Dongping Zhang; Li Chen; Dahong Li; Bing Lv; Yun Chen; Jingui Chen; XuejiaoYan; Jiansheng Liang

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) is one member of the most important WD repeat-containing family of proteins found in all eukaryotes and is involved in multiple signaling pathways. However, compared with the progress in the area of mammalian RACK1, our understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of RACK1 in the regulation of plant growth and development is still in its infancy. In the present study, we investigated the roles of rice RACK1A gene (OsRACK1A) in controlli...

  13. OsRACK1 Is Involved in Abscisic Acid- and H2O2-Mediated Signaling to Regulate Seed Germination in Rice (Oryza sativa, L.)

    Zhang, Dongping; Chen, Li; Li, Dahong; Lv, Bing; Chen, Yun; Chen, Jingui; XuejiaoYan,; Liang, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) is one member of the most important WD repeat–containing family of proteins found in all eukaryotes and is involved in multiple signaling pathways. However, compared with the progress in the area of mammalian RACK1, our understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of RACK1 in the regulation of plant growth and development is still in its infancy. In the present study, we investigated the roles of rice RACK1A gene (OsRACK1A) in controlli...

  14. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of P4-ATPases

    Frøsig, Merethe Mørch

    Abstract Kinase-Mediated Regulation of P4-ATPases Understanding kinase-mediated regulation and designing novel tools to study regulatory proteins of P4-ATPases P4-ATPases play a critical role in the biogenesis of transport vesicles in the secretory and endocytic pathways, and P4-ATPase activity...

  15. ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation regulates cellular radiosensitivity

    Purpose: Activation of the DNA damage responsive protein kinase ATM is a critical step for cellular survival in response to ionizing irradiation (IR). Direct targets of ATM regulating radiosensitivity remain to be fully investigated. We have recently reported that ATM phosphorylates the transcriptional repressor Snail on Serine 100. We aimed to further study the functional significance of ATM-mediated Snail phosphorylation in response to IR. Material and methods: We transfected vector-only, wild-type, the Serine 100 to alanine (S100A) or to glutamic acid (S100E) substitution of Snail into various cell lines. We assessed colony formation, γ-H2AX focus formation and the invasion index in the cells treated with or without IR. Results: We found that over-expression of the S100A mutant Snail in HeLa cells significantly increased radiosensitivity. Meanwhile the expression of S100E, a phospho-mimicking mutation, resulted in enhanced radio-resistance. Interestingly, S100E could rescue the radiosensitive phenotype in ATM-deficient cells. We also found that expression of S100E increased γ-H2AX focus formation and compromised inhibition of invasion in response to IR independent of cell survival. Conclusion: ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation in response to IR plays an important part in the regulation of radiosensitivity

  16. Regulation of amino acid transporters by adenoviral-mediated human insulin-like growth factor-1 in a mouse model of placental insufficiency in vivo and the human trophoblast line BeWo in vitro

    Jones, H.; Crombleholme, T.; Habli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that over-expression of human insulin-like growth factor-11 (hIGF-1) in the placenta corrects fetal weight deficits in mouse, rat, and rabbit models of intrauterine growth restriction without changes in placental weight. The underlying mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. To investigate the effect of intra-placental IGF-1 over-expression on placental function we examined amino acid transporter expression and localization in both a mouse model of placental Insufficiency (PI) and a model of human trophoblast, the BeWo Choriocarcinoma cell line. For in vitro human studies, BeWo Choriocarcinoma cells were maintained in F12 complete medium + 10%FBS. Cells were incubated in serum-free control media ± Ad-IGF-1 or Ad-LacZ for 48 h. MOIs of 10:1 and 100:1 were utilized. In BeWo, transfection efficiency was 100% at an MOI of 100:1 and Ad-IGF-1 significantly increased IGF-1 secretion, proliferation and invasion but reduced apoptosis compared to controls. In vitro, amino acid uptake was increased following Ad-IGF-1 treatment and associated with significantly increased RNA expression of SNAT1, 2, LAT1 and 4F2hc. Only SNAT2 protein expression was increased but LAT1 showed relocalization from a perinuclear location to the cytoplasm and cell membrane. For in vivo studies, timed-pregnant animals were divided into four groups on day 18; sham-operated controls, uterine artery branch ligation (UABL), UABL + Ad-hIGF-1 (108 PFU), UABL + Ad-LacZ (108 PFU). At gestational day 20, pups and placentas were harvested by C-section. Only LAT1 mRNA expression changed, showing that a reduced expression of the transporter levels in the PI model could be partially rectified with Ad-hIGF1 treatment. At the protein level, System L was reduced in PI but remained at control levels following Ad-hIGF1. The System A isoforms were differentially regulated with SNAT2 expression diminished but SNAT1 increased in PI and Ad-hIGF1 groups. Enhanced

  17. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  18. Bile acid biosynthesis and its regulation

    Areta Hebanowska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid biosynthesis is the main pathway of cholesterol catabolism. Bile acids are more soluble than cholesterol so are easier to excrete. As amphipathic molecules they participate in lipid digestion and absorption in the intestine and they help to excrete free cholesterol with bile. They are also ligands for nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Interconversion of cholesterol into bile acids is an important point of its homeostasis. Seventeen enzymes are engaged in this process and many of them are cytochromes P450. Bile acid synthesis initiation may proceed with the “classical” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C7α position or the “alternative” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C27 position. Two additional pathways are possible, though their quantitative significance is small (initiated with cholesterol hydroxylations of C24 and C25 positions. Oxysterols produced are not only intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis but also important regulators of metabolism. Bile acid biosynthesis takes place in the liver, but some enzymes are also present in other organs, where they participate in regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Those enzymes are potential targets for new drugs against cholesterol metabolism disturbances. This article is a brief description of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway and participating enzymes.

  19. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    Je Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism.

  20. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo, E-mail: innks@khu.ac.kr

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  1. Lysine mediation of neuroendocrine food regulation in guinea fowl.

    Payne, A; Wang, X; Ivy, M T; Stewart, A; Nelson, K; Darris, C; Nahashon, S N

    2016-02-01

    In poultry, obesity is partly influenced by food intake, and is increasingly becoming a nationwide problem. Hypothalamic food intake mechanisms are involved metabolically and neurologically via two peptide hormones, leptin and ghrelin, and the amino acid glutamate, which is enzymatically derived from lysine metabolism. We hypothesize that lysine homeostasis mediates regulation of feed intake and performance characteristics via the brain-liver axis through glutamate sensing. The objective was to examine the effects of lysine homeostasis in avian food regulation and performance through neuroendocrine signaling. One-day-old male French Guinea fowl (GF) keets (n = 270) were weighed and randomly assigned to 5 dietary treatments (0.80%, 0.86%, 0.92%, 1.10% control, and 1.22% lysine) in 3 replicates. At 4 and 8 wk of age 20% of experimental birds were randomly selected, weighed and euthanatized. The liver, pancreas, and hypothalamus were excised, snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80°C until use. Tissue mRNA was extracted and cDNA synthesized for qPCR assays. Lysine at 0.80 and 0.86% hindered growth, development of digestive organs, expression of brain and liver glutamate and leptin receptors, and caused high mortality in GF. The fold change for metabotropic glutamate receptor I was lower (P < 0.05) in liver and higher in brain at 0.86 and 0.92% than the control (1.10%) and 1.22% lysine. The 1.22% lysine exhibited highest expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor, while brain ghrelin receptor expression was highest at 0.86 and 0.92% lysine. Therefore, dietary lysine concentration may influence signaling pathways regulating food intake in brain-liver axis via glutamate synthesis. PMID:26614682

  2. α-Linolenic acid prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of stearic acid lipotoxicity on primary rat hepatocytes

    Shi Hongyang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims Lipid accumulation in non-adipose tissues leads to cell dysfunction and apoptosis, a phenomenon known as lipotoxicity. Unsaturated fatty acids may offset the lipotoxicity associated with saturated fatty acids. Stearic acid induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and caused apoptotic and necrotic cell death in the primary rat hepatocytes. Methods Cell viability was investigated using MTT assay, and apoptosis was evaluated with Hoechst 33342 staining. Western blot analysis was used to examine the changes in the expression levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78, glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP. Caspase-3 activity was evaluated using a Caspase-3 substrate kit. Results We have studied the ability of α-linolenic acid to prevent endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of rat hepatocytes elicited by stearic acid and thapsigargin. Incubation of primary rat hepatocytes for 16 h with stearic acid produced a significant increase in cell death. Stearic acid also increased levels of three indicators of ER stress -- GRP78, CHOP, and GRP94. α-Linolenic acid distinctly reduced cell death and levels of all three indicators of ER stress brought about by stearic acid. Thapsigargin, which induces ER stress produced similar effects to those obtained using stearic acid; its effects were partly reversed by α-linolenic acid. Conclusion These results suggest that α-linolenic acid prevents ER stress-mediated apoptosis of stearic acid lipotoxicity on primary rat hepatocytes might become a target to develop new antiapoptotic compounds in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD.

  3. Soluble Mediators Regulating Immunity in Early Life

    Matthew Aaron Pettengill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Soluble factors in blood plasma have a substantial impact on both the innate and adaptive immune responses. The complement system, antibodies, and antimicrobial proteins and peptides (APPs, can directly interact with potential pathogens, protecting against systemic infection. The extracellular environment also has a critical influence on immune cell maturation, activation, and effector functions, and many of the factors in plasma, including hormones, vitamins, and purines, have been shown to influence these processes for leukocytes of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this review we give particular consideration to soluble mediators in plasma for which age-dependent differences in abundance may influence the ontogeny of immune function.

  4. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  5. Valve-regulated lead/acid batteries

    Rand, D. A. J.; Holden, L. S.; May, G. J.; Newnham, R. H.; Peters, K.

    Given the growing importance of valve-regulated lead/acid technology in many existing and emerging market areas, an expert panel was assembled at the Sixth Asian Battery Conference to answer questions from delegates on various technical and operational aspects of such batteries. Key issues included: advantantages; performance and reliability; thermal runaway; and failure modes. The interaction between the audience and the panel was both vigorous and informative. Overwhelmingly, it was agreed that valve-regulated technology has come of age and offers a dynamic solution to many of the world's energy-storage requirements and opportunities.

  6. Regulation of Inflammation by Short Chain Fatty Acids

    Renato T. Nachbar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The short chain fatty acids (SCFAs acetate (C2, propionate (C3 and butyrate (C4 are the main metabolic products of anaerobic bacteria fermentation in the intestine. In addition to their important role as fuel for intestinal epithelial cells, SCFAs modulate different processes in the gastrointestinal (GI tract such as electrolyte and water absorption. These fatty acids have been recognized as potential mediators involved in the effects of gut microbiota on intestinal immune function. SCFAs act on leukocytes and endothelial cells through at least two mechanisms: activation of GPCRs (GPR41 and GPR43 and inhibiton of histone deacetylase (HDAC. SCFAs regulate several leukocyte functions including production of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10, eicosanoids and chemokines (e.g., MCP-1 and CINC-2. The ability of leukocytes to migrate to the foci of inflammation and to destroy microbial pathogens also seems to be affected by the SCFAs. In this review, the latest research that describes how SCFAs regulate the inflammatory process is presented. The effects of these fatty acids on isolated cells (leukocytes, endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells and, particularly, on the recruitment and activation of leukocytes are discussed. Therapeutic application of these fatty acids for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies is also highlighted.

  7. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance.

    Kim, Dongjin; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Xiong, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. PMID:27264339

  8. Docosapentaenoic acid derived metabolites and mediators - The new world of lipid mediator medicine in a nutshell.

    Weylandt, Karsten-H

    2016-08-15

    Recent years have seen the description and elucidation of a new class of anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators. The arachidonic acid (AA)-derived compounds in this class are called lipoxins and have been described in great detail since their discovery thirty years ago. The new players are mediators derived from fish oil omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Taken together, these mediators are also called specialized pro-resolution mediators (SPMs). As compared to the AA/EPA/DHA-derived compounds, research regarding mediators formed from the n-3 and n-6 docosapentaenoic acids (DPAn-3 and DPAn-6) is sparse. However, mono- di- and trihydroxy derivates of the DPAs have anti-inflammatory properties as well, even though mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory action have not been fully elucidated. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding the DPA-derived SPMs and their actions. PMID:26546723

  9. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  10. Widespread context dependency of microRNA-mediated regulation.

    Erhard, Florian; Haas, Jürgen; Lieber, Diana; Malterer, Georg; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Zavolan, Mihaela; Dölken, Lars; Zimmer, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Gene expression is regulated in a context-dependent, cell-type-specific manner. Condition-specific transcription is dependent on the presence of transcription factors (TFs) that can activate or inhibit its target genes (global context). Additional factors, such as chromatin structure, histone, or DNA modifications, also influence the activity of individual target genes (individual context). The role of the global and individual context for post-transcriptional regulation has not systematically been investigated on a large scale and is poorly understood. Here we show that global and individual context dependency is a pervasive feature of microRNA-mediated regulation. Our comprehensive and highly consistent data set from several high-throughput technologies (PAR-CLIP, RIP-chip, 4sU-tagging, and SILAC) provides strong evidence that context-dependent microRNA target sites (CDTS) are as frequent and functionally relevant as constitutive target sites (CTS). Furthermore, we found the global context to be insufficient to explain the CDTS, and that flanking sequence motifs provide individual context that is an equally important factor. Our results demonstrate that, similar to TF-mediated regulation, global and individual context dependency are prevalent in microRNA-mediated gene regulation, implying a much more complex post-transcriptional regulatory network than is currently known. The necessary tools to unravel post-transcriptional regulations and mechanisms need to be much more involved, and much more data will be needed for particular cell types and cellular conditions in order to understand microRNA-mediated regulation and the context-dependent post-transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:24668909

  11. Salicylic acid binds NPR3 and NPR4 to regulate NPR1-dependent defense responses

    Moreau, Magali; Tian, Miaoying; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is widely recognized as a key player in plant immunity. While several proteins have been previously identified as the direct targets of SA, SA-mediated plant defense signaling mechanisms remain unclear. The Nature paper from Xinnian Dong's group demonstrates that the NPR1 paralogues NPR3 and NPR4 directly bind SA, and this binding modulates their interaction with NPR1 and thereby degradation of this key positive regulator of SA-mediated defense, shedding important new insi...

  12. Copper(I) mediated cross-coupling of amino acid derived organozinc reagents with acid chlorides

    Hjelmgaard, Thomas; Tanner, David Ackland

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a straightforward experimental protocol for copper-mediated cross-coupling of amino acid derived beta-amido-alkylzinc iodides 1 and 3 with a range of acid chlorides. The present method uses CuCN center dot 2LiCl as the copper source and for organozinc reagent...

  13. Acid mediates a prolonged antinociception via substance P signaling in acid-induced chronic widespread pain

    Chen, Wei-Nan; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance P is an important neuropeptide released from nociceptors to mediate pain signals. We recently revealed antinociceptive signaling by substance P in acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3)-expressing muscle nociceptors in a mouse model of acid-induced chronic widespread pain. However, methods to specifically trigger the substance P antinociception were still lacking. Results Here we show that acid could induce antinociceptive signaling via substance P release in muscle. We preve...

  14. Negative Regulators of Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT)-Mediated Thermogenesis

    Sharma, Bal Krishan; Patil, Mallikarjun; Satyanarayana, Ande

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for energy expenditure, a process called adaptive thermogenesis. PET-CT scans recently demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in adult humans, which revitalized our interest in BAT. Increasing the amount and/or activity of BAT holds tremendous promise for the treatment of obesity and its associated diseases. PGC1α is the master regulator of UCP1-mediated thermogenesis in BAT. A number of proteins have been identified to influence therm...

  15. Phosphorylation-Mediated Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Cancer

    Chiara Naro; Claudio Sette

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the key processes involved in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. AS catalyzes the removal of intronic sequences and the joining of selected exons, thus ensuring the correct processing of the primary transcript into the mature mRNA. The combinatorial nature of AS allows a great expansion of the genome coding potential, as multiple splice-variants encoding for different proteins may arise from a single gene. Splicing is mediated by a large...

  16. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Berndt, D.

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries with gelled electrolyte appeared as a niche market during the 1950s. During the 1970s, when glass-fiber felts became available as a further method to immobilize the electrolyte, the market for VRLA batteries expanded rapidly. The immobilized electrolyte offers a number of obvious advantages including the internal oxygen cycle which accommodates the overcharging current without chemical change within the cell. It also suppresses acid stratification and thus opens new fields of application. VRLA batteries, however, cannot be made completely sealed, but require a valve for gas escape, since hydrogen evolution and grid corrosion are unavoidable secondary reactions. These reactions result in water loss, and also must be balanced in order to ensure proper charging of both electrodes. Both secondary reactions have significant activation energies, and can reduce the service life of VRLA batteries, operated at elevated temperature. This effect can be aggravated by the comparatively high heat generation caused by the internal oxygen cycle during overcharging. Temperature control of VRLA batteries, therefore, is important in many applications.

  17. The anti-apoptotic and cardioprotective effects of salvianolic acid a on rat cardiomyocytes following ischemia/reperfusion by DUSP-mediated regulation of the ERK1/2/JNK pathway.

    Tongda Xu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of salvianolic acid A (SAA pretreatment on the myocardium during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R and to illuminate the interrelationships among dual specificity protein phosphatase (DUSP 2/4/16, ERK1/2 and JNK pathways during myocardial I/R, with the ultimate goal of elucidating how SAA exerts cardioprotection against I/R injury (IRI. Wistar rats were divided into the following six groups: control group (CON, I/R group, SAA+I/R group, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD098059+I/R group (PD+I/R, PD+SAA+I/R group, and JNK inhibitor SP600125+I/R group (SP+I/R. The cardioprotective effects of SAA on the myocardium during I/R were investigated with a Langendorff device. Heart rate (HR, left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, maximum rate of ventricular pressure rise and fall (±dp/dtmax, myocardial infarction areas (MIA, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and cardiomyocytes apoptosis were monitored. To determine the crosstalk betwee JNK and ERK1/2 via DUSP2/4/16 with SAA pretreatment, siRNA-DUSP2/4/16 were performed. The expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, p-JNK, p-ERK1/2 and DUSP2/4/16 in cardiomyocytes were assayed by Western blot. Our results showed that LDH, MIA and cell apoptosis were decreased, and various parameters of heart function were improved by SAA pretreatment and SP application. In the I/R group, the expression levels of p-ERK1/2 and DUSP4/16 were not significantly different compared with the CON group, however, the protein expression levels of p-ERK1/2, Bcl-2 and DUSP4/16 were higher, while p-JNK, Bax, caspase 3 and DUSP2 levels were reduced among the SAA+I/R, PD+SAA+I/R and SP+I/R groups. The above indices were not significantly different between the SAA+I/R and SP+I/R groups. Compared with the SAA+I/R group, p-ERK1/2 was increased and p-JNK was decreased in the SAA+si-DUSP2+I/R, however, p-ERK was downregulated and p-JNK was upregulated in SAA+si-DUSP4

  18. REGULATION OF INSURANCE MEDIATION IN CONDITIONS OF EURO INTEGRATION PROCESSES OF UKRAINE

    A. Sholoiko

    2016-01-01

    The review of national and European legislation in the field of regulation of insurance mediation is made. Subjects and object of regulation of insurance mediation are defined. The order of the legislative approximation in conditions of changing legislation of regulation of insurance mediation in European Union is characterized. A comparison of legal provisions to regulate insurance mediation in Ukraine and the EU is done. Suggestions of adaptation national legislation to the European in the ...

  19. Transcriptional Factors Mediating Retinoic Acid Signals in the Control of Energy Metabolism

    Rui Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA, an active metabolite of vitamin A (VA, is important for many physiological processes including energy metabolism. This is mainly achieved through RA-regulated gene expression in metabolically active cells. RA regulates gene expression mainly through the activation of two subfamilies in the nuclear receptor superfamily, retinoic acid receptors (RARs and retinoid X receptors (RXRs. RAR/RXR heterodimers or RXR/RXR homodimers bind to RA response element in the promoters of RA target genes and regulate their expressions upon ligand binding. The development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes is often associated with profound changes in the expressions of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in metabolically active cells. RA regulates some of these gene expressions. Recently, in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that status and metabolism of VA regulate macronutrient metabolism. Some studies have shown that, in addition to RARs and RXRs, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor β/δ may function as transcriptional factors mediating RA response. Herein, we summarize current progresses regarding the VA metabolism and the role of nuclear receptors in mediating RA signals, with an emphasis on their implication in energy metabolism.

  20. Tannic acid-mediated green synthesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles.

    Kim, Tae Yoon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-04-01

    The search for novel antibacterial agents is necessary to combat microbial resistance to current antibiotics. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been reported to be effective antibacterial agents. Tannic acid is a polyphenol compound from plants with antioxidant and antibacterial activities. In this report, AgNPs were prepared from silver ions by tannic acid-mediated green synthesis (TA-AgNPs). The reaction process was facile and involved mixing both silver ions and tannic acid. The absorbance at 423 nm in the UV-Visible spectra demonstrated that tannic acid underwent a reduction reaction to produce TA-AgNPs from silver ions. The synthetic yield of TA-AgNPs was 90.5 % based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images indicated that spherical-shaped TA-AgNPs with a mean particle size of 27.7-46.7 nm were obtained. Powder high-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the TA-AgNP structure was face-centered cubic with a zeta potential of -27.56 mV. The hydroxyl functional groups of tannic acid contributed to the synthesis of TA-AgNPs, which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro antibacterial activity was measured using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The TA-AgNPs were more effective against Gram-negative bacteria than Gram-positive bacteria. The MIC for the TA-AgNPs in all of the tested strains was in a silver concentration range of 6.74-13.48 μg/mL. The tannic acid-mediated synthesis of AgNPs afforded biocompatible nanocomposites for antibacterial applications. PMID:26895244

  1. The nitrate transporter MtNPF6.8 (MtNRT1.3) transports abscisic acid and mediates nitrate regulation of primary root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    Pellizzaro, Anthoni; Clochard, Thibault; Cukier, Caroline; Bourdin, Céline; Juchaux, Marjorie; Montrichard, Françoise; Thany, Steeve; Raymond, Valérie; Planchet, Elisabeth; Limami, Anis M; Morère-Le Paven, Marie-Christine

    2014-12-01

    Elongation of the primary root during postgermination of Medicago truncatula seedlings is a multigenic trait that is responsive to exogenous nitrate. A quantitative genetic approach suggested the involvement of the nitrate transporter MtNPF6.8 (for Medicago truncatula NITRATE TRANSPORTER1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER Family6.8) in the inhibition of primary root elongation by high exogenous nitrate. In this study, the inhibitory effect of nitrate on primary root elongation, via inhibition of elongation of root cortical cells, was abolished in npf6.8 knockdown lines. Accordingly, we propose that MtNPF6.8 mediates nitrate inhibitory effects on primary root growth in M. truncatula. pMtNPF6.8:GUS promoter-reporter gene fusion in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-generated transgenic roots showed the expression of MtNPF6.8 in the pericycle region of primary roots and lateral roots, and in lateral root primordia and tips. MtNPF6.8 expression was insensitive to auxin and was stimulated by abscisic acid (ABA), which restored the inhibitory effect of nitrate in npf6.8 knockdown lines. It is then proposed that ABA acts downstream of MtNPF6.8 in this nitrate signaling pathway. Furthermore, MtNPF6.8 was shown to transport ABA in Xenopus spp. oocytes, suggesting an additional role of MtNPF6.8 in ABA root-to-shoot translocation. (15)NO3(-)-influx experiments showed that only the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system was affected in npf6.8 knockdown lines. This indicates that MtNPF6.8 is a major contributor to the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system. The short-term induction by nitrate of the expression of Nitrate Reductase1 (NR1) and NR2 (genes that encode two nitrate reductase isoforms) was greatly reduced in the npf6.8 knockdown lines, supporting a role of MtNPF6.8 in the primary nitrate response in M. truncatula. PMID:25367858

  2. Mediator Complex Regulates Alternative mRNA Processing via the Med23 Subunit

    Yan HUANG; Li, Wencheng; Yao, Xiao; Lin, Qi-jiang; Yin, Jing-wen; Liang, Yan; Heiner, Monika; Tian, Bin; HUI, JINGYI; Wang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Mediator complex is an integrative hub for transcriptional regulation. Here we show that Mediator regulates alternative mRNA processing via its Med23 subunit. Combining tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified a number of mRNA processing factors that bind to a soluble recombinant Mediator subunit MED23 but not to several other Mediator components. One of these factors, hnRNP L, specifically interacts with MED23 in vitro and in vivo. Consistently, Mediator partially co...

