WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid gas hazards

  1. Shale gas, a hazardous exploitation

    In march 2010 three authorizations to search for shale gases were delivered in France in the regions of Montelimar, Nant and Villeneuve-de-Berg. A general public outcry has led the government to freeze the projects till a complete assessment of the impact on the environment is made. The fears of the public are based on the feedback experience in the Usa where some underground waters were polluted. The source of pollution is twofold: first the additives used in the injected fluids (methanol as an anti-microbic agent, hydrochloric acid to dissolve natural cements or glycol ethylene as a deposit inhibitor) and secondly metal particles of copper, zinc or lead trapped in the clay layers and released by the injection of the fluids. It appears also that the injection of high pressure fluids near a crack can induce earth tremors by reactivating the crack. (A.C.)

  2. The real hazards of shale gas

    This bibliographical sheet presents a book which addresses the issue of shale gas. A first part describes the origin of this gaseous hydrocarbon, the composition of shale gas and its extraction, the technique of hydraulic fracturing, and the environmental risks. A second part addresses the economic, ecologic and political issues. The authors outline that all signs are there to prove the alarming hazards of shale gas. One of the authors outlines the necessity of an energy transition, far from fossil and nuclear energy, in order to guarantee a high level of protection of human health and of the environment

  3. Chemical hazards arising from shale gas extraction

    Daria Pakulska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of the shale industry is gaining momentum and hence the analysis of chemical hazards to the environment and health of the local population is extremely timely and important. Chemical hazards are created during the exploitation of all minerals, but in the case of shale gas production, there is much more uncertainty as regards to the effects of new technologies application. American experience suggests the increasing risk of environmental contamination, mainly groundwater. The greatest concern is the incomplete knowledge of the composition of fluids used for fracturing shale rock and unpredictability of long-term effects of hydraulic fracturing for the environment and health of residents. High population density in the old continent causes the problem of chemical hazards which is much larger than in the USA. Despite the growing public discontent data on this subject are limited. First of all, there is no epidemiological studies to assess the relationship between risk factors, such as air and water pollution, and health effects in populations living in close proximity to gas wells. The aim of this article is to identify and discuss existing concepts on the sources of environmental contamination, an indication of the environment elements under pressure and potential health risks arising from shale gas extraction. Med Pr 2015;66(1:99–117

  4. Structural comparison of hazardous and non-hazardous coals based on gas sorption experiments

    Lakatos, J.; Toth, J. [Research Lab. for Mining Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Radnai-Gyoengyoes, Z. [Geopard Ltd., Pecs (Hungary); Bokanyi, L. [Miskolc Univ., Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Comparison of carbon-dioxide and propane sorption at ambient temperature was used for characterising the difference of the structure of hazardous and non hazardous coals. However, hazardous coals were found more microporous or contain more closed pores than non hazardous ones, this difference couldn`t have been enlarged and attributed to one petrographic component by producing the density fractions. Gas sorption isobars (nitrogen, methane, ethane) are proposed to make a distinction between fine pore structure of coals. (orig.)

  5. Solid and hazardous waste management issues for gas processing facilities

    This paper reports on common solid and hazardous waste related concerns associated with gas processing which include proper management and storage of hazardous material and hazardous waste, proper handling of controlled non-hazardous material such as petroleum hydrocarbons, and assessment, remediation and control of special contaminants such as PCB and asbestos. The Federal state, and local regulations governing management of these materials continues to change, typically trending toward more stringent control of waste handling and disposal, and sometimes affecting waste materials that were previously disposed of as non-hazardous solid waste. More recent, regulatory changes affecting gas processing facilities include proper waste characterization and record keeping, underground tank removal and leak management, on-site waste disposal options and remedial alternatives for chemical spills, PCB contamination assessments for processing equipment and facilities and used oil management

  6. Gas migration from oil and gas fields and associated hazards

    The migration of gas from oil and gas formations to the surface is a problem that greatly affects those surface areas where human activity exists. Underground gas storage facilities and oil fields have demonstrated a long history of gas migration problems. Experience has shown that the migration of gas to the surface creates a serious potential risk of explosion, fires, noxious odors and potential emissions of carcinogenic chemicals. These risks must be seriously examined for all oil and gas operations located in urban areas. This paper presents the mechanics of gas migration, paths of migration and a review of a few of the risks that should be considered when operating a gas facility in an urban area. The gas can migrate in a continuous or discontinuous stream through porous, water-filled media to the surface. The primary force in this migration of gas is the difference between specific weights of gas and water

  7. Hazard assessments of double-shell flammable gas tanks

    This report is the fourth in a series of hazard assessments performed on the double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks. This report focuses on hazards associated with the double-shell watch list tanks (101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN). While a similar assessment has already been performed for tank 103-SY, it is also included here to incorporate a more representative slurry gas mixture and provide a consistent basis for comparing results for all the flammable gas tanks. This report is intended to provide an in-depth assessment by considering the details of the gas release event and slurry gas mixing as the gas is released from the waste. The consequences of postulated gas ignition are evaluated using a plume burn model and updated ignition frequency predictions. Tank pressurization which results from a gas burn, along with the structural response, is also considered. The report is intended to support the safety basis for work activities in flammable gas tanks by showing margins to safety limits that are available in the design and procedures

  8. Hazard assessments of double-shell flammable gas tanks

    Fox, G.L.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1994-09-28

    This report is the fourth in a series of hazard assessments performed on the double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks. This report focuses on hazards associated with the double-shell watch list tanks (101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN). While a similar assessment has already been performed for tank 103-SY, it is also included here to incorporate a more representative slurry gas mixture and provide a consistent basis for comparing results for all the flammable gas tanks. This report is intended to provide an in-depth assessment by considering the details of the gas release event and slurry gas mixing as the gas is released from the waste. The consequences of postulated gas ignition are evaluated using a plume burn model and updated ignition frequency predictions. Tank pressurization which results from a gas burn, along with the structural response, is also considered. The report is intended to support the safety basis for work activities in flammable gas tanks by showing margins to safety limits that are available in the design and procedures.

  9. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    Jones, Robert MD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:151-156.

  10. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Waste Transfer Systems

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems (i.e., waste transfer piping and waste transfer-associated structures) made at control decision meetings on November 30, 1999a and April 19, 2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996). Following the Contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval. The control decision meeting on November 30, 1999 to address flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems followed the control decision process and the criteria for control decisions described in Section 3.3.1.5 of the FSAR. The control decision meeting agenda, attendance list, and introductory and background presentations are included in Attachments 1 through 4. The control decision discussions on existing and other possible controls for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems and the basis for selecting or not selecting specific controls are summarized in this report

  11. Acid Gas Removal from Natural Gas with Alkanolamines

    Sadegh, Negar

    Some 40 % of the world’s remaining gas reserves are sour or acid, containing large quantities of CO2 and H2S and other sulfur compounds. Many large oil and gas fields have more than 10 mole % CO2 and H2S content. In the gas processing industry absorption with chemical solvents has been used...... commercially for the removal of acid gas impurities from natural gas. Alkanolamines, simple combinations of alcohols and ammonia, are the most commonly used category of chemical solvents for acid gas capture. This Ph.D. project is aboutthermodynamics of natural gas cleaning process with alkanolamines as...... pressure on acid gas solubility was also quantitatively investigated through both experimental and modeling approaches....

  12. Survey of gas turbine hazardous air pollutant emission factors

    Hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emission factors from natural gas and liquid fueled turbines have been determined by surveying the literature and combining available data. Of the 189 US EPA HAPs, only a few have been found in turbine exhaust at concentrations above ambient levels. Test data are available from several different turbine models burning natural gas and distillate oils, but data at part loads is limited, and data from newer, dry low NOx turbines is virtually non-existent. Most of the liquid fueled turbine data is from military aircraft engines and small (less than 20 MW) stationary units. All of the data was critically evaluated, but only a small fraction was judged of poor quality and, therefore, excluded from this study. Mean HAP emissions from natural gas fired turbines are very low at base load, totaling only about 0.5 ppm by weight (ppmw), or 21 pounds of HAPs per million (MM) pounds of fuel. Median HAP emissions from natural gas fired turbines are even lower, totaling only about 0.02 ppmw, or 0.8 lb HAPs/MM lb fuel. The difference between the mean and the median reflects the relatively large number of observations that are reported as below detectable levels. Mean and median HAP emissions from liquid fueled turbines are slightly higher than natural gas fired turbine emissions. Of the organic compounds found in turbine exhaust, formaldehyde is one of the most abundant. Other HAPs found in turbine exhaust include nickel, phosphorus, and manganese. The limited part load data suggests that organic HAP emissions increase as load decreases, while inorganic HAP emissions remain constant or decrease slightly as load decreases

  13. Hydrofluoric acid dissolution of spent radioactive and hazardous HEPA filters

    This document discusses a process that treats High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters contaminated with radioactive particles containing transuranic and hazardous elements which has been studied at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). This process uses three to four steps to spent HEPA filter so that they meet regulatory requirements for disposal. The first step of the process is to bake the spent HEPA filters at 550 degrees C for 3 hours to volatilize organic binder which is used to provide strength in the filter's silicon glass media. In the second step, the filters are first leached in nitric acid, then are dissolved in hydrofluoric acid. The dissolution is conducted using an optimum fluoride to silicone molar ratio of 7/1 to prevent: (1) excess unreacted HF (free HF), (2) the formation of insoluble fluoride salts, and (3) the need of excessive aluminum nitrate to complex the free HF. Finally, the free HF is complexed with aluminum nitrate to an [HF] between 0.020 and 0.04 molar. The resulting solution from this process is minimally corrosive to stainless steel and is a stable high-level liquid waste that can be converted to a high-level solid waste in a fluidized bed operated at 500 degrees C. The stainless steel HEPA filter housing, which is not dissolved during the dissolution step, is compacted and disposed of as a nonhazardous, low-level radioactive waste

  14. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  15. Thermal Hazard Evaluation of Lauroyl Peroxide Mixed with Nitric Acid

    Chi-Min Shu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many thermal runaway incidents have been caused by organic peroxides due to the peroxy group, –O–O–, which is essentially unstable and active. Lauroyl peroxide (LPO is also sensitive to thermal sources and is incompatible with many materials, such as acids, bases, metals, and ions. From the thermal decomposition reaction of various concentrations of nitric acid (HNO3 (from lower to higher concentrations with LPO, experimental data were obtained as to its exothermic onset temperature (T0, heat of decomposition (ΔHd, isothermal time to maximum rate (TMRiso, and other safety parameters exclusively for loss prevention of runaway reactions and thermal explosions. As a novel finding, LPO mixed with HNO3 can produce the detonation product of 1-nitrododecane. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermal activity monitor III (TAM III, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS analyses of the reactivity for LPO and itself mixed with HNO3 to corroborate the decomposition reactions and reaction mechanisms in these investigations.

  16. Thermal hazard evaluation of lauroyl peroxide mixed with nitric acid.

    Tsai, Lung-Chang; You, Mei-Li; Ding, Mei-Fang; Shu, Chi-Min

    2012-01-01

    Many thermal runaway incidents have been caused by organic peroxides due to the peroxy group, -O-O-, which is essentially unstable and active. Lauroyl peroxide (LPO) is also sensitive to thermal sources and is incompatible with many materials, such as acids, bases, metals, and ions. From the thermal decomposition reaction of various concentrations of nitric acid (HNO3) (from lower to higher concentrations) with LPO, experimental data were obtained as to its exothermic onset temperature (T0), heat of decomposition (ΔHd), isothermal time to maximum rate (TMRiso), and other safety parameters exclusively for loss prevention of runaway reactions and thermal explosions. As a novel finding, LPO mixed with HNO3 can produce the detonation product of 1-nitrododecane. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal activity monitor III (TAM III), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of the reactivity for LPO and itself mixed with HNO3 to corroborate the decomposition reactions and reaction mechanisms in these investigations. PMID:22763742

  17. Research on safety assessment of gas explosion hazard in heading face based on BP neural network

    TIAN Shui-cheng; ZHU Li-jun; CHEN Yong-gang; WANG Li

    2005-01-01

    According to hazard theory and the principle of selecting assessment index,combining the causes and mechanism of gas explosion, established assessment index system of gas explosion in heading face. Based on the method of gray clustering, principle of BP neural network and characters of gas explosion in heading face, safety assessment procedural diagram of BP neural network on gas explosion hazard in heading face is designed. Meanwhile, concrete heading face of the gas explosion hazard is assessed by safety assessment method of BP neural network and grades of comprehensive safety assessment are got. The static and dynamic safety assessment can be achieved by this method. It is practical to improve safety management and to develop safety assessment technology in coalmine.

  18. Inert gas spraying device aids in repair of hazardous systems

    Teleha, S.

    1965-01-01

    Inert gas spraying device aids in safely making mechanical repairs to a cryogenic fluid system without prior emptying of the system. This method can be applied to any natural or bottled gas system and with modifications to gasoline transports.

  19. Gas chromatography of alkylphosphonic and dialkylphosphinic acids

    After carrying out an optimization study on the separation conditions for the TMS-derivatives, of the hexyl-, cyclohexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-phosphonic acids; dihexyl-, dicyclohexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-phosphinic acids, and dioctylphosphine oxide, their retention indices (I) at two temperatures and on the 0V-1 and 0V-17 stationary phase were determined. Correlations between I and molecular structure were established. Calibration factors of these compounds in the flame ionization detector were studied, and the results analized taking into account the variables afecting the quantitative results. These results were unbiased but they had a lower precission than usually achieveble in gas chromatography. (author)

  20. The gas-phase acidity of nitrocyclopropane

    Bartmess, John E.; Wilson, Burton; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Bloor, John E.

    1992-09-01

    Nitrocyclopropane is 10.5 kcal mol-1 weaker as an acid in the gas phase than its open-chain analog, 2-nitropropane. This is attributed to the conflicting hybridization requirements for carbanion stabilization by the cyclopropyl ring and by the nitro group. Based on reactivities, the deprotonated form does not ring-open to either the 2-nitroallyl anion or the 1-nitroallyl anion.

  1. Evaluation of Hazard of Mine Gas emissions at the Surface

    Urban Petr

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents principles of the method of measuring the concentration and the flow rate of gas emitted from various underground spaces by new evaluation criteria, however mainly from the point of view of consequences of risks associated with gas emissions in semiclosed and closed spaces, in areas affected by the mining of mineral raw materials or mining claims already abandoned.The paper gives the information about the objectives and principles of the method of measuring the concentratio...

  2. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  3. Development of an intelligent hypertext manual for the space shuttle hazardous gas detection system

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Bangasser, Carl; Fensky, Connie

    A computer-based Integrated Knowledge System (IKS), the Intelligent Hypertext Manual (IHM), is being developed for the Space Shuttle Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). The IHM stores all HGDS related knowledge and presents them in an interactive and intuitive manner. The IHM's purpose is to provide HGDS personnel with the capabilities of: enhancing the interpretation of real time data; recognizing and identifying possible faults in the Space Shuttle sub-system related to hazardous gas detections; locating applicable documentation related to procedures, constraints, and previous fault histories; and assisting in the training of personnel.

  4. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-03-28

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc. PMID:26632121

  5. Investigating animal health effects of sour gas acid forming emissions

    The effects of sour gas well blowout emissions on livestock are reviewed. Guidelines for safe drilling operations in hydrogen sulfide environments, general hazards and characteristics of hydrogen sulfide, and guidelines for field investigation into the effects of sour gas and acid emissions on livestock are discussed. A case history involving the Ross No. 2 gas well blowout of July 1985 in Rankin County, Mississippi is presented. The blowout lasted for 72 days, and at peak discharge the 500 ppM radius was ca 3.5 miles. A cattle embryo transplant operation located one half mile from the well was affected by the blowout. Examination by a local veterinarian of the cattle demonstrated eye irritation, epiphora, nasal discharge and coughing. After one and a half months of exposure, most animals showed clinical signs of a severe dry hacking cough, epiphora, dry rales over the thoracic inlet, and a bronchial popping sound over the lateral thorax. All animals had eye irritation. Of 55 animals showing signs of respiratory distress and eye irritations, 15 were still clinically ill in May of 1986. 7 refs., 1 tab

  6. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Baumann-Stanzer, Kathrin; Stenzel, Sirma [Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA) in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms{sup -1} in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4 C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders. (orig.)

  7. Acid sulfate soils are an environmental hazard in Finland

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) create significant threats to the environment on coastal regions of the Baltic Sea in Finland. The sediments were deposited during the ancient Litorina Sea phase of the Baltic Sea about 7500-4500 years ago. Finland has larger spatial extent of the ASS than any other European country. Mostly based on anthropogenic reasons (cultivation, trenching etc.) ASS deposits are currently being exposed to oxygen which leads to chemical reaction creating sulfuric acid. The acidic waters then dissolve metals form the soil. Acidic surface run off including the metals are then leached into the water bodies weakening the water quality and killing fish or vegetation. In constructed areas acidic waters may corrode building materials. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is mapping ASS deposits in Finland. The goal is to map a total of 5 million hectares of the potentially ASS affected region. It has been estimated that the problematic Litorina Sea deposits, which are situated 0-100 m above the recent Baltic Sea shoreline, cover 500 000 hectares area. There are several phases in mapping. The work begins at the office with gathering the existing data, interpreting airborne geophysical data and compiling a field working plan. In the field, quality of the soil is studied and in uncertain cases samples are taken to laboratory analyses. Also electrical conductivity and pH of soil and water are measured in the field. Laboratory methods include multielemental determinations with ICP-OES, analyses of grain size and humus content (LOI), and incubation. So far, approximately 60 % of the potential ASS affected regions in Finland are mapped. Over 15 000 sites have been studied in the field and 4000 laboratory analyses are done. The spatial database presented in the scale of 1: 250 000 can be viewed at the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/hasu/index.html).

  8. The issues surrounding a shallow gas database in relation to offshore hazards

    Holmes, R.; Alexander, S.; Ball, K.; Bulat, J.; Evans, R.; Long, D.; MacBeth, C.; McCormac, M.; Sankey, M.

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this report is to objectively review the current issues identified by operators, contractors, consultants and the Health and Safety Executive that are relevant to a shallow gas database, and so identify possible ways forward to address the safety concerns of the offshore oil and gas industry. Background information summarizing some of the current methods used to predict and detect shallow gas is used to demonstrate the potential scope for a database. The safety objective is achieved by approaches to approved contacts in the offshore oil and gas industry for their opinions on the needs, standards, procedures and the perceived utilisation and benefits associated with a possible shallow gas database. These opinions are compiled then reviewed in relation to the issues identified by industry and the Offshore Safety Division, Health and Safety Executive. Contact with industry and the Offshore Safety Division, Health and Safety Executive demonstrates a clear concern about the immediate threat to drilling operations from shallow gas. There is less industry concern about the need to address the threat to health and safety arising from the hazards posed by shallow gas to production facilities. In this last case, some concern is associated with engineering design, including the longer-term hazards to foundations from shallow gas. (author)

  9. Studying of acid-gas pipelines corrosion with impedance spectroscopy

    Neshati, J.; Fardi, M.R.; Ghassem, H. [Corrosion Department, NIOC-RIPI, Pazhooheshgah Bulevard, Khairabad Junction, Old Qom Road Tehran (Iran)

    2004-07-01

    In this research, the acid-gas pipelines of a gas refinery were simulated in laboratory. Acid gas is normally the feed of sulfur recovery plant (SRP) in a gas refinery. For studying corrosion kinetic and related mechanisms the impedance spectroscopy was used. Impedance diagrams were simulated by Boukamp1988 software. It was found that the simulated systems can be equated to a circuit with two time constants. For studying corrosion rate changes a type of inhibitor was utilized. The inhibitor used in this work was an imidazoline, an appropriate based inhibitor formulated with the commercial grade imidazoline and dimmer - trimer acid. It was shown that impedance spectroscopy technique can be used for corrosion monitoring of acid gas pipelines in gas refineries. The impedance spectroscopy will be tried in due course as a suitable technique in field for corrosion control of acid-gas pipelines. (authors)

  10. Hazardous gas treatment using atmospheric pressure microwave discharges

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasinski, Mariusz; Zakrzewski, Zenon [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure microwave discharge methods and devices used for producing non-thermal plasmas for control of gaseous pollutants are described in this paper. The main part of the paper is concerned with microwave torch discharges (MTDs). Results of laboratory experiments on plasma abatement of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in their mixtures with either synthetic air or nitrogen in low ({approx}100 W) and moderate (200-400 W) microwave torch plasmas at atmospheric pressure are presented. Three types of MTD generators, i.e. low-power coaxial-line-based MTDs, moderate-power waveguide-based coaxial-line MTDs and moderate-power waveguide-based MTDs were used. The gas flow rate and microwave (2.45 GHz) power delivered to the discharge were in the range of 1-3 litre min{sup -1} and 100-400 W, respectively. The concentrations of the processed gaseous pollutants were from several to several tens of per cent. The results showed that the MTD plasmas fully decomposed the VOCs at a relatively low energy cost. The energy efficiency of decomposition of several gaseous pollutants reached 1000 g (kW-h){sup -1}. This suggests that MTD plasmas can be useful tools for decomposition of highly concentrated VOCs.

  11. Experimental study on thermal hazard of tributyl phosphate-nitric acid mixtures using micro calorimeter technique.

    Sun, Qi; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Liang; Sun, Jin-Hua

    2016-08-15

    During PUREX spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, mixture of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and hydrocarbon solvent are employed as organic solvent to extract uranium in consideration of radiation contaminated safety and resource recycling, meanwhile nitric acid is utilized to dissolve the spent fuel into small pieces. However, once TBP contacts with nitric acid or nitrates above 130°C, a heavy "red oil" layer would occur accompanied by thermal runaway reactions, even caused several nuclear safety accident. Considering nitric acid volatility and weak exothermic detection, C80micro calorimeter technique was used in this study to investigate thermal decomposition of TBP mixed with nitric acid. Results show that the concentration of nitric acid greatly influences thermal hazard of the system by direct reactions. Even with a low heating rate, if the concentration of nitric acid increases due to evaporation of water or improper operations, thermal runaway in the closed system could start at a low temperature. PMID:27136728

  12. Evaluation of radiation hazard potential of TENORM waste from oil and natural gas production

    In this study, a potential radiation hazard from TENORM sludge wastes generated during exploration and extraction processes of oil and gas was evaluated. The activity concentration of natural radionuclides 238U, 226Ra and 232Th were determined in TENORM sludge waste. It was found that sludge waste from oil and gas industry is one of the major sources of 226Ra in the environment. Therefore, some preliminary chemical treatment of sludge waste using Triton X-100 was also investigated to reduce the radioactivity content as well as the risk of radiation hazard from TENORM wastes. The activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ra in petroleum sludge materials before and after chemical treatment were measured using gamma-ray spectrometry. The average values of the activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ra measured in the original samples were found as 8908 Bq kg−1 and 933 Bq kg−1, respectively. After chemical treatment of TENORM samples, the average values of the activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ra measured in the samples were found as 7835 Bq kg−1 and 574 Bq kg−1, respectively. Activity concentration index, internal index, absorbed gamma dose rate and the corresponding effective dose rate were estimated for untreated and treated samples. - Highlights: • Petroleum industry has been generated huge amount of natural occurring radioactive material. • Estimation of radiation hazards and environmental impact of TENORM sludge wastes. • New approach for decreasing the radioactivity content in TENORM sludge wastes

  13. Acid-gas injection in the Long Coulee Glauconite F Pool, Alberta : implications for enhanced gas recovery and acid-gas disposal

    Acid gas disposal in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is now being used as a means of safely and economically reducing acid gas emissions into the environment. Acid gas is currently being disposed into the Long Coulee Glauconite F pool in southern Alberta. The pool consists of a small oil leg and a large gas cap trapped in quartz arenite. In this study, reservoir mapping and permeability and porosity measurements were used to model the acid gas flow of a 98 per cent carbon dioxide (CO2) and 2 per cent hydrogen sulfide (H2S) mixture in order to determine the effects of acid gas injection on reservoir performance and recovery rates. The study demonstrated that acid gas injection resulted in increased gas recovery even with rapid CO2 breakthrough at offsetting gas producers. CO2 breakthrough occurred faster than H2S breakthrough. Gas partitioning occurred as a result of the preferential solubility of H2S in the formation brine. It was concluded that acid gas injection results in the partial re-pressurization of the gap cap.

  14. Acid-gas injection in the Long Coulee Glauconite F Pool, Alberta : implications for enhanced gas recovery and acid-gas disposal

    Dashtgard, S. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Pooladi-Darvish, M; Hong, H.; Theys, S.; Stocker, R. [Fekete Associates Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Bachu, S. [Energy Resources Conservation Board, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Acid gas disposal in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is now being used as a means of safely and economically reducing acid gas emissions into the environment. Acid gas is currently being disposed into the Long Coulee Glauconite F pool in southern Alberta. The pool consists of a small oil leg and a large gas cap trapped in quartz arenite. In this study, reservoir mapping and permeability and porosity measurements were used to model the acid gas flow of a 98 per cent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and 2 per cent hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) mixture in order to determine the effects of acid gas injection on reservoir performance and recovery rates. The study demonstrated that acid gas injection resulted in increased gas recovery even with rapid CO{sub 2} breakthrough at offsetting gas producers. CO{sub 2} breakthrough occurred faster than H{sub 2}S breakthrough. Gas partitioning occurred as a result of the preferential solubility of H{sub 2}S in the formation brine. It was concluded that acid gas injection results in the partial re-pressurization of the gap cap.

  15. Appraisal of possible combustion hazards associated with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    The report presents a study of combustion hazards that may be associated with the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) in the event of a primary coolant circuit depressurization followed by water or air ingress into the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Reactions between graphite and steam or air produce the combustible gases H2 and/or CO. When these gases are mixed with air in the containment vessel (CV), flammable mixtures may be formed. Various modes of combustion including diffusion or premixed flames and possibly detonation may be exhibited by these mixtures. These combustion processes may create high over-pressure, pressure waves, and very hot gases within the CV and hence may threaten the structural integrity of the CV or damage the instrumentation and control system installations within it. Possible circumstances leading to these hazards and the physical characteristics related to them are delineated and studied in the report

  16. A summary of geologic hazards for proposed OCS oil and gas lease sale 68, southern California

    Burdick, Deborah J.; Richmond, William C.

    1982-01-01

    A geophysical survey, consisting of about 6,880 line-km of multisensor, high-resolution, seismic reflection data, was run in 161 of the 221 tracts tentatively selected by the U.S. Department of the Interior for inclusion in the southern California Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sale 68. Geologic hazards identified in the study area for which stipulations are recommended are active faults, mass transport, steep slopes (>10?), and steep-walled submarine canyons. Geologic hazards whose effects can be mitigated through existing technology and design and are not considered cause for stipulation are shallow faults, buried and filled channels, shallow gas, gas-charged sediments, hydrocarbon seeps, and unstable fan deposits. The Minerals Management Service has recommended that a stipulation be applied to 83 tracts where there is evidence of existing or potential sea-floor instability over a significant portion of the tract. Further data acquisition and analysis on a more detail-ed grid will be required of lessees or operators before drilling will be permitted on leases issued as a result of the sale.

