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Sample records for acid induces relaxation

  1. The mechanism of gentisic acid-induced relaxation of the guinea pig isolated trachea: the role of potassium channels and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors

    J.F. Cunha

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined some of the mechanisms by which the aspirin metabolite and the naturally occurring metabolite gentisic acid induced relaxation of the guinea pig trachea in vitro. In preparations with or without epithelium and contracted by histamine, gentisic acid caused concentration-dependent and reproducible relaxation, with mean EC50 values of 18 µM and Emax of 100% (N = 10 or 20 µM and Emax of 92% (N = 10, respectively. The relaxation caused by gentisic acid was of slow onset in comparison to that caused by norepinephrine, theophylline or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP. The relative rank order of potency was: salbutamol 7.9 > VIP 7.0 > gentisic acid 4.7 > theophylline 3.7. Gentisic acid-induced relaxation was markedly reduced (24 ± 7.0, 43 ± 3.9 and 78 ± 5.6% in preparations with elevated potassium concentration in the medium (20, 40 or 80 mM, respectively. Tetraethylammonium (100 µM, a nonselective blocker of the potassium channels, partially inhibited the relaxation response to gentisic acid, while 4-AP (10 µM, a blocker of the voltage potassium channel, inhibited gentisic acid-induced relaxation by 41 ± 12%. Glibenclamide (1 or 3 µM, at a concentration which markedly inhibited the relaxation induced by the opener of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, levcromakalim, had no effect on the relaxation induced by gentisic acid. Charybdotoxin (0.1 or 0.3 µM, a selective blocker of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, caused rightward shifts (6- and 7-fold of the gentisic acid concentration-relaxation curve. L-N G-nitroarginine (100 µM, a NO synthase inhibitor, had no effect on the relaxant effect of gentisic acid, and caused a slight displacement to the right in the relaxant effect of the gentisic acid curve at 300 µM, while methylene blue (10 or 30 µM or ODQ (1 µM, the inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase, all failed to affect gentisic acid-induced relaxation. D-P-Cl-Phe6,Leu17[VIP] (0.1 µM, a VIP receptor antagonist

  2. The endothelium-dependent relaxation of rabbit aorta: effects of antioxidants and hydroxylated eicosatetraenoic acids.

    Förstermann, U.; Neufang, B.

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) induced concentration-dependent relaxations of rabbit aortic strips precontracted with noradrenaline. The relaxations were abolished if the endothelium of the strips was disrupted. Three different antioxidants (butylated hydroxytoluene, dithiothreitol and alpha-tocopherol) reversed the endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the antioxidant ascorbic acid did not alter the vasodilatation. The hydroxylated eicosatetraenoic acids 5-HET...

  3. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  4. Relaxation dispersion in MRI induced by fictitious magnetic fields

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J.; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-04-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ⩾2. RAFF generates a fictitious field ( E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i. e. the angle ɛ between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ɛ > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/ cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange ( e. g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ɛ induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ɛ ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T1ρ experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T1ρ method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable.

  5. Mechanism of nicotine-induced relaxation in the porcine basilar artery

    Zhang, W; Edvinsson, L; Lee, T J

    1998-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to examine possible influence of adrenergic nerves on nicotine-induced neurogenic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries denuded of endothelium. Nicotine and transmural nerve stimulation (TNS) induced relaxation of basilar arteries. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) abolished...... the relaxation elicited by TNS, but only partially blocked that induced by nicotine. Relaxation induced by both nicotine and TNS was abolished by N-nitro-L-arginine. The N-nitro-L-arginine inhibition of both TNS- and nicotine-induced relaxation was reversed by L-arginine but not by D......-arginine. Hexamethonium abolished the relaxation induced by nicotine, but did not affect that elicited by TNS. Relaxation induced by nicotine was diminished by guanethidine, which did not affect the relaxation induced by TNS, suggesting that guanethidine blockade of nicotine-induced relaxation is not due to its local...

  6. The ent-15α-Acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic Acid Relaxes Rat Artery Mesenteric Superior via Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Mechanisms

    Êurica Adélia Nogueira Ribeiro; Edla de Azevedo Herculano; Cintia Danieli Ferreira da Costa; Fabiola Fialho Furtado; Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão da-Cunha; José Maria Barbosa-Filho; Marcelo Sobral da Silva; Isac Almeida de Medeiros

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of the ent-15 α -acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA-acetoxy). In rat mesenteric artery rings, KA-acetoxy induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine. In the absence of endothelium, the vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right without reduction of the maximum effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAM...

  7. Hydrophobic bile acids relax rat detrusor contraction via inhibiting the opening of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger

    Jingzhen Zhu; Xingyou Dong; Qian Liu; Chao Wu; Qingqing Wang; Zhou Long; Longkun Li

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) are thought to inhibit smooth muscle contractility in several organs. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of hydrophobic BAs on the detrusor contractility of rat bladder and to explore the possible mechanism. Lithocholic acid (LCA) treatment increased the micturition interval and induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of bladder detrusor strips. In addition, LCA reduced the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and inhibit...

  8. Estimation of permeability of shaly sand reservoir from induced polarization relaxation time spectra

    Maosong, Tong; Weinan, Wang; Yizhong, Jiang; Deqin, Shi [R and D Center, Well Logging Company, Daqing Petroleum Administrative Bureau, Daqing 163412 (China); Li, Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Daqing Petroleum Institute, Daqing 163318 (China)

    2004-11-30

    The induced polarization (IP) decay curve contains more information than the polarizability which was used in the conventional induced polarization logging tool. The Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method makes it possible to transform induced polarization decay data into relaxation time spectra. The appropriate number of relaxation arrangement points in relaxation data inversion ranges from 32 to 64. The induced polarization relaxation time spectrum can be used to quantitatively estimate the pore size distribution of the shaly sands saturated with the NaCl brine. Combining the average IP relaxation time constant with the porosity can markedly improve the accuracy of determining the permeability over using total porosity from core measurements.

  9. Relaxation phenomena of radicals induced in irradiated fresh papayas

    Electron spin resonance spectrometry of the γ-irradiated fresh papayas followed by freeze-drying and powderization was performed. We found a strong single peak in the flesh was observed at g=2.004 and attributed to organic free radicals. Using the method of Lund et al., relaxation times of the peak from 0 to 14 days-stored samples after γ-irradiation were calculated. T2 showed a dose response, while T1 kept almost constant by the increment of doses. The γ-radiation-induced radicals showing progressive saturation behaviors can be caused through a different pathway from indirect effects by the low LET radiations. (author)

  10. Xanthorrhizol induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rat thoracic aorta.

    Campos, M G; Oropeza, M V; Villanueva, T; Aguilar, M I; Delgado, G; Ponce, H A

    2000-06-01

    Xanthorrhizol, a bisabolene isolated from the medicinal plant Iostephane heterophylla, was assayed on rat thoracic aorta rings to elucidate its effect and likely mechanism of action, by measuring changes of isometric tension. Xanthorrhizol (1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 microg/mL) significantly inhibited precontractions induced by KCI-; (60mM), noradrenaline (10(-6) M) or CaCl2 (1.0 mM). Increasing concentrations of external calcium antagonized the inhibitory effect on KCl-induced contractions. The vasorelaxing effect of xanthorrhizol was not affected by indomethacin (10 microM) or L-NAME (100 microM) in intact rat thoracic aorta rings precontracted by noradrenaline, which suggested that the effect was not mediated through either endothelium-derived prostacyclin (PGI2) or nitric oxide release from endothelial cells. Endothelium removal did not affect the relaxation induced by xanthorrhizol on rat thoracic aorta rings, discarding the participation of any substance released by the endothelium. Xanthorrhizol inhibitory effect was greater on KCI- and CaCl2-induced contractions than on those induced by noradrenaline. Xanthorrhizol inhibitory effect in rat thoracic aorta is likely explained for interference with calcium availability by inhibiting calcium influx through both voltage- and receptor-operated channels. PMID:10983876

  11. Hydrophobic bile acids relax rat detrusor contraction via inhibiting the opening of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger

    Zhu, Jingzhen; Dong, Xingyou; Liu, Qian; Wu, Chao; Wang, Qingqing; Long, Zhou; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) are thought to inhibit smooth muscle contractility in several organs. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of hydrophobic BAs on the detrusor contractility of rat bladder and to explore the possible mechanism. Lithocholic acid (LCA) treatment increased the micturition interval and induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of bladder detrusor strips. In addition, LCA reduced the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and inhibited both the outward and inward Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current (INCX) in primary isolated smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To further investigate the mechanism of action of LCA, several pharmacologic agents were used. We found that the NCX inhibitor 3′,4′-Dichlorobenzamil (DCB) can significantly inhibit the relaxation of detrusor strips and a reduction of the [Ca2+]i induced by LCA, while the antagonist of muscarinic receptor and the agonist of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) had no effect. In conclusion, these data suggest that the relaxation of rat detrusor induced by hydrophobic BAs is mediated by NCX. Further research is needed to carry out to demonstrate the possible pathway and provide a potential new strategy to investigation for the treatment of the low urinary tract syndromes. PMID:26892434

  12. Studies on the regulation of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) by acid in the esophagus and stomach.

    Banovcin, P; Halicka, J; Halickova, M; Duricek, M; Hyrdel, R; Tatar, M; Kollarik, M

    2016-07-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) is the major mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux, but the regulation of TLESR by stimuli in the esophagus is incompletely understood. We have recently reported that acid infusion in the esophagus substantially (by 75%) increased the number of meal-induced TLESR in healthy subjects. We concluded that the TLESR reflex triggered by gastric distention with meal was enhanced by the stimulation of esophageal nerves by acid. However, the possibilities that the acid infused into the esophagus acts after passing though lower esophageal sphincter in stomach to enhance TLESR, or that the acid directly initiates TLESR from the esophagus were not addressed. Here, we evaluated the effect of acid infusion into the proximal stomach on meal-induced TLESR (study 1) and the ability of acid infusion into the esophagus to initiate TLESR without prior meal (study 2). We analyzed TLESRs by using high-resolution manometry in healthy subjects in paired randomized studies. In study 1, we found that acid infusion into the proximal stomach did not affect TLESRs induced by standard meal. The number of meal-induced TLESRs following the acid infusion into the proximal stomach was similar to the number of meal-induced TLESRs following the control infusion. In study 2, we found that acid infusion into the esophagus without prior meal did not initiate TLESRs. We conclude that the increase in the meal-induced TLESRs by acid in the esophagus demonstrated in our previous study is not attributable to the action of acid in the stomach or to direct initiation of TLESR from the esophagus by acid. Our studies are consistent with the concept that the stimuli in the esophagus can influence TLESRs. The enhancement of TLESR by acid in the esophagus may contribute to pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux in some patients. PMID:25873206

  13. 1H relaxation enhancement induced by nanoparticles in solutions: Influence of magnetic properties and diffusion

    Magnetic nanoparticles that induce nuclear relaxation are the most promising materials to enhance the sensitivity in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation enhancement in solutions, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 1H spin-lattice relaxation for decalin and toluene solutions of various Fe2O3 nanoparticles was investigated. The relaxation experiments were performed in a frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz by applying Field Cycling method, and in the temperature range of 257–298 K, using nanoparticles differing in size and shape: spherical – 5 nm diameter, cubic – 6.5 nm diameter, and cubic – 9 nm diameter. The relaxation dispersion data were interpreted in terms of a theory of nuclear relaxation induced by magnetic crystals in solution. The approach was tested with respect to its applicability depending on the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystals and the time-scale of translational diffusion of the solvent. The role of Curie relaxation and the contributions to the overall 1H spin-lattice relaxation associated with the electronic spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation was thoroughly discussed. It was demonstrated that the approach leads to consistent results providing information on the magnetic (electronic) properties of the nanocrystals, i.e., effective electron spin and relaxation times. In addition, features of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation resulting from the electronic properties of the crystals and the solvent diffusion were explained

  14. Relaxation of surface stress induced by an organic adsorbate: PTCDA on vicinal Ag(111)

    Pollinger, Florian; Vrdoljak, Pavo; Fertig, Dominik; Schmitt, Stefan; Kumpf, Christian; Schoell, Achim; Umbach, Eberhard [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Tian, Zhen; Sander, Dirk; Kirschner, Juergen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Self-organization of metallic surfaces on large scales can be induced by the adsorption of organic molecules and has been observed in several experiments. One example is the growth of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on stepped (8.5 -vicinal) Ag(111) surfaces. At elevated temperatures, the adsorbate molecules lead to a bunching of substrate steps, which agglomerate to facets of critical sizes. The facets arrange in a coverage-dependent grating-like pattern on a mesoscopic length scale. The resulting order requires a long-range interaction which is mediated by the substrate. It can be explained by a change of surface stress induced by the adsorbate layer. Experimentally, such a change is directly accessible by an optical cantilever bending technique. We monitored the bending of a faceting thin Ag(10 8 7) crystal with this method in order to quantify the occurring relaxation of surface stress.

  15. Relaxation of Blazar-induced Pair Beams in Cosmic Voids

    Miniati, Francesco; Elyiv, Andrii

    2013-06-01

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  16. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    Miniati, Francesco [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Elyiv, Andrii, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2013-06-10

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  17. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  18. Furosemide-induced airway relaxation in guinea pigs: relation to Na-K-2Cl cotransporter function.

    Lavallee, S L; Iwamoto, L M; Claybaugh, J R; Dressel, M V; Sato, A K; Nakamura, K T

    1997-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that airway relaxation to furosemide is mediated via the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter. If this mechanism exists in airway smooth muscle like in vascular smooth muscle, changes in airway relaxation should be associated with changes in Na-K-2Cl cotransporter function, and both should be substrate dependent. Tracheal rings from newborn guinea pigs were bathed in standard (STD) or varying low Cl- concentration ([Cl-]) N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES). Isometric relaxation to 300 microM furosemide or 10(-8) to 10(-5) M salbutamol was measured. Airway segments were incubated with rubidium-86 (86Rb) in STD or varying low [Cl-] HEPES, with and without 300 microM furosemide or 25 microM salbutamol. Furosemide was unable to reduce 86Rb uptake at 10 mM [Cl-], although relaxation was still observed in 10 mM [Cl-]. Salbutamol did not affect 86Rb uptake. This study demonstrated that there is a furosemide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter in newborn guinea pig trachea. However, the effect of furosemide on cotransporter function did not always directly correspond to differences in relaxation, suggesting that the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter may play a major, but not exclusive, role in furosemide-induced airway relaxation. PMID:9252558

  19. Cajaninstilbene acid relaxes rat renal arteries: roles of Ca2+ antagonism and protein kinase C-dependent mechanism.

    Dong-Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available Cajaninstilbene acid (CSA is a major active component present in the leaves of Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp. The present study explores the underlying cellular mechanisms for CSA-induced relaxation in rat renal arteries. Vascular reactivity was examined in arterial rings that were suspended in a Multi Myograph System and the expression of signaling proteins was assessed by Western blotting method. CSA (0.1-10 µM produced relaxations in rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine, serotonin, 9, 11-dideoxy-9α, 11α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F(2α (U46619, and 60 mM KCl. CSA-induced relaxations did not show difference between genders and were unaffected by endothelium denudation, nor by treatment with N(G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin, ICI-182780, tetraethylammonium ion, BaCl(2, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine or propranolol. CSA reduced contraction induced by CaCl(2 (0.01-5 mM in Ca(2+-free 60 mM KCl solution and by 30 nM (--Bay K8644 in 15 mM KCl solution. CSA inhibited 60 mM KCl-induced Ca(2+ influx in smooth muscle of renal arteries. In addition, CSA inhibited contraction evoked by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, protein kinase C agonist in Ca(2+-free Krebs solution. Moreover, CSA reduced the U46619- and PMA-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC at Ser19 and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1 at Thr853 which was associated with vasoconstriction. CSA also lowered the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKCδ at Thr505. In summary, the present results suggest that CSA relaxes renal arteries in vitro via multiple cellular mechanisms involving partial inhibition of calcium entry via nifedipine-sensitive calcium channels, protein kinase C and Rho kinase.

  20. Dielectric Relaxation Studies of Alkylacrylates with Ortho-Substituted Benzoic acids in 1, 4 - Dioxane

    F. Liakath Ali Khan*,1

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric absorption studies of Hydrogen bonded complexes of alkyl acrylates with ortho substituted benzoic acid (2 - Fluro benzoic acid, 2 - Iodo benzoic acid, 2 - Chloro benzoic acid, 2 - Bromo benzoic acid, and 2 - Nitro benzoic acid were studied at microwave frequency 9.43GHz in dilute solution of 1,4 - Dioxane at room temperature. Different dielectric parameters like dielectric constant ( and dielectric loss ( at microwave frequency, and static dielectric constant (0 and dielectric constant ( at optical frequency were determined. The validity of the single frequency equation proposed by Higasi et.al., for multiple relaxation time (1 was found to be a function of the hydrogen bonding strength in benzoic acid, whereas the group rotation relaxation time (2 was a function of the steric interaction of proton donor. The relaxation time was maximum at 1:1 molar ratios of alky acrylates with ortho substituted benzoic acid.

  1. The relaxation phenomena of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mangoes

    Using the γ-irradiated fresh mangoes followed by freeze-drying and powderization, electron spin resonance spectrometry of specimens was performed. As a result, a strong single peak in the flesh, the pericarp and the seed was observed at g=2.004 and attributed to organic free radicals. When relaxation times of the peak was calculated using the method of Lund et al., T2 showed dose responses according to increasing doses while T1 was almost constant. Dose responsibility of the relaxation time T2 obtained from flesh specimens of the mangoes could be measured regardless of the preservation period of 1 to 9 days following γ-irradiation. Therefore, there might be possible to detect the irradiation treatment of fresh mangoes using relaxation time T2. (author)

  2. Photo-induced magnetic solitons and the slow relaxation mechanism in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Kanazawa, Ikuzo, E-mail: kanazawa@u-gakugei.ac.j [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganeishi, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    Taking into account the correlation effect among photo-induced magnetic solitons, the mechanism of the slow relaxation of the spin dynamics in diluted magnetic semiconductors has been discussed by the long-range p-spin spherical model.

  3. The CAP Theorem Versus Databases with Relaxed ACID properties

    Frank, Lars; Ulslev Pedersen, Rasmus; Frank, Christian Havnø; Larsson, N. Jesper

    2014-01-01

    traditional ACID properties and all the CAP properties were implemented. This optimizing is especially important in mobile integrated databases, where disconnections are normal and frequent. It is also important in distributed databases like EHR (electronic Health Records) where many different hospital...... locations are involved, since the risk for disconnections increases with the number of participating locations. We use distributed integrated EHR databases as an example where our optimizing method may contribute....

  4. Relaxation studies of amorphous alloys with creep induced magnetic and structural anisotropy

    Amorphous ferromagnetic (Fe,Co,Ni) ribbons of various compositions have been prepared by rapid solidification and annealed with applied tensile stress. This process yields both creep-induced magnetic anisotropy and structural anisotropy. Post-annealing has been done to investigate the relaxation process. X-ray diffraction and thermomechanical analysis measurement of post-annealed samples reveal a clear underlying relaxation process in the material, proving that structural anisotropy corresponds to the elastic strain induced by creep annealing.

  5. Reducing Anxiety in Gifted Children by Inducing Relaxation.

    Roome, John R.; Romney, David M.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty gifted children (grades six to eight) were allocated to either progressive muscle relaxation or biofeedback treatment groups or to a no-treament, control group. Biofeedback Ss evinced a significant decrease in anxiety and both groups moved towards more internal locus of control compared with controls. There was no change in trait anxiety.…

  6. {sup 1}H relaxation enhancement induced by nanoparticles in solutions: Influence of magnetic properties and diffusion

    Kruk, D., E-mail: danuta.kruk@matman.uwm.edu.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Słoneczna 54, 10-710 Olsztyn (Poland); Experimentalphysik II, Universität Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Korpała, A. [Department of Biophysics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Łazarza 16, 31-530 Kraków (Poland); Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Taheri, S. Mehdizadeh; Förster, S. [Department of Physical Chemistry I, Universität Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Kozłowski, A. [NU-MED Group Inc., Center of Radiotherapy and Improvements in Elbląg, Królewiecka 146, 82-300 Elbląg (Poland); Rössler, E. A. [Experimentalphysik II, Universität Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles that induce nuclear relaxation are the most promising materials to enhance the sensitivity in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation enhancement in solutions, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation for decalin and toluene solutions of various Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles was investigated. The relaxation experiments were performed in a frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz by applying Field Cycling method, and in the temperature range of 257–298 K, using nanoparticles differing in size and shape: spherical – 5 nm diameter, cubic – 6.5 nm diameter, and cubic – 9 nm diameter. The relaxation dispersion data were interpreted in terms of a theory of nuclear relaxation induced by magnetic crystals in solution. The approach was tested with respect to its applicability depending on the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystals and the time-scale of translational diffusion of the solvent. The role of Curie relaxation and the contributions to the overall {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation associated with the electronic spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation was thoroughly discussed. It was demonstrated that the approach leads to consistent results providing information on the magnetic (electronic) properties of the nanocrystals, i.e., effective electron spin and relaxation times. In addition, features of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation resulting from the electronic properties of the crystals and the solvent diffusion were explained.

  7. The ent-15α-Acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic Acid Relaxes Rat Artery Mesenteric Superior via Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Mechanisms

    Êurica Adélia Nogueira Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of the ent-15α-acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA-acetoxy. In rat mesenteric artery rings, KA-acetoxy induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine. In the absence of endothelium, the vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right without reduction of the maximum effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of the NO-synthase (NOS, indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, L-NAME + indomethacin, atropine, a nonselective antagonist of the muscarinic receptors, ODQ, selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, or hydroxocobalamin, a nitric oxide scavenger. The relaxation was completely reversed in the presence of L-NAME + 1 mM L-arginine or L-arginine, an NO precursor. Diterpene-induced relaxation was not affected by TEA, a nonselective inhibitor of K+ channels. The KA-acetoxy antagonized CaCl2-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner and also inhibited an 80 mM KCl-induced contraction. The KA-acetoxy did not interfere with Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The vasorelaxant induced by KA-acetoxy seems to involve the inhibition of the Ca2+ influx and also, at least in part, by endothelial muscarinic receptors activation, NO and PGI2 release.

  8. The ent-15α-Acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic Acid Relaxes Rat Artery Mesenteric Superior via Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Mechanisms

    Ribeiro, Êurica Adélia Nogueira; Herculano, Edla de Azevedo; da Costa, Cintia Danieli Ferreira; Furtado, Fabiola Fialho; da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of the ent-15α-acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA-acetoxy). In rat mesenteric artery rings, KA-acetoxy induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine. In the absence of endothelium, the vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right without reduction of the maximum effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of the NO-synthase (NOS), indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, L-NAME + indomethacin, atropine, a nonselective antagonist of the muscarinic receptors, ODQ, selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, or hydroxocobalamin, a nitric oxide scavenger. The relaxation was completely reversed in the presence of L-NAME + 1 mM L-arginine or L-arginine, an NO precursor. Diterpene-induced relaxation was not affected by TEA, a nonselective inhibitor of K+ channels. The KA-acetoxy antagonized CaCl2-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner and also inhibited an 80 mM KCl-induced contraction. The KA-acetoxy did not interfere with Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The vasorelaxant induced by KA-acetoxy seems to involve the inhibition of the Ca2+ influx and also, at least in part, by endothelial muscarinic receptors activation, NO and PGI2 release. PMID:23346202

  9. Exchange-induced relaxation in the presence of a fictitious field

    Sorce, Dennis J.; Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2014-08-01

    In the present study we derive a solution for two site fast exchange-induced relaxation in the presence of a fictitious magnetic field as generated by amplitude and frequency modulated RF pulses. This solution provides a means to analyze data obtained from relaxation experiments with the method called RAFFn (Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field of rank n), in which a fictitious field is created in a coordinate frame undergoing multi-fold rotation about n axes (rank n). The RAFF2 technique is relevant to MRI relaxation methods that provide good contrast enhancement for tumor detection. The relaxation equations for n = 2 are derived for the fast exchange regime using density matrix formalism. The method of derivation can be further extended to obtain solutions for n > 2.

  10. Arginase attenuates inhibitory nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-induced nitric oxide generation and airway smooth muscle relaxation

    Meurs Herman

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that endogenous arginase activity potentiates airway responsiveness to methacholine by attenuation of agonist-induced nitric oxide (NO production, presumably by competition with epithelial constitutive NO synthase for the common substrate, L-arginine. Using guinea pig tracheal open-ring preparations, we now investigated the involvement of arginase in the modulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-mediated relaxation induced by inhibitory nonadrenergic noncholinergic (iNANC nerve stimulation. Methods Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 150 mA, 4 ms, 4 s, 0.5 – 16 Hz-induced relaxation was measured in tracheal preparations precontracted to 30% with histamine, in the presence of 1 μM atropine and 3 μM indomethacin. The contribution of NO to the EFS-induced relaxation was assessed by the nonselective NOS inhibitor L-NNA (0.1 mM, while the involvement of arginase activity in the regulation of EFS-induced NO production and relaxation was investigated by the effect of the specific arginase inhibitor nor-NOHA (10 μM. Furthermore, the role of substrate availability to nNOS in EFS-induced relaxation was measured in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous L-arginine. Results EFS induced a frequency-dependent relaxation, ranging from 6.6 ± 0.8% at 0.5 Hz to 74.6 ± 1.2% at 16 Hz, which was inhibited with the NOS inhibitor L-NNA by 78.0 ± 10.5% at 0.5 Hz to 26.7 ± 7.7% at 8 Hz (P Conclusion The results indicate that endogenous arginase activity attenuates iNANC nerve-mediated airway relaxation by inhibition of NO generation, presumably by limiting L-arginine availability to nNOS.

  11. Acceleration of carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times in amino acids by electrolytes

    Tian Jinping; Yin Yingwu

    2004-01-01

    A series of amino acids and carboxylic acids were determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy.The results showed that addition of 3M MgCl2 led to the 13C NMR integral area of samples being well proportional to number of carbon atoms that produce the particular signal with reliability over 95%. Measurements of 13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) are reported for a number of amino acids. T1's of all the carbons in amino acids generally tend to decrease with the increase of the concentration of electrolytes, and the presence of magnesium slats is of significant. Carboxylic carbons in amino acids are the most sensitive "acceptor" of the 13C spin-lattice relaxation accelerating effects in electrolytes, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation accelerating ability of electrolytes is Mg(ClO4)2 >MgCl2 >CaCl2 >NaCl >KCl >LiClO4 >NaOH. In general, T1's of C1 carbons in nonpolar a-amino acids are higher than those in polar and basic a-amino acids both in aqueous and 3M MgCl2 medium. In aliphatic straight-chain amino acids, a-, a-, a-, ai- and a- amino acids, T1's of C1 carbons tend to reduce with the increase of inserted carbon numbers between amino and carboxylic groups compared with Gly. T1's can be decreased even more when amino acids are mixed in 3M MgCl2, but T1's of carbons in amino acids decrease slightly with increase of the concentration of amino acids in 3M MgCl2. The mechanisms of the observed phenomena are discussed in terms of intermolecular interaction and paramagnetic impurity in electrolytes, large contributions of intermolecular interaction which is enhanced in electrolytes concentrate on the incoming "unsaturation" of the primary solvation shell of cations with the increase of electrolytes concentration and complexes formation of amino acids with metal ions. In electrolytes, amino acids are "anchored" to cations and molecule tumbling is slowed down, molecular rigidity is increased and molecular size is "enlarged", all of these are helpful to accelerate

  12. TRPM8 Channel Activation Induced by Monoterpenoid Rotundifolone Underlies Mesenteric Artery Relaxation.

    Darizy Flavia Silva

    Full Text Available In this study, our aims were to investigate transient receptor potential melastatin-8 channels (TRPM8 involvement in rotundifolone induced relaxation in the mesenteric artery and to increase the understanding of the role of these thermosensitive TRP channels in vascular tissue. Thus, message and protein levels of TRPM8 were measured by semi-quantitative PCR and western blotting in superior mesenteric arteries from 12 week-old Spague-Dawley (SD rats. Isometric tension recordings evaluated the relaxant response in mesenteric rings were also performed. Additionally, the intracellular Ca2+ changes in mesenteric artery myocytes were measured using confocal microscopy. Using PCR and western blotting, both TRPM8 channel mRNA and protein expression was measured in SD rat mesenteric artery. Rotundifolone and menthol induced relaxation in the isolated superior mesenteric artery from SD rats and improved the relaxant response induced by cool temperatures. Also, this monoterpene induced an increase in transient intracellular Ca2+. These responses were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with capsazepine or BCTC, both TRPM8 channels blockers. The response induced by rotundifolone was not significantly attenuated by ruthenium red, a non-selective TRP channels blocker, or following capsaicin-mediated desensitization of TRPV1. Our findings suggest that rotundifolone induces relaxation by activating TRPM8 channels in rat superior mesenteric artery, more selectively than menthol, the classic TRPM8 agonist, and TRPM8 channels participates in vasodilatory pathways in isolated rat mesenteric arteries.