  3. The colocalization potential of HIV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells is mediated by integrin β7 but not CCR6 and regulated by retinoic acid.

    Vanessa Sue Wacleche

    Full Text Available CD4(+ T-cells from gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT are major targets for HIV-1 infection. Recruitment of excess effector CD8(+ T-cells in the proximity of target cells is critical for the control of viral replication. Here, we investigated the colocalization potential of HIV-specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells into the GALT and explored the role of retinoic acid (RA in regulating this process in a cohort of HIV-infected subjects with slow disease progression. The expression of the gut-homing molecules integrin β7, CCR6, and CXCR3 was identified as a "signature" for HIV-specific but not CMV-specific CD4(+ T-cells thus providing a new explanation for their enhanced permissiveness to infection in vivo. HIV-specific CD8(+ T-cells also expressed high levels of integrin β7 and CXCR3; however CCR6 was detected at superior levels on HIV-specific CD4(+ versus CD8(+ T-cells. All trans RA (ATRA upregulated the expression of integrin β7 but not CCR6 on HIV-specific T-cells. Together, these results suggest that HIV-specific CD8(+ T-cells may colocalize in excess with CD4(+ T-cells into the GALT via integrin β7 and CXCR3, but not via CCR6. Considering our previous findings that CCR6(+CD4(+ T-cells are major cellular targets for HIV-DNA integration in vivo, a limited ability of CD8(+ T-cells to migrate in the vicinity of CCR6(+CD4(+ T-cells may facilitate HIV replication and dissemination at mucosal sites.

  4. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  5. Catalytic Characterization and Cytokine Mediated Regulation of Cytochrome P450 4Fs in Rat Hepatocytes

    Kalsotra, Auinash; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Brommer, Chad L; Kikuta, Yasushi; Morgan, Edward T.; Strobel, Henry W.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F mediated leukotriene B4 (LTB4) metabolism modulates inflammation during injury and infection. Here we show that in addition to LTB4, the recombinant rat CYP4Fs catalyze omega-hydroxylations of lipoxin A4, and hydroxyeicosatetraeonic acids. CYP4F gene regulation studies in primary hepatocytes reveal that pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL) -1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α produce a general inductive response whereas IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytok...

  6. Retinoic acid decreases the severity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mediated gastroenteritis in a mouse model.

    Sinha, Ritam; Howlader, Debaki Ranjan; Mukherjee, Priyadarshini; Rai, Sulabh; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Koley, Hemanta

    2016-07-01

    Gastroenteritis is a global burden; it's the major cause of morbidity and mortality both in adults and children of developing countries. Salmonella is one of the leading causes of bacteria-mediated gastroenteritis and due to its increasing multidrug antibiotic resistance; Salmonella-mediated gastroenteritis is difficult to control. Retinoic acid, the biologically active agent of vitamin A has an anti-inflammatory effect on experimental colitis. In this study we have shown All trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment down regulates Salmonella-mediated colitis in a murine model. Macroscopic signs of inflammation such as decrease in body weight and cecum weight, shorter length of proximal colon and pathological score of colitis were observed less in ATRA treated mice than in a vehicle control group. ATRA treatment not only reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine responses, such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 production but also increased IL-10 response in the supernatant of intestinal tissue. Results also suggested that ATRA treatment enhances the number of FoxP3-expressing T regulatory cells in MLN and also decreases bacterial load in systemic organs. We concluded that ATRA treatment indeed reduces Salmonella Typhimurium-mediated gastroenteritis in mice, suggesting it could be an important part of an alternative therapeutic approach to combat the disease. PMID:26858186

  7. The effect pathway of retinoic acid through regulation of retinoic acid receptor in gastric cancer cells

    Su Liu; Qiao Wu; Zheng-Ming Chen; Wen-Jin Su

    2001-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of RARa gene in mediating the growth inhibitory effect of ail-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)on gastric cancer cells.``METHODS The expression levels of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in gastric cancer cells were detected by Northern blot. Transient transfection and chlorophenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) assay were used to show the transcriptional activity of β retinoic acid response element (βRARE) and AP-l activity. Cell growth inhibition was determined by MTT assay and anchorage-independent growth assay, respectively. Stable transfection was performed by the method of Lipofectamine, and the cells were screened by G418.``RESULTS ATRA could induce expression level of RARα in MGC80-3, BGCC8823 and SGC-7901 cells obviously,resulting in growth inhibition of these cell lines. After sense RARa gene was transfected into MKN-45 cells that expressed rather Iow level of RARα and could not be induced by ATRA, the cell growth was inhibited by ATRA markedly. In contrast, when antisense RARα gene was transfected into BGC-825 cells, a little inhibitory effect by ATRA was seen, compared with the parallel BGC-823cells. In transient transfection assay, ATRA effectively induced transcriptional activity of βRARE in MGC80-3,BGC.823, SGC-7902 and MKN/RARa cell lines, but not in MKN-45 and BGC/aRARa cell lines. Similar results were observed in measuring anti-AP-l activity by ATRA in these cancer cell lines.``CONCLUSION ATRA inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells by up-regulating the level of RARa; RARa is the major mediator of ATRA action in gastric cancer cells; and adequate level of RAPa is required for ATRA effect on gastric cancer cells.``

  8. Mechanistic Modeling Reveals the Critical Knowledge Gaps in Bile Acid-Mediated DILI.

    Woodhead, J L; Yang, K; Brouwer, K L R; Siler, S Q; Stahl, S H; Ambroso, J L; Baker, D; Watkins, P B; Howell, B A

    2014-01-01

    Bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibition has been proposed to be an important mechanism for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Modeling can prioritize knowledge gaps concerning bile acid (BA) homeostasis and thus help guide experimentation. A submodel of BA homeostasis in rats and humans was constructed within DILIsym, a mechanistic model of DILI. In vivo experiments in rats with glibenclamide were conducted, and data from these experiments were used to validate the model. The behavior of DILIsym was analyzed in the presence of a simulated theoretical BSEP inhibitor. BSEP inhibition in humans is predicted to increase liver concentrations of conjugated chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and sulfate-conjugated lithocholic acid (LCA) while the concentration of other liver BAs remains constant or decreases. On the basis of a sensitivity analysis, the most important unknowns are the level of BSEP expression, the amount of intestinal synthesis of LCA, and the magnitude of farnesoid-X nuclear receptor (FXR)-mediated regulation. PMID:25006780

  9. Lipids in salicylic acid-mediated defense in plants: focusing on the roles of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate

    Qiong eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved effective defense strategies to protect themselves from various pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA is an essential signaling molecule that mediates pathogen-triggered signals perceived by different immune receptors to induce downstream defense responses. While many proteins play essential roles in regulating SA signaling, increasing evidence also supports important roles for signaling phospholipids in this process. In this review, we collate the experimental evidence in support of the regulatory roles of two phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P, and their metabolizing enzymes in plant defense, and examine the possible mechanistic interaction between phospholipid signaling and SA-dependent immunity with a particular focus on the immunity-stimulated biphasic PA production that is reminiscent of and perhaps mechanistically connected to the biphasic reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and SA accumulation during defense activation.

  10. NEK6-mediated phosphorylation of human TPP1 regulates telomere length through telomerase recruitment.

    Hirai, Yugo; Tamura, Miki; Otani, Junji; Ishikawa, Fuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Shelterin component TPP1 plays critical roles in chromosome end protection and telomere length regulation. Specifically, TPP1 contains an OB-fold domain that provides an interface to recruit telomerase. However, it remains largely unknown how telomerase recruitment is regulated by cell cycle regulators. We show that TPP1 interacts with the cell cycle regulator kinase NEK6 in human cells. We found that NEK6-mediated phosphorylation of TPP1 Ser255 in G2/M phase regulates the association between telomerase activity and TPP1. Furthermore, we found evidence that POT1 negatively regulates TPP1 phosphorylation because the level of Ser255 phosphorylation was elevated when telomeres were elongated by a POT1 mutant lacking its OB-fold domains. Ser255 is located in the intervening region between the telomerase-recruiting OB-fold and the POT1 recruitment domains. Ser255 and the surrounding amino acids are conserved among vertebrates. These observations suggest that a region adjacent to the OB-fold domain of TPP1 is involved in telomere length regulation via telomerase recruitment. PMID:27396482

  11. Cullin-RING Ubiquitin Ligases in Salicylic Acid-Mediated Plant Immune Signaling

    James J. Furniss

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant immune responses against biotrophic pathogens are regulated by the signaling hormone salicylic acid (SA. SA establishes immunity by regulating a variety of cellular processes, including programmed cell death (PCD to isolate and kill invading pathogens, and development of systemic acquired resistance (SAR which provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum resistance throughout the plant. Central to these processes is post-translational modification of SA-regulated signaling proteins by ubiquitination, i.e. the covalent addition of small ubiquitin proteins. Emerging evidence indicates SA-induced protein ubiquitination is largely orchestrated by Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs, which recruit specific substrates for ubiquitination using interchangeable adaptors. Ligation of ubiquitin chains interlinked at lysine 48 leads to substrate degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here we discuss how CRL-mediated degradation of both nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat domain containing (NLR immune receptors and SA-induced transcription regulators are critical for functional PCD and SAR responses, respectively. By placing these recent findings in context of knowledge gained in other eukaryotic model species, we highlight potential alternative roles for processive ubiquitination in regulating the activity of SA-mediated immune responses.

  12. TGF-β-SMAD3 signaling mediates hepatic bile acid and phospholipid metabolism following lithocholic acid-induced liver injury.

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Naoki; Sato, Misako; Kang, Dong Wook; Krausz, Kristopher W; Flanders, Kathleen C; Ikeda, Kazuo; Luecke, Hans; Wakefield, Lalage M; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2012-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is activated as a result of liver injury, such as cholestasis. However, its influence on endogenous metabolism is not known. This study demonstrated that TGFβ regulates hepatic phospholipid and bile acid homeostasis through MAD homolog 3 (SMAD3) activation as revealed by lithocholic acid-induced experimental intrahepatic cholestasis. Lithocholic acid (LCA) induced expression of TGFB1 and the receptors TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 in the liver. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed higher TGFβ expression around the portal vein after LCA exposure and diminished SMAD3 phosphorylation in hepatocytes from Smad3-null mice. Serum metabolomics indicated increased bile acids and decreased lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) after LCA exposure. Interestingly, in Smad3-null mice, the metabolic alteration was attenuated. LCA-induced lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 4 (LPCAT4) and organic solute transporter β (OSTβ) expression were markedly decreased in Smad3-null mice, whereas TGFβ induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in primary mouse hepatocytes. In addition, introduction of SMAD3 enhanced the TGFβ-induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. In conclusion, considering that Smad3-null mice showed attenuated serum ALP activity, a diagnostic indicator of cholangiocyte injury, these results strongly support the view that TGFβ-SMAD3 signaling mediates an alteration in phospholipid and bile acid metabolism following hepatic inflammation with the biliary injury. PMID:23034213

  13. Artificial transcription factor-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    van Tol, Niels; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2014-08-01

    The transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes with artificial transcription factors (TFs) can offer new tools for plant biotechnology. Three systems are available for mediating site-specific DNA recognition of artificial TFs: those based on zinc fingers, TALEs, and on the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Artificial TFs require an effector domain that controls the frequency of transcription initiation at endogenous target genes. These effector domains can be transcriptional activators or repressors, but can also have enzymatic activities involved in chromatin remodeling or epigenetic regulation. Artificial TFs are able to regulate gene expression in trans, thus allowing them to evoke dominant mutant phenotypes. Large scale changes in transcriptional activity are induced when the DNA binding domain is deliberately designed to have lower binding specificity. This technique, known as genome interrogation, is a powerful tool for generating novel mutant phenotypes. Genome interrogation has clear mechanistic and practical advantages over activation tagging, which is the technique most closely resembling it. Most notably, genome interrogation can lead to the discovery of mutant phenotypes that are unlikely to be found when using more conventional single gene-based approaches. PMID:25017160

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Mediates Glycemic Regulation by Hepatic JNK

    Santiago Vernia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-signaling pathway is implicated in metabolic syndrome, including dysregulated blood glucose concentration and insulin resistance. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a target of the hepatic JNK-signaling pathway and may contribute to the regulation of glycemia. To test the role of FGF21, we established mice with selective ablation of the Fgf21 gene in hepatocytes. FGF21 deficiency in the liver caused marked loss of FGF21 protein circulating in the blood. Moreover, the protective effects of hepatic JNK deficiency to suppress metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed mice were not observed in mice with hepatocyte-specific FGF21 deficiency, including reduced blood glucose concentration and reduced intolerance to glucose and insulin. Furthermore, we show that JNK contributes to the regulation of hepatic FGF21 expression during fasting/feeding cycles. These data demonstrate that the hepatokine FGF21 is a key mediator of JNK-regulated metabolic syndrome.

  15. Fatty acid transporter CD36 mediates hypothalamic effect of fatty acids on food intake in rats.

    Valentine S Moullé

    Full Text Available Variations in plasma fatty acid (FA concentrations are detected by FA sensing neurons in specific brain areas such as the hypothalamus. These neurons play a physiological role in the control of food intake and the regulation of hepatic glucose production. Le Foll et al. previously showed in vitro that at least 50% of the FA sensing in ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH neurons is attributable to the interaction of long chain FA with FA translocase/CD36 (CD36. The present work assessed whether in vivo effects of hypothalamic FA sensing might be partly mediated by CD36 or intracellular events such as acylCoA synthesis or β-oxidation. To that end, a catheter was implanted in the carotid artery toward the brain in male Wistar rats. After 1 wk recovery, animals were food-deprived for 5 h, then 10 min infusions of triglyceride emulsion, Intralipid +/- heparin (IL, IL(H, respectively or saline/heparin (SH were carried out and food intake was assessed over the next 5 h. Experimental groups included: 1 Rats previously injected in ventromedian nucleus (VMN with shRNA against CD36 or scrambled RNA; 2 Etomoxir (CPT1 inhibitor or saline co-infused with IL(H/S(H; and 3 Triacsin C (acylCoA synthase inhibitor or saline co-infused with IL(H/S(H. IL(H significantly lowered food intake during refeeding compared to S(H (p<0.001. Five hours after refeeding, etomoxir did not affect this inhibitory effect of IL(H on food intake while VMN CD36 depletion totally prevented it. Triacsin C also prevented IL(H effects on food intake. In conclusion, the effect of FA to inhibit food intake is dependent on VMN CD36 and acylCoA synthesis but does not required FA oxidation.

  16. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling. PMID:24068326

  17. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  18. Regulation of uric acid metabolism and excretion.

    Maiuolo, Jessica; Oppedisano, Francesca; Gratteri, Santo; Muscoli, Carolina; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2016-06-15

    Purines perform many important functions in the cell, being the formation of the monomeric precursors of nucleic acids DNA and RNA the most relevant one. Purines which also contribute to modulate energy metabolism and signal transduction, are structural components of some coenzymes and have been shown to play important roles in the physiology of platelets, muscles and neurotransmission. All cells require a balanced quantity of purines for growth, proliferation and survival. Under physiological conditions the enzymes involved in the purine metabolism maintain in the cell a balanced ratio between their synthesis and degradation. In humans the final compound of purines catabolism is uric acid. All other mammals possess the enzyme uricase that converts uric acid to allantoin that is easily eliminated through urine. Overproduction of uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has been proven to play emerging roles in human disease. In fact the increase of serum uric acid is inversely associated with disease severity and especially with cardiovascular disease states. This review describes the enzymatic pathways involved in the degradation of purines, getting into their structure and biochemistry until the uric acid formation. PMID:26316329

  19. Altered Cultivar Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage Seedlings Mediated by Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene

    Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Sang Hee; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Two cultivars Buram-3-ho (susceptible) and CR-Hagwang (moderate resistant) of kimchi cabbage seedlings showed differential defense responses to anthracnose (Colletotrichum higginsianum), black spot (Alternaria brassicicola) and black rot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Xcc) diseases in our previous study. Defense-related hormones salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene led to different transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression in both cultiva...

  20. Lipocalin 2, a Regulator of Retinoid Homeostasis and Retinoid-mediated Thermogenic Activation in Adipose Tissue.

    Guo, Hong; Foncea, Rocio; O'Byrne, Sheila M; Jiang, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Deis, Jessica A; Blaner, William S; Bernlohr, David A; Chen, Xiaoli

    2016-05-20

    We have recently characterized the role of lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) as a new adipose-derived cytokine in the regulation of adaptive thermogenesis via a non-adrenergic pathway. Herein, we explored a potential non-adrenergic mechanism by which Lcn2 regulates thermogenesis and lipid metabolism. We found that Lcn2 is a retinoic acid target gene, and retinoic acid concurrently stimulated UCP1 and Lcn2 expression in adipocytes. Lcn2 KO mice exhibited a blunted effect of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) on body weight and fat mass, lipid metabolism, and retinoic acid signaling pathway activation in adipose tissue under the high fat diet-induced obese condition. We further demonstrated that Lcn2 is required for the full action of ATRA on the induction of UCP1 and PGC-1α expression in brown adipocytes and the restoration of cold intolerance in Lcn2 KO mice. Interestingly, we discovered that Lcn2 KO mice have decreased levels of retinoic acid and retinol in adipose tissue. The protein levels of STRA6 responsible for retinol uptake were significantly decreased in adipose tissue. The retinol transporter RBP4 was increased in adipose tissue but decreased in the circulation, suggesting the impairment of RBP4 secretion in Lcn2 KO adipose tissue. Moreover, Lcn2 deficiency abolished the ATRA effect on RBP4 expression in adipocytes. All the data suggest that the decreased retinoid level and action are associated with impaired retinol transport and storage in adipose tissue in Lcn2 KO mice. We conclude that Lcn2 plays a critical role in regulating metabolic homeostasis of retinoids and retinoid-mediated thermogenesis in adipose tissue. PMID:27008859

  1. RNA-Mediated Regulation of HMGA1 Function

    Arndt G. Benecke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1 is a master regulator of chromatin structure mediating its major gene regulatory activity by direct interactions with A/T-rich DNA sequences located in the promoter and enhancer regions of a large variety of genes. HMGA1 DNA-binding through three AT-hook motifs results in an open chromatin structure and subsequently leads to changes in gene expression. Apart from its significant expression during development, HMGA1 is over-expressed in virtually every cancer, where HMGA1 expression levels correlate with tumor malignancy. The exogenous overexpression of HMGA1 can lead to malignant cell transformation, assigning the protein a key role during cancerogenesis. Recent studies have unveiled highly specific competitive interactions of HMGA1 with cellular and viral RNAs also through an AT-hook domain of the protein, significantly impacting the HMGA1-dependent gene expression. In this review, we discuss the structure and function of HMGA1-RNA complexes during transcription and epigenomic regulation and their implications in HMGA1-related diseases.

  2. Acidic/IQ Motif Regulator of Calmodulin*

    Putkey, John A.; Waxham, M. Neal; Gaertner, Tara R.; Brewer, Kari J.; Goldsmith, Michael; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.

    2007-01-01

    The small IQ motif proteins PEP-19 (62 amino acids) and RC3 (78 amino acids) greatly accelerate the rates of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV in the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM). We show here that PEP-19 decreases the degree of cooperativity of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV, and we present a model showing that this could increase Ca2+ binding rate constants. Comparative sequence analysis showed that residues 28 to 58 from PEP-19 are conserved in other proteins. This region includes the IQ ...

  3. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut;

    The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) has emerged as an important regulator of peripheral T cell responses. However, whether there is endogenous retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling in developing thymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in thymocyte development remains unclear...

  4. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver . Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and ...

  5. p53 isoforms regulate astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    Turnquist, C; Horikawa, I; Foran, E; Major, E O; Vojtesek, B; Lane, D P; Lu, X; Harris, B T; Harris, C C

    2016-09-01

    Bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons have physiological roles in the central nervous system and an altered state or dysfunction of such interactions may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Astrocytes exert structural, metabolic and functional effects on neurons, which can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective. Their neurotoxic effect is mediated via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) involving pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6), while their neuroprotective effect is attributed to neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., NGF). We here demonstrate that the p53 isoforms Δ133p53 and p53β are expressed in astrocytes and regulate their toxic and protective effects on neurons. Primary human astrocytes undergoing cellular senescence upon serial passaging in vitro showed diminished expression of Δ133p53 and increased p53β, which were attributed to the autophagic degradation and the SRSF3-mediated alternative RNA splicing, respectively. Early-passage astrocytes with Δ133p53 knockdown or p53β overexpression were induced to show SASP and to exert neurotoxicity in co-culture with neurons. Restored expression of Δ133p53 in near-senescent, otherwise neurotoxic astrocytes conferred them with neuroprotective activity through repression of SASP and induction of neurotrophic growth factors. Brain tissues from AD and ALS patients possessed increased numbers of senescent astrocytes and, like senescent astrocytes in vitro, showed decreased Δ133p53 and increased p53β expression, supporting that our in vitro findings recapitulate in vivo pathology of these neurodegenerative diseases. Our finding that Δ133p53 enhances the neuroprotective function of aged and senescent astrocytes suggests that the p53 isoforms and their regulatory mechanisms are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27104929

  6. Quantitative proteomics by amino acid labeling identifies novel NHR-49 regulated proteins in C. elegans

    Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids combined with mass spectrometry is a widely used methodology to quantitatively examine metabolic and signaling pathways in yeast, fruit flies, plants, cell cultures and mice. However, only metabolic labeling using (15)N has been applied to examine such events...... loss or RNAi mediated knock down of the transcription factor NHR-49, and found numerous proteins involved in lipid metabolism to be downregulated, which is consistent with its previously proposed function as a transcriptional regulator of fatty acid metabolism. The combined use of quantitative...