  17. Diglycolamic acid modified silica gel for the separation of hazardous trivalent metal ions from aqueous solution.

    Suneesh, A S; Syamala, K V; Venkatesan, K A; Antony, M P; Vasudeva Rao, P R

    2015-01-15

    The surface of the silica gel was modified with diglycolamic acid moieties and the product (Si-DGAH) was characterized by elemental analysis, TG-DTA, (1)H and (29)Si NMR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption behavior of hazardous americium (III) and europium (III) in Si-DGAH was studied from aqueous nitric acid medium to examine the feasibility using the modified silica for the separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) from aqueous wastes. In this context, the effect of various parameters such as the duration of equilibration, and concentrations of europium, nitric acid, sodium nitrate and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) in aqueous phase, on the distribution coefficient (K(d)) of Am(III) and Eu(III) was investigated. The distribution coefficient of ∼10(3) mL/g (>99.9% extraction) was obtained for both Am(III) and Eu(III) at pH 3, and the K(d) values decreased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. Rapid kinetics of extraction in the initial stages of equilibration, followed by the establishment of equilibrium occurred within 30 min. The extraction data were fitted into Langmuir adsorption model and the apparent europium extraction capacity was determined. Europium loading capacity of the sorbent was determined at various feed pH by column method. The study indicated the possibility of using diglycolamic acid-modified silica for the separation of Eu(III) and Am(III) from aqueous wastes. PMID:25454425

  18. Determination of Fatty Acid in Asparagus by Gas Chromatography

    Zehra HAJRULAI-MUSLIU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Asparagus contain a lot of macronutrients and micronutrients including folate, dietary fibre (soluble and insoluble and phenolic compounds. Also asparagus is a good source of unsaturated linoleic and linolenic fatty acids which are precursors for Eicosapentanoic acid (EPA and Docosahexanoic acid (DHA. Unsaturated fatty acids have important biological effects and they have important role in human health. The objective of this study was to analyze fatty acid composition of asparagus as a potential source of linoleic and linolenic acid - a precursor for EPA and DHA. For this reason we analyzed fifty seven samples of asparagus collected from the local market. We used AOAC 996.06 method and analyses were performed with gas chromatograph with flame-ionization detector (GC-FID. The highest concentration of fatty acid in the asparagus was linoleic acid (C18:2n6 which content in asparagus is 25.620±1.0%. Also, asparagus is good source of -linolenic fatty acid (C18:3n3 and content of this fatty acid in asparagus is 8.840±0.3%. The omega-6 to omega-3 (n6/n3 ratio in asparagus was 3.19. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs were higher than monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs, and from saturated fatty acids, palmitic acid was most frequent with 24.324±1.0%. From our study we can conclude that asparagus is very good source of unsaturated fatty acids, especially linoleic and linolenic fatty acids.

  19. Polymeric supported sorbents for decreasing hazardous metal ions content in wet process phosphoric acid

    Procedure for preparation of polymeric supported silica, and their usage for decreasing hazardous metal ion content in wet process phosphoric acid was developed. The procedure is based firstly on extraction silica from rice straw by alkaline treatment , secondly supporting the produced silica on binding polyacrylonitrile (PAN). The produced polymer based sorbent was used for decreasing hazardous metal ions (especially iron) present as inorganic impurities in crud Egyptian phosphoric acid (green acid). Different factors affecting the sorption equilibrium ( contact time, temperature , sorbent mass and batch factor ) were studied. Studying the sorption isotherm revealed that the adsorption data could favorably fit the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. In the dynamic study , the sorption capacity at (Cξ/Cο = 50%) was found to be 28.5 mg/g and the loaded column could be regenerated using 50ml of 0.15 M HNO3 . The regenerated column could undergo sorption regeneration cycles up to four cycles without significant decrease in the sorption capacity , weight loss or change in the physical properties of the sorbent

  20. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRTs)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-06-28

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) made at control decision meetings on November 16, 17, and 18, 1999, on April 19,2000, and on May 10,2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996) for DCRTs. Following the contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval.

  1. Sensor Array Devices Utilizing Nano-structured Metal-oxides for Hazardous Gas Detection

    Andio, Mark A.

    Methane and carbon monoxide are two hazardous gases which require continuous monitoring by gas sensors in underground coal mines for explosion prevention and toxicity, respectively. This work explored implementing miniaturized gas sensors in this area to simultaneously detect both gases for benefits of increased portability and reduced power consumption of the chemiresistive gas sensor device. The focus of this research was to understand how the particle size, morphology, and microstructure of the metaloxide film affected the gas sensor performance to the two gases of interest on miniaturized gas sensor devices in the form of microhotplate platforms. This was done through three main research studies. The first was conducted by growing SnO2 nanowires from SnO 2 particles using an Au-catalyst. Growth conditions including temperature, time, and oxygen partial pressure were explored to determine the formation aspects of the SnO2 nanowires. Gas sensor studies were completed that provided evidence that the SnO2 nanowires increased detection to a fixed concentration of carbon monoxide compared to SnO2 particles without nano-structure formation. A second research study was performed to compare the gas sensor performance of SnO2 nanoparticles, hierarchical particles, and micron-size particles. The nanoparticles were developed into an ink and deposited via ink-jet printing on the microhotplate substrates to control the microstructure of the metal-oxide film. By preventing agglomeration of the nanoparticle film, the SnO2 nanoparticles displayed similar gas sensor performance to methane and carbon monoxide as the hierarchical particles. Both nano-structures had much higher gas sensor response than the micron-size particles which confirms the surface area of the metal-oxide film is critical for reaction of the analyte gas at the surface. The last research study presented in the dissertation describes an oxide nanoparticle array developed for detecting methane and carbon

  2. Gas hazard assessment in a densely inhabited area of Colli Albani Volcano (Cava dei Selci, Roma)

    Carapezza, M. L.; Badalamenti, B.; Cavarra, L.; Scalzo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The northwestern flank of the Colli Albani, a Quaternary volcanic complex near Rome, is characterised by high pCO 2 values and Rn activities in the groundwater and by the presence of zones with strong emission of gas from the soil. The most significant of these zones is Cava dei Selci where many houses are located very near to the gas emission site. The emitted gas consists mainly of CO 2 (up to 98 vol%) with an appreciable content of H 2S (0.8-2%). The He and C isotopic composition indicates, as for all fluids associated with the Quaternary Roman and Tuscany volcanic provinces, the presence of an upper mantle component contaminated by crustal fluids associated with subducted sediments and carbonates. An advective CO 2 flux of 37 tons/day has been estimated from the gas bubbles rising to the surface in a small drainage ditch and through a stagnant water pool, present in the rainy season in a topographically low central part of the area. A CO 2 soil flux survey with an accumulation chamber, carried out in February-March 2000 over a 12 000 m 2 surface with 242 measurement points, gave a total (mostly conductive) flux of 61 tons/day. CO 2 soil flux values vary by four orders of magnitude over a 160-m distance and by one order of magnitude over several metres. A fixed network of 114 points over 6350 m 2 has been installed in order to investigate temporal flux variations. Six surveys carried out from May 2000 to June 2001 have shown large variations of the total CO 2 soil flux (8-25 tons/day). The strong emission of CO 2 and H 2S, which are gases denser than air, produces dangerous accumulations in low areas which have caused a series of lethal accidents to animals and one to a man. The gas hazard near the houses has been assessed by continuously monitoring the CO 2 and H 2S concentration in the air at 75 cm from the ground by means of two automatic stations. Certain environmental parameters (wind direction and speed; atm P, T, humidity and rainfall) were also

  3. The Role of Deposition in Limiting the Hazard Extent of Dense-Gas Plumes

    Dillon, M B

    2008-05-11

    Accidents that involve large (multi-ton) releases of toxic industrial chemicals and form dense-gas clouds often yield far fewer fatalities, casualties and environmental effects than standard assessment and emergency response models predict. This modeling study, which considers both dense-gas turbulence suppression and deposition to environmental objects (e.g. buildings), demonstrates that dry deposition to environmental objects may play a significant role in reducing the distance at which adverse impacts occur - particularly under low-wind, stable atmospheric conditions which are often considered to be the worst-case scenario for these types of releases. The degree to which the released chemical sticks to (or reacts with) environmental surfaces is likely a key parameter controlling hazard extents. In all modeled cases, the deposition to vertical surfaces of environmental objects (e.g. building walls) was more efficient in reducing atmospheric chemical concentrations than deposition to the earth's surface. This study suggests that (1) hazard extents may vary widely by release environment (e.g. grasslands vs. suburbia) and release conditions (e.g. sunlight or humidity may change the rate at which chemicals react with a surface) and (2) greenbelts (or similar structures) may dramatically reduce the impacts of large-scale releases. While these results are demonstrated to be qualitatively consistent with the downwind extent of vegetation damage in two chlorine releases, critical knowledge gaps exist and this study provides recommendations for additional experimental studies.

  4. Organic acids emissions from natural-gas-fed engines

    Zervas, Efthimios; Tazerout, Mohand

    A natural-gas-fed spark-ignition engine, operating under lean conditions, is used for the study of the organic acids exhaust emissions. These pollutants are collected by passing a sample of exhaust gas into deionised water. The final solution is directly analysed by HPLC/UV at 204 nm. Only formic acid is emitted in detectable concentration under the experimental conditions used. Its concentration decreases with the three engine operating parameters studied: spark advance, volumetric efficiency and fuel/air equivalence ratio. Exhaust formic acid concentration is also linked with exhaust oxygen concentration and exhaust temperature. A comparison with other engines (SI engines fed with gasoline and compression ignition engines) from bibliographic data proves that natural-gas-fed engines emit less organic acids than the other two types of engines.

  5. Hazardous waste disposal in relationship to radon gas emanation in atmosphere

    Radioactive/toxic radon gas (Rn) produced naturally in the ground by the normal decay of uranium (U) and radium (Ra) is widely distributed in trace amounts in the earth's crust. It is a colorless, odorless and tasteless element and is one of the six generally known noble gases which are inert gases lacking the usual or anticipated chemical or biological action. Most radon gas is concentrated in the oxidation belt which is at a relatively shallow depth from the ground surface. Under normal conditions, the amount of radon gas seeping into the atmosphere or entering into residential buildings is very little and will not be harmful to human health. In recent years, due to population growth, a progressive living standard and industrial progress, many natural farm lands, forests and wetlands have been destroyed by conversion into residential and industrial compounds; consequently, such construction activities and industrial waste disposal changes the dynamic equilibrium of the ecosystem which can trigger and accelerate radon gas emanation and mobilization. This change is the major reason for the problem of indoor radon concentration which has significantly increased in recent years. Recent findings indicate that radon is not a totally inert element as previously thought. It can be influenced by local environments such as temperature, pH value, ion exchange, redox reaction, etc. to some degree. Also radon gas interacts with soil, water, air and others; unfortunately, the interface mechanisms between radon and the environment are not yet clearly understood and little information on these aspects is available. In this paper only the hazardous waste disposal causes for radon emanation are discussed. To deal with such complex phenomena, a new approach is presented that assumes radon gas interaction with the environment through dust in the air and suspensions in the water and soil-water system

  6. The spatiotemporal characteristics of environmental hazards caused by offshore oil and gas operations in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Meng, Qingmin

    2016-09-15

    Marine ecosystems are home to a host of numerous species ranging from tiny planktonic organisms, fishes, and birds, to large mammals such as the whales, manatees, and seals. However, human activities such as offshore oil and gas operations increasingly threaten marine and coastal ecosystems, for which there has been little exploration into the spatial and temporal risks of offshore oil operations. Using the Gulf of Mexico, one of the world's hottest spots of offshore oil and gas mining, as the study area, we propose a spatiotemporal approach that integrates spatial statistics and geostatistics in a geographic information system environment to provide insight to environmental management and decision making for oil and gas operators, coastal communities, local governments, and the federal government. We use the records from 1995 to 2015 of twelve types of hazards caused by offshore oil and gas operations, and analyze them spatially over a five year period. The spatial clusters of these hazards are analyzed and mapped using Getis-Ord Gi and local Moran's I statistics. We then design a spatial correlation coefficient matrix for multivariate spatial correlation, which is the ratio of the cross variogram of two types of hazards to the product of the variograms of the two hazards, showing a primary understanding of the degrees of spatial correlation among the twelve types hazards. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first application of spatiotemporal analysis methods to environmental hazards caused by offshore oil and gas operations; the proposed methods can be applied to other regions for the management and monitoring of environmental hazards caused by offshore oil operations. PMID:27213845

  7. Hazards to nuclear power plants from large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spills on water

    The hazards to nuclear power plants arising from large spills of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on water transportation routes are treated by deterministic analytical procedures. Global models, which address the salient features of the LNG spill phenomena are used in the analysis. A coupled computational model for the combined LNG spill, spreading, and fire scenario is developed. To predict the air blast environment in the vicinity of vapor clouds with pancake-like geometries, a scalable procedure using both analytical methods and hydrocode calculations is synthesized. Simple response criteria from the fire and weapons effects literature are used to characterize the susceptibility of safety-related power plant systems. The vulnerability of these systems is established either by direct comparison between the LNG threat and the susceptibility criteria or through simple response calculations. Results are analyzed

  8. Coal seam gas water: potential hazards and exposure pathways in Queensland.

    Navi, Maryam; Skelly, Chris; Taulis, Mauricio; Nasiri, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of coal seam gas (CSG) produces large volumes of potentially contaminated water. It has raised concerns about the environmental health impacts of the co-produced CSG water. In this paper, we review CSG water contaminants and their potential health effects in the context of exposure pathways in Queensland's CSG basins. The hazardous substances associated with CSG water in Queensland include fluoride, boron, lead and benzene. The exposure pathways for CSG water are (1) water used for municipal purposes; (2) recreational water activities in rivers; (3) occupational exposures; (4) water extracted from contaminated aquifers; and (5) indirect exposure through the food chain. We recommend mapping of exposure pathways into communities in CSG regions to determine the potentially exposed populations in Queensland. Future efforts to monitor chemicals of concern and consolidate them into a central database will build the necessary capability to undertake a much needed environmental health impact assessment. PMID:24853090

  9. Evaluation of Chilled Methanol Processes for Acid Gas Removal

    Piña Dreyer, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    As the main goal achieved with this master thesis, a plant design was constructed for an acid gas removal process with methanol operating at low temperatures. First, a bibliographical research was made in terms of sour gas treatment; with special focus of physical absorption processes involving methanol as the solvent to achieve separation; such as Rectisol and Ifpexsol. The literature research was extended to thermodynamic data; compiling equilibrium values for binary systems between methano...

  10. Acid-resistant composite for reinforcing gas and oil wells

    Tarnavskiy, A.P.; Avilov, V.I.; Bayda, Yu.V.; Danyushevskiy, V.S.; Sitkov, B.P.; Zolotukhin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    The acid-resistant composite for reinforcing gas and oil wells including ferromolybdenum slag, liquid glass and sodium fluosilicate is distinguished by the fact that in order to increase its setting periods in acid media with increased bed temperature to 80/sup 0/ C, it additionally contains potassium oleate with the following ratio of components (parts by weight): ferromolybdenum slag 100, liquid glass 99-100, sodium fluosilicate 5.5-10.0; potassium oleate 0.2-1.5.

  11. Hazard Ranking Methodology for Assessing Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development and Production: The Maryland Case Study

    Sangaramoorthy, Thurka; Wilson, Sacoby; Nachman, Keeve E.; Babik, Kelsey; Jenkins, Christian C.; Trowell, Joshua; Milton, Donald K.; Sapkota, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The recent growth of unconventional natural gas development and production (UNGDP) has outpaced research on the potential health impacts associated with the process. The Maryland Marcellus Shale Public Health Study was conducted to inform the Maryland Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission, State legislators and the Governor about potential public health impacts associated with UNGDP so they could make an informed decision that considers the health and well-being of Marylanders. In this paper, we describe an impact assessment and hazard ranking methodology we used to assess the potential public health impacts for eight hazards associated with the UNGDP process. The hazard ranking included seven metrics: 1) presence of vulnerable populations (e.g. children under the age of 5, individuals over the age of 65, surface owners), 2) duration of exposure, 3) frequency of exposure, 4) likelihood of health effects, 5) magnitude/severity of health effects, 6) geographic extent, and 7) effectiveness of setbacks. Overall public health concern was determined by a color-coded ranking system (low, moderately high, and high) that was generated based on the overall sum of the scores for each hazard. We provide three illustrative examples of applying our methodology for air quality and health care infrastructure which were ranked as high concern and for water quality which was ranked moderately high concern. The hazard ranking was a valuable tool that allowed us to systematically evaluate each of the hazards and provide recommendations to minimize the hazards. PMID:26726918

  12. Hazard Ranking Methodology for Assessing Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development and Production: The Maryland Case Study.

    Boyle, Meleah D; Payne-Sturges, Devon C; Sangaramoorthy, Thurka; Wilson, Sacoby; Nachman, Keeve E; Babik, Kelsey; Jenkins, Christian C; Trowell, Joshua; Milton, Donald K; Sapkota, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The recent growth of unconventional natural gas development and production (UNGDP) has outpaced research on the potential health impacts associated with the process. The Maryland Marcellus Shale Public Health Study was conducted to inform the Maryland Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission, State legislators and the Governor about potential public health impacts associated with UNGDP so they could make an informed decision that considers the health and well-being of Marylanders. In this paper, we describe an impact assessment and hazard ranking methodology we used to assess the potential public health impacts for eight hazards associated with the UNGDP process. The hazard ranking included seven metrics: 1) presence of vulnerable populations (e.g. children under the age of 5, individuals over the age of 65, surface owners), 2) duration of exposure, 3) frequency of exposure, 4) likelihood of health effects, 5) magnitude/severity of health effects, 6) geographic extent, and 7) effectiveness of setbacks. Overall public health concern was determined by a color-coded ranking system (low, moderately high, and high) that was generated based on the overall sum of the scores for each hazard. We provide three illustrative examples of applying our methodology for air quality and health care infrastructure which were ranked as high concern and for water quality which was ranked moderately high concern. The hazard ranking was a valuable tool that allowed us to systematically evaluate each of the hazards and provide recommendations to minimize the hazards. PMID:26726918

  13. Gas-Phase IR Spectroscopy of Deprotonated Amino Acids

    Oomens, J.; Steill, J. D.; Redlich, B.

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra have been recorded for the conjugate bases of a series of amino acids (Asp, Cys, Glu, Phe, Set, Trp, Tyr). The spectra are dominated by strong symmetric and antisymmetric carboxylate stretching modes around 1300 and 1600 cm(-1), respect

  14. role of conjugated linoleic acid in the prevention of radiation hazard in male rats

    the objective of the present study was to examine the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as a natural product in minimizing the radiation hazards. male rats were assigned to six groups each of 7 animals throughout six weeks, fed 1% CLA (wt/wt)added to commercial diet in the form of milk powder 182 g/kg diet. rats exposed to 6 Gy whole body gamma irradiation showed significant increase in total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).triglycerides (TG), atherosclerosis index, total lipid (TL), phospholipids (ph-lipids), malondialdehyde (MDA), urea,creatinine, uric acid, calcium (Ca) and phosphorous levels associated with decrease in high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), activity of reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant status, body weight, testes weight and testosterone both irradiated and non-irradiated milk powder administrated to irradiated rat groups minimized the radiation damage in the assayed parameters indicating its beneficial role as a promising antioxidant in scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species

  15. Hazardous gas production by alpha particles in solid organic transuranic waste matrices. 1998 annual progress report

    'This project uses fundamental radiation chemical techniques to elucidate the basic processes occurring in the heavy-ion radiolysis of solid hydrocarbon matrices such as polymers and organic resins that are associated with many of the transuranic waste deposits or the transportation of these radionuclides. The environmental management of mixed waste containing transuranic radionuclides is difficult because these nuclides are alpha particle emitters and the energy deposited by the alpha particles causes chemical transformations in the matrices accompanying the waste. Most radiolysis programs focus on conventional radiation such as gamma rays, but the chemical changes induced by alpha particles and other heavy ions are typically very different and product yields can vary by more than an order of magnitude. The objective of this research is to measure the production of gases, especially molecular hydrogen, produced in the proton, helium ion, and carbon ion radiolysis of selected solid organic matrices in order to obtain fundamental mechanistic information on the radiolytic decomposition of these materials. This knowledge can also be used to directly give reasonable estimates of explosive or flammability hazards in the storage or transport of transuranic wastes in order to enhance the safety of DOE sites. This report summarizes the work after eight months of a three-year project on determining the production of hazardous gases in transuranic waste. The first stage of the project was to design and build an assembly to irradiate solid organic matrices using accelerated ion beams. It is necessary to measure absolute radiolytic yields, and simulate some of the conditions found in the field. A window assembly was constructed allowing the beam to pass consecutively through a collimator, a vacuum exit window and into the solid sample. The beam is stopped in the sample and the entire end of the assembly is a Faraday cup. Integration of the collected current, in conjunction

  16. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  17. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  18. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    Sonnenthal Eric

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual

  19. The use of activated char for flue gas polishing in municipal and hazardous waste combustors

    Hartenstein, H.U.; Steinmueller, L.C.

    1996-10-01

    In the year of 1989/1990 stringent new emission requirements were introduced for municipal (MWC`s) and hazardous waste combustors (HWC`s) in Central Europe. These laws reducing not only the former emission values of most pollutants by a factor of 20 or more, also introduced new pollutants to be regulated such as dioxins (PCDD`s) and furans (PCDF`s). In order to meet these new laws a new generation of air pollution control (APC) equipment had to developed. Most of the new techniques are based on the use of some kind of activated carbon which allows for the low emission values required. This paper describes the ACR (activated char reactor) technology developed by the L. & C. Steinmutler GmbH, Gummersbach through its 100% subsidiary Hugo Petersen GmbH & Co. KG, Wiesbaden Germany. The ACR technology utilizes the excellent adsorption capabilities of activated char for a wide variety of air pollutants at the tail end and of the APC-train for flue gas polishing. The paper details the design as well as the removal capabilities of the technique. It outlines several full scale applications in Europe an provides data from various installations.

  20. Realtime Gas Emission Monitoring at Hazardous Sites Using a Distributed Point-Source Sensing Infrastructure.

    Manes, Gianfranco; Collodi, Giovanni; Gelpi, Leonardo; Fusco, Rosanna; Ricci, Giuseppe; Manes, Antonio; Passafiume, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed point-source monitoring platform for gas level and leakage detection in hazardous environments. The platform, based on a wireless sensor network (WSN) architecture, is organised into sub-networks to be positioned in the plant's critical areas; each sub-net includes a gateway unit wirelessly connected to the WSN nodes, hence providing an easily deployable, stand-alone infrastructure featuring a high degree of scalability and reconfigurability. Furthermore, the system provides automated calibration routines which can be accomplished by non-specialized maintenance operators without system reliability reduction issues. Internet connectivity is provided via TCP/IP over GPRS (Internet standard protocols over mobile networks) gateways at a one-minute sampling rate. Environmental and process data are forwarded to a remote server and made available to authenticated users through a user interface that provides data rendering in various formats and multi-sensor data fusion. The platform is able to provide real-time plant management with an effective; accurate tool for immediate warning in case of critical events. PMID:26805832

  1. Gas chromatography of alkylphosphonic and dialkyl phosphinic acids

    After carrying out an optimization study on the separation conditions for the TMSr- derivatives, of the hexyl-, cyclohexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-phosphonic acids; dihexyl dicyclohexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-phosphinic acids, and dioctyl phosphine oxide, their retention indices (I) at two temperatures and on the OV-1 and OV-17 stationary phase were determined. Correlations between I and molecular structure were established. Calibration factors of these compounds in the flame ionization detector were studied, and the results analyzed taking into account the variables affecting the quantitative results, These results were unbiased but they had a lower precision than that usually achievable in gas chromatography. (Author) 24 refs

  2. Gas hazard assessment in the touristic area of Levante Beach (Vulcano island, Italy)

    Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Di Piazza, Andrea; Gattuso, Alessandro; Ranaldi, Massimo; Sortino, Francesco; Tarchini, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Since the last eruption occurred at "La Fossa" in 1888-1890, Vulcano remained in a quiescence state characterized by an intense fumarolic activity. The main degassing manifestations are concentrated in La Fossa crater area (high temperature fumaroles) and in the area of Vulcano Porto, between Levante Beach and Faraglioni (medium-low temperature fumaroles). In addition the entire volcanic edifice of La Fossa, its base and the area of Vulcano Porto are characterized by en extensive soil CO2 diffuse degassing. In the last century episodic "crises" have occurred with increase of temperature, gas output and compositional changes of the crater fumaroles indicating an increase of the magmatic component in the discharged fluids. These episodic crises occurred in 1916-1924, in 1988-1993, in 1996 and in 2004-2006. During the period 1988-1990, the accumulation of CO2 in morphological depressions or excavation provoked the death for asphyxiation of two children in the area of Vulcano Porto and of some small animals at the base of the crater area. In April 2015, a child lost his senses while playing at Levante Beach; he was rescued by an air ambulance to the hospital of Lipari. According to the national chronicle (La Repubblica, 22 June 2015), doctors attributed the malaise to a high CO2 air concentration. Soon after this event the Major of Lipari installed at Levante Beach some panels informing tourists on gas hazard. In summer 2015 we performed a geochemical survey of the Levante Beach sector (onshore and offshore) and of the mud pool, estimating the diffuse and viscous gas flux and the air gas concentration in order to evaluate the degassing level. The total gas flux in the Levante Beach area, from 0.3 km2, has been estimated in 1 t/day of CO2 and 16,1 kg/day of H2S; values comparable with those of the 2009 and 2011 campaigns. In addition, a soil CO2 flux survey of the target area at La Fossa crater was performed, ascertaining that the degassing rate was within the range of

  3. Study on Cyclometalated Palladium-azo Complexes as Colorimetric Probes for Hazardous Gas in Water

    YU,Chun-Wei; LI,Shun-Hua; ZHENG,Hong; XU,Jin-Gou

    2007-01-01

    A synthesized cyclometalated palladium-azo complex was explored as a multifunctional probe for visual detection of SO2, H2S and NH3 in water. In acidic aqueous environment, the sensing solution underwent a sharp color change from poor violet to deep blue when titrated with Na2SO3 standard solution. But the color changed from poor violet to bright yellow when titrated with Na2S standard solution. In basic environment, the sensing solution rapidly changed to magenta when titrated by NH4Cl-NH3 standard buffer solution at high concentration. However, the color of sensing solution changed to blue when titrated by NH4Cl-NH3 standard buffer solution at low concentration although the pH was kept constant during the titration. Different species of these hazardous gases at environmentally relevant concentration levels were differentiated by independent optical signal outputs, and the interference from other inorganic ions commonly existing in water was very small.

  4. The risk early-warning of gas hazard in coal mine based on Rough Set-neural network

    TIAN Shui-cheng; WANG Li

    2007-01-01

    This article proposed the risk early-warning model of gas hazard based on Rough Set and neural network. The attribute quantity was reduced by Rough Set, the main characteristic attributes were withdrawn, the complexity of neural network system and the computing time was reduced, as well. Because of fault-tolerant ability, parallel processing ability, anti-jamming ability and processing non-linear problem ability of neural network system, the methods of Rough Set and neural network were combined. The examples research indicate: applying Rough Set and BP neural network to the gas hazard risk early-warning coal mines in coal mine, the BPNN structure is greatly simplified, the network computation quantity is reduced and the convergence rate is speed up.

  5. Potential geologic hazards and constraints for blocks in proposed Mid-Atlantic OCS oil and gas lease sale 49

    Hall, R. W., (Edited By); Ensminger, H. Robert

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of side-scan sonar, subbottom profiler, processed sparker, and fathometer data (approximately 5060 km) from the 136 blocks in the proposed Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sale 49 disclosed features that are potential geologic hazards to oil and gas exploration and development operations. These potential hazards are past mass sediment movement (slumping or sliding) in parts or all of 57 proposed lease sale blocks (27 of which are virtually covered by slumped materials), shallow gas deposits in three proposed lease sale blocks, and recent shallow faulting in one proposed lease sale block. Other features considered merely to be developmental constraints can be accommodated by existing standard design and engineering technology: erosion and scour, sand waves, filled channels, acoustically turbid zones (gassy sediments), lagoonal sediments, potentially unstable slopes (due to gradient), unidentified bottom objects, and a shipwreck.

  6. Gas and rock-bump hazard monitoring in the Polish mining

    ISAKOW Zbigniew; KRZYSTANEK Zdzistaw; TRENCZEK Stanislaw; WOJTAS Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Described the main environmental hazards occurring in Polish underground mines and their continuous growth in recent years as well as equipment and systems which were used for monitoring mine air parameters and geodynamic phenomena. The latest versions of environmental hazard monitoring systems, having a form of a compre- hensive set of underground and surface equipment, are presented and their functions characterized.