  13. Dietary polyphenols generate nitric oxide from nitrite in the stomach and induce smooth muscle relaxation

    Nitrite, considered a biological waste and toxic product, is being regarded as an important physiological molecule in nitric oxide (·NO) biochemistry. Because the interaction of dietary phenolic compounds and nitrite would be kinetically (due to the high concentrations achieved) and thermodynamically (on basis of the redox potentials) feasible in the stomach, we have studied the potential reduction of nitrite by polyphenols present in several dietary sources. By measuring the time courses of ·NO production in simulated gastric juice (pH 2), the efficiency of the compounds studied is as follows: Epicatechin-3-O-gallate > quercetin > procyanidin B8 dimer > oleuropein > procyanidin B2 dimer > chlorogenic acid > epicatechin > catechin > procyanidin B5 dimer. The initial rates of ·NO production fall in a narrow range (ca. 1-5 μM s-1) but the distinct kinetics of the decay of ·NO signals suggest that competition reactions for ·NO are operative. The proof of concept that, in the presence of nitrite, phenol-containing dietary products induce a strong increase of ·NO in the stomach was established in an in vivo experiment with healthy volunteers consuming lettuce, onions, apples, wine, tea, berries and cherries. Moreover, selected mixtures of oleuropein and catechin with low nitrite (1 μM) were shown to induce muscle relaxation of stomach strips in a structure-dependent way. Data presented here brings strong support to the concept that polyphenols consumed in a variety of dietary products, under gastric conditions, reduce nitrite to ·NO that, in turn, may exert a biological impact as a local relaxant.

  14. High resolution NMR study of T1 magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T1-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution

  15. Papaverine-induced and endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated rat aortic strip.

    Seçilmis A

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to obtain further evidence in favour of the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO is a major mediator of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and to clarify whether NO plays a role in papaverine-induced vasorelaxation. The relaxant effects of acetylcholine (Ach, acidified NaNO2 or papaverine were investigated on isolated helical strips of the rat thoracic aorta precontracted with phenylephrine in an organ bath containing Krebs solution aerated with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. The relaxation was quantified as % peak reduction of phenylephrine contracture. Saponin abolished the relaxant effects of Ach completely whereas it had no effect on the responses to acidified NaNO2 or papaverine. NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG reduced the effects of Ach significantly, but it was ineffective on the relaxation induced by acidified NaNO2. The inhibitory action of L-NOARG was partly restored by L-arginine, but not by D-arginine. Hemoglobin, hydroxocobalamin and hydroquinone exhibited significant inhibition on the relaxation evoked by Ach and acidified NaNO2. L-NOARG, hydroxocobalamin and hydroquinone caused only limited but significant decrease in the relaxation due to papaverine. This phenomenon was also observed by increasing phenylephrine concentration leading to an enhancement in the contraction. Our findings strongly support the view that Ach-induced relaxation of rat aorta strips is mediated by free NO released from the endothelium and the results suggest that NO may indirectly contribute to papaverine-induced relaxation.

  16. Radiation Induced Stress Relaxation in Silicone and Polyurethane Elastomers

    Spellman, G; Gourdin, W; Jensen, W; Pearson, M; Fine, I

    2007-08-22

    Many different materials are used in the National Ignition Facility, NIF, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, LLNL. Some of these are exposed to significant doses of ionizing radiation. Two elastomers are of special interest because they are used in sealing applications with long expected lifetimes. These are LPU4, a polyurethane formulated at LLNL, and Dow Corning DC93-500, a silicone RTV elastomer. In 2004 a program to determine the impact of ionizing radiation on the stress relaxation and compression set characteristics of these two elastomers was undertaken. Since the materials are used in continuous compression and must reliably seal, the primary test utilized was a stress relaxation test. This test provides insight into the ability of a seal to remain functional in a static seal. The test determines how much residual force remains after a certain period of time under compression. The temperature and absorbed radiation dose can dramatically impact this property. In this study the only independent environmental variable studied is the effect of radiation at ambient temperatures. Two levels of radiation exposure were studied, 1 MRad, and 10 MRad. One of the independent test parameters is the compression deflection during storage and in this test the value used was 25%. The need for a compression retention mechanism ruled out radiation exposure in the compressed direction since the high atomic number materials for that device would block the radiation. Therefore, an annular ring was chosen for the specimen shape. The procedures are, as closely as possible, based on ASTM D 6147-97. Since the data is readily obtained at the end of the stress relaxation test, the samples were also evaluated for compression set. Compression set is the essentially permanent deformation incurred in a seal after the seal is compressed for some period of time and then unloaded. Though this is indicative of potential sealing reliability, it is not as direct an indicator of

  17. Temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids

    We examined the temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids in various samples in vitro at 11 tesla as a standard calibration data for quantitative temperature imaging of fat. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, of both the methylene (CH2) chain and terminal methyl (CH3) was linearly related to temperature (r>0.98, P2 signal for calibration and observed the signal with 18% of CH3 to estimate temperature. These findings suggested that separating the fatty acid components would significantly improve accuracy in quantitative thermometry for fat. Use of the T1 of CH2 seems promising in terms of reliability and reproducibility in measuring temperature of fat. (author)

  18. Zero field splitting fluctuations induced phase relaxation of Gd3+ in frozen solutions at cryogenic temperatures

    Raitsimring, A.; Dalaloyan, A.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Meade, T.; Goldfarb, D.

    2014-11-01

    Distance measurements using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) and Gd3+ chelates for spin labels (GdSL) have been shown to be an attractive alternative to nitroxide spin labels at W-band (95 GHz). The maximal distance that can be accessed by DEER measurements and the sensitivity of such measurements strongly depends on the phase relaxation of Gd3+ chelates in frozen, glassy solutions. In this work, we explore the phase relaxation of Gd3+-DOTA as a representative of GdSL in temperature and concentration ranges typically used for W-band DEER measurements. We observed that in addition to the usual mechanisms of phase relaxation known for nitroxide based spin labels, GdSL are subjected to an additional phase relaxation mechanism that features an increase in the relaxation rate from the center to the periphery of the EPR spectrum. Since the EPR spectrum of GdSL is the sum of subspectra of the individual EPR transitions, we attribute this field dependence to transition dependent phase relaxation. Using simulations of the EPR spectra and its decomposition into the individual transition subspectra, we isolated the phase relaxation of each transition and found that its rate increases with |ms|. We suggest that this mechanism is due to transient zero field splitting (tZFS), where its magnitude and correlation time are scaled down and distributed as compared with similar situations in liquids. This tZFS induced phase relaxation mechanism becomes dominant (or at least significant) when all other well-known phase relaxation mechanisms, such as spectral diffusion caused by nuclear spin diffusion, instantaneous and electron spin spectral diffusion, are significantly suppressed by matrix deuteration and low concentration, and when the temperature is sufficiently low to disable spin lattice interaction as a source of phase relaxation.

  19. Interactions of acetylcholinesterase with salvianolic acid B and rosmarinic acid from Salvia miltiorhiza water extract investigated by NMR relaxation rate

    Guo Wei Yin; Yi Ming Li; Wei Wei; Shan Hao Jiang; Da Yuan Zhu; Wei Hong Du

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand whether the ameliorating effect on old ages memory disorder by the root of Salvia miltiorhiza is related to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, two main ingredients, salvianolic acid B (1) and rosmarinic acid (2), which were isolated from S. Miltiorhiza water extract, were investigated in vitro by NMR relaxation rate in this work. The results showed that the proton selective relaxation rates and the molecular rotational correlation time of proton pairs for compounds 1 and 2 increased significantly by adding of AChE in mixing solution. The study reveals that the two compounds might bind to the enzyme and have AChE inhibitory effect, which could contribute to the ameliorating effect at some extent on old ages memory disorder.

  20. Relaxation Time Distribution (RTD) of Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) data from environmental studies

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Ustra, A.; Slater, L. D.; Zhang, C.; Mendonça, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present an alternative formulation of the Debye Decomposition (DD) of complex conductivity spectra, with a new set of parameters that are directly related to the continuous Debye relaxation model. The procedure determines the relaxation time distribution (RTD) and two frequency-independent parameters that modulate the induced polarization spectra. The distribution of relaxation times quantifies the contribution of each distinct relaxation process, which can in turn be associated with specific polarization processes and characterized in terms of electrochemical and interfacial parameters as derived from mechanistic models. Synthetic tests show that the procedure can successfully fit spectral induced polarization (SIP) data and accurately recover the RTD. The procedure was applied to different data sets, focusing on environmental applications. We focus on data of sand-clay mixtures artificially contaminated with toluene, and crude oil-contaminated sands experiencing biodegradation. The results identify characteristic relaxation times that can be associated with distinct polarization processes resulting from either the contaminant itself or transformations associated with biodegradation. The inversion results provide information regarding the relative strength and dominant relaxation time of these polarization processes.

  1. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonaemic Encephalopathy

    Objective: To observe clinical and laboratory features of valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy in patients taking valproic acid. Methods: Observational study was conducted at the Neurology Department, Dow University of Health Sciences, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from February 26, 2010 to March 20, 2011. Ten patients on valproic acid therapy of any age group with idiopathic or secondary epilepsy, who presented with encephalopathic symptoms, were registered and followed up during the study. Serum ammonia level, serum valproic acid level, liver function test, cerebrospinal fluid examination, electroencephalogram and brain imaging of all the patients were done. Other causes of encephalopathy were excluded after clinical and appropriate laboratory investigations. Microsoft Excel 2007 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Hyperammonaemia was found in all patients with encephalopathic symptoms. Rise in serum ammonia was independent of dose and serum level of valproic acid. Liver function was also found to be normal in 80% (n=8) of the patients. Valproic acid was withdrawn in all patients. Three (30%) patients improved only after the withdrawal of valproic acid. Six (60%) patients improved after L-Carnitine replacement, one (10%) after sodium benzoate. On followup, serum ammonia had reduced to normal in five (50%) patients and to more than half of the baseline level in two (20%) patients. Three (30%) patients were lost to followup after complete clinical improvement. Conclusion: Within therapeutic dose and serum levels, valproic acid can cause symptomatic hyperammonaemia resulting in encephalopathy. All patients taking valproic acid presenting with encephalopathic symptoms must be monitored for the condition. (author)

  2. Can Stress Relaxation Experiments be Used to Assess Deformation Induced Mobility in Glassy Polymers?

    Kropka, Jamie; Long, Kevin

    The observance of an increase in glassy polymer relaxation rates under a mechanical deformation is often referred to as deformation induced mobility (DIM). It has been argued that stress relaxation experiments can provide indirect evidence of this phenomenon. Recently, stress relaxation experiments have been interpreted as demonstrating a mobility decrease with increased deformation when very slow strain rates, 1.2 x 10-5 s-1, are used to apply the deformation. This would suggest against generality of DIM and would have significant implications to constitutive models founded on this principle. Here, a mathematical exercise is performed to evaluate the implications of DIM on stress relaxation response. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Relaxation phenomena in current-induced switching in thin magnetic tunnel junctions

    Recently, reversible resistance (R) changes were observed in thin tunnel junctions (TJ) when a critical electrical current was applied. These changes are called current-induced switching (CIS) and are attributed to electromigration in nanoconstrictions in the insulating barrier. Here, we study the CIS effect on a thin TJ prepared by IBD, displaying a 3.4% R change when a CIS cycle is performed at room temperature. After complete (or half) CIS cycles with adequate maximum currents, we monitored R as a function of time. In both cases a non-monotonic relaxation occurs with two distinct relaxation times, τ1∼10min, τ2∼102min. First R increases (decreases) rapidly, but then a slow relaxation dominates, reducing (increasing) R. These opposite relaxation processes suggest two independent physical mechanisms acting simultaneously inside the TJ. The physical origin of these effects is discussed

  4. Peroxynitrite-induced relaxation in isolated rat aortic rings and mechanisms of action

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the product of superoxide and nitric oxide, on isolated segments of rat aorta. In the absence of any vasoactive agent, ONOO- (from 10-8 to 10-4 M) failed to alter the basal tension. In phenylephrine (PE; 5 x 10-7 M)-precontracted rat aortic rings (RAR), ONOO- elicited concentration-dependent relaxation at concentrations of from 10-8 to 10-4 M. The effective concentrations producing approximately 50% of maximal relaxation (ED5) to ONOO- were 1.84 x 10-5 M and 1.96 x 10-5 M in intact and denuded RAR, respectively (P > 0.05). No significant differences in the relaxation responses were found between RAR with or without endothelium (P > 0.05). The presence of either 5 μM methylene blue (MB) or 5 μM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) significantly inhibited the relaxations induced by ONOO-. Sildenafil (10-7 M), on the other hand, significantly potentiated the ONOO--induced relaxations. Tetraethylammonium chloride (T-2265) significantly decreased the ONOO--induced relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner. However, ONOO- had no effect on RAR precontracted by high KCL (40 mM, n = 6, P > 0.05). Addition of calyculin A also significantly decreased the ONOO--induced relaxation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ONOO- significantly inhibited calcium-induced contractions of K+-depolarized aortic rings in a concentration-related manner. Lastly, a variety of other pharmacological agents and antagonists including L-NMMA, L-arginine, indomethacin, atropine, naloxone, diphenhydramine, cimetine, glibenclamide, haloperidol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase did not influence the relaxant effects of ONOO- on RAR. Our new results suggest that ONOO--triggered relaxation on rat aortic rings is mediated by elevation of cGMP levels, membrane hyperpolarization via K+-channel activation, activation of myosin phosphatase activity, and interference with calcium movement and

  5. Hydrophobic bile acids relax rat detrusor contraction via inhibiting the opening of the Na⁺/Ca²⁺ exchanger.

    Zhu, Jingzhen; Dong, Xingyou; Liu, Qian; Wu, Chao; Wang, Qingqing; Long, Zhou; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) are thought to inhibit smooth muscle contractility in several organs. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of hydrophobic BAs on the detrusor contractility of rat bladder and to explore the possible mechanism. Lithocholic acid (LCA) treatment increased the micturition interval and induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of bladder detrusor strips. In addition, LCA reduced the concentration of intracellular free Ca(2+)([Ca(2+)]i) and inhibited both the outward and inward Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) current (INCX) in primary isolated smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To further investigate the mechanism of action of LCA, several pharmacologic agents were used. We found that the NCX inhibitor 3',4'-Dichlorobenzamil (DCB) can significantly inhibit the relaxation of detrusor strips and a reduction of the [Ca(2+)]i induced by LCA, while the antagonist of muscarinic receptor and the agonist of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) had no effect. In conclusion, these data suggest that the relaxation of rat detrusor induced by hydrophobic BAs is mediated by NCX. Further research is needed to carry out to demonstrate the possible pathway and provide a potential new strategy to investigation for the treatment of the low urinary tract syndromes. PMID:26892434

  6. Genomic counter-stress changes induced by the relaxation response.

    Jeffery A Dusek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mind-body practices that elicit the relaxation response (RR have been used worldwide for millennia to prevent and treat disease. The RR is characterized by decreased oxygen consumption, increased exhaled nitric oxide, and reduced psychological distress. It is believed to be the counterpart of the stress response that exhibits a distinct pattern of physiology and transcriptional profile. We hypothesized that RR elicitation results in characteristic gene expression changes that can be used to measure physiological responses elicited by the RR in an unbiased fashion. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed whole blood transcriptional profiles in 19 healthy, long-term practitioners of daily RR practice (group M, 19 healthy controls (group N(1, and 20 N(1 individuals who completed 8 weeks of RR training (group N(2. 2209 genes were differentially expressed in group M relative to group N(1 (p<0.05 and 1561 genes in group N(2 compared to group N(1 (p<0.05. Importantly, 433 (p<10(-10 of 2209 and 1561 differentially expressed genes were shared among long-term (M and short-term practitioners (N(2. Gene ontology and gene set enrichment analyses revealed significant alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, generation of reactive oxygen species and response to oxidative stress in long-term and short-term practitioners of daily RR practice that may counteract cellular damage related to chronic psychological stress. A significant number of genes and pathways were confirmed in an independent validation set containing 5 N(1 controls, 5 N(2 short-term and 6 M long-term practitioners. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first compelling evidence that the RR elicits specific gene expression changes in short-term and long-term practitioners. Our results suggest consistent and constitutive changes in gene expression resulting from RR may relate to long term physiological effects. Our study may stimulate new

  7. Mechanisms of relaxation induced by flavonoid ayanin in isolated aorta rings from Wistar rats

    Rosalía Carrón

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study shows the relaxant effect induced by ayanin in aorta rings from Wistar rats linked to nitric oxide/cyclic-GMP pathway.  This flavonoid is the prevalent compound obtained from Croton schiedeanus Schlecht (Euphorbiaceae, specie used in Colombian folk medicine for the treatment of arterial hypertension. Objectives: To identify possible action mechanisms of vascular relaxation induced by ayanin (quercetin 3,4',7-trimethyl ether. Methodology: Isolated aorta rings from Wistar rats obtained at the Animal House of the University of Salamanca were contracted with KCl (80 mM or phenylephrine (PE, 10-6 M and exposed to ayanin (10-6-10-4 M.  Then, the effect of ayanin was assessed in deendothelized rings contracted with PE and in intact rings contracted with PE previously incubated with: ODQ (10-6 M, L-NAME (10-4 M, L-NAME plus D- and L-arginine (10-4 M, indomethacin (5x10-6 M, dipyridamole (3x10-7 M, glibenclamide (10-6 M, propranolol (10-6 M, verapamil (10-7 M or atropine (3x10-5 M.  In addition, the relaxant effect of acetylcholine (Ach, 10-8-3x10-4 M, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 10-9-3x10-5 M was assessed in the presence and absence of ayanin (10-6 M. Results: Ayanin induced a greater concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels contracted with phenylephrine (pEC50: 5.84±0.05, an effect significantly reduced by deendothelization and by both ODQ and L-NAME.  L-arginine was able to reverse the effect of L-NAME.  Indomethacin weakly inhibited ayanin response.  Dipyridamole, glibenclamide, propranolol, verapamil, and atropine did not affect ayanin relaxation.  Ayanin did not have any effect on the relaxation elicited by acetylcholine (ACh, while weakly decreasing the relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Conclusion: Ayanin induces endothelium-dependent relaxation in the rat aorta mainly related to nitric oxide/cGMP pathway, according to the response observed in the presence of L-NAME, L-arginine and ODQ.

  8. Overview of the Benefits and Costs og Integrating Heterogeneous Applications by Using Relaxed ACID Properties

    Frank, Lars

    2012-01-01

    In central databases the consistency of data is normally implemented by using the ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durability) properties of a DBMS (Data Base Management System). In practice, it is not possible to implement the ACID properties if heterogeneous or distributed databases...... properties across different database systems or ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) modules in order to make it possible to select the best set of modules even though the combination of modules may be heterogeneous. That is, it should be possible to select the best of breed software for the different business...... functions of the company. The objective of this paper is to give an overview of both the benefits and costs of using application/database integration with relaxed ACID properties....

  9. Relaxation of Blazar Induced Pair Beams in Cosmic Voids

    Miniati, Francesco; Elyiv, Andrii

    2012-01-01

    The stability properties of a low density ultra relativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could affect considerably the thermal history of the intergalactic medium and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar induced electromagnetic...

  10. Endothelium negatively modulates the vascular relaxation induced by nitric oxide donor, due to uncoupling NO synthase.

    Bonaventura, Daniella; Lunardi, Claure N; Rodrigues, Gerson J; Neto, Mário A; Vercesi, Juliana A; de Lima, Renata G; da Silva, Roberto S; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2009-10-01

    Nitrosyl ruthenium complexes have been characterized as nitric oxide (NO) donors that induce relaxation in the denuded rat aorta. There are some differences in their vascular relaxation mechanisms compared with sodium nitroprusside. This study investigates whether the endothelium could interfere with the [Ru(terpy)(bdq)NO](3+)-TERPY-induced vascular relaxation, by analyzing the maximal relaxation (Emax) and potency (pD(2)) of TERPY. Vascular reactivity experiments showed that the endothelium negatively modulates (pD(2): 6.17+/-0.07) the TERPY relaxation in intact rat aortic rings compared with the denuded rat aorta (pD(2): 6.65+/-0.07). This effect is abolished by a non-selective NO-synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (pD(2): 6.46+/-0.10), by the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenger TIRON (pD(2): 6.49+/-0.08), and by an NOS cofactor BH(4) (pD(2): 6.80+/-0.10). The selective dye for O(2)(-) (DHE) shows that TERPY enhances O(2)(-) concentration in isolated endothelial cells (intensity of fluorescence (IF):11258.00+/-317.75) compared with the basal concentration (IF: 7760.67+/-381.50), and this enhancement is blocked by L-NAME (IF: 8892.33+/-1074.41). Similar results were observed in vascular smooth muscle cells (concentration of superoxide after TERPY: 2.63+/-0.17% and after TERPY+L-NAME: -4.63+/-0.14%). Considering that TERPY could induce uncoupling NOS, thus producing O(2)(-), we have also investigated the involvement of prostanoids in the negative modulation of the endothelium. The non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin and the selective tromboxane (TXA(2)) receptor antagonist SQ29548 reduce the effect of the endothelium on TERPY relaxation (pD(2) INDO: 6.80+/-0.17 and SQ29548: 6.85+/-0.15, respectively). However, a selective prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor antagonist (AH6809) does not change the endothelium effect. Moreover, TERPY enhances the concentration of TXA(2) stable metabolite (TXB(2)), but this effect is blocked by L-NAME and TIRON. The

  11. Pharmacological characterization of the relaxant effect induced by adrenomedullin in rat cavernosal smooth muscle

    Leite, L.N. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Gonzaga, N.A. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, D.P.C.; Tirapelli, L.F. [Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, C.R. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanisms underlying the relaxant effect of adrenomedullin (AM) in rat cavernosal smooth muscle (CSM) and the expression of AM system components in this tissue. Functional assays using standard muscle bath procedures were performed in CSM isolated from male Wistar rats. Protein and mRNA levels of pre-pro-AM, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and Subtypes 1, 2 and 3 of the receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) family were assessed by Western immunoblotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Nitrate and 6-keto-prostaglandin F{sub 1α} (6-keto-PGF{sub 1α}; a stable product of prostacyclin) levels were determined using commercially available kits. Protein and mRNA of AM, CRLR, and RAMP 1, -2, and -3 were detected in rat CSM. Immunohistochemical assays demonstrated that AM and CRLR were expressed in rat CSM. AM relaxed CSM strips in a concentration-dependent manner. AM{sub 22-52}, a selective antagonist for AM receptors, reduced the relaxation induced by AM. Conversely, CGRP{sub 8-37}, a selective antagonist for calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, did not affect AM-induced relaxation. Preincubation of CSM strips with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, quanylyl cyclase inhibitor), Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor), SC560 [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-trifluoromethyl pyrazole, selective cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor], and 4-aminopyridine (voltage-dependent K{sup +} channel blocker) reduced AM-induced relaxation. On the other hand, 7-nitroindazole (selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor), H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), SQ22536 [9-(tetrahydro-2-furanyl)-9H-purin-6-amine, adenylate cyclase inhibitor], glibenclamide (selective blocker of ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels), and

  12. Pharmacological characterization of the relaxant effect induced by adrenomedullin in rat cavernosal smooth muscle

    The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanisms underlying the relaxant effect of adrenomedullin (AM) in rat cavernosal smooth muscle (CSM) and the expression of AM system components in this tissue. Functional assays using standard muscle bath procedures were performed in CSM isolated from male Wistar rats. Protein and mRNA levels of pre-pro-AM, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and Subtypes 1, 2 and 3 of the receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) family were assessed by Western immunoblotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Nitrate and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α; a stable product of prostacyclin) levels were determined using commercially available kits. Protein and mRNA of AM, CRLR, and RAMP 1, -2, and -3 were detected in rat CSM. Immunohistochemical assays demonstrated that AM and CRLR were expressed in rat CSM. AM relaxed CSM strips in a concentration-dependent manner. AM22-52, a selective antagonist for AM receptors, reduced the relaxation induced by AM. Conversely, CGRP8-37, a selective antagonist for calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, did not affect AM-induced relaxation. Preincubation of CSM strips with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, quanylyl cyclase inhibitor), Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor), SC560 [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-trifluoromethyl pyrazole, selective cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor], and 4-aminopyridine (voltage-dependent K+ channel blocker) reduced AM-induced relaxation. On the other hand, 7-nitroindazole (selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor), H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), SQ22536 [9-(tetrahydro-2-furanyl)-9H-purin-6-amine, adenylate cyclase inhibitor], glibenclamide (selective blocker of ATP-sensitive K+ channels), and apamin (Ca2+-activated channel blocker

  13. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Sun, Nian, E-mail: n.sun@neu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Peng, Bin; Liu, Ming, E-mail: mingliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Budil, David [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  14. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  15. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate

  16. Relationship between susceptibility induced field inhomogeneities, restricted diffusion, and relaxation in sedimentary rocks.

    Wilson, Robert C; Hürlimann, Martin D

    2006-11-01

    Low field relaxation and diffusion measurements have become essential tools to study the pore space of sedimentary rocks with important practical applications in the field of well logging and hydrocarbon extractions. Even at Larmor frequencies below 2 MHz, diffusion measurements are often affected noticeably by internal field inhomogeneities. These field inhomogeneities are induced by susceptibility contrast between the rock and the fluid and are evident in most sandstones. Using sets of two-dimensional diffusion-relaxation measurements in applied and internal gradients, we study in detail the correlation between the field inhomogeneities, restricted diffusion, and relaxation time in three rocks of different susceptibility. We find that in the sandstone cores, the field inhomogeneities in large pores can be described by a local gradient that scales inversely with relaxation time above 250 ms. At shorter relaxation times, the extracted internal gradients deviate from this scaling relationship and we observe a dependence on diffusion time. This demonstrates that in this case, the internal field has structure on a length scale of a few microns. PMID:16890000

  17. Managing Consistency Anomalies in Distributed Integrated Databases with Relaxed ACID Properties

    Frank, Lars; Ulslev Pedersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    In central databases the consistency of data is normally implemented by using the ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durability) properties of a DBMS (Data Base Management System). This is not possible if distributed and/or mobile databases are involved and the availability of data also...... been committed and completed, the execution has the consistency property. The above definition of the consistency property is not useful in distributed databases with relaxed ACID properties because such a database is almost always inconsistent. In the following, we will use the concept Consistency...... distributed consistency property. We will also illustrate how to use the countermeasures against the consistency anomalies in ERP systems integrated with heterogeneous E-commerce systems and the databases of mobile salesman ERP modules. The methods described in this paper may be used in so called CAP...