  7. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions

    Highlights: • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was decomposed based on ferric ion performance. • Complete decomposition of PFOA was confirmed in strongly acidic conditions. • Fe2+ changed to Fe3+ to restore chemical equilibrium in this condition. • Fe3+ was only produced from Fe2+ by hydroxyl radical in weakly acidic conditions. • The Fe3+ regeneration mechanisms resulted in the performance of Fe3+ for PFOA. - Abstract: The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe3+ ion. Although Fe3+ ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe2+ ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe2+ ion will change to Fe3+ ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH)2+. At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe3+ ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe2+ ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH)2+ under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe3+ regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion

  8. Fatty acids and the regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase interconversion

    Stewart, Melanie Ann.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents evidence for a novel mechanism of regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase by fatty acids and also results of a study of muscle triacylglycerol concentration. In animals regulation of PDH complex activity is central to the selection of respiratory fuels and to the conservation of glucose during carbohydrate deprivation. The principal means of regulation of PDH complex is interconversion of phosphorylated (inactive) and dephosphorylated (active) fo...

  9. RNF4-mediated polyubiquitination regulates the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway.

    Xie, Jenny; Kim, Hyungjin; Moreau, Lisa A; Puhalla, Shannon; Garber, Judy; Al Abo, Muthana; Takeda, Shunichi; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2015-04-01

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) pathway is a DNA repair pathway that is required for excision of DNA interstrand cross-links. The 17 known FA proteins, along with several FA-associated proteins (FAAPs), cooperate in this pathway to detect, unhook, and excise DNA cross-links and to subsequently repair the double-strand breaks generated in the process. In the current study, we identified a patient with FA with a point mutation in FANCA, which encodes a mutant FANCA protein (FANCAI939S). FANCAI939S failed to bind to the FAAP20 subunit of the FA core complex, leading to decreased stability. Loss of FAAP20 binding exposed a SUMOylation site on FANCA at amino acid residue K921, resulting in E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme UBC9-mediated SUMOylation, RING finger protein 4-mediated (RNF4-mediated) polyubiquitination, and proteasome-mediated degradation of FANCA. Mutation of the SUMOylation site of FANCA rescued the expression of the mutant protein. Wild-type FANCA was also subject to SUMOylation, RNF4-mediated polyubiquitination, and degradation, suggesting that regulated release of FAAP20 from FANCA is a critical step in the normal FA pathway. Consistent with this model, cells lacking RNF4 exhibited interstrand cross-linker hypersensitivity, and the gene encoding RNF4 was epistatic with the other genes encoding members of the FA/BRCA pathway. Together, the results from our study underscore the importance of analyzing unique patient-derived mutations for dissecting complex DNA repair processes. PMID:25751062

  10. Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system

    An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement. 2 figs

  11. Dietary arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid regulate liver fatty acid desaturase (FADS) alternative transcript expression in suckling piglets

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Downs, Ian; Tyburczy, Cynthia; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Park, Woo Jung; Blank, Bryant S.; Zimmer, J. Paul; Butt, C. M.; Salem, Norman; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular regulation of fatty acid desaturase (Fads) gene expression by dietary arachidonic (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) during early postnatal period, when the demand for long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) is very high, has not been well defined. The objective of the current study was to determine regulation of liver Fads1, Fads2 and Fads3 classical (CS) and alternative transcripts (AT) expression by dietary ARA and DHA, within the physiological range present in human b...

  12. Casein kinase 2 down-regulation and activation by polybasic peptides are mediated by acidic residues in the 55-64 region of the beta-subunit. A study with calmodulin as phosphorylatable substrate

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G; Pińna, L A

    1994-01-01

    The noncatalytic beta-subunit is responsible for the latency of casein kinase 2 (CK2) activity toward calmodulin. Twenty-one mutants of the beta-subunit bearing either deletions or Ala substitutions for charged residues in the 5-6, 55-70, and 171-178 sequences have been assayed for their ability to...... substitute for wild-type beta-subunit as a suppressor of activity toward calmodulin. The only mutations that reduced the ability of the beta-subunit to suppress calmodulin phosphorylation activity, though being compatible with normal reconstitution of CK2 holoenzyme, were those affecting Asp55, Glu57 and the...... conversely ineffective. The latent "calmodulin kinase" activity of CK2 can also be specifically unmasked by a peptide (alpha[66-86]) reproducing a basic insert of the catalytic subunit. This effect is reversed by equimolar addition of a peptide (beta[55-71]) including the 55-64 acidic stretch of the beta...

  13. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...o A, Bamming D, Horvath CM. Cytokine. 2008 Sep;43(3):350-8. Epub 2008 Aug 13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Negative... regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r

  14. Hoarding and eating pathology: the mediating role of emotion regulation.

    Raines, Amanda M; Boffa, Joseph W; Allan, Nicholas P; Short, Nicole A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2015-02-01

    Hoarding disorder is characterized by persistent difficulty discarding possessions resulting in clutter that precludes one from using living areas for their intended purposes. The limited empirical work available has suggested a strong link between hoarding and various non-psychiatric conditions, including obesity. Despite these associations, no research has examined the link between hoarding and other forms of eating pathology including symptoms associated with binge eating. Moreover, little is known about mechanisms that may account for this relationship. The current study examined the associations between hoarding severity, obesity, and symptoms associated with binge eating in a sample (N=97) of individuals with elevated hoarding symptoms. Results revealed that hoarding severity was associated with increased body mass index (BMI) and symptoms of binge eating. In addition, difficulties regulating emotions mediated the association between hoarding and eating concerns. Considering the lack of information on hoarding behaviors, as well as its classification as a new diagnosis within DSM-5, these findings add considerably to a growing body of literature on hoarding disorder. PMID:25440599

  15. Family Expressivity and Social Anxiety in Children: The Potential Mediating and Moderating Roles of Emotion Regulation

    Noguchi, Ryoichi J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Family Expressivity and Social Anxiety in Children: The Potential Mediating and Moderating Roles of Emotion Regulation Ryoichi J. P. Noguchi ABSTRACT The role of childrenâ s emotion regulation as a potential mediator or moderator in the relations between a familyâ s emotional expressiveness and their childâ s social anxiety was explored in a sample of clinic-referred children. For the mediational analyses, it was predicted that emotional expressivity in families would be associ...

  16. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  17. TNL-mediated immunity in Arabidopsis requires complex regulation of the redundant ADR1 gene family.

    Dong, Oliver Xiaoou; Tong, Meixuezi; Bonardi, Vera; El Kasmi, Farid; Woloshen, Virginia; Wünsch, Lisa K; Dangl, Jeffery L; Li, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) serve as intracellular immune receptors in animals and plants. Sensor NLRs perceive pathogen-derived effector molecules and trigger robust host defense. Recent studies revealed the role of three coiled-coil-type NLRs (CNLs) of the ADR1 family - ADR1, ADR1-L1 and ADR1-L2 - as redundant helper NLRs, whose function is required for defense mediated by multiple sensor NLRs. From a mutant snc1-enhancing (MUSE) forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis targeted to identify negative regulators of snc1 that encodes a TIR-type NLR (TNL), we isolated two alleles of muse15, both carrying mutations in ADR1-L1. Interestingly, loss of ADR1-L1 also enhances immunity-related phenotypes in other autoimmune mutants including cpr1, bal and lsd1. This immunity-enhancing effect is not mediated by increased SNC1 protein stability, nor is it fully dependent on the accumulation of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA). Transcriptional analysis revealed an upregulation of ADR1 and ADR1-L2 in the adr1-L1 background, which may overcompensate the loss of ADR1-L1, resulting in enhanced immunity. Interestingly, autoimmunity of snc1 and chs2, which encode typical TNLs, is fully suppressed by the adr1 triple mutant, suggesting that the ADRs are required for TNL downstream signaling. This study extends our knowledge on the interplay among ADRs and reveals their complexity in defense regulation. PMID:27074399

  18. Rpi-blb2-Mediated Hypersensitive Cell Death Caused by Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 Requires SGT1, but not EDS1, NDR1, Salicylic Acid-, Jasmonic Acid-, or Ethylene-Mediated Signaling

    Sang-Keun Oh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Rpi-blb2 encodes a protein with a coiled-coil-nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR motif that recognizes the Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 effector and triggers hypersensitive cell death (HCD. To better understand the components required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in plants, we used virus-induced gene silencing to repress candidate genes in Rpi-blb2-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants and assayed the plants for AVRblb2 effector. Rpi-blb2 triggers HCD through NbSGT1-mediated pathways, but not NbEDS1- or NbNDR1-mediated pathways. In addition, the role of salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA, and ethylene (ET in Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD were analyzed by monitoring of the responses of NbICS1-, NbCOI1-, or NbEIN2-silenced or Rpi-blb2::NahG-transgenic plants. Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2 was not associated with SA accumulation. Thus, SA affects Rpi-blb2-mediated resistance against P. infestans, but not Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2. Additionally, JA and ET signaling were not required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings suggest that NbSGT1 is a unique positive regulator of Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2, but EDS1, NDR1, SA, JA, and ET are not required.

  19. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Hajjar, Katherine A.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases.

  20. Cetalox and analogues: synthesis via acid-mediated polyene cyclizations.

    Snowden, Roger L

    2008-06-01

    Using a novel, acid-mediated cyclization methodology, a direct access to Cetalox ((+/-)-1; a commercially important ambergris-type odorant) and various structurally related didehydro (i.e., 19, 26, and 30) and tetradehydro (i.e., 28 and 37/38) analogues is described. Treatment of either (E,E)-14 or (E)-15 with an excess of FSO(3)H in 2-nitropropane at -90 degrees stereospecifically afforded (+/-)-1 in 40 and 42% yield, respectively. Under similar conditions, cyclization of (E)-18 or 20 furnished 19 in 60 and 64% yield, respectively. Analogously, using an excess of ClSO(3)H in CH(2)Cl(2) at -80 degrees, 26 is formed with high stereoselectivity by cyclization of either (E)-24 or (Z)-25 (52 and 31% yield, resp.); in the same manner, 28 was prepared from 27 (22% yield). The same principle was applied to the synthesis of racemic Superambrox (30), via cyclization of 35, but only with poor selectivity (22%) and low yield (7%). Another approach via cyclization of (E)-40 under solvolysis conditions (excess TFA in CH(2)Cl(2) at -10 degrees) gave a higher yield (15%) with improved selectivity (43%). Finally, cyclization of 34 (1:1 diastereoisomer mixture) afforded 37/38 (10:1) in 27% yield. The qualitative organoleptic properties of 19, 26, 28, 30, and 37/38 (10:1) are briefly discussed. PMID:18618391

  1. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  2. The Hypolipidemic Agent Guggulsterone Regulates the Expression of Human Bile Salt Export Pump: Dominance of Transactivation over Farsenoid X Receptor-Mediated Antagonism

    Deng, Ruitang; Yang, Dongfang; Radke, Amy; Yang, Jian; Yan, Bingfang

    2006-01-01

    Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids in the liver is initiated by the rate-limiting enzyme cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and excretion of bile acids from the liver is mediated by the bile salt export pump (BSEP). The expression of CYP7A1 and BSEP is coordinately regulated by a negative feedback and positive feed-forward mechanism, respectively, through bile acid-mediated activation of farsenoid X receptor (FXR). It is well established that hypolipidemic agent guggulsterone is an FXR ...

  3. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  4. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  5. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions

    Ohno, Masaki, E-mail: mohno@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Mino A, Esteban R. [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Kose, Tomohiro [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Okuda, Tetsuji [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Nakai, Satoshi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Kawata, Kuniaki [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Nishijima, Wataru [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was decomposed based on ferric ion performance. • Complete decomposition of PFOA was confirmed in strongly acidic conditions. • Fe{sup 2+} changed to Fe{sup 3+} to restore chemical equilibrium in this condition. • Fe{sup 3+} was only produced from Fe{sup 2+} by hydroxyl radical in weakly acidic conditions. • The Fe{sup 3+} regeneration mechanisms resulted in the performance of Fe{sup 3+} for PFOA. - Abstract: The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe{sup 3+} ion. Although Fe{sup 3+} ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe{sup 2+} ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe{sup 2+} ion will change to Fe{sup 3+} ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH){sup 2+}. At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe{sup 3+} ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH){sup 2+} under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe{sup 3+} regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  6. Bile-acid-activated farnesoid X receptor regulates hydrogen sulfide production and hepatic microcirculation

    Barbara Renga; Andrea Mencarelli; Marco Migliorati; Eleonora Distrutti; Stefano Fiorucci

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates expression of liver cystathionase (CSE), a gene involved in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation. METHODS: The regulation of CSE expression in response to FXR ligands was evaluated in HepG2 cells and in wild-type and FXR null mice treated with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid (6E-CDCA), a synthetic FXR ligand. The analysis demonstrated an FXR responsive element in the 5'-flanking region of the human CSE gene. The function of this site was investigated by luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Livers obtained from rats treated with carbon tetrachloride alone, or in combination with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid, were studied for hydrogen sulphide generation and portal pressure measurement. RESULTS: Liver expression of CSE is regulated by bile acids by means of an FXR-mediated mechanism. Western blotting, qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, as well as immunohistochemical analysis, showed that expression of CSE in HepG2 cells and in mice is induced by treatment with an FXR ligand. Administration of 6E-CDCA to carbon tetrachloride treated rats protected against the down-regulation of CSE expression, increased H2S generation, reduced portal pressure and attenuated the endothelial dysfunction of isolated and perfused cirrhotic rat livers. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that CSE is an FXR-regulated gene and provide a new molecular explanation for the pathophysiology of portal hypertension.

  7. NR4A orphan nuclear receptors influence retinoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid signaling via up-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 5

    Volakakis, Nikolaos; Joodmardi, Eliza [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Perlmann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.perlmann@licr.ki.se [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-12-25

    The orphan nuclear receptor (NR) Nurr1 is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system and is also induced as an immediate early gene in a variety of cell types. In silico analysis of human promoters identified fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), a protein shown to enhance retinoic acid-mediated PPAR{beta}/{delta} signaling, as a potential Nurr1 target gene. Nurr1 has previously been implicated in retinoid signaling via its heterodimerization partner RXR. Since NRs are commonly involved in cross-regulatory control we decided to further investigate the regulatory relationship between Nurr1 and FABP5. FABP5 expression was up-regulated by Nurr1 and other NR4A NRs in HEK293 cells, and Nurr1 was shown to activate and bind to the FABP5 promoter, supporting that FABP5 is a direct downstream target of NR4A NRs. We also show that the RXR ligand docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can induce nuclear translocation of FABP5. Moreover, via up-regulation of FABP5 Nurr1 can enhance retinoic acid-induced signaling of PPAR{beta}/{delta} and DHA-induced activation of RXR. We also found that other members of the NR4A orphan NRs can up-regulate FABP5. Thus, our findings suggest that NR4A orphan NRs can influence signaling events of other NRs via control of FABP5 expression levels.

  8. GROWTH-REGULATING ACTIVITY OF SOME SALTS OF 1-NAPHTHALENACETIC ACID AND 2-NAPHTHOXYACETIC ACID

    Maria Laichici

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The salts of 1-naphthalene acetic acid and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid with ethanolamine have been synthetized. The two salts have been assessed using Tsibulskaya-Vassiliev biological test using agar-agar as the medium. Statistical processing of the data has been carried out. The good results of the bioassay indicate an auxinic growth-regulating activity of the two salts.

  9. CodY-mediated regulation of Streptococcus pyogenes exoproteins

    McDowell Emily J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of Streptococcus pyogenes exoproteins, many of which contribute to virulence, is regulated in response to nutrient availability. CodY is a transcriptional regulator that controls gene expression in response to amino acid availability. The purpose of this study was to identify differences in the expression of streptococcal exoproteins associated with deletion of the codY gene. Results We compared the secreted proteins produced by wild-type S. pyogenes to a codY mutant in the post-exponential phase of growth. We used both one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to separate exoproteins. Proteins that were significantly different in abundance upon repeated analysis were identified with tandem mass spectrometry. The production of the secreted cysteine protease SpeB, a secreted chromosomally encoded nuclease (SdaB, and a putative adhesion factor (Spy49_0549 were more abundant in supernatant fluids obtained from the codY mutant. In addition, hyaluronidase (HylA, CAMP factor (Cfa, a prophage encoded nuclease (Spd-3, and an uncharacterized extracellular protein (Spy49_0015 were less abundant in supernatant fluids obtained from the codY mutant strain. Enzymatic assays showed greater DNase activity in culture supernatants isolated in the post-exponential phase of growth from the codY mutant strain compared to the wild-type strain. Because extracellular nucleases and proteases can influence biofilm formation, we also measured the ability of the strains to form biofilms during growth with both rich medium (Todd Hewitt yeast extract; THY and chemically defined media (CDM. No difference was observed with rich media but with CDM the biofilms formed by the codY mutant strain had less biomass compared to the wild-type strain. Conclusions Overall, the results indicate that CodY alters the abundance of a select group of S. pyogenes exoproteins, including DNases, a protease, and hylauronidase, which together may alleviate

  10. Dysfunctional miRNA-Mediated Regulation in Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Sun, Xiaohan; Zhang, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Past research on pathogenesis of a complex disease suggests that differentially expressed message RNAs (mRNAs) can be noted as biomarkers of a disease. However, significant miRNA-mediated regulation change might also be more deep underlying cause of a disease. In this study, a miRNA-mediated regulation module is defined based on GO terms (Gene Ontology terms) from which dysfunctional modules are identified as the suspected cause of a disease. A miRNA-mediated regulation module contains mRNAs annotated to a GO term and MicroRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate the mRNAs. Based on the miRNA-mediated regulation coefficients estimated from the expression profiles of the mRNA and the miRNAs, a SW (single regulation-weight) value is then designed to evaluate the miRNA-mediated regulation change of an mRNA, and the modules with significantly differential SW values are thus identified as dysfunctional modules. The approach is applied to Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and it identifies 70 dysfunctional miRNA-mediated regulation modules from initial 4381 modules. The identified dysfunctional modules are detected to be comprehensive reflection of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. The proposed approach suggests that accumulated alteration in miRNA-mediated regulation might cause functional alterations, which further cause a disease. Moreover, this approach can also be used to identify diffentially miRNA-mediated regulated mRNAs showing more comprehensive underlying association with a disease than differentially expressed mRNAs. PMID:27258182

  11. Regulation and limitations to fatty acid oxidation during exercise

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Kiens, Bente

    2012-01-01

    turn is trapped by carnitine. This will lead to less availability of free carnitine for fatty acid transport into mitochondria. This review summarizes our present view on how FA metabolism is regulated during exercise with a special focus on the limitations in FA oxidation in the transition from...

  12. Regulation of ENaC-Mediated Sodium Reabsorption by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    Tengis S. Pavlov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are members of a steroid hormone receptor superfamily that responds to changes in lipid and glucose homeostasis. Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor subtype γ (PPARγ has received much attention as the target for antidiabetic drugs, as well as its role in responding to endogenous compounds such as prostaglandin J2. However, thiazolidinediones (TZDs, the synthetic agonists of the PPARγ are tightly associated with fluid retention and edema, as potentially serious side effects. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC represents the rate limiting step for sodium absorption in the renal collecting duct. Consequently, ENaC is a central effector impacting systemic blood volume and pressure. The role of PPARγ agonists on ENaC activity remains controversial. While PPARγ agonists were shown to stimulate ENaC-mediated renal salt absorption, probably via Serum- and Glucocorticoid-Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1, other studies reported that PPARγ agonist-induced fluid retention is independent of ENaC activity. The current paper provides new insights into the control and function of ENaC and ENaC-mediated sodium transport as well as several other epithelial channels/transporters by PPARs and particularly PPARγ. The potential contribution of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites in PPAR-dependent mechanisms is also discussed.

  13. Hemin-mediated Hemolysis in Erythrocytes: Effects of Ascorbic Acid and Glutathione

    Shu-De LI; Yan-Dan SU; Ming LI; Cheng-Gang ZOU

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the effect of ascorbic acid and glutathione on hemolysis induced by hemin in erythrocytes. Ascorbic acid not only enhanced hemolysis, but also induced formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the presence of hemin. It has been shown that glutathione inhibits hemin-induced hemolysis by mediating hemin degradation. Erythrocytes depleted of glutathione became very sensitive to oxidative stress induced by hemin and ascorbic acid. H2O2 was involved in heminmediated hemolysis in the presence of ascorbic acid. However, a combination of glutathione and ascorbic acid was more effective in inhibiting hemolysis induced by hemin than glutathione alone. Extracellular and intracellular ascorbic acid exhibited a similar effect on hemin-induced hemolysis or inhibition of hemininduced hemolysis by glutathione. The current study indicates that ascorbic acid might function as an antioxidant or prooxidant in hemin-mediated hemolysis, depending on whether glutathione is available.

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid regulates adhesion molecules and enhances migration of human oral keratinocytes.

    Thorlakson, Hong H; Schreurs, Olav; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2016-04-01

    Oral keratinocytes are connected via cell-to-cell adhesions to protect underlying tissues from physical and bacterial damage. Lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) are a family of phospholipid mediators that have the ability to regulate gene expression, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cytokine/chemokine secretion, which mediate proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Several forms of LPA are found in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid, but it is unknown how they affect human oral keratinocytes (HOK). The aim of the present study was therefore to examine how different LPA forms affect the expression of adhesion molecules and the migration and proliferation of HOK. Keratinocytes were isolated from gingival biopsies obtained from healthy donors and challenged with different forms of LPA. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression of adhesion molecules. Migration and proliferation assays were performed. Lysophosphatidic acids strongly promoted expression of E-cadherin and occludin mRNAs and translocation of E-cadherin protein from the cytoplasm to the membrane. Occludin and claudin-1 proteins were up-regulated by LPA. Migration of HOK in culture was increased, but proliferation was reduced, by the addition of LPA. This indicates that LPA can have a role in the regulation of the oral epithelial barrier by increasing the expression of adhesion molecules of HOK, by promotion of migration and by inhibition of proliferation. PMID:26913569

  15. Emotion Regulation Factors as Mediators between Body Dissatisfaction and Bulimic Symptoms in Early Adolescent Girls

    Sim, Leslie; Zeman, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Research suggests that negative affect is an important mediator in the relationship between body dissatisfaction and bulimic symptoms. This study examines the mediational role of specific emotion regulation processes (i.e., negative emotionality, poor awareness of emotion, nonconstructive coping with negative emotion) in bulimic symptoms. In…

  16. Barrier stabilizing mediators in regulation of microvascular endothelial permeability

    HUANG Qiao-bing

    2012-01-01

    Increase of microvascular permeability is one of the most important pathological events in the pathogenesis of trauma and bum injury.Massive leakage of fluid from vascular space leads to lose of blood plasma and decrease of effective circulatory blood volume,resulting in formation of severe tissue edema,hypotension or even shock,especially in severe bum injury.Fluid resuscitation has been the only valid approach to sustain patient's blood volume for a long time,due to the lack of overall and profound understanding of the mechanisms of vascular hyperpenneability response.There is an emerging concept in recent years that some so-called barrier stabilizing mediators play a positive role in preventing the increase of vascular permeability.These mediators may be released in response to proinflammatory mediators and serve to restore endothelial barrier function.Some of these stabilizing mediators are important even in quiescent state because they preserve basal vascular permeability at low levels.This review introduces some of these mediators and reveals their underlying signaling mechanisms during endothelial barrier enhancing process.