  7. Rapid reduction of lead leachate from hazardous fly ash using microwave treatment with acid combination.

    Chou, Chih-Mei; Wang, Li-Pang; Kao, Jimmy C M; Lin, Kae-Long; Chang, Yu-Min

    2016-02-01

    The novelty of this study is to rapidly reduce hazardous lead leachates from solid waste using microwave digestion treatment, which is an energy-saving and low greenhouse gas emission technology. The article presents the reduction of toxic characteristic leaching procedure-extractable lead concentration in the municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by the microwave digestion treatment in HNO3/H2SO4 combination, and focuses on the effects of treatment time and temperature. The results obtained from this study indicated a significant reduction efficiency of toxic characteristic leaching procedure-extractable lead concentration and showed sufficient reduction in leaching levels to render the treated fly ash safe in lead compound leaching characteristics. The reduction efficiency of toxic characteristic leaching procedure-extractable lead concentration can reach 98% in 15 minutes of treatment time. This is equivalent to the original toxic characteristic leaching procedure-extractable lead concentration of 46.2 mg L(-1) in raw fly ash being reduced down to less than 1.0 mg L(-1). Based on the experimental data obtained in this study, a useful correlation between reduction efficiency and treatment conditions is proposed. For engineering applications, the necessary minimum treatment time is solved using a graphic illustration method, by which the minimum treatment time (t(min)) is obtained if the desired reduction efficiency (η) and treatment temperature (T) are known. The effects of treatment time and temperature are discussed. Some problems caused by the microwave digestion treatment method are also delineated in this article. PMID:26526019

  8. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from gas-fired combustion sources: emissions and the effects of design and fuel type.

    England, G C; McGrath, T P; Gilmer, L; Seebold, J G; Lev-On, M; Hunt, T

    2001-01-01

    Air emissions from gas-fired combustion devices such as boilers, process heaters, gas turbines and stationary reciprocating engines contain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) subjected to consideration under the federal clean air act (CAA). This work presents a recently completed major research project to develop an understanding of HAP emissions from gas-fired boilers and process heaters and new HAP emission factors based on field emission tests of gas-fired external combustion devices used in the petroleum industry. The effect of combustion system design and operating parameters on HAP emissions determined by both field and research tests are discussed. Data from field tests of gas-fired petroleum industry boilers and heaters generally show very low emission levels of organic HAPs. A comparison of the emission data for boilers and process heaters, including units with and without various forms of NOx emission controls, showed no significant difference in organic HAP emission characteristics due to process or burner design. This conclusion is also supported by the results of research tests with different burner designs. Based on field tests of units fired with natural gas and various petroleum industry process gases and research tests in which gas composition was intentionally varied, organic HAP emissions were not determined to be significantly affected by the gas composition. Research data indicate that elevated organic HAP emission levels are found only under extreme operating conditions (starved air or high excess air combustion) associated with poor combustion. PMID:11219701

  9. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from gas-fired combustion sources: emissions and the effects of design and fuel type

    Air emissions from gas-fired combustion devices such as boilers, process heaters, gas turbines and stationary reciprocating engines contain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) subjected to consideration under the federal clean air act (CAA). This work presents a recently completed major research project to develop an understanding of HAP emissions from gas-fired boilers and process heaters and new HAP emission factors based on field emission tests of gas-fired external combustion devices used in the petroleum industry. The effect of combustion system design and operating parameters on HAP emissions determined by both field and research tests are discussed. Data from field tests of gas-fired petroleum industry boilers and heaters generally show very low emission levels of organic HAPs. A comparison of the emission data for boilers and process heaters, including units with and without various forms of NOx emission controls, showed no significant difference in organic HAP emission characteristics due to process or burner design. This conclusion is also supported by the results of research tests with different burner designs. Based on field tests of units fired with natural gas and various petroleum industry process gases and research tests in which gas composition was intentionally varied, organic HAP emissions were not determined to be significantly affected by the gas composition. Research data indicate that elevated organic HAP emission levels are found only under extreme operating conditions (starved air or high excess air combustion) associated with poor combustion. (author)

  10. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  11. Removal of the hazardous, volatile, and organic compound benzene from aqueous solution using phosphoric acid activated carbon from rice husk

    Yakout, Sobhy M

    2014-01-01

    Background Benzene is one of the most hazardous organic pollutants in groundwater. The removal of benzene from water is very important from a health point of view and for environmental protection. In this study, benzene adsorption kinetics was investigated using phosphoric acid activated carbon, prepared from rice husk. Results An initial rapid uptake of benzene was observed and became almost constant after 40 minutes of contact. Kinetic data was analyzed using pseudo first order, pseudo seco...

  12. Unknown plant de-construction hazard -- Toxic COS and CS2 gas from torch cutting of pipe

    An employee exhibited signs of illness after apparently inhaling fumes generated from a pipe that had been cut with a cutting torch. Identification and quantification of the hazardous air emission for reduction of risk via the Department of Energy Class B Investigation are described in this case study. The old hydrogen sulfide gas flare pipe in the heavy water plant of the Savannah River Site has been abandoned with one end open to atmosphere for almost twenty years. The pipe was being removed and cut into sections for disposal during an asbestos abatement project. It contained ash like corrosion deposits that smolder after torch cutting. Investigation revealed that burning of carbon and sulfur in the oxygen deficient atmosphere in the ash generated carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) gas, which vented when the pipe was moved by the injured construction rigger. This is believed to be the first well documented exposure and response of a human to high concentration COS gas. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas is also generated during the cutting. SO2 is almost impossible to inhale and has apparently prevented a similar injury during the cutting. SO2 is almost impossible to inhale and has apparently prevented a similar injury during the many years of US and Canadian heavy water plant de-construction experience. Immediate water quench of the smoldering ash after each cut has eliminated the hazard of residual COS and CS2 gas. This previously unrecognized industrial hazard may be encountered by other chemical and petroleum industries during torch cutting of pipes that contain similar deposits of iron oxide, iron sulfate, sulfur and carbon

  13. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2011-09-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO{2/-} anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional γ or δ unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond π electrons during NO{2/-} rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples.

  14. A new chemical system solution for acid gas removal

    Seiler, M.; Rolker, J.; Witthaut, D.; Schulze, S. [Evonik Industries AG, Hanau (Germany); Buchholz, S. [Evonik Industries AG, Marl (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    An energy-efficient absorbent formulation fors eparating acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, H2S) from gas streams such as natural gas, syngas or flue gas is important for a number of industrial applications. In many cases, a substantial share of their costs is driven by the operational expenditure (OPEX) of the CO{sub 2} separation unit. One possible strategy for reducing OPEX is the improvement of the absorbent performance. Although a number of absorbents for the separation of CO{sub 2} from gas streams exist, there is still a need to develop CO{sub 2} absorbents with an improved absorption performance, less corrosion and foaming, no nitrosamine formation, lower energy requirement and therefore less OPEX. This contribution aims at giving a brief state-of-the-art overview followed by an introduction and performance characterization of a new family of amine-based CO{sub 2} absorbents. High cyclic capacities in the range of 2.9 to 3.2 mol CO{sub 2} kg{sup -1} absorbent and low absorption enthalpies of about -30 kJ mol{sup -1} allow for significant savings in the regeneration energy of the new absorbent system. Calculations with the modified Kremser model indicate a reduction in the specific reboiler heat duty of 45 %. Moreover, the high-performance absorbents developed show much lower corrosion rates than state-of-the-art solutions that are currently employed. (orig.)

  15. Simulation of a Wet Sulfuric Acid Process (WSA for Utilization of Acid Gas Separated from Omani Natural Gas

    Ahmed Jawad Ali Al-Dallal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a proposed process for the utilization of hydrogen sulphide separated with other gases from omani natural gas for the production of sulphuric acid by wet sulphuric acid process (WSA was studied. The processwas simulated at an acid gas feed flow of 5000 m3/hr using Aspen ONE- V7.1-HYSYS software. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the optimum conditions for the operation of plant. This included primarily the threepacked bed reactors connected in series for the production of sulphur trioxidewhich represented the bottleneck of the process. The optimum feed temperature and catalyst bed volume for each reactor were estimated and then used in the simulation of the whole process for two cases namely 4 and 6 mole% SO2 stream fed to the first catalytic reactor. The 4mole% SO2 gaves the highest conversion (98% compared with 6 mole% SO2 (94.7%. A valuable quantity of heat was generated from the process. This excess heat could also be transformed into power in a turbine or used as a heating media in neighbouring process units.

  16. Analysis of radioactive mixed hazardous waste using derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Six samples of core segments from Tank 101-SY were analyzed for chelators, chelator fragments, and several carboxylic acids by derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The major components detected were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitroso-iminodiacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid. The chelator of highest concentration was ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in all six samples analyzed. Liquid chromatography was used to quantitate low molecular weight acids including oxalic, formic, glycolic, and acetic acids, which are present in the waste as acid salts. From 23 to 61% of the total organic carbon in the samples analyzed was accounted for by these acids

  17. Potential geologic hazards and constraints for blocks in proposed North Atlantic OCS Oil and gas lease sale 52

    Carpenter, G.B.; Cardinell, A.P.; Francois, D.K.; Good, L.K.; Lewis, R.L.; Stiles, N.T.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of high-resolution geophysical data collected over 540 blocks tentatively selected for leasing in proposed OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sale 52 (Georges Bank) revealed a number of potential geologic hazards to oil and gas exploration and development activities: evidence of mass movements and shallow gas deposits on the continental slope. No potential hazards were observed on the continental shelf or rise. Other geology-related problems, termed constraints because they pose a relatively low degree of risk and can be routinely dealt with by the use of existing technology have been observed on the continental shelf. Constraints identified in the proposed sale area are erosion, sand waves, filled channels and deep faults. Piston cores were collected for geotechnical analysis at selected locations on the continental slope in the proposed lease sale area. The core locations were selected to provide information on slope stability and to establish the general geotechnical properties of the sediments. Preliminary results of a testing program suggest that the surficial sediment cover is stable with respect to mass movement.

  18. Amine-oxide hybrid materials for acid gas separations

    Bollini, Praveen

    2011-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials based on porous silica materials functionalized with amine-containing organic species are emerging as an important class of materials for the adsorptive separation of acid gases from dilute gas streams. In particular, these materials are being extensively studied for the adsorption of CO 2 from simulated flue gas streams, with an eye towards utilizing these materials as part of a post-combustion carbon capture process at large flue gas producing installations, such as coal-fired electricity-generating power plants. In this Application Article, the utilization of amine-modified organic-inorganic hybrid materials is discussed, focusing on important attributes of the materials, such as (i) CO 2 adsorption capacities, (ii) adsorption and desorption kinetics, and (iii) material stability, that will determine if these materials may one day be useful adsorbents in practical CO 2 capture applications. Specific research needs and limitations associated with the current body of work are identified. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Local permeability changes, passive degassing and related gas hazard at the Baia di Levante area (Vulcano island, Italy)

    Diliberto, Iole Serena; Cangemi, Marianna; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Madonia, Paolo; Pedone, Maria; Fabio Pisciotta, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Vulcano, the southernmost island of the Aeolian archipelago (Italy), is presently characterized by active fumarolic fields located along the rim of La Fossa cone and the shoreline of the Baia di Levante beach, in the northern portion of the island.The Baia di Levante fumarolic vents are fed by a shallow hydrothermal aquifer heated by magmatic gases rising from the deep down, with a spatial distribution strongly affected by the local fracture network. These fractures are the expression of a deformation field, dominated by a northward motion to Lipari, abruptly decaying to the Vulcanello peninsula, immediately northward of the Baia di Levante beach. Variable rates of fluid transfer to the surface, following permeability changes affecting the fracture network are among the results of stress field variations over time which induce fluctuations in the pressure state of the hydrothermal system. Under these conditions, increments in hydrothermal gas flow, able to cause an increase of gas hazard, could be determined by a rearrangement of the shallow permeability distribution induced by changes in the deformation field. In this case not associated to any variation in the volcanic activity state. Since 2009 an huge gas flow increment has been noticed in some undersea vents of the Baia di Levante area, leading to increase of gas hazard in their immediate surroundings. On the contrary, the acquired data from the INGV volcanic surveillance program didn't suggest any correlated increase of the magmatic fluid component in the degassing activity.In July 2015, we carried out multi-parametric geochemical surveys in this area, based on direct (thermocouple) and indirect (thermal infrared camera and pyrometer) soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, atmospheric concentration of CO2 and H2S measurements at low elevation (one meter a.s.l.). The chemical and isotopic composition of low temperature fumarole gases was determined too.The comparison of the new data with previous surveys carried out

  20. Acid gas injection: Another approach of acid gas treatment%酸气回注——酸气处理的另一途径

    John J.Carroll; Shouxi Wang; 汤林

    2009-01-01

    目前在北美,很多生产富含硫化氢和二氧化碳的天然气公司均采用一种新技术处理其废气,该废气的主要成分为硫化氢和二氧化碳,故称为"酸气".这种处理酸气的过程被称为酸气回注系统,其过程主要涉及酸气压缩、输送以及注入地下储存层.这种酸气回注技术解决了地面硫的回收和二氧化碳排放对空气污染的问题,已经逐渐成为一种切实可行的酸气处理方法.为此,针对不同回注酸气流的组成,分别从回注酸气的地层、回注酸气的管道、酸气流体相包络曲线、酸气压缩机、酸气含水量和压缩机操作过程中的注意事项等方面全面介绍了酸气回注技术及酸气回注系统的设计要点.该方法是酸气处理的另一条途经.%At present, many sour natural gas producers in North America adopt a new technology to deal with the waste gas, so-called acid gas, which mainly contains H_2S and CO_2. The acid gas treatment technology is also called acid gas injection system, the process of which involves the compression, transportation, and subsurface injection of acid gas stream. This technology has become a feasible and practical method of acid gas treatment which has solved the problems of sulfur recovery and carbon dioxide emission. According to different compositions of acid gas stream, acid gas injection design requires many sides of considerations including the underground stratum and pipes of acid flooding, the envelop curve of acid gas stream, the acid gas compressor, the water content in acid gas, and the operation process of the compressor, etc. This new technology has been proved to be another good approach of dealing with acid gas in fields.

  1. Source Mechanism, Stress Triggering, and Hazard Analysis of Induced Seismicity in Oil/Gas Fields in Oman and Kuwait

    Gu, C.; Toksoz, M. N.; Ding, M.; Al-Enezi, A.; Al-Jeri, F.; Meng, C.

    2015-12-01

    Induced seismicity has drawn new attentions in both academia and industry in recent years as the increasing seismic activity in the regions of oil/gas fields due to fluid injection/extraction and hydraulic fracturing. Source mechanism and triggering stress of these induced earthquakes are of great importance for understanding their causes and the physics of the seismic processes in reservoirs. Previous research on the analysis of induced seismic events in conventional oil/gas fields assumed a double couple (DC) source mechanism. The induced seismic data in this study are from both Oman and Kuwait. For the Oman data, the induced seismicity is monitored by both surface network (0oil/gas field. The data used in the study consist of 800 events located by the surface network and 2000 events from the downhole network. For the Kuwait data a surface network is used to collect the local seismic data (0oil/gas fields from year 1999 to 2007 for Oman, and from year 2006 to 2015 for Kuwait. In addition, the local hazard corresponding to the induced seismicity in these oil/gas fields is assessed and compared to ground motion prediction due to large (M>5.0) regional tectonic earthquakes.

  2. Comparative acute freshwater hazard assessment and preliminary PNEC development for eight fluorinated acids.

    Hoke, Robert A; Bouchelle, Laurie D; Ferrell, Barbra D; Buck, Robert C

    2012-05-01

    Short-term 48, 72 and 96-h aquatic toxicity tests were conducted to evaluate the acute toxicity of eight fluorinated acids to the cladoceran, Daphnia magna, the green alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss or the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas. The eight fluorinated acids studied were tridecafluorohexyl ethanoic acid (6:2 FTCA), heptadecafluorooctyl ethanoic acid (8:2 FTCA), 2H-dodecafluoro-2-octenoic acid (6:2 FTUCA), 2H-hexadecafluoro-2-decenoic acid (8:2 FTUCA), 2H,2H,3H,3H-undecafluoro octanoic acid (5:3 acid), 2H,2H,3H,3H-pentadecafluoro decanoic acid (7:3 acid), n-perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPeA) and n-perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA). The results of the acute toxicity tests conducted during this study suggest that the polyfluorinated acids, 8:2 FTCA, 8:2 FTUCA, 6:2 FTCA, 6:2 FTUCA, 7:3 acid and 5:3 acid, and the perfluorinated acids PFPeA and PFDA, are generally of low to medium concern based on evaluation of their acute freshwater toxicity (EC/LC50s typically between 1 and >100 mg L(-1)) using the USEPA TSCA aquatic toxicity evaluation paradigm. For the polyfluorinated acids, aquatic toxicity generally decreased as the number of fluorinated carbons decreased and as the overall carbon chain length decreased from 12 to 8. Acute aquatic toxicity of the 5 and 10 carbon perfluorocarboxylic acids (EC/LC50s between 10.6 and >100 mg L(-1)) was greater or similar to that of the 6-9 carbon perfluorocarboxylic acids (EC/LC50s>96.5 mg L(-1)). This study also provides the first report of the acute aquatic toxicity of the 5:3 acid (EC/LC50s of 22.5 to >103 mg L(-1)) which demonstrated less aquatic toxicity than the 7:3 acid (EC/LC50s of 0.4-32 mg L(-1)). The cladoceran, D. magna and the green alga, P. subcapitata had generally similar EC50 values for a given substance while fish were typically equally or less sensitive with the exception that PFPeA was most toxic to fish. Predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) were

  3. Effects of gas atmospheres on poly(lactic acid) film in acrylic acid plasma treatment

    Plasma polymerized acrylic acid (AA) coatings were deposited on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) films in various gas atmospheres during the pre-treatment of PLA and the deposition of AA, respectively. Therefore, this work was twofold: the argon pretreated PLA films followed by a deposition in argon were investigated against the mixture of argon and oxygen pretreated ones under the same deposition conditions; the plasma deposition of AA operating in different atmospheres (argon, oxygen and nitrogen) was employed to modify the pretreated PLA in oxygen. Chemical and physical changes on the plasma-treated surfaces were examined using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis. The results showed that the discharge gas can have a significant influence on the chemical composition of the PLA surfaces: oxygen plasmas introduced oxygen-containing groups in company with surface etching in pretreatment and deposition, while argon discharges was able to achieve much better hydrophilic behavior and high retention ratio of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) coating before and after washing in water.

  4. [Determination of docosahexaenoic acid in milk powder by gas chromatography using acid hydrolysis].

    Shao, Shiping; Xiang, Dapeng; Li, Shuang; Xi, Xinglin; Chen, Wenrui

    2015-11-01

    A method to determine docosahexenoic acid (DHA) in milk powder by gas chromatography was established. The milk powder samples were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid, extracted to get total fatty acids by Soxhlet extractor, then esterified with potassium hydroxide methanol solution to form methyl esters, and treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate. The optimal experiment conditions were obtained from orthogonal experiment L9(3(3)) which performed with three factors and three levels, and it requires the reaction performed with 1 mol/L potassium hydroxide solution at 25 degrees C for 5 min. The derivative treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate was separated on a column of SP-2560 (100 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 μm), and determined in 55 min by temperature programming-gas chromatography. Good linearity was obtained in the range 5.0-300 mg/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.999 9. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 3.4%, 1.2% and 1.1% for the seven repeated experiments of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L of DHA, respectively. The limit of detection was 2 mg/kg, and the recoveries of DHA were in the range of 90.4%-93.5%. The results are satisfactory through the tests of practical samples. PMID:26939370

  5. Effects of gas atmospheres on poly(lactic acid) film in acrylic acid plasma treatment

    Zhao, Yun, E-mail: yun.zhaotju@yahoo.com [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fina, Alberto [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino – sede di Alessandria, V. T. Michel 5, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Venturello, Alberto; Geobaldo, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Plasma polymerized acrylic acid (AA) coatings were deposited on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) films in various gas atmospheres during the pre-treatment of PLA and the deposition of AA, respectively. Therefore, this work was twofold: the argon pretreated PLA films followed by a deposition in argon were investigated against the mixture of argon and oxygen pretreated ones under the same deposition conditions; the plasma deposition of AA operating in different atmospheres (argon, oxygen and nitrogen) was employed to modify the pretreated PLA in oxygen. Chemical and physical changes on the plasma-treated surfaces were examined using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis. The results showed that the discharge gas can have a significant influence on the chemical composition of the PLA surfaces: oxygen plasmas introduced oxygen-containing groups in company with surface etching in pretreatment and deposition, while argon discharges was able to achieve much better hydrophilic behavior and high retention ratio of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) coating before and after washing in water.

  6. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO3). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at ∼1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl2). The computed HCI fugacity (∼ 10-4 bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H2O mass fraction in gas is reduced below ∼10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H2O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to ∼1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl24H2O and CaCl2 precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors

  7. The Role of Deposition in Limiting the Hazard Extent of Dense-Gas Plumes

    Dillon, M B

    2008-01-29

    Accidents involving release of large (multi-ton) quantities of toxic industrial chemicals often yield far fewer fatalities and causalities than standard, widely-used assessment and emergency response models predict. While recent work has suggested that models should incorporate the protection provided by buildings, more refined health effect methodologies, and more detailed consideration of the release process; investigations into the role of deposition onto outdoor surfaces has been lacking. In this paper, we examine the conditions under which dry deposition may significantly reduce the extent of the downwind hazard zone. We provide theoretical arguments that in congested environments (e.g. suburbs, forests), deposition to vertical surfaces (such as building walls) may play a significant role in reducing the hazard zone extent--particularly under low-wind, stable atmospheric conditions which are often considered to be the worst-case scenario for these types of releases. Our analysis suggests that in these urban or suburban environments, the amount of toxic chemicals lost to earth's surface is typically a small fraction of overall depositional losses. For isothermal gases such as chlorine, the degree to which the chemicals stick to (or react with) surfaces (i.e. surface resistance) is demonstrated to be a key parameter controlling hazard extent (the maximum distance from the release at which hazards to human health are expected). This analysis does not consider the depositional effects associated with particulate matter or gases that undergo significant thermal change in the atmosphere. While no controlled experiments were available to validate our hypothesis, our analysis results are qualitatively consistent with the observed downwind extent of vegetation damage in two chlorine accidents.

  8. Source Mechanism, Stress Triggering, and Hazard Analysis of Induced Seismicity in Oil/Gas Fields in Oman and Kuwait

    Gu, C.; Toksoz, M. N.; Ding, M.; Al-Enezi, A.; Al-Jeri, F.; Meng, C.

    2015-12-01

    Induced seismicity has drawn new attentions in both academia and industry in recent years as the increasing seismic activity in the regions of oil/gas fields due to fluid injection/extraction and hydraulic fracturing. Source mechanism and triggering stress of these induced earthquakes are of great importance for understanding their causes and the physics of the seismic processes in reservoirs. Previous research on the analysis of induced seismic events in conventional oil/gas fields assumed a double couple (DC) source mechanism. The induced seismic data in this study are from both Oman and Kuwait. For the Oman data, the induced seismicity is monitored by both surface network (0ratio of the data makes it possible to obtain the source mechanisms and triggering stress. We determine the full moment tensor of the induced seismicity data, based on a full-waveform inversion method (Song and Toksöz, 2011). With the full moment tensor inversion results, Coulomb stress is calculated to investigate the triggering features of the induced seismicity data. Our results show a detailed evolution of 3D triggering stress in oil/gas fields from year 1999 to 2007 for Oman, and from year 2006 to 2015 for Kuwait. In addition, the local hazard corresponding to the induced seismicity in these oil/gas fields is assessed and compared to ground motion prediction due to large (M>5.0) regional tectonic earthquakes.

  9. Rapid and selective detection of acetone using hierarchical ZnO gas sensor for hazardous odor markers application

    Highlights: • ZnO spheres fabricated via solvothermal method are with (0 0 2) polar facet exposed. • Response time of ZnO sensor for detecting 100 ppm acetone is as short as 3 s. • Ra/Rg toward 100 ppm acetone is 33 when operated at 230 °C. • ZnO sensor exhibits good selectivity against other toxic gases and water vapor. • Porous structure and exposure of polar facet contribute to good sensing properties. - Abstract: Hierarchical nanostructured ZnO dandelion-like spheres were synthesized via solvothermal reaction at 200 °C for 4 h. The products were pure hexagonal ZnO with large exposure of (0 0 2) polar facet. Side-heating gas sensor based on hierarchical ZnO spheres was prepared to evaluate the acetone gas sensing properties. The detection limit to acetone for the ZnO sensor is 0.25 ppm. The response (Ra/Rg) toward 100 ppm acetone was 33 operated at 230 °C and the response time was as short as 3 s. The sensor exhibited remarkable acetone selectivity with negligible response toward other hazardous gases and water vapor. The high proportion of electron depletion region and oxygen vacancies contributed to high gas response sensitivity. The hollow and porous structure of dandelion-like ZnO spheres facilitated the diffusion of gas molecules, leading to a rapid response speed. The largely exposed (0 0 2) polar facets could adsorb acetone gas molecules easily and efficiently, resulting in a rapid response speed and good selectivity of hierarchical ZnO spheres gas sensor at low operating temperature

  10. Rapid and selective detection of acetone using hierarchical ZnO gas sensor for hazardous odor markers application

    Jia, Qianqian; Ji, Huiming, E-mail: jihuiming@tju.edu.cn; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Yalu; Sun, Xiaohong, E-mail: sunxh@tju.edu.cn; Jin, Zhengguo

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • ZnO spheres fabricated via solvothermal method are with (0 0 2) polar facet exposed. • Response time of ZnO sensor for detecting 100 ppm acetone is as short as 3 s. • R{sub a}/R{sub g} toward 100 ppm acetone is 33 when operated at 230 °C. • ZnO sensor exhibits good selectivity against other toxic gases and water vapor. • Porous structure and exposure of polar facet contribute to good sensing properties. - Abstract: Hierarchical nanostructured ZnO dandelion-like spheres were synthesized via solvothermal reaction at 200 °C for 4 h. The products were pure hexagonal ZnO with large exposure of (0 0 2) polar facet. Side-heating gas sensor based on hierarchical ZnO spheres was prepared to evaluate the acetone gas sensing properties. The detection limit to acetone for the ZnO sensor is 0.25 ppm. The response (R{sub a}/R{sub g}) toward 100 ppm acetone was 33 operated at 230 °C and the response time was as short as 3 s. The sensor exhibited remarkable acetone selectivity with negligible response toward other hazardous gases and water vapor. The high proportion of electron depletion region and oxygen vacancies contributed to high gas response sensitivity. The hollow and porous structure of dandelion-like ZnO spheres facilitated the diffusion of gas molecules, leading to a rapid response speed. The largely exposed (0 0 2) polar facets could adsorb acetone gas molecules easily and efficiently, resulting in a rapid response speed and good selectivity of hierarchical ZnO spheres gas sensor at low operating temperature.

  11. Identification of Cyclopentenyl Fatty Acids by Gas Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    Shukla, V. K. S.; Abdel-Moety, E. M.; Larsen, Elfinn;

    1979-01-01

    The straight chain fatty acids and the cyclopentenyl fatty acids present in the lipids of Hydnocarpus wightiana seeds were separated as their pyrrolidides by means of gas chromatography. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system confirmed the complete separation and permitted the identification...

  12. Methods for upgrading of a fuel gas and succinic acid production

    2014-01-01

    The present invention provides methods of upgrading of a CO2-containing fuel gas comprising the use of anaerobic succinic acid-producing microorganisms. Thus, the present invention provides a method for simultaneous upgrading of a CO2-containing fuel gas and biosuccinic acid production....

  13. Proceedings of the 1. international acid gas injection symposium 2009 Canada

    Developed in Alberta, acid gas injection is an innovative technology that is now used throughout the world as a means of reducing emissions and enhancing oil recovery. This international symposium provided a forum for researchers, reservoir engineers, industry members and other stakeholders to discuss recent advances in acid gas technology. Challenges associated with the implementation and operation of acid gas injection systems were discussed. Pilot projects and demonstration programs related to acid gas injection into aquifers and other geologic structures were reviewed. Mathematical models and simulation studies for predicting acid gas behaviour were also presented. The symposium also discussed various case studies of projects currently being conducted in China. All 32 presentations from this symposium have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database

  14. Effect of gas emissions from Tianchi volcano (NE China) on environment and its potential volcanic hazards

    2006-01-01

    The Tianchi volcano in the Changbai Mountains is located on the boundary between China and North Korea. There are many times of eruptions of the Tianchi volcano during the Holocene. One of its large eruptions occurred around 1000 years ago dated by 14C method and historical records. Composition of products of the largest Tianchi volcanic eruption studied is characterized by comenditic Plinian fallout and unwelded ignimbrite, which are mainly distributed in China and North Korea. Caldera is about 4.4 km long and 3.4 km wide, which had filled with water (e.g. Tianchi Lake). The Tianchi volcanic cone is about 2700 m high above sea level. The Tianchi Lake is located on the summit of the volcanic cone, that is also highest peak of the Changbai Mountains in northeastern China. This study analyzed Cl, F, S and H2O concentrations of melt inclusions in the phenocryst minerals (anorthoclase and quartz) and co-existing matrix glasses using the electron microprobe and estimated environmental effect of Tianchi volcanic gases. The authors proposed a new method to evaluate future eruption of active volcano and estimate potential volcanic hazards based on contents of volatile emissions. Using this method, we made a perspective of future volcanic hazard in this region.