  18. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  19. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  20. Lattice strain induced phase selection and epitaxial relaxation in crystalline GeTe thin film

    We report that the lattice strain induced phase selection and epitaxial relaxation in crystalline GeTe thin films by pulsed laser deposition. The single-crystal substrates of MgO and BaF2 are designed to match the lattice of low-temperature α-GeTe phase and high-temperature β-GeTe phase, respectively. The structures of deposited GeTe films show lattice-match dependence rather than temperature dependence. Raman analysis indicates that the α-GeTe to β-GeTe ferroelectric phase transition accompanies an increase of local six-coordinated Ge atoms, which is analogous to the phase transition from amorphous to crystalline for memory application. - Highlights: • Lattice-match dependence in crystalline GeTe growth • The epitaxial relaxation induced by slight misfit strain • Crystalline GeTe is ferroelectric. • The local structure evolution during crystalline GeTe phase transition

  1. Potentiation of Vancomycin-Induced Histamine Release by Muscle Relaxants and Morphine in Rats

    Shuto, Hideki; Sueyasu, Masanori; Otsuki, Shuji; Hara, Tomoko; Tsuruta, Yuki; Kataoka, Yasufumi; Oishi,Ryozo

    1999-01-01

    The intravenous injection of vancomycin sometimes causes anaphylactoid reactions, in which histamine release may play a major role. These reactions are more frequently manifested when vancomycin is injected into anesthetized patients. We examined the vancomycin-induced histamine release and the interaction of vancomycin with muscle relaxants or opioid in rats. In an in vitro study with rat peritoneal mast cells, treatment with vancomycin at concentrations of greater than 1.25 mM produced sign...

  2. Influence of redox compounds on nitrovasodilator-induced relaxations of rat coronary arteries

    Murphy, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Various classes of nitrovasodilators release nitric oxide (NO) through distinct reaction pathways, many of which involve endogenous reductants and/or oxidants. This study examined relaxations of isolated rat coronary arteries induced by spermine NONOate (SPNO), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), nitroprusside (NP), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and nitroglycerin (NTG) in order to assess whether their potency was influenced by any of six redox compounds: 1 mM ascorbate, 1 mM dehydroasco...

  3. Ambrisentan and tadalafil synergistically relax endothelin-induced contraction of rat pulmonary arteries.

    Liang, Faquan; Yang, Suya; Yao, Lina; Belardinelli, Luiz; Shryock, John

    2012-03-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that a selective endothelin type A receptor antagonist (ambrisentan) and a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (tadalafil) may act synergistically to relax endothelin-constricted pulmonary arteries. Rat isolated intrapulmonary arterial rings contracted with 8 nmol/L endothelin-1 were relaxed by 10 nmol/L ambrisentan and 30 nmol/L tadalafil alone by 26±3% and 21±1%, respectively, whereas both drugs in combination acted synergistically to relax arterial rings by 83±6%. The nonselective endothelin type A and B receptor antagonists bosentan (100 nmol/L) and macitentan (30 nmol/L) alone relaxed endothelin-contracted rings by 30±5% and 24±3%, respectively. Combinations of 30 nmol/L tadalafil with 100 nmol/L bosentan or 30 nmol/L macitentan relaxed endothelin-contracted rings by 53±5% or 46±7%, respectively; these values are similar to the calculated sums of the individual effects of these compounds. Denudation of endothelium from pulmonary arterial rings abolished the vasodilator response to 30 nmol/L tadalafil and the synergistic vasorelaxant effect of tadalafil with ambrisentan. In the presence of 1 μmol/L BQ-788, a selective endothelin type B receptor antagonist, the vasorelaxant effects of 10 nmol/L ambrisentan and 30 nmol/L tadalafil were additive but not synergistic. These data can be interpreted to suggest that ambrisentan and tadalafil synergistically inhibit endothelin-1-induced constriction of rat intrapulmonary arteries and that endothelin type B receptors in endothelium are necessary to enable a synergistic vasorelaxant effect of the drug combination. PMID:22311911

  4. Ion peening and stress relaxation induced by low-energy atom bombardment of covalent solids

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the buildup and relaxation of stress induced by low-energy (≤150 eV) atom bombardment of a target material. The effect is brought out most clearly by using an initially compressed specimen. As target material, we employ Si, based on the Tersoff potential. By varying the bond strength in the potential, we can specifically study its effect on damage production and stress changes. We find that in general, stress is relaxed by the atom bombardment; only for low bombarding energies and strong bonds, atom bombardment increases stress. We rationalize this behavior by considering the role of energized atoms and of recoil-implanted target atoms

  5. Diminished nitroprusside-induced relaxation of inflamed colonic smooth muscle in mice

    J. D. van Bergeijk

    1998-01-01

    mouse colonic smooth muscle preparations caused regional differences in relaxation, the highest relaxation seen in normal proximal colonic tissue. However, this relaxation was markedly reduced in inflamed proximal preparations , associated with a diminished cGMP contents .

  6. Cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation induced by Schisandrol A via the NO-cGMP signaling pathway.

    Liu, W; Choi, B R; Bak, Y O; Zhang, L T; Zhou, L X; Huang, Y R; Zhao, C; Park, J K

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of Schisandrol A on rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and elucidate the potential mechanism. Penises were obtained from healthy male New Zealand White rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg). The pre-contracted penis with phenylephrine (Phe, 10 µM) was treated with accumulative concentrations of Schisandrol A (10-7, 10-6, 10-5 and 10-4 M). The change in intracavernosum pressure (ICP) and tension was recorded, cyclic nucleotides in the cavernosum tissue were measured by radioimmunoassay, mRNA level and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) were measured by real time PCR and western blot respectively. The corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation induced by Schisandrol A was in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with NOS inhibitor (Nω nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester, L-NAME) or guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one, ODQ) significantly diminished the relaxation. The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level was significantly increased in the cavernosum tissue. Real time PCR and western blot showed the mRNA level and expression of eNOS and nNOS was also upregulated. Schisandrol A relaxes the cavernosum smooth muscle by activating NO-cGMP signaling pathway. It may be a new promising treatment for erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27064883

  7. Methanol extracts of Hamelia patens containing oxindole alkaloids relax KCl-induced contraction in rat myometrium.

    Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo; Rivera, Jesús; Oropeza, Martha; Mendoza, Pilar; Amekraz, Badia; Jankowski, Christopher; Campos, Maria

    2004-10-01

    Hamelia patens JAQC. (Rubiaceae) is a medicinal bush widely distributed in tropical areas of the American continent. It is used in Mexican Traditional Medicine for the treatment of menstrual disorders, therefore suggesting that its chemical constituents may have some effect on myometrium contractility. Physiological effects might differ due to quantitative variations in the content of alkaloids arising from its wide geographical distribution. To test this hypothesis, the content of oxindole alkaloids in methanol extracts of five different samples collected in Mexico was quantified by GC-MS. Each extract was assayed on contractility of estrogen-primed rat myometrium. Variations in the content of alkaloids were observed among the different samples. All samples relaxed in a concentration-dependent manner the high KCl-induced contraction in rat myometrium. Those which lack rumberine and/or maruquine displayed a higher relaxant effect than samples containing them, suggesting that these alkaloids might counteract the effects of isopteropodine. However, in contrast with verapamil, Hamelia patens metanol extracts are poor relaxants. PMID:15467206

  8. Cross-sectional TEM and X-ray examination of radiation-induced stress relaxation of peened stainless steel surfaces

    Sencer, B. H.; Was, G. S.; Yuya, H.; Isobe, Y.; Sagisaka, M.; Garner, F. A.

    2005-02-01

    Neutron irradiation-induced relaxation was emulated using proton irradiation in order to determine the expected amount of stress relaxation in the peened surface layer of a BWR core shroud during its 40 year lifetime. Samples of 304 SS were shot peened to induce a compressive residual stress, and then irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons at 288 °C to four dose levels spanning 0.1-2.0 dpa. One set of specimens was as-peened and a second was pre-injected with 25 appm He. Depth-dependent measurements of internal stress were conducted using successive steps of X-ray line broadening measurement and electropolishing. Results showed that the compressive stress state was progressively relaxed, but was maintained at some level for the majority of the 2 dpa target dose. Helium pre-injection did not significantly affect the relaxation, but the magnitude of thermally-induced relaxation was somewhat greater, although it was observed to be largely a transient, saturable process. A new cross-section technique was developed that allows multiple observations to be made in one specimen at all depths, both in and beyond the peen-damaged range. The as-peened microstructure varies strongly with depth, consisting of deformation twins and dense dislocation networks. The radiation-induced relaxation on the microstructural level was expressed primarily in modification and reduction of the dislocation structure. A comparison was made between the proton-induced relaxation of internal stresses and predictions based on neutron-induced relaxation of externally-applied stresses. The relatively good agreement indicates that proton irradiation is a valid emulation of neutron irradiation for this application.

  9. Role of voltage-dependent potassium channels and myo-endothelial gap junctions in 4-aminopyridine-induced inhibition of acetylcholine relaxation in rat carotid artery.

    Gupta, Praveen K; Subramani, Jaganathan; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Sikarwar, Anurag S; Parida, Subhashree; Prakash, Vellanki Ravi; Mishra, Santosh K

    2008-09-01

    The present study examined the role of voltage-gated potassium (K(v)) channels and myo-endothelial gap junctions in 4-aminopyridine-induced inhibition of acetylcholine-evoked endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO release in the rat carotid artery. The acetylcholine-induced relaxation was drastically inhibited by 94% and 82%, respectively in the presence of either 100 microM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 10 microM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), while it was abolished following endothelium removal. 4-aminopyridine (1 mM), a preferential blocker of the K(v) channels significantly decreased the vasodilator potency, as well as efficacy of acetylcholine (pD(2) 5.7+/-0.09, R(max) 86.1+/-3.5% versus control 6.7+/-0.10 R(max) 106+/-3.5%, n=6), but had no effect on the relaxations elicited by either sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP). 4-AP (1 mM) also inhibited acetylcholine (3 microM)-stimulated nitrite release in the carotid artery segments (99.4+/-4.93 pmol/mg tissue weight wt; n=6 versus control 123.8+/-7.43 pmol/mg tissue weight wt, n=6). 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (18alpha-GA, 5 microM), a gap junction blocker, completely prevented the inhibition of acetylcholine-induced relaxation, as well as nitrite release by 4-AP. In the pulmonary artery, however antagonism of acetylcholine-evoked relaxation by 4-AP was not reversed by 18alpha-GA. These results suggest that 4-AP-induced inhibition of endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO release involves electrical coupling between vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells via myo-endothelial gap junctions in the rat carotid artery, but not in the pulmonary artery. Further, direct activation of 4-AP-sensitive vascular K(v) channels by endothelium-derived NO is not evident in the carotid blood vessel, while this appears to be an important mechanism of acetylcholine-induced relaxation in the pulmonary artery. PMID:18577383

  10. Myosin light chain phosphatase activation is involved in the hydrogen sulfide-induced relaxation in mouse gastric fundus.

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2009-03-15

    The relaxant effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the vascular tree is well established but its influence and mechanism of action in gastrointestinal smooth muscle was hardly investigated. The influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse gastric fundus was therefore examined. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) was administered to prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse gastric fundus, before and after incubation with interfering drugs. NaHS caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridin and barium chloride had no influence on the NaHS-induced relaxation. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by L-NAME, ODQ and SQ 22536, inhibitors of the cGMP and cAMP pathway, by nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A reduced the NaHS-induced relaxation, but the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We show that NaHS is able to relax PGF(2alpha)-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The results suggest that in the mouse gastric fundus, H(2)S causes relaxation at least partially via activation of MLCP. PMID:19374871

  11. Relaxation of soman-induced contracture of airway smooth muscle in vitro. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Filbert, M.G.; Moore, D.H.; Adler, M.

    1992-12-31

    A possible role for beta-adrenergic agonists in the management of bronchoconstriction resulting from exposure to anticholinesterase compounds was investigated in vitro in canine tracheal smooth muscle. Norepinephrine, salbutamol and isoproterenol produced partial relaxation of soman-induced contractures. However, the relaxation induced was not sustained; muscle tensions returned to pretreatment levels within minutes despite the continued presence of beta-agonists. Increasing cAMP levels with the non beta-agonist bronchodilators such as thoophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, or forskolin, a specific stimulator of adenylate cyclase, resulted in more complete and longer lasting relaxation, suggesting that beta-adrenoceptor desensitization may contribute to the failure by beta-agonists to produce sustained relaxation. Nerve agents, Soman, Toxicity, Airway smooth muscle, In vitro, Physiology, Effects.

  12. Two field-induced slow magnetic relaxation processes in a mononuclear Co(ii) complex with a distorted octahedral geometry.

    Li, Jing; Han, Yuan; Cao, Fan; Wei, Rong-Min; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Song, You

    2016-05-31

    A distorted octahedral Co(II) complex is reported with homoscorpionate ligands. This complex comprised a field-induced single-molecule magnet, showing two slow relaxation processes under a low dc field (magnetic data, we show for the first time that one of the slow relaxation processes in the low dc field originates from intermolecular dipolar interactions. Interestingly, the Raman process is predominant in the spin reversal relaxation process. The origin of the behaviours of the complex was elucidated by ab initio calculations. PMID:27180637

  13. Prostaglandin E2 induces vascular relaxation by E-prostanoid 4 receptor-mediated activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    Hristovska, Ana-Marija; Rasmussen, Lasse E; Hansen, Pernille B L; Nielsen, Susan S; Nüsing, Rolf M; Narumiya, Shuh; Vanhoutte, Paul; Skøtt, Ole; Jensen, Boye L

    2007-01-01

    abolished by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H(1,2,4)-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. In PGE(2)-relaxed aortic rings, the cGMP content increased significantly. PGE(2)-induced relaxations were abolished by the EP4 receptor antagonist AE3-208 (10(-8) mol......-dependent vasorelaxation and accumulation of cGMP in aortic rings....

  14. Relaxation behavior and dose dependence of radiation induced radicals in irradiated mango

    Mangoes are imported to Japan after treated with hot water. Recently, irradiated mangoes imported to U. S. are widely used. This paper reports on the ESR method for analyzing the radiation induced radicals of irradiated mangoes. Upon the γ ray irradiation, a strong single peak in the flesh and skin of mangoes was observed at g=2.004. This singlet peak may be attributed to organic free radicals. The ESR spectra of the flesh and skin of mangoes showed the radiation induced radicals due to cellulose by irradiation over 12 kGy. The relaxation times (T1 and T2) of the singlet signal were calculated. T2 showed dose response according to increasing the irradiation dose levels, while T1 was almost constant. The value of (T1T2)1/2 showed the dependence of irradiation dose level. (author)

  15. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  16. Valproic acid induced pancreatitis: a case report

    Bhupen Barman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid is a commonly used antiepileptic drug. Apart from its common side effect there is definite association between valproic acid therapy and acute pancreatitis. Since 1979, many cases of acute pancreatitis induced by valproic acid have been published in medical literature. Here we are reporting a case of valproic acid induced acute pancreatitis in a 27 years old boy. The treatment is supportive, re-challenge is hazardous and should be avoided. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1765-1767

  17. Dielectric relaxation dependent memory elements in pentacene/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester bi-layer field effect transistors

    We fabricate a pentacene/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) bi-layer field effect transistor (FET) featuring large hysteresis that can be used as memory elements. Intentional introduction of excess electron traps in a PCBM layer by exposure to air caused large hysteresis in the FET. The memory window, characterized by the threshold voltage difference, increased upon exposure to air and this is attributed to an increase in the number of electron trapping centers and (or) an increase in the dielectric relaxation time in the underlying PCBM layer. Decrease in the electron conduction in the PCBM close to the SiO2 gate dielectric upon exposure to air is consistent with the increase in the dielectric relaxation time, ensuring that the presence of large hysteresis in the FET originates from electron trapping at the PCBM not at the pentacene. - Highlights: • Charge trapping-induced memory effect was clarified using transistors. • The memory window can be enhanced by controlling charge trapping mechanism. • Memory transistors can be optimized by controlling dielectric relaxation time

  18. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style

  19. A relaxed eddy accumulation system for measuring vertical fluxes of nitrous acid

    X. Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system combined with a nitrous acid (HONO analyzer was developed to measure atmospheric HONO vertical fluxes. The system consists of three major components: (1 a fast-response sonic anemometer measuring both vertical wind velocity and air temperature, (2 a fast-response controlling unit separating air motions into updraft and downdraft samplers by the sign of vertical wind velocity, and (3 a highly sensitive HONO analyzer based on aqueous long path absorption photometry that measures HONO concentrations in the updrafts and downdrafts. A dynamic velocity threshold (±0.5σw, where σw is a standard deviation of the vertical wind velocity was used for valve switching determined by the running means and standard deviations of the vertical wind velocity. Using measured temperature as a tracer and the average values from two field deployments, the flux proportionality coefficient, β, was determined to be 0.42 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the theoretical estimation. The REA system was deployed in two ground-based field studies. In the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex study in Bakersfield, California in summer 2010, measured HONO fluxes appeared to be upward during the day and were close to zero at night. The upward HONO flux was highly correlated to the product of NO2 and solar radiation. During the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX 2009 at Blodgett Forest, California in July 2009, the overall HONO fluxes were small in magnitude and were close to zero. Causes for the different HONO fluxes in the two different environments are briefly discussed.

  20. Acid effect on excited Auramine-O molecular rotor relaxations in solution and adsorbed on insulin fibrils

    Simkovitch, R.; Akulov, K.; Erez, Y.; Amdursky, N.; Gepshtein, R.; Schwartz, T.; Huppert, D.

    2015-09-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques were employed to study the non-radiative process of Auramine-O (AuO). We focused our attention on the ultrafast nonradiative decay of Auramine-O in water and on the acid effect on Auramine-O spectroscopy. We found that weak acids like formic acid shorten the excited-state decay times of both the emission and the transient pump-probe spectra of Auramine-O. We found three time domains in the relaxation of the excited states back to the ground state. In mixtures of acetic and formic acids, the three decay times associated with the relaxation process are shorter in the presence of formic acid in Auramine-O solutions. We qualitatively explain the very large non-radiative rate in water and in formic-acetic acid mixtures by a protic nonradiative model proposed by Sobolewski and Domcke. The steady-state emission spectrum of AuO adsorbed on insulin fibrils consists of two bands assigned to protonated and deprotonated forms and the emission intensity increases by three orders of magnitude. We conclude that the nonradiative process prevails in the liquid state, whereas when AuO is adsorbed on fibrils the nonradiative rate is reduced by three orders of magnitude and thus enables a slow ESPT process to occur.

  1. Hyaluronic Acid Inhibits Polycation Induced Cellular Responses

    lalenti, A.; Lanaro, A.; Brignola, G.; Marotta, P; Di Rosa, M.

    1994-01-01

    Positively charged macromolecules cause a variety of pathological events through their electrostatic interaction with anionic sites present on the membrane of target cells. In the present study we have investigated the effect of hyaluronic acid, a negatively charged molecule, on rat paw oedema induced by poly-L-lysine as well as on histamine release from rat mast cells and nitric oxide formation from rabbit aorta, both induced by this polycation. The results indicate that hyaluronic acid is a...

  2. Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence

    Guo, Wei; Ren, Jie; Wang, Biye; Zhu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants’ subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performa...

  3. Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence

    Wei Guo; Jie Ren; Biye Wang; Qin Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants' subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performa...

  4. Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    Amamou, Walid; Lin, Zhisheng; van Baren, Jeremiah; Turkyilmaz, Serol; Shi, Jing; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate spin relaxation in graphene by systematically comparing the roles of spin absorption, other contact-induced effects (e.g., fringe fields), and bulk spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with MgO barriers, Al2O3 barriers, and transparent contacts. We obtain effective spin lifetimes by fitting the Hanle spin precession data with two models that include or exclude the effect of spin absorption. Results indicate that additional contact-induced spin relaxation other than spin absorption dominates the contact effect. For tunneling contacts, we find reasonable agreement between the two models with median discrepancy of ˜20% for MgO and ˜10% for Al2O3.

  5. Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    Walid Amamou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate spin relaxation in graphene by systematically comparing the roles of spin absorption, other contact-induced effects (e.g., fringe fields, and bulk spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with MgO barriers, Al2O3 barriers, and transparent contacts. We obtain effective spin lifetimes by fitting the Hanle spin precession data with two models that include or exclude the effect of spin absorption. Results indicate that additional contact-induced spin relaxation other than spin absorption dominates the contact effect. For tunneling contacts, we find reasonable agreement between the two models with median discrepancy of ∼20% for MgO and ∼10% for Al2O3.

  6. Omeprazole induces altered bile acid metabolism

    Shindo, K; Machida, M.; Fukumura, M; Koide, K.; Yamazaki, R.

    1998-01-01

    Background—It has been reported that the acidity of gastric contents could be an important factor in regulating jejunal flora. 
Aims—To investigate the effects of omeprazole induced changes in gastric pH on jejunal flora and bile acid metabolism. 
Methods—Twenty one patients with gastric ulcer and 19 healthy volunteers were studied. Deconjugation of bile acids was detected using a bile acid breath test. Jejunal fluid was aspirated using a double lumen tube with a rubber cover o...

  7. Pseudo-variables method to calculate HMA relaxation modulus through low-temperature induced stress and strain

    Highlights: • Proposal of a new method to analyze low-temperature cracking of bituminous mixtures. • Reliability of the relaxation modulus master curve modeling through Prony series. • Suitability of the pseudo-variables approach for a close form solution. - Abstract: Thermal cracking is a critical failure mode for asphalt pavements. Relaxation modulus is the major viscoelastic property that controls the development of thermally induced tensile stresses. Therefore, accurate determination of the relaxation modulus is fundamental for designing long lasting pavements. This paper proposes a reliable analytical solution for constructing the relaxation modulus master curve by measuring stress and strain thermally induced in asphalt mixtures. The solution, based on Boltzmann’s Superposition Principle and pseudo-variables concepts, accounts for time and temperature dependency of bituminous materials modulus, avoiding complex integral transformations. The applicability of the solution is demonstrated by testing a reference mixture using the Asphalt Thermal Cracking Analyzer (ATCA) device. By applying thermal loadings on restrained and unrestrained asphalt beams, ATCA allows the determination of several parameters, but is still unable to provide reliable estimations of relaxation properties. Without them the measurements from ATCA cannot be used in modeling of pavement behavior. Thus, the proposed solution successfully integrates ATCA experimental data. The same methodology can be applied to all test methods that concurrently measure stress and strain. The statistical parameters used to evaluate the goodness of fit show optimum correlation between theoretical and experimental results, demonstrating the accuracy of this mathematical approach

  8. Vascular smooth muscle-specific deletion of the leptin receptor attenuates leptin-induced alterations in vascular relaxation.

    Ryan, Michael J; Coleman, T Taylor; Sasser, Jennifer M; Pittman, Katarina M; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-05-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased plasma levels of the adipose-derived hormone leptin. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) express leptin receptors (LepR); however, their physiological role is unclear. We hypothesized that leptin, at levels to mimic morbid obesity, impairs vascular relaxation. To test this, we used control and VSM-LepR knockout mice (VSM-LepR KO) created with a tamoxifen-inducible specific Cre recombinase to delete the LepR gene in VSMC. Control (10-12 wk old) and VSM-LepR KO (10-12 wk old) mice were fed a diet containing tamoxifen (50 mg/kg) for 6 wk, after which vascular reactivity was studied in isolated carotid arteries using an organ chamber bath. Vessels were incubated with leptin (100 ng/ml) or vehicle (0.1 mM Tris·HCl) for 30 min. Leptin treatment resulted in significant impairment of vessel relaxation to the endothelial-specific agonist acetylcholine (ACh). When these experiments were repeated in the presence of the superoxide scavenger tempol, relaxation responses to ACh were restored. VSM-LepR deletion resulted in a significant attenuation of leptin-mediated impaired ACh-induced relaxation. These data show that leptin directly impairs vascular relaxation via a VSM-LepR-mediated mechanism, suggesting a potential pathogenic role for leptin to increase cardiovascular risk during obesity. PMID:26936780

  9. Role of NO-cGMP pathway in ovine cervical relaxation induced by Erythroxylum caatingae Plowman.

    Santos, K C; Monte, A P O; Lima, J T; Ribeiro, L A A; Palheta Junior, R C

    2016-01-01

    Erythroxylum caatingae Plowman has a myorelaxing effect on smooth muscle tissue. We investigated the effect of the crude ethanolic extract of E. caatingae Plowman (Ec-EtOH) on the contractility of the ovine cervix. In an isometric system, circular strips were subjected to 90mM potassium (K(+)) or 30μM carbamylcholine (CCh)-induced contraction. We then exposed the tissue to cumulative concentrations of Ec-EtOH (1-729 μg/ml). In other bath solutions, the tissues were exposed to l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 100μM), l-NAME (100μM)+l-arginine (300μM), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, ODQ; 5μM), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 3mM), tetraethylammonium (TEA; 0.3mM), glybenclamide (1μM), atosiban (10μM) or verapamil (3μM), followed by the addition of Ec-EtOH (1-729 μg/ml). We also evaluated the effect of cervical Ec-EtOH infusion (2mg) on cervical contractility in vivo. Ec-EtOH decreased cervical contractility induced by K(+) or CCh, and 729 μg/ml Ec-EtOH decreased 85.4±5.1% the amplitude of basal contractility in vitro, with an EC50 of 17.9±3.7 μg/ml. This effect of Ec-EtOH was prevented by l-NAME or ODQ. l-arginine impaired the blunting effect of l-NAME on cervical relaxation caused by Ec-EtOH. However, the potassium channel blockers 4-AP, TEA, and glybenclamide did not modify this myorelaxation triggered by Ec-EtOH. Ec-EtOH also decreased acetylcholine-induced contractions in tissue preincubated with verapamil. In addition, Ec-EtOH decreased ovine cervical contractions in vivo. Thus, Ec-EtOH had a relaxant effect on ovine cervical contractions. This may involve the nitric oxide signal, mediated by cGMP cellular transduction, and be related to intracellular calcium sequestration. PMID:26619941

  10. Creep and stress relaxation induced by interface diffusion in metal matrix composites

    Li, Yinfeng; Li, Zhonghua

    2013-03-01

    An analytical solution is developed to predict the creep rate induced by interface diffusion in unidirectional fiber-reinforced and particle reinforced composites. The driving force for the interface diffusion is the normal stress acting on the interface, which is obtained from rigorous Eshelby inclusion theory. The closed-form solution is an explicit function of the applied stress, volume fraction and radius of the fiber, as well as the modulus ratio between the fiber and the matrix. It is interesting that the solution is formally similar to that of Coble creep in polycrystalline materials. For the application of the present solution in the realistic composites, the scale effect is taken into account by finite element analysis based on a unit cell. Based on the solution, a closed-form solution is also given as a description of stress relaxation induced by interfacial diffusion under constant strain. In addition, the analytical solution for the interface stress presented in this study gives some insight into the relationship between the interface diffusion and interface slip. This work was supported by the financial support from the Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 10932007), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB631003/5), and the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20100073110006).

  11. NO-induced relaxation of labouring and non-labouring human myometrium is not mediated by cyclic GMP

    Buxton, Iain L O; Kaiser, Robert A; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Tichenor, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    In myometrial strips from near-term non-labouring human uterus, addition of oxytocin (OT) evoked dose-dependent (10 – 3000 nM) phasic contractions that were antagonized by atosiban (1 μM) and relaxed by addition of the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso L-cysteine (Cys-NO). In near-term labouring myometrium, however, addition of OT was ineffective at raising additional tone.In both labouring and non-labouring tissue, Cys-NO mediated relaxation of spontaneous or OT-induced contractions (IC50=1 μM) w...

  12. Relaxation of a shear-induced lamellar phase measured with time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering

    We have measured the relaxation of Couette shear-induced Lα lamellar states to their isotropic L3 'sponge' equilibrium phases in the cetylpryridinium-hexanol/dextrose-brine system by (cycled) time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering. Although diffusive motions of adjacent membrane sheets may be estimated to bring them into contact with frequencies ∼10 kHz, we observe structural relaxation times on the order of seconds. This indicates a significant activation energy against the re-establishment of the passages characterizing the convoluted sponge structure

  13. A three-dimensional relaxation model for calculation of atomic mixing and topography changes induces by ion beams

    A simple model for three-dimensional material relaxation associated with atomic mixing is presented. The relaxation of the solid to accommodate the extra effective displacement volume Ω of an implanted or relocated atom is modelled by treating the surrounding solid as an incompressible medium. This leads to a tractable general formalism which can be used to predict implant distribution and changes in surface topography induced by ion beams, both in monatomic and multicomponent targets. The two-component case is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  14. Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence.