  17. PPAR-γ activation by Tityus serrulatus venom regulates lipid body formation and lipid mediator production.

    Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Sorgi, Carlos Artério; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-01-01

    Tityus serrulatus venom (TsV) consists of numerous peptides with different physiological and pharmacological activities. Studies have shown that scorpion venom increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production, contributing to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction, and patient death. We have previously demonstrated that TsV is a venom-associated molecular pattern (VAMP) recognized by TLRs inducing intense inflammatory reaction through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4. Lipid bodies (LBs) are potential sites for eicosanoid production by inflammatory cells. Moreover, recent studies have shown that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) is implicated in LB formation and acts as an important modulator of lipid metabolism during inflammation. In this study, we used murine macrophages to evaluate whether the LB formation induced by TsV after TLR recognition correlates with lipid mediator generation by macrophages and if it occurs through PPAR-γ activation. We demonstrate that TsV acts through TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation and PPAR-γ activation to induce LB formation and generation of PGE2 and LTB4. Our data also show that PPAR-γ negatively regulates the pro-inflammatory NF-κB transcription factor. Based on these results, we suggest that during envenomation, LBs constitute functional organelles for lipid mediator production through signaling pathways that depend on cell surface and nuclear receptors. These findings point to the inflammatory mechanisms that might also be triggered during human envenomation by TsV. PMID:25450800

  18. Emotional Regulation and Depression: A Potential Mediator between Heart and Mind

    Angelo Compare; Cristina Zarbo; Edo Shonin; William Gordon; Chiara Marconi

    2014-01-01

    A narrative review of the major evidence concerning the relationship between emotional regulation and depression was conducted. The literature demonstrates a mediating role of emotional regulation in the development of depression and physical illness. Literature suggests in fact that the employment of adaptive emotional regulation strategies (e.g., reappraisal) causes a reduction of stress-elicited emotions leading to physical disorders. Conversely, dysfunctional emotional regulation strategi...

  19. Enzymatically mediated incorporation of 2-chlorophenol 4-chlorophenol into humic acids

    Lassen, P.; Randall, A.; Jørgensen, O.;

    1994-01-01

    A possible route to chlorinated humic substances in the environment, is an indirect chlorination of humic material by enzymatically mediated incorporation of low molecular weight organo-chlorine compounds into the humic skeleton. The enzymatically mediated incorporation of 2-chlorophenol and 4......-chlorophenol into humic acids by Horseradish Peroxidase is reported. The incorporation is accompanied by a significant polymerization of the chlorophenols. The stability of the chlorinated humic acids as well as the environmental implication are discussed....

  20. REGULATION OF INSURANCE MEDIATION IN CONDITIONS OF EURO INTEGRATION PROCESSES OF UKRAINE

    A. Sholoiko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The review of national and European legislation in the field of regulation of insurance mediation is made. Subjects and object of regulation of insurance mediation are defined. The order of the legislative approximation in conditions of changing legislation of regulation of insurance mediation in European Union is characterized. A comparison of legal provisions to regulate insurance mediation in Ukraine and the EU is done. Suggestions of adaptation national legislation to the European in the area of regulation of insurance mediation in conditions of euro integration processes are represented. The main are the next: - it is advisable to expand the object and the scope of regulation of insurance mediation and set appropriate limits to the subjects for which the sale of insurance products is not the main activity; - it is necessary to introduce a regular improvement of the knowledge and skills for insurance distributors because of the development of insurance conditions and changing of economic environment; - it is necessary to create the order of compulsory professional indemnity insurance in accordance with the requirements of the Directive on insurance distribution; - before the signing of the contract it is necessary to disclosure to customers of insurance products the information about the status of insurance distributors and type of remuneration that they receive; - if the insurance product is in addition to the goods or services, insurance distributor shall inform the client about the possibility of buying various product components separately with the presentation of their characteristics.

  1. Nutrient Regulation: Conjugated Linoleic Acid's Inflammatory and Browning Properties in Adipose Tissue.

    Shen, Wan; McIntosh, Michael K

    2016-07-17

    Obesity is the most widespread nutritional disease in the United States. Developing effective and safe strategies to manage excess body weight is therefore of paramount importance. One potential strategy to reduce obesity is to consume conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements containing isomers cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12, or trans-10, cis-12 alone. Proposed antiobesity mechanisms of CLA include regulation of (a) adipogenesis, (b) lipid metabolism, (c) inflammation, (d) adipocyte apoptosis, (e) browning or beiging of adipose tissue, and (f) energy metabolism. However, causality of CLA-mediated responses to body fat loss, particularly the linkage between inflammation, thermogenesis, and energy metabolism, is unclear. This review examines whether CLA's antiobesity properties are due to inflammatory signaling and considers CLA's linkage with lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, and browning of white and brown adipose tissue. We propose a series of questions and studies to interrogate the role of the sympathetic nervous system in mediating CLA's antiobesity properties. PMID:27431366

  2. SuperSAGE analysis of the Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome after fatty acid-amino acid elicitation (FAC: identification of early mediators of insect responses

    Baldwin Ian T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants trigger and tailor defense responses after perception of the oral secretions (OS of attacking specialist lepidopteran larvae. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs in the OS of the Manduca sexta larvae are necessary and sufficient to elicit the herbivory-specific responses in Nicotiana attenuata, an annual wild tobacco species. How FACs are perceived and activate signal transduction mechanisms is unknown. Results We used SuperSAGE combined with 454 sequencing to quantify the early transcriptional changes elicited by the FAC N-linolenoyl-glutamic acid (18:3-Glu and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS to examine the function of candidate genes in the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. The analysis targeted mRNAs encoding regulatory components: rare transcripts with very rapid FAC-elicited kinetics (increases within 60 and declines within 120 min. From 12,744 unique Tag sequences identified (UniTags, 430 and 117 were significantly up- and down-regulated ≥ 2.5-fold, respectively, after 18:3-Glu elicitation compared to wounding. Based on gene ontology classification, more than 25% of the annotated UniTags corresponded to putative regulatory components, including 30 transcriptional regulators and 22 protein kinases. Quantitative PCR analysis was used to analyze the FAC-dependent regulation of a subset of 27 of these UniTags and for most of them a rapid and transient induction was confirmed. Six FAC-regulated genes were functionally characterized by VIGS and two, a putative lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP and a protein of unknown function, were identified as important mediators of the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. Conclusions The analysis of the early changes in the transcriptome of N. attenuata after FAC elicitation using SuperSAGE/454 has identified regulatory genes involved in insect-specific mediated responses in plants. Moreover, it has provided a foundation for the identification of additional novel regulators

  3. Altered Cultivar Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage Seedlings Mediated by Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene

    Young Hee Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two cultivars Buram-3-ho (susceptible and CR-Hagwang (moderate resistant of kimchi cabbage seedlings showed differential defense responses to anthracnose (Colletotrichum higginsianum, black spot (Alternaria brassicicola and black rot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Xcc diseases in our previous study. Defense-related hormones salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene led to different transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR gene expression in both cultivars. In this study, exogenous application of SA suppressed basal defenses to C. higginsianum in the 1st leaves of the susceptible cultivar and cultivar resistance of the 2nd leaves of the resistant cultivar. SA also enhanced susceptibility of the susceptible cultivar to A. brassicicola. By contrast, SA elevated disease resistance to Xcc in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible cultivar. Methyl jasmonate (MJ treatment did not affect the disease resistance to C. higginsianum and Xcc in either cultivar, but it compromised the disease resistance to A. brassicicola in the resistant cultivar. Treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC ethylene precursor did not change resistance of the either cultivar to C. higginsianum and Xcc. Effect of ACC pretreatment on the resistance to A. brassicicola was not distinguished between susceptible and resistant cultivars, because cultivar resistance of the resistant cultivar was lost by prolonged moist dark conditions. Taken together, exogenously applied SA, JA and ethylene altered defense signaling crosstalk to three diseases of anthracnose, black spot and black rot in a cultivar-dependent manner.

  4. RNAi mediated down regulation of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase to generate low phytate rice

    Ali, Nusrat; Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K.; Datta, Karabi

    2013-01-01

    Background Phytic acid (InsP6) is considered as the major source of phosphorus and inositol phosphates in cereal grains. Reduction of phytic acid level in cereal grains is desirable in view of its antinutrient properties to maximize mineral bioavailability and minimize the load of phosphorus waste management. We report here RNAi mediated seed-specific silencing of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS) gene catalyzing the first step of phytic acid biosynthesis in rice. Moreover, we also stu...

  5. Physiological and clinical significance of enterochromaffin-like cell activation in the regulation of gastric acid secretion

    Guanglin Cui; Helge L Waldum

    2007-01-01

    Gastric acid plays an important role in digesting food (especially protein), iron absorption, and destroying swallowed micro-organisms. H+ is secreted by the oxyntic parietal cells and its secretion is regulated by endocrine, neurocrine and paracrine mechanisms.Gastrin released from the antral G cell is the principal physiological stimulus of gastric acid secretion. Activation of the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell is accepted as the main source of histamine participating in the regulation of acid secretion and is functionally and trophically controlled by gastrin, which is mediated by gastrin/CCK-2 receptors expressed on the ECL cell. However, longterm hypergastrinemia will induce ECL cell hyperplasia and probably carcinoids. Clinically, potent inhibitors of acid secretion have been prescribed widely to patients with acid-related disorders. Long-term potent acid inhibition evokes a marked increase in plasma gastrin levels,leading to enlargement of oxyntic mucosa with ECL cell hyperplasia. Accordingly, the induction of ECL cell hyperplasia and carcinoids remains a topic of considerable concern, especially in long-term use. In addition, the activation of ECL cells also induces another clinical concern, i.e., rebound acid hypersecretion after acid inhibition. Recent experimental and clinical findings indicate that the activation of ECL cells plays a critical role both physiologically and clinically in the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

  6. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression ...

  7. Potency of Individual Bile Acids to Regulate Bile Acid Synthesis and Transport Genes in Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultures

    Liu, Jie; LU, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. ...

  8. Carbonic anhydrase 5 regulates acid-base homeostasis in zebrafish.

    Ruben Postel

    Full Text Available The regulation of the acid-base balance in cells is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. Disturbed acid-base balance directly affects cellular physiology, which often results in various pathological conditions. In every living organism, the protein family of carbonic anhydrases regulate a broad variety of homeostatic processes. Here we describe the identification, mapping and cloning of a zebrafish carbonic anhydrase 5 (ca5 mutation, collapse of fins (cof, which causes initially a collapse of the medial fins followed by necrosis and rapid degeneration of the embryo. These phenotypical characteristics can be mimicked in wild-type embryos by acetazolamide treatment, suggesting that CA5 activity in zebrafish is essential for a proper development. In addition we show that CA5 regulates acid-base balance during embryonic development, since lowering the pH can compensate for the loss of CA5 activity. Identification of selective modulators of CA5 activity could have a major impact on the development of new therapeutics involved in the treatment of a variety of disorders.

  9. Need satisfaction, motivational regulations and exercise: moderation and mediation effects

    Weman-Josefsson, Karin; Lindwall, Magnus; Ivarsson, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Based on the Self-determination theory process model, this study aimed to explore relationships between the latent constructs of psychological need satisfaction, autonomous motivation and exercise behaviour; the mediational role of autonomous motivation in the association of psychological need satisfaction with exercise behaviour; as well as gender and age differences in the aforementioned associations. Methods Adult active members of an Internet-based exercise program (n = 1091) b...

  10. Tea Polyphenols Regulate Key Mediators on Inflammatory Cardiovascular Diseases

    Jun-ichi Suzuki; Mitsuaki Isobe; Ryuichi Morishita; Ryozo Nagai

    2009-01-01

    Tea polyphenols known as catechins are key components with many biological functions, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anticarcinogenic effects. These effects are induced by the suppression of several inflammatory factors including nuclear factor-kappa B (NF- B). While these characteristics of catechins have been well documented, actions of catechins as mediators on inflammation-related cardiovascular diseases have not yet been well investigated. In this article, we reviewed ...

  11. The role of metalloproteinase ADAM17 in regulating ICOS ligand-mediated humoral immune responses

    Marczynska, Joanna; Ozga, Aleksandra; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka;

    2014-01-01

    Immune cells regulate cell surface receptor expression during their maturation, activation, and motility. Although many of these receptors are regulated largely at the level of expression, protease-mediated ectodomain shedding represents an alternative means of refashioning the surface of immune ...... suggest a functional link between ADAM17 and ICOSL in controlling adaptive immune responses....

  12. Emotion Regulation and Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers: The Mediating Role of Social Information Processing

    Helmsen, Johanna; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the relation between maladaptive emotion regulation and aggression was mediated by deviant social information processing (SIP). Participants were 193 preschool children. Emotion regulation and aggression were rated by teachers. Deviant SIP (i.e., attribution of hostile intent, aggressive response generation, aggressive…

  13. Involvement of atypical protein kinase C in the regulation of cardiac glucose and long-chain fatty acid uptake

    JanGlatz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cardiac GLUT4 translocation/glucose uptake and CD36 translocation/ long-chain fatty acid uptake are not fully understood. We compared in heart/muscle-specific PKC-λ knockout mice the roles of atypical PKCs (PKC-ζ and PKC-λ in regulating cardiac glucose and fatty acid uptake. Results: Neither insulin-stimulated nor AMPK-mediated glucose and fatty acid uptake were inhibited upon genetic PKC-λ ablation in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, myristoylated PKC-ζ pseudosubstrate inhibited both insulin-stimulated and AMPK-mediated glucose and fatty acid uptake by >80% in both wild-type and PKC-λ-knockout cardiomyocytes. In PKC-λ knockout cardiomyocytes, PKC-ζ is the sole remaining atypical PKC isoform, and its expression level is not different from wild-type cardiomyocytes, in which it contributes to 29% and 17% of total atypical PKC expression and phosphorylation, respectively. Conclusion: Taken together, atypical PKCs are necessary for insulin-stimulated and AMPK-mediated glucose uptake into the heart, as well as for insulin-stimulated and AMPK-mediated fatty acid uptake. However, the residual PKC-ζ activity in PKC-λ-knockout cardiomyocytes is sufficient to allow optimal stimulation of glucose and fatty acid uptake, indicating that atypical PKCs are necessary but not rate-limiting in the regulation of cardiac substrate uptake and that PKC-λ and PKC-ζ have interchangeable functions in these processes.

  14. K-channels inhibited by hydrogen peroxide mediate abscisic acid signaling in Vicia guard cells

    2001-01-01

    A number of studies show that environmental stress conditions increase abscisic acid (ABA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels in plant cells. Despite this central role of ABA in altering stomatal aperture by regulating guard cell ion transport, little is known concerning the relationship between ABA and H2O2 in signal transduction leading to stomatal movement. Epidermal strip bioassay illustrated that ABA-inhibited stomatal opening and ABA-induced stomatal closure were abolished partly by externally added catalase (CAT) or diphenylene iodonium (DPI), which are a H2O2 scavenger and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor respectively. In contrast, internally added CAT or DPI nearly completely or partly reversed ABA-induced closure in half-stoma. Consistent with these results, whole-cell patch-clamp analysis showed that intracellular application of CAT or DPI partly abolished ABA-inhibited inward K+ current across the plasma membrane of guard cells. H2O2 mimicked ABA to inhibit inward K+ current, an effect which was reversed by the addition of ascorbic acid (Vc) in patch clamping micropipettes. These results suggested that H2O2 mediated ABA-induced stomatal movement by targeting inward K+ channels at plasma membrane.

  15. Acid rain compliance: Coordination of state and federal regulation

    The Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 impose new controls on emissions by electric utilities of the two major precursors of acid rain: sulfur dioxide (SO2) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Utilities, and the utility holding company systems and power pools of which they are members, will be subject to extensive and costly compliance obligations under the new statute. Most of these utilities, utility systems, and power pools are regulated by more than one utility regulatory authority. Some utilities are regulated by several states, some by a single state and by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and some by multiple states, by the FERC, and by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Utility regulators will need to coordinate their policies for ratemaking and for reviewing acid rain compliance strategies if least cost solutions are to be implemented without imposing on ratepayers and utility shareholders the costs and risks of inconsistent regulatory determinations. This article outlines the scope of the coordination problem and addresses possible approaches that utility regulators may take to deal with this problem

  16. Difficulties with emotion regulation mediate the relationship between borderline personality disorder symptom severity and interpersonal problems.

    Herr, Nathaniel R; Rosenthal, M Zachary; Geiger, Paul J; Erikson, Karen

    2013-08-01

    Problems with interpersonal functioning and difficulties with emotion regulation are core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Little is known, however, about the interrelationship between these areas of dysfunction in accounting for BPD symptom severity. The present study examines a model of the relationship between difficulties with emotion regulation and interpersonal dysfunction in a community sample of adults (n = 124) with the full range of BPD symptoms. Results showed that difficulties with emotion regulation fully mediated the relationship between BPD symptom severity and interpersonal dysfunction. An alternative model indicated that interpersonal problems partially mediated the relationship between difficulties with emotion regulation and BPD symptom severity. These findings support existing theories of BPD, which propose that difficulties with emotion regulation may account for the types of interpersonal problems experienced by individuals with BPD and suggest further examination of the possibility that interpersonal dysfunction may worsen these individuals' difficulties with emotion regulation. PMID:24343962

  17. The protective effect of salicylic acid on lysozyme against riboflavin-mediated photooxidation

    Li, Kun; Wang, Hongbao; Cheng, Lingli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Mei; Wang, Shi-Long

    2011-06-01

    As a metabolite of aspirin in vivo, salicylic acid was proved to protect lysozyme from riboflavin-mediated photooxidation in this study. The antioxidative properties of salicylic acid were further studied by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm. It can quench the triplet state of riboflavin via electron transfer from salicylic acid to the triplet state of riboflavin with a reaction constant of 2.25 × 10 9 M -1 s -1. Mechanism of antioxidant activities of salicylic acid on lysozyme oxidation was discussed. Salicylic acid can serve as a potential antioxidant to quench the triplet state of riboflavin and reduce oxidative pressure.

  18. Solanum lycopersicum IAA15 functions in the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide mechanism of action by mediating abscisic acid signalling.

    Xu, Tao; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xin; Gao, Song; Qi, Mingfang; Li, Tianlai

    2015-07-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), an important plant growth regulator, is the herbicide most commonly used worldwide to control weeds. However, broad-leaf fruits and vegetables are extremely sensitive to herbicides, which can cause damage and result in lost crops when applied in a manner inconsistent with the directions. Despite detailed knowledge of the mechanism of 2,4-D, the regulation of auxin signalling is still unclear. For example, although the major mediators of auxin signalling, including auxin/indole acetic acid (AUX/IAA) proteins and auxin response factors (ARFs), are known to mediate auxinic herbicides, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, the effects of 2,4-D on AUX/IAA gene expression in tomato were investigated, and the two most notably up-regulated genes, SlIAA15 and SlIAA29, were selected for further study. Western blotting revealed the substantial accumulation of both SlIAA15 and SlIAA29, and the expression levels of the corresponding genes were increased following abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene treatment. Overexpressing SlIAA15, but not SlIAA29, induced a 2,4-D herbicide damage phenotype. The 35S::SlIAA15 line exhibited a strong reduction in leaf stomatal density and altered expression of some R2R3 MYB genes that are putatively involved in the regulation of stomatal differentiation. Further study revealed that root elongation in 35S::SlIAA15 was sensitive to ABA treatment, and was most probably due to the altered expression of an ABA signal transduction gene. In addition, the altered auxin sensitivities of SlIAA15 transformants were also explored. These results suggested that SlIAA15 plays an important role in determining the effects of the herbicide 2,4-D. PMID:25948703

  19. Feed-forward regulation of bile acid detoxification by CYP3A4: studies in humanized transgenic mice.

    Stedman, Catherine; Robertson, Graham; Coulter, Sally; Liddle, Christopher

    2004-03-19

    Bile acids are potentially toxic end products of cholesterol metabolism and their concentrations must be tightly regulated. Homeostasis is maintained by both feed-forward regulation and feedback regulation. We used humanized transgenic mice incorporating 13 kb of the 5' regulatory flanking sequence of CYP3A4 linked to a lacZ reporter gene to explore the in vivo relationship between bile acids and physiological adaptive CYP3A gene regulation in acute cholestasis after bile duct ligation (BDL). Male transgenic mice were subjected to BDL or sham surgery prior to sacrifice on days 3, 6, and 10, and others were injected with intraperitoneal lithocholic acid (LCA) or vehicle alone. BDL resulted in marked hepatic activation of the CYP3A4/lacZ transgene in pericentral hepatocytes, with an 80-fold increase in transgene activation by day 10. Individual bile acids were quantified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Serum 6beta-hydroxylated bile acids were increased following BDL, confirming the physiological relevance of endogenous Cyp3a induction to bile acid detoxification. Although concentrations of conjugated primary bile acids increased after BDL, there was no increase in LCA, a putative PXR ligand, indicating that this cannot be the only endogenous bile acid mediating this protective response. Moreover, in LCA-treated animals, 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside staining showed hepatic activation of the CYP3A4 transgene only on the liver capsular surface, and minimal parenchymal induction, despite significant liver injury. This study demonstrates that CYP3A up-regulation is a significant in vivo adaptive response to cholestasis. However, this up-regulation is not dependent on increases in circulating LCA and the role of other bile acids as regulatory molecules requires further exploration. PMID:14681232

  20. Synthetic Fatty Acids Prevent Plasmid-Mediated Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Getino Redondo, María; Sanabria Ríos, David J.; Fernández López, Raúl; Campos Gómez, Javier; Sánchez López, José M.; Fernández Medarde, Antonio; Carballeira Cabranes, Néstor M.; Cruz Calahorra, Fernando de la

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation constitutes a major horizontal gene transfer mechanism for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes among human pathogens. Antibiotic resistance spread could be halted or diminished by molecules that interfere with the conjugation process. In this work, synthetic 2-alkynoic fatty acids were identified as a novel class of conjugation inhibitors. Their chemical properties were investigated by using the prototype 2-hexadecynoic acid and its derivatives. Essential fe...