  15. The use of activated char for flue gas polishing in municipal and hazardous waste combustors

    Hartenstein, H.U. [L & C Steinmueller GmbH, Gummersbach (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    During the late 1980`s and the early 1990`s legislation on emissions from waste combustors were tightened drastically. Also emission limits on new pollutants like dioxins and furans were introduced. Since the flue gas cleaning equipment commonly used before was not designed to meet these emission limits, new technologies had to be developed. Most of these new technologies rely on the use of activated carbon or char for the adsorption of the pollutants. Due to the fact that the amount of activated char used is directly proportional to the mass flow rate of pollutants entering the adsorber, the bulk part of the pollutants has been removed in the preceding gas cleaning stages. Thus the activated char adsorption reactor is employed as a flue gas polishing stage at the end of the APC-train.

  16. Perfluorosulfonic acid membrane catalysts for optical sensing of anhydrides in the gas phase.

    Ayyadurai, Subasri M; Worrall, Adam D; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Angelopoulos, Anastasios P

    2010-07-15

    Continuous, on-site monitoring of personal exposure levels to occupational chemical hazards in ambient air is a long-standing analytical challenge. Such monitoring is required to institute appropriate health measures but is often limited by the time delays associated with batch air sampling and the need for off-site instrumental analyses. In this work, we report on the first attempt to use the catalytic properties of perfluorosulfonic acid (PSA) membranes to obtain a rapid, selective, and highly sensitive optical response to trimellitic anhydride (TMA) in the gas phase for portable sensor device application. TMA is used as starting material for various organic products and is recognized to be an extremely toxic agent by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Resorcinol dye is shown to become immobilized in PSA membranes and diffusionally constrain an orange brown product that results from acid-catalyzed reaction with more rapidly diffusing TMA molecules. FTIR, UV/vis, reaction selectivity to TMA versus trimellitic acid (TMLA), and homogeneous synthesis are used to infer 5,7- dihydroxyanthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid as the acylation product of the reaction. The color response has a sensitivity to at least 3 parts per billion (ppb) TMA exposure and, in addition to TMLA, excludes maleic anhydride (MA) and phthalic anhydride (PA). Solvent extraction at long times is used to determine that the resorcinol extinction coefficient in 1100 EW PSA membrane has a value of 1210 m(2)/g at 271.01 nm versus a value of 2010 m(2)/g at 275.22 nm in 50 vol% ethanol/water solution. The hypsochromic wavelength shift and reduced extinction coefficient suggest that the polar perfluorosulfonic acid groups in the membrane provide the thermodynamic driving force for diffusion and immobilization. At a resorcinol concentration of 0.376 g/L in the membrane, a partition coefficient of nearly unity is obtained between the membrane and solution concentrations and a

  17. Gas hazard assessment at the Monticchio Mt. Vulture, a volcano in Southern Italy

    Caracausi, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Nuccio, P. M.; Dipartimento Chimica e Fisica della Terra e Applicazioni, Universita` di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90100, Palermo, Italy; Favara, R.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Nicolosi, M.; Dipartimento Chimica e Fisica della Terra e Applicazioni, Universita` di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90100, Palermo, Italy; Paternoster, M.; Dipartimento Scienze Geologiche, Università della Basilicata.

    2009-01-01

    Geochemical investigations have shown that there is a considerable inflow of gas into both crater lakes of Monticchio, Southern Italy. These lakes are located in two maars that formed 140 000 years ago during Mt. Vulture volcano s last eruptive activity. Isotopic analyses suggest that CO2 and helium are of magmatic origin; the latter displays 3He ⁄ 4He isotope ratios similar to those measured in olivines of the maar ejecta. In spite of the fact that the amount of dissolved gases in the wat...

  18. Gas hazard assessment at the Monticchio crater lakes of Mt. Vulture, a volcano in Southern Italy

    Caracausi, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Nuccio, P. M.; Dipartimento CFTA, Universita` di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.; R. Favara; Nicolosi, M.; Dipartimento CFTA, Universita` di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.; Paternoster, M.; Dipartimento Scienze Geologiche, Università della Basilicata.

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical investigations have shown that there is a considerable inflow of gas into both crater lakes of Monticchio, Southern Italy. These lakes are located in two maars that formed 140,000 years ago during Mt. Vulture volcano’s last eruptive activity. Isotopic analyses suggest that CO2 and helium are of magmatic origin; the latter displays 3He/4He isotope ratios similar to those measured in olivines of the maar ejecta. In spite of the fact that the amount of dissolved gases in the water is...

  19. Report: Proceedings of the Hedberg Research Conference 'Gas Hydrates : Energy resource potential and associated geologic hazards'

    Veerayya, M.

    -1 NOTES 651 The crisis in Kashmir valley like tsunami is of a delayed reaction. Difficulty seems communication between SASE (Snow and Avalanche Studies Establishment) and the users i.e. army and local population. All avalanche-prone spots are now...), was convened in Vancouver, British Columbia. Canada, from 12-16 September, 2004. Dr. Tim Collett. U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO, USA and Dr. A Johnson (Hydrate Energy International, New Orleans, LA, USA) have organized this conference. Natural gas hydrate...

  20. Assessment of Volatile Organic Compound and Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Oil and Natural Gas Well Pads using Mobile Remote and On-site Direct Measurements

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from oil and natural gas production were investigated using direct measurements of component-level emissions on well pads in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) Basin and remote measurements of production pad-...

  1. Environmental assessment of indoor radon gas exposure health hazards and some of its public risks

    This study examine the relationship between indoor radon gas exposure and the cancer risk and housing characteristics in lung cancer risk houses (CRH) compared to non lung cancer risk houses (NCRH). Mean radon concentrations measured by active method were significantly higher among CRH compared to NCRH, 9:93 pCi/L versus 4.56 pCi/L, respectively. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation as regards radon levels in all examined houses. Indoor radon concentrations show statistically significance in houses with bad ventilation (low air change rate) compared to houses with good ventilation (high air change rate). Houses with floor material of tiles, had statistically significant higher radon concentrations. Neither finishing wall material nor indoor gas source shows statistically significance as regard radon levels. Radon levels > 4 pCi/L (US EPA action level) were statistically significance higher in bed rooms compared levels in living rooms. High radon concentrations were reported in lung cane risk houses and in houses with bad ventilation

  2. The application of thermospray LC/MS to the analysis of small organic acids in mixed hazardous wastes

    The Hanford site was built by the Army Corps of Engineers and the Du Pont Corporation in 1943 to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons in support of World War II. The facility was very successful; within two years after its conception, Hanford had supplied the plutonium used for the bomb dropped on Nagasaki in World War II. Plutonium production continued after the war until January 1987 when the last product reactor ceased operation at the Hanford site. Nine production reactors and five reprocessing facilities operated at the Hanford site to support that mission. These operations created a large quantity of radioactive wastes, much of which was and continues to be stored in underground storage tanks. There are 177 high-level waste storage tanks at Hanford. Of these, 23 tanks are being watched closely because of the possibility that flammable gas mixtures are being produced from the mixed waste contained in the storage tanks. One tank in particular, Tank 241-SY-101, has exhibited episodic release of flammable gas mixtures since its initial filing in the late 1970s. Studies of simulated waste mixtures (SWM) have indicated that the gas generation and retention are influenced by chelator concentration. It was postulated that the chelators form hydrophobic surfaces on solids in the SWM. These hydrophobic surfaces are more conducive to bubble attachment, which leads to flotation of the solids and eventually crust formation. The presence of chelators becomes very important for the understanding of crust formation and gas release. Among the degradation products of the chelators are a number of small organic acids, some of which may be linked to the production of flammable gases such as hydrogen and which also possess chelating properties. As a result, the authors have analyzed actual waste samples from Tank 101-SY for small organic acids

  3. Shale gas, a hazardous exploitation; Gaz de schiste, une exploitation a risque

    Maincent, G.

    2011-04-15

    In march 2010 three authorizations to search for shale gases were delivered in France in the regions of Montelimar, Nant and Villeneuve-de-Berg. A general public outcry has led the government to freeze the projects till a complete assessment of the impact on the environment is made. The fears of the public are based on the feedback experience in the Usa where some underground waters were polluted. The source of pollution is twofold: first the additives used in the injected fluids (methanol as an anti-microbic agent, hydrochloric acid to dissolve natural cements or glycol ethylene as a deposit inhibitor) and secondly metal particles of copper, zinc or lead trapped in the clay layers and released by the injection of the fluids. It appears also that the injection of high pressure fluids near a crack can induce earth tremors by reactivating the crack. (A.C.)

  4. Ammonia Gas Sensing Behavior of Tanninsulfonic Acid Doped Polyaniline-TiO2 Composite

    Venu Gopal Bairi; Bourdo, Shawn E.; Nicolas Sacre; Dev Nair; Berry, Brian C.; Biris, Alexandru S; Tito Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO2 composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO2 in TANIPAN...

  5. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    L. Rondo; Flagan, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantita...

  6. The Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI: A Hazard-Based Scoring and Ranking Tool for Chemicals and Products Used in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Tim Verslycke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A large portfolio of chemicals and products is needed to meet the wide range of performance requirements of the oil and gas industry. The oil and gas industry is under increased scrutiny from regulators, environmental groups, the public, and other stakeholders for use of their chemicals. In response, industry is increasingly incorporating “greener” products and practices but is struggling to define and quantify what exactly constitutes “green” in the absence of a universally accepted definition. We recently developed the Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI which is ultimately intended to be a globally implementable tool that comprehensively scores and ranks hazards to human health, safety, and the environment for products used in oil and gas operations. CSI scores are assigned to products designed for the same use (e.g., surfactants, catalysts on the basis of product composition as well as intrinsic hazard properties and data availability for each product component. As such, products with a lower CSI score within a product use group are considered to have a lower intrinsic hazard compared to other products within the same use group. The CSI provides a powerful tool to evaluate relative product hazards; to review and assess product portfolios; and to aid in the formulation of products.

  7. Development of a gas phase source for perfluoroalkyl acids to examine atmospheric sampling methods.

    MacInnis, John J; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Young, Cora J

    2016-06-21

    An inability to produce environmentally relevant gaseous mixing ratios of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), ubiquitous global contaminants, limits the analytical reliability of atmospheric chemists to make accurate gas and particulate measurements that are demonstrably free of interferences due to sampling artefacts. A gas phase source for PFAAs based on the acid displacement mechanism using perfluoropropionate (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been constructed. The displacement efficiency of gas phase perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is inversely related to chain length. Decreasing displacement efficiencies for PFPrA, PFBA, PFHxA, and PFOA were 90% ± 20%, 40% ± 10%, 40% ± 10%, 9% ± 4%, respectively. Generating detectable amounts of gas phase perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) was not possible. It is likely that lower vapour pressure and much higher acidity play a role in this lack of emission. PFCA emission rates were not elevated by increasing relative humidity (25%-75%), nor flow rate of carrier gas from 33-111 sccm. Overall, reproducible gaseous production of PFCAs was within the error of the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a displacing acid (±20%) and was accomplished using a dry nitrogen flow of 33 ± 2 sccm. A reproducible mass emission rate of 0.97 ± 0.10 ng min(-1) (n = 8) was observed for PFBA. This is equivalent to an atmospheric mixing ratio of 12 ppmv, which is easily diluted to environmentally relevant mixing ratios of PFBA. Conversely, generating gas phase perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by sublimating the solid acid under the same conditions produced a mass emission rate of 2800 ng min(-1), which is equivalent to a mixing ratio of 18 ppthv and over a million times higher than suspected atmospheric levels. Thus, for analytical certification of atmospheric sampling methods, generating gas phase standards for PFCAs is best accomplished using acid displacement under dry conditions

  8. Protective Effects Of ALPHA Lipoic Acid On GAMMA Irradiation Hazards In Male Rats

    Ionizing radiation is known to increase the oxidative stress and damage the body organs. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) is a powerful antioxidant that neutralizes free radicals in both fatty and watery regions of cells, so, this study was designed to investigate the efficacy of ALA on radiation-induced injury in male rats. Animals were randomly distributed into 5 groups, each of 24 rats. The groups of animals were categorized as control group, ALA group, irradiated group, simultaneously irradiated ALA group and pre-irradiated ALA group. A fractionated dose of irradiation (2 Gy each 3 days to reach accumulative dose levels of 6 Gy) caused hepatic, renal and cardiac damage which manifested biochemically as elevation in the levels of serum liver alanine, aspartate aminotransferases (ALT and AST) , alkaline phosphatase (ALP), heart creatine kinase (CK-MB), kidney urea and creatinine. Administration of ALA at a dose level of 30 mg/kg /day orally for 7 days before exposure and 9 days throughout the irradiation period induced more significant improvement than the simultaneously irradiated ALA group as compared to the irradiated group. The findings of this study suggest that ALA can potentially be used clinically to prevent irradiation-induced hepato, renal and cardiac disorders

  9. Synthesis of porous starch xerogels modified with mercaptosuccinic acid to remove hazardous gardenia yellow.

    Bao, Liping; Zhu, Xinyi; Dai, Hongxia; Tao, Yongxin; Zhou, Xiaoying; Liu, Wenjie; Kong, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) molecules were inserted into potato starch, leading to the breaking of intrinsic H-bonds within macromolecular chains of starch and the formation of intermolecular H-bonds between MSA and starch, which could be verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-TR). MSA modified porous starch xerogels (PSX/MSA) were obtained after freeze-drying the MSA modified starch, and they were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), exhibiting the intriguing porous structure due to the separation of starch chains by MSA molecules. The PSX/MSA were then used as the adsorbents to remove gardenia yellow (GY), a natural colorant with genotoxicity. Due to the porous structure of PSX and the introduced carboxyl groups from MSA, the adsorption capacity of the PSX/MSA was much higher than that of the starch xerogels alone (SX). The adsorption behaviors of GY by the PSX/MSA fitted both the Freundlich isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the efficient adsorption of GY suggested that the PSX/MSA might be potential adsorbents for the removal of dyes from contaminated aquatic systems. PMID:27151673

  10. Poly(L-lactic acid) membranes: absence of genotoxic hazard and potential for drug delivery.

    Uzun, Nelson; Martins, Thomás Duzzi; Teixeira, Gabriella Machado; Cunha, Nayanne Larissa; Oliveira, Rogério Belle; Nassar, Eduardo José; Dos Santos, Raquel Alves

    2015-01-22

    The use of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) has been considered an important alternative for medical devices once this polyester presents biomechanical, optical and biodegradable properties. Moreover, the use of PLA results in less inflammatory reactions and more recently it has been proposed its application in drug delivery systems. Genotoxicological evaluations are considered part of the battery assays in toxicological analysis. Considering the wide applications of PLA, the present work evaluated the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PLA in CHO-K1 cells, as well as its physicochemical properties. No cytotoxic effects of PLA were detected by colorimetric tetrazolium assay (XTT) analysis, and the clonogenic survival assay showed that PLA did not disrupt the replicative cell homeostasis, neither exhibited genotoxic effects as evidenced by comet and micronucleus assays. Thermogravimetric properties of PLA were not altered after contact with cells and this film exhibited ability in absorb and release Europium(III) complex. All these data suggest genotoxicological safety of PLA for further applications in drug delivery systems. PMID:25479058

  11. Methacrylic acid obtaining in the presence of vanadium-containing catalysts in gas phase

    Івасів, Володимир Васильович

    2012-01-01

    In the article regularities of methacrylic acid obtaining by the aldol condensation of propionic acid with formaldehyde in the presence of B2O3 – P2O5 – V2O5 catalysts in gas phase have been investigated

  12. Rapid determination of dipicolinic acid in the spores of Clostridium species by gas-liquid chromatography.

    Tabor, M W; MacGee, J; Holland, J W

    1976-01-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic procedure has been developed to quantitate dipicolinic acid in bacterial spores. The culture, washed from a plate, was hydrolyzed with acid containing the internal standard, pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylate, and then extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone. The internal standard and dipicolinic acid were then extracted into a small volume of trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide. Injection of the resultant quaternary ammonium salts into a gas chromatograph yielded, via thermal decomposition, the methyl ester derivatives of the dipicolinic acid and the internal standard. The amount of dipicolinic acid in the sample was determined from a standard curve. The method was sensitive to 100 ng of dipicolinic acid per sample and was 1,000 to 5,000 times more sensitive than the commonly used methods. Preparation of the sample required less than 1.5 h and less than 15 min of the analyst's time. PMID:942206

  13. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may...

  14. Ab initio and density functional theory studies of the structure,gas-phase acidity and aromaticity of tetraselenosquaric acid

    周立新

    2000-01-01

    Results or ab initio selr-consistent-field ( SCF) and denityfunctional theory (DFr) calculations of the gas-phase structure, acidity (free energy of deprotona tion, △G°) and aroma ticity of tetraselenosquaric acid (3, 4-diseleny-3-cyclobutene-1,2-diselenone, H2C4Se4) are reported.The global minimu found on the potenial energy surface of tetraselenosquaric acid presents a planar conformation. The ZZ isomer was found to have the lowest energy among the three planar conformers and the ZZ and ZE is omers are very close in energy. The optimized geometric parameters exhibit a bond length equalization relative to reference compounds, cyclobutanediselenone, and cyclobutenediselenol. The computed aromaic stabilization energy(ASE)by homodesmotic reaction is -77.4 (MP2(fu)/6 - 311 + G* *//RHF/6 - 311 + G* * ) and - 54.8 kJ/mol (B3LYP/6 - 311 + G* * //B3LYP/6 - 311 + G* * ). The aromaticity of tetraselenosquaric acid is indicated by the calculated diamagnetic susceptibility exaltation (A) - 19.13 (CSGT(IGAIM) - RHF/6 - 311 + G**//RHF/6 - 311 + G* * and - 32.91(4π· 10-6 m3/mo l)(CSGT(IGA1M)-B3LYP/6 - 311 + G* *//B3LYP/6 - 311 + G* * ).Thus, tetraselenosquaric acid fulfils the geometric, energetic and magnetic criteria of aromaticity. The calculated gas-phase acidity is △G10(298K) = 1257.7 and △G20(298K) = 1617.1 kJ/mol. Hence, tetraselenosquarc acid is the stronest acid among the three squaric acids (3,4-dihydroxy-3-cyclobutene-1,2-dione, H2C4O4, 3,4-dithiohydroxy-3- cyclobutene-1,2-dithione, H2C4S4, 3,4- diselenyl-3- cyclobutene- 1,2-diselenone, H2C4Se4).

  15. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  16. Extraction of Fatty Acids for Capillary Gas Chromatography Analysis

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Wei Zou ### Abstract Fatty acids are major energy provider for the human body. Over intake of fatty acids causes obesity. ### Reagents 1. CM mixture: chloroform: methanol: butylated hydroxytolune (BHT) = 2 L : 1 L : 100 mg. - 0.5 N methanolic sodium hydroxide (NaOH) (10 g NaOH in 500 mL methanol): mix the solution for 15 minutes with a stir bar. Don’t heat the mixture because methanol is highly flammable. - 14% Boron Trifluoride (BF3) in methanol (commercially ...

  17. GAS PERMEATION PROPERTIES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID). (R826733)

    AbstractThe need for the development of polymeric materials based on renewable resources has led to the development of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) which is being produced from a feedstock of corn rather than petroleum. The present study examines the permeation of nitrogen...

  18. Limiting Current of Oxygen Reduction on Gas-Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells

    Li, Qingfeng; Gang, Xiao; Hjuler, Hans Aage;

    1994-01-01

    on polytetrafluorine-ethyl bonded gas-diffusion electordes in phosphoric acid with and without fluorinated additives. This provides an alternative to estimate the film thickness by combining it with the acid-adsorption measurements and the porosity analysis of the catalyst layer. It was noticed that the limiting...... expression for the limiting current density. The acid-film thickness estimated this way was found to be of 0.1 mum order of magnitude for the two types of electrodes used in phosphoric acid with and without fluorinated additives at 150-degrees-C....

  19. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0+) = 1151.8(5), B(0+) = 100.3(5), C(0+) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0−) = 1152.2(5), B(0−) = 100.7(5), C(0−) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy

  20. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid

    Daly, Adam M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, California 91106 (United States); Carey, Spencer J.; Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Li, Kexin; Kukolich, Stephen G., E-mail: Kukolich@u.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Kang, Lu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia 30144 (United States)

    2015-04-14

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0{sup +}) = 1151.8(5), B(0{sup +}) = 100.3(5), C(0{sup +}) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0{sup −}) = 1152.2(5), B(0{sup −}) = 100.7(5), C(0{sup −}) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy.

  1. Fluoroalkyl chloroformates in treating amino acids for gas chromatographic analysis

    Hušek, Petr; Šimek, Petr; Hartvich, Petr; Zahradníčková, Helena

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1186, 1/2 (2008), s. 391-400. ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0192; GA ČR GA303/06/1674 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : amino acids * derivatization * pentafluoropropyl- and heptafluorobutyl chloroformates Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.756, year: 2008

  2. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    Sonnenthal Eric; Spycher Nicolas; Zhang Guoxiang; Steefel Carl

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes...

  3. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid Functional Groups with Carbodiimides

    Prentice, Boone M.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Stutzman, John R.; Forrest, William P.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N′-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT). Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the an...

  4. Estimation of Fatty Acids in Corn Oil by Gas Capillary Chromatography

    Fatty acids provide energy as well as play important role in some cellular structures like cell membrane and certain hormones. Saturated fatty acids are usually found in animal products and in some vegetable oils as well. These saturated fatty acids may be a factor in weight gain and obesity but eating them in moderate amounts may not be damaging to health of every person. Monounsaturated fatty acids can lower blood levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol and have potential to increase blood levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and by this way plays protective role against heart disease. The omega 3 and 6 fatty acids have vital roles in many biological systems such as nervous, immune, cardiovascular, dermal and vision systems. Therefore, it is essential to optimize the instrumental conditions and column specification for the estimation of various fatty acids in the oil, which was considered in the current study using Gas Capillary Chromatography. (author)

  5. The Role of Acid Strength of Modified NaX Zeoliteson Gas Phase Ethylation of Benzene

    Sanghamitra Barman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of acid strength of modified NaX zeolites in gas phase ethylation of benzene were studied over Ce exchanged NaX zeolite of different types. Acidity of the modified zeolite was investigated by means of adsorbing ammonia at different temperature. The conversion of reactantsvaries with the acid strength as well as the different types of the zeolites. The strong acid sites are active centers while the weak acid sites are inactive. The influences of various process parameters such as temperature, space-time and the feed ratio of benzene to ethanol on benzene conversion over most acidic zeolite were studied. The kinetic and adsorption constants of the rate equations were estimated by the best fit. From the estimated kinetic constants, the activation energies and frequency factors for various reactions were determined. The activation energy values compared well with those reported by other investigators for same reactions over similar catalysts.

  6. Effect of oxygen enrichment in air on acid gas combustion under Claus conditions

    Ibrahim, Salisu

    2013-09-01

    Results are presented to examine the combustion of acid gas (H2S and CO2) in hydrogen-fueled flames using a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen under Claus conditions (Φ = 3). Specifically the effect of oxygen enrichment in the above flames is examined. The compositions of acid gas examined are100% H2S and 50% H2S/50% CO2 with different percentages of oxygen enrichment (0%, 19.3% and 69.3%) in the oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The results revealed that combustion of acid gas formed SO2 wherein the mole fraction of SO2 increased to an asymptotic value at all the oxygen concentrations examined. In addition, increase in oxygen enrichment of the air resulted in increased amounts of SO2 rather than the formation of more desirable elemental sulfur. In case of 50% H2S/50% CO2 acid gas, carbon monoxide mole fraction increased with oxygen enrichment which is an indicator to the availability of additional amounts of oxygen into the reaction pool. This gas mixture resulted in the formation of other sulfurous–carbonaceous compounds (COS and CS2) due to the presence of carbon monoxide. The results showed that the rate of COS formation increased with oxygen enrichment due to the availability of higher amounts of CO while that of CS2 reduced. The global reactions responsible for this observed phenomenon are presented.

  7. Identification of bound alcohols in soil humic acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Berthier, Gersende; Dou, Sen; Peakman, Torren; Lichtfouse, Eric

    2000-01-01

    International audience Humic acids are complex, partly macromolecular, yellow-brownish substances occurring in soils, waters and sediments. In order to shed some light on their molecular structure, crop humic acids were cleaved by alkaline hydrolysis (KOH). The products were fractionated by thin layer chromatography to give mono-alcohols which were analysed as acetate derivatives by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Linear alcohols, sterols, stanols and plant-derived triterp...

  8. Preparation of sphingolipid fatty acid methyl esters for determination by gas-liquid chromatography.

    MacGee, J; Williams, M G

    1981-01-30

    Sphingolipid fatty acids are first converted to a mixture of free acids and their n-butyl esters by heating the specimen at 85 degree C in aqueous butanolic hydrogen chloride; the butyl esters are then saponified with methanolic potassium hydroxide. After acidification and extraction into hexane, the fatty acids are extracted into a very small volume of aqueous trimethyl(m-trifluorotolyl)ammonium hydroxide (TMTFTH), injection of an aliquot of the TMTFTH extract into the gas chromatograph yields the fatty acid methyl esters by pyrolytic methylation of the quaternary ammonium salts of the fatty acids. The preparation of a specimen ready for the gas--liquid chromatographic (GLC) analysis with quantitative recovery of the sphingolipid fatty acids can be accomplished in less than 2 h. By comparison, none of a number of well-accepted techniques for the release of sphingomyelin fatty acids by hydrolysis or methanolysis released the fatty acids quantitatively in less than 3 h, and all required additional manipulations before GLC analysis. PMID:7217267

  9. Estimating Fatty Acid Composition of Infant Buccal Mucosal Cells by Capillary Gas Chromatography

    CHEN Fei; ZHANG Wei-li; LI Fang; ZHU Xiao-dong; ZHU Jian-xing

    2008-01-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty adds, i. e., docosahexaenoic acid (DHA or C22 : 6n -3), arachidonic acid (AA or C20 : 4n - 6) have been identified as essential fatty acids and play an important role in growth and development of infants. Mensurement of fatty acid composition is usually by collection of blood, but to obtain blood in infants is difficult. Nowadays, the fatty acid composition can be estimated by collecting buccal mucosal cells, which can avoid repeated blood sampling. The purpose of this paper is to compare the fatty acid composition of cheek calls with that of plasma and red blood cells (RBCs). In this study, twenty-seven infants were enrolled, and buccal mucosal cells and blood samples were obtained from these infants of the same time. Fatty acid composition of buccal mucesal cells, plasma and RBCs were measured by capillary gas chromatography. The results show that the contents of AA and DHA in the buccal mucosal cells are correlated well with that in the plasma [r=0.36 (P=0.042) and r=0.38 (P=0.033), respectively]. The ratio of AA to DHA is 1.32% in buccal mucosal cells, 1.60% in plasma and 1.55% in RBCs and there are no significant differences among groups (P = 0.134). It shows that the fatty acid composition in buccal mucosal cells can reflect the fat nutrition status in infants and can be detected by capillary gas chromatography. Estimating fatty acid composition of buccal mucosal cells in infants by capillary gas chromatography is feasible, and because of its noninvasiveness, it can be suitable for nutrition research in infants.

  10. Influence of tryptophan loading on urinary excretion of anthranilic acid and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid by men and women as determined by alkali flame ionization gas chromatography

    Poll, J.M. van der; Vink, M.; Schrijver, J.; Odink, J.