    Guo, Wei; Ren, Jie; Wang, Biye; Zhu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants' subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performance in a Go/NoGo task, were measured before and after the fatigue-inducing phase. A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group. The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music. Our results revealed that after the fatigue-inducing phase, (a) the music group demonstrated significantly less mental fatigue than control group, (b) reaction time significantly increased for the control group but not for the music group, (c) larger Go-P3 and NoGo-P3 amplitudes were observed in the music group, although larger NoGo-N2 amplitudes were detected for both groups. These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task. PMID:26305353

  15. Effects of Relaxing Music on Mental Fatigue Induced by a Continuous Performance Task: Behavioral and ERPs Evidence.

    Wei Guo

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether listening to relaxing music would help reduce mental fatigue and to maintain performance after a continuous performance task. The experiment involved two fatigue evaluation phases carried out before and after a fatigue inducing phase. A 1-hour AX-continuous performance test was used to induce mental fatigue in the fatigue-inducing phase, and participants' subjective evaluation on the mental fatigue, as well as their neurobehavioral performance in a Go/NoGo task, were measured before and after the fatigue-inducing phase. A total of 36 undergraduate students (18-22 years participated in the study and were randomly assigned to the music group and control group. The music group performed the fatigue-inducing task while listening to relaxing music, and the control group performed the same task without any music. Our results revealed that after the fatigue-inducing phase, (a the music group demonstrated significantly less mental fatigue than control group, (b reaction time significantly increased for the control group but not for the music group, (c larger Go-P3 and NoGo-P3 amplitudes were observed in the music group, although larger NoGo-N2 amplitudes were detected for both groups. These results combined to suggest that listening to relaxing music alleviated the mental fatigue associated with performing an enduring cognitive-motor task.

  16. Tranexamic Acid Diminishes Laser-Induced Melanogenesis

    Kim, Myoung Shin; Bang, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Shin, Hong-Ju; Choi, Jee-Ho; Chang, Sung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) remains challenging. Tranexamic acid, a well-known anti-fibrinolytic drug, has recently demonstrated a curative effect towards melasma and ultraviolet-induced PIH in Asian countries. However, the precise mechanism of its inhibitory effect on melanogenesis is not fully understood. Objective In order to clarify the inhibitory effect of tranexamic acid on PIH, we investigated its effects on mouse melanocytes (i.e., melan-a cel...

  17. Mefenamic Acid Induced Nephrotoxicity: An Animal Model

    Muhammad Nazrul Somchit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are used for the treatment of many joint disorders, inflammation and to control pain. Numerous reports have indicated that NSAIDs are capable of producing nephrotoxicity in human. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate mefenamic acid, a NSAID nephrotoxicity in an animal model. Methods: Mice were dosed intraperitoneally with mefenamic acid either as a single dose (100 or 200 mg/kg in 10% Dimethyl sulfoxide/Palm oil or as single daily doses for 14 days (50 or 100 mg/kg in 10% Dimethyl sulfoxide/Palm oil per day. Venous blood samples from mice during the dosing period were taken prior to and 14 days post-dosing from cardiac puncture into heparinized vials. Plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine activities were measured. Results: Single dose of mefenamic acid induced mild alteration of kidney histology mainly mild glomerular necrosis and tubular atrophy. Interestingly, chronic doses induced a dose dependent glomerular necrosis, massive degeneration, inflammation and tubular atrophy. Plasma blood urea nitrogen was statistically elevated in mice treated with mefenamic acid for 14 days similar to plasma creatinine. Conclusion: Results from this study suggest that mefenamic acid as with other NSAIDs capable of producing nephrotoxicity. Therefore, the study of the exact mechanism of mefenamic acid induced severe nephrotoxicity can be done in this animal model.

  18. Synthesis, Characterization of α-Oxopentanedioic Acid-Isonicotinoyl Hydrazone Rare Earth-Complexes and Relaxivity of Gd-complex

    杨正银; 杨汝栋

    2004-01-01

    α-Oxopentanedioic acid isonicotinoyl hydrazone (H2L) and its five rare earth complexes were synthesized with a view to further investigating MRI activities of the polycarboxylic Schiff base complexes. The complexes were characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, UV, 1H NMR spectra and thermal analyses. The general formula of the complexes is [Ln(HL)(H2O)2]Cl2·H2O (where Ln(Ⅲ)=La, Pr, Nd, Eu and Gd). In addition, the relaxivity (R1) of the Gd-complex was determined by INVREC Au program.

  19. Far-from-equilibrium sheared colloidal liquids: Disentangling relaxation, advection, and shear-induced diffusion

    Lin, Neil Y. C.

    2013-12-01

    Using high-speed confocal microscopy, we measure the particle positions in a colloidal suspension under large-amplitude oscillatory shear. Using the particle positions, we quantify the in situ anisotropy of the pair-correlation function, a measure of the Brownian stress. From these data we find two distinct types of responses as the system crosses over from equilibrium to far-from-equilibrium states. The first is a nonlinear amplitude saturation that arises from shear-induced advection, while the second is a linear frequency saturation due to competition between suspension relaxation and shear rate. In spite of their different underlying mechanisms, we show that all the data can be scaled onto a master curve that spans the equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium regimes, linking small-amplitude oscillatory to continuous shear. This observation illustrates a colloidal analog of the Cox-Merz rule and its microscopic underpinning. Brownian dynamics simulations show that interparticle interactions are sufficient for generating both experimentally observed saturations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  20. Changes in the flexion relaxation response induced by lumbar muscle fatigue

    Cantin Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP is an interesting model to study the modulation of lumbar stability. Previous investigations have explored the effect of load, angular velocity and posture on this particular response. However, the influence of muscular fatigue on FRP parameters has not been thoroughly examined. The objective of the study is to identify the effect of erector spinae (ES muscle fatigue and spine loading on myoelectric silence onset and cessation in healthy individuals during a flexion-extension task. Methods Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study and performed blocks of 3 complete trunk flexions under 4 different experimental conditions: no fatigue/no load (1, no fatigue/load (2, fatigue/no load(3, and fatigue/load (4. Fatigue was induced according to the Sorenson protocol, and electromyographic (EMG power spectral analysis confirmed that muscular fatigue was adequate in each subject. Trunk and pelvis angles and surface EMG of the ES L2 and L5 were recorded during a flexion-extension task. Trunk flexion angle corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence was then compared across the different experimental conditions using 2 × 2 repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Onset of myoelectric silence during the flexion motion appeared earlier after the fatigue task. Additionally, the cessation of myoelectric silence was observed later during the extension after the fatigue task. Statistical analysis also yielded a main effect of load, indicating a persistence of ES myoelectric activity in flexion during the load condition. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the presence of fatigue of the ES muscles modifies the FRP. Superficial back muscle fatigue seems to induce a shift in load-sharing towards passive stabilizing structures. The loss of muscle contribution together with or without laxity in the viscoelastic tissues may have a substantial impact on post fatigue stability.

  1. Study of proton spin-lattice relaxation variation induced by paramagnetic antibodies

    A murine anti-human melanoma monoclonal antibody fragment was labeled with gadolinium and its proton relaxation efficiency compared to controls at frequencies ranging from 2 to 300 MHz. Relaxation time variations were about 30-40% in 10-15 microM solutions. The labeled fragment showed proton relaxation enhancement relative to free gadolinium, while preserving its immunoreactivity. A tentative labeling of a melanoma pellet by means of the fragment, just at the borderline of a minimum expected T1 variation, gave no detectable difference

  2. Photoexcited electron and hole dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots: phonon-induced relaxation, dephasing, multiple exciton generation and recombination.

    Kim, Hyeon-Deuk; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-01-01

    Photoexcited dynamics of electrons and holes in semiconductor quantum dots (QD), including phonon-induced relaxation, multiple exciton generation, fission and recombination (MEG, MEF and MER), were simulated by combining ab initio time-dependent density functional theory and non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. These nonequilibrium phenomena govern the optical properties and photoexcited dynamics of QDs, determining the branching between electronic processes and thermal energy losses. Our approa...

  3. Thermal Annealing induced relaxation of compressive strain in porous GaN structures

    Ben Slimane, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The effect of annealing on strain relaxation in porous GaN fabricated using electroless chemical etching is presented. The Raman shift of 1 cm-1 in phonon frequency of annealed porous GaN with respect to as-grown GaN corresponds to a relaxation of compressive strain by 0.41 ± 0.04 GPa. The strain relief promises a marked reduction in threading dislocation for subsequent epitaxial growth.

  4. Relaxation response induces temporal transcriptome changes in energy metabolism, insulin secretion and inflammatory pathways.

    Manoj K Bhasin

    Full Text Available The relaxation response (RR is the counterpart of the stress response. Millennia-old practices evoking the RR include meditation, yoga and repetitive prayer. Although RR elicitation is an effective therapeutic intervention that counteracts the adverse clinical effects of stress in disorders including hypertension, anxiety, insomnia and aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms that explain these clinical benefits remain undetermined. To assess rapid time-dependent (temporal genomic changes during one session of RR practice among healthy practitioners with years of RR practice and also in novices before and after 8 weeks of RR training, we measured the transcriptome in peripheral blood prior to, immediately after, and 15 minutes after listening to an RR-eliciting or a health education CD. Both short-term and long-term practitioners evoked significant temporal gene expression changes with greater significance in the latter as compared to novices. RR practice enhanced expression of genes associated with energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, insulin secretion and telomere maintenance, and reduced expression of genes linked to inflammatory response and stress-related pathways. Interactive network analyses of RR-affected pathways identified mitochondrial ATP synthase and insulin (INS as top upregulated critical molecules (focus hubs and NF-κB pathway genes as top downregulated focus hubs. Our results for the first time indicate that RR elicitation, particularly after long-term practice, may evoke its downstream health benefits by improving mitochondrial energy production and utilization and thus promoting mitochondrial resiliency through upregulation of ATPase and insulin function. Mitochondrial resiliency might also be promoted by RR-induced downregulation of NF-κB-associated upstream and downstream targets that mitigates stress.

  5. Relaxation response induces temporal transcriptome changes in energy metabolism, insulin secretion and inflammatory pathways.

    Bhasin, Manoj K; Dusek, Jeffery A; Chang, Bei-Hung; Joseph, Marie G; Denninger, John W; Fricchione, Gregory L; Benson, Herbert; Libermann, Towia A

    2013-01-01

    The relaxation response (RR) is the counterpart of the stress response. Millennia-old practices evoking the RR include meditation, yoga and repetitive prayer. Although RR elicitation is an effective therapeutic intervention that counteracts the adverse clinical effects of stress in disorders including hypertension, anxiety, insomnia and aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms that explain these clinical benefits remain undetermined. To assess rapid time-dependent (temporal) genomic changes during one session of RR practice among healthy practitioners with years of RR practice and also in novices before and after 8 weeks of RR training, we measured the transcriptome in peripheral blood prior to, immediately after, and 15 minutes after listening to an RR-eliciting or a health education CD. Both short-term and long-term practitioners evoked significant temporal gene expression changes with greater significance in the latter as compared to novices. RR practice enhanced expression of genes associated with energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, insulin secretion and telomere maintenance, and reduced expression of genes linked to inflammatory response and stress-related pathways. Interactive network analyses of RR-affected pathways identified mitochondrial ATP synthase and insulin (INS) as top upregulated critical molecules (focus hubs) and NF-κB pathway genes as top downregulated focus hubs. Our results for the first time indicate that RR elicitation, particularly after long-term practice, may evoke its downstream health benefits by improving mitochondrial energy production and utilization and thus promoting mitochondrial resiliency through upregulation of ATPase and insulin function. Mitochondrial resiliency might also be promoted by RR-induced downregulation of NF-κB-associated upstream and downstream targets that mitigates stress. PMID:23650531

  6. Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde-containing micelles induce relaxation of isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of nitric oxide and calcium

    Raffai G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gábor Raffai,1 Byungkuk Kim,1 Sanga Park,1 Gilson Khang,1 Dongwon Lee,1 Paul M Vanhoutte1,21World Class University, Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk, South Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy and State Key Laboratory for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region, ChinaBackground and purpose: Cinnamaldehyde, a major component of cinnamon, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species and exerts vasodilator and anticancer effects, but its short half-life limits its clinical use. The present experiments were designed to compare the acute relaxing properties of cinnamaldehyde with those of self-assembling polymer micelles either loaded with cinnamaldehyde or consisting of a polymeric prodrug [poly(cinnamaldehyde] that incorporates the compound in its backbone.Methods: Rings of porcine coronary arteries were contracted with the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619 or 40 mM KCl, and changes in isometric tension were recorded.Results: Cinnamaldehyde induced concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent, nitric oxide synthase (NOS-independent, cyclooxygenase-independent, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC-independent, calcium-activated potassium-independent, and TRPA1 channel-independent relaxations. Cinnamaldehyde also inhibited the contractions induced by 40 mM KCl Ca2+ reintroduction in 40 mM KCl Ca2+-free solution or by the Ca2+ channel opener Bay K8644. Cinnamaldehyde-loaded control micelles induced complete, partly endothelium-dependent relaxations sensitive to catalase and inhibitors of NOS or sGC, but not cyclooxygenase or TRPA1, channels. Cinnamaldehyde-loaded micelles also inhibited contractions induced by 40 mM KCl Ca2+ reintroduction or Bay K8644. Poly(cinnamaldehyde micelles induced only partial, endothelium-dependent relaxations that were reduced by inhibitors of NOS or sGC and by

  7. Mast cell degranulation induced by chlorogenic acid

    Huang, Fang-hua; Zhang, Xin-yue; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Li, Qin; Ni, Bin; Zheng, Xiao-liang; CHEN, AI-JUN

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of chlorogenic acid (CA)-induced anaphylactoid reactions. Methods: Degranulation of peritoneal mast cells was assayed by using alcian blue staining in guinea pigs, and the degranulation index (DI) was calculated. CA-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells was also observed and assayed using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and β-hexosaminidase release. Results: CA 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mmol/L was able to promote degranulation of ...

  8. Transverse relaxation optimized HCN experiment for nucleic acids: Combining the advantages of TROSY and MQ spin evolution

    A three-dimensional MQ-TROSY-HCN pulse sequence is presented which provides intra-base and sugar-to-base correlations for 13C, 15N labeled nucleic acids (RNA, DNA). The experiment simultaneously exploits the favorable relaxation properties of 1H-13C multiple quantum coherence for sugar carbons and of 13C TROSY-type spin evolution for base carbons. MQ-TROSY-HCN thus combines the advantages of MQ-HCN for sugar-to-base and TROSY-HCN for intra-base correlations in a single experiment. In addition, two slightly different implementations of the MQ-TROSY-HCN experiment ensure optimal performance for small and larger oligonucleotides, respectively. The advantages of the MQ-TROSY-HCN experiment compared to the best previous implementations of HCN are demonstrated for a 33 nucleotide RNA aptamer

  9. Relaxation phenomena induced by edge biasing experiments in the CASTOR tokamak

    Spolaore, M.; Martines, E.; Brotánková, Jana; Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Dufková, Edita; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Peleman, P.; Van Oost, G.; Devynck, P.; Figueiredo, H.; Kirnev, G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 12 (2005), s. 1597-1606. ISSN 0011-4626. [Workshop on the Electric Field s, Structures, and Relaxation in Edge Plasmas/8th./. Tarragona, 3.7.2005-4.4.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0789 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * edge biasing * relaxation * E x B flow Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.360, year: 2005 http://www.lib.cas.cz/casopisy/cz/Czechoslovak_Journal_of_Physics.htm

  10. Dielectric relaxation properties of carboxylic acid-terminated n-alkyl monolayers tethered to Si(1 1 1): dynamics of dipoles and gauche defects

    Godet, C.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular-level insights into the organization and dynamics of n-alkyl monolayers covalently bonded to Si(1 1 1) were gained from admittance measurements of dipolar relaxation in rectifying Hg \\parallel HOOC-C10H25-n Si junctions performed as a function of applied voltage and temperature. A collective behavior of dipole dynamics is inferred from the non-Debye asymmetric relaxation peak shape and strong coupling of the dipole relaxation path with some bending vibrations of the n-alkyl OML (multi-excitation entropy model). A variety of relaxation mechanisms is observed in the frequency range (0.1 Hz-10 MHz) with different dependence of relaxation frequency and dipolar strength on measurement temperature and applied voltage. Their microscopic origin is discussed by comparing the activation energy of relaxation frequency with previous molecular mechanics calculations of saddle point energy barriers for structural defects such as gauche conformations or chain kinks in n-alkanes assemblies. Gauche conformations organized in pairs (kinks) have vanishing relaxation strength below an order-disorder transition temperature T D  =  175 K and their probability strongly increases with applied reverse voltage, above T D. The presence of hydrogen bonds between terminal carboxylic acid functionalities is inferred from a comparison with a similar junction bearing a low density of carboxylic acid end groups. This temperature-dependent hydrogen-bond network provides some additional stiffness against external electrostatic stress, as deduced from the rather weak sensitivity of relaxation frequencies to applied bias voltage.

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  12. Relaxed incremental variational approach for the modeling of damage-induced stress hysteresis in arterial walls.

    Schmidt, Thomas; Balzani, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional relaxed incremental variational damage model is proposed, which enables the description of complex softening hysteresis as observed in supra-physiologically loaded arterial tissues, and which thereby avoids a loss of convexity of the underlying formulation. The proposed model extends the relaxed formulation of Balzani and Ortiz [2012. Relaxed incremental variational formulation for damage at large strains with application to fiber-reinforced materials and materials with truss-like microstructures. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 92, 551-570], such that the typical stress-hysteresis observed in arterial tissues under cyclic loading can be described. This is mainly achieved by constructing a modified one-dimensional model accounting for cyclic loading in the individual fiber direction and numerically homogenizing the response taking into account a fiber orientation distribution function. A new solution strategy for the identification of the convexified stress potential is proposed based on an evolutionary algorithm which leads to an improved robustness compared to solely Newton-based optimization schemes. In order to enable an efficient adjustment of the new model to experimentally observed softening hysteresis, an adjustment scheme using a surrogate model is proposed. Therewith, the relaxed formulation is adjusted to experimental data in the supra-physiological domain of the media and adventitia of a human carotid artery. The performance of the model is then demonstrated in a finite element example of an overstretched artery. Although here three-dimensional thick-walled atherosclerotic arteries are considered, it is emphasized that the formulation can also directly be applied to thin-walled simulations of arteries using shell elements or other fiber-reinforced biomembranes. PMID:26341795

  13. The relaxant effect induced by Allium sativum L. bulb aqueous extract on rat isolated trachea

    Badreddine Fehri; Mueen Ahmed, K.K.; Jean-Marc Aiache

    2011-01-01

    Background: Garlic plays an important role in complementary and alternative medicine. Most people believe in and use herbal products even when they have not been as thoroughly researched as garlic. Garlic is also known for its beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. Materials and Methods: The relaxant effect of Allium sativum L. bulb aqueous extract (ASBAE) containing 0.06%-0.10% of allicin was studied on isolated smooth muscle of trachea of rats precontracted using acetylcholine (10...

  14. Changes in the flexion-relaxation response induced by hip extensor and erector spinae muscle fatigue

    Cantin Vincent; Lafond Danik; Descarreaux Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) is defined by reduced lumbar erector spinae (ES) muscle myoelectric activity during full trunk flexion. The objectives of this study were to quantify the effect of hip and back extensor muscle fatigue on FRP parameters and lumbopelvic kinematics. Methods Twenty-seven healthy adults performed flexion-extension tasks under 4 different experimental conditions: no fatigue/no load, no fatigue/load, fatigue/no load, and fatigue/load. Total...

  15. Ion-induced stress relaxation during the growth of cubic boron nitride thin films

    Abendroth, B.E.

    2004-08-01

    in this thesis the deposition of cubic boron nitride films by magnetron sputtering is described. The deposition process is analyzed by Langmuir-probe measurement and energy resolved mass spectroscopy. the films are studied by stress measurement, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Discussed are the stress relaxation and the microstructure and bonding characteristics together with the effects of ion bombardement. (HSI)

  16. Changes in the flexion relaxation response induced by lumbar muscle fatigue

    Cantin Vincent; Centomo Hugo; Jeffrey-Gauthier Renaud; Lafond Danik; Descarreaux Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) is an interesting model to study the modulation of lumbar stability. Previous investigations have explored the effect of load, angular velocity and posture on this particular response. However, the influence of muscular fatigue on FRP parameters has not been thoroughly examined. The objective of the study is to identify the effect of erector spinae (ES) muscle fatigue and spine loading on myoelectric silence onset and cessation in he...

  17. Ion-induced stress relaxation during the growth of cubic boron nitride thin films

    in this thesis the deposition of cubic boron nitride films by magnetron sputtering is described. The deposition process is analyzed by Langmuir-probe measurement and energy resolved mass spectroscopy. the films are studied by stress measurement, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Discussed are the stress relaxation and the microstructure and bonding characteristics together with the effects of ion bombardement. (HSI)

  18. Engineering and Scaling the Spontaneous Magnetization Reversal of Faraday Induced Magnetic Relaxation in Nano-Sized Amorphous Ni Coated on Crystalline Au

    Wen-Hsien Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the generation of large inverse remanent magnetizations in nano-sized core/shell structure of Au/Ni by turning off the applied magnetic field. The remanent magnetization is very sensitive to the field reduction rate as well as to the thermal and field processes before the switching off of the magnetic field. Spontaneous reversal in direction and increase in magnitude of the remanent magnetization in subsequent relaxations over time were found. All of the various types of temporal relaxation curves of the remanent magnetizations are successfully scaled by a stretched exponential decay profile, characterized by two pairs of relaxation times and dynamic exponents. The relaxation time is used to describe the reduction rate, while the dynamic exponent describes the dynamical slowing down of the relaxation through time evolution. The key to these effects is to have the induced eddy current running beneath the amorphous Ni shells through Faraday induction.

  19. Nuclear relaxation induced by diffusion in confined media; the case of inverted micelles

    This work emphasizes the specificities of molecular motions in restricted media observed by NMR. The observation of proton nuclear relaxation of small water pools in AOT reversed micelles has led to separation of dipolar contributions using substitution by deuterium. The water-water contributions to relaxation are easily explained by well-known models and show that water rotational movements are, at most, five times slower than in pure water. The other contributions display a strong frequency dependence with spectrometer frequency and, in order to explain them, a specific dipolar relaxation model was developed between two particles whose movements are restricted to the surface of a sphere and in a concentric sphere respectively. This model was generalized to all cases of diffusion movements of particles in a spherical symmetry environment. In the case of AOT micelles, this model can not explain the experimental results. An elementary discussion taking into account the polar heads specificities and their interactions with water lead to a qualitative interpretation of the experimental data. (author)

  20. Light-induced relaxation dynamics in Rh-doped Bi12TiO20 crystals

    The lifetime of the excited charge carriers in Rh-doped BTO crystals is characterized by measuring the time-resolved photoinduced absorption (PIA) after nanosecond pulse excitation from a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (λ=532 nm). It was found that the Rh-addition in the BTO structure slows down the relaxation decay in comparison with non- doped BTO, which is attributed to additional trapping centers related to the rhodium dopant. The experimental curve is well fitted by a double-exponential decay which is ascribed to the presence of two different shallow traps contributing to the charge transport and recombination mechanisms in Rh-doped BTO crystal

  1. The relationship between radiation-induced chemical processes and transverse relaxation times in polymer gel dosimeters

    The effects of ionizing radiation in different compositions of polymer gel dosimeters are investigated using FT-Raman spectroscopy and NMR T2 relaxation times. The dosimeters are manufactured from different concentrations of comonomers (acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide) dispersed in different concentrations of an aqueous gelatin matrix. Results are analysed using a model of fast exchange of magnetization between three proton pools. The fraction of protons in each pool is determined using the known chemical composition of the dosimeter and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Based on these results, the physical and chemical processes in interplay in the dosimeters are examined in view of their effect on the changes in T2. The precipitation of growing macroradicals and the scavenging of free radicals by gelatin are used to explain the rate of polymerization. The model describes the changes in T2 as a function of the absorbed dose up to 50 Gy for the different compositions. This is expected to aid the theoretical design of new, more efficient dosimeters, since it was demonstrated that the optimum dosimeter (i.e, with the lowest dose resolution) must have a range of relaxation times which match the range of T2 values which can be determined with the lowest uncertainty using an MRI scanner. (author)

  2. Ranolazine enhances nicardipine-induced relaxation of alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction on isolated rabbit aorta.

    Malavaki, Christina; Hatziefthimiou, Apostolia; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Karatzaferi, Christina; Aidonidis, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    Ranolazine (RAN) and nicardipine (NIC) have been studied for their vasorelaxing effects but the combination of these agents against adrenergic vasoconstriction has not been tested. The present study aimed at investigating the vasorelaxing effect by the combination of the two agents on alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction on isolated rabbit aorta. Aortic rings were mounted for isometric tension recording in organ baths containing Krebs-Henseleit solution. Concentration-response curves of RAN (10(-9) to 10(-4) M), NIC (10(-1) to 10(-5) M), and RAN + NIC (3 x 10(-6) M) were obtained in a cumulative manner using phenylephrine (PE, 2 x 10(-6) M) as constrictor agent. The effective concentration (EC)50 values for RAN and NIC were 6.5 x 10(-6) M and 1.4 x 10(-5) M, respectively. The treatment of PE-precontracted aortic rings with either RAN or NIC up to 65 min revealed that both agents displayed a biphasic pattern of initial rising and late sustained phases of relaxation. At 35 min of incubation, RAN and NIC induced relaxation by 23 +/- 3% and 14 +/- 4%, respectively (N = 7, P=NS, RAN vs. NIC); their combination resulted in a 34 +/- 4% relaxation (N=7; P < 0.01, RAN + NIC vs. NIC). At 65 min the effect of NIC prevailed and tended to be closer to the values of the combination treatment (P < 0.01, RAN + NIC vs. RAN). The results indicate that RAN at therapeutic concentrations exerts a significant additive vasorelaxing effect when combined with NIC in rabbit aorta. PMID:26148375

  3. Field-Induced Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Mononuclear Manganese(III)-Porphyrin Complex.

    Pascual-Álvarez, Alejandro; Vallejo, Julia; Pardo, Emilio; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Krzystek, J; Armentano, Donatella; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cano, Joan

    2015-11-23

    We report on a novel manganese(III)-porphyrin complex with the formula [Mn(III) (TPP)(3,5-Me2 pyNO)2 ]ClO4 ⋅CH3 CN (2; 3,5-Me2 pyNO=3,5-dimethylpyridine N-oxide, H2 TPP=5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin), in which the Mn(III) ion is six-coordinate with two monodentate 3,5-Me2 pyNO molecules and a tetradentate TPP ligand to build a tetragonally elongated octahedral geometry. The environment in 2 is responsible for the large and negative axial zero-field splitting (D=-3.8 cm(-1) ), low rhombicity (E/|D|=0.04) of the high-spin Mn(III) ion, and, ultimately, for the observation of slow magnetic-relaxation effects (Ea =15.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G) in this rare example of a manganese-based single-ion magnet (SIM). Structural, magnetic, and electronic characterizations were carried out by means of single-crystal diffraction studies, variable-temperature direct- and alternating-current measurements and high-frequency and -field EPR spectroscopic analysis followed by quantum-chemical calculations. Slow magnetic-relaxation effects were also observed in the already known analogous compound [Mn(III) (TPP)Cl] (1; Ea =10.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G). The results obtained for 1 and 2 are compared and discussed herein. PMID:26481722

  4. Reduced nitric oxide-mediated relaxation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the tail arteries of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Mokhtar, Siti Safiah; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan Wai Sum; Suppian, Rapeah; Yusof, Mohd Imran; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2016-02-15

    Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. The present study aimed to examine the role of nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH), in the relaxation of ventral tail arteries of rats under diabetic conditions. Relaxations of tail arteries of control and diabetic rats were studied in wire myograph. Western blotting and immunostaining were used to determine the presence of proteins. Acetylcholine-induced relaxations were significantly smaller in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 70.81±2.48% versus 85.05±3.15%). Incubation with the combination of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin and potassium channel blockers, TRAM 34 and UCL 1684, demonstrated that NO-mediated relaxation was attenuated significantly in diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 48.47±5.84% versus 68.39±6.34%). EDH-type (in the presence of indomethacin and NO synthase inhibitor, LNAME) and prostacyclin-mediated (in the presence of LNAME plus TRAM 34 and UCL 1684) relaxations were not significantly reduced in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats [Rmax: (EDH; 17.81±6.74% versus 34.16±4.59%) (prostacyclin; 15.85±3.27% versus 17.23±3.75%)]. Endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside, salbutamol and prostacyclin were comparable in the two types of preparations. Western blotting and immunostaining indicated that diabetes diminished the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), while increasing those of COX-1 and COX-2. Thus, since acetylcholine-induced NO-mediated relaxation was impaired in diabetes because of reduced eNOS protein expression, pharmacological intervention improving NO bioavailability could be useful in the management of diabetic endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26825543

  5. Irradiation induced stress relaxation and high temperature deformation behavior of neutron irradiated Ti based shape memory alloys

    Several tools using Ti based shape memory alloys (SMA) such as SMA coupler, connector, jack system and in-vacuum gate valve, have been developed to promote the remote maintenance and the quick replacement technology for fusion core parts. Recently, irradiation induced stress relaxation (IISR) has become a concern for components of the fusion core. IISR may be a severe problem for SMAs as well as the structural materials in the fusion reactor. The IISR of TiNi SMA and TiPd high temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA), which have both transformation temperatures and working temperatures 400 K higher than those of TiNi alloys, may be controlled by the migration of vacancies rather than interstitials. This mechanism facilitates restoration of the damaged state to normal state under irradiation. TiPd HTSMAs may be used to fabricate irradiation-resistant shape memory devices for temperatures up to 800 K if proper heat treatments can be developed. ((orig.))