  1. The regulation of the intestinal mucin MUC2 expression by short chain fatty acids: implications for epithelial protection

    Burger-van Paassen, Nanda; Vincent, Audrey; Puiman, Patrycja J; van der Sluis, Maria; Bouma, Janneke; Boehm, Günther; Van Goudoever, Johannes B; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Ingrid B Renes

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), fermentation products of bacteria, influence epithelial-specific gene expression. We hypothesize that SCFAs affect goblet cell-specific mucin MUC2 expression and thereby alter epithelial protection. Our aim was to study the mechanisms that regulate butyrate-mediated effects on MUC2 synthesis. Human goblet cell-like LS174T cells were treated with SCFAs, after which MUC2 mRNA levels and stability and MUC2 protein expression were analyzed. SCF...

  2. High and low molecular weight hyaluronic acid differentially regulate human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Anu S Maharjan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following tissue injury, monocytes can enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, but little is known about what regulates this differentiation. Extracellular matrix contains high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA; ∼2×10(6 Da. During injury, HMWHA breaks down to low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA; ∼0.8-8×10(5 Da. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this report, we show that HMWHA potentiates the differentiation of human monocytes into fibrocytes, while LMWHA inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Digestion of HMWHA with hyaluronidase produces small hyaluronic acid fragments, and these fragments inhibit fibrocyte differentiation. Monocytes internalize HMWHA and LMWHA equally well, suggesting that the opposing effects on fibrocyte differentiation are not due to differential internalization of HMWHA or LMWHA. Adding HMWHA to PBMC does not appear to affect the levels of the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44, whereas adding LMWHA decreases CD44 levels. The addition of anti-CD44 antibodies potentiates fibrocyte differentiation, suggesting that CD44 mediates at least some of the effect of hyaluronic acid on fibrocyte differentiation. The fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting factor serum amyloid P (SAP inhibits HMWHA-induced fibrocyte differentiation and potentiates LMWHA-induced inhibition. Conversely, LMWHA inhibits the ability of HMWHA, interleukin-4 (IL-4, or interleukin-13 (IL-13 to promote fibrocyte differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesize that hyaluronic acid signals at least in part through CD44 to regulate fibrocyte differentiation, with a dominance hierarchy of SAP>LMWHA≥HMWHA>IL-4 or IL-13.

  3. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway

  4. A buffer-regulated HF acid for sandstone acidizing to 550/sup 0/F

    Scheuerman, R.F.

    1988-02-01

    Two earlier papers discussed the suitability of bugger-regulated HF acid (BRHFA) for high-temperature sandstone matrix stimulation treatments. Acetic-acid/acetate buffering (pH = 4.5 to 5.0) limited corrosion to acceptable levels at temperatures up to about 350/sup 0/F (177/sup 0/C). Subsequent development of reservoirs with temperatures approaching 450/sup 0/F (232/sup 0/C) demonstrated a need for even higher-temperature acidizing systems. This paper discusses a new, less corrosive BRHFA formulation that has clay-dissolving capacity comparable to 7 1/2% HCl/1 1/2% HF acid. The corrosion rate of carbon steel at 550/sup 0/F (288/sup 0/C) is only 330 mils/yr (8.4 mm/a). The BRHFA systems are also compatible with a variety of corrosion-resistant alloys. This paper presents clay slurry, core flow, and corrosion data and discusses use guidelines.

  5. Clinical Neuroanatomy and Neurotransmitter-Mediated Regulation of Penile Erection

    Jung, Junyang; Jo, Hyun Woo; Kwon, Hyunseob; Jeong, Na Young

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has an adverse impact on men's quality of life. Penile erection, which is regulated by nerves that are innervated into the erectile tissue, can be affected by functional or anatomical trauma of the perineal region, including specific structures of the penis, causing ED. Penile erection is neurologically controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand the neurogenic structure of the erectile tissue and the types of neuro...

  6. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as ...

  7. Successful behavior change in obesity interventions in adults: a systematic review of self-regulation mediators

    Texeira, Pedro J; Carraça, Eliana V; Marques, Marta M; Rutter, Harry; Oppert, Jean-Michel; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Lakerveld, Jeroen; Brug, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Background Relapse is high in lifestyle obesity interventions involving behavior and weight change. Identifying mediators of successful outcomes in these interventions is critical to improve effectiveness and to guide approaches to obesity treatment, including resource allocation. This article reviews the most consistent self-regulation mediators of medium- and long-term weight control, physical activity, and dietary intake in clinical and community behavior change interventions targeting ove...

  8. Nutrient-responsive regulation determines biodiversity in a colicin-mediated bacterial community

    Hol, F.J.H. (Felix); Voges, M.J.; Dekker, C.; Keymer, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antagonistic interactions mediated by antibiotics are strong drivers of bacterial community dynamics which shape biodiversity. Colicin production by Escherichia coli is such an interaction that governs intraspecific competition and is involved in promoting biodiversity. It is unknown how environmental cues affect regulation of the colicin operon and thus influence antibiotic-mediated community dynamics. Results Here, we investigate the community dynamics of colicin-producing, -sens...

  9. Ku proteins function as corepressors to regulate farnesoid X receptor-mediated gene expression

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates the expression of genes involved in enterohepatic circulation and the metabolism of bile acids. Based on functional analyses, nuclear receptors are divided into regions A-F. To explore the cofactors interacting with FXR, we performed a pull-down assay using GST-fused to the N-terminal A/B region and the C region, which are required for the ligand-independent transactivation and DNA-binding, respectively, of FXR, and nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), Ku80, and Ku70 as FXR associated factors. These proteins are known to have an important role in DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. DNA-PKcs mainly interacted with the A/B region of FXR, whereas the Ku proteins interacted with the C region and with the D region (hinge region). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the Ku proteins associated with FXR on the bile salt export pump (BSEP) promoter. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of the Ku proteins decreased the promoter activity and expression of BSEP gene mediated by FXR. These results suggest that the Ku proteins function as corepressors for FXR.

  10. Ku proteins function as corepressors to regulate farnesoid X receptor-mediated gene expression

    Ohno, Masae; Kunimoto, Masaaki; Nishizuka, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro [Department of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8603 (Japan); Imagawa, Masayoshi, E-mail: imagawa@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8603 (Japan)

    2009-12-18

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates the expression of genes involved in enterohepatic circulation and the metabolism of bile acids. Based on functional analyses, nuclear receptors are divided into regions A-F. To explore the cofactors interacting with FXR, we performed a pull-down assay using GST-fused to the N-terminal A/B region and the C region, which are required for the ligand-independent transactivation and DNA-binding, respectively, of FXR, and nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), Ku80, and Ku70 as FXR associated factors. These proteins are known to have an important role in DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. DNA-PKcs mainly interacted with the A/B region of FXR, whereas the Ku proteins interacted with the C region and with the D region (hinge region). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the Ku proteins associated with FXR on the bile salt export pump (BSEP) promoter. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of the Ku proteins decreased the promoter activity and expression of BSEP gene mediated by FXR. These results suggest that the Ku proteins function as corepressors for FXR.

  11. Pivotal Role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the Cross-Regulation of Dendritic Cell-Derived Inflammatory Mediators

    Hedi Harizi; Norbert Gualde

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to pathogens induces antigen-presenting cells (APC) such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) to produce various endogenous mediators, including arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids, cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO). Many secreted products of activated APC can act by themselves in an autocrine manner and modulate their function. Moreover, the cross-interaction between endogenous bioactive molecules regulates the function of professional APC with important consequences for their ability to activate and sustain immune and inflammatory responses, and to regulate immune homeostasis. Although neglected for many years when compared to their role in cardiovascular homeostasis, cancer and inflammation, the importance of eicosanoids in immunology is becoming more defined. The role of prostaglandin (PG) E2 (PGE2), one of the best known and most well studied eicosanoids,is of particular interest. It modulates the activities of professional DC by acting on their differentiation, maturation and their ability to secrete cytokines. Uniquely among haematopoietic cytokines, interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic molecule that displays both immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory activities. IL-10 has attached much attention because of its anti-inflammatory properties. It modulates expression of cytokines, soluble mediators and cell surface molecules by cells of myeloid origin, particularly macrophages and DC. We previously reported that PGE2 is a potent inducer of IL-10 in bone marrow-derived DC (BM-DC), and PGE2-induced IL-10 is a key regulator of the BM-DC pro-inflammatory phenotype. BM-DC may be considered as an important model to study complex interactions between endogenous mediators, and autocrine IL-10 plays a pivotal role in the crossregulation of AA-derived lipid mediators, cytokines, and NO, with critical effects on immune and inflammatory responses. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):271-277.

  12. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  13. Tetramethylpyrazine stimulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated anion secretion in distal colon of rodents

    Qiong He; Jin-Xia Zhu; Ying Xing; Lai-Ling Tsang; Ning Yang; Dewi Kenneth Rowlands; Yiu-Wa Chung; Hsiao-Chang Chan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), an active compound from Ligustiun Wollichii Franchat, on electrolyte transport across the distal colon of rodents and the mechanism involved.METHODS: The short-circuit current (ISC) technique in conjunction with pharmacological agents and specific inhibitors were used in analyzing the electrolyte transport across the distal colon of rodents. The underlying cellular signaling mechanism was investigated by radioimmunoassay analysis (RIA) and a special mouse model of cystic fibrosis.RESULTS: TMP stimulated a concentration-dependent rise in ISC, which was dependent on both Cl- and HCO3-, and inhibited by apical application of diphenylamine-2,2'-dicarboxylic acid (DPC) and glibenclamide, but resistant to 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt hydrate (DIDS). Removal of Na+ from basolateral solution almost completely abolished the ISC response to TMP, but it was insensitive to apical Na+ replacement or apical Na+channel blocker, amiloride. Pretreatment of colonic mucosa with BAPTA-AM, a membrane-permeable selective Ca2+chelator, did not significantly alter the TMP-induced ISC. No additive effect of forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) was observed on the TMP-induced ISc, but it was significantly reduced by a protein kinase A inhibitor, H89.RIA results showed that TMP (1 mmol/L) elicited a significant increase in cellular cAMP production, which was similar to that elicited by the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin (10 μmol/L). The TMP-elicited ISC as well as forskolin- or IBMX-induced ISC were abolished in mice with homozygous mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) presenting defective CFTR functions and secretions.CONCLUSION: TMP may stimulate cAMP-dependent and CFTR-mediated Cl- and HCO3- secretion. This may have implications in the future development of alternative treatment for constipation.

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Mediates Glycemic Regulation by Hepatic JNK

    Santiago Vernia; Julie Cavanagh-Kyros; Tamera Barrett; Cathy Tournier; Roger J. Davis

    2016-01-01

    The cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is implicated in metabolic syndrome, including dysregulated blood glucose concentration and insulin resistance. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a target of the hepatic JNK signaling pathway and may contribute to the regulation of glycemia. To test the role of FGF21, we established mice with selective ablation of the Fgf21 gene in hepatocytes. FGF21-deficiency in the liver caused marked loss of FGF21 protein circulating in the blood. ...

  15. Fulvic Acid Mediated Photolysis of Ibuprofen in Water.

    Photolysis of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was studied in solutions of fulvic acid (FA) isolated from Pony Lake, Antarctica; Suwannee River, GA, USA; and Old Woman Creek, OH, USA. At an initial concentration of 10 µM ibuprofen degrades by direct photolysis...

  16. New insights into the acid mediated disproportionation of pentavalent uranyl

    Mougel, Victor; Biswas, Biplab; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, SCIB, UMR-E 3 CEA-UJF FRE 3200 CNRS, INAC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The reaction of benzoic acid with the uranyl(V) complex [(UO{sub 2}Py{sub 5})(KI{sub 2}Py{sub 2})] in pyridine leads to immediate disproportionation with formation of a hexa-nuclear U(IV) benzoate cluster, a bis-benzoate complex of uranyl(VI) and water. (authors)

  17. Opposite Regulation of CD36 Ubiquitination by Fatty Acids and Insulin: EFFECTS ON FATTY ACID UPTAKE*

    Smith, Jill; Su, Xiong; El-Maghrabi, Raafat; Stahl, Philip D.; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2008-01-01

    FAT/CD36 is a membrane scavenger receptor that facilitates long chain fatty acid uptake by muscle. Acute increases in membrane CD36 and fatty acid uptake have been reported in response to insulin and contraction. In this study we have explored protein ubiquitination as one potential mechanism for the regulation of CD36 level. CD36 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) or HEK 293 cells was found to be polyubiquitinated via a process involving both lysines 48 and 63 of ubiquitin. Using CHO c...

  18. Own pace, own space, own face, human, and tool support : Mediators in web-based self-regulation learning

    Latva-Karjanmaa, Raija

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the study is to identify how mediation supports a web-based course on self-regulation. In the context of education, mediation can be defined as a supporter or promoter of learning. Mediation selects, interprets, and amplifies objects for human learners. The study creates an integrated view of mediators as learning promoters based on Vygotsky s (1978) and Feuerstein s theories (1990, 1991) for studying mediators in web-based learning. This study presents an integrated definition o...

  19. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA. PMID:23688550

  20. Distinct brain systems mediate the effects of nociceptive input and self-regulation on pain.

    Choong-Wan Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive self-regulation can strongly modulate pain and emotion. However, it is unclear whether self-regulation primarily influences primary nociceptive and affective processes or evaluative ones. In this study, participants engaged in self-regulation to increase or decrease pain while experiencing multiple levels of painful heat during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI imaging. Both heat intensity and self-regulation strongly influenced reported pain, but they did so via two distinct brain pathways. The effects of stimulus intensity were mediated by the neurologic pain signature (NPS, an a priori distributed brain network shown to predict physical pain with over 90% sensitivity and specificity across four studies. Self-regulation did not influence NPS responses; instead, its effects were mediated through functional connections between the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. This pathway was unresponsive to noxious input, and has been broadly implicated in valuation, emotional appraisal, and functional outcomes in pain and other types of affective processes. These findings provide evidence that pain reports are associated with two dissociable functional systems: nociceptive/affective aspects mediated by the NPS, and evaluative/functional aspects mediated by a fronto-striatal system.

  1. Dexamethasone-mediated transcriptional regulation of rat carboxylesterase 2 gene.

    Hori, Takeshi; Jin, Liangjing; Fujii, Ayako; Furihata, Tomomi; Nagahara, Yuko; Chiba, Kan; Hosokawa, Masakiyo

    2012-07-01

    Rat carboxylesterase 2 (rCES2), which was previously identified as a methylprednisolone 21-hemisuccinate hydrolase, is highly inducible by dexamethasone in the liver. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which this induction occurs. Injection of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg weight) into rats resulted in increases in the expression of rCES2 mRNA in a time-dependent manner with a peak at 12 h after injection. In primary rat hepatocytes, the expression level of rCES2 mRNA was increased by treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone, and the increase was completely blocked in the presence of 10 µM mifepristone (RU-486), a potent inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), or 10 µg/mL cycloheximide, a translation inhibitor. Luciferase assays revealed that 100 nM dexamethasone increased rCES2 promoter activities, although the effect of dexamethasone on the promoter activity was smaller than that on rCES2 mRNA expression. The increased activities were completely inhibited by treatment of the hepatocytes with 10 µM RU-486. Based on these results, it is concluded that dexamethasone enhances transcription of the rCES2 gene via GR in the rat liver and that the dexamethasone-mediated induction of rCES2 mRNA may be dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Our results provide clues to understanding what compounds induce rCES2. PMID:22235919

  2. Ionic liquid mediated esterification of alcohol with acetic acid

    Beilei ZHOU; Yanxiong FANG; Hao GU; Saidan ZHANG; Baohua HUANG; Kun ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Highly efficient esterification of alcohols with acetic acid by using a Bransted acidic ionic liquid, i.e., 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidonium hydrogen sulfate ([Hnmp]HSo4), as catalyst has been realized. The turnover numbers (TON) were able to reach up to 11000 and turnover frequency (TOF) was 846. The catalytic system is suitable for the esterification of long chain aliphatic alcohols, benzyl alcohol and cyclohexanol with good yields of esters. The procedure of separating the product and catalyst is simple, and the catalyst could be reused. [Hnmp]HSO4 had much weaker corrosiveness than H2SO4. The corrosive rate of H2SO4 was 400 times more than that of [Hnmp]HSO4 to stainless steel.

  3. Hyaluronic acid: A promising mediator for periodontal regeneration

    Bansal Jyoti; Kedige Suresh; Anand Samir

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a natural-non sulphated high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that forms a critical component of the extracellular matrix and contributes significantly to tissue hydrodynamics, cell migration and proliferation. The use of HA in the treatment of inflammatory process is established in medical areas such as orthopedics, dermatology and ophthalmology. In the field of dentistry, hyaluronate has shown anti-inflammatory, antiedematous and anti-bacterial effects for the trea...

  4. Dietary arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid regulate liver fatty acid desaturase (FADS) alternative transcript expression in suckling piglets.

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Downs, Ian; Srigley, Cynthia Tyburczy; Kothapalli, Kumar S D; Park, Woo Jung; Blank, Bryant S; Zimmer, J Paul; Butt, C M; Salem, Norman; Brenna, J Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Molecular regulation of fatty acid desaturase (Fads) gene expression by dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) during early post-natal period, when the demand for long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) is very high, has not been well defined. The objective of the current study was to determine regulation of liver Fads1, Fads2 and Fads3 classical (CS) and alternative transcripts (AT) expression by dietary ARA and DHA, within the physiological range present in human breast milk, in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed one of six milk replacer formula diets (formula-reared groups, FR) with varying ARA and DHA content from days 3-28 of age. The ARA/DHA levels of the six formula diets were as follows (% total fatty acid, FA/FA): (A1) 0.1/1.0; (A2) 0.53/1.0; (A3-D3) 0.69/1.0; (A4) 1.1/1.0; (D2) 0.67/0.62; and (D1) 0.66/0.33. The control maternal-reared (MR) group remained with the dam. Fads1 expression was not significantly different between FR and MR groups. Fads2 expression was down-regulated significantly in diets with 1:1 ratio of ARA:DHA, compared to MR. Fads2 AT1 expression was highly correlated to Fads2 expression. Fads3 AT7 was the only Fads3 transcript sensitive to dietary LC-PUFA intake and was up-regulated in the formula diets with lowest ARA and DHA contents compared to MR. Thus, the present study provides evidence that the proportion of dietary ARA:DHA is a significant determinant of Fads2 expression and LC-PUFA metabolism during the early postnatal period. Further, the data suggest that Fads3 AT7 may have functional significance when dietary supply of ARA and DHA are low during early development. PMID:24075244

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates myeloid differentiation within the human bone marrow microenvironment.

    Denis Evseenko

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow.

  6. Metabolic regulation of amino acid uptake in marine waters

    Kirchman, D.L.; Hodson, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    To determine the relationships among the processes of uptake, intracellular pool formation, and incorporation of amino acids into protein, the authors measured the uptake of dipeptides and free amino acids by bacterial assemblages in estuarine and coastal waters of the southeast US. The dipeptide phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (phe-phe) lowered V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake when the turnover rate of phenylalanine was relatively high. When the turnover rate was relatively low, phe-phe either had no effect or increased V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake. An analytical model was developed and tested to measure the turnover time of the intracellular pool of phenylalanine. The results suggested that the size of the intracellular pool is regulated, which precludes high assimilation rates of both phenylalanine and phe-phe. In waters with relatively low phenylalanine turnover rates, bacterial assemblages appear to have a greater capacity to assimilate phenylalanine and phe-phe simultaneously. Marine bacterial assemblages do not substantially increase the apparent respiration of amino acids when concentrations increase. The authors conclude that sustained increases in uptake rates and mineralization by marine bacterial assemblages in response to an increase in the concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen is determined by the rate of protein synthesis.

  7. Scaffold mediated regulation of MAPK signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics: A perspective

    Pullikuth, Ashok K.; Catling, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    Cell migration is critical for many physiological processes and is often misregulated in developmental disorders and pathological conditions including cancer and neurodegeneration. MAPK signaling and the Rho family of proteins are known regulators of cell migration that exert their influence on cellular cytoskeleton during cell adhesion and migration. Here we review data supporting the view that localized ERK signaling mediated through recently identified scaffold proteins may regulate cell m...

  8. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal “clock” gene expression

    Imbesi, Marta; Yildiz, Sevim; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Sharma, Rajiv; Manev, Hari; Uz, Tolga

    2008-01-01

    Using transgenic mice model (i.e., “clock” knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulate the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in...

  9. RNA-Mediated Reciprocal Regulation between Two Bacterial Operons Is RNase III Dependent

    Johnson, Christopher M; Haemig, Heather H. A.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Wei-Shou, Hu; Weaver, Keith E.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In bacteria, RNAs regulate gene expression and function via several mechanisms. An RNA may pair with complementary sequences in a target RNA to impact transcription, translation, or degradation of the target. Control of conjugation of pCF10, a pheromone response plasmid of Enterococcus faecalis, is a well-characterized system that serves as a model for the regulation of gene expression in bacteria by intercellular signaling. The prgQ operon, whose products mediate conjugation, is neg...

  10. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  11. miRNA-mediated functional changes through co-regulating function related genes.

    Jie He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs play important roles in various biological processes involving fairly complex mechanism. Analysis of genome-wide miRNA microarray demonstrate that a single miRNA can regulate hundreds of genes, but the regulative extent on most individual genes is surprisingly mild so that it is difficult to understand how a miRNA provokes detectable functional changes with such mild regulation. RESULTS: To explore the internal mechanism of miRNA-mediated regulation, we re-analyzed the data collected from genome-wide miRNA microarray with bioinformatics assay, and found that the transfection of miR-181b and miR-34a in Hela and HCT-116 tumor cells regulated large numbers of genes, among which, the genes related to cell growth and cell death demonstrated high Enrichment scores, suggesting that these miRNAs may be important in cell growth and cell death. MiR-181b induced changes in protein expression of most genes that were seemingly related to enhancing cell growth and decreasing cell death, while miR-34a mediated contrary changes of gene expression. Cell growth assays further confirmed this finding. In further study on miR-20b-mediated osteogenesis in hMSCs, miR-20b was found to enhance osteogenesis by activating BMPs/Runx2 signaling pathway in several stages by co-repressing of PPARγ, Bambi and Crim1. CONCLUSIONS: With its multi-target characteristics, miR-181b, miR-34a and miR-20b provoked detectable functional changes by co-regulating functionally-related gene groups or several genes in the same signaling pathway, and thus mild regulation from individual miRNA targeting genes could have contributed to an additive effect. This might also be one of the modes of miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  12. Bacteriophage-mediated toxin gene regulation in Clostridium difficile.