    1986-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method with alkali flame ionization detection is described for the determination of urinary total (free and conjugated) anthranilic acid (AA) and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (HAA) as their pentafluorobenzyl esters. Prior to analysis, urine was hydrolysed using hydrochloric acid i

  11. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    Wiberg, Gustav Karl Henrik; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated...

  12. [Gas chromatographic determination of formic acid in urine as carbon monoxide (author's transl)].

    Angerer, J

    1976-02-01

    A gas chromatographic method for determining formic acid in human urine is described. The analytical reliability of this method fullfills the criteria of statistical quality control. The rate of recovery is 101.2 to 105.7% the variability coefficients lie between 2.9 and 7.2%. The selectivity of this method is demonstrated by analysing a group of components normally occuring in urine which did not interfere with the determination of formic acid. The detection limit of about 4.3 mumol/1 formic acid in urine permits the determination of the concentration of formic acid in the urine of normal persons. The concentrations of formic acid in the urine of a group of normal persons lies between 0 and 2.79 mmol/1. The average concentration was 0.39 +/- 0.60 mmol/1. PMID:1249528

  13. Amino acid salt solutions as solvents in CO2 capture from flue gas

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    solutions is their ability to form solid precipitates upon the absorption of CO2. The occurrence of crystallization offers the possibility of increasing the CO2 loading capacity of the solvent. However, precipitation can also have negative effect on the CO2 capture process. The chemical nature of the solid...... loading capacity of aqueous solutions of the potassium salts of selected amino-acids (glycine, taurine, lysine proline, and glutamic acid) were examined, and the relation between the initial amino acid salt concentration and precipitation ability of each solution were determined. Experiments were...... glycine, taurine, and lysine, while in the case of proline, and glutamic acid, the precipitate was found to be bicarbonate. These results give an important contribution to further understanding the potential of amino acid salt solutions in CO2 capture from flue gas....

  14. A shallow-layer model for heavy gas dispersion from natural sources: Application and hazard assessment at Caldara di Manziana, Italy

    Costa, A.; Chiodini, G.; Granieri, D.; Folch, A.; Hankin, R. K. S.; Caliro, S.; Avino, R.; Cardellini, C.

    2008-03-01

    Several nonvolcanic sources in central Italy emit a large amount of carbon dioxide (CO2). Under stable atmospheric conditions and/or in the presence of topographic depressions, the concentration of CO2, which has a molecular mass greater than that of air, can reach high values that are lethal to humans or animals. Several episodes of this phenomenon were recorded in central Italy and elsewhere. In order to validate a model for the dispersion of a heavy gas and to assess the consequent hazard, we applied and tested the code TWODEE-2, an improved version of the established TWODEE model, which is based on a shallow-layer approach that uses depth-averaged variables to describe the flow behavior of dense gas over complex topography. We present results for a vented CO2 release at Caldara di Manziana in central Italy. We find that the model gives reliable results when the input quantity can be properly defined. Moreover, we show that the model can be a useful tool for gas hazard assessment by evaluating where and when lethal concentrations for humans and animals are reached.

  15. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid Functional Groups with Carbodiimides

    Prentice, Boone M.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Stutzman, John R.; Forrest, William P.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [ N-cyclohexyl- N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities.

  16. Impact of individual acid flue gas components on mercury capture by heat-treated activated carbon

    Jian-ming ZHENG; Jin-song ZHOU; Zhong-yang LUO; Ke-fa CEN

    2012-01-01

    Elemental mercury capture on heat-treated activated carbon (TAC) was studied using a laboratory-scale fixed bed reactor.The capability of TAC to perform Hg0 capture under both N2 and baseline gas atmospheres was studied and the effects of common acid gas constituents were evaluated individually to avoid complications resulting from the coexistence of multiple components.The results suggest that surface functional groups (SFGs) on activated carbon (AC) are vital to Hg0 capture in the absence of acid gases.Meanwhile,the presence of acid gas components coupled with defective graphitic lattices on TAC plays an important role in effective Hg0 capture.The presence of HCl,NO2,and NO individually in basic gases markedly enhances Hg0 capture on TAC due to the heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 on acidic sites created on the carbon surface and catalysis by the defective graphitic lattices on TAC.Similarly,the presence of SO2 improves Hg0 capture by about 20%.This improvement likely results from the deposition of sulfur groups on the AC surface and oxidation of the elemental mercury by SO2 due to catalysis on the carbon surface.Furthermore,O2 exhibits a synergistic effect on Hg0 oxidation and capture when acid gases are present in the flue gases.

  17. Gas chromatography-vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy for analysis of fatty acid methyl esters.

    Fan, Hui; Smuts, Jonathan; Bai, Ling; Walsh, Phillip; Armstrong, Daniel W; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    A new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography was recently developed and applied to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. VUV detection features full spectral acquisition in a wavelength range of 115-240nm, where virtually all chemical species absorb. VUV absorption spectra of 37 FAMEs, including saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated types were recorded. Unsaturated FAMEs show significantly different gas phase absorption profiles than saturated ones, and these classes can be easily distinguished with the VUV detector. Another advantage includes differentiating cis/trans-isomeric FAMEs (e.g. oleic acid methyl ester and linoleic acid methyl ester isomers) and the ability to use VUV data analysis software for deconvolution of co-eluting signals. As a universal detector, VUV also provides high specificity, sensitivity, and a fast data acquisition rate, making it a powerful tool for fatty acid screening when combined with gas chromatography. The fatty acid profile of several food oil samples (olive, canola, vegetable, corn, sunflower and peanut oils) were analyzed in this study to demonstrate applicability to real world samples. PMID:26471553

  18. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-08-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media.

  19. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas using Amino Acid Salt Solutions

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    The reversible absorption of CO2 into a chemical solvent is currently the leading CO2 capture technology. Available solvents are almost exclusively based on aqueous alkanolamine solutions, which entail both economic and environmental complications, making the commercialization of the technology...... difficult. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions. A number of advantages make amino acid salt solutions attractive solvents for CO2 capture from flue gas. In the present study CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions of 0.5 M potassium glycinate and 0.5 M...... monoethanolamine (MEA) were performed, using a stirred cell reactor experimental setup. The absorption of gas containing 10 mol % CO2 and 90 mol % N2 was followed by measuring the percentage of CO2 in the outlet gas. Also the temperature and pH in the solutions were measured during the absorption. The results...

  20. Analyzing solubility of acid gas and light alkanes in triethylene glycol

    Alireza Bahadori; Had B.Vuthaluru; Saeid Mokhatab

    2008-01-01

    Physical solvents such as ethylene glycol (EG), diethylene glycol (DEG), and triethylene glycol (TEG) are commonly used in wet gas dehydration processes with TEG being the most popular due to ease of regeneration and low solvent losses. Unfortunately, TEG absorbs significantly more hydrocarbons and acid gases than EG or DEG. Quantifying this amount of absorption is therefore critical in order to minimize hydrocarbon losses or to optimize hydrocarbon recovery depending on the objective of the process. In this article, a new correlation that fully covers the operating ranges of TEG dehydration units is developed in order to determine the solubility of light alkanes and acid gases in TEG solvent. The influence of several parameters on hydrocarbon and acid gas solubility including temperature, pressure, and solvent content is also examined.

  1. TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS

    Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

    2004-02-01

    Over the past 14 years, the Gas Technology Institute and jointly with Uhde since 1997 developing Morphysorb{reg_sign} a new physical solvent-based acid gas removal process. Based on extensive laboratory, bench, pilot-plant scale experiments and computer simulations, DEGT Gas Transmission Company, Canada (DEGT) has chosen the process for use at its Kwoen processing facility near Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada as the first commercial application for the Morphysorb process. DOE co-funded the development of the Morphysorb process in various stages of development. DOE funded the production of this report to ensure that the results of the work would be readily available to potential users of the process in the United States. The Kwoen Plant is designed to process 300 MMscfd of raw natural gas at 1,080-psia pressure. The sour natural gas contains 20 to 25 percent H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. The plant reduces the acid gas content by about 50% and injects the removed H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} into an injection well. The Kwoen plant has been operating since August 2002. Morphysorb{reg_sign} is a physical solvent-based process used for the bulk removal of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S from natural gas and other gaseous streams. The solvent consists of N-Formyl morpholine and other morpholine derivatives. This process is particularly effective for high-pressure and high acid-gas applications and offers substantial savings in investment and operating cost compared to competitive physical solvent-based processes. GTI and DEGT first entered into an agreement in 2002 to test the Morphysorb process at their Kwoen Gas Treating Plant in northern BC. The process is operating successfully without any solvent related problems and has between DEGTC and GTI. As of December 2003, about 90 Bcf of sour gas was processed. Of this about 8 Bcf of acid gas containing mainly H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was injected back into the depleted reservoir and 82 Bcf sent for further processing at DEGTC

  2. Determination of 4-Chloroindole-3-Acetic Acid Methyl Ester in Lathyrus Vicia and Pisum by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen; Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn

    1980-01-01

    4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester was identified unequivocally in Lathyrus latifolius L., Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L. by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The gas chromatographic system was able to separate underivatized chloroindole-3-acetic acid...... methyl ester isomers. The quantitative determination of 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester in immature seeds of these three species was performed by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry using deuterium labelled 4-chloro-indole-3-acetic acid methyl ester as an internal standard. P. sativum...

  3. Ruminal Methane Production on Simple Phenolic Acids Addition in in Vitro Gas Production Method

    A. Jayanegara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane production from ruminants contributes to total global methane production, which is an important contributor to global warming. In this experiment, six sources of simple phenolic acids (benzoic, cinnamic, phenylacetic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at two different levels (2 and 5 mM added to hay diet were evaluated for their potential to reduce enteric methane production using in vitro Hohenheim gas production method. The measured variables were gas production, methane, organic matter digestibility (OMD, and short chain fatty acids (SCFA. The results showed that addition of cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids at 5 mM significantly (P p-coumaric > ferulic > cinnamic. The addition of simple phenols did not significantly decrease OMD. Addition of simple phenols tends to decrease total SCFA production. It was concluded that methane decrease by addition of phenolic acids was relatively small, and the effect of phenolic acids on methane decrease depended on the source and concentration applied.

  4. Noble gas dependence of single-bubble sonoluminescence in phosphoric acid

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SL) from a concentrated solution of phosphoric acid doped with various noble gases has been studied using a hydrochemical model. The results indicate that in agreement with experiment, the SL temperature increases with the atomic mass of the noble gases. Also, both the temperature and the intensity of SL are remarkably higher for lower partial pressures of a noble gas. Our calculations show that the maximum acquirable SL intensity from phosphoric acid is considerably greater than that of water. This mainly originates from the lower vapor pressure and the higher viscosity of phosphoric acid relative to water making the instability mechanisms completely different for these liquids. -- Highlights: ► Sonoluminescence (SL) radiation from a concentrated phosphoric acid solution has been simulated. ► The SL temperature is shown to increase with the atomic mass of noble gases. ► The difference between the noble gases is more remarkable at lower partial pressures of the gases. ► Both the temperature and the intensity of SL decrease with increment of the noble gas partial pressure in acid. ► The range of 6000–10 000 K is obtained for the SL temperature at relatively high partial pressures of the noble gases in the acid.

  5. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) may not measure all gas-phase sulfuric acid if base molecules are present

    Kurtén, T.; T. Petäjä; Smith,J; Ortega, I.K.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; M. Ehn; Vehkamäki, H.; Mauldin, L.; Worsnop, D.R.; M. Kulmala

    2010-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. Using computed proton affinities and reaction thermodynamics for the relevant charging reactions, we show that in the presence of strong bases such as amines, which tend to cluster with the sulfuric acid molecules, a significant fraction of the total gas-phase sulfuric acid may not be measured by a CIMS instrument. If this is the c...

  6. Electron beam treatment technology for exhaust gas for preventing acid rain

    Recently, accompanying the increase of the use of fossil fuel, the damage due to acid rain such as withering of trees and extinction of fishes and shells has occurred worldwide, and it has become a serious problem. The sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides contained in exhaust gas are oxidized by the action of sunbeam to become sulfuric acid and nitric acid mists, which fall in the form of rain. Acid rain is closely related to the use of the coal containing high sulfur, and it hinders the use of coal which is rich energy source. In order to simplify the processing system for boiler exhaust gas and to reduce waste water and wastes, Ebara Corp. developed the dry simultaneous desulfurizing and denitrating technology utilizing electron beam in cooperation with Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The flow chart of the system applied to the exhaust gas treatment in a coal-fired thermal power station is shown. The mechanism of desulfurization and denitration, and the features of this system are described. The demonstration plant was constructed in a coal-fired thermal power station in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, and the trial operation was completed in July, 1987. The test results are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Amino Acids and Sugars in the Gas Phase: Microwave Data for Astrochemistry

    Mata, S.; Cabezas, C.; Varela, M.; Peña, I.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; Sanz, M. E.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    Microwave spectroscopy, considered the most definitive gas phase structural probe, can distinguish between different conformational structures since they have unique spectroscopic constants and give separate rotational spectra. However it has been limited to molecular specimens having an appreciable vapor pressure. In general, molecules of biological importance have low vapor pressures and tend to undergo degradation upon heating. The combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets (LA-MB-FTMW) which overcomes the problems of thermal decomposition has rendered accessible the gas phase structural studies of these molecules. To date different α-, β- and γ-amino acids have been studied using this technique. Even in conformationally challenging systems the preferred conformations can be identified by rotational spectroscopy, as has been illustrated with the assignment of seven low-energy conformers in serine and threonine, six in cysteine and aspartic acid , and nine in γ-amino butyric (gaba). This technique has been successfully applied to the study of monosaccarides. Three conformers of the prototypes α-D-glucose and β-D-glucose have been characterized for the first time in the gas phase. After the first experimental observation of the monohydrated cluster of glycine, complexes between amino acids and nitrogen bases with water have also been investigated to obtain information on the changes induced in the conformational or tautomeric preferences by the addition of solvent molecules. The information given here is relevant for the unambiguous identification of these amino acids and sugars in the interstellar medium.

  8. Comparison of Genetic Parameters Estimation of Fatty Acids from Gas Chromatography and FT-IR in Holsteins

    Poulsen, Nina Aagaard; Eskildsen, C E A; Skov, Thomas;

    on fatty acids data measured from gas chromatography in 371 Danish Holstein cows. Results showed similar heritability estimates and strong genomic correlations for most of the fatty acids. However, for some fatty acids, the choice of data affected the genetic parameter estimation, which may be due to...

  9. Energy exploitation of acid gas with high H2S content by means of a chemical looping combustion system

    Highlights: • CLC can exploit the energy potential of acid gas by burning H2S. • New combustion process demonstration in a continuous CLC unit. • Highest H2S concentrations (20 vol.%) ever used in a CLC process. • Fe20γAl oxygen carrier is a suitable material for acid gas combustion. • H2S content above 20 vol.% turns the acid gas CLC into an auto-thermal process. - Abstract: In gas and petroleum industry, the waste gas stream from the sweetening process of a sour natural gas stream is commonly referred as acid gas. Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) technology has the potential to exploit the combustible fraction of acid gas, H2S, to produce energy obtaining a flue gas highly concentrated on CO2 and SO2, which can be cost-effectively separated for subsequent applications, such as sulfuric acid production. At the same time, a concentrated CO2 stream ready for storage is obtained. The resistance of oxygen carriers to sulfur becomes crucial when an acid gas is subjected to a CLC process since the H2S content can be very high. In this work, a total of 41 h of continuous operation with acid gas and H2S concentrations up to 20 vol.% has been carried out in a 500 Wth CLC unit with two oxygen carriers based on Cu (Cu14γAl) and Fe (Fe20γAl). The formation of copper sulfides and the SO2 emissions in the air reactor made the Cu14γAl material not adequate for the process. In contrast, excellent results were obtained during acid gas combustion with the Fe20γAl oxygen carrier. H2S was fully burnt to SO2 in the fuel reactor at all operating conditions, SO2 was never detected in the gas outlet stream of the air reactor, and iron sulfides were never formed even at H2S concentrations as high as 20 vol.%. Furthermore, it was found that a H2S content of 20 vol.% in the acid gas was high enough to turn the CLC process into an auto-thermal process. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the Fe-based materials prepared by impregnation are very adequate to exploit

  10. An integrated approach for the evaluation of technological hazard impacts on air quality: the case of the Val d'Agri oil/gas plant

    Calvello, M.; Esposito, F.; Trippetta, S.

    2014-08-01

    The Val d'Agri area (southern Italy) hosts one of the biggest onshore European reservoir and the largest oil/gas pre-treatment plant, named Centro Olio Val d'Agri (COVA), located in a rural/anthropized context. Several hazards are associated with this plant. These are mainly represented by possible impacts of the COVA atmospheric emissions on the local air quality and human health. This work uses a novel approach based on the integration of air quality measurements from the regional monitoring network, additional experimental measurements (i.e. sub-micrometre particulate matter (PM1) and black carbon (BC)) and advanced statistical analyses to provide a preliminary evaluation of the Val d'Agri air quality state and give some indication of specific areas potentially affected by COVA hazards. Results show that the COVA plant emissions have a particular impact on the air quality of the area closest to it. In this area several pollutants specifically related to the COVA combustion processes (i.e. nitrogen oxides, benzene and toluene) show the highest concentration values and significant correlations. The proposed approach represents a first step in the assessment of the risks associated with oil/gas exploration and pre-treatment activities and a starting point for the development of effective and exportable air quality monitoring strategies.

  11. An integrated approach for the evaluation of technological hazard impacts on air quality: the case of the Val d'Agri oil/gas plant

    M. Calvello

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Val d'Agri area (southern Italy hosts the biggest on-shore European reservoir and the largest oil/gas pre-treatment plant, named Centro Olio Val d'Agri (COVA, located in a rural/anthropized context. Several hazards are associated to this plant. These are mainly represented by possible impacts of the COVA atmospheric emissions on the local air quality and human health. This work uses a novel approach based on the integration of air quality measurements from the regional monitoring network, additional experimental measurements (i.e., sub-micrometric particulate matter – PM1 and Black Carbon – BC and advanced statistical analyses to provide a preliminary evaluation of the Val d'Agri air quality state and give some indications of specific areas potentially affected by COVA hazards. Results show that the COVA plant emissions exert an impact especially on the air quality of the area closest to it. In this area several pollutants specifically related to the COVA combustion processes (i.e., nitrogen oxides, benzene and toluene show the highest concentration values and significant correlations. The proposed approach represents a first step in the assessment of the risks associated to oil/gas exploration and pre-treatment activities and a starting point for the development of effective and exportable air quality monitoring strategies.

  12. Accident at chemically hazardous enterprises: numerical simulation of the process of neutralizing the toxic gas over the building roof

    N.N. Belyaev

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The 2D numerical model was used to simulate the toxic gas neutralization when this gas flows from the opening in the cellar of the building. The helicopter is used to supply the neutralizer. The model is based on the K-gradient transport model and equation of potential flow. The results of numerical experiment are presented.

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF WICKING TOXIC GAS INTO THE ROOM ON THE TERRITORY OF CHEMICALLY HAZARDOUS OBJECT DURING THE EMERGENCY

    N. N. Belyaev

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The 3D numerical model to simulate the toxic gas dispersion at an industrial site and inflow of toxic gas into the industrial room after an accident ejection was developed. The model is based on the K-gradient transport model and equation of potential flow. The results of numerical experiment are presented.

  14. Uptake of Gas-Phase Nitric Acid by Water-Ice Surfaces

    Ullerstam, M.; Abbatt, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    Nitric acid is a widespread molecule found in the atmosphere. It is mainly removed from the troposphere by wet or dry deposition. In colder regions such as the upper troposphere and tropopause where cirrus clouds are formed nitric acid can also be scavenged by cirrus ice particles. The uptake of gas-phase nitric acid by water-ice films has been re-examined with a coated-wall flow tube coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) at 228K. Previous flow tube studies of this system have shown little dependence of the uptake over the partial pressure regime studied. In these studies the initial, short-term uptake has been the focus and the long term uptake has not been quantified. In this experimental setup it was possible to study the uptake of nitric acid at lower partial pressures resulting in a more atmospherically appropriate determination of the adsorption isotherm and the long term uptake has also been addressed. Measurement of the initial uptake coefficient representing a lower limit will also be presented. Finally, possible burial of nitric acid into the bulk of the ice during continuous growth of the ice film has been studied. In the atmosphere ice particles will be subject to cycles of evaporation and condensation which could cause the nitric acid to be encapsulated into the particle, especially since the major part of the adsorption has been proven to be irreversible. This could enhance the ice particles capacity of scavenging nitric acid.

  15. 含硫化氢天然气泄漏事故的硫化氢中毒灾害分析%A new method for analyzing the hazardous hydrogen sulfide poisoning caused by the sulfurous natural gas leakage

    雷达; 张建文; 冯文兴

    2012-01-01

    应用前文建立的天然气长输管道泄漏扩散模型,在大量事故统计分析基础上,针对含硫化氢天然气泄漏后硫化氢导致的化学灾害后果提出了一种新的风险分析方法.综合考虑概率风险评价法和伤害范围评价法的特点,研究了不同规模泄漏事故可能导致的个人风险和社会风险,并绘制了相应的社会风险曲线图.%The present paper is aimed to introduce a new method for analyzing the hydrogen sulfide poisoning hazards caused by the sulfurous natural gas leakage. As is well known, China is rich in sulfurous natural gas, whose deposits are huge and widely distributed in our country. However, due to its toxic nature, the release of hydrogen sulfide-containing natural gas from the pipeline tends to bring about serious threats to human life and material property near its leakage source. To predict or evaluate the threat of hydrogen sulfide poisoning , a lot of measures can be taken to test or evaluate such hydrogen sulfide poisoning source, and QRA (Quantitative Hazard Analysis) method can be thought of as an effective one. But, the above said analysis method doesn t seem enough for the sake of security management of its exploration, letting alone to do the quantitative hazards, such as individual intake hazard and societal hazard, for ex- ample, the community poisoning threat. It is for this need that we would like to propose a new analysis method for hydrogen sulfide poisoning of hydrogen sulfide-bearing natural gas known as the comprehensive hazards analysis method, based on the study of the historical accident-statistical data of EGIG ( European Gas Pipeline Incident Data Group) and BG Transco, while the probability of hazard and the scope of the damage were taken into account. While working at our method, we have also analyzed the three leakage scenarios of the East-Sichuan Gas Transportation Project, including the individual hazard analysis and societal hazard analysis. In addition

  16. Seismic hazard assessment for oil-and-gas-bearing shelf zones: A case study of the North Caspian region

    Krylov, A. A.; Ivashchenko, A. I.; Kovachev, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Seismic hazard assessment is done for oil field areas in the North Caspian region by a method earlier successfully applied to other areas. The method involves general seismic zoning data, available regional databases on recurrence of seismic shaking, known models of ground motion attenuation in seismoactive regions, and data on geological and geophysical surveys in the studied area. The assigned level of seismic hazard of the region is refined using probabilistic analysis; additionally, disaggregation is made and accelerograms are synthesized (the latter are necessary for seismic microzoning of particular sites using the numerical nonlinear analysis of ground seismic response). The amplitude and spectral characteristics of ground motions are obtained which are necessary for seismic resistance design and construction of petroleum industry objects.

  17. Acetylsalicylic acid as a potential pediatric health hazard: legislative aspects concerning accidental intoxications in the European Union.

    Mund, Menen E; Gyo, Christoph; Brüggmann, Dörthe; Quarcoo, David; Groneberg, David A

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a frequently used medication worldwide. It is not used in pediatrics due its association with Reye syndrome. However, in case of pediatric intoxication, children are more fragile to salicylate poisoning because of their reduced ability of buffer the acid stress. Intoxication leads to a decoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and subsequently to a loss in mitochondrial function. Symptoms of poisoning are diverse; eventually they can lead to the death of the patient. Governmental websites of various EU countries were searched for legal information on acetylsalicylic acid availability in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. Various EU countries permit prescription-free sales of acetylsalicylic acid in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. In Sweden acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg may be sold in a maximum package size of 20 tablets or effervescent tablets in a non-pharmacy. In the UK a maximum of 16 tablets of acetylsalicylic acid 325 mg is allowed to sell in non-pharmacies. In Ireland acetylsalicylic acid is classified as S2 medication. Subsequently, acetylsalicylic acid is allowed to be sold prescription-free in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. In the Netherlands acetylsalicylic acid may only be sold in drug stores or pharmacies. A maximum of 24 tablets of 500 mg is allowed to purchase in a drug store. Several countries in the European Union are permitted to offer acetylsalicylic acid prescription-free in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores without legal guidance on the storage position within the store. Further research is needed to investigate whether acetylsalicylic acid is located directly accessible to young children within the stores in EU countries which permit prescription-free sales of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:27418941

  18. Electrons Mediate the Gas-Phase Oxidation of Formic Acid with Ozone.

    van der Linde, Christian; Tang, Wai-Kit; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-08-26

    Gas-phase reactions of CO3 (.-) with formic acid are studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Signal loss indicates the release of a free electron, with the formation of neutral reaction products. This is corroborated by adding traces of SF6 to the reaction gas, which scavenges 38 % of the electrons. Quantum chemical calculations of the reaction potential energy surface provide a reaction path for the formation of neutral carbon dioxide and water as the thermochemically favored products. From the literature, it is known that free electrons in the troposphere attach to O2 , which in turn transfer the electron to O3 . O3 (.-) reacts with CO2 to form CO3 (.-) . The reaction reported here formally closes the catalytic cycle for the oxidation of formic acid with ozone, catalyzed by free electrons. PMID:27400953

  19. Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units

    None

    1994-05-01

    This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

  20. Evaluation and Management of the Gas and Rock Outburst Hazard in the Light of International Legal Regulations

    Skoczylas, Norbert; Wierzbicki, Mirosław

    2014-12-01

    As part of the present article, the Authors analyzed relevant legal rules that are in force in countries where the gas and coal outburst hazard occurs (Australia, the Czech Republic, China, Germany, Poland, Russia, and Ukraine). Similarities and differences between particular solutions were highlighted. As the subject of the analysis were the original legal standards, the article incorporates the parameter symbols and units adopted in the discussed regulations. W ramach niniejszej pracy poddano analizie obowiązujące rozwiązania prawne z krajów, gdzie występuje zagrożenie wyrzutami gazu i węgla (Australia, Czechy, Chiny, Niemcy, Polska, Rosja, Ukraina). Zwrócono uwagę na podobieństwa i różnice w poszczególnych rozwiązaniach. Ze względu na analizę oryginalnych rozwiązań legislacyjnych w opracowaniu pozostawione zostały stosowane w odpowiednich przepisach oznaczenia parametrów oraz ich jednostki. Istnieje duże podobieństwo w obrębie przepisów w krajach europejskich. Podobieństwo to dotyczy zarówno ogólnej koncepcji przepisów, w których dąży się do maksymalnego sformalizowania nakładanych wymogów, łącznie ze wskazaniem konkretnych parametrów górniczych oraz ich wartości kryterialnych, na bazie których klasyfikowane są pokłady węglowe, bądź ich części, do poszczególnych klas zagrożenia wyrzutowego. Podobne podejście w ustawodawstwie w zakresie bezpieczeństwa w górnictwie reprezentują Chiny. W całkowitej opozycji do przepisów europejskich i chińskich znajdują się przepisy amerykańskie i australijskie. W przepisach tych wyraźnie zaakcentowany jest fakt, iż charakter ryzyka wyrzutowego jest bardzo lokalny, więc trudno go uogólniać nie tylko między kopalniami, ale również w poszczególnych wyrobiskach. Jedno, niezmienne podejście do zarządzania ryzykiem, zgodnie z przepisami australijskimi, jest więc niewłaściwe. Przepisy te nie podają szczegółowego opisu, w jaki sposób prowadzić zarz

  1. A novel decomposition technique of friable asbestos by CHClF2-decomposed acidic gas

    Asbestos was widely used in numerous materials and building products due to their desirable properties. It is, however, well known that asbestos inhalation causes health damage and its inexpensive decomposition technique is necessary to be developed for pollution prevention. We report here an innovative decomposition technique of friable asbestos by acidic gas (HF and HCl) generated from the decomposition of CHClF2 by the reaction with superheated steam at 800 deg. C. Chrysotile-asbestos fibers were completely decomposed to sellaite and magnesium silicofluoride hexahydrate by the reaction with CHClF2-decomposed acidic gas at 150 deg. C for 30 min. At high temperatures beyond 400 deg. C, sellaite and hematite were detected in the decomposed product. In addition, crocidolite containing wastes and amosite containing wastes were decomposed at 500 deg. C and 600 deg. C for 30 min, respectively, by CHClF2-decomposed acidic gas. The observation of the reaction products by phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that the resulting products did not contain any asbestos

  2. Determination of major phenolic acids, phenolic diterpenes and triterpenes in Rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis L.) by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry:

    Vončina, Ernest; Doleček, Valter; Islamčević Razboršek, Maša; Brodnjak-Vončina, Darinka

    2007-01-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of seven major phenolic and terpenic compounds in Rosmarinus officinalis L. was developed. The compounds were identified as trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives of phenolic acids (caffeic and rosmarinic acid), phenolic diterpene (carnosic acid), and pentacyclic triterpenes (ursolic, oleanolic, betulinic acid and betulin). These compounds have been identified by retention time and compari...