  6. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    Chieko Iwao

    Full Text Available The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1 GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2 all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3 phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells.

  7. Glycyrrhetinic acid-induced permeability transition in rat liver mitochondria.

    Salvi, Mauro; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Toninello, Antonio

    2003-12-15

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, a hydrolysis product of one of the main constituents of licorice, the triterpene glycoside of glycyrrhizic acid, when added to rat liver mitochondria at micromolar concentrations induces swelling, loss of membrane potential, pyridine nucleotide oxidation, and release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor. These changes are Ca(2+) dependent and are prevented by cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide. All these observations indicate that glycyrrhetinic acid is a potent inducer of mitochondrial permeability transition and can trigger the pro-apoptotic pathway. PMID:14637195

  8. CGP 35348, a new GABAB antagonist, prevents antinociception and muscle-relaxant effect induced by baclofen.

    Malcangio, M.; Ghelardini, C.; Giotti, A.; Malmberg-Aiello, P.; Bartolini, A.

    1991-01-01

    1. CGP 35348, a new GABAB antagonist, was examined on antinociception induced by (+/-)-baclofen by use of the hot plate and writhing tests in mice and the paw pressure test in rats. CGP 35348 was also studied in mice on (+/-)-baclofen-induced impairment of rota-rod performance. 2. CGP 35348, injected either i.p. (60-100 mg kg-1 in mouse) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) (0.5-2.5 micrograms per mouse; 25 micrograms per rat) prevented (+/-)-baclofen-induced antinociception. 3. CGP 35348 di...

  9. On the Use of Molecular Weight Cutoff Cassettes to Measure Dynamic Relaxivity of Novel Gadolinium Contrast Agents: Example Using Hyaluronic Acid Polymer Complexes in Phosphate-Buffered Saline

    Nima Kasraie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether standard extracellular contrast agents of Gd(III ions in combination with a polymeric entity susceptible to hydrolytic degradation over a finite period of time, such as Hyaluronic Acid (HA, have sufficient vascular residence time to obtain comparable vascular imaging to current conventional compounds and to obtain sufficient data to show proof of concept that HA with Gd-DTPA ligands could be useful as vascular imaging agents. We assessed the dynamic relaxivity of the HA bound DTPA compounds using a custom-made phantom, as well as relaxation rates at 10.72 MHz with concentrations ranging between 0.09 and 7.96 mM in phosphate-buffered saline. Linear dependences of static longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 on concentration were found for most measured samples, and the HA samples continued to produce high signal strength after 24 hours after injection into a dialysis cassette at 3T, showing superior dynamic relaxivity values compared to conventional contrast media such as Gd-DTPA-BMA.

  10. On the Use of Molecular Weight Cutoff Cassettes to Measure Dynamic Relaxivity of Novel Gadolinium Contrast Agents: Example Using Hyaluronic Acid Polymer Complexes in Phosphate-Buffered Saline

    The aims of this study were to determine whether standard extracellular contrast agents of Gd(III) ions in combination with a polymeric entity susceptible to hydrolytic degradation over a finite period of time, such as Hyaluronic Acid (HA), have sufficient vascular residence time to obtain comparable vascular imaging to current conventional compounds and to obtain sufficient data to show proof of concept that HA with Gd-DTPA ligands could be useful as vascular imaging agents. We assessed the dynamic relaxivity of the HA bound DTPA compounds using a custom-made phantom, as well as relaxation rates at 10.72 MHz with concentrations ranging between 0.09 and 7.96 mM in phosphate-buffered saline. Linear dependences of static longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) on concentration were found for most measured samples, and the HA samples continued to produce high signal strength after 24 hours after injection into a dialysis cassette at 3T, showing superior dynamic relaxivity values compared to conventional contrast media such as Gd-DTPA-BMA

  11. Modeling Creep-Induced Stress Relaxation at the Leading Edge of SiC/SiC Airfoils

    Lang, Jerry; DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Anticipating the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC composites into internally cooled airfoil components within the turbine section of future aero-propulsion engines, the primary objective of this study was to develop physics-based analytical and finite-element modeling tools to predict the effects of composite creep and stress relaxation at the airfoil leading edges, which will generally experience large thermal gradients at high temperatures. A second objective was to examine how some advanced NASA-developed SiC/SiC systems coated with typical EBC materials would behave as leading edge materials in terms of long-term steady-state operating temperatures. Because of the complexities introduced by mechanical stresses inherent in internally cooled airfoils, a simple cylindrical thin-walled tube model subjected to thermal stresses only is employed for the leading edge, thereby obtaining a best-case scenario for the material behavior. In addition, the SiC/SiC composite materials are assumed to behave as isotropic materials with temperature-dependent viscoelastic creep behavior as measured in-plane on thin-walled panels. Key findings include: (1) without mechanical stresses and for typical airfoil geometries, as heat flux is increased through the leading edge, life-limiting tensile crack formation will occur first in the hoop direction on the inside wall of the leading edge; (2) thermal gradients through all current SiC/SiC systems should be kept below approx.300 F at high temperatures to avoid this cracking; (3) at temperatures near the maximum operating temperatures of advanced SiC/SiC systems, thermal stresses induced by the thermal gradients will beneficially relax with time due to creep; (4) although stress relaxation occurs, the maximum gradient should still not exceed 300oF because of residual tensile stress buildup on the airfoil outer wall during cool-down; and (5) without film cooling and mechanical stresses, the NASA-developed N26 SiC/SiC system with thru

  12. Measurement of the ferric diffusion coefficient in agarose and gelatine gels by utilization of the evolution of a radiation induced edge as reflected in relaxation rate images

    A method has been developed to determine the diffusion coefficients of ferric ions in ferrous sulphate doped gels. A radiation induced edge was created in the gel, and two spin-echo sequences were used to acquire a pair of images of the gel at different points of time. For each of these image pairs, a longitudinal relaxation rate image was derived. From profiles through these images, the standard deviations of the Gaussian functions that characterize diffusion were determined. These data provided the basis for the determination of the ferric diffusion coefficients by two different methods. Simulations indicate that the use of single spin-echo images in this procedure may in some cases lead to a significant underestimation of the diffusion coefficient. The technique was applied to different agarose and gelatine gels that were prepared, irradiated and imaged simultaneously. The results indicate that the diffusion coefficient is lower in a gelatine gel than in an agarose gel. Addition of xylenol orange to a gelatine gel lowers the diffusion coefficient from 1.45 to 0.81 mm2 h-1, at the cost of significantly lower R1 sensitivity. The addition of benzoic acid to the latter gel did not increase the R1 sensitivity. (author) OK

  13. New concept of damage evaluation method for core internal materials considering radiation induced stress relaxation (1). Experiments and modeling of radiation effects

    In order to build the new concept of material damage evaluation method, synergistic effect of radiation and residual stress on material degradation was estimated experimentally, and the effect of radiation induced stress relaxation on retardation of material degradation was observed. (author)

  14. Acid mediates a prolonged antinociception via substance P signaling in acid-induced chronic widespread pain

    Chen, Wei-Nan; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance P is an important neuropeptide released from nociceptors to mediate pain signals. We recently revealed antinociceptive signaling by substance P in acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3)-expressing muscle nociceptors in a mouse model of acid-induced chronic widespread pain. However, methods to specifically trigger the substance P antinociception were still lacking. Results Here we show that acid could induce antinociceptive signaling via substance P release in muscle. We preve...

  15. Relaxation of rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and aortic vascular endothelium induced by new nitric oxide donor substances of the nitrosyl-ruthenium complex

    Joao B. G. Cerqueira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Endothelial dysfunction characterized by endogenous nitric oxide (NO deficiency made 56% of patients affected with erectile dysfunction decline treatment with PDE-5 inhibitors. New forms of treatment are currently being developed for this group of patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study compared the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP and two substances of the nitrosyl-ruthenium complex, cis-[Ru(bpy2(SO3(NO]PF-6-9 ("FONO1” and trans-[Ru(NH34(caffeine(NO]C13 ("LLNO1” on relaxation of rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and aortic vascular endothelium. The samples were immersed in isolated baths and precontracted with 0.1 µM phenylephrine (PE and the corresponding relaxation concentration/response curves were plotted. In order to investigate the relaxation mechanisms involved, 100 µM ODQ (a soluble guanylate cyclase-specific inhibitor, 3 µM or 10 µM oxyhemoglobin (an extracellular NO scavenger or 1 mM L-cysteine (a nitrosyl anion-specific scavenger was added to the samples. RESULTS: All the NO donors tested produced a significant level of relaxation in the vascular endothelium. In corpus cavernosum samples, FONO1 produced no significant effect, but LLNO1 and SNP induced dose-dependent relaxation with comparable potency (pEC50 = 6.14 ± 0.08 and 6.4 ± 0.14, respectively and maximum effect (Emax = 82% vs. 100%, respectively. All NO donors were found to activate soluble guanylate cyclase, since the addition of the corresponding inhibitor (100 µM ODQ completely neutralized the relaxation effect observed. The addition of oxyhemoglobin reduced the relaxation effect, but did not inhibit it completely. In aortic vascular endothelium 3 µM oxyhemoglobin decreased the relaxation effect by 26% on the average, while 10 µM oxyhemoglobin reduced it by over 52%. The addition of 100 µM L-cysteine produced no significant inhibiting effect. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that LLNO1 and FONO1 are potent vasodilators. LLNO1 was

  16. Relaxation dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced temperature modulation on the surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    Levy, Yoann; Derrien, Thibault J.-Y.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is a complicated phenomenon which involves periodic spatial modulation of laser energy absorption on the irradiated surface, transient changes in optical response, surface layer melting and/or ablation. The listed processes strongly depend on laser fluence and pulse duration as well as on material properties. This paper is aimed at studying the spatiotemporal evolution of a periodic modulation of the deposited laser energy, once formed upon irradiation of metal (Ti) and semiconductor (Si) surfaces. Assuming that the incoming laser pulse interferes with a surface electromagnetic wave, the resulting sinusoidal modulation of the absorbed laser energy is introduced into a two-dimensional two-temperature model developed for titanium and silicon. Simulations reveal that the lattice temperature modulation on the surfaces of both materials following from the modulated absorption remains significant for longer than 50 ps after the laser pulse. In the cases considered here, the partially molten phase exists 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si, suggesting that molten matter can be subjected to temperature-driven relocation toward LIPSS formation, due to the modulated temperature profile on the material surfaces. Molten phase at nanometric distances (nano-melting) is also revealed.

  17. Involvement of K channels and calcium-independent mechanisms in hydrogen sulfide-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric small arteries

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K;

    2015-01-01

    that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of NaSH, Na2S, and GYY4137 were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free [H2S......] than NaSH and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 μM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaSH lowered calcium and caused...... relaxation of norepinephrine-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaSH relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In norepinephrine-contracted arteries, NaSH (1 mM) lowered phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1...

  18. PC02 Beta3-adrenoceptor agonist-induced relaxation of human placental arteries is reduced in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    0BARTHEZ; CROUGET; PGUERARD; MJLEROYZAMIA; MBREUILLER-FOUCHE; EJMORCILLO; TCRPCO; PSAGOT; MDUMAS; MBARDOU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the functionality of β2- and 133-adrenoreceptors(β-ARs) in human placental arteries and to assess the influence of pregnancy-induced hypertension on β-ARs responsiveness.METHODS: We performed in vitro functional and biochemical studies as well as RT-PCR experiments. RESULTS: SR59119

  19. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in Chicken Embryos and Hatchlings

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxi...

  20. Essential role of nitric oxide in sepsis-induced impairment of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated relaxation in rat pulmonary artery.

    Subramani, Jaganathan; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Kathirvel, Kandaswamy; Arunadevi, Rathinam; Singh, Thakur Uttam; Prakash, Vellanki Ravi; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2010-03-25

    Both endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) are important vasodilators in pulmonary circulation. Sepsis is known to impair endothelium-dependent dilation in the pulmonary vasculature, but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. We have examined the relative contribution of EDHF/NO to the attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxation of pulmonary artery in sepsis, and the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-derived NO in this mechanism. Sepsis was induced in male adult Wistar rats by caecal ligation and puncture. At 18h after surgery, left and right branches of pulmonary arteries were isolated for tension recording, NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) measurements, mRNA and protein expressions. Despite a marked decrease in the arterial endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and phosphorylated-eNOS (p-eNOS) protein expressions in sepsis, endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) mediated by NO, acetylcholine-stimulated NO release and tissue cGMP levels were moderately inhibited. Sepsis however abolished the N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)/indomethacin-resistant arterial relaxation (EDHF response) to acetylcholine in this vessel. In vitro treatment of the arterial rings from septic rats with 1400W, a selective inhibitor of iNOS restored the EDHF response, but had no effect on the acetylcholine-induced relaxation mediated by endothelial NO. The functional role of iNOS-derived NO in impairing EDHF-mediated relaxation was coincident with an increased basal NO production, iNOS mRNA and protein expressions in the rat pulmonary artery. In conclusion, the loss of the EDHF response may be primarily responsible for the endothelial dysfunction in sepsis, and its restoration by a selective iNOS inhibitor may improve pulmonary vasodilation. PMID:20035746

  1. Role of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester-resistant acetylcholine-induced relaxation in chicken carotid artery.

    Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Siddegowda, Yeshavanth K B; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra K; Sastry, Kochiganti V H; Prakash, Vellanki Ravi; Mishra, Santosh K

    2008-10-31

    The current study examined the hypothesis that acetylcholine-induced N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-resistant endothelium-dependent relaxations in the chicken carotid artery are mediated by nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. Acetylcholine (1 nM-3 microM) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation (pD(2) 6.81+/-0.05, R(max) 115+/-3%) of the artery segments precontracted with phenylephrine (3 microM). L-NAME (1 mM) decreased the sensitivity (pD(2) 6.44+/-0.06), but not the efficacy (R(max) 108+/-3%) of acetylcholine. It also partially decreased the acetylcholine (3 microM)-stimulated nitrite release. While treatment with N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine (l-NNA; 1 mM) plus L-NAME (1 mM) decreased the acetylcholine-stimulated nitrite release to the basal level, it moderately inhibited (R(max) 77+/-3%) the maximal relaxation elicited with the muscarinic agonist. 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO; 100 microM) a specific scavenger of nitric oxide (NO) plus the two NOS inhibitors further decreased the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation (R(max) 34+/-2%). Although soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 10 microM) markedly inhibited the acetylcholine-stimulated increase in tissue cGMP to less than the basal levels, it only decreased the sensitivity, but not the efficacy of the agonist either in the presence or absence of L-NAME (1 mM). Zinc Protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP; 10 microM), a hemeoxygenase (HO) inhibitor, partially inhibited (R(max) 72+/-3%) the L-NAME-resistant acetylcholine-induced relaxations. A combined treatment of the arterial rings with L-NAME, l-NNA, PTIO and ZnPP nearly abolished (R(max) 7+/-0.9%) the vasodilator responses to acetylcholine. Endothelium removal abolished the relaxation response to acetylcholine. In conclusion, it is suggested that the acetylcholine-induced L-NAME-resistant relaxation is primarily, mediated by NO with a small but significant contribution from

  2. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. eleg...

  3. Slow magnetic relaxation in four square-based pyramidal dysprosium hydroxo clusters ligated by chiral amino acid anions - a comparative study.

    Thielemann, Dominique T; Wagner, Anna T; Lan, Yanhua; Anson, Christopher E; Gamer, Michael T; Powell, Annie K; Roesky, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three chiral and one achiral amino acid anion ligated dysprosium hydroxo clusters [Dy5(OH)5(α-AA)4(Ph2acac)6] (α-AA = d-PhGly, l-Pro, l-Trp, Ph2Gly; Ph2acac = dibenzoylmethanide) are reported. The solid state structures were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction and show that five Dy(iii) ions are arranged in a square-based pyramidal geometry with NO7-donor-sets for the basal and O8-donor-sets for the apical Dy atom. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties were investigated for all four compounds and show a slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour below 10 K in all cases. The similar SMM behaviour observed for all four compounds suggests that the very similar coordination geometries seen for the dysprosium atoms in all members of this family, which are independent of the amino acid ligand used, play a decisive role in steering the contribution of the single ion anisotropies to the observed magnetic relaxation. PMID:23986134

  4. Airway smooth muscle relaxation results from a reduction in the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations induced by a cAMP-mediated inhibition of the IP3 receptor

    Sanderson Michael J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that the contractile state of airway smooth muscle cells (SMCs in response to agonists is determined by the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations occurring within the SMCs. Therefore, we hypothesized that the relaxation of airway SMCs induced by agents that increase cAMP results from the down-regulation or slowing of the frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations. Methods The effects of isoproterenol (ISO, forskolin (FSK and 8-bromo-cAMP on the relaxation and Ca2+ signaling of airway SMCs contracted with methacholine (MCh was investigated in murine lung slices with phase-contrast and laser scanning microscopy. Results All three cAMP-elevating agents simultaneously induced a reduction in the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations within the SMCs and the relaxation of contracted airways. The decrease in the Ca2+ oscillation frequency correlated with the extent of airway relaxation and was concentration-dependent. The mechanism by which cAMP reduced the frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations was investigated. Elevated cAMP did not affect the re-filling rate of the internal Ca2+ stores after emptying by repetitive exposure to 20 mM caffeine. Neither did elevated cAMP limit the Ca2+ available to stimulate contraction because an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration induced by exposure to a Ca2+ ionophore (ionomycin or by photolysis of caged-Ca2+ did not reverse the effect of cAMP. Similar results were obtained with iberiotoxin, a blocker of Ca2+-activated K+ channels, which would be expected to increase Ca2+ influx and contraction. By contrast, the photolysis of caged-IP3 in the presence of agonist, to further elevate the intracellular IP3 concentration, reversed the slowing of the frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations and relaxation of the airway induced by FSK. This result implied that the sensitivity of the IP3R to IP3 was reduced by FSK and this was supported by the reduced ability of IP3 to release Ca2+ in SMCs in the presence of

  5. Involvement of H1 and H2 receptors and soluble guanylate cyclase in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Moor, Andrea N.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the roles of the H1 and H2 histamine receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, and soluble guanylate (sGC) cyclase in histamine-induced modulation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic pumping. Methods Isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics were treated with 1–100 μM histamine. Histamine receptors were blocked with either the H1 antagonist mepyramine or the H2 antagonist cimetidine. The role of NO/sGC signaling was tested using the arginine analog L-NAME, the sGC inhibitor ODQ, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as a positive control. Results Histamine applied at 100 μM decreased tone and contraction frequency (CF) of isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. Pharmacologic blockade of either H1 or H2 histamine receptors significantly inhibited the response to histamine. Pretreatment with ODQ, but not L-NAME, completely inhibited the histamine-induced decrease in tone. ODQ pretreatment also significantly inhibited SNP-induced lymphatic relaxation. Conclusions H1 and H2 histamine receptors are both involved in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. NO synthesis does not appear to contribute to the histamine-induced response. However, sGC is critical for the histamine-induced decrease in tone and contributes to the drop in CF. PMID:24702851

  6. Effects of Lipoic Acid on Acrylamide Induced Testicular Damage

    Lebda, Mohamed; Gad, Shereen; Gaafar, Hossam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acrylamide is very toxic to various organs and associated with significant increase of oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidants. Alpha-lipoic acid enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Aim of the study: This study aimed to evaluate the protective role of alpha-lipoic acid on the oxidative damage induced by acrylamide in testicular and epididymal tissues. Material and methods: Forty adult male rats were divided into ...

  7. Convective mixing induced by acid-base reactions.

    Almarcha, Christophe; R'Honi, Yasmina; De Decker, Yannick; Trevelyan, Philip; Eckert, Kerstin; De Wit, Anne

    2011-01-01

    When two miscible solutions, each containing a reactive species, are put in contact in the gravity field, local variations in the density due to the reaction can induce convective motion and mixing. We characterize here both experimentally and theoretically such buoyancy-driven instabilities induced by the neutralization of a strong acid by a strong base in aqueous solutions. The diverse patterns obtained are shown to depend on the type of reactants used and on their relative concentrations. ...

  8. Inducible gene expression system by 3-hydroxypropionic acid

    Zhou, Shengfang; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Seol, Eunhee; Nguyen, Trinh Thi; Park, Sunghoon

    2015-01-01

    Background 3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is an important platform chemical that boasts a variety of industrial applications. Gene expression systems inducible by 3-HP, if available, are of great utility for optimization of the pathways of 3-HP production and excretion. Results Here we report the presence of unique inducible gene expression systems in Pseudomonas denitrificans and other microorganisms. In P. denitrificans, transcription of three genes (hpdH, mmsA and hbdH-4) involved in 3-HP ...

  9. THE PARTICIPATION OF THE NITRERGIC PATHWAY IN INCREASED RATE OF TRANSITORY RELAXATION OF LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER INDUCED BY RECTAL DISTENSION IN DOGS

    Michel Santos PALHETA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The rectal distension in dogs increases the rate of transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation considered the main factor causing gastroesophageal reflux. Objectives The aim of this study was evaluate the participation of the nitrergic pathway in the increased transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation rate induced by rectal distension in anesthetized dogs. Methods Male mongrel dogs (n = 21, weighing 10-15 kg, were fasted for 12 hours, with water ad libitum. Thereafter, they were anesthetized (ketamine 10 mg.Kg-1 + xylazine 20 mg.Kg-1, so as to carry out the esophageal motility evaluation protocol during 120 min. After a 30-minute basal period, the animals were randomly intravenous treated whith: saline solution 0.15M (1ml.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1, L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1 + L-Arginine (200 mg.Kg-1, glibenclamide (1 mg.Kg-1 or methylene blue (3 mg.Kg-1. Forty-five min after these pre-treatments, the rectum was distended (rectal distension, 5 mL.Kg-1 or not (control with a latex balloon, with changes in the esophageal motility recorded over 45 min. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Student Newman-Keuls test. Results In comparison to the respective control group, rectal distension induces an increase in transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Pre-treatment with L-NAME or methylene blue prevents (P<0.05 this phenomenon, which is reversible by L-Arginine plus L-NAME. However, pretreating with glibenclamide failed to abolish this process. Conclusions Therefore, these experiments suggested, that rectal distension increases transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in dogs via through nitrergic pathways.

  10. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    Ono, Koichi [Department of Anesthesiology and Resuscitation, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Koizumi, Tomonobu, E-mail: tomonobu@shinshu-u.ac.jp [First Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki [First Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Nakagawa, Rikimaru [Department of Anesthesiology and Resuscitation, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Obata, Toru [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of DNA Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  11. Thermal Properties of Extruded Injection-Molded Poly (lactic acid) and Milkweed Composites: Degradation Kinectics and Enthalpic Relaxation

    In order to determine the degree of compatibility between Poly (lactic Acid) (PLA) and different biomaterials, PLA was compounded with milkweed fiber, a new crop oil seed. After oil extraction, the remaining cake retained approximately 10% residual oil and 47% protein. The pressed seed cake (10% mo...

  12. 磁性液体透射光的场致驰豫性%Field-Induced Relaxation Behavior of Transmitted Light Through Ferrofluids

    刘晓东; 李建; 林跃强; 黄彦

    2004-01-01

    研究了在磁场作用下,经过磁性液体的透射光的驰豫特性.结果表明,加上磁场后,透射光强立即增加,随后减弱.如果磁场的均匀性较差,透射光将保持衰减趋势.反之,透射光减小到一个最低值后又将增加,直到趋于一稳定值.这种透射光的驰豫性质对应着磁场作用下磁性液体的各向异性微结构的形成过程.%Relaxation behavior of transmitted light through ferrofluids under applied magnetic field is studied. The results show the intensity of transmitted light increase quickly as soon as magnetic field is applied, then weakens with time. If uniformity of the field is poor, the transmission of light remains to decrease. Otherwise, the transmission of light vill increase to tend a stable value after decreasing to minimum value. The relaxation time is order of some hundreds seconds. The relaxation process of field-induced transmission of light is corresponding to anisotropic microstructure of ferrofluid forming under applied magnetic field.

  13. Metastability exchange optical pumping in 3He gas up to 30 mT. Efficiency measurements and evidence of laser-induced nuclear relaxation

    Advances in metastability exchange optical pumping (MEOP) of 3He at high laser powers, with its various applications, but also at high gas pressures p3 and high magnetic field strengths B, have provided strong motivation for revisiting the understanding and for investigating the limitations of this powerful technique. For this purpose, we present systematic experimental and theoretical studies of efficiency and of relaxation mechanisms in B≤30 mT and p3=0.63-2.45 mbar. 3He nuclear polarisation is measured by light absorption in longitudinal configuration where weak light beams at 1083 nm parallel to magnetic field and cell axis with opposite circular polarisations are used to probe the distribution of populations in the metastable state. This method is systematically tested to evaluate potential systematic biases and is shown to be reliable for the study of OP dynamics despite the redistribution of populations by OP light. Nuclear polarisation loss associated to the emission of polarised light by the plasma discharge used for MEOP is found to decrease above 10 mT, as expected, due to hyperfine decoupling in highly excited states. However, this does not lead to improved MEOP efficiency at high laser power. We find clear evidence of additional laser-induced relaxation instead. The strong OP-enhanced polarisation losses, currently limiting MEOP performances, are quantitatively investigated using an angular momentum budget approach and a recently developed comprehensive model that describes the combined effects of OP, ME and relaxation, validated by comparison to experimental results.