    Govind, Revathi; Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Rolfe, Rial D; Dupuy, Bruno; Fralick, Joe A

    2009-12-01

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as the most important single identifiable cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis. Virulent strains of C. difficile produce two large protein toxins, toxin A and toxin B, which are involved in pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of lysogeny by PhiCD119 on C. difficile toxin production. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated a decrease in the expression of pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) genes tcdA, tcdB, tcdR, tcdE, and tcdC in PhiCD119 lysogens. During this study we found that repR, a putative repressor gene of PhiCD119, was expressed in C. difficile lysogens and that its product, RepR, could downregulate tcdA::gusA and tcdR::gusA reporter fusions in Escherichia coli. We cloned and purified a recombinant RepR containing a C-terminal six-His tag and documented its binding to the upstream regions of tcdR in C. difficile PaLoc and in repR upstream region in PhiCD119 by gel shift assays. DNA footprinting experiments revealed similarities between the RepR binding sites in tcdR and repR upstream regions. These findings suggest that presence of a CD119-like temperate phage can influence toxin gene regulation in this nosocomially important pathogen. PMID:19776116

  13. Regulation of PKC mediated signaling by calcium during visceral leishmaniasis.

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  14. Regulation of PKC mediated signaling by calcium during visceral leishmaniasis.

    Nivedita Roy

    Full Text Available Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis.

  15. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  16. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Gorrell, Rebecca J; Steen, Jason A; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Kwok, Terry; Grimmond, Sean M; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Jennings, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes) that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression). In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M) system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion"), via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates). Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis. PMID:22162751

  17. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  18. Resilience to chronic stress is mediated by noradrenergic regulation of dopamine neurons.

    Isingrini, Elsa; Perret, Léa; Rainer, Quentin; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Guma, Elisa; Tanti, Arnaud; Martin, Garance; Robinson, Jennifer; Moquin, Luc; Marti, Fabio; Mechawar, Naguib; Williams, Sylvain; Gratton, Alain; Giros, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) help mediate stress susceptibility and resilience. However, upstream mechanisms controlling these neurons remain unknown. Noradrenergic (NE) neurons in the locus coeruleus, implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, have direct connections within the VTA. Here we demonstrate that NE neurons regulate vulnerability to social defeat through inhibitory control of VTA DA neurons. PMID:26878672

  19. Regulation of GPCR-mediated smooth muscle contraction : implications for asthma and pulmonary hypertension

    Wright, D B; Tripathi, S; Sikarwar, A; Santosh, K T; Perez-Zoghbi, J; Ojo, O O; Irechukwu, N; Ward, J P T; Schaafsma, D

    2013-01-01

    Contractile G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have emerged as key regulators of smooth muscle contraction, both under healthy and diseased conditions. This brief review will discuss some key topics and novel insights regarding GPCR-mediated airway and vascular smooth muscle contraction as discusse

  20. Ferulic acid reverses ABCB1-mediated paclitaxel resistance in MDR cell lines.

    Muthusamy, Ganesan; Balupillai, Agilan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Mary, Beaulah; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. The use of the dietary phytochemicals as chemosensitizing agents to enhance the efficacy of conventional cytostatic drugs has recently gained the attention as a plausible approach for overcoming the drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a naturally occurring diet-based phenolic acid, ferulic acid, could sensitize paclitaxel efficacy in ABCB1 overexpressing (P-glycoprotein) colchicine selected KB Ch(R)8-5 cell line. In vitro drug efflux assays demonstrated that ferulic acid inhibits P-glycoprotein transport function in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. However, ferulic acid significantly downregulates ABCB1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. Cytotoxicity assay reveals that ferulic acid decreased paclitaxel resistance in KBCh(R)8-5 and HEK293/ABCB1 cells, which indicates its chemosensitizing potential. Clonogenic cell survival assay and apoptotic morphological staining further confirm the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. Ferulic acid treatment enhances paclitaxel mediated cell cycle arrest and upregulates paclitaxel-induced apoptotic signaling in KB resistant cells. Hence, it has been concluded that downregulation of ABCB1 and subsequent induction of paclitaxel-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptotic signaling may be the cause for the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in P-gp overexpressing cell lines. PMID:27262378

  1. Lipoteichoic acid-deficient Lactobacillus acidophilus regulates downstream signals.

    Saber, Rana; Zadeh, Mojgan; Pakanati, Krishna C; Bere, Praveen; Klaenhammer, Todd; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2011-03-01

    The trillions of microbes residing within the intestine induce critical signals that either regulate or stimulate host immunity via their bacterial products. To better understand the immune regulation elicited by lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-deficient Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in steady state and induced inflammation, we deleted phosphoglycerol transferase gene, which synthesizes LTA in L. acidophilus NCFM. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted in order to compare the immune regulatory properties of the L. acidophilus strain deficient in LTA (NCK2025) with its wild-type parent (NCK56) in C57BL/6, C57BL/6 recombination-activation gene 1-deficient (Rag1 (-/-)) and C57BL/6 Rag1(-/-)IL-10(-/-) mice. We demonstrate that NCK2025 significantly activates the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but downregulates the phosphorylation of Akt1, cytosolic group IV PLA2 and p38 in mouse dendritic cells. Similarly, mice treated orally with NCK2025 exhibit decreased phosphorylation of inflammatory signals (Akt1, cytosolic group IV PLA2 or P38) but upregulate Erk1/2-phosphorylation in colonic epithelial cells in comparison with mice treated with NCK56. In addition, regulation of pathogenic CD4+ T cell induced colitis by NCK2025 was observed in Rag1 (-/-) but not Rag1(-/-)IL-10 (-/-) mice suggests a critical role of IL-10 that may be tightly regulated by Erk1/2 signaling. These data highlight the immunosuppressive properties of NCK2025 to deliver regulatory signals in innate cells, which results in the mitigation of T-cell-induced colitis in vivo. PMID:21395377

  2. Regulation of plant immunity through ubiquitin-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) -calmodulin-AtSR1/CAMTA3 signaling.

    Zhang, Lei; Du, Liqun; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Poovaiah, B W

    2014-04-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration are essential signals for activation of plant immunity. It has also been reported that Ca(2+) signals suppress salicylic acid-mediated plant defense through AtSR1/CAMTA3, a member of the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-regulated transcription factor family that is conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. How plants overcome this negative regulation to mount an effective defense response during a stage of intracellular Ca(2+) surge is unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of an important component of ubiquitin ligase, and the associated AtSR1 turnover. The AtSR1 interaction protein 1 (SR1IP1) was identified by CytoTrap two-hybrid screening. The loss-of-function mutant of SR1IP1 is more susceptible to bacterial pathogens, and over-expression of SR1IP1 confers enhanced resistance, indicating that SR1IP1 acts as a positive regulator of plant defense. SR1IP1 and AtSR1 act in the same signaling pathway to regulate plant immunity. SR1IP1 contains the structural features of a substrate adaptor in cullin 3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, and was shown to serve as a substrate adaptor that recruits AtSR1 for ubiquitination and degradation when plants are challenged with pathogens. Hence, SR1IP1 positively regulates plant immunity by removing the defense suppressor AtSR1. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into how Ca(2+) -mediated actions are coordinated to achieve effective plant immunity. PMID:24528504

  3. [Free fatty acids: mediators of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis].

    Castro Cabezas, M; Erkelens, D W; van Dijk, H

    2002-01-19

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are involved in the transportation of energy; in the postprandial phase to the peripheral tissues and in the postabsorptive phase from the adipose tissue to the liver. In the postprandial phase, FFAs are mainly derived from hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich particles like chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). The flux of FFAs is directed to peripheral cells such as adipocytes and muscle cells. In the postabsorptive period, FFAs are transported to the liver after being released from intracellular storage in the adipocytes. Complement component 3 (C3) plays an important role in the uptake of free fatty acids by the peripheral cells and their esterification to triglycerides. Since C3 is also involved in the pathogenesis of the insulin resistance syndrome, and since a deviant FFA metabolism with an increased FFA flux to the liver may induce insulin resistance, it is hypothesized that C3 may form the missing link between FFA metabolism and insulin resistance. In addition, recent studies have increasingly indicated that atherosclerosis is in fact an inflammation-based process involving complement-dependent responses, in which FFAs seem to play a role in the complement-dependent pathway. It has recently become apparent that FFAs have a regulatory function in the transcription of DNA, in relation to lipoprotein metabolism. This is where PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha agonists ('glitazones' and fibrates respectively) are active (PPAR is an abbreviation for peroxisome proliferation activating receptor). Glitazons may play an important role in the treatment of insulin resistance and related disorders. Acquiring more knowledge about the relationship between complement and FFA metabolism may increase our understanding of these processes and provide openings for the development of new antiatherogenic strategies. PMID:11826668

  4. Silent NMDA receptor-mediated synapses are developmentally regulated in the dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord.

    Baba, H; Doubell, T P; Moore, K A; Woolf, C J

    2000-02-01

    In vitro whole cell patch-clamp recording techniques were utilized to study silent pure-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in lamina II (substantia gelatinosa, SG) and lamina III of the spinal dorsal horn. To clarify whether these synapses are present in the adult and contribute to neuropathic pain, transverse lumbar spinal cord slices were prepared from neonatal, naive adult and adult sciatic nerve transected rats. In neonatal rats, pure-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were elicited in SG neurons either by focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 15 of 20 neurons) or focal stimulation of the dorsal root (n = 2 of 7 neurons). In contrast, in slices from naive adult rats, no silent pure-NMDA EPSCs were recorded in SG neurons following focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 27), and only one pure-NMDA EPSC was observed in lamina III (n = 23). Furthermore, in rats with chronic sciatic nerve transection, pure-NMDA EPSCs were elicited by focal intraspinal stimulation in only 2 of 45 SG neurons. Although a large increase in Abeta fiber evoked mixed alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and NMDA receptor-mediated synapses was detected after sciatic nerve injury, Abeta fiber-mediated pure-NMDA EPSCs were not evoked in SG neurons by dorsal root stimulation. Pure-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs are therefore a transient, developmentally regulated phenomenon, and, although they may have a role in synaptic refinement in the immature dorsal horn, they are unlikely to be involved in receptive field plasticity in the adult. PMID:10669507

  5. Hyaluronic acid receptor Stabilin-2 regulates Erk phosphorylation and arterial--venous differentiation in zebrafish.

    Megan S Rost

    Full Text Available The hyaluronic acid receptor for endocytosis Stabilin-2/HARE mediates systemic clearance of multiple glycosaminoglycans from the vascular and lymphatic circulations. In addition, recent in vitro studies indicate that Stab2 can participate in signal transduction by interacting with hyaluronic acid (HA, which results in Erk phosphorylation. However, it is not known whether Stab2 function or HA-Stab2 signaling play any role in embryonic development. Here we show that Stab2 functions in a signal transduction pathway regulating arterial-venous differentiation during zebrafish embryogenesis. Stab2 morpholino knockdown embryos (morphants display an absence of intersegmental vessels and defects in the axial vessel formation. In addition, Stab2 morphants show defects in arterial-venous differentiation including the expansion of venous marker expression. Simultaneous knockdown of Stabilin-2 and Has2, an HA synthetase, results in a synergistic effect, arguing that HA and Stab2 interact during vasculature formation. Stab2 morphants display reduced Erk phosphorylation in the arterial progenitors, which is a known transducer of VEGF signaling, previously associated with arterial-venous differentiation. In addition, VEGF signaling acts as a negative feedback loop to repress stab2 expression. These results argue that Stab2 is involved in a novel signaling pathway that plays an important role in regulating Erk phosphorylation and establishing arterial-venous identity.

  6. Conditional cooperativity of toxin - antitoxin regulation can mediate bistability between growth and dormancy.

    Ilaria Cataudella

    Full Text Available Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined "conditional cooperativity". Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state.

  7. Conditional cooperativity of toxin - antitoxin regulation can mediate bistability between growth and dormancy.

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined "conditional cooperativity". Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state. PMID:24009488

  8. Mfge8 promotes obesity by mediating the uptake of dietary fats and serum fatty acids

    Khalifeh-Soltani, Amin; McKleroy, William; Sakuma, Stephen; Cheung, Yuk Yin; Tharp, Kevin; Qiu, Yifu; Turner, Scott M; Chawla, Ajay; Stahl, Andreas; Atabai, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are integral mediators of energy storage, membrane formation and cell signaling. The pathways that orchestrate uptake of fatty acids remain incompletely understood. Expression of the integrin ligand Mfge8 is increased in human obesity and in mice on a high-fat diet, but its role in obesity is unknown. We show here that Mfge8 promotes the absorption of dietary triglycerides and the cellular uptake of fatty acid and that Mfge8-deficient (Mfge8−/−) mice are protected from diet-induce...

  9. Identification of genes regulated by UV/salicylic acid.

    Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Watson, C.; Milton, J.; Oryhon, J.; Salbego, D.; Milosavljevic, A.; Woloschak, G. E.; CuraGen Corp.

    2000-02-01

    Purpose : Previous work from the authors' group and others has demonstrated that some of the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression are modulated in response to the addition of salicylic acid to irradiated cells. The presumed effector molecule responsible for this modulation is NF-kappaB. In the experiments described here, differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify those cDNAs that are differentially modulated by UV radiation with and without the addition of salicylic acid. Materials and methods : Differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Results : Eight such cDNAs are presented: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-beta), nuclear encoded mitochondrial NADH ubiquinone reductase 24kDa (NDUFV2), elongation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B), nuclear dots protein SP100, nuclear encoded mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor (IF1), a cDNA similar to a subunit of yeast CCAAT transcription factor HAP5, and two expressed sequence tags (AA187906 and AA513156). Conclusions : Sequences of four of these genes contained NF-kappaB DNA binding sites of the type that may attract transrepressor p55/p55 NF-kappaB homodimers. Down-regulation of these genes upon UV irradiation may contribute to increased cell survival via suppression of p53 independent apoptosis.

  10. Redox-Mediated Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Sensitivity in Breast Cancer

    Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Barozzi, Iros; Miccolo, Claudia; Bucci, Gabriele; Palorini, Roberta; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Botrugno, Oronza A.; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Masullo, Michele; Passafaro, Alfonso; Galimberti, Viviana E.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Richon, Victoria M.; Pece, Salvatore; Viale, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Draetta, Giulio; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid; SAHA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) approved in the clinics for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma and with the potential to be effective also in breast cancer. We investigated the responsiveness to SAHA in human breast primary tumors and cancer cell lines. Results: We observed a differential response to drug treatment in both human breast primary tumors and cancer cell lines. Gene expression analysis of the breast cancer cell lines revealed that genes involved in cell adhesion and redox pathways, especially glutathione metabolism, were differentially expressed in the cell lines resistant to SAHA compared with the sensitive ones, indicating their possible association with drug resistance mechanisms. Notably, such an association was also observed in breast primary tumors. Indeed, addition of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a compound capable of depleting cellular glutathione, significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of SAHA in both breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors. Innovation: We identify and validate transcriptional differences in genes involved in redox pathways, which include potential predictive markers of sensitivity to SAHA. Conclusion: In breast cancer, it could be relevant to evaluate the expression of antioxidant genes that may favor tumor resistance as a factor to consider for potential clinical application and treatment with epigenetic drugs (HDACis). Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 15–29. PMID:25897982

  11. Extracellular signal regulated kinase 5 mediates signals triggered by the novel tumor promoter palytoxin

    Palytoxin is classified as a non-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type skin tumor because it does not bind to or activate protein kinase C. Palytoxin is thus a novel tool for investigating alternative signaling pathways that may affect carcinogenesis. We previously showed that palytoxin activates three major members of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Here we report that palytoxin also activates another MAPK family member, called ERK5, in HeLa cells and in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin (308 cells). By contrast, TPA does not activate ERK5 in these cell lines. The major cell surface receptor for palytoxin is the Na+,K+-ATPase. Accordingly, ouabain blocked the ability of palytoxin to activate ERK5. Ouabain alone did not activate ERK5. ERK5 thus represents a divergence in the signaling pathways activated by these two agents that bind to the Na+,K+-ATPase. Cycloheximide, okadaic acid, and sodium orthovanadate did not mimic the effect of palytoxin on ERK5. These results indicate that the stimulation of ERK5 by palytoxin is not simply due to inhibition of protein synthesis or inhibition of serine/threonine or tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, the mechanism by which palytoxin activates ERK5 differs from that by which it activates ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Finally, studies that used pharmacological inhibitors and shRNA to block ERK5 action indicate that ERK5 contributes to palytoxin-stimulated c-Fos gene expression. These results suggest that ERK5 can act as an alternative mediator for transmitting diverse tumor promoter-stimulated signals.

  12. Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) provides a key mode of regulation for synaptic GABAARs underlying phasic inhibition; however, less attention has been focused on the plasticity of tonic inhibition and whether this can also be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. To address this issue, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording in acute murine brain slices at both room and physiological temperatures to examine the effects of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on tonic inhibition. Recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells in the hippocampus and dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons in the thalamus demonstrated that PKC activation caused downregulation of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of PKC resulted in an increase in tonic GABAAR activity. These findings were corroborated by experiments on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing recombinant α4β2δ GABAARs, which represent a key extrasynaptic GABAAR isoform in the hippocampus and thalamus. Using bath application of low GABA concentrations to mimic activation by ambient neurotransmitter, we demonstrated a similar inhibition of receptor function following PKC activation at physiological temperature. Live cell imaging revealed that this was correlated with a loss of cell surface GABAARs. The inhibitory effects of PKC activation on α4β2δ GABAAR activity appeared to be mediated by direct phosphorylation at a previously identified site on the β2 subunit, serine 410. These results indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation can be an important physiological regulator of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. PMID:24102973

  13. Novel Endogenous Proresolving Molecules:Essential Fatty Acid-Derived and Gaseous Mediators in the Resolution of Inflammation.

    Shinohara, Masakazu; Serhan, Charles N

    2016-06-01

    Acute inflammation is a fundamental, protective response that orchestrates immune system to address harmful stimuli both from within and via invasion. New evidences indicate that the resolution of acute inflammation is not simply passive but active and highly regulated processes coordinated by new families of potent bioactive lipid mediators (LMs), coined specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs). These SPMs are biosynthesized from n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Low concentrations of SPM (nM range) stimulate proresolving cellular processes, such as inhibition of neutrophil infiltration, enhancement of macrophage phagocytosis of bacteria and efferocytosis of cellular debris, and reduction of inflammatory pain through specific G-protein coupled receptors.Of the many bioactive mediators that regulate inflammation resolution, low-dose carbon monoxide (CO) functions as a tissue-protective gaso-transmitter that is endogenously produced by the heme oxygenase (HO) system. Specific SPMs activate the HO system, which in turn enhances endogenous CO production locally, thus establishing a protective feed-forward circuit between SPMs and CO. In addition, treatment with low-dose CO and SPMs exerts protective effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury by decreasing leukocyte-platelet interaction and proinflammatory LM levels.Recent studies reviewed herein assessed the impact of SPMs and low-dose inhaled CO on inflammatory diseases. LM metabololipidomics approach allows the assessment of the efficacy of novel treatments with SPMs and low-dose CO. Moreover, this approach indicates the regions where the action of individual LMs may be physiologically relevant and when these LMs are produced in vivo to serve their proresolving mediator functions that may also permit new directions for treating human diseases. PMID:27052783

  14. Metabolic regulation of trisporic acid on Blakeslea trispora revealed by a GC-MS-based metabolomic approach.

    Jie Sun

    Full Text Available The zygomycete Blakeslea trispora is used commercially as natural source of â-carotene. Trisporic acid (TA is secreted from the mycelium of B. trispora during mating between heterothallic strains and is considered as a mediator of the regulation of mating processes and an enhancer of carotene biosynthesis. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis were employed to investigate TA-associated intracellular biochemical changes in B. trispora. By principal component analysis, the differential metabolites discriminating the control groups from the TA-treated groups were found, which were also confirmed by the subsequent hierarchical cluster analysis. The results indicate that TA is a global regulator and its main effects at the metabolic level are reflected on the content changes in several fatty acids, carbohydrates, and amino acids. The carbon metabolism and fatty acids synthesis are sensitive to TA addition. Glycerol, glutamine, and ã-aminobutyrate might play important roles in the regulation of TA. Complemented by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the results indicate that the actions of TA at the metabolic level involve multiple metabolic processes, such as glycolysis and the bypass of the classical tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results reveal that the metabolomics strategy is a powerful tool to gain insight into the mechanism of a microorganism's cellular response to signal inducers at the metabolic level.

  15. CD36 Mediated Fatty Acid-Induced Podocyte Apoptosis via Oxidative Stress.

    Wei Hua

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia-induced apoptosis mediated by fatty acid translocase CD36 is associated with increased uptake of ox-LDL or fatty acid in macrophages, hepatocytes and proximal tubular epithelial cells, leading to atherosclerosis, liver damage and fibrosis in obese patients, and diabetic nephropathy (DN, respectively. However, the specific role of CD36 in podocyte apoptosis in DN with hyperlipidemia remains poorly investigated.The expression of CD36 was measured in paraffin-embedded kidney tissue samples (Ctr = 18, DN = 20 by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. We cultured conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes (MPC5 and treated cells with palmitic acid, and measured CD36 expression by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence; lipid uptake by Oil red O staining and BODIPY staining; apoptosis by flow cytometry assay, TUNEL assay and Western blot analysis; and ROS production by DCFH-DA fluorescence staining. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 statistical software.CD36 expression was increased in kidney tissue from DN patients with hyperlipidemia. Palmitic acid upregulated CD36 expression and promoted its translocation from cytoplasm to plasma membrane in podocytes. Furthermore, palmitic acid increased lipid uptake, ROS production and apoptosis in podocytes, Sulfo-N-succinimidyloleate (SSO, the specific inhibitor of the fatty acid binding site on CD36, decreased palmitic acid-induced fatty acid accumulation, ROS production, and apoptosis in podocytes. Antioxidant 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidine -1-oxyl (tempol inhibited the overproduction of ROS and apoptosis in podocytes induced by palmitic acid.CD36 mediated fatty acid-induced podocyte apoptosis via oxidative stress might participate in the process of DN.

  16. Comparative Genomics of Regulation of Fatty Acid and Branched-chain Amino Acid Utilization in Proteobacteria

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Arkin, Adam Paul; Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Alm, Eric

    2008-10-31

    Bacteria can use branched-chain amino acids (ILV, i.e. isoleucine, leucine, valine) and fatty acids (FA) as sole carbon and energy sources convering ILV into acetyl-CoA, propanoyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, respectively. In this work, we used the comparative genomic approach to identify candidate transcriptional factors and DNA motifs that control ILV and FA utilization pathways in proteobacteria. The metabolic regulons were characterized based on the identification and comparison of candidate transcription factor binding sites in groups of phylogenetically related genomes. The reconstructed ILV/FA regulatory network demonstrates considerable variability and involves six transcriptional factors from the MerR, TetR and GntR families binding to eleven distinct DNA motifs. The ILV degradation genes in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria are mainly regulated by anovel regulator from the MerR family (e.g., LiuR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) (40 species), in addition, the TetR-type regulator LiuQ was identified in some beta-proteobacteria (8 species). Besides the core set of ILV utilization genes, the LiuR regulon in some lineages is expanded to include genes from other metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate shunt and glutamate synthase in the Shewanella species. The FA degradation genes are controlled by four regulators including FadR in gamma-proteobacteria (34 species), PsrA in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (45 species), FadP in beta-proteobacteria (14 species), and LiuR orthologs in alpha-proteobacteria (22 species). The remarkable variability of the regulatory systems associated with the FA degradation pathway is discussed from the functional and evolutionary points of view.