  3. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of taraxicuum officinale flowers oil by gas chromatography mass spectrometer

    Taraxicum officinale, is a highly valuable medicinal plant. The roots is an important herbal drug, having long been used on the continent as a remedy for liver complaints. Keeping in view the importance and wide applications in the pharmaceutical industries, the present study was therefore aimed to analyze the chemical constituents of the flowers of T. officinale. The T. officinale flowers oil constituents of methyl ester derivatives of fatty acids were analyzed applying gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer. The results obtained showed the presence of both containing the saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids in T. officinale flower oils. A total of 19 different components were identified and quantified. The concentration level of Methyl ester of Lenolenic acid was found very effective in concentration 3.33%, among the identified analytes of interest. In addition, the level of other chemical constituents of methyl ester of palmitic acid 3.11%, myristic acid 1.87, linolenic acids 1.67%, stearic acid 0.97 were found. The concentration level of the rest of identified fatty acids analytes were below 1%. Thus the results obtained from the current initiative is very promising due to the presence of high percentage of valuable analytes concentrations recorded in the fatty acid of T. officinale flower oil. Thus due to the presence of highly important analytes which have increased their importance for consumption in the pharmaceuticals as well as its applications in the new formulations for different skin, cosmetics and health purposes and for use by local practioners. The study will also provide a scientific database line. (author)

  4. Rapid Detection of Gas Hazards and Leaks with an Atmospheric Sampling, High Resolution, Mass Spectrometer with Low Pumping Requirements Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Miniaturization of mass spectrometers is restricted almost exclusively by the ability of small vacuum pumps to remove gas loads during operation of the instrument....

  5. Summary of flammable gas hazard and potential consequences in tank waste remediation system facility at the Hanford site

    Van Vleet, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-11

    This document provides a summary of the flammable gas program since 1992. It provides the best understanding of generation, retention, release of flammable gases. It gives a composition for each of the flammable gas tanks, calculates postulated concentrations in the event of a release, calculates the pressure obtained during a burn, and provides radiological and toxicological consequences. Controls from the analysis are found in WHC-SD-WM-SAR-067.

  6. Determination of long-chain fatty acids in serum by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry

    The quantification of long-chain fatty acids is fundamental for the diagnosis of several peroxisome disorders, particularly those in which the β-oxidation peroxisome of fatty acids is affected. In this work the implementation of an analytical method for the determination of these markers in serum by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry is described. Besides, samples from patients with a diagnostic impression of adrenoleukodystrophy linked to the X chromosome were analyzed. The necessary experimental conditions were achieved for the separation and quantification of C22:0, C24:0 and C26:0 fatty acids in serum, which are biochemical markers of various peroxisome diseases. The application of this method allowed confirming the diagnosis of three patients with a diagnostic impression of adrenoleukodystrophy linked to the X chromosome. The application of the method in daily practice will allow the Cuban medical system to count on a new laboratory parameter for the diagnosis of peroxisome disorders

  7. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  8. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  9. Formation of Small Gas Phase Carbonyls from Heterogeneous Oxidation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA)

    Zhou, S.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Gao, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are emitted into the atmosphere from gas and diesel powered vehicles, cooking, plants, and marine biota. Field measurements have suggested that FAs, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), could make up an important contribution to the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols. Due to the existence of carbon-carbon double bonds in their molecules, PUFA are believed to be highly reactive towards atmospheric oxidants such as OH and NO3 radicals and ozone, which will contribute to aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity. Previous work from our group has shown that small carbonyls formed from the heterogeneous reaction of linoleic acid (LA) thin films with gas-phase O3. It is known that the formation of small carbonyls in the atmosphere is not only relevant to the atmospheric budget of volatile organic compounds but also to secondary organic aerosol formation. In the present study, using an online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) we again investigated carbonyl formation from the same reaction system, i.e. the heterogeneous ozonolysis of LA film. In addition to the previously reported carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA), a source of reactive oxygen species that is mutagenic, has been identified as a product for the first time. Small dicarbonyls, e.g. glyoxal, are expected to be formed from the further oxidation of MDA. In this presentation, the gas-phase chemistry of MDA with OH radicals using a newly built Teflon chamber in our group will also be presented.

  10. Analysis of tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives in heavy gas oil from Brazilian naphthenic acids by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electron impact ionization.

    Vaz de Campos, Maria Cecília; Oliveira, Eniz Conceição; Filho, Pedro José Sanches; Piatnicki, Clarisse Maria Sartori; Caramão, Elina Bastos

    2006-02-10

    Naphthenic acids, C(n)H(2n+Z)O(2), are a complex mixture of alkyl-substituted acyclic and cycle-aliphatic carboxylic acids. The content of naphthenic acids and their derivatives in crude oils is very small, which hinders their extraction from matrixes of wide and varied composition. In this work, liquid-liquid extraction, followed by solid phase extraction with an ion exchange resin (Amberlyst A-27) and ultrasound desorption were used to isolate the acid fraction from heavy gas oil of Marlim petroleum (Campos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). The analysis was accomplished through gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electron impact ionization, after derivatization with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoracetamide (MTBDMSTFA). The results indicate the presence of carboxylic acids belonging to families of alicyclic and naphthenic compounds which contain up to four rings in the molecule. PMID:16439253

  11. 78 FR 53190 - Pipeline Safety: Notice to Operators of Hazardous Liquid and Natural Gas Pipelines of a Recall on...

    2013-08-28

    ... Liquid and Natural Gas Pipelines of a Recall on Leak Repair Clamps Due to Defective Seal AGENCY: Pipeline.... Williamson, Inc. (TDW) Leak Repair Clamp (LRC) recall issued by TDW on June 17, 2013. The recall covers all... subject to the recall by reviewing their records and equipment for installation of these LRCs....

  12. Determination of 4-Chloroindole-3-Acetic Acid Methyl Ester in Lathyrus Vicia and Pisum by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen; Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn

    1980-01-01

    methyl ester isomers. The quantitative determination of 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester in immature seeds of these three species was performed by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry using deuterium labelled 4-chloro-indole-3-acetic acid methyl ester as an internal standard. P. sativum...

  13. Identification and hazard prediction of tattoo pigments by means of pyrolysis—gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Andree, Sarah; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of regulation for tattoo ink ingredients across Europe has generated the need for analytical methods suitable to identify prohibited compounds. Common challenges of this subject are the poor solubility and the lack of volatility for most pigments and polymers applied in tattoo inks. Here, we present pyrolysis coupled to online gas chromatography and electron impact ionization mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS) as quick and reliable tool for pigment identification using both purif...

  14. Analysis of Gas Permeability Characteristics of Poly(Lactic Acid)/Poly(Butylene Succinate) Nanocomposites

    Amita Bhatia; Rahul K Gupta; Bhattacharya, Sati N.; Hyoung Jin Choi

    2012-01-01

    Gas permeability and morphological properties of nanocomposites prepared by the mixing of poly(lactic acid) (PLA), poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), and clay was investigated. While the composition of PLA and PBS polymers was fixed as 80% and 20% by weight, respectively, for all the nanocomposites, clay contents varied from 1 to 10 wt%. From the morphological studies using both wide angle X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, the nanocomposite having 1 wt% of clay was consider...

  15. The microbial communities and potential greenhouse gas production in boreal acid sulphate, non-acid sulphate, and reedy sulphidic soils

    Acid sulphate (AS) soils along the Baltic coasts contain significant amounts of organic carbon and nitrogen in their subsoils. The abundance, composition, and activity of microbial communities throughout the AS soil profile were analysed. The data from a drained AS soil were compared with those from a drained non-AS soil and a pristine wetland soil from the same region. Moreover, the potential production of methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide from the soils was determined under laboratory conditions. Direct microscopic counting, glucose-induced respiration (GIR), whole cell hybridisation, and extended phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis confirmed the presence of abundant microbial communities in the topsoil and also in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil. The patterns of microbial counts, biomass and activity in the profile of the AS soil and partly also in the non-AS soil therefore differed from the general tendency of gradual decreases in soil profiles. High respiration in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil (5.66 μg C g− 1 h− 1, as compared to 2.71 μg C g− 1 h− 1 in a top Ap horizon) is unusual but reasonable given the large amount of organic carbon in this horizon. Nitrous oxide production peaked in the BCgc horizon of the AS and in the BC horizon of the non-AS soil, but the peak value was ten-fold higher in the AS soil than in the non-AS soil (82.3 vs. 8.6 ng N g− 1d− 1). The data suggest that boreal AS soils on the Baltic coast contain high microbial abundance and activity. This, together with the abundant carbon and total and mineral nitrogen in the deep layers of AS soils, may result in substantial gas production. Consequently, high GHG emissions could occur, for example, when the generally high water table is lowered because of arable farming. - Highlights: •Boreal acid sulphate soils contain large amounts of organic C and N in subsoils. •Microbial communities throughout the acid sulphate soil profile were analysed.

  16. Gas emission from diffuse degassing structures (DDS) of the Cameroon volcanic line (CVL): Implications for the prevention of CO2-related hazards

    Issa; Ohba, T.; Chako Tchamabé, B.; Padrón, E.; Hernández, P.; Eneke Takem, E. G.; Barrancos, J.; Sighomnoun, D.; Ooki, S.; Nkamdjou, Sigha; Kusakabe, M.; Yoshida, Y.; Dionis, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the mid-1980s, lakes Nyos and Monoun violently released massive gas, mainly magmatic CO2 killing about 1800 people. Subsequent geochemical surveys and social studies indicate that lakes Nyos and Monoun event is cyclic in nature and may occur anywhere in the about 37 other volcanic lakes located in the corridor of the Cameroon volcanic line (CVL). This potential threat motivated us to check if, alike Nyos and Monoun, the internal dynamic of the other lakes is also controlled by inputs of deep-seated-derived CO2 and attempt to measure and provide comprehensive insights on the passive gas emission along the CVL. This knowledge shall contribute to the prevention of volcanic lake-related hazards in Cameroon and the refinement of the Global Carbon Cycle. We used in situ fixation and dry gas phase sampling methods to determine CO2 origin and the concentration, and the accumulation chamber technique to measure diffuse CO2 emission from nine lakes and on soil at Nyos Valley and Mount Manenguba Caldera. The results suggest that, although in minor concentrations (compared to Nyos and Monoun), ranging from 0.56 mmol kg- 1 to 8.75 mmol kg- 1, the bottom waters of some lakes also contain measurable magmatic CO2 with δ13C varies from - 4.42‰ to - 9.16‰ vs. PDB. That finding implies that, under certain circumstances, e.g. increase to volcanic and/or tectonic activities along the CVL, the concerned lakes could develop a Nyos-type behavioural scheme. The diffuse gas emission results indicate that the nine surveyed lakes release approximately 3.69 ± 0.37 kt km- 2 yr- 1 of CO2 to the atmosphere; extrapolation to the approximately 39 volcanic lakes located on the CVL yields an approximate CO2 output of 27.37 ± 0.5 kt km- 2 yr- 1, representing 0.023% of the global CO2 output from volcanic lakes. In addition to the precedent value, the gas removal operation in lakes Nyos and Monoun released approximately 2.52 ± 0.46 × 108 mol km- 2 yr- 1 CO2 to the atmosphere from January

  17. Core acid treatment influence on well reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field

    Janishevskii, A.; Ezhova, A.

    2015-11-01

    The research involves investigation of the influence of hydrochloric acid (HCI-12%) and mud acid (mixture: HCl - 10% and HF - 3%) treatment on the Upper-Jurassic reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field wells. The sample collection included three lots of core cylinders from one and the same depth (all in all 42). Two lots of core cylinders were distributed as following: first lot - reservoir properties were determined, and, then thin sections were cut off from cylinder faces; second lot- core cylinders were exposed to hydrochloric acid treatment, then, after flushing the reservoir properties were determined, and thin sections were prepared. Based on the quantitative petrographic rock analysis, involvin 42 thin sections, the following factors were determined: granulometric mineral composition, cement content, intergranular contacts and pore space structure. According to the comparative analysis of initial samples, the following was determined: content decrease of feldspar, clay and mica fragments, mica, clay and carbonate cement; increase of pore spaces while in the investigated samples- on exposure of rocks to acids effective porosity and permeability value range is ambiguous.

  18. Transportation of hazardous goods

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    A general reminder: any transportation of hazardous goods by road is subject to the European ADR rules. The goods concerned are essentially the following: Explosive substances and objects; Gases (including aerosols and non-flammable gases such as helium and nitrogen); Flammable substances and liquids (inks, paints, resins, petroleum products, alcohols, acetone, thinners); Toxic substances (acids, thinners); Radioactive substances; Corrosive substances (paints, acids, caustic products, disinfectants, electrical batteries). Any requests for the transport of hazardous goods must be executed in compliance with the instructions given at this URL: http://ts-dep.web.cern.ch/ts-dep/groups/he/HH/adr.pdf Heavy Handling Section TS-HE-HH 73793 - 160364

  19. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  20. Modeling acid-gas injection in deep saline aquifers for geological sequestration. Paper no. IGEC-1-070

    Geological sequestration of acid gas (H2S and CO2, with minor traces of hydrocarbons) is an important strategy for reducing release of greenhouse gases and sulfur compounds to the atmosphere. Performance of a deep well injection operation during and after injection is critically dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the injected gases, the operational parameters such as injection rate and pressure, as well as the geological and geochemical properties of the formation. This paper presents a semi-analytical model to predict the injection well performance as a function of these parameters for geological sequestration. In this model, in-situ phase and thermodynamic properties of acid gases are calculated by using volume-shifted Peng-Robinson equation of state and combining rules for mixtures. Equations governing the radial injection and migration of an immiscible acid gas into confined aquifers, its flow around the injector and toward the top due to buoyancy with simultaneous dissolution, and the escape of gases through leakage are presented. The formation heterogeneity and formation damage around the wellbore due to drilling, completion or mineral trapping are also considered. It has shown that the both formation characteristics and operational characteristics have significant influences on the underground migration, distribution and the total volume of the acid gas sequestrated. By evaluation of the well injectivity, this model provides a basic framework for planning and designing acid gas deep well injection process and hence the maximum allowable limits on acid gas geological sequestration. (author)

  1. Measurement of arachidonic acid release from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and platelets: comparison between gas chromatographic and radiometric assays

    a simple gas chromatographic method for the assay of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) has been described in which arachidonic acid released from endogenous phospholipid pools is measured following its extraction and derivatization to pentafluorobenzyl esters. Using this assay, PLA2 activities in control and calcium ionophore-stimulated human neutrophils, as well as in control, thrombin, and calcium ionophore stimulated human platelets, have been measured. These values are compared with those obtained by monitoring the release of radioactivity from 3H- or 14Carachidonic acid prelabeled cells. While the radiometric assay measures only the release of exogenously incorporated radioactive arachidonic acid, the gas chromatographic assay measures arachidonic acid released from all the endogenous pools. Thus, the apparent increase in PLA2 activity in stimulated cells measured by the gas chromatographic assay is four- to fivefold higher than that by the radiometric assay. Inclusion of fatty acid free bovine serum albumin in the reaction buffer significantly increases the amount of arachidonic acid that is measured by gas chromatography. The gas chromatographic method has also been successfully utilized for measuring PLA2 activity in cell-free preparations derived from physically disrupted human neutrophils

  2. Barrow hazards survey

    Following a series of public meetings at which PERG presented the results of a literature review and site specific accident study of the hazards of the maritime transport of spent nuclear reactor fuel to Barrow (en route to the Windscale reprocessing works), PERG was requested by the Planning Committee of Barrow Town Council to prepare an assessment of the interaction of the hazards arising from the concentration of nuclear activities in the area with those of a proposed gas-terminal. This report presents a preliminary review of the Environmental Impact Assessments prepared by the Borough Surveyor and a critical appraisal of the hazard analyses undertaken by the Health and Safety Executive, and the consultants to Cumbria County Council on this matter, the Safety and Reliability Directorate of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. After a general and historical introduction, the document continues under the following headings: a description of the hazards (BNFL spent fuel shipments; the gas terminal; gas condensate storage; the Vickers shipyard (involving nuclear powered submarines)); the interaction of hazards; planning implications and democratic decisions; recommendations. (U.K.)

  3. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  4. Evaluation of a gas chromatography method for azelaic acid determination in selected biological samples

    Mahdi Garelnabi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Azelaic acid (AzA is the best known dicarboxilic acid to have pharmaceutical benefits and clinical applications and also to be associated with some diseases pathophysiology. Materials and Methods: We extracted and methylesterified AzA and determined its concentration in human plasma obtained from healthy individuals and also in mice fed AzA containing diet for three months. Results: AzA was detected in Gas Chromatography (GC and confirmed by Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS, and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMC. Our results have shown that AzA can be determined efficiently in selected biological samples by GC method with 1nM limit of detection (LoD and the limit of quantification (LoQ; was established at 50nM. Analytical Sensitivity as assayed by hexane demonstrated an analytical sensitivity at 0.050nM. The method has demonstrated 8-10% CV batch repeatability across the sample types and 13-18.9% CV for the Within-Lab Precision analysis. The method has shown that AzA can efficiently be recovered from various sample preparation including liver tissue homogenate (95% and human plasma (97%. Conclusions: Because of its simplicity and lower limit of quantification, the present method provides a useful tool for determining AzA in various biological sample preparations.

  5. Acid decomposition and thiourea leaching of silver from hazardous jarosite residues: Effect of some cations on the stability of the thiourea system.

    Calla-Choque, D; Nava-Alonso, F; Fuentes-Aceituno, J C

    2016-11-01

    The recovery of silver from hazardous jarosite residues was studied employing thiourea as leaching agent at acid pH and 90°C. The stability of the thiourea in synthetic solutions was evaluated in the presence of some cations that can be present in this leaching system: cupric and ferric ions as oxidant species, and zinc, lead and iron as divalent ions. Two silver leaching methods were studied: the simultaneous jarosite decomposition-silver leaching, and the jarosite decomposition followed by the silver leaching. The study with synthetic solutions demonstrated that cupric and ferric ions have a negative effect on thiourea stability due to their oxidant properties. The effect of cupric ions is more significant than the effect of ferric ions; other studied cations (Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+)) had no effect on the stability of thiourea. When the decomposition of jarosite and the silver leaching are carried out simultaneously, 70% of the silver can be recovered. When the acid decomposition was performed at pH 0.5 followed by the leaching step at pH 1, total silver recovery increased up to 90%. The zinc is completely dissolved with any of these processes while the lead is practically insoluble with these systems producing a lead-rich residue. PMID:27322901

  6. A comparative investigation on adsorption performances of mesoporous activated carbon prepared from waste rubber tire and activated carbon for a hazardous azo dye-Acid Blue 113

    Research highlights: → The system is cheap, efficient and fast for the removal of dyes from waters. → Higher adsorption capacity is due to higher mesoporous volume of the adsorbent. → The rate determining step of the adsorption process is particle diffusion. - Abstract: A mesoporous carbon developed from waste tire rubber, characterized by chemical analysis, FTIR, and SEM studies, was used as an adsorbent for the removal and recovery of a hazardous azo dye, Acid Blue 113. Surface area, porosity, and density were determined. The adsorption of the dye over the prepared adsorbent and a commercial activated carbon was achieved under different pH, adsorbate concentration, sieve size, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature conditions. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were applied and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption process follow first order kinetics and particle diffusion mechanisms are operative. By percolating the dye solution through fixed-bed columns the bulk removal of the Acid Blue 113 was carried out and necessary parameters were determined to find out the percentage saturation of both the columns. Recovery of the dye was made by eluting 0.1 M NaOH through the column.

  7. Influence of liquid and gas flow rates on sulfuric acid mist removal from air by packed bed tower

    Jafari Mohammad Javad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The possible emission of sulfuric acid mists from a laboratory scale, counter-current packed bed tower operated with a caustic scrubbing solution was studied. Acid mists were applied through a local exhaust hood. The emissions from the packed bed tower were monitored in three different categories of gas flow rate as well as three liquid flow rates, while other influencing parameters were kept almost constant. Air sampling and sulfuric acid measurement were carried out iso-kinetically using USEPA method 8. The acid mists were measured by the barium-thorin titration method. According to the results when the gas flow rate increased from 10 L/s to 30 L/s, the average removal efficiency increased significantly (p 3, respectively. L/G of 2–3 was recommended for designing purposes of a packed tower for sulfuric acid mists and vapors removal from contaminated air stream.

  8. Influence of Liquid and Gas Flow Rates on Sulfuric acid Mist removal from Air by Packed bed Tower

    Mohammad Javad Jafari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The possible emission of sulfuric acid mists from a laboratory scale, counter-current packed bed tower operated with a caustic scrubbing solution was studied. Acid mists were applied through a local exhaust hood. The emissions from the packed bed tower were monitored in three different categories of gas flow rate as well as threeliquid flow rates, while other influencing paramet ers were kept almost constant. Air sampling and sulfuric acid measurement were carried out iso-kinetically using USEPA method 8. The acid mists were measured by the barium-thorin titration method. According to the results when the gas flow rate increased from 10 L/s to 30 L/s,the average removal efficiency increased significantly (p 3, respectively. L/G of 2–3 was recommended for designing purposes of a packed tower for sulfuric acid mists and vapors removal from contaminated air stream.

  9. Bio-toxicological supervision op workers exposed to lead poisoning hazard. Systematic examination of amino acids, in urine and plasma

    A bio-toxicological chart was established for the workers in a firm handling lead. The known facts concerning professional lead poisoning are outlined, after which the importance of lead work in a nuclear center is discussed. The work station of each man is described and the results of analyses made during atmospheric checks on the site are given with sampling techniques. Since the biological chart is centered on the chromatographic exploration of amino acids in blood and urine, the analytical technique used is described and the different technical modifications made to the standard technique reported. The results obtained on reference subjects are compared with those found in the specialized literature. The results found in lead workers are then presented in the form of histograms, which better illustrate the differences observed with respect to the reference subjects. An hematological and toxicological balance-sheet is drawn up and the correlation existing between the results of coproporphyrine, lead and delta-aminolevulinic acid analyses in urine is checked. Biological detection of lead-poisoning has the advantage of providing an early diagnosis, thus enabling the works doctor to forestall the effects of this professional disease before any clinical symptoms appear. (author)

  10. Analysis of phenolic acids as chloroformate derivatives using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography.

    Citová, Ivana; Sladkovský, Radek; Solich, Petr

    2006-07-28

    In the presented study, a simple and original procedure of phenolic acids derivatization treated by ethyl and methyl chloroformate performed in an aqueous media consisting of acetonitrile, water, methanol/ethanol and pyridine has been modified and optimized. Seven phenolic acid standards-caffeic, ferulic, gallic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic, syringic and vanillic were derivatized into corresponding methyl/ethyl esters and subsequently determined by the means of gas chromatography connected to the flame-ionisation detector (FID). Some selected validation parameters as linearity, detection and quantitation limits and peak area repeatability were valued. The total time of gas chromatography (GC) analysis was 24 min for methyl chloroformate and 30 min for ethyl chloroformate derivatization. The more suitable methyl chloroformate derivatization was used for further experiments on the possibility of multiple pre-concentration by the direct solid phase microextraction technique (SPME). For this purpose, polyacrylate (PA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibres were tested and the extraction conditions concerning time of extraction, temperature and time of desorption were optimized. The most polar PA fibre gave the best results under optimal extraction conditions (50 min extraction time, 25 degrees C extraction temperature and 10 min desorption time). As a result, the total time of SPME-GC analysis was 74 min and an increase in method sensitivity was reached. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) of p-coumaric, ferulic, syringic and vanillic acid esters after SPME pre-concentration were 0.02, 0.17, 0.2 and 0.2 microg mL(-1), respectively, showing approximately 10 times higher sensitivity in comparison with the original GC method. PMID:17723529

  11. A validated method for gas chromatographic analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tall fescue herbage.

    Kagan, Isabelle A; Coe, Brenda L; Smith, Lori L; Huo, Cheng-Jun; Dougherty, Charles T; Strickland, James R

    2008-07-23

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in animals that is also found in plants and has been associated with plant responses to stress. A simple and relatively rapid method of GABA separation and quantification was developed from a commercially available kit for serum amino acids (Phenomenex EZ:faast) and validated for tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Extraction in ethanol/water (80:20, v/v) at ambient temperature yielded detectable amounts of GABA. Clean separation from other amino acids in 28 min was achieved by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID), using a 30 m, 5% phenyl/95% dimethylpolysiloxane column. The identity of the putative GABA peak was confirmed by GC with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The relatively small effects of the sample matrix on GABA measurement were verified by demonstrating slope parallelism of GABA curves prepared in the presence and absence of fescue extracts. Limits of quantification and detection were 2.00 and 1.00 nmol/100 microL, respectively. Method recoveries at two different spike levels were 96.4 and 94.2%, with coefficients of variation of 7.3 and 7.2%, respectively. PMID:18558696

  12. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours. PMID:22841594

  13. Heating cells in acid methanol for 30 min without freeze-drying provides adequate yields of fatty acids and alcohols for gas chromatographic characterization of mycobacteria.

    Jimenez, J; Larsson, L

    1986-01-01

    We studied the release of mycobacterial fatty acids (as methyl esters) and secondary alcohols after heating both wet and freeze-dried cells in methanolic hydrogen chloride for different time periods. A 30-min heating of the mycobacteria without prior freeze-drying was found adequate in a routine gas chromatographic procedure for strain and species characterization.

  14. Identification and hazard prediction of tattoo pigments by means of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Andree, Sarah; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The implementation of regulation for tattoo ink ingredients across Europe has generated the need for analytical methods suitable to identify prohibited compounds. Common challenges of this subject are the poor solubility and the lack of volatility for most pigments and polymers applied in tattoo inks. Here, we present pyrolysis coupled to online gas chromatography and electron impact ionization mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS) as quick and reliable tool for pigment identification using both purified pigments and tattoo ink formulations. Some 36 organic pigments frequently used in tattoo inks were subjected to py-GC/MS with the aim to establish a pyrogram library. To cross-validate pigment identification, 28 commercially available tattoo inks as well as 18 self-made pigment mixtures were analyzed. Pyrograms of inks and mixtures were evaluated by two different means to work out the most reliable and fastest strategy for an otherwise rather time-consuming data review. Using this approach, the declaration of tattoo pigments currently used on the market could be verified. The pyrolysis library presented here is also assumed suitable to predict decomposition patterns of pigments when affected by other degradation scenarios, such as sunlight exposure or laser irradiation. Thus, the consumers' risk associated with the exposure to toxicologically relevant substances that originate from pigment decomposition in the dermal layers of the skin can be assessed. Differentiation between more or less harmful pigments for this field of application now will become feasible. PMID:27209489

  15. Oil/gas pre-treatment plants and air quality hazards: PM1 measurements in Agri Valley (southern Italy)

    Trippetta, S.; Caggiano, R.; Sabia, S.