  14. Metformin protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis.

    Titia E Woudenberg-Vrenken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metformin is used in the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type II and improves liver function in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Metformin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, the cellular energy sensor that is sensitive to changes in the AMP/ATP-ratio. AMPK is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Both AMPK and mTOR are able to modulate cell death. AIM: To evaluate the effects of metformin on hepatocyte cell death. METHODS: Apoptotic cell death was induced in primary rat hepatocytes using either the bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or TNFα in combination with actinomycin D (actD. AMPK, mTOR and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/Akt were inhibited using pharmacological inhibitors. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified by caspase activation, acridine orange staining and Sytox green staining respectively. RESULTS: Metformin dose-dependently reduces GCDCA-induced apoptosis, even when added 2 hours after GCDCA, without increasing necrotic cell death. Metformin does not protect against TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. The protective effect of metformin is dependent on an intact PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, but does not require AMPK/mTOR-signaling. Metformin does not inhibit NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: Metformin protects against bile acid-induced apoptosis and could be considered in the treatment of chronic liver diseases accompanied by inflammation.

  15. Capric Acid Inhibits NO Production and STAT3 Activation during LPS-Induced Osteoclastogenesis

    Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Sun A.; Choi, Yong-Min; Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Shim, Wooyoung; Lee, Gwang; Choi, Sangdun

    2011-01-01

    Capric acid is a second medium-chain fatty acid, and recent studies have shown that fatty acids are associated with bone density and reduce bone turnover. In this study, we investigated the effects of capric acid on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. After treatment with capric acid (1 mM), the number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells decreased significantly. Capric acid reduced LPS-induced TRAP expression, an osteoclast different...

  16. Iron Transformations Induced by an Acid-Tolerant Desulfosporosinus Species

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J.; Senko, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) ...

  17. Thermally-induced electronic relaxation in structurally-modified Cu0.1Ni0.8Co0.2Mn1.9O4 spinel ceramics

    Thermally-induced electronic relaxation in structurally-modified Cu0.1Ni0.8Co0.2Mn1.9O4 spinel ceramics is shown to be adequately described by stretched exponential function on time. This kinetics is defined by microsctructure perfectness of the relaxing media, showing obvious onset to stretched exponential behaviour with non-exponentionality index attaining close to 0.43 values for high-monolith ceramics and smaller ones in fine-grained ceramics. Percolation threshold in relaxation-degradation kinetics is detected for ceramics with 10% of NiO extractions, showing the smallest but most prolonged single-path degradation effect. This finding is treated in terms of Phillips’ axiomatic diffusion-to-trap model, where only one of two relaxation channels (caused by operative short-range forces) occurs to be effective, while additional non-operative channels contribute to electronic relaxation in fine-grained ceramics

  18. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  19. A Rat Model of Hemidystonia Induced by 3-Nitropropionic Acid

    Liu, Huan-Guang; Ma, Yu; Meng, Da-Wei; Yang, An-Chao; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Secondary dystonia commonly presents as hemidystonia and is often refractory to current treatments. We aimed to establish an inducible rat model of hemidystonia utilizing 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) and to determine the pathophysiology of this model. Methods Two different doses of 3-NP were stereotactically administered into the ipsilateral caudate putamen (CPu) of Wistar rats. Behavioral changes and alterations in the neurotransmitter levels in the basal ganglia were analyzed. We ...

  20. Acidic environments induce differentiation of Proteus mirabilis into swarmer morphotypes.

    Fujihara, Masatoshi; Obara, Hisato; Watanabe, Yusaku; Ono, Hisaya K; Sasaki, Jun; Goryo, Masanobu; Harasawa, Ryô

    2011-07-01

    Although swarmer morphotypes of Proteus mirabilis have long been considered to result from surfaced-induced differentiation, the present findings show that, in broth medium containing urea, acidic conditions transform some swimmer cells into elongated swarmer cells. This study has also demonstrates that P. mirabilis cells grown in acidic broth medium containing urea enhance virulence factors such as flagella production and cytotoxicity to human bladder carcinoma cell line T24, though no significant difference in urease activity under different pH conditions was found. Since there is little published data on the behavior of P. mirabilis at various hydrogen-ion concentrations, the present study may clarify aspects of cellular differentiation of P. mirabilis in patients at risk of struvite formation due to infection with urease-producing bacteria, as well as in some animals with acidic or alkaline urine. PMID:21707738

  1. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  2. Relaxed superconductors

    Andrade, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Momentum relaxation can be built into many holographic models without sacrificing homogeneity of the bulk solution. In this paper we study two such models: one in which translational invariance is broken in the dual theory by spatially-dependent sources for massless scalar fields and another that features an additional neutral scalar field. We turn on a charged scalar field in order to explore the condensation of a charged scalar operator in the dual theories. After demonstrating that the relaxed superconductors we construct are thermodynamically relevant, we find that the finite DC electrical conductivity of the normal phase is replaced by a superfluid pole in the broken phase. Moreover, when the normal phase possesses a Drude behaviour at low frequencies, the optical conductivity of the broken phase at low frequencies can be described by a two-fluid model that is a sum of a Drude peak and a superfluid pole, as was found recently for inhomogeneous holographic superconductors. We also study cases in which thi...

  3. Field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization in a pentacoordinate Co(II) compound [Co(phen)(DMSO)Cl2].

    Nemec, Ivan; Marx, Raphael; Herchel, Radovan; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-09-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic properties of a pentacoordinate [Co(phen)(DMSO)Cl2] compound (phen = 1,10'-phenanthroline, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) were thoroughly studied by experimental (SQUID magnetometry and HF-EPR spectroscopy) and theoretical methods (DFT and CASSCF calculations). It has been found from temperature/field-dependent magnetization measurements that the studied compound possesses a large and negative magnetic anisotropy (D = -17(1) cm(-1)) with large rhombicity (E/D = 0.24(5)), and these experimental results are in agreement with ab initio calculations (D = -17.7 cm(-1), E/D = 0.31). Interdoublet resonances were not observed in the HF-EPR measurements, but the large rhombicity was confirmed (DEPR = -17.7 cm(-1) (fixed from CASSCF calculations), E/DEPR = 0.33). A frequency dependent out-of-phase susceptibility signal was observed only in a non-zero static magnetic field (B = 0.1 T) and the following parameters of slow-relaxation of magnetisation were derived from the experimental data: either the energy of spin reversal barrier, Ueff = 10.4 K, and the relaxation time, τ0 = 5.69 × 10(-9) s using the Debye model, or Ueff = 21.4-40.3 K and τ0 = 0.248-58.3 × 10(-9) based on a simplified model. PMID:26229042

  4. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of membrane proteins by incorporation of the metal-chelating unnatural amino acid 2-amino-3-(8-hydroxyquinolin-3-yl)propanoic acid (HQA)

    Park, Sang Ho; Wang, Vivian S.; Radoicic, Jasmina; Angelis, Anna A. De; Berkamp, Sabrina; Opella, Stanley J., E-mail: sopella@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The use of paramagnetic constraints in protein NMR is an active area of research because of the benefits of long-range distance measurements (>10 Å). One of the main issues in successful execution is the incorporation of a paramagnetic metal ion into diamagnetic proteins. The most common metal ion tags are relatively long aliphatic chains attached to the side chain of a selected cysteine residue with a chelating group at the end where it can undergo substantial internal motions, decreasing the accuracy of the method. An attractive alternative approach is to incorporate an unnatural amino acid that binds metal ions at a specific site on the protein using the methods of molecular biology. Here we describe the successful incorporation of the unnatural amino acid 2-amino-3-(8-hydroxyquinolin-3-yl)propanoic acid (HQA) into two different membrane proteins by heterologous expression in E. coli. Fluorescence and NMR experiments demonstrate complete replacement of the natural amino acid with HQA and stable metal chelation by the mutated proteins. Evidence of site-specific intra- and inter-molecular PREs by NMR in micelle solutions sets the stage for the use of HQA incorporation in solid-state NMR structure determinations of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers.

  5. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of membrane proteins by incorporation of the metal-chelating unnatural amino acid 2-amino-3-(8-hydroxyquinolin-3-yl)propanoic acid (HQA)

    The use of paramagnetic constraints in protein NMR is an active area of research because of the benefits of long-range distance measurements (>10 Å). One of the main issues in successful execution is the incorporation of a paramagnetic metal ion into diamagnetic proteins. The most common metal ion tags are relatively long aliphatic chains attached to the side chain of a selected cysteine residue with a chelating group at the end where it can undergo substantial internal motions, decreasing the accuracy of the method. An attractive alternative approach is to incorporate an unnatural amino acid that binds metal ions at a specific site on the protein using the methods of molecular biology. Here we describe the successful incorporation of the unnatural amino acid 2-amino-3-(8-hydroxyquinolin-3-yl)propanoic acid (HQA) into two different membrane proteins by heterologous expression in E. coli. Fluorescence and NMR experiments demonstrate complete replacement of the natural amino acid with HQA and stable metal chelation by the mutated proteins. Evidence of site-specific intra- and inter-molecular PREs by NMR in micelle solutions sets the stage for the use of HQA incorporation in solid-state NMR structure determinations of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

  6. Glycyrrhizic acid alleviates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    Lili eGao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal form of interstitial lung disease that lacks effective therapies at present. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a natural compound extracted from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Glycyrrhiza glabra, was recently reported to benefit lung injury and liver fibrosis in animal models, yet whether GA has a therapeutic effect on pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of GA on pulmonary fibrosis in a rat model with bleomycin (BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The results indicated that GA treatment remarkably ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and attenuated BLM-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and activation of tansforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lungs. Further, we demonstrated that GA treatment inhibited proliferation of 3T6 fibroblast cells, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted apoptosis in vitro, implying that GA-mediated suppression of fibroproliferation may contribute to the anti-fibrotic effect against BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In summary, our study suggests a therapeutic potential of GA in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  8. Metastability exchange optical pumping in {sup 3}He gas up to 30 mT. Efficiency measurements and evidence of laser-induced nuclear relaxation

    Batz, Marion

    2011-07-08

    Advances in metastability exchange optical pumping (MEOP) of {sup 3}He at high laser powers, with its various applications, but also at high gas pressures p{sub 3} and high magnetic field strengths B, have provided strong motivation for revisiting the understanding and for investigating the limitations of this powerful technique. For this purpose, we present systematic experimental and theoretical studies of efficiency and of relaxation mechanisms in B{<=}30 mT and p{sub 3}=0.63-2.45 mbar. {sup 3}He nuclear polarisation is measured by light absorption in longitudinal configuration where weak light beams at 1083 nm parallel to magnetic field and cell axis with opposite circular polarisations are used to probe the distribution of populations in the metastable state. This method is systematically tested to evaluate potential systematic biases and is shown to be reliable for the study of OP dynamics despite the redistribution of populations by OP light. Nuclear polarisation loss associated to the emission of polarised light by the plasma discharge used for MEOP is found to decrease above 10 mT, as expected, due to hyperfine decoupling in highly excited states. However, this does not lead to improved MEOP efficiency at high laser power. We find clear evidence of additional laser-induced relaxation instead. The strong OP-enhanced polarisation losses, currently limiting MEOP performances, are quantitatively investigated using an angular momentum budget approach and a recently developed comprehensive model that describes the combined effects of OP, ME and relaxation, validated by comparison to experimental results.

  9. Protective Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Molecular Behavior Changes of Hemoglobin Induced by Magnetic Field

    Hassan, Nahed S.; Abou Aiad, T. H. M.

    With the use of electricity and industrialization of societies, humans are commonly exposed to static magnetic field induced by electric currents. The putative mechanisms by which Static Magnetic Field (SMF) may affect biological systems is that of increasing free radical life span in organisms. To test this hypothesis, we investigate the effect of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) treatment on the changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin as a result of exposure of the animals to magnetic field in the occupation levels. By measuring the relative permittivity, dielectric loss, relaxation time, conductivity, radius and diffusion coefficient of aqueous solutions of hemoglobin. These measurements were calculated in the frequency range of (100 Hz-100 kHz) to give more information about molecular behavior. Twenty four male albino rats were equally divided into four groups 1, 2, 3 and 4. Animals of group 1, were used as control, animals of group 2, were exposed to (0.2T) magnetic field and that of group 3, 4, were treated with Ascorbic Acid by two doses group 3 (20 mg kg-1 body weight), group 4 (50 mg kg-1 body weight) orally half hour before exposure to magnetic field. The sub chronic exposure expanded (1 h day-1) for 30 consecutive days. The results indicated that exposure of animals to magnetic field resulted in changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin molecule while treatment with ascorbic acid afforded comparatively more significant amelioration in these molecular changes, via decreasing the radical pair interaction of magnetic field with biological molecules.

  10. Radiation induced grafting of acrylic acid onto extruded polystyrene surface

    Polystyrene materials with good solubility in liquid scintillation cocktails are used to wipe off different types of surfaces in order to determine the tritium removable contamination with the help of a liquid scintillation counter. This paper analyses hydrophilic surface modifications by radiation induced grafting of acrylic groups onto extruded polystyrene plates. Two grafting methods were used: (a) exposure of extruded polystyrene plates, immersed in aqueous acrylic acid solution, to a gamma radiation of a Co-60 source, and (b) exposure of extruded polystyrene plates to a Co-60 source, followed by the immersion of extruded polystyrene plates in aqueous acrylic acid solution. The grafting of acrylic was proved by IR spectrometry and by radiometric methods using acrylic acid labelled with tritium. - Highlights: ► Polystyrene (PS) is used to determine the removable surface contamination (RSC). ► RSC factor may be increased by PS surface modification. ► PS surface was modified by acrylic acid grafting using γ radiation 60Co source. ► Acrylic fragments insertion was determined by IR, and radiometric. ► Grafted PS discs increase RSC factor in the case of tritium contamination.

  11. Ursolic acid improves domoic acid-induced cognitive deficits in mice

    Wu, Dong-mei [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Jun, E-mail: lu-jun75@163.com [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Yan-qiu [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zheng, Yuan-lin, E-mail: ylzheng@xznu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Hu, Bin [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Cheng, Wei [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Zi-feng; Li, Meng-qiu [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2013-09-01

    Our previous findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is the mechanism underlying cognitive deficits induced by domoic acid (DA). Ursolic acid (UA), a natural triterpenoid compound, possesses many important biological functions. Evidence shows that UA can activate PI3K/Akt signaling and suppress Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) activity. FoxO1 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function. Here we investigate whether FoxO1 is involved in the oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in DA-treated mice and whether UA inhibits DA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through regulating the PI3K/Akt and FoxO1 signaling pathways. Our results showed that FoxO1 knockdown reversed the mitochondrial abnormalities and cognitive deficits induced by DA in mice through decreasing HO-1 expression. Mechanistically, FoxO1 activation was associated with oxidative stress-induced JNK activation and decrease of Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through promoting Akt phosphorylation and FoxO1 nuclear exclusion in the hippocampus of DA-treated mice. LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling, significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus of DA/UA mice, which weakened UA actions. These results suggest that UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for the prevention and therapy of cognitive deficits in excitotoxic brain disorders. - Highlights: • Ursolic acid (UA) is a naturally triterpenoid compound. • UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits. • Mechanistically, UA activates PI3K/Akt signaling and suppresses FoxO1 activity. • UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for anti-excitotoxic brain disorders.

  12. Ameliorative effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids against palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance in L6 skeletal muscle cells

    Sawada Keisuke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose uptake activity in muscle cells are fundamental events in the development of type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. There is an increasing demand for compounds including drugs and functional foods that can prevent myocellular insulin resistance. Methods In this study, we established a high-throughput assay to screen for compounds that can improve myocellular insulin resistance, which was based on a previously reported non-radioisotope 2-deoxyglucose (2DG uptake assay. Insulin-resistant muscle cells were prepared by treating rat L6 skeletal muscle cells with 750 μM palmitic acid for 14 h. Using the established assay, the impacts of several fatty acids on myocellular insulin resistance were determined. Results In normal L6 cells, treatment with saturated palmitic or stearic acid alone decreased 2DG uptake, whereas unsaturated fatty acids did not. Moreover, co-treatment with oleic acid canceled the palmitic acid-induced decrease in 2DG uptake activity. Using the developed assay with palmitic acid-induced insulin-resistant L6 cells, we determined the effects of other unsaturated fatty acids. We found that arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids improved palmitic acid-decreased 2DG uptake at lower concentrations than the other unsaturated fatty acids, including oleic acid, as 10 μM arachidonic acid showed similar effects to 750 μM oleic acid. Conclusions We have found that polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids prevent palmitic acid-induced myocellular insulin resistance.

  13. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid)

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature (Tg) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units (G(-u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively

  14. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid)

    Kantoglu, O

    2002-01-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature (T sub g) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units (G(-u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  15. mJ mixing and multipole relaxation in 6 2P rubidium atoms induced by He, Ne, and Ar collisions

    Rubidium vapor, contained together with a buffer gas in a quartz cell located in a 4.75-T magnetic field, was irradiated with light from a pulsed dye laser producing selective excitation of each 6 2P Zeeman substate in turn. Collisions of the excited and polarized atoms with the ground-state He, Ne, or Ar atoms and the resulting Zeeman mixing produced a population of the whole Zeeman manifold and resulted in the emission of a Zeeman fluorescence spectrum that was resolved with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer and recorded with a photomultiplier and a multichannel scaler. Measurements of the relative intensities of the fluorescence components in relation to the buffer-gas pressures yielded the absolute (thermally averaged) cross sections for Zeeman mixing and cross sections for relaxation of the atomic multipole moments for collisions with He, Ne, and Ar

  16. Residual Stress Relaxation Induced by Mass Transport Through Interface of the Pd/SrTiO3

    Nazarpour S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metal interconnections having a small cross-section and short length can be subjected to very large mass transport due to the passing of high current densities. As a result, nonlinear diffusion and electromigration effects which may result in device failure and electrical instabilities may be manifested. Various thicknesses of Pd were deposited over SrTiO3 substrate. Residual stress of the deposited film was evaluated by measuring the variation of d-spacing versus sin2ψ through conventional X-ray diffraction method. It has been found that the lattice misfit within film and substrate might be relaxed because of mass transport. Besides, the relation between residual intrinsic stress and oxygen diffusion through deposited film has been expressed. Consequently, appearance of oxide intermediate layer may adjust interfacial characteristics and suppress electrical conductivity by increasing electron scattering through metallic films.

  17. Pattern of Limb Malformations in Mice Induced by Methoxyacetic Acid

    Rasjad, Chairuddin; Yamashita, Keisuke; Datu, Abdul Razak; Yasuda, Mineo

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigated the pattern of limb malformations induced in mice by methoxyacetic acid (MAA), one of di(2-methoxyethyl) phthalate (DMEP) metabolites. Pregnant Jcl:ICR mice were given orally at gestational day (gd) 10.5, 11.0, or 11.5 (vaginal plug = gd 0) a single dose of MAA 10 mmol/kg of body weight. Fetuses were examined at gd 15.5 for external and skeletal malformations. Limb defects were maximum in frequency and severity after administration at gd 11.5. Forelimbs had grea...

  18. Acid-induced changes of brain protein buffering

    Kraig, Richard P.; Wagner, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Excessive cellular acidosis is thought to enhance destruction of brain from ischemia. Protein denaturation may contribute to such injury although the behavior of brain proteins to acidosis is poorly defined. As a first approach to detect acid-induced changes in brain proteins and to characterize buffer content, homogenates were acidified for 20 min (as low as pH 3.1), returned to baseline pH (6.9), and then titrated. Titration curves show a significant (P < 0.0001) and permanent increase in b...

  19. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria.

    Marte S Dragset

    Full Text Available Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance.

  20. Nitric oxide, prostanoid and non-NO, non-prostanoid involvement in acetylcholine relaxation of isolated human small arteries

    Buus, Niels H; Simonsen, Ulf; Pilegaard, Hans K; Mulvany, Michael J

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to clarify to which extent nitric oxide (NO) contributes to acetylcholine (ACh) induced relaxation of human subcutaneous small arteries. Arterial segments were mounted in myographs for recording of isometric tension, NO concentration and smooth muscle membrane potential. In noradrenaline-contracted arteries, ACh induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. The NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) had a small significant effect on the concentration-response curves for ACh, and in the presence of L-NOARG, indomethacin only caused a small additional rightward shift in the ACh relaxation. The NO scavenger, oxyhaemoglobin attenuated relaxations for ACh and for the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). Inhibition of guanylyl cyclase with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), and inhibition of protein kinase G with β-phenyl-1, N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine- 3′, 5′- cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer, slightly attenuated ACh relaxation, but abolished SNAP induced relaxation. ACh induced relaxation without increases in the free NO concentration. In contrast, for equivalent relaxation, SNAP increased the NO concentration 32±8 nM. ACh hyperpolarized the arterial smooth muscle cells with 11.4±1.3 mV and 10.5±1.3 mV in the absence and presence of L-NOARG, respectively. SNAP only elicited a hyperpolarization of 1.6±0.9 mV. In the presence of indomethacin and L-NOARG, ACh relaxation was almost unaffected by lipoxygenase inhibition with nordihydroguaiaretic acid, or cytochrome P450 inhibition with 17-octadecynoic acid or econazole. ACh relaxation was strongly reduced by the combination of charybdotoxin and apamin, but small increments in the extracellular potassium concentration induced no relaxations. The study demonstrates that the NO/L-arginine pathway is present in human subcutaneous small arteries and to a limited extent is involved in ACh induced relaxation. The study also suggests a

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated acid protects against indomethacin-induced gastric injury.

    Pineda-Peña, Elizabeth Arlen; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Chávez-Piña, Aracely Evangelina

    2012-12-15

    Previous studies have shown gastroprotective effect of fish oil in several experimental models. However, the mechanisms and active compounds underlying this effect are not fully understood. Fish oil has several components; among them, one of the most studied is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is an omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid. The aim of this study was to examine the gastroprotective effect of DHA as a pure compound in a rat model of indomethacin-induced gastric injury as well as elucidate some of the mechanism(s) behind DHA's gastroprotective effect. Indomethacin was orally administered to induce an acute gastric injury (3, 10 and 30mg/kg). Omeprazol (a proton pump inhibitor, 30mg/kg, p.o.) and DHA (3, 10, 30mg/kg, p.o.) were gavaged 30 and 120min, respectively, before indomethacin insult (30mg/kg p.o.). Three hours after indomethacin administration, rats were sacrificed, gastric injury was evaluated by determining the total damaged area. A sample of gastric tissue was harvested and processed to quantify prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Indomethacin produced gastric injury in dose-dependent manner. DHA protected against indomethacin-induced gastric damage, and this effect was comparable with omeprazol's gastroprotective effect. DHA did not reverse the indomethacin-induced reduction of PGE(2) gastric levels. In contrast, DHA partially prevented the indomethacin-induced increase in LTB(4) gastric levels. This is the first report demonstrating DHA's gastroprotective effect as a pure compound. Furthermore, the results reveal that the gastroprotective effect is mediated by a decrease in gastric LTB(4) levels in indomethacin-induced gastric damage. PMID:23063544

  2. Co-culture-inducible bacteriocin production in lactic acid bacteria.

    Chanos, Panagiotis; Mygind, Tina

    2016-05-01

    It is common knowledge that microorganisms have capabilities, like the production of antimicrobial compounds, which do not normally appear in ideal laboratory conditions. Common antimicrobial discovery techniques require the isolation of monocultures and their individual screening against target microorganisms. One strategy to achieve expression of otherwise hidden antimicrobials is induction by co-cultures. In the area of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria, there has been some research focusing into the characteristics of co-culture-inducible bacteriocin production and particularly the molecular mechanism(s) of such interactions. No clear relationship has been seen between bacteriocin-inducing and bacteriocin-producing microorganisms. The three-component regulatory system seems to be playing a central role in the induction, but inducing compounds have not been identified or characterized. However, the presence of the universal messenger molecule autoinducer-2 has been associated in some cases with the co-culture-inducible bacteriocin phenotype and it may play the role in the additional regulation of the three-component regulatory system. Understanding the mechanisms of induction would facilitate the development of strategies for screening and development of co-culture bacteriocin-producing systems and novel products as well as the perseverance of such systems in food and down to the intestinal tract, possibly conferring a probiotic effect on the host. PMID:27037694

  3. Perflurooctanoic acid induces developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryos and hatchlings

    Highlights: ► PFOA exposure thinned right ventricular wall thickness in D19 chicken embryo hearts. ► PFOA exposure induced left ventricle hypertrophy in hearts of hatchling chickens. ► PFOA exposure induced altered cardiac function in hatchling chickens. -- Abstract: Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα). As the cardiovascular system is crucial for embryonic survival, PFOA-induced effects on the heart may partially explain embryonic mortality. To assess impacts of PFOA exposure on the developing heart in an avian model, we used histopathology and immunohistochemical staining for myosin to assess morphological alterations in 19-day-old chicken embryo hearts after PFOA exposure. Additionally, echocardiography and cardiac myofibril ATPase activity assays were used to assess functional alterations in 1-day-old hatchling chickens following developmental PFOA exposure. Overall thinning and thinning of a dense layer of myosin in the right ventricular wall were observed in PFOA-exposed chicken embryo hearts. Alteration of multiple cardiac structural and functional parameters, including left ventricular wall thickness, left ventricular volume, heart rate, stroke volume, and ejection fraction were detected with echocardiography in the exposed hatchling chickens. Assessment of ATPase activity indicated that the ratio of cardiac myofibril calcium-independent ATPase activity to calcium-dependent ATPase activity was not affected, which suggests that developmental PFOA exposure may not affect cardiac energetics. In summary, structural and functional characteristics of the heart appear to be developmental targets of PFOA, possibly at the level of cardiomyocytes. Additional studies will

  4. Induced resistance by cresotic acid (3-hydroxy-4-methyl methylbenzoic acid) against wilt disease of melon and cotton

    Cresotic acid (3-hydroxy-4-methylbenzoic acid) was proved be active in controlling wilt diseases of melon and cotton plants grown in the house. Soil drench with 200-1000 ppm cresotic acid induced 62-77 %, 69-79 % and 50-60 % protection against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp melonis (FOM) in melon, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) and Verticillium dahliae in cotton, respectively. Since no inhibitory effect of cresotic acid on mycelial growth of these three fungual pathogens was observed in vitro, it is suggested that control of these wilt diseases with cresotic acid resulted from induced resistance. Cresotic acid induced resistance in melon plants not only against race 0, race 1, race 2 and race 1,2, but also against a mixture of these four races of FOM, suggesting a non-race- specific resistance. Level of induced resistance by cresotic acid against FOM depended on inoculum pressure applied to melon plants. At 25 day after inoculation with FOM, percentage protection induced by cresotic acid under low inoculum pressure retained a level of 51 %, while under high inoculum pressure percentage protection decreased to only 10 %. High concentrations of cresotic acid significantly reduced plant growth. Reduction in fresh weight of melon (36-51%) and cotton (42-71%) was obtained with 500-1000 ppm cresotic acid, while only less than 8% reduction occurred with 100-200 ppm. (author)

  5. The Effect of Opsteoporotic Model Rats Induced by Retinoic Acid

    Xu Peng; Yao Jianfeng; Jin Weizhang; Cai Qiankun; Guo Xiong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of retinoic acid on inducing osteoporosis in female rat. Methods: 48SD female rats were divided randomly into experiment group and control group. Retinoic acid was administered orally to experiment group with 80mg.kg-1d-1 for 15 days. Then the rats were sacrificed on the 0th, 30th, 60th days after last administration. The serum concentration of Ca, P, BGP, E2, AKP and TRAP were detected. Components of collagen and proteoglycan in the bones and BMD were also assayed .The femoral morphometric change and epiphyseal plate cartilage histological changes were observed. Results: After a 15-day period treatment with retinoic acid, charateristics of experiment group were compared with control, it is shown that the concentration of serum E2 and BGP declined, the activity of AKP and TRAP increased while BMP decreased, the bone mass of both spongy bone and cortical bone reduced, the number of spongy bone osteoclasts and their activity increased, number of epiphyseal plate chondrocyte reduced, cartilage hypertrophic zone displayed dyscalcification, and no difference of other markers was found in the two groups. On the 30th day after the last administration, the experiment group appeared a declined number of cancellous bone osteoclast and level of serum AKP yet they were still higher than control. Number of epiphyseal chondrocyte, serum BGP and tibial BMD, though higher than before, were still lower than control. Other markers were no difference. On the 60th day after treatment, although the femoral cancellous bone mass was still less and cancellous osteoblast was more than control, the cortical bone mass, cancellous osteoclast number and level of serum Ca and P were all remained no different between two groups.Conclusion: Retinoic acid possessed a better short-term effect than long-term effect. Cancellous bone loss lasted much longer than cortical bone and more obviously; the bone matrix in this osteoporosis model was able to repair itself

  6. Relaxation of Blazar Induced Pair Beams in Cosmic Voids: Measurement of Magnetic Field in Voids and Thermal History of the IGM

    Miniati, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The stability properties of a low density ultra relativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could affect considerably the thermal history of the intergalactic medium and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the shower properties, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the beam, as a function of distance from the blazar. We find that the fastest growing modes, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, requires a kinetic treatment. Combined with the effect of non-linear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found typically longer than a Hubble time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce severe loss of ...