  17. Cerebral Ischemia Mediates the Effect of Serum Uric Acid on Cognitive Function

    Vannorsdall, Tracy D.; Jinnah, H.A.; Gordon, Barry; Kraut, Michael; Schretlen, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose High normal concentrations of serum uric acid (UA) are associated with mild cognitive dysfunction and increased cerebral ischemia as indexed by white matter hyperintensity volumes. We hypothesized that individual differences in white matter hyperintensities mediate the association between UA and mild cognitive dysfunction. Methods One hundred eighty community-dwelling adults aged 20 to 96 years completed neuropsychological testing, laboratory blood studies, and a brain MRI scan. Results Serum UA was associated (Pischemia might mediate the association between UA and cognitive dysfunction. Even mild elevations in UA appear to contribute to structural and functional brain changes. PMID:18772442

  18. Evidence for a role of Collapsin response mediator protein-2 in signaling pathways that regulate the proliferation of non-neuronal cells

    Collapsin response mediator protein-2 or Crmp-2 plays a critical role in the establishment of neuronal polarity. In this study, we present evidence that apart from its functions in neurodevelopment, Crmp-2 is also involved in pathways that regulate the proliferation of non-neuronal cells through its phosphorylation by regulatory proteins. We show that Crmp-2 undergoes dynamic phosphorylation changes in response to contact inhibition-induced quiescence and that hyperphosphorylation of Crmp-2 occurs in a tumor. We further suggest that de-regulation of Crmp-2 phosphorylation levels at certain amino acid residues may lead to aberrant cell proliferation and consequently, tumorigenesis

  19. Arabidopsis PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 is required for auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity and regulates auxin signalling.

    Yang, Bao-Jun; Han, Xin-Xin; Yin, Lin-Lin; Xing, Mei-Qing; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin is perceived by the nuclear F-box protein TIR1 receptor family and regulates gene expression through degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. Several studies have revealed the importance of the proteasome in auxin signalling, but details on how the proteolytic machinery is regulated and how this relates to degradation of Aux/IAA proteins remains unclear. Here we show that an Arabidopsis homologue of the proteasome inhibitor PI31, which we name PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 (PTRE1), is a positive regulator of the 26S proteasome. Loss-of-function ptre1 mutants are insensitive to auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity, show diminished auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA proteins and display auxin-related phenotypes. We found that auxin alters the subcellular localization of PTRE1, suggesting this may be part of the mechanism by which it reduces proteasome activity. Based on these results, we propose that auxin regulates proteasome activity via PTRE1 to fine-tune the homoeostasis of Aux/IAA repressor proteins thus modifying auxin activity. PMID:27109828

  20. Identification of phenylalanine 346 in the rat growth hormone receptor as being critical for ligand-mediated internalization and down-regulation

    Allevato, G; Billestrup, N; Goujon, L; Galsgaard, E D; Norstedt, G; Postel-Vinay, M C; Kelly, P A; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1995-01-01

    The functional significance of growth hormone (GH) receptor (GHR) internalization is unknown; therefore, we have analyzed domains and individual amino acids in the cytoplasmic region of the rat GHR required for ligand-mediated receptor internalization, receptor down-regulation, and transcriptional...... signaling. When various mutated GHR cDNAs were transfected stably into Chinese hamster ovary cells or transiently into monkey kidney (COS-7) cells, internalization of the GHR was found to be dependent upon a domain located between amino acids 318 and 380. Mutational analysis of aromatic residues in this...... domain revealed that phenylalanine 346 is required for internalization. Receptor down-regulation in transiently transfected COS-7 cells was also dependent upon the phenylalanine 346 residue of the GHR, since no GH-induced down-regulation was observed in cells expressing the F346A GHR mutant. In contrast...

  1. Histone acetylation-mediated glycosyltransferase gene regulation in mouse brain during development

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Yanagisawa, Makoto; Ariga, Toshio; Yu, Robert K.

    2011-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids abundant in the central nervous tissues. The quantity and expression pattern of gangliosides in brain change drastically during early development and are mainly regulated through stage-specific expression of glycosyltransferase (ganglioside synthase) genes. It is still unclear, however, how the transcriptional activation of glycosyltransferase genes is regulated during development. In this study, we investigated the epigenetic regulat...

  2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  3. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  4. β-aminobutyric acid mediated drought stress alleviation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Shaw, Arun K; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Ghosh, Supriya; Roy, Sankhajit; Saha, Suman; Sherpa, Ang R; Saha, Samir K; Hossain, Zahed

    2016-02-01

    The present study highlights the role of β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) in alleviating drought stress effects in maize (Zea mays L.). Chemical priming was imposed by pretreating 1-week-old plants with 600 μM BABA prior to applying drought stress. Specific activities of key antioxidant enzymes and metabolites (ascorbate and glutathione) levels of ascorbate-glutathione cycle were studied to unravel the priming-induced modulation of plant defense system. Furthermore, changes in endogenous ABA and JA concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of key genes involved in their respective biosynthesis pathways were monitored in BABA-primed (BABA+) and non-primed (BABA-) leaves of drought-challenged plants to better understand the mechanistic insights into the BABA-induced hormonal regulation of plant response to water-deficit stress. Accelerated stomatal closure, high relative water content, and less membrane damage were observed in BABA-primed leaves under water-deficit condition. Elevated APX and SOD activity in non-primed leaves found to be insufficient to scavenge all H2O2 and O2 (·-) resulting in oxidative burst as evident after histochemical staining with NBT and DAB. A higher proline accumulation in non-primed leaves also does not give much protection against drought stress. Increased GR activity supported with the enhanced mRNA and protein expressions might help the BABA-primed plants to maintain a high GSH pool essential for sustaining balanced redox status to counter drought-induced oxidative stress damages. Hormonal analysis suggests that in maize, BABA-potentiated drought tolerance is primarily mediated through JA-dependent pathway by the activation of antioxidant defense systems while ABA biosynthesis pathway also plays an important role in fine-tuning of drought stress response. PMID:26416125

  5. Regulated release of BDNF by cortical oligodendrocytes is mediated through metabotropic glutamate receptors and the PLC pathway

    Issa P Bagayogo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies suggest that OLGs (oligodendrocytes), the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are also a source of trophic molecules, such as neurotrophins that may influence survival of proximate neurons. What is less clear is how the release of these molecules may be regulated. The present study investigated the effects of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) derived from cortical OLGs on proximate neurons, as well as regulatory mechanisms mediating BDNF release. Initial work determined that BDNF derived from cortical OLGs increased the numbers of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1)-positive glutamatergic cortical neurons. Furthermore, glutamate acting through metabotropic, and not AMPA/kainate or NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate), receptors increased BDNF release. The PLC (phospholipase C) pathway is a key mediator of metabotropic actions to release BDNF in astrocytes and neurons. Treatment of OLGs with the PLC activator m-3M3FBS [N-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonamide] induced robust release of BDNF. Moreover, release elicited by the metabotropic receptor agonist ACPD [trans-(1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] was inhibited by the PLC antagonist U73122, the IP3 (inositol triphosphate 3) receptor inhibitor 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane) and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. Taken together, these results suggest that OLG lineage cells release BDNF, a molecule trophic for proximate neurons. BDNF release is regulated by glutamate acting through mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors) and the PLC pathway. Thus glutamate and BDNF may be molecules that support neuron–OLG interactions in the cortex.

  6. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  7. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D-mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein.

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  8. Poly(A)-binding-protein-mediated regulation of hDcp2 decapping in vitro

    Khanna, Richie; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2004-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA decapping is a critical determinant for gene expression. We demonstrate that the poly(A) tail-mediated regulation of mRNA decapping observed in humans can be recapitulated in vitro by the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein PABP through a direct and specific binding to the 5′ end of capped mRNA. The specific association of PABP with the cap occurred only within the context of the RNA whereby a cap attached to an RNA moiety served as the high-affinity substrate but not the c...

  9. The Epigenetic Regulator G9a Mediates Tolerance to RNA Virus Infection in Drosophila

    Sarah H. Merkling; Bronkhorst, Alfred W.; Kramer, Jamie M.; Gijs J. Overheul; Schenck, Annette; van Rij, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Multicellular organisms deploy various strategies to fight microbial infections. Invading pathogens may be eradicated directly by antimicrobial effectors of the immune system. Another strategy consists of increasing the tolerance of the host to infection, for example, by limiting the adverse effects of the immune response. The molecular mechanisms underlying this novel concept remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that the epigenetic regulator G9a mediates tolera...

  10. How Does Stigma “Get Under the Skin”?: The Mediating Role of Emotion Regulation

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Dovidio, John

    2009-01-01

    Stigma is a risk factor for mental health problems, but few studies have considered how stigma leads to psychological distress. The present research examined whether specific emotion-regulation strategies account for the stigma-distress association. In an experience-sampling study, rumination and suppression occurred more on days when stigma-related stressors were reported than on days when these stressors were not reported, and rumination mediated the relationship between stigma-related stre...

  11. Distinct Mechanisms Regulate ATGL-Mediated Adipocyte Lipolysis by Lipid Droplet Coat Proteins

    Yang, Xingyuan; Heckmann, Bradlee L; Zhang, Xiaodong; Smas, Cynthia M.; Liu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the key triacylglycerol hydrolase in adipocytes. The precise mechanisms by which ATGL action is regulated by lipid droplet (LD) coat proteins and responds to hormonal stimulation are incompletely defined. By combining usage of loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we sought to determine the respective roles of perilipin 1 and fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) in the control of ATGL-mediated lipolysis in adipocytes. Knockdown of endogenous perilipin 1 expre...

  12. Lis1 mediates planar polarity of auditory hair cells through regulation of microtubule organization

    Sipe, Conor W.; Liu, Lixia; Lee, Jianyi; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia; Lu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    The V-shaped hair bundles atop auditory hair cells and their uniform orientation are manifestations of epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP) required for proper perception of sound. PCP is regulated at the tissue level by a conserved core Wnt/PCP pathway. However, the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery is poorly understood. Recent findings implicate hair cell microtubules in planar polarization of hair cells. To elucidate the microtubule-mediated polarity pathway, we analyzed Lis1 functio...

  13. Megakaryocytes regulate expression of Pyk2 isoforms and caspase-mediated cleavage of actin in osteoblasts.

    Kacena, Melissa A; Eleniste, Pierre P; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Huang, Su; Shivanna, Mahesh; Meijome, Tomas E; Mayo, Lindsey D; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-05-18

    The proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast (OB) precursors are essential for elaborating the bone-forming activity of mature OBs. However, the mechanisms regulating OB proliferation and function are largely unknown. We reported that OB proliferation is enhanced by megakaryocytes (MKs) via a process that is regulated in part by integrin signaling. The tyrosine kinase Pyk2 has been shown to regulate cell proliferation and survival in a variety of cells. Pyk2 is also activated by integrin signaling and regulates actin remodeling in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In this study, we examined the role of Pyk2 and actin in the MK-mediated increase in OB proliferation. Calvarial OBs were cultured in the presence of MKs for various times, and Pyk2 signaling cascades in OBs were examined by Western blotting, subcellular fractionation, and microscopy. We found that MKs regulate the temporal expression of Pyk2 and its subcellular localization. We also found that MKs regulate the expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Pyk2 in OBs, which may regulate OB differentiation and proliferation. MKs also induced cytoskeletal reorganization in OBs, which was associated with the caspase-mediated cleavage of actin, an increase in focal adhesions, and the formation of apical membrane ruffles. Moreover, BrdU incorporation in MK-stimulated OBs was blocked by the actin-polymerizing agent, jasplakinolide. Collectively, our studies reveal that Pyk2 and actin play an important role in MK-regulated signaling cascades that control OB proliferation and may be important for therapeutic interventions aimed at increasing bone formation in metabolic diseases of the skeleton. PMID:22447931

  14. Megakaryocytes Regulate Expression of Pyk2 Isoforms and Caspase-mediated Cleavage of Actin in Osteoblasts*

    Kacena, Melissa A.; Eleniste, Pierre P.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Huang, Su; Shivanna, Mahesh; Meijome, Tomas E.; Mayo, Lindsey D.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast (OB) precursors are essential for elaborating the bone-forming activity of mature OBs. However, the mechanisms regulating OB proliferation and function are largely unknown. We reported that OB proliferation is enhanced by megakaryocytes (MKs) via a process that is regulated in part by integrin signaling. The tyrosine kinase Pyk2 has been shown to regulate cell proliferation and survival in a variety of cells. Pyk2 is also activated by integrin signaling and regulates actin remodeling in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In this study, we examined the role of Pyk2 and actin in the MK-mediated increase in OB proliferation. Calvarial OBs were cultured in the presence of MKs for various times, and Pyk2 signaling cascades in OBs were examined by Western blotting, subcellular fractionation, and microscopy. We found that MKs regulate the temporal expression of Pyk2 and its subcellular localization. We also found that MKs regulate the expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Pyk2 in OBs, which may regulate OB differentiation and proliferation. MKs also induced cytoskeletal reorganization in OBs, which was associated with the caspase-mediated cleavage of actin, an increase in focal adhesions, and the formation of apical membrane ruffles. Moreover, BrdU incorporation in MK-stimulated OBs was blocked by the actin-polymerizing agent, jasplakinolide. Collectively, our studies reveal that Pyk2 and actin play an important role in MK-regulated signaling cascades that control OB proliferation and may be important for therapeutic interventions aimed at increasing bone formation in metabolic diseases of the skeleton. PMID:22447931

  15. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  16. Golgi-mediated post-translational processing of secretory acid phosphatase by Leishmania donovani promastigotes.

    Bates, P A; Hermes, I; Dwyer, D M

    1990-03-01

    Monensin, an inhibitor of Golgi function, was used to investigate the role of this cell compartment in the glycosylation of Leishmania donovani promastigote secretory acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2). Monensin-treated cells demonstrated morphological changes in the Golgi complex and secreted enzyme with an altered electrophoretic mobility: two discrete bands of approximately 95 and 110 kDa were found, as compared to the heterodisperse nature of the enzyme from untreated controls. Chemical deglycosylation by mild acid hydrolysis resulted in a similar effect on the electrophoretic mobility of purified extracellular enzyme. Acid phosphatase was also treated with N-glycosidase F (EC 3.5.1.52) to remove N-linked oligosaccharides. The altered lectin-binding properties of the enzyme after these two treatments demonstrated that an unusual type of galactose-containing acid-labile carbohydrate was present in secretory acid phosphatase in addition to the N-linked oligosaccharides. Further, experiments with 32P-labelled enzyme indicated that phosphodiester bonds were the structural component responsible for the sensitivity of this carbohydrate to mild acid hydrolysis. Cumulatively, these results demonstrated that a novel form of Golgi-mediated posttranslational modification had occurred to the secretory acid phosphatase presumably by the addition of an acid-labile phosphoglycan. PMID:2320058

  17. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  18. Mechanisms of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediated stimulation of intestinal apical Cl−/OH− exchange

    Singla, Amika; Dwivedi, Alka; Saksena, Seema; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alrefai, Waddah A.; RAMASWAMY, KRISHNAMURTHY; Dudeja, Pradeep K.

    2009-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a potent bioactive phospholipid, is a natural component of food products like soy and egg yolk. LPA modulates a number of epithelial functions and has been shown to inhibit cholera toxin-induced diarrhea. Antidiarrheal effects of LPA are known to be mediated by inhibiting chloride secretion. However, the effects of LPA on chloride absorption in the mammalian intestine are not known. The present studies examined the effects of LPA on apical Cl−/OH− exchangers known...

  19. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  20. Keratin impact on PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated regulation of hepatocyte lipid raft size - implication for FasR-associated apoptosis.

    Gilbert, Stéphane; Loranger, Anne; Omary, M Bishr; Marceau, Normand

    2016-09-01

    Keratins are epithelial cell intermediate filament (IF) proteins that are expressed as pairs in a cell-differentiation-regulated manner. Hepatocytes express the keratin 8 and 18 pair (denoted K8/K18) of IFs, and a loss of K8 or K18, as in K8-null mice, leads to degradation of the keratin partner. We have previously reported that a K8/K18 loss in hepatocytes leads to altered cell surface lipid raft distribution and more efficient Fas receptor (FasR, also known as TNFRSF6)-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrate here that the absence of K8 or transgenic expression of the K8 G62C mutant in mouse hepatocytes reduces lipid raft size. Mechanistically, we find that the lipid raft size is dependent on acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, also known as SMPD1) enzyme activity, which is reduced in absence of K8/K18. Notably, the reduction of ASMase activity appears to be caused by a less efficient redistribution of surface membrane PKCδ toward lysosomes. Moreover, we delineate the lipid raft volume range that is required for an optimal FasR-mediated apoptosis. Hence, K8/K18-dependent PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated modulation of lipid raft size can explain the more prominent FasR-mediated signaling resulting from K8/K18 loss. The fine-tuning of ASMase-mediated regulation of lipid rafts might provide a therapeutic target for death-receptor-related liver diseases. PMID:27422101

  1. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies. PMID:26732761

  2. Leishmania Donovani Cell Surface Sialoglycans Regulate Susceptibility for Siglec Mediated Macrophage Invasion and Parasite Survival

    Tripti De

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in the survival of Leishmania parasites in destructive surroundings. An important constituent present on many glycoconjugates is sialic acid. By virtue of their peripheral position on oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates, sialic acids are well suited as molecular determinants of specific biological processes, including the interaction of pathogenic microorganisms with sialylated cellular receptors. Differences in a2,3- and a2,6-sialoglycan patterns detected in clonal virulent Leishmania donovani promastigotes, correlated with the level of a2,3- and a2,6-sialyltransferase activity present in these parasites. The role of macrophage sialic acid-receptors in uptake and survival of L.donovani was studied in the murine macrophage cell line raw 264.7. Macrophage invasion was dependent on the binding to Siglec-1, while suppression of MAPK signaling was mediated through Siglec-5. Sialic acid removal by neuraminidase treatment reduced parasite infectivity. The presence of trypsin resistant sialic acid residues in the neuraminidase treated parasites grown in a serum free medium in presence of sialoglycoconjugates indicated that the parasites could salvage sialic acid from exogenous sialoglycans and reutilize it for de novo glycoprotein sialylation in L.donovani parasites. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of sialoglycans in the invasion as well as the survival process of L.donovani parasites.

  3. Rupestonic acid derivative YZH-106 suppresses influenza virus replication by activation of heme oxygenase-1-mediated interferon response.

    Ma, Lin-Lin; Wang, Hui-Qiang; Wu, Ping; Hu, Jin; Yin, Jin-Qiu; Wu, Shuo; Ge, Miao; Sun, Wen-Fang; Zhao, Jiang-Yu; Aisa, Haji Akber; Li, Yu-Huan; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Given the limitation of available antiviral drugs and vaccines, there remains to be a pressing need for novel anti-influenza drugs. Rupestonic acid derivatives were reported to have an anti-influenza virus activity, but their mechanism remains to be elucidated. Herein, we aim to evaluate the antiviral activity of YZH-106, a rupestonic acid derivative, against a broad-spectrum of influenza viruses and to dissect its antiviral mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that YZH-106 exhibited a broad-spectrum antiviral activity against influenza viruses, including drug-resistant strains in vitro. Furthermore, YZH-106 provided partial protection of the mice to Influenza A virus (IAV) infection, as judged by decreased viral load in lungs, improved lung pathology, reduced body weight loss and partial survival benefits. Mechanistically, YZH-106 induced p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which led to the activation of erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) that up-regulated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in addition to other genes. HO-1 inhibited IAV replication by activation of type I IFN expression and subsequent induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), possibly in a HO-1 enzymatic activity-independent manner. These results suggest that YZH-106 inhibits IAV by up-regulating HO-1-mediated IFN response. HO-1 is thus a promising host target for antiviral therapeutics against influenza and other viral infectious diseases. PMID:27107768

  4. Gallic acid abolishes the EGFR/Src/Akt/Erk-mediated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Lin, Ku-Nan; Jhang, Li-Mei; Huang, Chia-Hui; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chang, Long-Sen

    2016-05-25

    Several studies have revealed that natural compounds are valuable resources to develop novel agents against dysregulation of the EGF/EGFR-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in cancer cells. In view of the findings that EGF/EGFR-mediated MMP-9 expression is closely related to invasion and metastasis of breast cancer. To determine the beneficial effects of gallic acid on the suppression of breast cancer metastasis, we explored the effect of gallic acid on MMP-9 expression in EGF-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with EGF up-regulated MMP-9 mRNA and protein levels in MCF-7 cells. EGF treatment induced phosphorylation of EGFR and elicited Src activation, subsequently promoting Akt/NFκB (p65) and ERK/c-Jun phosphorylation in MCF-7 cells. Activation of Akt/p65 and ERK/c-Jun was responsible for the MMP-9 up-regulation in EGF-treated cells. Gallic acid repressed the EGF-induced activation of EGFR and Src; furthermore, inactivation of Akt/p65 and ERK/c-Jun was a result of the inhibitory effect of gallic acid on the EGF-induced MMP-9 up-regulation. Over-expression of constitutively active Akt and MEK1 or over-expression of constitutively active Src eradicated the inhibitory effect of gallic acid on the EGF-induced MMP-9 up-regulation. A chromosome conformation capture assay showed that EGF induced a chromosomal loop formation in the MMP-9 promoter via NFκB/p65 and AP-1/c-Jun activation. Treatment with gallic acid, EGFR inhibitor, or Src inhibitor reduced DNA looping. Taken together, our data suggest that gallic acid inhibits the activation of EGFR/Src-mediated Akt and ERK, leading to reduced levels of p65/c-Jun-mediated DNA looping and thus inhibiting MMP-9 expression in EGF-treated MCF-7 cells. PMID:27087131

  5. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4

    Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Petersen, Morten; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective...