    2014-04-01

    A PM1 (i.e., aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameter less 1.0 μm) short term monitoring campaign was carried out in Agri Valley (southern Italy) in September 2012. This area is of international concern since it houses the largest European on-shore reservoir and the largest oil/gas pre-treatment plant (i.e., Centro Olio Val d'Agri - COVA) within an anthropized context. PM1 measurements were performed in Viggiano, the nearest town to the COVA plant and one of the most populated town of the Agri Valley. During the study period, the PM1 daily concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 8.4 μg m-3 with a mean value of 4.6 μg m-3. Regarding the PM1 chemical composition, it can be observed that S and typical crustal elements were the most abundant constituents of the PM1 collected. By applying the Principal Component Analysis, it was pointed out that crustal soil, biomass and wood burning, secondary atmospheric reactions involving COVA plant emissions and local soil particles, and traffic were the main sources contributing to the PM1 measured in the area under study. Moreover, a possible contribution of the long-range transport of African dust was observed.

  16. Formation of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid via gas phase oxidation of pinonic acid – a mass spectrometric study of SOA aging

    L. Müller

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric investigations of the OH-initiated oxidative aging of α-pinene SOA under simulated tropospheric conditions at the large aerosol chamber facility AIDA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In particular, the OH-initiated oxidation of pure pinic and pinonic acid, two well-known oxidation products of α-pinene, was investigated. Two complementary analytical techniques were used, on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (APCI/MS and filter sampling followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS. The results show that 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA, a known and very low volatile α-pinene SOA product, is formed from the oxidation of pinonic acid and that this oxidation takes place in the gas phase. This finding is confirmed by temperature-dependent aging experiments on whole SOA formed from α-pinene, in which the yield of MBTCA scales with the pinonic acid fraction in the gas phase. Based on the results, several feasible gas-phase radical mechanisms are discussed to explain the formation of MBTCA from OH-initiated pinonic acid oxidation.

  17. Formation of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid via gas phase oxidation of pinonic acid - a mass spectrometric study of SOA aging

    Müller, L.; Reinnig, M.-C.; Naumann, K. H.; Saathoff, H.; Mentel, T. F.; Donahue, N. M.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric investigations of the OH-initiated oxidative aging of α-pinene SOA under simulated tropospheric conditions at the large aerosol chamber facility AIDA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In particular, the OH-initiated oxidation of pure pinic and pinonic acid, two well-known oxidation products of α-pinene, was investigated. Two complementary analytical techniques were used, on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (APCI/MS) and filter sampling followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS). The results show that 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a very low volatile α-pinene SOA product and a tracer compound for terpene SOA, is formed from the oxidation of pinonic acid and that this oxidation takes place in the gas phase. This finding is confirmed by temperature-dependent aging experiments on whole SOA formed from α-pinene, in which the yield of MBTCA scales with the pinonic acid fraction in the gas phase. Based on the results, several feasible gas-phase radical mechanisms are discussed to explain the formation of MBTCA from OH-initiated pinonic acid oxidation.

  18. Effect of peat quality on microbial greenhouse gas formation in an acidic fen

    M. Reiche

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle and represent both an important stock of soil carbon and a substantial natural source of relevant greenhouse gases like CO2 and CH4. While it is known that the microbial availability of organic matter affects degradation and mineralization processes in peatlands, the manner in which peat organic matter affects the formation of CO2 and CH4 remains unclear. In this study we developed a fast and simple peat quality index in order to estimate its greenhouse gas potential by linking the thermo-degradability of peat with anaerobic CO2 and CH4 formation rates. Peat samples were obtained at several depths (0–40 cm at four sampling locations from an acidic fen (pH∼4.7. CO2 and CH4 formation rates were highly spatially variable and depended on depth, sampling location, and the composition of pyrolysable organic matter. Peat samples active in CO2 and CH4 formation had a quality index above 1.35, and the fraction of thermally labile pyrolyzable organic matter (comparable to easily available carbon substrates for microbial activity obtained by thermogravimetry was above 35%. Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry mainly identified carbohydrates and lignin as pyrolysis products in these samples, indicating that undecomposed organic matter was found in this fraction. In contrast, lipids and unspecific pyrolysis products, which indicate recalcitrant and highly decomposed organic matter, correlated significantly with lower CO2 formation and reduced methanogenesis. Our results suggest that undecomposed organic matter is a prerequisite for CH4 and CO2 development in acidic fens. Furthermore, the new peat quality index should aide the estimation of greenhouse gas formation potential resulting from peatland restoration and permafrost thawing

  19. Study on removal of elemental mercury from simulated flue gas over activated coke treated by acid

    Ma, Jinfeng [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Caiting, E-mail: ctli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Lingkui; Zhang, Jie; Song, Jingke; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Xunan; Xie, Yine [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • HClO{sub 4} treated AC was developed for effective Hg{sup 0} removal from simulated flue gas. • The exceptional effect of SO{sub 2} on Hg{sup 0} removal by AC{sub 4.5} was discussed. • Possible reaction mechanism of Hg{sup 0} removal over AC{sub 4.5} was put forward. - Abstract: This work addressed the investigation of activated coke (AC) treated by acids. Effects of AC samples, modified by ether different acids (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4}) or HClO{sub 4} of varied concentrations, on Hg{sup 0} removal were studied under simulated flue gas conditions. In addition, effects of reaction temperature and individual flue gas components including O{sub 2}, NO, SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O were discussed. In the experiments, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied to explore the surface properties of sorbents and possible mechanism of Hg{sup 0} oxidation. Results showed that AC sample treated by HClO{sub 4} of 4.5 mol/L exhibited maximum promotion of efficiency on Hg{sup 0} removal at 160 °C. NO was proved to be positive in the removal of Hg{sup 0}. And SO{sub 2} displayed varied impact in capturing Hg{sup 0} due to the integrated reactions between SO{sub 2} and modified AC. The addition of O{sub 2} could improve the advancement further to some extent. Besides, the Hg{sup 0} removal capacity had a slight declination when H{sub 2}O was added in gas flow. Based on the analysis of XPS and FTIR, the selected sample absorbed Hg{sup 0} mostly in chemical way. The reaction mechanism, deduced from results of characterization and performance of AC samples, indicated that Hg{sup 0} could firstly be absorbed on sorbent and then react with oxygen-containing (C−O) or chlorine-containing groups (C−Cl) on the surface of sorbent. And the products were mainly in forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) and mercuric oxide (HgO)

  20. Hazardous waste to materials: recovery of molybdenum and vanadium from acidic leach liquor of spent hydroprocessing catalyst using alamine 308.

    Sahu, K K; Agrawal, Archana; Mishra, D

    2013-08-15

    Recovery of valuable materials/metals from waste goes hand in hand with environmental protection. This paper deals with the development of a process for the recovery of metals such as Mo, V, Ni, Al from spent hydroprocessing catalyst which may otherwise cause a nuisance if dumped untreated. A detailed study on the separation of molybdenum and vanadium from the leach solution of spent hydroprocessing catalyst of composition: 27.15% MoO₃, 1.7% V₂O₅, 3.75% NiO, 54.3% Al₂O₃, 2.3% SiO₂ and 10.4% LOI is reported in this paper. The catalyst was subjected to roasting under oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature of about 550 °C and leaching in dilute sulphuric acid to dissolve molybdenum, vanadium, nickel and part of aluminium. Metals from the leach solution were separated by solvent extraction. Both molybdenum and vanadium were selectively extracted with a suitable organic solvent leaving nickel and dissolved aluminium in the raffinate. Various parameters such as initial pH of the aqueous feed, organic to aqueous ratio (O:A), solvent concentration etc. were optimized for the complete extraction and recovery of Mo and V. Molybdenum and vanadium from the loaded organic were stripped by ammonia solution. They were recovered as their corresponding ammonium salt by selective precipitation, and were further calcined to get the corresponding oxides in pure form. PMID:23644591

  1. Fundamental studies of acid gas treating by aqueous alkanolamines: Vapor-liquid equilibrium studies. Annual report, January-December 1992

    Ng, H.J.; Huang, S.H.

    1993-02-01

    The project addresses the measurement of the solubilities of acid gases such as H2S and CO2 in alkanolamine solutions. Systems of acid gas mixtures and of amine mixtures are included in the study. The temperature range extended from 40 to 120 C and the partial pressure of the acid gases ranged from 0.005 kPa up to 3,000 kPa. The range is sufficient to cover most of the industrial operating conditions for amine-based sweeteners. The planned schedule of experimental work was maintained during 1992. The solubilities of H2S in seven amine systems have been measured and reported. The study will be continued in 1993. The measurements will be extended to systems containing CO2 as the acid gas.

  2. Multi-coincidence measurements in gas-phase amino acid alanine after valence level ionization

    Full text: The first chiral amino acids having distinct enantiomeric structures is the alanine. Therefore the study of such molecules is important for developing our understanding of this class of molecule. In this work, we report coincidence measurements between photoelectron and photoion, and total ion yield (TIY) measurements after valence level ionization of D,L-alanine in gas phase. The experiments were performed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) at the Toroidal Grating Monochromator beamline (D0-5A TGM) in the 12-35 eV energy range. The end-station of the beamline is composed by a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer specially build for the photoelectron-photoion-photoion (PEPIPICO) measurements. The TIY have been compared with valence photoelectron spectra recorded with synchrotron radiation reported in the literature and have been discussed in a comparative form. The results will be presented during the conference

  3. Incorporation of small BN domains in graphene during CVD using methane, boric acid and nitrogen gas.

    Bepete, George; Voiry, Damien; Chhowalla, Manish; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Coville, Neil J

    2013-07-21

    Chemical doping of graphene with small boron nitride (BN) domains has been shown to be an effective way of permanently modulating the electronic properties in graphene. Herein we show a facile method of growing large area graphene doped with small BN domains on copper foils using a single step CVD route with methane, boric acid powder and nitrogen gas as the carbon, boron and nitrogen sources respectively. This facile and safe process avoids the use of boranes and ammonia. Optical microscopy confirmed that continuous films were grown and Raman spectroscopy confirmed changes in the electronic structure of the grown BN doped graphene. Using XPS studies we find that both B and N can be substituted into the graphene structure in the form of small BN domains to give a B-N-C system. A novel structure for the BN doped graphene is proposed. PMID:23759928

  4. Incorporation of small BN domains in graphene during CVD using methane, boric acid and nitrogen gas

    Bepete, George; Voiry, Damien; Chhowalla, Manish; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Coville, Neil J.

    2013-06-01

    Chemical doping of graphene with small boron nitride (BN) domains has been shown to be an effective way of permanently modulating the electronic properties in graphene. Herein we show a facile method of growing large area graphene doped with small BN domains on copper foils using a single step CVD route with methane, boric acid powder and nitrogen gas as the carbon, boron and nitrogen sources respectively. This facile and safe process avoids the use of boranes and ammonia. Optical microscopy confirmed that continuous films were grown and Raman spectroscopy confirmed changes in the electronic structure of the grown BN doped graphene. Using XPS studies we find that both B and N can be substituted into the graphene structure in the form of small BN domains to give a B-N-C system. A novel structure for the BN doped graphene is proposed.

  5. Analysis of dibutylphosphoric acid (DBP) in degraded solvent by utilizing gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry

    In JAEA, a washing process of tributylphosphate (TBP) in the Purex reprocessing have been investigated by means of n-butylamine oxalate as a washing reagent, which is decomposable by incineration or electrolysis. The concentration of the dibutylphosphoric acid (DBP) in organic and aqueous phase has been determined by an ion-chromatography. In this analytical method, however; we found out that the quantitative analysis for DBP exhibited poor reproducibility because of low sensitivity for DBP. Here we report a new analytical method for DBP by means of a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). From our investigation, silylation of DBP was efficient to improve the sensitivity and the reproducibility of the quantitative analysis for DBP. Moreover, we found out that the silylation was effective for the analysis of monobutylphosphoric (MBP). (author)

  6. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications

    Amy, Fabrice [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Hufton, Jeffrey [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Bhadra, Shubhra [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Weist, Edward [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Lau, Garret [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Jonas, Gordon [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Air Products has developed an acid gas removal technology based on adsorption (Sour PSA) that favorably compares with incumbent AGR technologies. During this DOE-sponsored study, Air Products has been able to increase the Sour PSA technology readiness level by successfully operating a two-bed test system on coal-derived sour syngas at the NCCC, validating the lifetime and performance of the adsorbent material. Both proprietary simulation and data obtained during the testing at NCCC were used to further refine the estimate of the performance of the Sour PSA technology when expanded to a commercial scale. In-house experiments on sweet syngas combined with simulation work allowed Air Products to develop new PSA cycles that allowed for further reduction in capital expenditure. Finally our techno economic analysis of the use the Sour PSA technology for both IGCC and coal-to-methanol applications suggests significant improvement of the unit cost of electricity and methanol compared to incumbent AGR technologies.

  7. Infrared and density functional theory studies of formic acid hydrate clusters in noble gas matrices

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of formic acid hydrate clusters (HCOOH)m(H2O)n have been measured in noble gas matrices (Ar and Kr). The concentration dependence of the spectra and the comparison with a previous experimental study on HCOOH(H2O) and HCOOH(H2O)2 [Geoge et al., Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 60 (2004) 3225] led to the identification of large clusters. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) level were carried out to determine the anharmonic vibrational properties of the clusters, enabling a consistent assignment of the observed vibrational peaks to specific clusters.

  8. Aspects on the removal of hazardous substances from flue gas by the applicance of waste water treatment techniques. Final report. Abwassertechnische Aspekte bei der Schadstoffreduzierung aus Abgasen. Schlussbericht

    Dreschmann, P.; Sterk, T.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was the qualitative and quantitative assessment of condensates, the examination of changes to the characteristics of the waste water due to immission of condensates, the assessment of effects on communal waste water purification plants, the investigation of the possibilities of waste gas purification using communal waste water. The results of investigations have shown that discharge of untreated condensates will not be possible, with respect to local regulations, as the pH value of the condensates vary between 3.0 and 4.0 in the case of gas-firing, and between 1.7 and 2.5 in the case of oil-firing. As far as the other approximate values given by the ATV in the worksheet A 115 'Advice on discharging waste water into public sewage works' are concerned, for anions, cations and hydrocarbons, it was possible to demonstrate that such values were not exceeded in the case of gas condensates, whereas in the gas of oil condensates, depending on the furnace installation, values were at times exceeded. The discharge experiments, conducted with various mixtures of condensate/waste water, have shown that the neutralisation of condensates using communal waste water, depending on the furnace installation and the fuel used, is definitely capable of being implemented as a pretreatment technique. In order to prevent damage to the biocenosis and to guarantee nitrification in the waste water purification plant, an acidic capacity in the flow of k/sub S/ /sub 43/ /ge/ 6.5 mmol/l is required. Trials in waste gas purification using communal waste water of the City of Heidenheim produced elimination rates, in the case of oil-firing, for SO/sub 2/ of eta SO/sub 2/ = 88.1% with an inlet facility in the channel floor, and of eta SO/sub 2/ = 97.4% with a countercurrent cascade. In the case of gas-firing an NO/sub x/ elimination rate of eta NO/sub x/ = 12.8% was achieved. 133 refs., 48 tabs., 45 figs.

  9. Structural characterization of humic acids, extracted from sewage sludge during composting, by thermochemolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Amir, Soumia; Hafidi, Mohamed; Lemee, Laurent; Merlina, Georges; Guiresse, Maritxu; Pinelli, Eric; Revel, Jean-Claude; Bailly, Jean-René; Amblès, André

    2006-01-01

    Thermochemolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry were applied to determine the structure of humic acids (HA) extracted from a sewage sludge and straw mixture at different steps of composting. The HA extracted from sludge mixture released various compounds, such as mono-, di-, tri-methoxy (alkyl) benzene and (alkyl) benzoic acids, which originated from lignin like derivatives of phydroxyphenyl, guiaicyl and syringyl units. In addition, other aromatic non-lignin derived st...

  10. The tropospheric processing of acidic gases and hydrogen sulphide in volcanic gas plumes as inferred from field and model investigations

    Aiuppa, A.; Franco, A.; von Glasow, R.; Allen, A.G.; W. D'Alessandro; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Valenza, M.

    2007-01-01

    Improving the constraints on the atmospheric fate and depletion rates of acidic compounds persistently emitted by non-erupting (quiescent) volcanoes is important for quantitatively predicting the environmental impact of volcanic gas plumes. Here, we present new experimental data coupled with modelling studies to investigate the chemical processing of acidic volcanogenic species during tropospheric dispersion. Diffusive tube samplers were deployed at Mount Etna, a very active open-conduit basa...

  11. The tropospheric processing of acidic gases and hydrogen sulphide in volcanic gas plumes as inferred from field and model investigations

    Aiuppa, A.; Franco, A.; von Glasow, R.; Allen, A.G.; D’Alessandro, W.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Valenza, M.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the constraints on the atmospheric fate and depletion rates of acidic compounds persistently emitted by non-erupting (quiescent) volcanoes is important for quantitatively predicting the environmental impact of volcanic gas plumes. Here, we present new experimental data coupled with modelling studies to investigate the chemical processing of acidic volcanogenic species during tropospheric dispersion. Diffusive tube samplers were deployed at Mount Etna, a very active open-conduit basa...

  12. Comparative assessment of the environmental hazards of and exposure to perfluoroalkyl phosphonic and phosphinic acids (PFPAs and PFPiAs): Current knowledge, gaps, challenges and research needs.

    Wang, Zhanyun; Cousins, Ian T; Berger, Urs; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Scheringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl phosphonic and phosphinic acids (PFPAs and PFPiAs) are sub-groups of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) that have been commercialized since the 1970s, particularly as defoamers in pesticide formulations and wetting agents in consumer products. Recently, C4/C4 PFPiA and its derivatives have been presented as alternatives to long-chain PFASs in certain applications. In this study, we systematically assess the publicly available information on the hazardous properties, occurrence, and exposure routes of PFPAs and PFPiAs, and make comparisons to the corresponding properties of their better-known carboxylic and sulfonic acid analogs (i.e. PFCAs and PFSAs). This comparative assessment indicates that [i] PFPAs likely have high persistence and long-range transport potential; [ii] PFPiAs may transform to PFPAs (and possibly PFCAs) in the environment and biota; [iii] certain PFPAs and PFPiAs can only be slowly eliminated from rainbow trout and rats, similarly to long-chain PFCAs and PFSAs; [iv] PFPAs and PFPiAs have modes-of-action that are both similar to, and different from, those of PFCAs and PFSAs; and [v] the measured levels of PFPAs/PFPiAs in the global environment and biota appear to be low in comparison to PFCAs and PFSAs, suggesting, for the time being, low risks from PFPAs and PFPiAs alone. Although risks from individual PFPAs/PFPiAs are currently low, their ongoing production and use and high persistence will lead to increasing exposure and risks over time. Furthermore, simultaneous exposure to PFPAs, PFPiAs and other PFASs may result in additive effects necessitating cumulative risk assessments. To facilitate effective future research, we highlight possible strategies to overcome sampling and analytical challenges. PMID:26922149

  13. Utilization of multiple waste streams for acid gas sequestration and multi-pollutant control

    Soong, Y.; Dilmore, R.M.; Hedges, S.W.; Howard, B.H.; Romanov, V. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    A novel CO{sub 2} sequestration concept is reported that combines SO{sub 2} removal and CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, using a bauxite-processing residue which is a waste product and with waste brine water from oil/gas production. The bauxite residue/brine mixture of 46/54 v/v exhibited a CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of > 0.078 mol L{sup -1} when exposed to pure CO{sub 2} at 20 C and 2.73 MPa. At a higher temperature of 140 C, a bauxite residue/brine mixture of 80/20 v/v indicated a CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of > 0.094 mol L{sup -1} when exposed to pure CO{sub 2} at 3.85 MPa. Under the same reaction conditions, an identical ratio of reaction mixture exposed to simulated flue gas at a similar initial pressure was capable of sequestering 0.16 mol of CO{sub 2} and > 99.9 % of the applied SO{sub 2}. Calcite formation was verified as a product of bauxite/brine mixture carbonation. The caustic bauxite residues (pH 12.5-13.5) and acidic wastewater brine (pH 3-5) are also effectively neutralized after participating as reactive reagents in the conceptual process. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Observations of gas phase hydrochloric acid in the polluted marine boundary layer

    Crisp, Timia A.; Lerner, Brian M.; Williams, Eric J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Bertram, Timothy H.

    2014-06-01

    Ship-based measurements of gas phase hydrochloric acid (HCl), particulate chloride (pCl-), and reactive nitrogen oxides (NOy) were made in the polluted marine boundary layer along the California coastline during spring 2010. These observations are used to assess both the rate of Cl atom production from HCl and the role of direct HCl emissions and subsequent partitioning as a source for pCl-. Observations of HCl made in coastal Southern California are broadly correlated with NOz (NOz ≡ NOy - NOx), peaking at 11 A.M. The observed median HCl mixing ratio in Southern California is 1.3 ppb (interquartile range: 0.53-2.7 ppb), as compared to 0.19 ppb (interquartile range: 0.10-0.38 ppb) measured along the Sacramento River between San Francisco and Sacramento. Concurrent measurements of aerosol ion chemistry indicate that aerosol particles sampled in Northern California are heavily depleted in Cl-, corresponding to a mean pCl- deficit of 0.05 ± 0.03 (1σ) ppb for sub-10 µm aerosol particles. In comparison, aerosols measured in Southern California indicate that over 25% of particles showed an addition of Cl- to the particle population. Observations presented here suggest that primary sources of HCl, or gas phase chlorine precursors to HCl, are likely underestimated in the California Air Resource Board emissions inventory. These results highlight the need for future field observations designed to better constrain direct reactive halogen emissions.

  15. Analysis of Gas Permeability Characteristics of Poly(Lactic Acid/Poly(Butylene Succinate Nanocomposites

    Amita Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas permeability and morphological properties of nanocomposites prepared by the mixing of poly(lactic acid (PLA, poly(butylene succinate (PBS, and clay was investigated. While the composition of PLA and PBS polymers was fixed as 80% and 20% by weight, respectively, for all the nanocomposites, clay contents varied from 1 to 10 wt%. From the morphological studies using both wide angle X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, the nanocomposite having 1 wt% of clay was considered to have a mixed morphology of intercalated and delaminated structure, while some clusters or agglomerated particles were detected for nanocomposites having 3 and more than 3 wt% of clay content. However, the average particle size of the dispersed PBS phase was reduced significantly from 7 μm to 30–40 nm with the addition of clay in the blend. The oxygen barrier property was improved significantly as compared to the water vapor. A model based on gas barrier property was used for the validation of the oxygen relative permeabilities of PLA/PBS/clay nanocomposites. PLA/PBS/clay nanocomposites validated the Bharadwaj model up to 3 wt% of clay contents only, while for nanocomposites of higher clay contents the Bharadwaj model was invalid due to the clusters and agglomerates formed.

  16. Transparent nanocellulosic multilayer thin films on polylactic acid with tunable gas barrier properties.

    Aulin, Christian; Karabulut, Erdem; Tran, Amy; Wågberg, Lars; Lindström, Tom

    2013-08-14

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method was used for the build-up of alternating layers of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) or carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with a branched, cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI) on flexible poly (lactic acid) (PLA) substrates. With this procedure, optically transparent nanocellulosic films with tunable gas barrier properties were formed. 50 layer pairs of PEI/NFC and PEI/CMC deposited on PLA have oxygen permeabilities of 0.34 and 0.71 cm(3)·μm/m(2)·day·kPa at 23 °C and 50% relative humidity, respectively, which is in the same range as polyvinyl alcohol and ethylene vinyl alcohol. The oxygen permeability of these multilayer nanocomposites outperforms those of pure NFC films prepared by solvent-casting. The nanocellulosic LbL assemblies on PLA substrates was in detailed characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals large structural differences between the PEI/NFC and the PEI/CMC assemblies, with the PEI/NFC assembly showing a highly entangled network of nanofibrils, whereas the PEI/CMC surfaces lacked structural features. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a nearly perfect uniformity of the nanocellulosic coatings on PLA, and light transmittance results revealed remarkable transparency of the LbL-coated PLA films. The present work demonstrates the first ever LbL films based on high aspect ratio, water-dispersible nanofibrillated cellulose, and water-soluble carboxymethyl cellulose polymers that can be used as multifunctional films and coatings with tailorable properties, such as gas barriers and transparency. Owing to its flexibility, transparency and high-performance gas barrier properties, these thin film assemblies are promising candidates for several large-scale applications, including flexible electronics and renewable packaging. PMID:23834391

  17. Gas-Phase Thermal Tautomerization of Imidazole-Acetic Acid: Theoretical and Computational Investigations

    Saadullah G. Aziz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gas-phase thermal tautomerization reaction between imidazole-4-acetic (I and imidazole-5-acetic (II acids was monitored using the traditional hybrid functional (B3LYP and the long-range corrected functionals (CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The roles of the long-range and dispersion corrections on their geometrical parameters, thermodynamic functions, kinetics, dipole moments, Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital–Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and total hyperpolarizability were investigated. All tested levels of theory predicted the preference of I over II by 0.750–0.877 kcal/mol. The origin of predilection of I is assigned to the H-bonding interaction (nN8→σ*O14–H15. This interaction stabilized I by 15.07 kcal/mol. The gas-phase interconversion between the two tautomers assumed a 1,2-proton shift mechanism, with two transition states (TS, TS1 and TS2, having energy barriers of 47.67–49.92 and 49.55–52.69 kcal/mol, respectively, and an sp3-type intermediate. A water-assisted 1,3-proton shift route brought the barrier height down to less than 20 kcal/mol in gas-phase and less than 12 kcal/mol in solution. The relatively high values of total hyperpolarizability of I compared to II were interpreted and discussed.