  7. Photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer and intramolecular vibrational relaxation of rhodamine 6G in DMSO revealed by multiplex transient grating spectroscopy

    Photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer (PIET) and intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) dynamics of the excited state of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G+) in DMSO are investigated by multiplex transient grating. Two major components are resolved in the dynamics of Rh6G+. The first component, with a lifetime τPIET = 140 fs–260 fs, is attributed to PIET from the phenyl ring to the xanthene plane. The IVR process occurring in the range τIVR = 3.3 ps–5.2 ps is much slower than the first component. The PIET and IVR processes occurring in the excited state of Rh6G+ are quantitatively determined, and a better understanding of the relationship between these processes is obtained. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Relaxation and interaction of electronic excitations induced by intense ultra short light pulses in BaF2 scintillator

    Kirm, M.; Nagirnyi, V.; Vielhauer, S.; Feldbach, E.

    2011-06-01

    Excitation density effects have a pronounced influence on relaxation processes in solids. They come into play in scintillating and dosimetric materials exposed to ionizing radiation or in laser materials operating in intense ultraviolet light fields. The scientific understanding of the underlying process is poor, mainly because most of the studies of light emitting materials under short wavelength excitation have been performed at weak and moderate excitation intensities due to limited availability of powerful light sources. Disembodied data on excitation density effects have been reported for wide-gap dielectrics studied by luminescence spectroscopy, by using such excitation sources as powerful ion beams,1,2pulsed electron beams,2,3 and wide-band hard X-ray synchrotron radiation.4 It is obvious that such non-selective excitation is a good tool for revealing density-related phenomena in these materials in general, but for investigating specific features of relaxation processes in insulators, light sources with well defined parameters are necessary. Since the shortwavelength free electron laser (FEL) technology has been devised by an international consortium at HASYLAB of DESY, resulting in the development of TESLA Test facility (TTF)5 and later in the construction of a dedicated FEL source FLASH in Hamburg,6 more advanced studies became possible. The range of interests towards this light source covers the fields from material science and various other branches of physics to structural biology. The pioneering luminescence study revealed excitation density effects in the decay of Ce3+ 5d-4f luminescence in Y3Al5O12 crystals and luminescence of BaF2 crystals in UV-visible range.7 These results motivated systematic investigations of excitation density effects in wide gap crystals using FEL8,9 and high-harmonic-generated VUV radiation,10 and, at lower energies, femtosecond laser pulses in the UV.11,12 The main goal of the present work is to analyze the same phenomenon

  9. The radiation-induced degradation of hyaluronic acid

    Free-radical-induced chain scission in hyaluronic acid in aqueous solution has been studied using pulse radiolysis. In the absence of oxygen (nitrous oxide-saturated solutions) the process of chain breakage was monitored by measuring changes in conductivity resulting from the release of condensed counter-ions (K+), originally located in the vicinity of the break. The rate of formation of breaks was found to be first order and was catalysed by acid and base. More than two independent reaction pathways are involved in the cleavage processes. In the presence of oxygen (N2O/O2), chain scission has been measured by pulse radiolysis monitoring changes in scattered light intensity as well as following conductivity changes. In oxygenated solutions, the kinetics of OH-radical-induced chain scission were found to contain a second-order component; the rate of breakage was base catalysed. Yield-dose plots for chain breaks (N2O/O2, pulse-irradiated), showed a marked dependence on pH. Steady-state radiolysis (N2O/O2) was used to determine G-values for oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide formation and peroxide formation. (author)

  10. Retinoic Acid-Induced Epidermal Transdifferentiation in Skin

    Yoshihiro Akimoto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoids function as important regulatory signaling molecules during development, acting in cellular growth and differentiation both during embryogenesis and in the adult animal. In 1953, Fell and Mellanby first found that excess vitamin A can induce transdifferentiation of chick embryonic epidermis to a mucous epithelium (Fell, H.B.; Mellanby, E. Metaplasia produced in cultures of chick ectoderm by high vitamin A. J. Physiol. 1953, 119, 470–488. However, the molecular mechanism of this transdifferentiation process was unknown for a long time. Recent studies demonstrated that Gbx1, a divergent homeobox gene, is one of the target genes of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA for this transdifferentiation. Furthermore, it was found that ATRA can induce the epidermal transdifferentiation into a mucosal epithelium in mammalian embryonic skin, as well as in chick embryonic skin. In the mammalian embryonic skin, the co-expression of Tgm2 and Gbx1 in the epidermis and an increase in TGF-β2 expression elicited by ATRA in the dermis are required for the mucosal transdifferentiation, which occurs through epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. Not only does retinoic acid (RA play an important role in mucosal transdifferentiation, periderm desquamation, and barrier formation in the developing mammalian skin, but it is also involved in hair follicle downgrowth and bending by its effect on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and on members of the Runx, Fox, and Sox transcription factor families.

  11. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels. PMID:26571019

  12. Radiation-induced electron migration in nucleic acids

    Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to non-random types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Radiation-induced electron migration in nucleic acids has been examined using oligonucleotides containing 5-bromouracil (5-BrU). Interaction of 5-BrU with solvated electrons results in release of bromide ions and formation of uracil-5-yl radicals. Monitoring either bromide ion release or uracil formation provides an opportunity to study electron migration processes in model nucleic acid systems. Using this approach we have discovered that electron migration along oligonucleotides is significantly influenced by the base sequence and strandedness. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution, which compares with mean migration distances of 6-10 bp for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 bp for E. coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5' to 3' direction along a double-stranded oligonucleotide containing a region of purine bases adjacent to the 5-BrU moiety. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation. (Author)

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid induce changes in the physical properties of a lipid bilayer model membrane.

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Morishita, Mariko; Chiba, Yoshiyuki; Tokiwa, Shinji; Takayama, Kozo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA, 18:0), oleic acid (OA, 18:1), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) on a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer by determining the phase transition temperature, fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), and detergent insolubility. Treatment with unsaturated fatty acid broadened and shifted the phase transitions of the DPPC bilayer to a lower temperature. The phase transition temperature and the value of fluorescence anisotropy of DPH at 37 degrees C decreased progressively with increasing treatment amounts of unsaturated fatty acid. A large amount of the DPPC bilayer treated with unsaturated fatty acid was dissolved in Triton X-100, obtaining a low level of detergent insolubility. These modifications of the bilayer physical properties were most pronounced with DHA and EPA treatment. These data show that unsaturated fatty acids, particularly DHA and EPA, induce a marked change in the lipid bilayer structure. The composition of fatty acids in the DPPC bilayer was similar after treatment with various unsaturated fatty acids, suggesting that the different actions of unsaturated fatty acids are attributed to change in the molecular structure (e.g., kinked conformation by double bonds). We further explored the change in physical properties induced by fatty acids dispersed in a water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion and found that unsaturated fatty acids acted efficiently on the DPPC bilayer, even when incorporated in emulsion form. PMID:16394552

  14. Variable involvement of the perivascular retinal tissue in carbonic anhydrase inhibitor induced relaxation of porcine retinal arterioles in vitro

    Kehler, Anne Katrine; Holmgaard, Kim; Hessellund, Anders;

    2007-01-01

    in a myograph. After precontraction with the prostaglandin analogue U46619, the vasorelaxing effect of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors methyl bromopyruvate, ethyl bromopyruvate, acetazolamide, and dorzolamide were studied. RESULTS: All the examined carbonic anhydrase inhibitors induced a...

  15. The PPARbeta/delta agonist GW0742 relaxes pulmonary vessels and limits right heart hypertrophy in rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Louise S Harrington

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary vascular diseases are increasingly recognised as important clinical conditions. Pulmonary hypertension associated with a range of aetiologies is difficult to treat and associated with progressive morbidity and mortality. Current therapies for pulmonary hypertension include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, or prostacyclin mimetics. However, none of these provide a cure and the clinical benefits of these drugs individually decline over time. There is, therefore, an urgent need to identify new treatment strategies for pulmonary hypertension. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the PPARbeta/delta agonist GW0742 induces vasorelaxation in systemic and pulmonary vessels. Using tissue from genetically modified mice, we show that the dilator effects of GW0742 are independent of the target receptor PPARbeta/delta or cell surface prostacyclin (IP receptors. In aortic tissue, vascular relaxant effects of GW0742 were not associated with increases in cGMP, cAMP or hyperpolarisation, but were attributed to inhibition of RhoA activity. In a rat model of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, daily oral dosing of animals with GW0742 (30 mg/kg for 3 weeks significantly reduced the associated right heart hypertrophy and right ventricular systolic pressure. GW0742 had no effect on vascular remodelling induced by hypoxia in this model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations are the first to show a therapeutic benefit of 'PPARbeta/delta' agonists in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension and provide pre-clinical evidence to favour clinical trials in man.

  16. Inflammatory cells′ role in acetic acid-induced colitis

    Mohammad H Sanei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free radicals are the known mechanisms responsible for inducing colitis with two origins: Inflammatory cells and tissues. Only the inflammatory cells can be controlled by corticosteroids. Our aim was to assess the importance of neutrophils as one of the inflammatory cells in inducing colitis and to evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six mice were divided into six groups of six mice each. Colitis was induced in three groups by exposing them to acetic acid through enema (group 1, ex vivo (group 3, and enema after immune suppression (group 5. Each group had one control group that was exposed to water injection instead of acetic acid. Tissue samples were evaluated and compared based on macroscopic damages and biochemical and pathological results. Results: Considering neutrophilic infiltration, there were significant differences between groups 1, 3, 5, and the control of group 1. Groups 3, 5, and their controls, and group 1 and the control of group 3 had significant differences in terms of goblet depletion. Based on tissue originated H 2 O 2 , we found significant differences between group 1 and its control and group 3, and also between groups 5 and the control of group 3. All the three groups were significantly different from their controls based on Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP and such differences were also seen between group 1 with two other groups. Conclusion: Neutrophils may not be the only cause of oxidation process in colitis, and also makes the effectiveness of corticosteroids in the treatment of this disease doubtful.

  17. Dihydrolipoic Acid Induces Cytotoxicity in Mouse Blastocysts through Apoptosis Processes

    Wen-Hsiung Chan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available α-Lipoic acid (LA is a thiol with antioxidant properties that protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. LA is absorbed from the diet, taken up by cells and tissues, and subsequently reduced to dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA. In view of the recent application of DHLA as a hydrophilic nanomaterial preparation, determination of its biosafety profile is essential. In the current study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of DHLA on mouse embryos at the blastocyst stage, subsequent embryonic attachment and outgrowth in vitro, in vivo implantation by embryo transfer, and early embryonic development in an animal model. Blastocysts treated with 50 μM DHLA exhibited significantly increased apoptosis and a corresponding decrease in total cell number. Notably, the implantation success rates of blastocysts pretreated with DHLA were lower than that of their control counterparts. Moreover, in vitro treatment with 50 μM DHLA was associated with increased resorption of post-implantation embryos and decreased fetal weight. Data obtained using an in vivo mouse model further disclosed that consumption of drinking water containing 100 μM DHLA led to decreased early embryo development, specifically, inhibition of development to the blastocyst stage. However, it appears that concentrations of DHLA lower than 50 μM do not exert a hazardous effect on embryonic development. Our results collectively indicate that in vitro and in vivo exposure to concentrations of DHLA higher than 50 μM DHLA induces apoptosis and retards early pre- and post-implantation development, and support the potential of DHLA to induce embryonic cytotoxicity.

  18. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity.

    Esther M Verhaag

    Full Text Available Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis.To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions.HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1-50 μM of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h, menadione (50 μM, 6 h or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h. Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11 and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed.Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  19. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions. Methods HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h) with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1–50 μM) of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h), menadione (50 μM, 6 h) or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h). Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11) and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed. Results Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauro)ursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  20. 3D chiral and 2D achiral cobalt(ii) compounds constructed from a 4-(benzimidazole-1-yl)benzoic ligand exhibiting field-induced single-ion-magnet-type slow magnetic relaxation.

    Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Lin; Liu, Cai-Ming; Du, Zi-Yi; Chen, Li-Li; Liu, Qing-Yan

    2016-05-01

    Organizing magnetically isolated 3d transition metal ions, which behave as single-ion magnet (SIM) units, in a coordination network is a promising approach to design novel single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Herein 3D chiral and 2D achiral cobalt(ii) coordination compounds based on single metal nodes with a 4-(benzimidazole-1-yl)benzoic acid (Hbmzbc) ligand, namely, [Co(bmzbc)2(1,2-etdio)]n () (1,2-etdio = 1,2-ethanediol) and [Co(bmzbc)2(Hbmzbc)]n (), have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The 3D chiral structure with 2-fold interpenetrating qtz topological nets consisting of totally achiral components was obtained via spontaneous resolution, while the achiral structure is a 2D (4,4) net. In both structures, individual cobalt(ii) ions are spatially well separated by the long organic ligands in the well-defined networks. Magnetic measurements on and showed field-induced slow magnetic relaxation resulting from single-ion anisotropy of the individual Co(ii) ions. Analysis of the dynamic ac susceptibilities with the Arrhenius law afforded an anisotropy energy barrier of 16.8(3) and 31.3(2) K under a 2 kOe static magnetic field for and , respectively. The distinct coordination environments of the Co(ii) ions in and lead to the different anisotropic energy barriers. PMID:27054774

  1. Retinoic acid-induced gene expression in normal and leukemic myeloid cells

    1986-01-01

    Retinoic acid has been shown to induce large accumulations of tissue transglutaminase in cultured myeloid cells. Addition of retinoic acid to mouse resident peritoneal macrophages increased the level of tissue transglutaminase mRNA within 30-60 min. Retinoic acid also increased tissue transglutaminase mRNA levels in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL- 60) cells. These studies show that retinoic acid can induce acute alterations in specific gene expression in both normal and leukemic myeloid cells.

  2. The radiation-induced degradation of hyaluronic acid

    Deeble, D. J.; Phillips, G. O.; Bothe, E.; Schuchmann, H.-P.; von Sonntag, C.

    Free-radical-induced chain scission in hyaluronic acid in aqueous solution has been studied using pulse radiolysis. In the absence of oxygen (nitrous oxide-saturated solutions) the process of chain breakage was monitored by measuring changes in conductivity resulting from the release of condensed counter-ions (K +), originally located in the vicinity of the break. The rate of formation of breaks was found to be first order and was catalysed by acid and base (overall half-lives at pH values of 4.8, 7 and 10.2 were 0.6, 1 and 0.1 ms). It would seem that more than two independent reaction pathways are involved in the cleavage processes. In the presence of oxygen (N 2O/O 2), chain scission has been measured by pulse radiolysis monitoring changes in scattered light intensity as well as following conductivity changes. In oxygenated solutions, the kinetics of OH-radical-induced chain scission were found to contain a second-order component; the rate of breakage was base catalysed. Yield-dose plots for chain breaks (N 2O/O 2, pulse-irradiated), showed a marked dependence on pH, with G-values (molecules/100 eV) of 0.7, 2.5 and 4.7 at pH values of 7, 9.7 and 10.4, respectively. Steady-state radiolysis (N 2O/O 2) was used to determine G-values for oxygen consumption [ G(-O 2) ≈ 6], carbon dioxide formation [ G(CO 2) = 0.8 in the absence of O 2 and 1.3 in its presence] and peroxide formation [ G(H 2O 2) ≈ 2; G(organic hydroperoxide) < 0.15].

  3. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  4. Role of calcium-activated potassium currents in CNP-induced relaxation of gastric antral circular smooth muscle in guinea pigs

    Hui-Shu Guo; Zheng-Xu Cai; Hai-Feng Zheng; Xiang-Lan Li; Yi-Feng Cui; Zuo-Yu Wang; Wen-Xie Xu; Sang-Jin Lee; Young-Chul Kim

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ion channel mechanism in CNP-induced relaxation of gastric circular smooth muscle in guinea pigs.METHODS: Spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle was recorded by a four -channel physiograph. The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record calciumactivated potassium currents and membrane potential in the gastric myocytes isolated by collagenase.RESULTS: C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) markedly inhibited the spontaneous contraction in a dose-dependent manner in gastric circular smooth muscle in guinea pigs.Ly83583, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, weakened CNPinduced inhibition on spontaneous contraction but Zaparinast, an inhibitor of cGMP sensitive phosphoesterase,potentiated CNP-induced inhibition in gastric circular smooth muscles. The inhibitory effects of CNP on spontaneous contraction were blocked by tetrathylammonium (TEA), a nonselective potassium channel blocker. CNP hyperpolarized membrane potential from -60.0 mV±2.0 mV to -68.3 meV±3.0 mV in a single gastric myocyte. CNP increased calcium-activated potassium currents (Ik(ca)) in a dose-dependent manner in gastric circular myocytes. CNP also increased the spontaneously transient outward currents (STOCs). Ly83583 partly blocked CNP-induced increase of calcium-activated potassium currents, but Zaparinast potented the effect.CONCLUSION: CNP inhibits spontaneous contraction, and potassium channel may be involved in the process in gastric circular smooth musde of guinea pigs. CNP-induced increase of Ik(ca) is mediated by a cGMP dependent pathway.

  5. Aminomethylphosphonic Acid and Methoxyacetic Acid Induce Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Keshab R. Parajuli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA and its parent compound herbicide glyphosate are analogs to glycine, which have been reported to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells, but not normal cells. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA is the active metabolite of ester phthalates widely used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer; its exposure is associated with developmental and reproductive toxicities in both rodents and humans. MAA has been reported to suppress prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether AMPA and MAA can inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, we found that AMPA and MAA inhibited cell growth in prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3 and DU-145 through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Importantly, the AMPA-induced apoptosis was potentiated with the addition of MAA, which was due to downregulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3. These results demonstrate that the combination of AMPA and MAA can promote the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells, suggesting that they can be used as potential therapeutic drugs in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Fresh green tea and gallic acid ameliorate oxidative stress in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Jeng, Kee-Ching G; Yao, Pei-Wun; Chuang, Lu-Te; Kuo, Su-Ling; Hou, Chien-Wei

    2012-03-01

    Green tea is one of the most-consumed beverages due to its taste and antioxidative polyphenols. However, the protective effects of green tea and its constituent, gallic acid (GA), against kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure have not been studied. We investigated the effect of fresh green tea leaf (GTL) and GA on KA-induced neuronal injury in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that GTL and GA reduced the maximal seizure classes, predominant behavioral seizure patterns, and lipid peroxidation in male FVB mice with status epilepticus (SE). GTL extract and GA provided effective protection against KA-stressed PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the protective mechanism study, GTL and GA decreased Ca(2+) release, ROS, and lipid peroxidation from KA-stressed PC12 cells. Western blot results revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), RhoA, and COX-2 expression were increased in PC12 cells under KA stress, and expression of COX-2 and p38 MAPK, but not RhoA, was significantly reduced by GTL and GA. Furthermore, GTL and GA were able to reduce PGE(2) production from KA-stressed PC12 cells. Taken together, the results showed that GTL and GA provided neuroprotective effects against excitotoxins and may have a clinical application in epilepsy. PMID:22324774

  7. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products. PMID:25300299

  8. Analysis of Salicylic Acid Induced Proteins in Rice

    1999-01-01

    An analysis using SDS-PAGE of acidic and basic protein fractions extracted from rice seedling treated with salicylic acid (SA) yielded several new proteins, some of which are similar in relative molecular mass to PR-1a,c, PR-2, 2e and PR-3d, 3e of tobacco.Direct assays for peroxidases and β-1,3-glucanases demonstrated that the activities of the two enzymes in the rice seedlings increased rapidly with time after SA treatment, reaching a maximum 6 days after treatment.Disease resistance tests showed that SA treated rice seedlings stunted the development of blight lesions and displayed higher resistance to rice blight pathogen (Xanthomonas oryzea pv.oryzea).The data suggest that the treatment with SA, even for plants with high endogenous SA levels such as rice, may induce the appearance of new proteins and the formation of disease resistance.The results contribute to the analysis of the SA role in rice systemic acquired resistance.

  9. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Ceftazidime

    Devbhuti P*,1

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation is the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids which is a free radical related process and responsible for thedevelopment of many diseases and disorders like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cancer etc. End products of lipid peroxidation aremalondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, etc. which are the ultimate mediator of toxicity. Antioxidants have the capability toinhibit lipid peroxidation. Keeping in mind this fact, the present in vitro study was carried out to evaluate lipid peroxidation induction potential of ceftazidime, a cephalosporin antibiotic and its suppression with ascorbic acid considering some laboratory markers of lipid peroxidation like MDA, 4-HNE and reduced glutathione (GSH. Goat liver was used as the lipid source. After treatment of the liver homogenate with drug and/or antioxidant the levels of 4-HNE, MDA and GSH were estimated in different samples at different hours of incubation. The results showed that the drug ceftazidime could significantly induce lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant ascorbic acid has the capability to inhibit ceftazidime-inducedlipid peroxidation.

  10. Iron transformations induced by an acid-tolerant Desulfosporosinus species.

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J; Senko, John M

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) and Fe(III). In medium containing Fe predominately in the +II oxidation state, ferrimagnetic, single-domain greigite (Fe₃S₄) was formed, but the addition of Fe(III) inhibited greigite formation. In media that contained abundant Fe(III) [as schwertmannite; Fe₈O₈(OH)₆SO₄ · nH₂O], the activities of strain GBSRB4.2 enhanced the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (α-FeOOH), due to the increased pH and Fe(II) concentrations that resulted from the activities of GBSRB4.2. PMID:22038606

  11. An immunosensor based on magnetic relaxation switch and polystyrene microparticle-induced immune multivalency enrichment system for the detection of Pantoea stewartii subsp. Stewartii.

    Chen, Yi ping; Zou, Ming qiang; Wang, Da ning; Li, Yong liang; Xue, Qiang; Xie, Meng xia; Qi, Cai

    2013-05-15

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple immunosensor has been developed for the detection of Pantoea stewartii subsp. Stewartii (Pss). This immunosensor combines magnetic relaxation switch (MRS) assay with polystyrene microparticle-induced immune multivalency enrichment system. Comparing to conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the immunosensor developed in this study provides higher sensitivity and requires less analysis time. The detection limit of Pss obtained by immunosensor was determined to be 10(3)cfu/mL, 50 times lower than that by ELISA (5×10(4)cfu/mL), while the analysis time required by immunosensor is 30min much shorter than that by ELISA. The average recoveries studied with Pss at various spiking levels ranged from 85.5% to 93.4% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) below 6.0%. No cross-reaction with the other five strains was found, demonstrating a good specificity of Pss detection. The results showed that the MRS immunosensor combined with PS-induced immune multivalency enhancement system is a promising platform for the determination of large biological molecules due to its high sensitivity, specificity, homogeneity, and speed. PMID:23274190

  12. Temperature Induced Aggregation and Clouding in Humic Acid Solutions

    Leah Shaffer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids in aqueous solution demonstrate inverse temperature-solubility relationships when solution conditions are manipulated to reduce coulombic repulsion among the humic polyanions. These effects were followed by dynamic light scattering (DLS measurements of the resulting aggregates, as well as the addition of a polarity sensitive fluorescent probe (pyrene. The humic solutions could be primed for temperature induced clouding by carefully lowering the pH to a point where hydration effects became dominant. The exact value of the cloud point (CP was a function of both pH and humate concentration. The CPs mostly lay in the range 50–90°C, but DLS showed that temperature induced aggregation proceeded from approximately 30°C onward. Similar effects could be achieved by adding multivalent cations at concentrations below those which cause spontaneous precipitation. The declouding of clouded humate solutions could be affected by lowering the temperature combined with mechanical agitation to disentangle the humic polymers.

  13. Hyaluronic acid induces activation of the κ-opioid receptor.

    Barbara Zavan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nociceptive pain is one of the most common types of pain that originates from an injury involving nociceptors. Approximately 60% of the knee joint innervations are classified as nociceptive. The specific biological mechanism underlying the regulation of nociceptors is relevant for the treatment of symptoms affecting the knee joint. Intra-articular administration of exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA appears to be particularly effective in reducing pain and improving patient function. METHODS: We performed an in vitro study conducted in CHO cells that expressed a panel of opioid receptors and in primary rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons to determine if HA induces the activation of opioid peptide receptors (OPr using both aequorin and the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM. RESULTS: Selective agonists and antagonists for each OPr expressed on CHO cells were used to test the efficacy of our in vitro model followed by stimulation with HA. The results showed that HA induces stimulatory effects on the κ receptor (KOP. These effects of HA were also confirmed in rat DRG neurons, which express endogenously the OPr. CONCLUSIONS: HA activates the KOP receptor in a concentration dependent manner, with a pEC(50 value of 7.57.

  14. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-01-01

    P < 0.001; 11.7% at 90° P < 0.01; 5.6% at 70° nonsignificant (ns); 1.3% at 50° ns; -3.7% at 30° ns. CRS: P < 0.001; stretching × angle P < 0.001; 17.7% at 90°, 13.4% at 70°, 11.4% at 50°, all P < 0.01, 4.3% at 30° ns]. The overall stretch-induced strength loss was greater (P = 0.015) after CRS (11...

  15. The Role of Fatty Acids and Caveolin-1 in TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Cell Activation

    Wang, Lei; Lim, Eun-Jin; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia and associated high circulating free fatty acids are important risk factors of atherosclerosis. In contrast to omega-3 fatty acids, linoleic acid, the major omega-6 unsaturated fatty acid in the American diet, may be atherogenic by amplifying an endothelial inflammatory response. We hypothesize that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids can differentially modulate TNF-α-induced endothelial cell activation and that functional plasma membrane microdomains called caveolae are requ...

  16. Punicic acid a conjugated linolenic acid inhibits TNFalpha-induced neutrophil hyperactivation and protects from experimental colon inflammation in rats.