  6. Salicylic acid regulates Plasmodesmata closure during innate immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Wang, Xu; Sager, Ross; Cui, Weier; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Hua; Lee, Jung-Youn

    2013-06-01

    In plants, mounting an effective innate immune strategy against microbial pathogens involves triggering local cell death within infected cells as well as boosting the immunity of the uninfected neighboring and systemically located cells. Although not much is known about this, it is evident that well-coordinated cell-cell signaling is critical in this process to confine infection to local tissue while allowing for the spread of systemic immune signals throughout the whole plant. In support of this notion, direct cell-to-cell communication was recently found to play a crucial role in plant defense. Here, we provide experimental evidence that salicylic acid (SA) is a critical hormonal signal that regulates cell-to-cell permeability during innate immune responses elicited by virulent bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that direct exogenous application of SA or bacterial infection suppresses cell-cell coupling and that SA pathway mutants are impaired in this response. The SA- or infection-induced suppression of cell-cell coupling requires an enhanced desease resistance1- and nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1-dependent SA pathway in conjunction with the regulator of plasmodesmal gating Plasmodesmata-located protein5. We discuss a model wherein the SA signaling pathway and plasmodesmata-mediated cell-to-cell communication converge under an intricate regulatory loop. PMID:23749844

  7. CHIP mediates down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 in preosteoblast cell line models.

    Xue, Fuying; Wu, Yanping; Zhao, Xinghui; Zhao, Taoran; Meng, Ying; Zhao, Zhanzhong; Guo, Junwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Nucleobindin-1 (NUCB1), also known as Calnuc, is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein widely expressed in tissues and cells. It contains two EF-hand motifs which have been shown to play a crucial role in binding Ca(2+) ions. In this study, we applied comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to characterize differentially expressed proteins in HA-CHIP over-expressed and endogenous CHIP depleted MC3T3-E1 stable cell lines, identifying NUCB1 as a novel CHIP/Stub1 targeted protein. NUCB1 interacts with and is down-regulated by CHIP by both proteasomal dependent and independent pathways, suggesting that CHIP-mediated down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 might play a role in osteoblast differentiation. The chaperone protein Hsp70 was found to be important for CHIP and NUCB1 interaction as well as CHIP-mediated NUCB1 down-regulation. Our findings provide new insights into understanding the stability regulation of NUCB1. PMID:27178152

  8. New Regulators of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis Identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Systematic Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Farrell, Kristen B; Grossman, Caitlin; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2015-11-01

    Despite the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for cell biology, it is unclear if all components of the machinery have been discovered and many regulatory aspects remain poorly understood. Here, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a fluorescence microscopy screening approach we identify previously unknown regulatory factors of the endocytic machinery. We further studied the top scoring protein identified in the screen, Ubx3, a member of the conserved ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) protein family. In vivo and in vitro approaches demonstrate that Ubx3 is a new coat component. Ubx3-GFP has typical endocytic coat protein dynamics with a patch lifetime of 45 ± 3 sec. Ubx3 contains a W-box that mediates physical interaction with clathrin and Ubx3-GFP patch lifetime depends on clathrin. Deletion of the UBX3 gene caused defects in the uptake of Lucifer Yellow and the methionine transporter Mup1 demonstrating that Ubx3 is needed for efficient endocytosis. Further, the UBX domain is required both for localization and function of Ubx3 at endocytic sites. Mechanistically, Ubx3 regulates dynamics and patch lifetime of the early arriving protein Ede1 but not later arriving coat proteins or actin assembly. Conversely, Ede1 regulates the patch lifetime of Ubx3. Ubx3 likely regulates CME via the AAA-ATPase Cdc48, a ubiquitin-editing complex. Our results uncovered new components of the CME machinery that regulate this fundamental process. PMID:26362318

  9. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. (Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  10. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of [14C]cholesterol from [2-14C]acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of [14C]cholesterol from [2-14C]acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis

  11. Oxide for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Lam, L. T.; Lim, O. V.; Haigh, N. P.; Rand, D. A. J.; Manders, J. E.; Rice, D. M.

    In order to meet the increasing demand for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, a new soft lead has been produced by Pasminco Metals. In this material, bismuth is increased to a level that produces a significant improvement in battery cycle life. By contrast, other common impurities, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel, antimony and tellurium, that are known to be harmful to VRLA batteries are controlled to very low levels. A bismuth (Bi)-bearing oxide has been manufactured (Barton-pot method) from this soft lead and is characterized in terms of phase composition, particle size distribution, BET surface area, and reactivity. An investigation is also made of the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from the Bi-bearing oxide. For comparison, the characteristics and performance of a Bi-free (Barton-pot) oxide, which is manufactured in the USA, are also examined. Increasing the level of bismuth and lowering those of the other impurities in soft lead produces no unusual changes in either the physical or the chemical properties of the resulting Bi-bearing oxide compared with Bi-free oxide. This is very important because there is no need for battery manufacturers to change their paste formulae and paste-mixing procedures on switching to the new Bi-bearing oxide. There is little difference in the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from Bi-bearing or Bi-free oxides. On the other hand, these rates increase on the former electrodes when the levels of all the other impurities are made to exceed (by deliberately adding the impurities as oxide powders) the corresponding, specified values for the Bi-bearing oxide. The latter behaviour is particularly noticeable for hydrogen evolution, which is enhanced even further when a negative electrode prepared from Bi-bearing oxide is contaminated through the deposition of impurities added to the sulfuric acid solution. The effects of impurities in the positive

  12. Retinoic acid response element in the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3: implications for regulation of retinoic acid synthesis.

    Duester, G; Shean, M L; McBride, M S; Stewart, M J

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid regulation of one member of the human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family was demonstrated, suggesting that the retinol dehydrogenase function of ADH may play a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway for retinoic acid. Promoter activity of human ADH3, but not ADH1 or ADH2, was shown to be activated by retinoic acid in transient transfection assays of Hep3B human hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping experiments identified a region in the ADH3 promoter located between...

  13. Effect of Chicoric Acid on Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Lee, Na Young; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Jin, Jong Sik; Bang, Keuk Soo; Eom, Ye-Jin; Hong, Chul-Hee; Nugroho, Agung; Park, Hee-Jun; An, Hyo-Jin

    2015-12-24

    Chicoric acid (dicaffeoyl-tartaric acid), is a natural phenolic compound found in a number of plants, such as chicory (Cichorium intybus) and Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea), which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and analgesic activities. Although these biological effects of chicoric acid have been investigated, there are no reports of its antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effects in human mast cells (HMC)-1 or anaphylactic activity in a mouse model. Therefore, we investigated the antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect of chicoric acid and its underlying mechanisms of action using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Chicoric acid decreased the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β. We studied the inhibitory effects of chicoric acid on the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activation of caspase-1. However, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was not sufficient to abrogate the stimulus. In addition, we investigated the ability of chicoric acid to inhibit compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis in vivo. Oral administration of chicoric acid at 20 mg/kg inhibited histamine release and protected mice against compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic mortality. These results suggest that chicoric acid has an antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect that involves modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses. Therefore, chicoric acid could be an efficacious agent for allergy-related inflammatory disorders. PMID:26593037

  14. FBXL5 targets cortactin for ubiquitination-mediated destruction to regulate gastric cancer cell migration.

    Cen, Gang; Ding, Hong-Hua; Liu, Bin; Wu, Wei-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Cortactin, an actin-interacting protein, is implicated in cytoskeletal architecture and often amplified in several types of cancer including gastric adenocarcinomas. Downregulation of cortactin decreases cell migration and invasion. However, how to regulate cortactin in gastric cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we report that FBXL5 interacts with and targets cortactin for ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we showed that FBXL5-induced cortactin degradation is mediated by extracellular regulated signal kinase (ERK). Serine phosphorylation sites mutant, cortactinS405A/S418A, prevent FBXL5-induced cortactin degradation. Moreover, CortactinS405A/S418A exhibited stronger effects in promoting gastric cancer cell migration when compared to wild-type cortactin. Taken together, our data suggested a novel molecular mechanism for the negative regulation of cortactin by FBXL5 in gastric cancer cells migration. PMID:24867096

  15. Parent Emotion Socialization Practices and Child Self-regulation as Predictors of Child Anxiety: The Mediating Role of Cardiac Variability.

    Williams, Sarah R; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The importance of the parent-child relationship in emotional development is well supported. The parental role of facilitating a child's self-regulation may provide a more focused approach for examining the role of parenting in child anxiety. The current study hypothesized that parent emotion socialization practices would predict a child's abilities in self-regulation. Given that physiological arousal has been implicated in emotional development, this was hypothesized to mediate the relationship between parental emotion socialization and child emotion regulation to predict child anxiety. Eighty-five parent and child dyads participated in the study. Parents reporting higher degrees of unsupportive emotion socialization were more likely to have children with fewer abilities in emotion regulation. Cardiac responsiveness mediated the relationship between unsupportive emotion socialization and child emotion regulation. The model of cardiac responsiveness mediating the relationship between unsupportive emotion socialization and child emotion regulation failed to reach statistical significance in predicting child anxiety symptoms. PMID:25204571

  16. Substrate-specific effects of pirinixic acid derivatives on ABCB1-mediated drug transport.

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Wurglics, Mario; Aniceto, Natália; Dittrich, Michaela; Zettl, Heiko; Wiese, Michael; Wass, Mark; Ghafourian, Taravat; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-03-01

    Pirinixic acid derivatives, a new class of drug candidates for a range of diseases, interfere with targets including PPARα, PPARγ, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and microsomal prostaglandin and E2 synthase-1 (mPGES1). Since 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, and PPARγ represent potential anti-cancer drug targets, we here investigated the effects of 39 pirinixic acid derivatives on prostate cancer (PC-3) and neuroblastoma (UKF-NB-3) cell viability and, subsequently, the effects of selected compounds on drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells. Few compounds affected cancer cell viability in low micromolar concentrations but there was no correlation between the anti-cancer effects and the effects on 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, or PPARγ. Most strikingly, pirinixic acid derivatives interfered with drug transport by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 in a drug-specific fashion. LP117, the compound that exerted the strongest effect on ABCB1, interfered in the investigated concentrations of up to 2μM with the ABCB1-mediated transport of vincristine, vinorelbine, actinomycin D, paclitaxel, and calcein-AM but not of doxorubicin, rhodamine 123, or JC-1. In silico docking studies identified differences in the interaction profiles of the investigated ABCB1 substrates with the known ABCB1 binding sites that may explain the substrate-specific effects of LP117. Thus, pirinixic acid derivatives may offer potential as drug-specific modulators of ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PMID:26887049

  17. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation.

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J; Schleimer, Robert P; Wechsler, Joshua B; Loffredo, Lucas F; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2015-08-15

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells from CD151(-/-) mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells. PMID:26136426

  18. PPARα activators down-regulate CYP2C7, a retinoic acid and testosterone hydroxylase

    Peroxisome proliferators (PP) are a large class of structurally diverse chemicals that mediate their effects in the liver mainly through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Exposure to PP results in down-regulation of CYP2C family members under control of growth hormone and sex steroids including CYP2C11 and CYP2C12. We hypothesized that PP exposure would also lead to similar changes in CYP2C7, a retinoic acid and testosterone hydroxylase. CYP2C7 gene expression was dramatically down-regulated in the livers of rats treated for 13 weeks by WY-14,643 (WY; 500 ppm) or gemfibrozil (GEM; 8000 ppm). In the same tissues, exposure to WY and GEM and to a lesser extent di-n-butyl phthalate (20 000 ppm) led to decreases in CYP2C7 protein levels in both male and female rats. An examination of the time and dose dependence of CYP2C7 protein changes after PP exposure revealed that CYP2C7 was more sensitive to compound exposure compared to other CYP2C family members. Protein expression was decreased after 1, 5 and 13 weeks of PP treatment. CYP2C7 protein expression was completely abolished at 5 ppm WY, the lowest dose tested. GEM and DBP exhibited dose-dependent decreases in CYP2C7 protein expression, becoming significant at 1000 ppm or 5000 ppm and above, respectively. These results show that PP exposure leads to changes in CYP2C7 mRNA and protein levels. Thus, in addition to known effects on steroid metabolism, exposure to PP may alter retinoic acid metabolism

  19. Hormonal Regulation and Expression Profiles of Wheat Genes Involved during Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway

    Sipla Aggarwal; Vishnu Shukla; Kaushal Kumar Bhati; Mandeep Kaur; Shivani Sharma; Anuradha Singh; Shrikant Mantri; Ajay Kumar Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) biosynthesis pathway genes were reported from multiple crop species. PA accumulation was enhanced during grain filling and at that time, hormones like Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA3) interplay to control the process of seed development. Regulation of wheat PA pathway genes has not yet been reported in seeds. In an attempt to find the clues for the regulation by hormones, the promoter region of wheat PA pathway genes was analyzed for the presence of cis-elements...

  20. Emotional Regulation and Depression: A Potential Mediator between Heart and Mind

    Angelo Compare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A narrative review of the major evidence concerning the relationship between emotional regulation and depression was conducted. The literature demonstrates a mediating role of emotional regulation in the development of depression and physical illness. Literature suggests in fact that the employment of adaptive emotional regulation strategies (e.g., reappraisal causes a reduction of stress-elicited emotions leading to physical disorders. Conversely, dysfunctional emotional regulation strategies and, in particular, rumination and emotion suppression appear to be influential in the pathogenesis of depression and physiological disease. More specifically, the evidence suggests that depression and rumination affect both cognitive (e.g., impaired ability to process negative information and neurobiological mechanisms (e.g., hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis overactivation and higher rates of cortisol production. Understanding the factors that govern the variety of health outcomes that different people experience following exposure to stress has important implications for the development of effective emotion-regulation interventional approaches (e.g., mindfulness-based therapy, emotion-focused therapy, and emotion regulation therapy.

  1. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes, but it is...

  2. Lithocholic acid induction of the FGF19 promoter in intestinal cells is mediated by PXR

    Wolfgang Wistuba; Carsten Gnewuch; Gerhard Liebisch; Gerd Schmitz; Thomas Langmann

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of the toxic secondary bile acid lithocholic acid (LCA) on the expression of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) in intestinal cells and to characterize the pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) response of the FGF19 promoter region.METHODS: The intestinal cell line LS174T was stimulated with various concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid for several time points.FGF19 mRNA levels were determined with quantitative realtime RT-PCR. FGF19 deletion promoter constructs were generated and the LCA response was analzyed in reporter assays. Co-transfections with PXR and RXR were carried out to study FGF19 regulation by these factors.RESULTS: LCA and CDCA strongly up-regulate FGF19 mRNA expression in LS174T cells in a time and dose dependent manner. Using reporter gene assays with several deletion constructs we found that the LCA responsive element in the human FGF19 promoter maps to the proximal regulatory region containing two potential binding sites for PXR. Overexpression of PXR and its dimerization partner retinoid X receptor (RXR) and stimulation with LCA or the potent PXR ligand rifampicin leads to a significant induction of FGF19 promoter activity in intestinal cells.CONCLUSION: LCA induced feedback inhibition of bile acid synthesis in the liver is likely to be regulated by PXR inducing intestinal FGF19 expression.

  3. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future. PMID:27164024

  4. Tumour–stromal interactions in acid-mediated invasion: A mathematical model

    Martin, Natasha K.

    2010-12-01

    It is well established that the tumour microenvironment can both promote and suppress tumour growth and invasion, however, most mathematical models of invasion view the normal tissue as inhibiting tumour progression via immune modulation or spatial constraint. In particular, the production of acid by tumour cells and the subsequent creation of a low extracellular pH environment has been explored in several \\'acid-mediated tumour invasion\\' models where the acidic environment facilitates normal cell death and permits tumour invasion. In this paper, we extend the acid-invasion model developed by Gatenby and Gawlinski (1996) to include both the competitive and cooperative interactions between tumour and normal cells, by incorporating the influence of extracellular matrix and protease production at the tumour-stroma interface. Our model predicts an optimal level of tumour acidity which produces both cell death and matrix degradation. Additionally, very aggressive tumours prevent protease production and matrix degradation by excessive normal cell destruction, leading to an acellular (but matrix filled) gap between the tumour and normal tissue, a feature seen in encapsulated tumours. These results suggest, counterintuitively, that increasing tumour acidity may, in some cases, prevent tumour invasion.

  5. Structure-Based Identification of a Potent Inhibitor Targeting Stp1-Mediated Virulence Regulation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Zheng, Weihao; Cai, Xiaodan; Xie, Mingsheng; Liang, Yujie; Wang, Tao; Li, Zigang

    2016-08-18

    The increasing threats of antibiotic resistance urge the need for developing new strategies against bacterial infections. Targeting eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr phosphatase Stp1-mediated virulence regulation represents a promising approach for combating staphylococcal infection yet to be explored. Here, we report the 2.32-Å resolution crystal structure of Stp1. Stp1 binds an unexpected fourth metal ion, which is important for Stp1's enzymatic activity as demonstrated by amino acid substitution studies. Inspired by the structural details of Stp1, we identified a potent and selective Stp1 inhibitor, aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA). Transcriptome analysis and biochemical studies supported Stp1 as the target of ATA inhibition within the pathogen, preventing upregulation of virulence genes. Notably, ATA did not affect in vitro growth of Staphylococcus aureus, while simultaneously attenuating staphylococcal virulence in mice. Our findings demonstrate that ATA is a potent anti-virulence compound against staphylococcal infection, laying the foundation for further developing new scaffolds for Stp1-targeted small molecules. PMID:27499528

  6. Histone acetylation mediates epigenetic regulation of transcriptional reprogramming in insects during metamorphosis, wounding and infection

    Mukherjee Krishnendu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in eukaryotes is regulated by histone acetylation/deacetylation, an epigenetic process mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs and histone deacetylases (HDACs whose opposing activities are tightly regulated. The acetylation of histones by HATs increases DNA accessibility and promotes gene expression, whereas the removal of acetyl groups by HDACs has the opposite effect. Results We explored the role of HDACs and HATs in epigenetic reprogramming during metamorphosis, wounding and infection in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella. We measured the expression of genes encoding components of HATs and HDACs to monitor the transcriptional activity of each enzyme complex and found that both enzymes were upregulated during pupation. Specific HAT inhibitors were able to postpone pupation and to reduce insect survival following wounding, whereas HDAC inhibitors accelerated pupation and increased survival. The administration of HDAC inhibitors modulated the expression of effector genes with key roles in tissue remodeling (matrix metalloproteinase, the regulation of sepsis (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects and host defense (antimicrobial peptides, and simultaneously induced HAT activity, suggesting that histone acetylation is regulated by a feedback mechanism. We also discovered that both the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can delay metamorphosis in G. mellonella by skewing the HDAC/HAT balance. Conclusions Our study provides for the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria can interfere with the regulation of HDACs and HATs in insects which appear to manipulate host immunity and development. We conclude that histone acetylation/deacetylation in insects mediates transcriptional reprogramming during metamorphosis and in response to wounding and infection.

  7. ROTUNDA3 function in plant development by phosphatase 2A-mediated regulation of auxin transporter recycling

    Karampelias, Michael; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Aesaert, Stijn; Coussens, Griet; Rolčík, Jakub; Bruno, Leonardo; De Winne, Nancy; Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Van Montagu, Marc; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Friml, Jiří; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    The shaping of organs in plants depends on the intercellular flow of the phytohormone auxin, of which the directional signaling is determined by the polar subcellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Phosphorylation dynamics of PIN proteins are affected by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the PINOID kinase, which act antagonistically to mediate their apical–basal polar delivery. Here, we identified the ROTUNDA3 (RON3) protein as a regulator of the PP2A phosphatase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The RON3 gene was map-based cloned starting from the ron3-1 leaf mutant and found to be a unique, plant-specific gene coding for a protein with high and dispersed proline content. The ron3-1 and ron3-2 mutant phenotypes [i.e., reduced apical dominance, primary root length, lateral root emergence, and growth; increased ectopic stages II, IV, and V lateral root primordia; decreased auxin maxima in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-treated root apical meristems; hypergravitropic root growth and response; increased IAA levels in shoot apices; and reduced auxin accumulation in root meristems] support a role for RON3 in auxin biology. The affinity-purified PP2A complex with RON3 as bait suggested that RON3 might act in PIN transporter trafficking. Indeed, pharmacological interference with vesicle trafficking processes revealed that single ron3-2 and double ron3-2 rcn1 mutants have altered PIN polarity and endocytosis in specific cells. Our data indicate that RON3 contributes to auxin-mediated development by playing a role in PIN recycling and polarity establishment through regulation of the PP2A complex activity. PMID:26888284

  8. Cigarette smoke regulates VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling in rat lungs

    Stevenson Christopher S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling is critical to endothelial cell survival, maintenance of the vasculature and alveolar structure and regeneration of lung tissue. Reduced VEGF and VEGFR2 expression in emphysematous lungs has been linked to increased endothelial cell death and vascular regression. Previously, we have shown that CS down-regulated the VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling in mouse lungs. However, the VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling in response to oxidants/cigarette smoke (CS is not known. We hypothesized that CS exposure leads to disruption of VEGFR2-mediated endothelial survival signaling in rat lungs. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed CS for 3 days, 8 weeks and 6 months to investigate the effect of CS on VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling by measuring the Akt/PI3-kinase/eNOS downstream signaling in rat lungs. Results and Discussion We show that CS disrupts VEGFR2/PI3-kinase association leading to decreased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation. This may further alter the phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad and increase the Bad/Bcl-xl association. However, this was not associated with a significant lung cell death as evidenced by active caspase-3 levels. These data suggest that although CS altered the VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling in the rat lungs, but it was not sufficient to cause lung cell death. Conclusion The rat lungs exposed to CS in acute, sub-chronic and chronic levels may be representative of smokers where survival signaling is altered but was not associated with lung cell death whereas emphysema is known to be associated with lung cell apoptosis.

  9. c-Cbl regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion

    Highlights: • c-Cbl ubiquitinates αPix for proteasome-mediated degradation. • C6 and A172 glioma cells lack c-Cbl, which leads to stabilization of αPix. • The accumulated αPix promotes migration and invasion of the cancer cells. • The lack of c-Cbl in the cells appears responsible for their malignant behavior. - Abstract: c-Cbl, a RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase, down-regulates receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGF receptor, and inhibits cell proliferation. Moreover, c-Cbl mutations are frequently found in patients with myeloid neoplasm. Therefore, c-Cbl is known as a tumor suppressor. αPix is expressed only in highly proliferative and mobile cells, including immune cells, and up-regulated in certain invasive tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we showed that c-Cbl serves as an ubiquitin E3 ligase for proteasome-mediated degradation of αPix, but not βPix. Remarkably, the rat C6 and human A172 glioma cells were unable to express c-Cbl, which leads to a dramatic accumulation of αPix. Depletion of αPix by shRNA markedly reduced the ability of the glioma cells to migrate and invade, whereas complementation of shRNA-insensitive αPix promoted it. These results indicate that c-Cbl negatively regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion and the lack of c-Cbl in the C6 and A172 glioma cells is responsible for their malignant behavior

  10. Silver ion catalyzed cerium(IV) mediated electrochemical oxidation of phenol in nitric acid medium

    Mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO) is one of the sustainable processes for organic pollutant destruction and has been employed for organic mineralization reactions by many researchers. In the MEO a metal ion capable of exhibiting redox behavior is oxidized from lower oxidation state to higher oxidation state by an electrochemical cell and subsequently used as an oxidant for mineralizing the toxic organics into CO2 and water. The net result is the consumption of electrical energy for organic mineralization. Therefore, the current efficiency is an important factor and maximizing the current efficiency is one of the ways of reducing the running cost of the MEO process. It has been reported in the literature that the current efficiency could be increased using a metal ion catalyst having a good redox potential. In this study Ce(IV) mediated electrochemical oxidation of phenol was carried out with silver ion catalyst. The current efficiency for the electro-oxidation of cerium(III) in nitric acid was found to be increased by the addition of silver ions. This mixed mediator system was tested for the oxidation of phenol in order to optimize the parameters for organic pollutant destruction. The mineralization efficiency calculated based on the CO2 evolution was found to be higher for silver catalyzed Ce(IV) mediated oxidation compared to the non-silver catalyzed system