  18. Hazardous wastes

    The dangers and problems of hazardous wastes are described in this pictorial booklet that is part of the EPA solid waste management publication series. It is shown that how the nation's hazardous wastes are managed or mismanaged is a crucial environmental issue with vast implications for public health and for the integrity of the ecological systems on which man depends. The environmental folly of dumping or burning these wastes is emphasized, along with the economic imprudence of continuing to throw away valuable resources as wastes. The public as well as industry must pay the costs of safe hazardous waste management

  19. Determination of methacrylic acid in food simulants by pyrolytic butylation-gas chromatography.

    Huang, Zhongping; Qiu, Ruofeng; Liu, Tingfei; Huang, Yilei; Zhu, Zuoyi; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    An on-line pyrolytic butylation approach was proposed to determine methacrylic acid (MA) in food simulants by gas chromatography (GC) without an expensive pyrolyzer. MA in food simulants was converted into butyl methacrylate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) without any pretreatment at 330°C in the injection-port, contributing to high GC signal response. The derivatizing conditions for the proposed method were optimized, namely the injection-port temperature, type and amount of the organic alkaline used for derivatization. A series of standard solutions of MA in the range of 1.0-50mg/kg were analyzed with correlation coefficient r≥0.9975. The limits of detection (LODs) were less than 0.15mg/kg for MA in four matrix simulants (distilled water, 3%w/v acetic acid, 10%v/v ethanol, and isooctane). Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for retention time, peak height and peak area were all less than 3.88%. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of MA migrating from plastic cup samples, with recoveries of added MA in the range of 96.5-123.0%. Direct injection of the simulants into the GC system after migration tests, without any pretreatment step, makes the developed method of great value for rapid screening analysis of samples in bulks. PMID:27262371

  20. Validation of an enantioselective analysis for (l)-pidolic acid by chiral gas chromatography with derivatization.

    Salisbury, John J; Li, Mingshu; Boyd, Aisha

    2016-02-20

    A sensitive and rapid analytical method has been validated for the enantiomeric purity determination of l-pidolic acid, a biological lactam and metabolite of glutamic acid commonly found in urine, skin, bones, brain and is available commercially as a food supplement. An efficient, two-step achiral derivatization was implemented which consisted of an alkylation step (using HCl-IPA) followed by an acylation step (using TFAA) of the carboxy and amide functional groups. This allowed detection with high sensitivity using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The described procedure employs a CP-Chiralsil-L Val column (25m×0.25mm) at a constant flow rate of 1.5mLmin(-1), a gradient temperature program from 80°C to 160°C and an injector and detector temperature of 250°C. The proposed method was validated according to ICH Q2 standards and included such parameters as specificity, system precision, analyst repeatability, intermediate precision, accuracy, linearity, LOD/LOQ and solution stability. PMID:26710173

  1. Novel derivatization technique for the detection of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Complete text of publication follows. The analytical detection of phenoxyacetic acid type herbicides (2,4-D, dichloprop, MCPA, etc.) from environmental samples is often a problem in instrumental analysis, as these compounds containing free carboxylic groups require chemical derivatisation prior to gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Commonly used derivatising agents include diazomethane and pentachlorobenzyl bromide, the former being toxic and explosive, the latter is being most suitable for GC with electron capture detector. In order to detect these compounds in GC coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), a novel method for the formation of stable chemical derivatives from the acidic herbicides prior to GC analysis was developed. Earlier we have applied silylcarbamates for the derivatisation of chlorophenols (A. Kovacs et al., J. Chromat. A, 1194 (1) (2008) 139-142.), and this procedure was extended now to the silylation of phenoxyacetic acid type compounds. We studied the reactions between commercially available trimethylsilyl N,N-dimethylcarbamate and mecoprop, MCPA, dichlorprop, 2,4-D, MCPB 2,4,5-T, 2,4,5-TP and 2,4-DB, respectively. Beside the trimethylsilylated derivatives of the target compounds the corresponding tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives were also prepared in order to enhance hydrolytic stability and improve mass spectrometric properties. For that purpose the corresponding tert-butyldimethylsilyl N,N-dimethylcarbamate agent was prepared, allowing detection limits at ppb level. The reactions proved to be fast and the reagent excess and by-products were proven not to interfere with the target compounds. In accordance with the expectations tert-butyldimethylsilyl esters of phenoxyacetic acids surpassed the corresponding trimethylsilyl analogues both in stability and detectability. The procedure was also compared with the results obtained by commercial silylating agent BSTFA and certain alkylating agents (TMAH, Me3SOH, trimethylsilyldiazomethane

  2. Flue gas desulfurization by-product weathering by acidic mine drainage

    The authors examined the suitability using a flue gas desulfurization grout (FGDG) for the attenuation and abatement of acidic mine drainage (AMD). The FGDG used was a mixture of fly ash (FA) and filter cake (FC) with a FA/FC ratio of 1:1 to improve handling. Five percent of lime (CaO) was added to improve strength development and allow the use of this FGDG as a hydrologic seal for underground mines. Acidic mine drainage solutions collect from wells located within mine voids were reacted with samples of FGDG for up to 168 d, to evaluate the potential for grout dissolution subsequent to subterranean implacement. Shortly upon reaction with AMD, FGDG released a number of ions into solution (As, B, Ca, K, Na, Se, SO4), a concomitant with a rapid increase in solution pH (8.5), causing decreases in the solubility of most cations (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn). Significant increases in dissolved As and B concentrations were noted. Both elements were present in solution at levels below respective regulatory limits for drinking water. Of the original quantities of As and B present in FGDG, 1.3 and 45.6%, respectively, were released to solution over a 168-d reaction period. Concomitant with changes in solution composition, reaction of FGDG with AMD resulted in a loss of ettringite and hannebachgite and a growth of gypsum. Additional changes in mineralogy were observed as FGDG equilibrated with AMD solutions. From these reactions, the long-term stability of FGDG in underground acidic mine environments is questionable and warrants study in situ

  3. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    Chapman, Elizabeth C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science; Capo, Rosemary C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science; Stewart, Brian W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science; Hedin, Robert S. [Hedin Environmental, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Weaver, Theodore J. [Hedin Environmental, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Edenborn, Harry M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  4. Analysis of four pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in several bioactive botanicals with gas and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection.

    Moldoveanu, Serban C; Scott, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Several pentacyclic triterpenoid acids including betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids were reported to have health beneficial properties such as antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as the capability to inhibit "in vitro" the development of various cancer cell types. For this reason betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids are used as neutraceuticals. For the analysis of the pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in complex plant materials, an improved scheme was developed, involving a qualitative screening using silylation and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis, followed by quantitation using a novel liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure. The use of the two methods provides more reliable information regarding the plant materials with unknown composition. Besides betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids that were analyzed, by this procedure a fourth pentacyclic triterpenoid acid was identified and quantitated that was not previously reported to be present in plants. This acid has been identified as 3β-3-hydroxy-lupa-18,20(29)-dien-28-oic acid. The newly identified acid has a structure as a derivative of lupane, although lupane with a double bond in the 18-position was not previously reported as present in plants. The new liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure developed for this study offers a very low limit of quantitation, excellent precision, and robustness. Rosemary was found to contain the largest levels of pentacyclic triterpenoid acids among all the analyzed botanicals. PMID:26549610

  5. An optimized method for fatty acid analysis, including quantification of trans fatty acids, in human adipose tissue by gas-liquid chromatography

    Bysted, Anette; Cold, S; Hølmer, Gunhild Kofoed

    1999-01-01

    Considering the need for a quick direct method for measurement of the fatty acid composition including trans isomers ofhuman adipose tissue we have developed a procedure using gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) alone, which is thussuitable for validation of fatty acid status in epidemiological studies...... for 25 min, and finally raised at 25 degrees C/min to 225 degrees C. The trans and cis isomers of18:1 were well separated from each other, as shown by silver-ion thin-layer chromatography. Verification by standardsshowed that the trans 18:1 isomers with a double bond in position 12 or lower were...

  6. Large carbon and nitrogen pools in subsoil of acid sulphate soils, a potential source for greenhouse gas emissions?

    Virtanen, S.; Šimek, Miloslav; Krištůfek, Václav; Simojoki, A.; Yli-Halla, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2011), s. 227. ISSN 1653-2015. [NJF Congress: Food , Feed, Fuel and Fun /24./, Nordic Feed Science Conference /2./. 14.06.2011-16.06.2011, Uppsala] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : large carbon and nitrogen pools * acid sulphate soils * greenhouse gas emissions Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Direct analysis of intact glycidyl fatty acid esters in edible oils using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    H. van Steenbergen; K. Hrnčiřík; A. Ermacora; S. de Koning; H.-G. Janssen

    2013-01-01

    Glycidyl esters (GE), fatty acid esters of glycidol, are process contaminants formed during edible oil processing. A novel direct method for the determination of intact GE in oils and fats based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is presented. The method consists of a simple extraction

  8. Determination of urinary 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acid by gas chromatography and its clinical application in man

    Guillaume, CPF; van der Molen, JC; Kerstens, MN; Dullaart, RPF; Wolthers, BG

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive and quantitative gas chromatographic assay for the determination of 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (18 beta-GA), the main metabolite of glycyrrhizin after oral licorice consumption in human urine, has been developed and validated. For the extraction of 18 beta-GA from urine two Sep-Pak C-18

  9. PREPARATION OF ASYMMETRIC POLYETHERKETONE FLAT AND HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATION USING ACETIC ACID BASED COAGULANTS

    Ji-ping Yang; Philip J. Brown

    2008-01-01

    Membranes for gas separation have developed significantly in the last twenty years, however, there is still a need for high temperature and chemically resistant membranes that exhibit good selectivity and gas permeability. Our study examines the fundamental properties of polyetherketone (PEK, a thermally stable and chemically resistant polymer)membranes prepared using concentrated sulphuric acid (98% H2SO4) as the solvent. Non-solvents used in the work included acetic acid, ethanol, methanol, glycerol, and water. The concentration of the polymer solutions was chosen to be 20%. The membrane structures were examined using SEM, and the gas separation properties were measured using a lab-scale test rig.The results show that formation and control of membrane structures are complicated, and many preparation parameters affect membrane morphology and performance. Using appropriate conditions skinned sponge-like structured hollow fiber membranes could be made from PEK by using acetic acid as the internal coagulant. PEK hollow fibers spun from 20%PEK/H2SO4 solutions with 50% aqueous acetic acid as internal coagulant had selectivity for hydrogen/methane of around 40, implying a solution diffusion separation mechanism for gas separation without the need for fiber coating or after post-treatments.

  10. Separation of cis/trans fatty acid isomers on gas chromatography compared to the Ag-TLC method

    Ravi Kiran, C.; Reshma, M. V.; Sundaresan, A.

    2013-05-01

    The present study investigates the separation of the cis/ trans isomers of fatty acids on the 75 m SP2560 column under different gas chromatographic (GC) conditions including an isothermal program and a time-temperature program. The time-temperature program showed improved separation of cis/trans isomers of C{sub 1}4:1, C{sub 1}6:1, C{sub 1}8:1, C{sub 1}8:2 and C{sub 1}8:3 fatty acids along with short chain fatty acids compared to the isothermal program. The separation of trans/trans isomers of C{sub 1}8:1 fatty acids including elaidic acid (C{sub 1}8:1 .9t) and vaccenic acid (C{sub 1}8:1 {Delta}11t) was difficult with the time-temperature program. The thin layer chromatography impregnated with silver nitrate (Ag- TLC) method was performed to separate cis/trans fractions and GC analysis was carried out with the trans fraction. But GC analysis showed a co-elution of trans isomers of C{sub 1}8:1 fatty acid. Thus the study shows that a time-temperature programmed GC method with the highly polar cyanopropyl column is sufficient to resolve trans fatty acids along with short chain fatty acids when a large number of samples has to be analyzed. (Author) 33 refs.

  11. Separation of cis/trans fatty acid isomers on gas chromatography compared to the Ag-TLC method

    The present study investigates the separation of the cis/ trans isomers of fatty acids on the 75 m SP2560 column under different gas chromatographic (GC) conditions including an isothermal program and a time-temperature program. The time-temperature program showed improved separation of cis/trans isomers of C14:1, C16:1, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 fatty acids along with short chain fatty acids compared to the isothermal program. The separation of trans/trans isomers of C18:1 fatty acids including elaidic acid (C18:1 .9t) and vaccenic acid (C18:1 Δ11t) was difficult with the time-temperature program. The thin layer chromatography impregnated with silver nitrate (Ag- TLC) method was performed to separate cis/trans fractions and GC analysis was carried out with the trans fraction. But GC analysis showed a co-elution of trans isomers of C18:1 fatty acid. Thus the study shows that a time-temperature programmed GC method with the highly polar cyanopropyl column is sufficient to resolve trans fatty acids along with short chain fatty acids when a large number of samples has to be analyzed. (Author) 33 refs.

  12. Investigating the Weak to Evaluate the Strong: An Experimental Determination of the Electron Binding Energy of Carborane Anions and the Gas phase Acidity of Carborane Acids

    Meyer, Matthew M; Wang, Xue B; Reed, Christopher A; Wang, Lai S; Kass, Steven R

    2009-12-23

    Five CHB11X6Y5- carborane anions from the series X = Br, Cl, I and Y = H, Cl, CH3 were generated by electrospray ionization, and their reactivity with a series of Brønsted acids and electron transfer reagents were examined in the gas phase. The undecachlorocarborane acid, H(CHB11Cl11), was found to be far more acidic than the former record holder, (1-C4F9SO2)2NH (i.e., ΔH°acid = 241 ± 29 vs 291.1 ± 2.2 kcal mol-1) and bridges the gas-phase acidity and basicity scales for the first time. Its conjugate base, CHB11Cl11-, was found by photoelectron spectroscopy to have a remarkably large electron binding energy (6.35 ± 0.02 eV) but the value for the (1-C4F9SO2)2N- anion is even larger (6.5 ± 0.1 eV). Consequently, it is the weak H-(CHB11Cl11) BDE (70.0 kcal mol-1, G3(MP2)) compared to the strong BDE of (1-C4F9SO2)2N-H (127.4 ± 3.2 kcal mol-1) that accounts for the greater acidity of carborane acids.

  13. Identify alkylation hazards

    This paper reports that extensive experience shows that alkylation plants regardless of acid catalyst choice, can be operated safely, and with minimum process risk to employees or neighbors. Both types of plants require a comprehensive and fully supported hazard management program that accounts for differing physical properties of the acids involved. Control and mitigation cost to refiners will vary considerably from plant to plant and location to location. In the author's experience, the order of magnitude costs will be about $1 to $2 million for a sulfuric acid (SA) alkylation plant, and about $10 to $15 million for a hydrofluoric acid (HF) plant. These costs include water supply systems and impoundment facilities for contaminated runoff water. The alkylation process, which chemically reacts isobutane and light olefins in the presence of a strong acid catalyst into a premium gasoline component is described

  14. Hydrocarbon fuels from gas phase decarboxylation of hydrolyzed free fatty acid

    Wang, Weicheng

    2012-01-01

    Gas phase decarboxylation of hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) from canola oil has beeninvestigated in two fix-bed reactors by changing reaction parameters such as temperatures,FFA feed rates, and H 2-to-FFA molar ratios. FFA, which contains mostly C 18 aswell as a few C 16, C 20, C 22, and C 24 FFA, was fed into the boiling zone, evaporated, carriedby hydrogen flow at the rate of 0.5-20 ml/min, and reacted with the 5% Pd/C catalystin the reactor. Reactions were conducted atmospherically at 380-450 °C and the products,qualified and quantified through gas chromatography-flame ionization detector(GC-FID), showed mostly n-heptadecane and a few portion of n-C 15, n-C 19, n-C 21, n-C 23 as well as some cracking species. Results showed that FFA conversion increased withincreasing reaction temperatures but decreased with increasing FFA feed rates and H 2-to-FFA molar ratios. The reaction rates were found to decrease with higher temperatureand increase with higher H 2 flow rates. Highly selective heptadecane was achieved byapplying higher temperatures and higher H 2-to-FFA molar ratios. From the results, ascatalyst loading and FFA feed rate were fixed, an optimal reaction temperature of 415 °C as well as H 2-to-FFA molar ratio of 4.16 were presented. These results provided goodbasis for studying the kinetics of decarboxylation process. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  15. Dry flue gas desulfurization byproducts as amendments for reclamation of acid mine spoil

    Development of beneficial reuses of highly alkaline, dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts can impact the economics of adopting these FGD technologies for retrofit on existing powerplants. Greenhouse studies were conducted to evaluate the use of two dry FGD byproducts for reclamation of acid mine spoil (pH, 3.1 to 5.8). Treatment rates of FGD ranges from 0% to 32% by dry weight and most treatments also included 6% by dry weight of sewage sludge. Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) was harvested monthly for a total of six harvests. Plant tissue composition and root growth were determined after the sixth harvest. Leachate analyses and pH determination of mixes were done at the beginning and end of the experiments. Both FGD byproducts were effective in raising the spoil pH and in improving fescue growth. At the highest FGD application rate, fescue growth decreased from the optimum due to high pH and reduced rooting volume caused by cementation reactions between the FGD and spoil. Trace elements, with the exception of B, were decreased in the fescue tissue when FGD was applied. Leachate pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved organic carbon, Ca, Mg, and S tended to increase with increased FGD application rate; Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn decreased. pH was the most important variable controlling the concentrations of these elements in the leachate. Concentrations of elements of environmental concern were near or below drinking water standard levels. These results indicate that FGD applied at rates equivalent to spoil neutralization needs can aid in the revegetation of acid spoil revegetation with little potential for introduction of toxic elements into the leachate water or into the food chain

  16. Hazardous Chemicals

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  17. Determination of naphthenic acid profile in Ghana's Jubilee Oil using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Crude oil is the life-blood of the global economy. Its importance stems from the fact that it is a base product for a wide variety of goods [Drugs, Plastics, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)]. The oil discovery (over 3 billion barrel reserves in hydrocarbon and gas), about 60 km offshore between the Deepwater Tano and Cape Three Points Block in South western Ghana is a valuable natural asset and it has the potential of boosting the Ghanaian economy. During petroleum processing, various waste products are generated. One of such products is Naphthenic acids (NA). Naphthenic acids are organic acids naturally occurring in crude oil and a constituent of waste associated with oil refinery. Naphthenic acids serve as biomarkers for identification of the source of crude oil. The presence of Naphthenic acid in the aquatic environment causes toxic effects due to their weak biodegradable nature; the toxicity of Naphthenic acids depends on the class of Naphthenic acids present in the crude oil. The study assessed the profile of Naphthenic acids in Ghana’s Jubilee crude oil using Low Resolution Electron Impact – Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LREI-GCMS) after isolation of Naphthenic acids in the Jubilee oil by a modified Kupchan’s Partitioning Process. The Mass Spectrometric (MS) Work Station Software was used for the identification of the Naphthenic acids present in the Jubilee crude oil. The quality of the Jubilee oil was also evaluated through the use of some key physico-chemical parameters [Total Acid Number (TAN), Sulphur Content, Viscosity, Pour Point, Flashpoint, Water Content and Densities] based on the American Standards for Testing and Materials (ASTM, 2007). The Total Acid Number was determined by Colorimetric Titration (ASTM D974); Sulphur Content by X-ray Fluorescent Spectrometry (ASTM D4294); Pour Point by the use of the SETA cloud and Pour Point Refrigerator Technique (ASTM D97); Viscosity by Gravity Timed Method (ASTM D445); Density by the Hydrometer

  18. The effect of H2SO4 – amine clustering on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) measurements of gas-phase sulfuric acid

    Kurtén, T.; T. Petäjä; Smith,J; Ortega, I.K.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; M. Ehn; Vehkamäki, H.; Mauldin, L.; Worsnop, D.R.; M. Kulmala

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. We have assessed the possible effect of the sulfuric acid molecules clustering with base molecules on CIMS measurements using computational chemistry. From the computational data, three conclusions can be drawn. First, a significant fraction of the gas-phase sulfuric acid molecules are very likely clustered with amines i...

  19. Penetration of methyl isocyanate through organic vapor and acid gas respirator cartridges.

    Moyer, E S; Berardinelli, S P

    1987-04-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is a volatile, toxic chemical [Threshold Limit Value (TLV) = 0.02 ppm] used to manufacture carbamate pesticides. The principal manufacturer of MIC is Union Carbide, and the site of production is Institute, West Virginia. In light of the December 1984 Bhopal, India disaster and possible safety problems at the Institute facility, NIOSH conducted this research as a basis upon which to recommend protective equipment that might be used in an emergency situation where extremely high MIC concentrations might be encountered. Both protective clothing and respirators were evaluated. In particular, NIOSH studied air-purifying respirators in order to assess their effectiveness against MIC vapor penetration. NIOSH does not recommend any air purifying respirator for MIC because of its high toxicity and lack of warning properties and because no effective end of service life indicator currently is available for MIC. This report addresses only MIC penetration through air-purifying cartridges at challenge concentrations designed to simulate emergency escape conditions. Another report addresses the protective clothing issue. The results presented are for two different manufacturers' organic vapor (OV) and acid gas cartridges. Penetration tests were conducted at three or four MIC challenge concentrations and at three different humidity conditions. In general, breakthrough times (1% of challenge concentration) were very short (less than 20 min). Also, high relative humidity was found to decrease the breakthrough time of MIC. PMID:3591646

  20. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation.

    Donaldson, D James; Kroll, Jay A; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 ((3)B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited (1)B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  1. Numerical study on laminar circular jet of carbonic acid gas discharging into stagnant air

    The flow behavior of the circular jet of two component gases is the most fundamental study in that of multi-component gases. The objective of present study is to investigate numerically the fluid flow and diffusion behavior of laminar circular jet of carbonic acid gas (CO2) discharging into stagnant air along gravity force. The flow and CO2 mass fraction distribution analysis was carried out by modified TEAM (Turbulent Elliptic Algorithm Manchester) code which solved elliptic equations using staggered grid system. As the result, the followings were obtained in the range of Froude number Fr = 0.007 - 0.7: (1) Axial velocity increased along down stream because the jet accelerated by gravity force. (2) It was necessary to obtain accurate radial velocity to evaluate CO2 mass fraction distribution. (3) In the case of low Froude number, half radii of axial velocity and CO2 mass fraction distribution increased along the flow direction as well as the conventional buoyant jet. In the case of relatively high Froude number, however, half radius of axial velocity distribution was constant and half radius of CO2 mass fraction decreased along the flow direction. (author)

  2. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  3. Optimizing Techology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2004-01-31

    More than 56,000 coal quality data records from five public data sets have been selected for use in this project. These data will be used to create maps showing where coals with low mercury and acid-gas emissions might be found for power plants classified by air-pollution controls. Average coal quality values, calculated for 51,156 commercial coals by U.S. county-of-origin, are listed in the appendix. Coal moisture values are calculated for commercially shipped coal from 163 U.S. counties, where the raw assay data (including mercury and chlorine values) are reported on a dry basis. The calculated moisture values are verified by comparison with observed moisture values in commercial coal. Moisture in commercial U.S. coal shows provincial variation. For example, high volatile C bituminous rank coal from the Interior province has 3% to 4% more moisture than equivalent Rocky Mountain province coal. Mott-Spooner difference values are calculated for 4,957 data records for coals collected from coal mines and exploration drill holes. About 90% of the records have Mott-Spooner difference values within {+-}250 Btu/lb.

  4. Growth, Gas Exchange, Abscisic Acid, and Calmodulin Response to Salt Stress in Three Poplars

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of increasing salinity on growth, gas exchange, abscisic acid(ABA), calmodulin (CAM), and the relevance to salt tolerance in seedlings of Populus euphratica Oliv. and cuttings of P. "pupularis 35-44" (P. popularis) and P. x euramericana cv. 1-214 (P. cv. Italica). The relative growth rates of shoot height (RGRH) for P. cv. Italica and P. popularis were severely reduced by increasing salt stress,whereas the growth reduction was relatively less in P. euphratica. Similarly, P. euphratica maintained higher net photosynthetic rates (Pn) and unit transpiration rates (TRN) than P. cv. Italica and P. popularis under conditions of higher salinity. Salinity caused a significant increase in leaf ABA and CaM in the three genotypes after the onset of stress, but NaCl-induced ABA and CaM accumulation was more pronounced in P. euphratica,suggesting that P. euphratica plants are more sensitive in sensing soil salinity than the other two poplars.Furthermore, P. euphratica maintained relatively higher ABA and CaM concentrations under conditions of high salinity. The higher capacity to synthesize stress signals, namely ABA and CaM, in P. euphratica and the contribution of this to the salt resistance of P. euphratica are discussed.

  5. Determination of the optimum conditions for boric acid extraction with carbon dioxide gas in aqueous media from colemanite containing arsenic

    Ata, O.N.; Colak, S.; Copur, M.; Celik, C.

    2000-02-01

    The Taguchi method was used to determine optimum conditions for the boric acid extraction from colemanite ore containing As in aqueous media saturated by CO{sub 2} gas. After the parameters were determined to be efficient on the extraction efficiency, the experimental series with two steps were carried out. The chosen experimental parameters for the first series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 25--70 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.091 to 0.333; (3) gas flow rate (in mL/min), 66.70--711; (4) mean particle size, {minus}100 to {minus}10 mesh; (5) stirring speed, 200--600 rpm; (6) reaction time, 10--90 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.091; gas flow rate, 711 (in mL/min); particle size, {minus}100 mesh; stirring speed, 500 rpm; reaction time, 90 min. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite containing As was approximately 54%. Chosen experimental parameters for the second series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 60--80 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.1000 to 0.167; (3) gas pressure (in atm), 1.5; 2.7; (4) reaction time, 45--120 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.1; gas pressure, 2.7 atm; reaction time, 120 min. Under these optimum conditions the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite ore was approximately 75%. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from calcined colemanite ore was approximately 99.55%.

  6. Comparison of gas chromatographic and gravimetric methods for quantization of total fat and fatty acids in foodstuffs

    Sabria Aued-Pimentel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Different methods to determine total fat (TF and fatty acids (FA, including trans fatty acids (TFA, in diverse foodstuffs were evaluated, incorporating gravimetric methods and gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID, in accordance with a modified AOAC 996.06 method. Concentrations of TF and FA obtained through these different procedures diverged (p< 0.05 and TFA concentrations varied beyond 20 % of the reference values. The modified AOAC 996.06 method satisfied both accuracy and precision, was fast and employed small amounts of low toxicity solvents. Therefore, the results showed that this methodology is viable to be adopted in Brazil for nutritional labeling purposes.

  7. Gas chromatography of alkylphosphonic and dialkyl phosphinic acids; Cromatografia en fase gaseosa de acidos alquifosfonicos y dialquilfosinicos

    Gasco Sanchez, L.; Barrera Peniero, R.; Ramirez Caceres, A.; Marin Munoz, M.

    1978-07-01

    After carrying out an optimization study on the separation conditions for the TMSr- derivatives, of the hexyl-, cyclohexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-phosphonic acids; dihexyl dicyclohexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-phosphinic acids, and dioctyl phosphine oxide, their retention indices (I) at two temperatures and on the OV-1 and OV-17 stationary phase were determined. Correlations between I and molecular structure were established. Calibration factors of these compounds in the flame ionization detector were studied, and the results analyzed taking into account the variables affecting the quantitative results, These results were unbiased but they had a lower precision than that usually achievable in gas chromatography. (Author) 24 refs.

  8. Assay of methylmalonic acid in the serum of patients with cobalamin deficiency using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Stabler, S.P.; Marcell, P D; Podell, E R; Allen, R. H.; Lindenbaum, J

    1986-01-01

    To determine the incidence of elevated levels of serum methylmalonic acid in patients with cobalamin deficiency, we utilized a new capillary gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric technique to measure methylmalonic acid in the serum of 73 patients with clinically confirmed cobalamin deficiency. Values ranged from 55 to 22,300 ng/ml, and 69 of the 73 patients had values above the normal range of 19-76 ng/ml as determined for 50 normal blood donors. In the cobalamin-deficient patients, serum me...

  9. Identification of rapeseed oil fatty acid esters in transesterification reactions by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry method

    Rapeseed oil transesterification with different alcohols - methyl, ethyl, n-propyl and isopropyl alcohol - has been carried out. Yields of fatty acid alkyl esters obtained from rapeseed oil were determined using the internal standard method. Results of interpretation of the obtained ester mass spectra are reported. The specimen of Latvian rape oil contains: 57.6% of oleic acid, 18.2% of linoleic acid, 8.2% linolenic acid, 3.3% palmitic acid, 2% of stearic acid and less than 1% of arachidic acid. Values of Kovats retention indices of the rapeseed oil fatty acid esters on the capillary columns DB-5 MS and DB-17 MS have been compared. More selective separation of fatty acid alkyl esters has been achieved on the stationary phase with higher content of phenyl groups (DB-17 MS). (authors)

  10. Investigations of acidity and nucleophilicity of diphenyldithiophosphinate ligands using theory and gas-phase dissociation reactions

    Christopher M. Leavitt; Garold L. Gresham; Michael T. Benson; Jean-Jaques Gaumet; Dean Peterman; John Klaehn; Megan Moser; Frederic Aubriet; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Gary S. Groenewold

    2008-04-01

    Diphenyldithiophosphinate (DTP) ligands modified with electron-withdrawing trifluoromethyl (TFM) substitutents are of high interest because they have demonstrated potential for exceptional separation of Am3+ from lanthanide3+ cations. Specifically, the bis(ortho-TFM) (L1-) and (ortho-TFM)(meta-TFM) (L2-) derivatives have shown excellent separation selectivity, while the bis(meta-TFM) (L3)- and unmodified DTP (Lu-) did not. Factors responsible for selective coordination have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations in concert with competitive dissociation reactions in the gas phase. To evaluate the role of (DTP+H) acidity, density functional calculations were used to predict pKa values, which followed the trend of L3 < L2 < L1 < Lu. The order of the TFM-modified (DTP+H) acids was opposite of what would be expected based on the e--withdrawing effects of the TFM group, suggesting that secondary factors are influencing the pKa and nucleophilicity. The relative nucleophilicities of the DTP anions were evaluated by forming metal-mixed ligand complexes in a trapped ion mass spectrometer, and then fragmenting them using competitive collision induced dissociation. Relative to Na+, the unmodified Lu- anion was the strongest nucleophile. Comparing the TFM derivatives, the bis(ortho-TFM) derivative L1- was found to be the strongest nucleophile, while the bis(meta-TFM) L3- was the weakest, a trend consistent with the pKa calculations. DFT modeling of the Na+ complexes suggested that the elevated cation affinity of the L1- and L2- anions was due to donation of electron density from fluorine atoms to the metal center, which was occurring in rotational conformers where the TFM moiety was proximate to the Na+-dithiophosphinate group. Competitive dissociation experiments were performed with the dithiophosphinate anions complexed with europium nitrate species; ionic dissociation of these complexes always produced the TFM-modified dithiophosphinate anions