    Tarek Boussetta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of ROS produced by NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO. The proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha primes ROS production through phosphorylation of the NADPH-oxidase subunit p47phox on Ser345. Conventional anti-inflammatory therapies remain partially successful and may have side effects. Therefore, regulation of neutrophil activation by natural dietary components represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of punicic acid, a conjugated linolenic fatty acid from pomegranate seed oil on TNFalpha-induced neutrophil hyperactivation in vitro and on colon inflammation in vivo. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the effect of punicic acid on TNFalpha-induced neutrophil upregulation of ROS production in vitro and on TNBS-induced rat colon inflammation. Results show that punicic acid inhibited TNFalpha-induced priming of ROS production in vitro while preserving formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced response. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of Ser345-p47phox phosphorylation and upstream kinase p38MAPK. Punicic acid also inhibited fMLP- and TNFalpha+fMLP-induced MPO extracellular release from neutrophils. In vivo experiments showed that punicic acid and pomegranate seed oil intake decreased neutrophil-activation and ROS/MPO-mediated tissue damage as measured by F2-isoprostane release and protected rats from TNBS-induced colon inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data show that punicic acid exerts a potent anti-inflammatory effect through inhibition of TNFalpha-induced priming of NADPH oxidase by targeting the p38MAPKinase/Ser345-p47phox-axis and MPO release. This natural dietary compound may provide a novel alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  17. Resistance to ursodeoxycholic acid-induced growth arrest can also result in resistance to deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis and increased tumorgenicity

    There is a large body of evidence which suggests that bile acids increase the risk of colon cancer and act as tumor promoters, however, the mechanism(s) of bile acids mediated tumorigenesis is not clear. Previously we showed that deoxycholic acid (DCA), a tumorogenic bile acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a putative chemopreventive agent, exhibited distinct biological effects, yet appeared to act on some of the same signaling molecules. The present study was carried out to determine whether there is overlap in signaling pathways activated by tumorogenic bile acid DCA and chemopreventive bile acid UDCA. To determine whether there was an overlap in activation of signaling pathways by DCA and UDCA, we mutagenized HCT116 cells and then isolated cell lines resistant to UDCA induced growth arrest. These lines were then tested for their response to DCA induced apoptosis. We found that a majority of the cell lines resistant to UDCA-induced growth arrest were also resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis, implying an overlap in DCA and UDCA mediated signaling. Moreover, the cell lines which were the most resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis also exhibited a greater capacity for anchorage independent growth. We conclude that UDCA and DCA have overlapping signaling activities and that disregulation of these pathways can lead to a more advanced neoplastic phenotype

  18. C-type natriuretic-peptide-potentiated relaxation response of gastric smooth muscle in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Ying-Lan Cai; Dong-Yuan Xu; Xiang-Lan Li; Zhang-Xun Qiu; Zheng Jin; Wen-Xie Xu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the sensitivity of gastric smooth muscle to C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. METHODS: The spontaneous contraction of a gastric smooth muscle strip was recorded by using physiological methods in rats. The expressions of CNP and natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B) in gastric tissue were examined by using immunohistochemistry techniques in the diabetic rat. RESULTS: At 4 wk after injection of STZ and vehicle, the frequency of spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle was significantly reduced in diabetic rats, and the frequency was decreased from 3.10 ± 0.14 cycle/min in controls to 2.23 ± 0.13 cycle/min ( n = 8, P < 0.01). However, the ampli tude of spontaneous contraction was not significant different from the normal rat. CNP significantly inhibited spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle in normal and diabetic rats, but the inhibitory effect was significantly potentiated in the diabetic rats. The amplitudes of spontaneous contraction were suppressed by 75.15% ± 0.71% and 58.92% ± 1.32% while the frequencies were decreased by 53.33% ± 2.03% and 26.95% ± 2.82% in diabetic and normal rats, respectively ( n = 8, P < 0.01). The expression of CNP in gastric tissue was not changed in diabetic rats, however the expression of NPR-B was significantly increased in diabetic rats, and the staining indexes of NPR-B were 30.67 ± 1.59 and 17.63 ± 1.49 in diabetic and normal rat, respectively ( n = 8, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The results suggest that CNP induced an inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle, potentiated in diabetic rat via up-regulation of the natriuretic peptides-NPR-Bparticulate guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signal pathway.

  19. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation. PMID:25216642

  20. Thermally-induced electronic relaxation in structurally-modified Cu{sub 0.1}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 1.9}O{sub 4} spinel ceramics

    Shpotyuk, O., E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua [Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42200 Poland (Poland); Balitska, V. [Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv State University of Vital Activity Safety, 35, Kleparivska Street, Lviv 79007 (Ukraine); Brunner, M. [Fachhochschule Köln/University of Applied Sciences, 2, Betzdorfer Strasse, Köln 50679 (Germany); Hadzaman, I. [Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Drohobych Ivan Franko State Pedagogical University, 24, I. Franko Street, Drohobych 82100 (Ukraine); Klym, H. [Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202, Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12, Bandera Street, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine)

    2015-02-15

    Thermally-induced electronic relaxation in structurally-modified Cu{sub 0.1}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 1.9}O{sub 4} spinel ceramics is shown to be adequately described by stretched exponential function on time. This kinetics is defined by microsctructure perfectness of the relaxing media, showing obvious onset to stretched exponential behaviour with non-exponentionality index attaining close to 0.43 values for high-monolith ceramics and smaller ones in fine-grained ceramics. Percolation threshold in relaxation-degradation kinetics is detected for ceramics with 10% of NiO extractions, showing the smallest but most prolonged single-path degradation effect. This finding is treated in terms of Phillips’ axiomatic diffusion-to-trap model, where only one of two relaxation channels (caused by operative short-range forces) occurs to be effective, while additional non-operative channels contribute to electronic relaxation in fine-grained ceramics.

  1. Epigenetic modifications in valproic acid-induced teratogenesis

    Exposure to the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in utero is associated with a 1-2% increase in neural tube defects (NTDs), however the molecular mechanisms by which VPA induces teratogenesis are unknown. Previous studies demonstrated that VPA, a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can induce histone hyperacetylation and other epigenetic changes such as histone methylation and DNA demethylation. The objective of this study was to determine if maternal exposure to VPA in mice has the ability to cause these epigenetic alterations in the embryo and thus contribute to its mechanism of teratogenesis. Pregnant CD-1 mice (GD 9.0) were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA (400 mg/kg, s.c.) and embryos extracted 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after injection. To assess embryonic histone acetylation and histone methylation, Western blotting was performed on whole embryo homogenates, as well as immunohistochemical staining on embryonic sections. To measure DNA methylation changes, the cytosine extension assay was performed. Results demonstrated that a significant increase in histone acetylation that peaked 3 h after VPA exposure was accompanied by an increase in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and a decrease in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased histone acetylation in the neuroepithelium, heart, and somites. A decrease in methylated histone H3K9 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium and somites, METHYLATED histone H3K4 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium. No significant differences in global or CpG island DNA methylation were observed in embryo homogenates. These results support the possibility that epigenetic modifications caused by VPA during early mouse organogenesis results in congenital malformations.

  2. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidative injury and cellular abnormalities in doxorubicin induced cardiac toxicity in rats.

    Goyal, Sameer N; Mahajan, Umesh B; Chandrayan, Govind; Kumawat, Vivek S; Kamble, Sarika; Patil, Pradip; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Patil, Chandragouda R; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of doxorubicin (Dox) induced cardiotoxicity may be co-operative to recover future Dox treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the cardioprotective effects of oleanolic acid (OA), an antioxidant agent, on Dox induced cardiotoxicity. OA is a triterpenoid compound, which exist widely in plant kingdom in free acid form or as a glycosidic triterpenoids saponins. Cardiotoxicity was induced in Wistar rats with single intravenous injection of doxorubicin at dose of 67.75 mg/kg i.v for 48 hrs. At 12 hrs of interval following Dox administration the cardioprotective effect of OA (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and Amifostine (AMF) (90 mg/kg i.v., single dose prior 30 min) were evaluated. Induction of cardiotoxicity was confirmed by increase in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures, maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dtmax, an indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dtmax, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load). Cardiac markers in such as CK-MB, LDH and alterations in ECG. Dox administration showed alteration in Biochemical parameters and endogenous antioxidants. Administration of OA Showed maximal protection against Dox induced cardiac toxicity as observed by reduction in blood pressure, prevention of left ventricular function and attenuation of biochemical and antioxidant parameters. Based on the findings, its concluded that OA can be used as an adjuvant with Dox therapy in treating cancers. PMID:27069540

  3. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean.

    Charles Kanobe

    Full Text Available The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of "metabolic hijacking" by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor.

  4. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite.

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U = 14.7 cm(-1), which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, U(theor). = 20.2 cm(-1), based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D = -10.1 cm(-1) fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  5. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U = 14.7 cm−1, which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, Utheor. = 20.2 cm−1, based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D = −10.1 cm−1 fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  6. Structural relaxation accompanied by photo-induced chromatic phase transition of polydiacetylenes with butylene-N-difluorophenyl carbamate side chains

    Maekawa, Yuuki; Sakamoto, Naoya; Kokado, Ryousuke; Kajimoto, Naoshi; Izumi, Yuuichiro [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama (Japan); Itoh, Chihiro, E-mail: citoh@sys.wakayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    We have studied the phase transition of poly-5,7-dodecadiyne-1,12-diol bis[2,4-difluorophenyl carbamate] (PDA-2,4-DFPC) and poly-5,7-dodecadiyne-1,12-diol bis[3,4-difluorophenyl carbamate] (PDA-3,4-DFPC) by visible reflection spectroscopy and mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy. Both PDA-2,4-DFPC and PDA-3,4-DFPC show the reflection spectra characterized by a sharp peak at around 1.9 eV at room temperature. While PDA-3,4-DFPC shows thermochromic phase transition to the phase showing the reflection spectrum with a peak around 2.2 eV above 120 Degree-Sign C, PDA-2,4-DFPC shows no abrupt change of the reflection spectrum. However, PDA-2,4-DFPC shows drastic change of the reflection spectrum under 532-nm CW-laser excitation. Based on these results, we can draw the following two conclusions. First, the phase transition behavior of PDA can be controlled by modifying the side-chain structure. Second, we demonstrate that thermally inaccessible phase of PDA is induced by the photo-excitation. By measuring mid-infrared absorption of PDAs, we elucidated that conformational change of side chains is accompanied with the phase transition. Based on the results, we discussed the role of the side chain in the phase transition. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have synthesized polydiacetylene (PDA) with difluorophenyl carbamate side chain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDAs show distinct phase transition (PT) depending on the side-chain structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDA with 3,4-difluorophenyl carbamate shows PT by thermal stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer However, PDA with 2,4-difluorophenyl carbamate shows PT only under photo-excitation.

  7. Testicular acid phosphatase induces odontoblast differentiation and mineralization.

    Choi, Hwajung; Kim, Tak-Heun; Yun, Chi-Young; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-04-01

    Odontoblasts differentiate from dental mesenchyme during dentin formation and mineralization. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling odontoblast differentiation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that expression of testicular acid phosphatase (ACPT) is restricted in the early stage of odontoblast differentiation in proliferating dental mesenchymal cells and secretory odontoblasts. ACPT is expressed earlier than tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and partly overlaps with TNAP in differentiating odontoblasts. In MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells, expression of ACPT appears simultaneously with a decrease in β-catenin activity and is abolished with the expression of Phex and Dsp. Knockdown of ACPT in MDPC-23 cells stimulates cell proliferation together with an increase in active β-catenin and cyclin D1. In contrast, the overexpression of ACPT suppresses cell proliferation with a decrease in active β-catenin and cyclin D1. Expression of TNAP, Osx, Phex and Dsp is reduced by knockdown of ACPT but is enhanced by ACPT overexpression. When ACPT is blocked with IgG, alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited but cell proliferation is unchanged regardless of ACPT expression. These findings suggest that ACPT inhibits cell proliferation through β-catenin-mediated signaling in dental mesenchyme but elicits odontoblast differentiation and mineralization by supplying phosphate during dentin formation. Thus, ACPT might be a novel candidate for inducing odontoblast differentiation and mineralization for dentin regeneration. PMID:26547858

  8. [Epigenetic variability induced by nicotinic acid in Triticum aestivum L].

    Bogdanova, E D

    2003-09-01

    The effect of nicotinic acid (NA) on hereditary traits of spring common wheat cultivar Kazakhstanskaya 126 (K.126) were studied under the laboratory and field conditions. Treatment of seeds and vegetating plants with 0.01-0.1% NA (aqueous solution) induced heritable epigenetic changes in wheat. As a result, strong tall plants with the long productive spike, large seeds, and several quantitative and qualitative characters other than in the original cultivar were obtained in the second and further generations after treatment. Crosses of changed plants with each other did not result in segregation with respect to leaf downiness or anthocyan stem color in F2-F4, suggesting the same epigenetic state of genes responsible for changed characters. In crosses with the original cultivar, characters of the changed plants always dominated in F1. Basing on the current views, the changes were attributed to a transition of the hl1 and pc recessive marker genes into new, dominant epiallelic states Hl1 and Pc, which respectively determine downy leaves and the colored stem. The NA effect was specific, since only one type of the variation was observed. The changed characters were stable, and no reversion to the original phenotype was detected in 57 generations. PMID:14582391

  9. Rabbit gastric ulcer models: comparison and evaluation of acetic acid-induced ulcer and mucosectomy-induced ulcer

    Maeng, Jin Hee; Lee, Eunhye; Lee, Don Haeng; YANG, SU-GEUN

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined rabbit gastric ulcer models that can serve as more clinically relevant models. Two types of ulcer model were studied: acetic acid-induced ulcers (AAU) and mucosal resection-induced ulcers (MRU). For AAU, rabbit gastric mucosa was exposed by median laparotomy and treated with bottled acetic acid. MRU was examined as a model for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Normal saline was injected into the submucosal layer and the swollen mucosa was resected with scissors. E...

  10. TGF-β-SMAD3 signaling mediates hepatic bile acid and phospholipid metabolism following lithocholic acid-induced liver injury.

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Naoki; Sato, Misako; Kang, Dong Wook; Krausz, Kristopher W; Flanders, Kathleen C; Ikeda, Kazuo; Luecke, Hans; Wakefield, Lalage M; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2012-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is activated as a result of liver injury, such as cholestasis. However, its influence on endogenous metabolism is not known. This study demonstrated that TGFβ regulates hepatic phospholipid and bile acid homeostasis through MAD homolog 3 (SMAD3) activation as revealed by lithocholic acid-induced experimental intrahepatic cholestasis. Lithocholic acid (LCA) induced expression of TGFB1 and the receptors TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 in the liver. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed higher TGFβ expression around the portal vein after LCA exposure and diminished SMAD3 phosphorylation in hepatocytes from Smad3-null mice. Serum metabolomics indicated increased bile acids and decreased lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) after LCA exposure. Interestingly, in Smad3-null mice, the metabolic alteration was attenuated. LCA-induced lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 4 (LPCAT4) and organic solute transporter β (OSTβ) expression were markedly decreased in Smad3-null mice, whereas TGFβ induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in primary mouse hepatocytes. In addition, introduction of SMAD3 enhanced the TGFβ-induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. In conclusion, considering that Smad3-null mice showed attenuated serum ALP activity, a diagnostic indicator of cholangiocyte injury, these results strongly support the view that TGFβ-SMAD3 signaling mediates an alteration in phospholipid and bile acid metabolism following hepatic inflammation with the biliary injury. PMID:23034213

  11. Breathing and Relaxation

    ... related breathing difficulties. Learn some ways to control breathing and some techniques to help you reach a greater level of relaxation during your day: Diaphragmatic Breathing Minimizing Shortness of Breath Instant Relaxation Drill Meditation ...

  12. Stress -induced biosynthesis of dicaffeoylquinic acids in globe artichoke

    Moglia, A.; Lanteri, S.; Comino, C.; Acquadro, A.; Vos, de C.H.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Leaf extracts from globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) have been widely used in medicine as hepatoprotectant and choleretic agents. Globe artichoke leaves represent a natural source of phenolic acids with dicaffeoylquinic acids, such as cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid), along wi

  13. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F.; Nüsing, Rolf M.; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP3 prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and...

  14. Chronic gamma radiation-induced changes in the content of fatty acids in spring rape seeds

    Chronic gamma irradiation of spring rape plants having no erucic acid and eicosanoic acid in seed oil induced changes both in the growth and in the morphological composition of the plants. The contents of erucic acid and eicosanoic acid did not increase. The greatest changes occurred in unsaturated acids, especially in macromutants resulting from irradiated plants located in the closest proximity of the radiation source or in places with the most significant plant growth inhibition. Nutants with a low, or a high, content of linolenic acid were obtained. (author)

  15. Paramagnetic ion binding to amino acids: The structure of the manganese (II)-L-proline complex from carbon-13 relaxation data

    Carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation times T1 of aqueous solutions of proline at pH = 11 containing 10-4-10-5M manganese(II) perchlorate are measured at 62.86 MHz und 600C. Under these conditions, the Mn2+ cation is bound to three proline molecules in their dibasic form to form the complex [Mn(L-PRO-)3]-. The relaxation of carbons α, β, γ, delta in this complex is shown to be dipolar. The relevant correlation time is rotational tausub(r) = 4.3 x 1011s (at 600C). A method is given to compute the Mn2+-13C distances in the complex from the paramagnetic relaxation rates 1/T1sub(M) of carbons α to delta and an assumed geometry of the proline molecule. The manganes (II) cation may be positioned with respect to each proline ligand, thus determining the structure of the hexacoordinated complex. The sites of coordination are the uncharged nitrogen and one carboxylic oxygen atom of the proline molecules, their distance to the Mn2+ cation are respectively 2.22 and 1.97 A. (orig.)

  16. Peptide IC-20, encoded by skin kininogen-1 of the European yellow-bellied toad, Bombina variegata, antagonizes bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation

    Mu Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives were to determine if the skin secretion of the European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata, in common with other related species, contains a bradykinin inhibitor peptide and to isolate and structurally characterize this peptide. Materials and Methods: Lyophilized skin secretion obtained from this toad was subjected to reverse phase HPLC fractionation with subsequent bioassay of fractions for antagonism of the bradykinin activity using an isolated rat tail artery smooth muscle preparation. Subsequently, the primary structure of the peptide was established by a combination of microsequencing, mass spectroscopy, and molecular cloning, following which a synthetic replicate was chemically synthesised for bioassay. Results: A single peptide of molecular mass 2300.92 Da was resolved in HPLC fractions of skin secretion and its primary structure determined as IYNAIWP-KH-NK-KPGLL-. Database interrogation with this sequence indicated that this peptide was encoded by skin kininogen-1 previously cloned from B. variegata. The blank cycles were occupied by cysteinyl (C residues and the peptide was located toward the C-terminus of the skin kininogen, and flanked N-terminally by a classical -KR- propeptide convertase processing site. The peptide was named IC-20 in accordance (I = N-terminal isoleucine, C = C-terminal cysteine, 20 = number of residues. Like the natural peptide, its synthetic replicate displayed an antagonism of bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Conclusion: IC-20 represents a novel bradykinin antagonizing peptide from amphibian skin secretions and is the third such peptide found to be co-encoded with bradykinins within skin kininogens.

  17. Effect of naloxone on met-enkephalin-induced gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin in man.

    Olsen, P S; Kirkegaard, P; Petersen, B; Christiansen, J.

    1982-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that met-enkephalin, and endogenous opiate, stimulates gastric acid secretion in man, while naloxone inhibits meal-stimulated acid secretion. In seven healthy subjects the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone was infused in a dose of 10 microgram/kg/h during stimulation of gastric acid secretion with pentagastrin 100 ng/kg/h and met-enkephalin 0.1 microgram/kg/h. Naloxone had no effect on pentagastrin-induced acid secretion, whereas met-enkephalin-induced ac...

  18. The memory-enhancing effect of erucic acid on scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in mice.

    Kim, Eunji; Ko, Hae Ju; Jeon, Se Jin; Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Hyung Eun; Kim, Ha Neul; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-03-01

    Erucic acid is a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid isolated from the seed of Raphanus sativus L. that is known to normalize the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids in the brains of patients suffering from X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Here, we investigated whether erucic acid enhanced cognitive function or ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment using the passive avoidance, Y-maze and Morris water maze tasks. Erucic acid (3mg/kg, p.o.) enhanced memory performance in normal naïve mice. In addition, erucic acid (3mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment, as assessed via the behavioral tasks. We then investigated the underlying mechanism of the memory-enhancing effect of erucic acid. The administration of erucic acid increased the phosphorylation levels of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and additional protein kinase B (Akt) in the hippocampus. These results suggest that erucic acid has an ameliorative effect in mice with scopolamine-induced memory deficits and that the effect of erucic acid is partially due to the activation of PI3K-PKCζ-ERK-CREB signaling as well as an increase in phosphorylated Akt in the hippocampus. Therefore, erucic acid may be a novel therapeutic agent for diseases associated with cognitive deficits, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26780350

  19. Effects of the strain relaxation of an AlGaN barrier layer induced by various cap layers on the transport properties in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Liu Zi-Yang; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Duan Huan-Tao; Xue Jun-Shuai; Lin Zhi-Yu; Ma Jun-Cai; Xue Xiao-Yong; Hao Yue

    2011-01-01

    The strain relaxation of an AlGaN barrier layer may be influenced by a thin cap layer above,and affects the transport properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. Compared with the slight strain relaxation found in AlGaN barrier layer without cap layer,it is found that a thin cap layer can induce considerable changes of strain state in the AIGaN barrier layer. The degree of relaxation of the AlGaN layer significantly influences the transport properties of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. It is observed that electron mobility decreases with the increasing degree of relaxation of the AlGaN barrier,which is believed to be the main cause of the deterioration of crystalline quality and morphology on the AlGaN/GaN interface. On the other hand,both GaN and AIN cap layers lead to a decrease in 2DEG density. The reduction of 2DEG caused by the GaN cap layer may be attributed to the additional negative polarization charges formed at the interface between GaN and AIGaN,while the reduction of the piezoelectric effect in the AlGaN layer results in the decrease of 2DEG density in the case of AIN cap layer.

  20. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  1. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    Luo, Yi, E-mail: yi.luo@pfizer.com; Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  2. Alterations of N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid-Activated K2P Channels in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    Nielsen, Gorm; Wandall-Frostholm, Christine; Sadda, Veeranjaneyulu; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Lloyd, Eric E.; Bryan, Robert M.; Simonsen, Ulf; Köhler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-activated two-pore domain potassium channels (K2P) have been proposed to be expressed in the pulmonary vasculature. However, their physiological or pathophysiological roles are poorly defined. Here we tested the hypothesis that PUFA-activated K2P are involved in pulmonary vasorelaxation and that alterations of channel expression are pathophysiologically linked to pulmonary hypertension. Expression of PUFA-activated K2P in the murine lung was investigated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry (IHC), by patch clamp (PC), and myography. K2P-gene expression was examined in chronic hypoxic mice. QRT-PCR showed that the K2P2.1 and K2P6.1 were the predominantly expressed K2P in the murine lung. IHC revealed protein expression of K2P2.1 and K2P6.1 in the endothelium of pulmonary arteries and of K2P6.1 in bronchial epithelium. PC showed pimozide-sensitive K2P-like K+-current activated by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in freshly isolated endothelial cells as well as DHA-induced membrane hyperpolarization. Myography on pulmonary arteries showed that DHA-induced concentration-dependent and instantaneous relaxations that were resistant to endothelial removal and inhibition of NO and prostacyclin synthesis and to a cocktail of blockers of calcium-activated K+ channels but were abolished by high extracellular (30 mM) K+-concentration. Gene expression and protein of K2P2.1 were not altered in chronic hypoxic mice while K2P6.1 was up-regulated by fourfold. In conclusion, the PUFA-activated K2P2.1 and K2P6.1 are expressed in murine lung and functional K2P-like channels contribute to endothelium-hyperpolarization and pulmonary artery relaxation. The increased K2P6.1-gene expression may represent a novel counter-regulatory mechanism in pulmonary hypertension, and suggest that arterial K2P2.1 and K2P6.1 could be novel therapeutic targets. PMID:23724868

  3. Acid stress adaptation protects saccharomyces cerevisiae from acetic acid-induced programme cell death

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia

    2005-01-01

    In this work evidence is presented that acid stress adaptation protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae from acetic acid-mediated programmed cell death. Exponential-phase yeast cells, non-adapted or adapted to acid stress by 30 min incubation in rich medium set at pH 3.0 with HCl, have been exposed to increasing concentrations of acetic acid and time course changes of cell viability have been assessed. Adapted cells, in contrast to non-adapted cells, when exposed to 80 mM acetic acid for 200 min ...

  4. Anacardic acid induces apoptosis-like cell death in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Ashok; Nair, Bipin G; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid), extracted from cashew nut shell liquid, is a natural phenolic lipid well known for its strong antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. Its effect has been well studied in bacterial and mammalian systems but remains largely unexplored in fungi. The present study identifies antifungal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities of anacardic acid in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. It was found that anacardic acid causes inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth in this ascomycetous fungus. Phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that growth inhibition of fungus is mainly caused by apoptosis-like cell death. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK treatment indicated that anacardic acid induces caspase-independent apoptosis in M. oryzae. Expression of a predicted ortholog of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated during the process of apoptosis, suggesting the possibility of mitochondria dependent apoptosis via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor. Anacardic acid treatment leads to decrease in reactive oxygen species rather than increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation normally observed during apoptosis, confirming the antioxidant properties of anacardic acid as suggested by earlier reports. Our study also shows that anacardic acid renders the fungus highly sensitive to DNA damaging agents like ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Treatment of rice leaves with anacardic acid prevents M. oryzae from infecting the plant without affecting the leaf, suggesting that anacardic acid can be an effective antifungal agent. PMID:26381667

  5. Study on the dose-response relation of premature chromosome condensation induced by Okadaic acid

    In order to study the effect-dosage relationship between the PCC induced by Okadaic acid and the IR dosages, human peripheral blood in vitro was irradiated by X-rays at different doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0Gy) cultivated for 48 hours and added with Okadaic acid two hours before the end of culture. Chromosome aberrations frequencies was analyzed and compared with that induced by the conventional chromosome assay and their dose-response curves were fitted. The results show that the mitotic index of the PCC induced by Okadaic acid is higher than that of the conventional chromosome assay. And the fragment rate of chromosome condensation induced by Okadaic acid has a favorable linearity relationship with external radiation doses. (authors)

  6. Radiation-induced alterations in splenic acid phosphatase of pigeons

    The effect of total body ν-irradiation with sub-lethal dose (400 rad) on acid phosphatase has been studied in spleen of pigeons. The specific activity of acid phosphatase increased significantly 48 hr and 72 hr after irradiation. This increase was accompanied by a substantial reduction in per cent 'bound' activity. The histochemical observation after irradiation confirmed the result obtained by quantitative biochemical study. This increase in acid phosphatase activity may be attributed to an increased permeability of lysosomal membrane caused by damaged lymphocytes (lymphocytolysis) after ν-irradiation. (author)

  7. Effectiveness of malic acid 1% in patients with xerostomia induced by antihypertensive drugs

    Gómez Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Aguilar Salvatierra, Antonio; Cabrera Ayala, Marible; Maté Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Calvo Guirado, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Assessing the clinical effectiveness of a topical sialogogue on spray (malic acid, 1%) in the treatment of xerostomia induced by antihypertensive drugs. Study Design: This research has been carried out through a randomized double-blind clinical trial. 45 patients suffering from hypertensive drugs-induced xerostomia were divided into 2 groups: the first group (25 patients) received a topical sialogogue on spray (malic acid, 1%) whereas the second group (20 patients) received a plac...

  8. Cardioprotective effects of gallic acid in diabetes-induced myocardial dysfunction in rats

    Patel, Snehal S.; Goyal, Ramesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Normalization of hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and oxidative stress is an important objective in preventing diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction. Objective: This study was undertaken to examine the effects of gallic acid in myocardial dysfunctions associated with type-1 diabetes. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg i.v.). Gallic acid was administered daily at three different doses (100, 50, and 25 mg/kg p.o....

  9. Nucleoside-nucleotide free diet protects rat colonic mucosa from damage induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    Adjei, A A; Morioka, T.; Ameho, C K; Yamauchi, K.; Kulkarni, A. D.; Al-Mansouri, H M; Kawajiri, A; Yamamoto, S.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that intestinal recovery from injury induced by radiation, endotoxin, and protein deficiency is improved by the ingestion of nucleosides and nucleotides. AIM: This study examined the effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides supplementation on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid induced colonic damage in experimental colitis. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into two groups and fed nucleic acid free 20% casein diet (control) or this diet supple...

  10. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Perera Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control, alpha lipoic acid alone (100 mg/kg p.o for 21 days, haloperidol alone (2 mg/kg i.p for 21 days, and haloperidol with alpha lipoic acid groups (for 21 days. Haloperidol treatment significantly decreased levels of the brain antioxidant enzymes super oxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and concurrent treatment with alpha lipoic acid significantly reversed the oxidative effects of haloperidol. Histopathological changes revealed significant haloperidol-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, and substantia nigra. Alpha lipoic acid significantly reduced this damage and there were very little neuronal atrophy. Areas of angiogenesis were also seen in the alpha lipoic acid-treated group. In conclusion, the study proves that alpha lipoic acid treatment significantly reduces haloperidol-induced neuronal damage.